Science.gov

Sample records for oxford record linkage

  1. Privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL)

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Hye-Chung; Krishnamurthy, Ashok; Machanavajjhala, Ashwin; Reiter, Michael K; Ahalt, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Objective Record linkage to integrate uncoordinated databases is critical in biomedical research using Big Data. Balancing privacy protection against the need for high quality record linkage requires a human–machine hybrid system to safely manage uncertainty in the ever changing streams of chaotic Big Data. Methods In the computer science literature, private record linkage is the most published area. It investigates how to apply a known linkage function safely when linking two tables. However, in practice, the linkage function is rarely known. Thus, there are many data linkage centers whose main role is to be the trusted third party to determine the linkage function manually and link data for research via a master population list for a designated region. Recently, a more flexible computerized third-party linkage platform, Secure Decoupled Linkage (SDLink), has been proposed based on: (1) decoupling data via encryption, (2) obfuscation via chaffing (adding fake data) and universe manipulation; and (3) minimum information disclosure via recoding. Results We synthesize this literature to formalize a new framework for privacy preserving interactive record linkage (PPIRL) with tractable privacy and utility properties and then analyze the literature using this framework. Conclusions Human-based third-party linkage centers for privacy preserving record linkage are the accepted norm internationally. We find that a computer-based third-party platform that can precisely control the information disclosed at the micro level and allow frequent human interaction during the linkage process, is an effective human–machine hybrid system that significantly improves on the linkage center model both in terms of privacy and utility. PMID:24201028

  2. Efficient Record Linkage Algorithms Using Complete Linkage Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2016-01-01

    Data from different agencies share data of the same individuals. Linking these datasets to identify all the records belonging to the same individuals is a crucial and challenging problem, especially given the large volumes of data. A large number of available algorithms for record linkage are prone to either time inefficiency or low-accuracy in finding matches and non-matches among the records. In this paper we propose efficient as well as reliable sequential and parallel algorithms for the record linkage problem employing hierarchical clustering methods. We employ complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms to address this problem. In addition to hierarchical clustering, we also use two other techniques: elimination of duplicate records and blocking. Our algorithms use sorting as a sub-routine to identify identical copies of records. We have tested our algorithms on datasets with millions of synthetic records. Experimental results show that our algorithms achieve nearly 100% accuracy. Parallel implementations achieve almost linear speedups. Time complexities of these algorithms do not exceed those of previous best-known algorithms. Our proposed algorithms outperform previous best-known algorithms in terms of accuracy consuming reasonable run times. PMID:27124604

  3. Efficient Record Linkage Algorithms Using Complete Linkage Clustering.

    PubMed

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2016-01-01

    Data from different agencies share data of the same individuals. Linking these datasets to identify all the records belonging to the same individuals is a crucial and challenging problem, especially given the large volumes of data. A large number of available algorithms for record linkage are prone to either time inefficiency or low-accuracy in finding matches and non-matches among the records. In this paper we propose efficient as well as reliable sequential and parallel algorithms for the record linkage problem employing hierarchical clustering methods. We employ complete linkage hierarchical clustering algorithms to address this problem. In addition to hierarchical clustering, we also use two other techniques: elimination of duplicate records and blocking. Our algorithms use sorting as a sub-routine to identify identical copies of records. We have tested our algorithms on datasets with millions of synthetic records. Experimental results show that our algorithms achieve nearly 100% accuracy. Parallel implementations achieve almost linear speedups. Time complexities of these algorithms do not exceed those of previous best-known algorithms. Our proposed algorithms outperform previous best-known algorithms in terms of accuracy consuming reasonable run times.

  4. The Iowa Record-Linkage Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Donald W.

    1989-01-01

    Conducted Iowa Record-Linkage Study, reviewing records of psychiatric inpatients to 1 hospital in 10-year period and linking information with all Iowa death certificates for same period, resulting in identification of 331 deaths. Data analysis revealed that relative risk for premature death was greatest among women and the young. (NB)

  5. Some methods for blindfolded record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Churches, Tim; Christen, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Background The linkage of records which refer to the same entity in separate data collections is a common requirement in public health and biomedical research. Traditionally, record linkage techniques have required that all the identifying data in which links are sought be revealed to at least one party, often a third party. This necessarily invades personal privacy and requires complete trust in the intentions of that party and their ability to maintain security and confidentiality. Dusserre, Quantin, Bouzelat and colleagues have demonstrated that it is possible to use secure one-way hash transformations to carry out follow-up epidemiological studies without any party having to reveal identifying information about any of the subjects – a technique which we refer to as "blindfolded record linkage". A limitation of their method is that only exact comparisons of values are possible, although phonetic encoding of names and other strings can be used to allow for some types of typographical variation and data errors. Methods A method is described which permits the calculation of a general similarity measure, the n-gram score, without having to reveal the data being compared, albeit at some cost in computation and data communication. This method can be combined with public key cryptography and automatic estimation of linkage model parameters to create an overall system for blindfolded record linkage. Results The system described offers good protection against misdeeds or security failures by any one party, but remains vulnerable to collusion between or simultaneous compromise of two or more parties involved in the linkage operation. In order to reduce the likelihood of this, the use of last-minute allocation of tasks to substitutable servers is proposed. Proof-of-concept computer programmes written in the Python programming language are provided to illustrate the similarity comparison protocol. Conclusion Although the protocols described in this paper are not

  6. Composite Bloom Filters for Secure Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Durham, Elizabeth Ashley; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Xue, Yuan; Toth, Csaba; Kuzu, Mehmet; Malin, Bradley

    2014-12-01

    The process of record linkage seeks to integrate instances that correspond to the same entity. Record linkage has traditionally been performed through the comparison of identifying field values (e.g., Surname), however, when databases are maintained by disparate organizations, the disclosure of such information can breach the privacy of the corresponding individuals. Various private record linkage (PRL) methods have been developed to obscure such identifiers, but they vary widely in their ability to balance competing goals of accuracy, efficiency and security. The tokenization and hashing of field values into Bloom filters (BF) enables greater linkage accuracy and efficiency than other PRL methods, but the encodings may be compromised through frequency-based cryptanalysis. Our objective is to adapt a BF encoding technique to mitigate such attacks with minimal sacrifices in accuracy and efficiency. To accomplish these goals, we introduce a statistically-informed method to generate BF encodings that integrate bits from multiple fields, the frequencies of which are provably associated with a minimum number of fields. Our method enables a user-specified tradeoff between security and accuracy. We compare our encoding method with other techniques using a public dataset of voter registration records and demonstrate that the increases in security come with only minor losses to accuracy.

  7. Client and Birth Record Linkage: A Method, Biases, and Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holian, John

    1996-01-01

    Describes record linkage as a data-generating technique, and presents a method for linking client records to live and stillbirth records, using 32,974 births in the Cleveland (Ohio) area. Biases that can enter the linkage process and general research issues related to record linkage are discussed. (SLD)

  8. Construction of a virtual EPR and automated contextual linkage to multiple sources of support information on the Oxford Clinical Intranet.

    PubMed Central

    Kay, J. D.; Nurse, D.

    1999-01-01

    We have used internet-standard tools to provide access for clinicians to the components of the electronic patient record held on multiple remote disparate systems. Through the same interface we have provided access to multiple knowledgebases, some written locally and others published elsewhere. We have developed linkage between these two types of information which removes the need for the user to drill down into each knowledgebase to search for relevant information. This approach may help in the implementation of evidence-based practice. The major problems appear to be semantic rather than technological. The intranet was developed at low cost and is now in routine use. This approach appears to be transferable across systems and organisations. PMID:10566476

  9. Privacy-preserving record linkage on large real world datasets.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sean M; Ferrante, Anna M; Boyd, James H; Bauer, Jacqueline K; Semmens, James B

    2014-08-01

    Record linkage typically involves the use of dedicated linkage units who are supplied with personally identifying information to determine individuals from within and across datasets. The personally identifying information supplied to linkage units is separated from clinical information prior to release by data custodians. While this substantially reduces the risk of disclosure of sensitive information, some residual risks still exist and remain a concern for some custodians. In this paper we trial a method of record linkage which reduces privacy risk still further on large real world administrative data. The method uses encrypted personal identifying information (bloom filters) in a probability-based linkage framework. The privacy preserving linkage method was tested on ten years of New South Wales (NSW) and Western Australian (WA) hospital admissions data, comprising in total over 26 million records. No difference in linkage quality was found when the results were compared to traditional probabilistic methods using full unencrypted personal identifiers. This presents as a possible means of reducing privacy risks related to record linkage in population level research studies. It is hoped that through adaptations of this method or similar privacy preserving methods, risks related to information disclosure can be reduced so that the benefits of linked research taking place can be fully realised.

  10. RLT-S: A Web System for Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2015-01-01

    Background Record linkage integrates records across multiple related data sources identifying duplicates and accounting for possible errors. Real life applications require efficient algorithms to merge these voluminous data sources to find out all records belonging to same individuals. Our recently devised highly efficient record linkage algorithms provide best-known solutions to this challenging problem. Method We have developed RLT-S, a freely available web tool, which implements our single linkage clustering algorithm for record linkage. This tool requires input data sets and a small set of configuration settings about these files to work efficiently. RLT-S employs exact match clustering, blocking on a specified attribute and single linkage based hierarchical clustering among these blocks. Results RLT-S is an implementation package of our sequential record linkage algorithm. It outperforms previous best-known implementations by a large margin. The tool is at least two times faster for any dataset than the previous best-known tools. Conclusions RLT-S tool implements our record linkage algorithm that outperforms previous best-known algorithms in this area. This website also contains necessary information such as instructions, submission history, feedback, publications and some other sections to facilitate the usage of the tool. Availability RLT-S is integrated into http://www.rlatools.com, which is currently serving this tool only. The tool is freely available and can be used without login. All data files used in this paper have been stored in https://github.com/abdullah009/DataRLATools. For copies of the relevant programs please see https://github.com/abdullah009/RLATools. PMID:25942687

  11. Quantification of NSW Ambulance Record Linkages with Multiple External Datasets.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Therese; Muecke, Sandy; Simpson, Judy; Irvine, Katie; Jenkins, André

    2015-01-01

    This study has two aims: 1) to describe linkage rates between ambulance data and external datasets for "episodes of care" and "patient only" linkages in New South Wales (NSW), Australia; and 2) to detect and report any systematic issues with linkage that relate to patients, and operational or clinical variables that may introduce bias in subsequent studies if not adequately addressed. During 2010-11, the Centre for Health Record Linkage (CHeReL) in NSW, linked the records for patients attended by NSW Ambulance paramedics for the period July 2006 to June 2009, with four external datasets: Emergency Department Data Collection; Admitted Patient Data Collection; NSW Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages death registration data; and the Australian Bureau of Statistics mortality data. This study reports linkage rates in terms of those "expected" to link and those who were "not expected" to link with external databases within 24 hours of paramedic attendance. Following thorough data preparation processes, 2,041,728 NSW Ambulance care episodes for 1,116,509 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The overall episode-specific hospital linkage rate was 97.2%. Where a patient was not transported to hospital following paramedic care, 8.6% of these episodes resulted in an emergency department attendance within 24 hours. For all care episodes, 5.2% linked to a death record at some time within the 3-year period, with 2.4% of all death episodes occurring within 7 days of a paramedic encounter. For NSW Ambulance episodes of care that were expected to link to an external dataset but did not, nonlinkage to hospital admission records tended to decrease with age. For all other variables, issues relating to rates of linkage and nonlinkage were more indiscriminate. This quantification of the limitations of this large linked dataset will underpin the interpretation and results of ensuing studies that will inform future clinical and operational policies and practices at NSW Ambulance.

  12. Efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for record linkage

    PubMed Central

    Mamun, Abdullah-Al; Mi, Tian; Aseltine, Robert; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective Integrating data from multiple sources is a crucial and challenging problem. Even though there exist numerous algorithms for record linkage or deduplication, they suffer from either large time needs or restrictions on the number of datasets that they can integrate. In this paper we report efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for record linkage which handle any number of datasets and outperform previous algorithms. Methods Our algorithms employ hierarchical clustering algorithms as the basis. A key idea that we use is radix sorting on certain attributes to eliminate identical records before any further processing. Another novel idea is to form a graph that links similar records and find the connected components. Results Our sequential and parallel algorithms have been tested on a real dataset of 1 083 878 records and synthetic datasets ranging in size from 50 000 to 9 000 000 records. Our sequential algorithm runs at least two times faster, for any dataset, than the previous best-known algorithm, the two-phase algorithm using faster computation of the edit distance (TPA (FCED)). The speedups obtained by our parallel algorithm are almost linear. For example, we get a speedup of 7.5 with 8 cores (residing in a single node), 14.1 with 16 cores (residing in two nodes), and 26.4 with 32 cores (residing in four nodes). Conclusions We have compared the performance of our sequential algorithm with TPA (FCED) and found that our algorithm outperforms the previous one. The accuracy is the same as that of this previous best-known algorithm. PMID:24154837

  13. Association between multiple sclerosis and epilepsy: large population-based record-linkage studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) and epilepsy are both fairly common and it follows that they may sometimes occur together in the same people by chance. We sought to determine whether hospitalisation for MS and hospitalisation for epilepsy occur together more often than expected by chance alone. Methods We analysed two datasets of linked statistical hospital admission records covering the Oxford Record Linkage Study area (ORLS, 1963–1998) and all England (1999–2011). In each, we calculated the rate of occurrence of hospital admission for epilepsy in people after admission for MS, compared with equivalent rates in a control cohort, and expressed the results as a relative risk (RR). Results The RR for hospital admission for epilepsy following an admission for MS was significantly high at 4.1 (95% confidence interval 3.1–5.3) in the ORLS and 3.3 (95% CI 3.1–3.4) in the all-England cohort. The RR for a first recorded admission for epilepsy 10 years and more after first recorded admission for MS was 4.7 (2.8–7.3) in ORLS and 3.9 (3.1–4.9) in the national cohort. The RR for the converse–MS following hospitalisation for epilepsy–was 2.5 (95% CI 1.7–3.5) in the ORLS and 1.9 (95% CI 1.8–2.1) in the English dataset. Conclusions MS and epilepsy occur together more commonly than by chance. One possible explanation is that an MS lesion acts as a focus of an epileptic seizure; but other possibilities are discussed. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of epilepsy in people with MS. The findings may also suggest clues for researchers in developing hypotheses about underlying mechanisms for the two conditions. PMID:24304488

  14. A literature review of record linkage procedures focusing on infant health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Record linkage is a powerful tool in assembling information from different data sources and has been used by a number of public health researchers. In this review, we provide an overview of the record linkage methodologies, focusing particularly on probabilistic record linkage. We then stress the purposes and research applications of linking records by focusing on studies of infant health outcomes based on large data sets, and provide a critical review of the studies in Brazil.

  15. Improving Integration Effectiveness of ID Mapping Based Biological Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Hasan M

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, biological objects such as genes, proteins, and pathways are represented by a convenient identifier, or ID, which is then used to cross reference, link and describe objects in biological databases. Relationships among the objects are often established using non-trivial and computationally complex ID mapping systems or converters, and are stored in authoritative databases such as UniGene, GeneCards, PIR and BioMart. Despite best efforts, such mappings are largely incomplete and riddled with false negatives. Consequently, data integration using record linkage that relies on these mappings produces poor quality of data, inadvertently leading to erroneous conclusions. In this paper, we discuss this largely ignored dimension of data integration, examine how the ubiquitous use of identifiers in biological databases is a significant barrier to knowledge fusion using distributed computational pipelines, and propose two algorithms for ad hoc and restriction free ID mapping of arbitrary types using online resources. We also propose two declarative statements for ID conversion and data integration based on ID mapping on-the-fly.

  16. Use of graph theory measures to identify errors in record linkage.

    PubMed

    Randall, Sean M; Boyd, James H; Ferrante, Anna M; Bauer, Jacqueline K; Semmens, James B

    2014-07-01

    Ensuring high linkage quality is important in many record linkage applications. Current methods for ensuring quality are manual and resource intensive. This paper seeks to determine the effectiveness of graph theory techniques in identifying record linkage errors. A range of graph theory techniques was applied to two linked datasets, with known truth sets. The ability of graph theory techniques to identify groups containing errors was compared to a widely used threshold setting technique. This methodology shows promise; however, further investigations into graph theory techniques are required. The development of more efficient and effective methods of improving linkage quality will result in higher quality datasets that can be delivered to researchers in shorter timeframes.

  17. Quantifying the Correctness, Computational Complexity, and Security of Privacy-Preserving String Comparators for Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Durham, Elizabeth; Xue, Yuan; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2012-10-01

    Record linkage is the task of identifying records from disparate data sources that refer to the same entity. It is an integral component of data processing in distributed settings, where the integration of information from multiple sources can prevent duplication and enrich overall data quality, thus enabling more detailed and correct analysis. Privacy-preserving record linkage (PPRL) is a variant of the task in which data owners wish to perform linkage without revealing identifiers associated with the records. This task is desirable in various domains, including healthcare, where it may not be possible to reveal patient identity due to confidentiality requirements, and in business, where it could be disadvantageous to divulge customers' identities. To perform PPRL, it is necessary to apply string comparators that function in the privacy-preserving space. A number of privacy-preserving string comparators (PPSCs) have been proposed, but little research has compared them in the context of a real record linkage application. This paper performs a principled and comprehensive evaluation of six PPSCs in terms of three key properties: 1) correctness of record linkage predictions, 2) computational complexity, and 3) security. We utilize a real publicly-available dataset, derived from the North Carolina voter registration database, to evaluate the tradeoffs between the aforementioned properties. Among our results, we find that PPSCs that partition, encode, and compare strings yield highly accurate record linkage results. However, as a tradeoff, we observe that such PPSCs are less secure than those that map and compare strings in a reduced dimensional space.

  18. Ensuring Privacy When Integrating Patient-Based Datasets: New Methods and Developments in Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adrian P.; Ferrante, Anna M.; Randall, Sean M.; Boyd, James H.; Semmens, James B.

    2017-01-01

    In an era where the volume of structured and unstructured digital data has exploded, there has been an enormous growth in the creation of data about individuals that can be used for understanding and treating disease. Joining these records together at an individual level provides a complete picture of a patient’s interaction with health services and allows better assessment of patient outcomes and effectiveness of treatment and services. Record linkage techniques provide an efficient and cost-effective method to bring individual records together as patient profiles. These linkage procedures bring their own challenges, especially relating to the protection of privacy. The development and implementation of record linkage systems that do not require the release of personal information can reduce the risks associated with record linkage and overcome legal barriers to data sharing. Current conceptual and experimental privacy-preserving record linkage (PPRL) models show promise in addressing data integration challenges. Enhancing and operationalizing PPRL protocols can help address the dilemma faced by some custodians between using data to improve quality of life and dealing with the ethical, legal, and administrative issues associated with protecting an individual’s privacy. These methods can reduce the risk to privacy, as they do not require personally identifying information to be shared. PPRL methods can improve the delivery of record linkage services to the health and broader research community. PMID:28303240

  19. Hospitalisation of the elderly during the last year of life: an application of record linkage in Western Australia 1985-1994

    PubMed Central

    Brameld, K. J.; Holman, C. D.; Bass, A. J.; Codde, J. P.; Rouse, I. L.

    1998-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: To measure the trend, pattern, and cost of time spent in hospital during the last year of life in Western Australia and to identify trends in the place of death. The results were compared with those reported from the Oxford Record Linkage Study. DESIGN: Mortality records for those aged 65 years and over were linked to inpatient hospital morbidity records with a date of separation within one year before death. Comparative inpatient resource utilisation was estimated using ANDRG 3.0 cost weights for Australian public hospitals. SETTING: Western Australia. PARTICIPANTS: All 68,875 persons aged 65 years and over who died between 1 January 1985 and 31 December 1994. MAIN RESULTS: Increasing proportions of all age groups (65-74, 75-84, and 85+ years) were admitted to hospital at least once in the year before death during 1985-94, but the chance of admission decreased with age. There was a trend towards a greater number of shorter admissions per person. Total bed days per person showed no significant increase, except at ages 65-74 years. Total inpatient resource utilisation during the last year of life was lowest and remained constant in those aged 85 years and over, while increasing gradually (3.7% per annum) in the younger elderly. The Western Australian population spent more time in hospital in the last year of life at ages 65-74 years, but the advanced elderly spent less time in hospital, when compared with the Oxford Region. CONCLUSIONS: Recent gains in life expectancy and higher per capita health expenditure have not been accompanied by more time spent in hospital during the last year of life at ages 75+ years. International differences between Western Australia and Oxford can be explained by differences in aged care provision.   PMID:10396507

  20. Evaluating Health Outcomes of Criminal Justice Populations Using Record Linkage: The Importance of Aliases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larney, Sarah; Burns, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    Individuals in contact with the criminal justice system are a key population of concern to public health. Record linkage studies can be useful for studying health outcomes for this group, but the use of aliases complicates the process of linking records across databases. This study was undertaken to determine the impact of aliases on sensitivity…

  1. Accuracy of probabilistic and deterministic record linkage: the case of tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Gisele Pinto; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza de Souza; de Camargo, Kenneth Rochel; Coeli, Cláudia Medina; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the accuracy of deterministic and probabilistic record linkage to identify TB duplicate records, as well as the characteristics of discordant pairs. METHODS The study analyzed all TB records from 2009 to 2011 in the state of Rio de Janeiro. A deterministic record linkage algorithm was developed using a set of 70 rules, based on the combination of fragments of the key variables with or without modification (Soundex or substring). Each rule was formed by three or more fragments. The probabilistic approach required a cutoff point for the score, above which the links would be automatically classified as belonging to the same individual. The cutoff point was obtained by linkage of the Notifiable Diseases Information System – Tuberculosis database with itself, subsequent manual review and ROC curves and precision-recall. Sensitivity and specificity for accurate analysis were calculated. RESULTS Accuracy ranged from 87.2% to 95.2% for sensitivity and 99.8% to 99.9% for specificity for probabilistic and deterministic record linkage, respectively. The occurrence of missing values for the key variables and the low percentage of similarity measure for name and date of birth were mainly responsible for the failure to identify records of the same individual with the techniques used. CONCLUSIONS The two techniques showed a high level of correlation for pair classification. Although deterministic linkage identified more duplicate records than probabilistic linkage, the latter retrieved records not identified by the former. User need and experience should be considered when choosing the best technique to be used. PMID:27556963

  2. Creating a Powerful Platform to Explore Health in a Correctional Population: A Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, Kathryn E.; Farrell MacDonald, Shanna; Chong, Nelson; Moser, Andrea; Moineddin, Rahim; Colantonio, Angela; Nathens, Avery; Matheson, Flora I.

    2016-01-01

    We used record linkage to create a data repository of health information of persons who were federally incarcerated in Ontario and Canada. We obtained records from 56,867 adults who were federally incarcerated between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2011 from the Correctional Service of Canada; 15,248 records belonged to individuals residing in Ontario, Canada. We linked these records to the Registered Persons Database (RPDB) which contained records from 18,116,996 individuals eligible for health care in Ontario. Out of 56,867 OMS records, 22,844 (40.2%) were linked to the RPDB. Looking only at those incarcerated in Ontario, 98%, (14 953 of 15248) records were linked to RPDB. Most records of persons in Ontario-based facilities were linked deterministically. Linkage rates were lower for women, minority groups, and substance users. In conclusion, record linkage enabled the creation of a valuable data repository: there are no electronic medical records for correctional populations in Canada, making it more difficult to profile their health. PMID:27532612

  3. Record linkage to correct under‐ascertainment of cancers in HIV cohorts: The Sinikithemba HIV clinic linkage project

    PubMed Central

    Spoerri, Adrian; Egger, Matthias; Kielkowski, Danuta; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Cloete, Christie; Giddy, Janet; Bohlius, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The surveillance of HIV‐related cancers in South Africa is hampered by the lack of systematic collection of cancer diagnoses in HIV cohorts and the absence of HIV status in cancer registries. To improve cancer ascertainment and estimate cancer incidence, we linked records of adults (aged ≥ 16 years) on antiretroviral treatment (ART) enrolled at Sinikithemba HIV clinic, McCord Hospital in KwaZulu‐Natal (KZN) with the cancer records of public laboratories in KZN province using probabilistic record linkage (PRL) methods. We calculated incidence rates for all cancers, Kaposi sarcoma (KS), cervix, non‐Hodgkin's lymphoma and non‐AIDS defining cancers (NADCs) before and after inclusion of linkage‐identified cancers with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 8,721 records of HIV‐positive patients were linked with 35,536 cancer records. Between 2004 and 2010, we identified 448 cancers, 82% (n = 367) were recorded in the cancer registry only, 10% (n = 43) in the HIV cohort only and 8% (n = 38) both in the HIV cohort and the cancer registry. The overall cancer incidence rate in patients starting ART increased from 134 (95% CI 91–212) to 877 (95% CI 744–1,041) per 100,000 person‐years after inclusion of linkage‐identified cancers. Incidence rates were highest for KS (432, 95% CI 341–555), followed by cervix (259, 95% CI 179–390) and NADCs (294, 95% CI 223–395) per 100,000 person‐years. Ascertainment of cancer in HIV cohorts is incomplete, PRL is both feasible and essential for cancer ascertainment. PMID:27098265

  4. Birth Outcomes and Academic Achievement in Childhood: A Population Record Linkage Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Elizabeth A.; Harris, Felicity; Laurens, Kristin R.; Green, Melissa J.; Brinkman, Sally; Lenroot, Rhoshel K.; Carr, Vaughan J.

    2014-01-01

    Poor academic performance during childhood predicts later adverse outcomes, and could be targeted for improvement if detected early. This study used population-based record linkage to examine the association between early life risk factors and academic achievement at two different stages of development using two different cohorts: a kindergarten…

  5. Multiple sclerosis after infectious mononucleosis: record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Goldacre, M.; Wotton, C.; Seagroatt, V.; Yeates, D.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain if infectious mononucleosis is a risk factor for the development of multiple sclerosis (MS); and, if it is, whether its effect is close to or remote in time from the onset of MS. Design: Analysis of database of linked abstracts of records of hospital admission and death. Setting: Health region in central southern England. Main outcome measure: Ratio of rate of MS in a cohort of people admitted to hospital with infectious mononucleosis to the rate in a comparison cohort. Results: Considering all time intervals from admission with infection to admission with MS, there was a non-significant increase of risk of MS in the infectious mononucleosis cohort (rate ratio 2.17, 95% confidence intervals 0.79 to 4.77). At the interval of 10 years or more, there was a significant increase in risk of MS (rate ratio 4.01, 1.48 to 8.93). The mean time from infectious mononucleosis to first admission with MS was 14 years. Conclusion: This study adds support to the evidence that Epstein-Barr virus, the cause of infectious mononucleosis, is associated with MS. Its role is probably as an initiator of the disease process of MS, or as a contributor to its early development, rather than as an activator of latent, existing disease. PMID:15547068

  6. Designing an Algorithm to Preserve Privacy for Medical Record Linkage With Error-Prone Data

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Doyel; Chen, Tingting; Khethavath, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background Linking medical records across different medical service providers is important to the enhancement of health care quality and public health surveillance. In records linkage, protecting the patients’ privacy is a primary requirement. In real-world health care databases, records may well contain errors due to various reasons such as typos. Linking the error-prone data and preserving data privacy at the same time are very difficult. Existing privacy preserving solutions for this problem are only restricted to textual data. Objective To enable different medical service providers to link their error-prone data in a private way, our aim was to provide a holistic solution by designing and developing a medical record linkage system for medical service providers. Methods To initiate a record linkage, one provider selects one of its collaborators in the Connection Management Module, chooses some attributes of the database to be matched, and establishes the connection with the collaborator after the negotiation. In the Data Matching Module, for error-free data, our solution offered two different choices for cryptographic schemes. For error-prone numerical data, we proposed a newly designed privacy preserving linking algorithm named the Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm, that allows the error-prone data to be correctly matched if the distance between the two records is below a threshold. Results We designed and developed a comprehensive and user-friendly software system that provides privacy preserving record linkage functions for medical service providers, which meets the regulation of Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. It does not require a third party and it is secure in that neither entity can learn the records in the other’s database. Moreover, our novel Error-Tolerant Linking Algorithm implemented in this software can work well with error-prone numerical data. We theoretically proved the correctness and security of our Error

  7. A machine learning approach to create blocking criteria for record linkage.

    PubMed

    Giang, Phan H

    2015-03-01

    Record linkage, a part of data cleaning, is recognized as one of most expensive steps in data warehousing. Most record linkage (RL) systems employ a strategy of using blocking filters to reduce the number of pairs to be matched. A blocking filter consists of a number of blocking criteria. Until recently, blocking criteria are selected manually by domain experts. This paper proposes a new method to automatically learn efficient blocking criteria for record linkage. Our method addresses the lack of sufficient labeled data for training. Unlike previous works, we do not consider a blocking filter in isolation but in the context of an accompanying matcher which is employed after the blocking filter. We show that given such a matcher, the labels (assigned to record pairs) that are relevant for learning are the labels assigned by the matcher (link/nonlink), not the labels assigned objectively (match/unmatch). This conclusion allows us to generate an unlimited amount of labeled data for training. We formulate the problem of learning a blocking filter as a Disjunctive Normal Form (DNF) learning problem and use the Probably Approximately Correct (PAC) learning theory to guide the development of algorithm to search for blocking filters. We test the algorithm on a real patient master file of 2.18 million records. The experimental results show that compared with filters obtained by educated guess, the optimal learned filters have comparable recall but reduce throughput (runtime) by an order-of-magnitude factor.

  8. Probabilistic record linkage and an automated procedure to minimize the undecided-matched pair problem.

    PubMed

    Machado, Carla Jorge; Hill, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    Probabilistic record linkage allows the assembling of information from different data sources. We present a procedure when a one-to-one relationship between records in different files is expected but not found. Data were births and infant deaths, 1998-birth cohort, city of São Paulo, Brazil. Pairs for which a one-to-one relationship was obtained and a best-link was found with the highest weight were taken as unequivocally matched pairs and provided information to decide on the remaining pairs. For these, an expected relationship between differences in dates of death and birth registration was found; and places of birth and death registration for neonatal deaths were likely to be the same. Such evidence was used to solve for the remaining pairs. We reduced the number of non-uniquely matched records and of uncertain matches, and increased the number of uniquely matched pairs from 2,249 to 2,827. Future research using record linkage should use strategies from first record linkage runs before a full clerical review (the standard procedure under uncertainty) to efficiently retrieve matches.

  9. SOEMPI: A Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index Software Toolkit for Private Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Csaba; Durham, Elizabeth; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Xue, Yuan; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate bias in multi-institutional research studies, healthcare organizations need to integrate patient records. However, this process must be accomplished without disclosing the identities of the corresponding patients. Various private record linkage (PRL) techniques have been proposed, but there is a lack of translation into practice because no software suite supports the entire PRL lifecycle. This paper addresses this issue with the introduction of the Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index (SOEMPI). We show how SOEMPI covers the PRL lifecycle, illustrate the implementation of several PRL protocols, and provide a runtime analysis for the integration of two datasets consisting of 10,000 records. While the PRL process is slower than a non-secure setting, our analysis shows the majority of processes in a PRL protocol require several seconds or less and that SOEMPI completes the process in approximately two minutes, which is a practical amount of time for integration. PMID:25954421

  10. Design and implementation of a privacy preserving electronic health record linkage tool in Chicago

    PubMed Central

    Cashy, John P; Jackson, Kathryn L; Pah, Adam R; Goel, Satyender; Boehnke, Jörn; Humphries, John Eric; Kominers, Scott Duke; Hota, Bala N; Sims, Shannon A; Malin, Bradley A; French, Dustin D; Walunas, Theresa L; Meltzer, David O; Kaleba, Erin O; Jones, Roderick C; Galanter, William L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To design and implement a tool that creates a secure, privacy preserving linkage of electronic health record (EHR) data across multiple sites in a large metropolitan area in the United States (Chicago, IL), for use in clinical research. Methods The authors developed and distributed a software application that performs standardized data cleaning, preprocessing, and hashing of patient identifiers to remove all protected health information. The application creates seeded hash code combinations of patient identifiers using a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant SHA-512 algorithm that minimizes re-identification risk. The authors subsequently linked individual records using a central honest broker with an algorithm that assigns weights to hash combinations in order to generate high specificity matches. Results The software application successfully linked and de-duplicated 7 million records across 6 institutions, resulting in a cohort of 5 million unique records. Using a manually reconciled set of 11 292 patients as a gold standard, the software achieved a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 100%, with a majority of the missed matches accounted for by patients with both a missing social security number and last name change. Using 3 disease examples, it is demonstrated that the software can reduce duplication of patient records across sites by as much as 28%. Conclusions Software that standardizes the assignment of a unique seeded hash identifier merged through an agreed upon third-party honest broker can enable large-scale secure linkage of EHR data for epidemiologic and public health research. The software algorithm can improve future epidemiologic research by providing more comprehensive data given that patients may make use of multiple healthcare systems. PMID:26104741

  11. Comparison of individual follow-up and computerized record linkage using the Canadian Mortality Data Base.

    PubMed

    Shannon, H S; Jamieson, E; Walsh, C; Julian, J A; Fair, M E; Buffet, A

    1989-01-01

    We compared two methods of ascertaining mortality in a historical prospective mortality study. Computerized Record Linkage (CRL) with the centralized historical Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB) was carried out on 2469 men and an attempt was also made to trace the subjects by individual follow-up (IFU). All but 88 were traced and 60 were reported to be dead. CRL was able to locate the deaths of three men who had been untraced by IFU. Contradictory information on vital status was obtained on 5 subjects--in 4 of them, the discrepancy was resolved in favour of CRL. Overall, CRL using the CMDB performed very well. We also consider factors that affect the relative costs of the two methods, which should be balanced against the accuracy of information obtained.

  12. The Role of Administrative Record Linkage in Creating Trajectories of Early Human Development

    PubMed Central

    Hertzman, Clyde

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood development (ECD) is a significant social determinant of health. Monitoring ECD to reveal trends and patterns of development requires high-quality information on a population from infancy through adulthood. This study linked data from the Early Development Instrument (EDI), administered in senior kindergarten, with data from the Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA), graduation status and SES to show that Vancouver schools with poor FSA results also had high proportions of children with low EDI and SES scores. Linking EDI data to data on pregnancy, birth, medical history, hospital care and success in school would enable the creation of normative EDC trajectories for all children. A person-specific, anonymized, population-based record linkage system is an indispensable prerequisite for creating and monitoring developmental trajectories. PMID:24933373

  13. Associations between Klinefelter's syndrome and autoimmune diseases: English national record linkage studies.

    PubMed

    Seminog, Olena O; Seminog, Alla B; Yeates, David; Goldacre, Michael J

    2015-03-01

    There are reports suggesting that people with Klinefelter's syndrome (KS) may be at increased risk of some autoimmune diseases, but the evidence is not substantial. We wanted to add to the evidence by systematically assessing the risk of autoimmune diseases in a national cohort of people with KS. We selected records of all people with KS in a record-linked dataset of all hospital day cases and inpatient admissions in England, 1999-2011; and we followed them up by electronic record linkage to identify the occurrence of autoimmune diseases. We compared their occurrence in the KS cohort with a control cohort, studied in the same way, and expressed the results as rate ratios (RR). Of 30 autoimmune diseases studied in people with KS, there were significantly increased risks of seven-Addison's disease (RR 11.7, 95% confidence interval 2.4-34.4), diabetes mellitus type 1 (6.1, 4.4-8.3), multiple sclerosis (4.3, 1.2-11.0), acquired hypothyroidism (2.7, 1.8-4.0), rheumatoid arthritis (3.3, 2.0-5.2), Sjogren's syndrome (19.3, 4.0-57.0) and systemic lupus erythematosus (18.1, 2.2-65.6). We concluded that people with KS have increased risk of some autoimmune diseases, particularly those that are female-predominant. The increased risk of autoimmune diseases associated with the XXY karyotype may hold clues to the pathogenesis of some aspects of autoimmunity.

  14. Data resource profile: the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) medical records-linkage system.

    PubMed

    St Sauver, Jennifer L; Grossardt, Brandon R; Yawn, Barbara P; Melton, L Joseph; Pankratz, Joshua J; Brue, Scott M; Rocca, Walter A

    2012-12-01

    The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) medical records-linkage system was established in 1966 to capture health care information for the entire population of Olmsted County, MN, USA. The REP includes a dynamic cohort of 502 820 unique individuals who resided in Olmsted County at some point between 1966 and 2010, and received health care for any reason at a health care provider within the system. The data available electronically (electronic REP indexes) include demographic characteristics, medical diagnostic codes, surgical procedure codes and death information (including causes of death). In addition, for each resident, the system keeps a complete list of all paper records, electronic records and scanned documents that are available in full text for in-depth review and abstraction. The REP serves as the research infrastructure for studies of virtually all diseases that come to medical attention, and has supported over 2000 peer-reviewed publications since 1966. The system covers residents of all ages and both sexes, regardless of socio-economic status, ethnicity or insurance status. For further information regarding the use of the REP for a specific study, please visit our website at www.rochesterproject.org or contact us at info@rochesterproject.org. Our website also provides access to an introductory video in English and Spanish.

  15. New South Wales Child Development Study (NSW-CDS): an Australian multiagency, multigenerational, longitudinal record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Vaughan J; Harris, Felicity; Raudino, Alessandra; Luo, Luming; Kariuki, Maina; Liu, Enwu; Tzoumakis, Stacy; Smith, Maxwell; Holbrook, Allyson; Bore, Miles; Brinkman, Sally; Lenroot, Rhoshel; Dix, Katherine; Dean, Kimberlie; Laurens, Kristin R; Green, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The initial aim of this multiagency, multigenerational record linkage study is to identify childhood profiles of developmental vulnerability and resilience, and to identify the determinants of these profiles. The eventual aim is to identify risk and protective factors for later childhood-onset and adolescent-onset mental health problems, and other adverse social outcomes, using subsequent waves of record linkage. The research will assist in informing the development of public policy and intervention guidelines to help prevent or mitigate adverse long-term health and social outcomes. Participants The study comprises a population cohort of 87 026 children in the Australian State of New South Wales (NSW). The cohort was defined by entry into the first year of full-time schooling in NSW in 2009, at which time class teachers completed the Australian Early Development Census (AEDC) on each child (with 99.7% coverage in NSW). The AEDC data have been linked to the children's birth, health, school and child protection records for the period from birth to school entry, and to the health and criminal records of their parents, as well as mortality databases. Findings to date Descriptive data summarising sex, geographic and socioeconomic distributions, and linkage rates for the various administrative databases are presented. Child data are summarised, and the mental health and criminal records data of the children's parents are provided. Future plans In 2015, at age 11 years, a self-report mental health survey was administered to the cohort in collaboration with government, independent and Catholic primary school sectors. A second record linkage, spanning birth to age 11 years, will be undertaken to link this survey data with the aforementioned administrative databases. This will enable a further identification of putative risk and protective factors for adverse mental health and other outcomes in adolescence, which can then be tested in subsequent record linkages

  16. Month of Conception and Learning Disabilities: A Record-Linkage Study of 801,592 Children.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Daniel F; Smith, Gordon C S; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Wood, Rachael; King, Albert; Clark, David N; Pell, Jill P

    2016-10-01

    Learning disabilities have profound, long-lasting health sequelae. Affected children born over the course of 1 year in the United States of America generated an estimated lifetime cost of $51.2 billion. Results from some studies have suggested that autistic spectrum disorder may vary by season of birth, but there have been few studies in which investigators examined whether this is also true of other causes of learning disabilities. We undertook Scotland-wide record linkage of education (annual pupil census) and maternity (Scottish Morbidity Record 02) databases for 801,592 singleton children attending Scottish schools in 2006-2011. We modeled monthly rates using principal sine and cosine transformations of the month number and demonstrated cyclicity in the percentage of children with special educational needs. Rates were highest among children conceived in the first quarter of the year (January-March) and lowest among those conceived in the third (July-September) (8.9% vs 7.6%; P < 0.001). Seasonal variations were specific to autistic spectrum disorder, intellectual disabilities, and learning difficulties (e.g., dyslexia) and were absent for sensory or motor/physical impairments and mental, physical, or communication problems. Seasonality accounted for 11.4% (95% confidence interval: 9.0, 13.7) of all cases. Some biologically plausible causes of this variation, such as infection and maternal vitamin D levels, are potentially amendable to intervention.

  17. History of the Rochester Epidemiology Project: half a century of medical records linkage in a US population.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Walter A; Yawn, Barbara P; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Grossardt, Brandon R; Melton, L Joseph

    2012-12-01

    The Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) has maintained a comprehensive medical records linkage system for nearly half a century for almost all persons residing in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Herein, we provide a brief history of the REP before and after 1966, the year in which the REP was officially established. The key protagonists before 1966 were Henry Plummer, Mabel Root, and Joseph Berkson, who developed a medical records linkage system at Mayo Clinic. In 1966, Leonard Kurland established collaborative agreements with other local health care providers (hospitals, physician groups, and clinics [primarily Olmsted Medical Center]) to develop a medical records linkage system that covered the entire population of Olmsted County, and he obtained funding from the National Institutes of Health to support the new system. In 1997, L. Joseph Melton III addressed emerging concerns about the confidentiality of medical record information by introducing a broad patient research authorization as per Minnesota state law. We describe how the key protagonists of the REP have responded to challenges posed by evolving medical knowledge, information technology, and public expectation and policy. In addition, we provide a general description of the system; discuss issues of data quality, reliability, and validity; describe the research team structure; provide information about funding; and compare the REP with other medical information systems. The REP can serve as a model for the development of similar research infrastructures in the United States and worldwide.

  18. Oxford dictionary of Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacs, Alan

    The dictionary is derived from the Concise Science Dictionary, first published by Oxford University Press in 1984 (third edition, 1996). It consists of all the entries relating to physics in that dictionary, together with some of those entries relating to astronomy that are required for an understanding of astrophysics and many entries that relate to physical chemistry. It also contains a selection of the words used in mathematics that are relevant to physics, as well as the key words in metal science, computing, and electronics. For this third edition a number of words from quantum field physics and statistical mechanics have been added. Cosmology and particle physics have been updated and a number of general entries have been expanded.

  19. Reform and Resistance at Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labi, Aisha

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, both Harvard and Oxford Universities have been rattled by reform-minded--some say brash--leaders determined to question the status quo. At Harvard, President Lawrence H. Summers proved too controversial for his own good and is scheduled to step down this month after five contentious years in office. But at Oxford, John Hood, who…

  20. Educational outcomes following breech delivery: a record-linkage study of 456 947 children

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Daniel F; Wood, Rachael; King, Albert; Clark, David N; Cooper, Sally-Ann; Smith, Gordon CS; Pell, Jill P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Obstetric management of term breech infants changed dramatically following the Term Breech Trial which suggested increased serious neonatal morbidity following trial of labour. Short-term morbidity is a poor proxy of long-term neurological sequelae. We determined whether vaginal breech delivery was associated with educational outcomes. Methods: We linked three Scotland-wide administrative databases at an individual level: the ScotXed school census; Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA) examination results; and Scottish Morbidity Record (SMR02) maternity database. The linkage provided information on singleton children, born at term, attending Scottish schools between 2006 and 2011. Results: Of the 456 947 eligible children, 1574 (0.3%) had vaginal breech deliveries, 12 489 (2.7%) planned caesarean section for breech presentation and 442 090 (96.9%) vaginal cephalic deliveries. The percentage of term breech infants delivered vaginally fell from 23% to 7% among children who started school in 2006 and 2011, respectively. Of children born by vaginal breech delivery, 1.5% had a low 5-min Apgar score (≤3) compared with only 0.4% of those born by either breech caesarean section [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 6.16, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.44–8.54, p < 0.001] or cephalic vaginal delivery (adjusted OR 3.84, 95% CI 2.99–4.93, p < 0.001). Children born by vaginal breech delivery had lower examination attainment than those born by either planned caesarean section for breech presentation (adjusted OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.02–1.32, p = 0.020) or vaginal cephalic delivery (adjusted OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.01–1.28, p = 0.029). Conclusions: Vaginal delivery of term breech infants was associated with lower examination attainment, as well as poorer Apgar scores, suggesting that the adverse effects are not just short-term. PMID:25613426

  1. Following Up Crack Users after Hospital Discharge Using Record Linkage Methodology: An Alternative to Find Hidden Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Veralice Maria; Pedroso, Rosemeri; dos Santos, Antônio Marcos; Diemen, Lisia Von; Pechansky, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the probabilistic record linkage (PRL) methodology as an alternative way to find or follow up hard-to-reach population as crack users. PRL was based on secondary data from public health information systems and the strategy used from standardization; phonetic encoding and the rounds of matching data were described. A total of 293 patient records from medical database and two administrative datasets obtained from Ministry of Health Information Systems were used. Patient information from the medical database was the identifiers to the administrative datasets containing data on outpatient treatment and hospital admissions. 40% of patient records were found in the hospital database and 12% were found in the outpatient database; 95% of the patients were hospitalized up to 5 times, and only 10 out of them had outpatient information. The record linkage methodology by linking government databases may help to address research questions about the path of patients in the care network without spending time and financial resources with primary data collection. PMID:26425565

  2. Inaccurate Ascertainment of Morbidity and Mortality due to Influenza in Administrative Databases: A Population-Based Record Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, David J.; Amin, Janaki; MacIntyre, C. Raina; Newall, Anthony T.; Rawlinson, William D.; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilmour, Robin; Thackway, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background Historically, counting influenza recorded in administrative health outcome databases has been considered insufficient to estimate influenza attributable morbidity and mortality in populations. We used database record linkage to evaluate whether modern databases have similar limitations. Methods Person-level records were linked across databases of laboratory notified influenza, emergency department (ED) presentations, hospital admissions and death registrations, from the population (∼6.9 million) of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, 2005 to 2008. Results There were 2568 virologically diagnosed influenza infections notified. Among those, 25% of 40 who died, 49% of 1451 with a hospital admission and 7% of 1742 with an ED presentation had influenza recorded on the respective database record. Compared with persons aged ≥65 years and residents of regional and remote areas, respectively, children and residents of major cities were more likely to have influenza coded on their admission record. Compared with older persons and admitted patients, respectively, working age persons and non-admitted persons were more likely to have influenza coded on their ED record. On both ED and admission records, persons with influenza type A infection were more likely than those with type B infection to have influenza coded. Among death registrations, hospital admissions and ED presentations with influenza recorded as a cause of illness, 15%, 28% and 1.4%, respectively, also had laboratory notified influenza. Time trends in counts of influenza recorded on the ED, admission and death databases reflected the trend in counts of virologically diagnosed influenza. Conclusions A minority of the death, hospital admission and ED records for persons with a virologically diagnosed influenza infection identified influenza as a cause of illness. Few database records with influenza recorded as a cause had laboratory confirmation. The databases have limited value for estimating incidence

  3. A deep-time perspective of land-ocean linkages in the sedimentary record.

    PubMed

    Romans, Brian W; Graham, Stephan A

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly important to understand and predict how marine environments respond to changes in climate and sea level and to variability in sediment flux from rivers. The dynamics of these factors occur over several orders of temporal magnitude and, under favorable geologic conditions, contribute to long-lived sediment accumulation. Thus, stratigraphic successions along continental margins are archives of these environmental changes and can be used to reconstruct land-ocean linkages, which provide important context for shorter-term and future modifications to this critical zone. Here, we discuss an integrated approach to the analysis of deep-time sediment archives (>10(6) years) that considers the entire system, from eroding catchments where sediment is produced to subsiding basins where sediment accumulates. This holistic approach is presented within the framework of fundamental concepts about sedimentary-basin analysis and stratigraphic characterization through a combination of foundational literature and studies that represent the state of the art.

  4. Teaching and Learning: The Oxford Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindeman, Cheryl A.

    2006-01-01

    It all started with an invitation from the Oxford Round Table. The author was summoned to participate in a lively debate at Exeter College in the Oxford University about, "Science and Faith: The Great Matter." If one has participated in an Oxford University summer experience, he/she will agree it is a once in a lifetime learning…

  5. The Association between Bankruptcy and Hospital-Presenting Attempted Suicide: A Record Linkage Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidger, Judi; Gunnell, David; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Overstreet, Karen A.; Hollingworth, William

    2011-01-01

    The associations between admissions to an emergency department following attempted suicide and personal bankruptcy in the preceding and subsequent 2 years were evaluated. Records from a level 1 trauma center (June 1993-December 2002) in Seattle, WA, were linked with case files from the local U.S. District Bankruptcy Court (June 1991 onward).…

  6. Speleothem records of western Mediterranean. Hydrological variability along the Last Interglacial Period and marine linkages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torner, Judit; Cacho, Isabel; Moreno, Ana; Stoll, Heather; Belmonte, Anchel; Sierro, Francisco J.; Frigola, Jaime; Martrat, Belen; Fornós, Joan; Arnau Fernández, Pedro; Hellstrom, John; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to identify and characterize regional hydrological variability in the western Mediterranean region in base to different geochemical parameters (δ18O, δ13C, and Mg/Ca ratios). Speleothems have been recovered from several caves located in southern central Pyrenees one and the others form the Balearic Islands. Their chronologies have been constructed in base on U/Th absolute dating and indicate that the speleothem sequences cover the end of the last interglacial and the glacial inception. One of the most remarkable features of the records is the intense and abrupt shift toward more arid conditions that marks the end of the last interglacial (MIS 5e). Furthermore, our speleothem records also show relatively humid but highly variable hydrological conditions during the interstadial periods from MIS 5c to 5a. These speleothem records have been compared with new generated western Mediterranean marine records from the Balearic Sea (MD99-2343) and Alboran Sea (OPD-977). Marine records include (1) proxies of sea surface temperature and changes in evaporation-precipitation rates based on pair analysis of δ18O and the Mg/Ca ratios in planktonic foraminifera Globigerina bulloides; (2) proxies of deep-water currents associated with the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) based on grain size analyses. The results reveal that arid conditions on land were coeval with cold sea surface sub-stages (MIS 5b and 5d), and also with increases in the intensity of the WMDW-related currents. By contrast, humid and hydrological unstable atmosphere conditions were synchronous with sea surface warm sub-stages, and lower WMDW-related currents intensities (MIS 5a, c and e). Consequently, our results highly evidence a strong atmospheric-oceanic coupling, involving parallel changes in both surface but also deep western Mediterranean Sea conditions during the last interglacial period and the glacial inception.

  7. Marine and Lacustrine Turbidite Records: Testing Linkages and Estimating Ground Motions, Central Cascadia Margin, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausmann, R. B.; Goldfinger, C.; Black, B.; Collins, T.; Romsos, C. G.; Medeiros, L.; Mutschler, M.; Galer, S.; Raymond, R.; Morey, A. E.

    2015-12-01

    We are investigating a potential paleoseismic record at Bull Run Lake, 165 km inland and 280 km landward of the tip of the plate boundary thrust, at the latitude of Portland, Oregon, central Cascadia margin. Bull Run is a landslide dammed lake in a cirque basin on the western flanks of Mt. Hood. Bull Run is potentially a good paleoseismic site, with no major stream inputs and a small catchment basin. The watershed and lake are faulted, and may contain ashes and evidence of crustal faulting. The lake was investigated by Raymond (1983), who cored the lake and found an orderly stratigraphic sequence with a number of minerogenic disturbance events (turbidites) and the Mazama Ash. The bulk ages of several of the disturbance events dated in Raymond's cores overlap well-known Cascadia earthquakes, including the AD 1700 event and several prior earthquakes, suggesting potential for this site. We collected full coverage high-resolution multibeam and backscatter data, along with a high resolution grid of CHIRP sub-bottom profiles, and seven new sediment gravity cores. We find that the turbidite record in the lake is well imaged in the high-resolution chirp data, and is found throughout the lake, including at least one basin isolated from the main basin. The continuity of the turbidite record shows little or no relationship to the minor stream inlets, suggesting the disturbance beds are not likely to be storm related. Many faint laminae may contain a storm record. Subtle channels from north and south sides of the lake feed an axial channel that terminates at the eastern shore. Lake sidewall failures are evident on the north and south walls, and occur with and without imageable tabular blocky slide debris where sedimented slopes exceed ~ 22-25 deg. Smaller failures visible in backscatter data are found on slopes as low as 12 degrees. We conducted diver investigations of several of the landslide areas, collecting hand push core samples and in-situ vane shear torquemeter

  8. Risk of individual malignant neoplasms in patients with sickle cell disease: English national record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Seminog, Olena O; Ogunlaja, Oyindamola I; Yeates, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Case reports suggest that there may be an increased risk of some cancers associated with sickle cell disease. However, population-based studies are scarce and there is no comprehensive enumeration of the risks across the whole range of site-specific cancers. Our aim was to provide this. Design We used an English national dataset of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and deaths from 1999 to 2011 to undertake a retrospective cohort study. Setting England. Participants Records of all hospital admissions in England with SCD or with conditions included in the control cohort. Main outcome measures Rate ratios were calculated comparing rates of cancer in a sickle cell disease cohort and a control cohort, confining the analyses to people whose ethnicity was recorded as Black. Results Comparing the sickle cell disease cohort with the cohort without sickle cell disease, the rate ratio for all cancers combined was 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7–2.5). There were significantly high rate ratios for haematological malignancies, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (rate ratio 3.7, 1.5–8.4), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (2.6, 1.3–4.8), multiple myeloma (5.5, 2.8–10.1), lymphoid leukaemia (3.3, 1.3–8.0) and myeloid leukaemia (10.0, 4.6–21.5). Four solid tumours showed elevated rate ratios: colon cancer (2.8, 1.2–5.5), non-melanoma skin cancer (4.4, 1.3–12.2), kidney cancer (5.4, 2.3–11.5) and thyroid cancer (5.1, 1.3–15.4). Conclusions The risk of some malignancies may be raised in patients with sickle cell disease. However, this study was based on administrative data without the scope to validate these against patients’ full clinical records. Our findings need confirmation or refutation. If confirmed, work to elucidate, at the genetic and molecular level, why people with sickle cell disease have elevated risks of individual cancers might make contributions to the fundamental understanding of carcinogenesis. PMID:27325377

  9. Planned Repeat Cesarean Section at Term and Adverse Childhood Health Outcomes: A Record-Linkage Study

    PubMed Central

    Black, Mairead; Bhattacharya, Siladitya; Philip, Sam; Norman, Jane E.; McLernon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Global cesarean section (CS) rates range from 1% to 52%, with a previous CS being the commonest indication. Labour following a previous CS carries risk of scar rupture, with potential for offspring hypoxic brain injury, leading to high rates of repeat elective CS. However, the effect of delivery by CS on long-term outcomes in children is unclear. Increasing evidence suggests that in avoiding exposure to maternal bowel flora during labour or vaginal birth, offspring delivered by CS may be adversely affected in terms of energy uptake from the gut and immune development, increasing obesity and asthma risks, respectively. This study aimed to address the evidence gap on long-term childhood outcomes following repeat CS by comparing adverse childhood health outcomes after (1) planned repeat CS and (2) unscheduled repeat CS with those that follow vaginal birth after CS (VBAC). Methods and Findings A data-linkage cohort study was performed. All second-born, term, singleton offspring delivered between 1 January 1993 and 31 December 2007 in Scotland, UK, to women with a history of CS (n = 40,145) were followed up until 31 January 2015. Outcomes assessed included obesity at age 5 y, hospitalisation with asthma, learning disability, cerebral palsy, and death. Cox regression and binary logistic regression were used as appropriate to compare outcomes following planned repeat CS (n = 17,919) and unscheduled repeat CS (n = 8,847) with those following VBAC (n = 13,379). Risk of hospitalisation with asthma was greater following both unscheduled repeat CS (3.7% versus 3.3%, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.05–1.33) and planned repeat CS (3.6% versus 3.3%, adjusted HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.09–1.42) compared with VBAC. Learning disability and death were more common following unscheduled repeat CS compared with VBAC (3.7% versus 2.3%, adjusted odds ratio 1.64, 95% CI 1.17–2.29, and 0.5% versus 0.4%, adjusted HR 1.50, 95% CI 1.00–2.25, respectively). Risk of obesity

  10. Linkage methods for connecting children with parents in electronic health record and state public health insurance data.

    PubMed

    Angier, Heather; Gold, Rachel; Crawford, Courtney; P O'Malley, Jean; J Tillotson, Carrie; Marino, Miguel; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to develop methodologies for creating child-parent 'links' in two healthcare-related data sources. We linked children and parents who were patients in a network of Oregon clinics with a shared electronic health record (EHR), using data that reported the child's emergency contact information or the 'guarantor' for the child's visits. We also linked children and parents enrolled in the Oregon Health Plan (OHP; Oregon's public health insurance programs), using administrative data; here, we defined a 'child' as aged <19 years and identified potential 'parents' from among adults sharing the same OHP household identification (ID) number. In both data sources, parents had to be 12-55 years older than the child. We used OHP individual client ID and EHR patient ID numbers to assess the quality of our linkages through cross-validation. Of the 249,079 children in the EHR dataset, we identified 62,967 who had a 'linkable' parent with patient information in the EHR. In the OHP data, 889,452 household IDs were assigned to at least one child; 525,578 with a household ID had a 'linkable' parent (272,578 households). Cross-validation of linkages revealed 99.8 % of EHR links validated in OHP data and 97.7 % of OHP links validated in EHR data. The ability to link children and their parents in healthcare-related datasets will be useful to inform efforts to improve children's health. Thus, we developed strategies for linking children with their parents in an EHR and a public health insurance administrative dataset.

  11. Automatic spike sorting for extracellular electrophysiological recording using unsupervised single linkage clustering based on grey relational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, You-Yin; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Lo, Yu-Chun; Tsang, Siny; Chen, Shin-Yuan; Zhao, Wan-Ting; Chao, Wen-Hung; Chang, Yao-Chuan; Wu, Robby; Shih, Yen-Yu I.; Tsai, Sheng-Tsung; Jaw, Fu-Shan

    2011-06-01

    Automatic spike sorting is a prerequisite for neuroscience research on multichannel extracellular recordings of neuronal activity. A novel spike sorting framework, combining efficient feature extraction and an unsupervised clustering method, is described here. Wavelet transform (WT) is adopted to extract features from each detected spike, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test (KS test) is utilized to select discriminative wavelet coefficients from the extracted features. Next, an unsupervised single linkage clustering method based on grey relational analysis (GSLC) is applied for spike clustering. The GSLC uses the grey relational grade as the similarity measure, instead of the Euclidean distance for distance calculation; the number of clusters is automatically determined by the elbow criterion in the threshold-cumulative distribution. Four simulated data sets with four noise levels and electrophysiological data recorded from the subthalamic nucleus of eight patients with Parkinson's disease during deep brain stimulation surgery are used to evaluate the performance of GSLC. Feature extraction results from the use of WT with the KS test indicate a reduced number of feature coefficients, as well as good noise rejection, despite similar spike waveforms. Accordingly, the use of GSLC for spike sorting achieves high classification accuracy in all simulated data sets. Moreover, J-measure results in the electrophysiological data indicating that the quality of spike sorting is adequate with the use of GSLC.

  12. Residential segregation, dividing walls and mental health: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Aideen; French, Declan; O'Reilly, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Background Neighbourhood segregation has been described as a fundamental determinant of physical health, but literature on its effect on mental health is less clear. While most previous research has relied on conceptualised measures of segregation, Northern Ireland is unique as it contains physical manifestations of segregation in the form of segregation barriers (or ‘peacelines’) which can be used to accurately identify residential segregation. Methods We used population-wide health record data on over 1.3 million individuals, to analyse the effect of residential segregation, measured by both the formal Dissimilarity Index and by proximity to a segregation barrier, on the likelihood of poor mental health. Results Using multilevel logistic regression models, we found residential segregation measured by the Dissimilarity Index poses no additional risk to the likelihood of poor mental health after adjustment for area-level deprivation. However, residence in an area segregated by a ‘peaceline’ increases the likelihood of antidepressant medication by 19% (OR=1.19, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.23) and anxiolytic medication by 39% (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.32 to 1.48), even after adjustment for gender, age, conurbation, deprivation and crime. Conclusions Living in an area segregated by a ‘peaceline’ is detrimental to mental health suggesting segregated areas characterised by a heightened sense of ‘other’ pose a greater risk to mental health. The difference in results based on segregation measure highlights the importance of choice of measure when studying segregation. PMID:26858342

  13. The linkage between marine sediment records and changes in Holocene Saharan landscape: simulating the dust cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egerer, Sabine; Claussen, Martin; Reick, Christian; Stanelle, Tanja

    2016-04-01

    Marine sediment records reveal an abrupt and strong increase in dust deposition in the North Atlantic at the end of the African Humid Period about 4.9 ka to 5.5 ka ago (deMenocal et al., 2000; McGee et al., 2013). The change in dust flux has been attributed to varying Saharan land surface cover. Alternatively, the enhanced dust accumulation is linked to enhanced surface winds and a consequent intensification of coastal upwelling. We present simulation results from a recent sensitivity study, where we demonstrate for the first time the direct link between dust accumulation in marine cores and changes in Saharan land surface during the Holocene. We have simulated timeslices of he mid-Holocene (6 ka BP) and pre-industrial (1850 AD) dust cycle as a function of Saharan land surface cover and atmosphere-ocean conditions using the coupled atmosphere-aerosol model ECHAM6.1-HAM2.1. We prescribe mid-Holocene vegetation cover based on a vegetation reconstruction from pollen data (Hoelzmann et al., 1998) and mid-Holocene lake surface area is determined using a water routing and storage model (Tegen et al., 2002). In agreement with data from marine sediment cores, our simulations show that mid-Holocene dust deposition fluxes in the North Atlantic were two to three times lower compared with pre-industrial fluxes. We identify Saharan land surface characteristics to be the main control on dust transport from North Africa to the North Atlantic. We conclude that the variation in dust accumulation in marine cores is likely related to a transition of the Saharan landscape during the Holocene and not due to changes in atmospheric or ocean conditions alone. Reference: deMenocal, P., Ortiz, J., Guilderson, T., Adkins, J., Sarnthein, M., Baker, L., and Yarusinsky, M.: Abrupt onset and termination of the African Humid Period:: rapid climate responses to gradual insolation forcing, Quaternary Science Reviews, 19, 347-361, 2000. Hoelzmann, P., Jolly, D., Harrison, S. P., Laarif, F

  14. High Hospitalization Rates in Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Longitudinal Follow-Up Study Using Medical Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Sieswerda, Elske; Font-Gonzalez, Anna; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Heinen, Richard C.; Jaspers, Monique W.; van der Pal, Helena J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Caron, Huib N.

    2016-01-01

    Hospitalization rates over time of childhood cancer survivors (CCS) provide insight into the burden of unfavorable health conditions on CCS and health care resources. The objective of our study was to examine trends in hospitalizations of CCS and risk factors in comparison with the general population. We performed a medical record linkage study of a cohort of 1564 ≥five-year CCS with national registers. We obtained a random sample of the general population matched on year of birth, gender and calendar year per CCS retrieved. We quantified and compared hospitalization rates of CCS and reference persons from 1995 until 2005, and we analyzed risk factors for hospitalization within the CCS cohort with multivariable Poisson models. We retrieved hospitalization information from 1382 CCS and 25583 reference persons. The overall relative hospitalization rate (RHR) was 2.2 (95%CI:1.9–2.5) for CCS compared to reference persons. CCS with central nervous system and solid tumors had highest RHRs. Hospitalization rates in CCS were increased compared to reference persons up to at least 30 years after primary diagnosis, with highest rates 5–10 and 20–30 years after primary cancer. RHRs were highest for hospitalizations due to neoplasms (10.7; 95%CI:7.1–16.3) and endocrine/nutritional/metabolic disorders (7.3; 95%CI:4.6–11.7). Female gender (P<0.001), radiotherapy to head and/or neck (P<0.001) or thorax and/or abdomen (P = 0.03) and surgery (P = 0.01) were associated with higher hospitalization rates in CCS. In conclusion, CCS have increased hospitalization rates compared to the general population, up to at least 30 years after primary cancer treatment. These findings imply a high and long-term burden of unfavorable health conditions after childhood cancer on survivors and health care resources. PMID:27433937

  15. Review of the Oxford Cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, G.

    The Oxford Cryocooler incorporates a linear drive compressor operating close to resonance. All dynamic seals are noncontacting clearance seals maintained by mounting the piston and displacer on mechanical suspension systems with infinite fatigue life. The displacer is pneumatically driven but controlled by a miniature linear motor. The cooler is therefore nonwearing and performance can be maintained even in adverse environments by servo control of piston and displacer strokes and relative phase. Split and integral, single- and two-stage coolers have been produced with operating temperatures between 30 K and 200 K, refrigeration powers between 50 mW and several watts and capable of operating in ambient temperatures from -40 C to 70 C. A current project aims to extend the refrigeration power to 500 watts at 80 K. Experimental optimisation techniques have been devised for rapid development of high efficiency coolers.

  16. Corner Office Interviews: Oxford's Casper Grathwohl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roncevic, Mirela

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Casper Grathwohl, VP and publisher of reference at Oxford University Press (OUP), regarding his background of reference publishing, his role in OUP, and his plans of moving on with Oxford Bibliographies Online (OBO). Over the past 12 years, Grathwohl, has led a successful transition of the venerable…

  17. Leadership Styles of Oxford House Officers.

    PubMed

    Komer, Anne C; Jason, Leonard A; Harvey, Ronald; Olson, Brad

    Oxford House recovery homes are unusual compared to most recovery homes in that they function entirely without the use of staff; instead members are elected to officer positions. The aim of this study was to perform preliminary analysis of the types of leadership styles utilized by members of oxford house. Twentynine house residents of five Oxford Houses were asked to rate their own leadership styles using the leader behavior description questionnaire and the multifactor leader questionnaire. Results showed that participants were more likely to use person-oriented behaviors above task-oriented actions. Transformational leadership was associated with higher outcomes than Transactional leadership. Implications for future research are discussed.

  18. [Estimated parameters in linkage between mortality and hospitalization databases according to quality of records on underlying cause of death].

    PubMed

    Coeli, Cláudia Medina; Barbosa, Flávia dos Santos; Brito, Alexandre dos Santos; Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Camargo, Kenneth Rochel de; Medronho, Roberto de Andrade; Bloch, Katia Vergetti

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the linkage parameter estimates between hospitalization and mortality databases, calculated separately for the subsets of deaths from ill-defined causes and deaths from known causes. The databases for deaths from known causes and ill-defined causes were linked to a hospital admissions database. Parameters were estimated using two strategies: (1) first name, last name, and day, month, and year of birth, (2) full name and date of birth. In the first strategy, the estimates for the first and last name were at least 97% in both sets. However, the items day, month, and year of birth produced low values in both sets. In the second strategy there was an important difference between the two groups, with much lower values for full name and especially for date of birth in the group of deaths from ill-defined causes. Our results emphasize the need for pilot studies to evaluate possible internal heterogeneity of databases during the planning stage of linkage projects.

  19. Cycling safety: injury prevention in Oxford cyclists

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, L; Smith, N

    2000-01-01

    Objective—To assess injury prevention measures used by cyclists in Oxford and to detect any differences between wearers and non-wearers of cycling helmets. Method—A prospective observational survey of a series of cyclists passing a single point on a busy city road in reduced lighting. Two observers jointly recorded four measures of injury prevention: use of front or rear light, high visibility (reflective or fluorescent) clothing, and cycling helmet. The use of the first three interventions was analysed in relation to helmet use/non-use. Results—A total of 392 cyclists were observed over one hour. Fourteen (3.6%) were observed to use all four studied measures, while 137 (34.9%) used none of them. The frequency of measures observed was: lit front light 190 (48.5%), lit rear light 197 (50.2%), both lights on 163 (41.6%), helmet on 104 (26.5%), and high visibility clothing 39 (9.9%). Despite the helmet using group's smaller size, it contained a significantly higher proportion of cyclists with lit front light (60.6% v 44.1%), lit rear light (61.5% v 46.2%), and high visibility clothing (27.9% v 3.5%), than the non-helmet group (p≤0.01). Whereas only 22% of the helmet users had no other observed measures, 47.2% of non-users did so. Conclusion—Cycling helmet users were significantly more likely to use collision prevention measures in conditions of reduced visibility. Explanations may include higher levels of risk awareness and greater knowledge of safe cycling practices in the smaller, helmet using group. However, current measures by cyclists in a major cycling centre may be insufficient to prevent collisions and consequent serious injury or death. PMID:11144629

  20. Not Changing English: Syllabus Reform at Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    This article offers a personal view of the reform of the undergraduate English syllabus which is soon to come into effect at Oxford University. The particular example is analysed in relation to two more general developments: on one hand, changing conceptions of the place and purpose of language study in the discipline of English, and on the other,…

  1. Mystery surrounds death of Oxford astrophysicist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The circumstances around the death of a University of Oxford physicist at the home of a colleague last month still remain unclear. Astrophysicist Steve Rawlings, 50, a fellow of St Peter's College, was found dead on the evening of Wednesday 11 January.

  2. Designing for Science: Oxford School Development Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education and Science, London (England).

    Design features are described for a science building for a large boys' school in Oxford, England. General considerations of the project are discussed; and specific information is provided for each subject department (general science, biology, chemistry, and physics) and for preparation and storage facilities, a central workshop, and a library.…

  3. The "New Oxford English Dictionary" Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fawcett, Heather

    1993-01-01

    Describes the conversion of the 22,000-page Oxford English Dictionary to an electronic version incorporating a modified Standard Generalized Markup Language (SGML) syntax. Explains that the database designers chose structured markup because it supports users' data searching needs, allows textual components to be extracted or modified, and allows…

  4. Rheumatic Heart Disease-Attributable Mortality at Ages 5–69 Years in Fiji: A Five-Year, National, Population-Based Record-Linkage Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Tom; Kado, Joseph; Miller, Anne E.; Ward, Brenton; Heenan, Rachel; Colquhoun, Samantha M.; Bärnighausen, Till W.; Mirabel, Mariana; Bloom, David E.; Bailey, Robin L.; Tukana, Isimeli N.; Steer, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is considered a major public health problem in developing countries, although scarce data are available to substantiate this. Here we quantify mortality from RHD in Fiji during 2008–2012 in people aged 5–69 years. Methods and Findings Using 1,773,999 records derived from multiple sources of routine clinical and administrative data, we used probabilistic record-linkage to define a cohort of 2,619 persons diagnosed with RHD, observed for all-cause mortality over 11,538 person-years. Using relative survival methods, we estimated there were 378 RHD-attributable deaths, almost half of which occurred before age 40 years. Using census data as the denominator, we calculated there were 9.9 deaths (95% CI 9.8–10.0) and 331 years of life-lost (YLL, 95% CI 330.4–331.5) due to RHD per 100,000 person-years, standardised to the portion of the WHO World Standard Population aged 0–69 years. Valuing life using Fiji’s per-capita gross domestic product, we estimated these deaths cost United States Dollar $6,077,431 annually. Compared to vital registration data for 2011–2012, we calculated there were 1.6-times more RHD-attributable deaths than the number reported, and found our estimate of RHD mortality exceeded all but the five leading reported causes of premature death, based on collapsed underlying cause-of-death diagnoses. Conclusions Rheumatic heart disease is a leading cause of premature death as well as an important economic burden in this setting. Age-standardised death rates are more than twice those reported in current global estimates. Linkage of routine data provides an efficient tool to better define the epidemiology of neglected diseases. PMID:26371755

  5. Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty: medial pain and functional outcome in the medium term

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In our experience results of the Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement have not been as good as had been expected. A common post operative complaint is of persistent medial knee discomfort, it is not clear why this phenomenon occurs and we have attempted to address this in our study. Methods 48 patients were retrospectively identified at a mean of 4.5 years (range = 3 to 6 years) following consecutive Oxford medial Unicompartmental Knee arthroplasties for varus anteromedial osteoarthritis. The mean age at implantation was 67 years (range 57-86). Of these 48 patients, 4 had died, 4 had undergone revision of their unicompartmental knee replacements and 2 had been lost to follow up leaving 38 patients with 40 replaced knees available for analysis using the 'new Oxford Knee Score' questionnaire. During assessment patients were asked specifically whether or not they still experienced medial knee discomfort or pain. Results The mean 'Oxford score' was only 32.7 (range = 16 to 48) and 22 of the 40 knees were uncomfortable or painful medially. The accuracy of component positioning was recorded, using standard post operative xrays, by summing the angulation or displacement of each component in two planes from the ideal position (according to the 'Oxford knee system radiographic criteria'). No correlation was demonstrated between the radiographic scores and the 'Oxford scores', or with the presence or absence of medial knee discomfort or pain. Conclusion In our hands the functional outcome following Oxford Unicompartmental knee replacement was variable, with a high incidence of medial knee discomfort which did not correlate with the postoperative radiographic scores, pre-op arthritis and positioning of the prosthesis. PMID:21981987

  6. [Underreporting of tuberculosis in the Information System on Notifiable Diseases (SINAN): primary default and case detection from additional data sources using probabilistic record linkage].

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Rejane Sobrino; Andrade, Vanusa de Lemos; Oliveira, Gisele Pinto de

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to analyze underreporting of tuberculosis (TB) cases in the Information System on Notifiable Diseases (SINAN), based on the following data sources: Mortality Information System (SIM), Registry and Follow-up Book for TB Case Treatment (LPATB), and Laboratory Registry Book (LRLAB). Probabilistic record linkage was used between the SIM (2007-2008) and SINAN (2002-2008). A search was conducted in LPATB and LRLAB (2007-2008) for cases not recorded in SINAN. There were 125 deaths, of which 44.8% were not recorded in SINAN. In LPATB, 58 cases (5.1%) were in treatment and were not reported in SINAN. LRLAB showed 32 smear-positive cases not reported to SINAN and without treatment, representing primary default. Addition of the retrieved cases, led to a 14.6% increase in the incidence rate in 2007 and 11.6% in 2008. Underreporting of deaths from or with TB in the Mortality Information System and primary default revealed difficulties in access to adequate and timely treatment, calling for rethinking of strategies to detect cases for timely treatment.

  7. Cancer-related hospitalisations and ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer: a population-based record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue Qin; Smith, David Paul; Goldsbury, David Eamon; Cooke-Yarborough, Claire; Patel, Manish Indravadan; O'Connell, Dianne Lesley

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To identify reasons for prostate cancer stage being recorded as ‘unknown’ in Australia's largest population-based cancer registry. Design Prospective population-based cohort. Setting New South Wales (NSW) is the most populous state in Australia, with almost one third of the total national population. Participants NSW Cancer Registry (NSWCR) records for prostate cancer cases diagnosed in 2001–2009 were linked to the NSW Admitted Patient Data Collection (APDC) for 2000–2010. All patients in this study had a minimum of 12 months follow-up in the hospital episode records after their date of diagnosis as recorded by the NSWCR. Main outcome measures Incidence of ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer and cancer-specific survival. Results Of 50 597 prostate cancer cases, 39.9% were recorded as having ‘unknown’ stage. Up to 4 months after diagnosis, 77.2% of cases without a hospital-reported cancer diagnosis were recorded as having ‘unknown’ stage. Among those patients with a hospital-reported cancer diagnosis, stage was ‘unknown’ for 7.6% of cases who received a radical prostatectomy (RP) and for 34.0% of cases who had procedures other than RP. In the latter group, the factors that were related to having ‘unknown’ stage were living in disadvantaged areas (adjusted OR (aOR) range: 1.13 to 1.20), attending a private hospital (aOR range: 1.25 to 2.13), having day-only admission for care (aOR=1.23, 95% CI 1.11 to 1.36), or having procedures other than multiple procedures with imaging (eg, biopsy only, aOR range: 1.11 to 1.45). Conclusions Over half of ‘unknown’ stage prostate cancer cases did not have a hospital-reported prostate cancer diagnosis within the 4 months after initial diagnosis. We identified differences in the likelihood of cases being recorded as ‘unknown’ stage based on socioeconomic status and facility type, which suggests that further investigation of reporting practices in relation to diagnostic and treatment

  8. Cervical Abnormalities Are More Common among Indigenous than Other Australian Women: A Retrospective Record-Linkage Study, 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Whop, Lisa J; Baade, Peter; Garvey, Gail; Cunningham, Joan; Brotherton, Julia M L; Lokuge, Kamalini; Valery, Patricia C; O'Connell, Dianne L; Canfell, Karen; Diaz, Abbey; Roder, David; Gertig, Dorota M; Moore, Suzanne P; Condon, John R

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous Australian women have much higher incidence of cervical cancer compared to non-Indigenous women. Despite an organised cervical screening program introduced 25 years ago, a paucity of Indigenous-identified data in Pap Smear Registers remains. Prevalence of cervical abnormalities detected among the screened Indigenous population has not previously been reported. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of population-based linked health records for 1,334,795 female Queensland residents aged 20-69 years who had one or more Pap smears during 2000-2011; from linked hospital records 23,483 were identified as Indigenous. Prevalence was calculated separately for Indigenous and non-Indigenous women, for cytology-detected low-grade (cLGA) and high-grade abnormalities (cHGA), and histologically confirmed high-grade abnormalities (hHGA). Odds ratios (OR) were estimated from logistic regression analysis. In 2010-2011 the prevalence of hHGA among Indigenous women (16.6 per 1000 women screened, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14.6-18.9) was twice that of non-Indigenous women (7.5 per 1000 women screened, CI 7.3-7.7). Adjusted for age, area-level disadvantage and place of residence, Indigenous women had higher prevalence of cLGA (OR 1.4, CI 1.3-1.4), cHGA (OR 2.2, CI 2.1-2.3) and hHGA (OR 2.0, CI 1.9-2.1). Our findings show that Indigenous women recorded on the Pap Smear Register have much higher prevalence for cLGA, cHGA and hHGA compared to non-Indigenous women. The renewed cervical screening program, to be implemented in 2017, offers opportunities to reduce the burden of abnormalities and invasive cancer among Indigenous women and address long-standing data deficiencies.

  9. The accuracy of ascertaining vital status in a historical cohort study of synthetic textiles workers using computerized record linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, M S; Carpenter, M; Thériault, G; Fair, M

    1993-01-01

    Vital status of a cohort of 10,211 Quebec, synthetic textiles workers was ascertained through a probabilistic record linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base (CMDB); 5,033 of these workers were also traced using other sources. There was agreement in the vital status of all but 60 of the subjects traced jointly through the CMDB and the alternate sources. 41 subjects were declared 'deceased' from the CMDB but 'alive' from the alternate sources; it is likely that these subjects were indeed deceased. 19 subjects, declared 'deceased' with a fair degree of certainty from the alternate sources, were not identified from the computer search of the CMDB; 17 were found manually on the microfiche death records and two died outside of Canada. The probability of identifying deceased and living subjects from the CMDB was therefore estimated to be 98.2% (95% confidence interval: 97.5-98.7%) and about 100%, respectively. Estimates of cost are also presented, and it is concluded that use of the CMDB is the method of choice for tracing moderate to large cohorts.

  10. Sex-Differences in the Metabolic Health of Offspring of Parents with Diabetes: A Record-Linkage Study.

    PubMed

    Aldhous, Marian C; Reynolds, Rebecca M; Campbell, Archie; Linksted, Pamela; Lindsay, Robert S; Smith, Blair H; Seckl, Jonathan R; Porteous, David J; Norman, Jane E

    2015-01-01

    Maternal diabetes in pregnancy affects offspring health. The impact of parental diabetes on offspring health is unclear. We investigated the impact of parental diabetes on the metabolic-health of adult-offspring who did not themselves have diabetes. Data from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study, a population-based family cohort, were record-linked to subjects' own diabetes medical records. From F0-parents, we identified F1-offspring of: mothers with diabetes (OMD, n = 409), fathers with diabetes (OFD, n = 468), no parent with diabetes (ONoPD, n = 2489). Metabolic syndrome, body, biochemical measurements and blood-pressures were compared between F1-offspring groups by sex. A higher proportion of female OMD had metabolic syndrome than female OFD or ONoPD (P<0.0001). In female offspring, predictors of metabolic syndrome were: having a mother with diabetes (OR = 1.78, CI 1.03-3.07, [reference ONoPD]), body mass index (BMI, OR = 1.21, CI 1.13-1.30) and age (OR = 1.03, CI 1.01-1.06). In male offspring, predictors of metabolic syndrome were: BMI (OR = 1.18, CI 1.09-1.29) and percent body-fat (OR = 1.12, CI 1.05-1.19). In both sexes, OMD had higher blood-pressures than OFD (P<0.0001). In females, OMD had higher glucose (P<0.0001) and percent body-fat (P<0.0001) compared with OFD or ONoPD. OMD and OFD both had increased waist-measurements (P<0.0001), BMI (P<0.0001) and percent body-fat (P<0.0001) compared with ONoPD. Female OMD and OFD had lower HDL-cholesterol levels (P<0.0001) than female ONoPD. Parental diabetes is associated with higher offspring-BMI and body-fat. In female offspring, maternal diabetes increased the odds of metabolic syndrome, even after adjusting for BMI. Further investigations are required to determine the mechanisms involved.

  11. Wait times to rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases: a data linkage study of primary care electronic medical records and administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Widdifield, Jessica; Bernatsky, Sasha; Thorne, J. Carter; Bombardier, Claire; Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Wing, Laura; Paterson, J. Michael; Ivers, Noah; Butt, Debra; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Catherine; Ahluwalia, Vandana; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Wait Time Alliance recently established wait time benchmarks for rheumatology consultations in Canada. Our aim was to quantify wait times to primary and rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases. Methods: We identified patients from primary care practices in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database who had referrals to Ontario rheumatologists over the period 2000-2013. To assess the full care pathway, we identified dates of symptom onset, presentation in primary care and referral from electronic medical records. Dates of rheumatologist consultations were obtained by linking with physician service claims. We determined the duration of each phase of the care pathway (symptom onset to primary care encounter, primary care encounter to referral, and referral to rheumatologist consultation) and compared them with established benchmarks. Results: Among 2430 referrals from 168 family physicians, 2015 patients (82.9%) were seen by 146 rheumatologists within 1 year of referral. Of the 2430 referrals, 2417 (99.5%) occurred between 2005 and 2013. The main reasons for referral were osteoarthritis (32.4%) and systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (30.6%). Wait times varied by diagnosis and geographic region. Overall, the median wait time from referral to rheumatologist consultation was 74 (interquartile range 27-101) days; it was 66 (interquartile range 18-84) days for systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Wait time benchmarks were not achieved, even for the most urgent types of referral. For systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, most of the delays occurred before referral. Interpretation: Rheumatology wait times exceeded established benchmarks. Targeted efforts are needed to promote more timely access to both primary and rheumatology care. Routine linkage of electronic medical records with administrative data may help fill important gaps in knowledge about waits to primary and specialty care. PMID:27398365

  12. Pregnancy Outcome following Prenatal Diagnosis of Chromosomal Anomaly: A Record Linkage Study of 26,261 Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Sally-Ann; McGowan, Ruth; Nelson, Scott M.; Pell, Jill P.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the influence of changes in the age at which women give birth, and of developments in prenatal screening and diagnosis on the number of pregnancies diagnosed and terminated with chromosomal anomalies. However, we are unaware of any population studies examining pregnancy terminations after diagnosis of chromosomal anomalies that has included all aneuploidies and the influence of maternal factors. The aims of this study were to examine the association between results of prenatal tests and pregnancy termination, and the proportion of foetuses with and without chromosomal anomalies referred for invasive diagnostic tests over time. Diagnostic information of 26,261 prenatal invasive tests from all genetic service laboratories in Scotland from 2000 to 2011 was linked to Scottish Morbidity Records to obtain details on pregnancy outcome. Binary logistic regression was carried out to test the associations of year and type of diagnosis with pregnancy termination, while controlling for maternal age, neighbourhood deprivation and parity. There were 24,155 (92.0%) with no chromosomal anomalies, 1,483 (5.6%) aneuploidy diagnoses, and 623 (2.4%) diagnoses of anomaly that was not aneuploidy (including translocations and single chromosome deletions). In comparison with negative test results, pregnancies diagnosed with trisomy were most likely to be terminated (adjusted OR 437.40, 95% CI 348.19–549.46) followed by other aneuploid anomalies (adjusted OR 95.94, 95% CI 69.21–133.01). During the study period, fewer pregnancies that were diagnosed with aneuploidy were terminated, including trisomy diagnoses (adjusted OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.26–0.73). Older women were less likely to terminate (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.28, 0.42), and parity was also an independent predictor of termination. In keeping with previous findings, while the number of invasive diagnostic tests declined, the proportion of abnormal results increased from 6.09% to 10.88%. Systematic

  13. Reporting errors in siblings' survival histories and their impact on adult mortality estimates: results from a record linkage study in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Kanté, Almamy M; Duthé, Géraldine; Andro, Armelle

    2014-04-01

    Estimates of adult mortality in countries with limited vital registration (e.g., sub-Saharan Africa) are often derived from information about the survival of a respondent's siblings. We evaluated the completeness and accuracy of such data through a record linkage study conducted in Bandafassi, located in southeastern Senegal. We linked at the individual level retrospective siblings' survival histories (SSH) reported by female respondents (n = 268) to prospective mortality data and genealogies collected through a health and demographic surveillance system (HDSS). Respondents often reported inaccurate lists of siblings. Additions to these lists were uncommon, but omissions were frequent: respondents omitted 3.8 % of their live sisters, 9.1 % of their deceased sisters, and 16.6 % of their sisters who had migrated out of the DSS area. Respondents underestimated the age at death of the siblings they reported during the interview, particularly among siblings who had died at older ages (≥45 years). Restricting SSH data to person-years and events having occurred during a recent reference period reduced list errors but not age and date errors. Overall, SSH data led to a 20 % underestimate of 45 q 15 relative to HDSS data. Our study suggests new quality improvement strategies for SSH data and demonstrates the potential use of HDSS data for the validation of "unconventional" demographic techniques.

  14. Identifying risk factors for progression to critical care admission and death among individuals with acute pancreatitis: a record linkage analysis of Scottish healthcare databases

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Gungabissoon, Usha; Johnston, Philip; Cochrane, Lynda; Hopkins, Leanne; Wyper, Grant M A; Skouras, Christos; Dibben, Chris; Sullivan, Frank; Morris, Andrew; Ward, Hester J T; Lawton, Andrew M; Donnan, Peter T

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Acute pancreatitis (AP) can initiate systemic complications that require support in critical care (CC). Our objective was to use the unified national health record to define the epidemiology of AP in Scotland, with a specific focus on deterministic and prognostic factors for CC admission in AP. Setting Health boards in Scotland (n=4). Participants We included all individuals in a retrospective observational cohort with at least one episode of AP (ICD10 code K85) occurring in Scotland from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2012. 3340 individuals were coded as AP. Methods Data from 16 sources, spanning general practice, community prescribing, Accident and Emergency attendances, hospital in-patient, CC and mortality registries, were linked by a unique patient identifier in a national safe haven. Logistic regression and gamma models were used to define independent predictive factors for severe AP (sAP) requiring CC admission or leading to death. Results 2053 individuals (61.5% (95% CI 59.8% to 63.2%)) met the definition for true AP (tAP). 368 patients (17.9% of tAP (95% CI 16.2% to 19.6%)) were admitted to CC. Predictors of sAP were pre-existing angina or hypertension, hypocalcaemia and age 30–39 years, if type 2 diabetes mellitus was present. The risk of sAP was lower in patients with multiple previous episodes of AP. In-hospital mortality in tAP was 5.0% (95% CI 4.1% to 5.9%) overall and 21.7% (95% CI 19.9% to 23.5%) in those with tAP necessitating CC admission. Conclusions National record-linkage analysis of routinely collected data constitutes a powerful resource to model CC admission and prognosticate death during AP. Mortality in patients with AP who require CC admission remains high. PMID:27311912

  15. The Oxford Handbook of the Development of Play. First Edition. Oxford Library of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    The role of play in human development has long been the subject of controversy. Despite being championed by many of the foremost scholars of the twentieth century, play has been dogged by underrepresentation and marginalization in literature across the scientific disciplines. "The Oxford Handbook of the Development of Play" marks the first attempt…

  16. Same organization, same electronic health records (EHRs) system, different use: exploring the linkage between practice member communication patterns and EHR use patterns in an ambulatory care setting

    PubMed Central

    Leykum, Luci K; McDaniel, Reuben R

    2011-01-01

    Objective Despite efforts made by ambulatory care organizations to standardize the use of electronic health records (EHRs), practices often incorporate these systems into their work differently from each other. One potential factor contributing to these differences is within-practice communication patterns. The authors explore the linkage between within-practice communication patterns and practice-level EHR use patterns. Design Qualitative study of six practices operating within the same multi-specialty ambulatory care organization using the same EHR system. Semistructured interviews and direct observation were conducted with all physicians, nurses, medical assistants, practice managers, and non-clinical staff from each practice. Measurements An existing model of practice relationships was used to analyze communication patterns within the practices. Practice-level EHR use was defined and analyzed as the ways in which a practice uses an EHR as a collective or a group—including the degree of feature use, level of EHR-enabled communication, and frequency that EHR use changes in a practice. Interview and observation data were analyzed for themes. Based on these themes, within-practice communication patterns were categorized as fragmented or cohesive, and practice-level EHR use patterns were categorized as heterogeneous or homogeneous. Practices where EHR use was uniformly high across all users were further categorized as having standardized EHR use. Communication patterns and EHR use patterns were compared across the six practices. Results Within-practice communication patterns were associated with practice-level EHR use patterns. In practices where communication patterns were fragmented, EHR use was heterogeneous. In practices where communication patterns were cohesive, EHR use was homogeneous. Additional analysis revealed that practices that had achieved standardized EHR use (uniformly high EHR use across all users) exhibited high levels of mindfulness and

  17. Mobile-bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty: the Oxford experience.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jason M; Berend, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    With the recent increase in medial unicompartmental arthroplasty, this article reviews the design history, indications, results, and modern technique for the implantation of the Oxford mobile-bearing unicompartmental arthroplasty. The article also discusses how the indications for the Oxford differ from the historical indications for medial unicompartmental arthroplasty and supports this paradigm shift with review of the recent data. A detailed series of surgical pearls is also presented to help surgeons with the surgical nuances of the Oxford partial knee.

  18. Mobile-bearing unicondylar knee arthroplasty: the Oxford experience.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Jason M; Berend, Keith R

    2015-01-01

    With the recent increase in medial unicompartmental arthroplasty, this article reviews the design history, indications, results, and modern technique for the implantation of the Oxford mobile-bearing unicompartmental arthroplasty. The article also discusses how the indications for the Oxford differ from the historical indications for medial unicompartmental arthroplasty and supports this paradigm shift with review of the recent data. A detailed series of surgical pearls is also presented to help surgeons with the surgical nuances of the Oxford partial knee.

  19. The Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event: Linkage of High-Resolution Terrestrial and Marine Records of a Major Climate Perturbation During Peak Greenhouse Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageman, B. B.; Arthur, M. A.; Kenig, F.; Laurin, J.; McElwain, J. C.; Meyers, S. R.

    2004-12-01

    Interdisciplinary studies of paleoclimate provide a critical source of information about the nature and magnitude of changes in the natural climate system, of thresholds and feedbacks in the biogeochemical cycles that modulate climate, and of the biological consequences of extreme climate transitions and states. Unfortunately, many studies of ancient climate are constrained by low temporal resolution, diminished reliability of proxy data, and a lack of information about linkages between different components of the climate system. This talk will summarize recent improvements in the temporal resolution of biogeochemical and paleobiological data across the marine record of the Cenomanian-Turonian Boundary Event (CTBE), and extension of that record into the terrestrial realm of the Western Interior of North America. The CTBE is hypothesized to represent a brief interval of global marine organic carbon burial that occurred during the peak Cretaceous greenhouse. It is thought to have caused an oscillation in pCO2 comparable to, or greater in magnitude than glacial-interglacial cycles. This is believed to have caused transient cooling followed by return to maximum Cretaceous warmth with major impacts on the ecology and evolution of terrestrial ecosystems. Efforts to quantify the pCO2 effect, to assess available paleoclimate indicators, and to evaluate changes in terrestrial ecosystems across this event have been limited by the constraints mentioned above. However, a number of recent advances are facilitating a new generation of paleoclimatic analysis of the CTBE : 1) development of an orbital time scale for the C-T stratotype in central Colorado with average temporal resolution of 8 kyrs; 2) use of this time scale to calculate burial fluxes for key paleoenvironmental proxies; 3) export of the time scale to a coeval terrestrial section containing fossil whole plant and cuticle material based on high-resolution lithostratigraphic, biostratigraphic and chemostratigraphic

  20. Stennis hosts NASA Night in Oxford

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A young visitor to the Powerhouse Community Arts and Cultural Center in Oxford, Miss., enjoys a balloon rocket transportation activity during a NASA Night in the Neighborhood on March 29. NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis visited the center with a variety of space-related displays and educational activities. Events targeted for children included moon phasers and build-your-own rocket transportation exercises, as well as an astronaut ice cream tasting station. Visitors also were able to take photos in the astronaut suit display. Displays focused on the 40th anniversaries of the Apollo 11 and Apollo 13 lunar missions, the International Space Station, and various aspects of Stennis work. The event was sponsored by the NASA Office of External Affairs and Education at Stennis.

  1. The Oxford free electron laser project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, W. W. M.; Brau, C. A.; Brooks, C. B.; Doucas, G.; Elgin, J. N.; Gillispie, W. A.; Holmes, A. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Kimmitt, M. F.; Martin, P. F.; Mulvey, J. H.; Pidgeon, C. R.; Poole, M. W.

    1990-10-01

    It is proposed to use the Oxford 10 MV Van de Graaff accelerator as an electron beam source for a free electron laser (FEL) operating in the far infra red (FIR). The configuration and layout of the Van de Graaff make it very suitable for conversion, with a potentially high efficiency for electron beam recovery. Using a 2 m long wiggler of 34 mm period, the FEL would operate in the 60-300 μm wavelength band, with extension down to 30 μm on the 3rd harmonic. When constructed, the FEL will support a programme of FEL research and development, concentrating at first on investigations of behaviour in the moderately high-gain regime (˜ 100% per pass) and mechanisms for lasing on higher harmonics. It will also be the basis for a national UK user facility in the FIR.

  2. Oxford CyberSEM: remote microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.; Kirkland, A.; Cockayne, D.; Meyer, R.

    2008-08-01

    The Internet has enabled researchers to communicate over vast geographical distances, sharing ideas and documents. e-Science, underpinned by Grid [1] and Web Services, has enabled electronic communications to the next level where, in addition to document sharing, researchers can increasingly control high precision scientific instruments over the network. The Oxford CyberSEM project developed a simple Java applet via which samples placed in a JEOL 5510LV Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) can be manipulated and examined collaboratively over the Internet. Designed with schoolchildren in mind, CyberSEM does not require any additional hardware or software other than a generic Java-enabled web browser. This paper reflects on both the technical and social challenges in designing real-time systems for controlling scientific equipments in collaborative environments. Furthermore, it proposes potential deployment beyond the classroom setting.

  3. The Oxford Companion to the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Paul L.

    2001-06-01

    Here is a wealth of information on planet Earth, ranging from the heights of the ionsphere down to the red-hot molten core. Written by some 200 expert contributors, and illustrated with over 600 pictures, including 16 pages of color plates, The Oxford Companion to the Earth offers 900 alphabetically arranged entries that cover everything from deserts and wetlands to mountains, caves, glaciers, and coral reefs. There are articles on natural phenomena such as tornadoes and tsunamis, volcanoes and earthquakes, jet streams and weather fronts; on the history of Earth, including the origin of life, Burgess Shale fauna, dinosaurs, and the Ice Ages; on key figures, such as Agassiz, Cuvier, Darwin, and Lamarck; and on such important ecological concerns as acid rain, the ozone layer, industrial waste disposal, and the greenhouse effect. The Companion also examines the great sources of wealth to be found in the Earth, from coal and oil to gold, silver, and diamonds, and many curious land formations, from sinkholes and fiords to yardangs and quicksand. There are brief entries on rock types, from amber to travertine, and extensive essays on cutting-edge aspects of the earth sciences, such as seismology and marine geology. The Companion includes extensive cross-references, suggested further reading, an index, and many useful appendices, with a geological timescale, facts and figures about the Earth, and a table of chemical elements. The Oxford Companion to the Earth is a unique reference work, offering unrivaled coverage of our home planet. Generously illustrated and vividly written, it is a treasure house of information for all lovers of natural history, geology, and ecology, whether professional or amateur.

  4. Oxford and the Mandarin Culture: The Past that Is Gone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdanor, Vernon

    2006-01-01

    Why was Oxford the home of the mandarin and why has the era of the mandarin come to an end? The era of the mandarin was inaugurated by T. H. Green, who sought, through the gospel of citizenship, to provide a philosophy for an age of religious doubt. Green's moralism served in Oxford as a substitute for the social sciences, which came to be…

  5. The Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatte, Niranjan; Tecza, Matthias; Clarke, Fraser; Goodsall, Timothy; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Davies, Roger L.

    2006-06-01

    We present the design of the Oxford SWIFT integral field spectrograph, a dedicated I and z band instrument (0.65μm micron - 1.0μm micron at R~4000), designed to be used in conjunction with the Palomar laser guide star adaptive optics system (PALAO, and its planned upgrade PALM-3000). It builds on two recent developments (i) the improved ability of second generation adaptive optics systems to correct for atmospheric turbulence at wavelengths less than or equal to 1μm micron, and (ii) the availability of CCD array detectors with high quantum efficiency at very red wavelengths (close to the silicon band edge). Combining these with a state-of-the-art integral field unit design using an all-glass image slicer, SWIFT's design provides very high throughput and low scattered light. SWIFT simultaneously provides spectra of ~4000 spatial elements, arranged in a rectangular field-of-view of 44 × 89 pixels. It has three on-the-fly selectable pixel scales of 0.24", 0.16" and 0.08'. First light is expected in spring 2008.

  6. The Oxford Conception Study design and recruitment experience.

    PubMed

    Pyper, Cecilia; Bromhall, Lise; Dummett, Sarah; Altman, Douglas G; Brownbill, Pat; Murphy, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The Oxford Conception Study is a randomised controlled trial that aims to determine whether or not information about potential fertility from a device that monitors urinary hormones will increase the conception rate in women wishing to conceive. Three modified versions of a fertility monitor have been developed for the study. The monitor measures the levels of urinary oestrone-3-glucuronide (E3G) and luteinising hormone (LH), and the display indicates high or low fertility. The monitor requests all women to test their urine from day 6 to day 25 of the menstrual cycle inclusive. One-third of women are randomised to receive information from the fertility monitor about the early fertile time (from the first rise in E3G until the LH surge is detected), one-third receive information about the late fertile time (the onset of the LH surge and the following 2 days), and a third do not receive any information (control group). All the women are followed up for 6 months or until they are pregnant. A total of 1453 women have been recruited into the study, reaching the study recruitment goal for 80% power to detect a 10% difference in three-cycle pregnancy rate between the Late Fertile Time group (50%) and the Control group (40%), allowing for a 15% non-pregnancy drop-out rate. Follow-up of the women is currently ongoing. The primary analysis will compare the cumulative three-cycle pregnancy rate between each of the study arms. Time-specific conception probabilities will be estimated from coitus information recorded in 12-h intervals. The data from this study will also allow many additional questions to be addressed, including changes in intercourse patterns with feedback about the fertile days and other questions in relation to menstrual cycle function, sexual intercourse, stress, exposures to tobacco products, alcohol, caffeine and medications, fertility and pregnancy outcomes. In addition to presenting the study design, we review the recruitment experience for the Oxford

  7. Oxford phase III meniscal bearing fracture: case report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Chul; Shon, Won-Yong; Kim, Seung-Ju; Bae, Ji-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal bearing fracture is a rare complication of phase III Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). We report a case of a meniscal bearing fracture that occurred 7 years after phase III Oxford medial UKR. The meniscal bearing showed uneven delamination of the polyethylene in the thinnest articular surface and an impingement lesion. This lesion initiated a fatigue crack that propagated to cause failure of the meniscal bearing. This is the first report of a meniscal bearing fracture without a posterior marker wire.

  8. BOOK REVIEW: The Oxford Companion to Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Cosmology has a special status as a science, as it strives to combine the quantitative statistical rigour of observational astronomy with a theoretical framework emerging from rather speculative ideas about fundamental physics. It also has wider repercussions too, as the quest for an understanding of the origin of the Universe sometimes strays into territory traditionally associated with religious modes of enquiry. The Oxford Companion to Cosmology aims to provide a 'comprehensive but accessible overview' of this 'enduringly popular subject' suitable for students, teachers and others with a serious interest in cosmology. It consists of an introductory overview about the big bang cosmological model, followed by an encyclopedia-like section containing over 300 entries of varying length and technical level. One of the authors (Liddle) is a theorist and the other (Loveday) an observer, so between them they have sufficient authority to cover all aspects of the vigorous interplay between these two facets of the discipline. This is not the sort of volume that can easily be read from cover to cover. The best way to test its effectiveness is to dip into it randomly. In my sampling of the entries I found most to be well-written and informative. The first entry I looked at ('correlation function') had an incorrect formula in it, but I didn't find any further significant errors, which says something about the limitations of statistical inference! The only criticisms I have are very minor. Some of the figures are so small as to be virtually invisible to an oldie like me. I also think the book would have benefitted from more references, and am not sure the web links given in their place will prove very useful as these tend to be rather ephemeral. Overall, though, I would say that the book succeeds admirably in its aims. About ten years ago, I was involved in compiling a similar volume, which ended up as The Routledge Companion to the New Cosmology. I will refrain from trying to

  9. Reconciling late Quaternary transgressions in the Bohai Sea, China to the global sea level changes, and new linkage of sedimentary records to three astronomical rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Liang

    2013-04-01

    Terminations. Science 326, 248-252. Ding, Z.L., Yu, Z.W., Rutter, N.W., Liu, T.S., 1994. Towards an orbital time scale for chinese loess deposits. Quaternary Science Reviews 13, 39-70. IOCAS (Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences), 1985. Bohai Sea Geology. Science Press, Beijing, China. Liu, T., 2009. Loess and Arid Environment. Anhui Science & Techonology Press, Hefei, China. Wang, Y., Cheng, H., Edwards, R.L., An, Z., Wu, J., Chen, C.-C., Dorale, J.A., 2001. A High-Resolution Absolute-Dated Late Pleistocene Monsoon Record from Hulu Cave, China. Science 294, 2345-2348. Wang, Y., Cheng, H., Edwards, R.L., Kong, X., Shao, X., Chen, S., Wu, J., Jiang, X., Wang, X., An, Z., 2008. Millennial- and orbital-scale changes in the East Asian monsoon over the past 224,000 years. Nature 451, 1090-1093. Yi, L., Yu, H., Ortiz, J.D., Xu, X., Chen, S., Ge, J., Hao, Q., Yao, J., Shi, X., Peng, S., 2012a. Late Quaternary linkage of sedimentary records to three astronomical rhythms and the Asian monsoon, inferred from a coastal borehole in the south Bohai Sea, China. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology 329-310, 101-117. Yi, L., Lai, Z.P., Yu, H.J., Xu, X.Y., Su, Q., Yao, J., Wang, X.L., Shi, X., 2012b. Chronologies of sedimentary changes in the south Bohai Sea, China: Constraints from luminescence and radiocarbon dating. Boreas, doi: 10.1111/j.1502-3885.2012.00271.x. Yi, L., Yu, H.J., Ortiz, J.D., Xu, X.Y., Qiang, X.K., Huang, H.J., Shi, X., Deng, C.L., 2012c. A reconstruction of late Pleistocene relative sea level in the south Bohai Sea, China, based on sediment grain-size analysis. Sedimentary Geology 281, 88-100. Zhao, S., Yang, G., Cang, S., Zhang, H., Huang, Q., Xia, D., Wang, Y., Liu, F., Liu, C., 1978. Transgression's stratas and shoreline changes in the south coast of Bohai Bay, China. Oceanologia et Limnologia Sinica 9, 15-25.

  10. The Relationship Between Neighborhood Criminal Behavior and Oxford Houses.

    PubMed

    Deaner, Jeffrey; Jason, Leonard A; Aase, Darrin M; Mueller, David G

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated crime rates in areas surrounding 42 Oxford Houses and 42 control houses in a large city in the Northwestern United States. A city-run Global Information Systems' (GIS) website was used to gather crime data including assault, arson, burglary, larceny, robbery, sexual assault, homicide, and vehicle theft over a calendar year. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences between the crime rates around Oxford Houses and the control houses. These results suggest that well-managed and governed recovery homes pose minimal risks to neighbors in terms of criminal behavior.

  11. The Oxford Ethnography Conference: A Place in History?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walford, Geoffrey

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a history of the Oxford Ethnography Conference. Over more than three decades, a regular conference of sociologists of education and ethnographers has met and produced a series of academic writings. The paper describes some of the interrelationships between developments that occurred within the conference and external changes to…

  12. Technology evaluation: TroVax, Oxford BioMedica.

    PubMed

    Reinis, Milan

    2004-08-01

    TroVax, a gene-based tumor vaccine that uses a poxvirus vector to deliver the tumor antigen gene 5T4, is under development by Oxford BioMedica for the potential treatment of cancer. TroVax is undergoing phase II clinical trials.

  13. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Scott Durow, Software Engineer, Oxford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, Conducted by Paul

    1998-05-01

    Scott Durow was educated at Bootham School, York. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Chemistry to A-level and went on to Nottingham University to read Medical Physics. After graduating from Nottingham he embarked on his present career as a Software Engineer based in Oxford. He is a musician in his spare time, as a member of a band and playing the French horn.

  14. Oxford House: Deaf-Affirmative Support for Substance Abuse Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Josefina; Adebanjo, Aderonke M.; Davidson, Michelle K.; Jason, Leonard A.; Davis, Margaret I.

    2006-01-01

    Deaf individuals seeking substance abuse recovery are less likely to have access to treatment and aftercare services because of a lack of culturally and linguistically specific programs and insufficient information about existing services. Previous research indicates that Oxford House, a network of resident-run recovery homes, serves a diverse…

  15. Person-environment interactions among residents of Oxford Houses.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Christopher R; Jason, Leonard A; Miller, Steven A; Stevens, Ed; Ferrari, Joseph R

    2013-01-01

    The continued struggle of addiction recovery support systems suggest that the paradigm of this field needs to continue its evolution, which has increasingly emphasized environments. Field Theory suggests that the products of individual and environmental characteristics be considered rather than a summation of the two. This study examined such interactions in Oxford Houses, a network of democratic, and self-governed addiction recovery homes. This study examined sobriety in experienced houses (average length of residency > six months) compared to less experienced houses (average length of residency ≤ six months) in relation to individual resident characteristics (age, length of residence in an Oxford House, and referral from the criminal justice system). Using multilevel modeling, findings indicated that older residents living in an experienced Oxford Houses were more likely to remain abstinent over time than those in inexperienced homes. Additionally, for inexperienced houses, residents who had been in the Oxford House for a longer period had a higher the probability of abstinence than those that had been in the house for a shorter period of time. Finally, legal referral was related to a lower probability of one-year abstinence but only for those in experienced homes. These types of person-environment interactions point to the need for more research to better understand how person variables interact with environmental variables in the processes of recovery and adaptation to settings, as well as for treatment professionals' consideration of both person and environment when making recovery home referrals.

  16. Record-linkage comparison of verbal autopsy and routine civil registration death certification in rural north-east South Africa: 2006–09

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Jané; Bradshaw, Debbie; Kabudula, Chodziwadziwa; Rao, Chalapati; Kahn, Kathleen; Mee, Paul; Tollman, Stephen; Lopez, Alan D; Vos, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Background: South African civil registration (CR) provides a key data source for local health decision making, and informs the levels and causes of mortality in data-lacking sub-Saharan African countries. We linked mortality data from CR and the Agincourt Health and Socio-demographic Surveillance System (Agincourt HDSS) to examine the quality of rural CR data. Methods: Deterministic and probabilistic techniques were used to link death data from 2006 to 2009. Causes of death were aggregated into the WHO Mortality Tabulation List 1 and a locally relevant short list of 15 causes. The matching rate was compared with informant-reported death registration. Using the VA diagnoses as reference, misclassification patterns, sensitivity, positive predictive values and cause-specific mortality fractions (CSMFs) were calculated for the short list. Results: A matching rate of 61% [95% confidence interval (CI): 59.2 to 62.3] was attained, lower than the informant-reported registration rate of 85% (CI: 83.4 to 85.8). For the 2264 matched cases, cause agreement was 15% (kappa 0.1083, CI: 0.0995 to 0.1171) for the WHO list, and 23% (kappa 0.1631, CI: 0.1511 to 0.1751) for the short list. CSMFs were significantly different for all but four (tuberculosis, cerebrovascular disease, other heart disease, and ill-defined natural) of the 15 causes evaluated. Conclusion: Despite data limitations, it is feasible to link official CR and HDSS verbal autopsy data. Data linkage proved a promising method to provide empirical evidence about the quality and utility of rural CR mortality data. Agreement of individual causes of death was low but, at the population level, careful interpretation of the CR data can assist health prioritization and planning. PMID:25146564

  17. Record linkage between hospital discharges and mortality registries for motor neuron disease case ascertainment for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Elena; Ramalle-Gómara, Enrique; Quiñones, Carmen

    2014-06-01

    Our objective was to analyse the coverage of hospital discharge data and the mortality registry (MR) of La Rioja to ascertain motor neuron disease (MND) cases to be included in the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry. MND cases that occurred in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011 were selected from hospital discharge data and the MR by means of the International Classification of Diseases. Review of the medical histories was carried out to confirm the causes of death reported. Characteristics of the population with MND were analysed. A total of 133 patients with MND were detected in La Rioja during the period 1996-2011; 30.1% were only recorded in the hospital discharges data, 12.0% only in the MR, and 57.9% were recorded by both databases. Medical records revealed a miscoding of patients who had been diagnosed with progressive supranuclear palsy but were recorded in the MR with an MND code. In conclusion, the hospital discharges data and the MR appear to be complementary and are valuable databases for the Spanish National Rare Diseases Registry when MNDs are properly codified. Nevertheless, it would be advisable to corroborate the validity of the MR as data source since the miscoding of progressive supranuclear palsy has been corrected.

  18. 76 FR 9967 - Removal and Amendment of Class E Airspace, Oxford, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Removal and Amendment of Class E Airspace, Oxford, CT... upward from 700 feet at Oxford, CT. Decommissioning of the Waterbury Non- Directional Beacon (NDB) at the Waterbury-Oxford airport has made this action necessary for the safety and management of Instrument...

  19. 75 FR 52484 - Proposed Removal and Amendment of Class E Airspace, Oxford, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Removal and Amendment of Class E Airspace, Oxford... amend Class E airspace extending upward from 700 feet at Oxford, CT. Decommissioning of the Waterbury Non-Directional Beacon (NDB) at the Waterbury-Oxford airport has made this action necessary for...

  20. Ten- to 15-year results of the Oxford Phase III mobile unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lisowski, L. A.; Meijer, L. I.; van den Bekerom, M. P. J.; Pilot, P.; Lisowski, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The interest in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) for medial osteoarthritis has increased rapidly but the long-term follow-up of the Oxford UKAs has yet to be analysed in non-designer centres. We have examined our ten- to 15-year clinical and radiological follow-up data for the Oxford Phase III UKAs. Patients and Methods Between January 1999 and January 2005 a total of 138 consecutive Oxford Phase III arthroplasties were performed by a single surgeon in 129 patients for medial compartment osteoarthritis (71 right and 67 left knees, mean age 72.0 years (47 to 91), mean body mass index 28.2 (20.7 to 52.2)). Both clinical data and radiographs were prospectively recorded and obtained at intervals. Of the 129 patients, 32 patients (32 knees) died, ten patients (12 knees) were not able to take part in the final clinical and radiological assessment due to physical and mental conditions, but via telephone interview it was confirmed that none of these ten patients (12 knees) had a revision of the knee arthroplasty. One patient (two knees) was lost to follow-up. Results The mean follow-up was 11.7 years (10 to 15). A total of 11 knees (8%) were revised. The survival at 15 years with revision for any reason as the endpoint was 90.6% (95% confidence interval (CI) 85.2 to 96.0) and revision related to the prosthesis was 99.3% (95% CI 97.9 to 100). The mean total Knee Society Score was 47 (0 to 80) pre-operatively and 81 (30 to 100) at latest follow-up. The mean Oxford Knee Score was 19 (12 to 40) pre-operatively and 42 (28 to 55) at final follow-up. Radiolucency beneath the tibial component occurred in 22 of 81 prostheses (27.2%) without evidence of loosening. Conclusion This study supports the use of UKA in medial compartment osteoarthritis with excellent long-term functional and radiological outcomes with an excellent 15-year survival rate. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B(10 Suppl B):41–7. PMID:27694515

  1. From Classicism and Idealism to Scientific Naturalism: Titchener's Oxford Years and Their Impact Upon His Early Intellectual Development.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Saulo de Freitas; Marcellos, Cintia Fernandes

    2017-02-23

    Edward Titchener (1867-1927) is one of the most prominent figures in the history of American psychology from the early 20th century. Accordingly, his psychological system-structuralism-has received due attention in the secondary literature. However, a closer look at traditional interpretations of the development of Titchener's ideas reveals a series of missing elements, such as his early studies before going to Leipzig. The central goal of this article is to present the main elements of Titchener's intellectual education in Oxford, thereby showing the influence of the British tradition of the 19th century upon his early intellectual development. On the basis of hitherto unexplored primary sources, we discuss Titchener's relationship with British idealism and scientific naturalism, 2 movements that shaped a significant part of British psychological thinking in the 19th century. We conclude that Titchener's Oxford years are much more relevant to understanding his intellectual development than the literature has so far assumed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Linked versus unlinked estimates of mortality and length of life by education and marital status: evidence from the first record linkage study in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Shkolnikov, Vladimir M; Jasilionis, Domantas; Andreev, Evgeny M; Jdanov, Dmitri A; Stankuniene, Vladislava; Ambrozaitiene, Dalia

    2007-04-01

    Earlier studies have found large and increasing with time differences in mortality by education and marital status in post-Soviet countries. Their results are based on independent tabulations of population and deaths counts (unlinked data). The present study provides the first census-linked estimates of group-specific mortality and the first comparison between census-linked and unlinked mortality estimates for a post-Soviet country. The study is based on a data set linking 140,000 deaths occurring in 2001-2004 in Lithuania with the population census of 2001. The same socio-demographic information about the deceased is available from both the census and death records. Cross-tabulations and Poisson regressions are used to compare linked and unlinked data. Linked and unlinked estimates of life expectancies and mortality rate ratios are calculated with standard life table techniques and Poisson regressions. For the two socio-demographic variables under study, the values from the death records partly differ from those from the census records. The deviations are especially significant for education, with 72-73%, 66-67%, and 82-84% matching for higher education, secondary education, and lower education, respectively. For marital status, deviations are less frequent. For education and marital status, unlinked estimates tend to overstate mortality in disadvantaged groups and they understate mortality in advantaged groups. The differences in inter-group life expectancy and the mortality rate ratios thus are significantly overestimated in the unlinked data. Socio-demographic differences in mortality previously observed in Lithuania and possibly other post-Soviet countries are overestimated. The growth in inequalities over the 1990s is real but might be overstated. The results of this study confirm the existence of large and widening health inequalities but call for better data.

  3. The five-year radiological results of the uncemented Oxford medial compartment knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hooper, N; Snell, D; Hooper, G; Maxwell, R; Frampton, C

    2015-10-01

    This study reports on the first 150 consecutive Oxford cementless unicompartmental knee arthroplasties (UKA) performed in an independent centre (126 patients). All eligible patients had functional scores (Oxford knee score and high activity arthroplasty score) recorded pre-operatively and at two- and five-years of follow-up. Fluoroscopically aligned radiographs were taken at five years and analysed for any evidence of radiolucent lines (RLLs), subsidence or loosening. The mean age of the cohort was 63.6 years (39 to 86) with 81 (53.1%) males. Excellent functional scores were maintained at five years and there were no progressive RLLs demonstrated on radiographs. Two patients underwent revision to a total knee arthroplasty giving a revision rate of 0.23/100 (95% confidence interval 0.03 to 0.84) component years with overall component survivorship of 98.7% at five years. There were a further four patients who underwent further surgery on the same knee, two underwent bearing exchanges for dislocation and two underwent lateral UKAs for disease progression. This was a marked improvement from other UKAs reported in New Zealand Joint Registry data and supports the designing centre's early results.

  4. Trends in acoustic neuroma management: a 20-year review of the oxford skull base clinic.

    PubMed

    Mackeith, Samuel A C; Kerr, Richard S; Milford, Chris A

    2013-08-01

    Objective To describe the change in the management of acoustic neuromas at one United Kingdom center over a 20-year period and to compare this with what is known regarding trends in practice on a national and international scale. Design, Setting, and Participants Data was collected prospectively on all patients attending the Oxford Skull Base Clinic between 1990 and 2009. Main Outcome Measures The proportion of patients managed initially by observation versus radiotherapy versus surgery was recorded for each year. Results Significantly more patients received radiation treatment (instead of surgery) between 2000 and 2009 when compared with 1990 to 1999. Compared with national audit data, the Oxford Skull Base Clinic treats a higher proportion of patients with radiotherapy and significantly lower proportion with surgery, though the trend nationally is toward more observation and radiotherapy and less surgery. Conclusion Surgery will remain crucial in the management of some patients with acoustic neuromas (usually those with the larger tumors where radiosurgery is recognized to be less appropriate), but using current trends to predict future practice would suggest that alternative nonmicrosurgical treatment may play an increasingly important role in the future.

  5. Linkage Maps in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, THN.; Turner, L.; Hellens, R. P.; Lee, D.; Harker, C. L.; Enard, C.; Domoney, C.; Davies, D. R.

    1992-01-01

    We have analyzed segregation patterns of markers among the late generation progeny of several crosses of pea. From the patterns of association of these markers we have deduced linkage orders. Salient features of these linkages are discussed, as is the relationship between the data presented here and previously published genetic and cytogenetic data. PMID:1551583

  6. Holocene climate change evidence from high-resolution loess/paleosol records and the linkage to fire-climate change-human activities in the Horqin dunefield in northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Qin, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Bing

    2016-05-01

    The combination of high-resolution sedimentary paleoclimate proxies of total organic carbon and magnetic susceptibility of a loess/paleosol section with black carbon (BC) records provides us with information about climate change and the linkage of fire-climate change-vegetation-human activities in the Horqin dunefield over the past 11,600 cal yr BP. We found that during 11,600-8000 cal yr BP (the early Holocene), the area was dominated by a dry climate. The vegetation coverage was low, which limited the extent of fire. The Holocene optimum can be placed between 8000 and 3200 cal yr BP, and during this period, anthropogenic fire was a key component of total fire occurrence as the intensity of human activity increased. The development of agricultural activities and the growing population during this period increased the use of fire for cooking food and burning for cultivation and land fertilization purposes. During 2800-2600 cal yr BP, a warm/moister climate prevailed and was associated with a high degree of pedogenesis and vegetation cover density, evident at 2700 cal yr BP. Fires may have contributed to human survival by enabling the cooking of food in the warm and wet climate. In the period since 2000 cal yr BP, fires linked to agriculture may have led to increased biomass burning associated with agricultural activity.

  7. A national population-based e-cohort of people with psychosis (PsyCymru) linking prospectively ascertained phenotypically rich and genetic data to routinely collected records: overview, recruitment and linkage.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Keith; McGregor, Joanna; John, Ann; Craddock, Nick; Walters, James T; Linden, David; Jones, Ian; Bentall, Richard; Lyons, Ronan A; Ford, David V; Owen, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    PsyCymru was initially established as a proof of concept to investigate the feasibility of linking a prospectively ascertained, well-characterised (linked clinical cohort) of people with psychosis in Wales, UK with large amounts of anonymised routinely collected health record data. We are now additionally linking genetic data. PsyCymru aims to create a research platform and infrastructure for psychosis research in Wales by the establishment of two cohorts. The first is a well characterised clinically-assessed cohort of 490 individuals aged 16 and over, including genetic data. Consented individuals underwent a structured interview using a series of well-validated questionnaires and gave blood for the purpose of DNA extraction for sequencing and candidate gene identification. This data was linked to routinely collected health and social datasets with identity encryption used to protect privacy. The second is a much larger (12,097 individuals) but less well characterised population-based e-cohort of prevalent psychosis cases created using a previously validated algorithm applied to anonymised routine data. Both cohorts can be tracked prospectively and retrospectively using anonymised routinely collected electronic health and administrative data in the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) databank. This unique platform pools data together from multiple sources; linking clinical, psychological, biological, genetic and health care factors to address a wide variety of research questions. This resource will continue to expand over the coming years in size, breadth and depth of data, with continued recruitment and additional measures planned.

  8. High resolution sedimentary record from the Cocos Ridge: evidence of land-ocean linkages in the Eastern Equatorial Pacific over the last 70 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdmaa, I.; Ivanova, E.; Leduc, G.; Beaufort, L.; Peresypkin, V.; Vidal, L.; Ovsepyan, E.; Alekhina, G.; Kravtsov, V.; Vasileva, V.

    2009-04-01

    We analyzed n-alkanes spectra, TOC content, and C/N ratio in the upper 12 m of the giant IMAGES Core MD02-2529 from the Cocos Ridge (08°12.33'N; 84°07.32'W; 1619 m w.d.) to estimate terrestrial organic matter (TOM) and marine organic matter (MOM) contribution to the total organic matter budget in sediments. Multi-proxy studies of nannofossils, benthic and planktic foraminifers reveal productivity variations during the time interval of the last ~ 70 ka recovered by the upper part of the core according to the age model based on AMS-14C dates and benthic oxygen isotope record. According to the shipboard core description, the slightly calcareous hemipelagic mud recovered by Core MD02-2529 contains a considerable admixture of terrestrial plant remains. This is confirmed by optical microscopic and SEM studies which reveal a strong pyritization of the particular terrestrial organic matter. As estimated by the proportion of the mainly terrestrial long-molecular alkanes (C23 - C38) relative to mainly planktic short-molecular ones (C10 - C22), the TOM input largely controls variations in the TOC content throughout the studied core interval, possibly except for the Upper Holocene, where higher TOC values correspond to relatively increased MOM content. TOM strongly dominates over the MOM content in sediments of the beginning of Termination 1, most enriched in total organic matter (up to 3.4% TOC). High content of the TOM is also fixed by n-alkane data over the Younger Dryas and H-events. Mass accumulation rates (MAR) of TOC, as well as terrestrial and marine organic matter, generally support the data on percentages, but show that the MOM flux was considerable even during the maximum TOM input at the beginning of Termination I. We suggest that this abundant TOM flux was related to the glacioeustatic sea level lowstand at the LGM, during which the emerged shelf became a vegetated coastal plain affected by seasonally humid tropical monsoon climate. The terrestrial organic

  9. The Oxford Guide to the History of Physics and Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilbron, John L.

    2005-06-01

    With over 150 alphabetically arranged entries about key scientists, concepts, discoveries, technological innovations, and learned institutions, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy traces the history of physics and astronomy from the Renaissance to the present. For students, teachers, historians, scientists, and readers of popular science books such as Galileo's Daughter , this guide deciphers the methods and philosophies of physics and astronomy as well as the historical periods from which they emerged. Meant to serve the lay reader and the professional alike, this book can be turned to for the answer to how scientists learned to measure the speed of light, or consulted for neat, careful summaries of topics as complicated as quantum field theory and as vast as the universe. The entries, each written by a noted scholar and edited by J. L. Heilbron, Professor of History and Vice Chancellor, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley, reflect the most up-to-date research and discuss the applications of the scientific disciplines to the wider world of religion, law, war, art and literature. No other source on these two branches of science is as informative or as inviting. Thoroughly cross-referenced and accented by dozens of black and white illustrations, the Oxford Guide to Physics and Astronomy is the source to turn to for anyone looking for a quick explanation of alchemy, x-rays and any type of matter or energy in between.

  10. Some aspects of management and outcome of acute coronary heart disease in Oxford region.

    PubMed Central

    Acheson, R M; Sanderson, C

    1977-01-01

    (1) Over 15 months, 532 consecutive admissions to the CCU at the Radcliffe Oxford were studied; of these 333 were cases of myocardial infarction, and 319 were first admissions for this condition. Information about survival and return to work was collected for 300. A further 30 had artificial pacemakers inserted; there were 141 (26%) of the 532 cases which did not require the special care offered by the CCU. (2) Of 300 patients for whom data were available, 27 were recorded as having received DC shock. In hospital, case fatality was significantly higher among those requiring DC shock than among the remainder. Overall the 3-year survival rates were 47 per cent among those receiving shock, and 62 per cent among the remainder, compared with an expected 91 per cent for a population of the same age and sex. (3) Among men aged under 65 years, 6 of 11 who received shock, compared with 117 (77%) who did not receive shock, returned to work after leaving hospital. (4) Rates of admission to the CCU of cases of myocardial infarction per 1000 standardised population among people living in the areas around Oxford City were estimated as being 58 per cent of admission rates of cases among residents of the city. (5) The case incidence of ventricular fibrillation and the case fatality rate were both higher among those living in the environs than among those living in the city, but these differences were not statistically significant. (6) It is also concluded that insufficient is known about the factors underlying the general practitioner's decision to commit a case of myocardial infarction to other than short ambulance journeys or about the effects of such journeys on prognosis. PMID:831741

  11. From Oxford to Hawaii Ecophysiological Barriers Limit Human Progression in Ten Sport Monuments

    PubMed Central

    Desgorces, François-Denis; Berthelot, Geoffroy; El Helou, Nour; Thibault, Valérie; Guillaume, Marion; Tafflet, Muriel; Hermine, Olivier; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the determinants and trends of human performance evolution, we analyzed ten outdoor events among the oldest and most popular in sports history. Best performances of the Oxford-Cambridge boat race (since 1836), the channel crossing in swimming (1875), the hour cycling record (1893), the Elfstedentocht speed skating race (1909), the cross country ski Vasaloppet (1922), the speed ski record (1930), the Streif down-hill in Kitzbühel (1947), the eastward and westward sailing transatlantic records (1960) and the triathlon Hawaii ironman (1978) all follow a similar evolutive pattern, best described through a piecewise exponential decaying model (r2 = 0.95±0.07). The oldest events present highest progression curvature during their early phase. Performance asymptotic limits predicted from the model may be achieved in fourty years (2049±32 y). Prolonged progression may be anticipated in disciplines which further rely on technology such as sailing and cycling. Human progression in outdoor sports tends to asymptotic limits depending on physiological and environmental parameters and may temporarily benefit from further technological progresses. PMID:18985149

  12. An Independent Derivation of the Oxford Jet Kinetic Luminosity Formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Punsly, Brian

    2005-04-01

    This Letter presents a theoretical derivation of an estimate for a radio source jet kinetic luminosity. The expression yields jet powers that are quantitatively similar to a more sophisticated empirical relation published by C. Willott, K. Blundell, and S. Rawlings at Oxford. The formula allows one to estimate the jet kinetic luminosity from the measurement of the optically thin radio lobe emission in quasars and radio galaxies. Motivated by recent X-ray observations, the derivation assumes that most of the energy in the lobes is in plasma thermal energy with a negligible contribution from magnetic energy (not equipartition). The close agreement of the two independent expressions makes the veracity of these estimates seem very plausible.

  13. Technology evaluation: MetXia-P450, Oxford Biomedica.

    PubMed

    Hunt, S

    2001-12-01

    Oxford BioMedica is developing gene therapies for treating various forms of cancer. The therapies comprise the transfer of several anticancer genes at a time using a recombinant retrovirus approach based on the company's proprietary LTR Deleted Vector and Accelerated Vector Evolution technologies [238147]. MetXia-P450 is a gene therapy construct containing the cytochrome P450 gene CYP2B6, and is designed to be injected directly into tumors to convert them into 'drug factories'. This is achieved because CYP2B6 converts the inactive produg form cyclophosphamide into the active cytotoxic drug. MetXia-P450 is in phase I/II trials for breast cancer [339582].

  14. The Oxford scanning proton microprobe: A medical diagnostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, F.; Grime, G. W.; Takacs, J.; Vaux, D. J. T.

    1984-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a disease characterised by progressive destruction of small intrahepatic bile ducts, cholestasis, and high levels of copper within the liver. The Oxford 1 μm scanning proton microprobe (SPM) has been used to construct elemental maps of a 7 μm section of diseased liver at several different magnifications. The results of these investigations have shown that the copper is distributed in small deposits ( < 5 μm) at specific locations in the liver. Further there appears to be a 1:1 atomic correlation between copper and sulphur, indicating the presence of an inorganic salt or a protein with approximately equal numbers of copper and sulphur atoms.

  15. Lessons of Cross-National Comparison in Education. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education, Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David, Ed.

    The papers which make up this volume were for the most part presented at a program of seminars given in Oxford, England, in the autumn of 1990. The seminars represented the first activity of the new Centre for Comparative Studies in Education installed at the Department of Educational Studies of the University of Oxford in January 1990. The…

  16. The prescribing physicians and sick scholars of Oxford: Jeremiah Webbe's apothecarial notebook, 1653-54.

    PubMed

    Churchill, W D; Alsop, J D

    2001-12-01

    The prescription book of Jeremaih Webbe, apothecary, illuminates the medical practices of a number of Oxford physicians, including those of Thomas Willis, Francis Barkesdale, and William Conyers. It provides an indication of the nature of the illness present in Oxford, especially among the students of the University, in the years 1653 and 1654.

  17. An Examination of the First Oxford House in the UK: A Preliminary Investigation.

    PubMed

    Majer, John M; Beers, Kim; Jason, Leonard A

    2014-01-01

    An exploratory investigation was conducted to examine the implementation of the first self-run, communal-living setting based on the Oxford House model, in the United Kingdom (UK). A cross-sectional, mixed methods design was used to examine the Oxford House model's total abstinence approach to recovery from substance use disorders among residents (n = 7) living in the first Oxford House established in the UK. Several measures commonly used in addiction research and personal narratives were used to assess residents' response to Oxford House living. Findings suggest that the Oxford House model is a post-treatment intervention that meets the needs of individuals seeking an abstinence-based recovery from alcohol and/or drug dependence in the UK.

  18. Linkage results in Schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, M.

    1996-04-09

    In setting a model for replication studies, the collective effort by the various investigators is praiseworthy. The linkage reported is intriguing, but given the aforementioned caveats it would be premature to dub it {open_quotes}significant -- and, probably, confirmed.{close_quotes} The extent to which a real genetic effect exists on chromosome 6p24-22 remains to be seen. Compelling confirmation, which further study might proffer, would be a welcome boost to a fledgling enterprise, where other findings of promise have faltered or failed to gain unequivocal support. The caution advised in this commentary may guide the design and interpretation of other linkage studies in psychiatric disorders.

  19. The Market Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, Victor E.

    The Market Linkage Project (ML) for Special Education and the Basic Skills Validation and Marketing Program are two federally sponsored marketing projects developed under contract by LINC Resources, Inc., a professional marketing organization, for the U.S. Department of Education. LINC developed the marketing programs to provide the option for the…

  20. 2nd BASHH Oxford Diagnostics Course, November 2015.

    PubMed

    Patel, R R; White, J A; Menon-Johansson, A S; Sadiq, S T; Ross, J D

    2016-01-18

    The second British Association for Sexual Health and HIV Oxford Diagnostics Course of 2015 focussed on recent challenges and emerging concepts within diagnostics and service design. In response to increasing sexually transmitted infection rates and subsequent demand on UK sexual health services, multiple approaches to improving patient flow and reducing waiting times were presented. The value of novel remote sexually transmitted infection testing was explored, with a description of the patient journey, emerging demographics and rates of testing uptake for the UK's leading National Health Service provider. A cost-benefit evaluation was made for the use of nucleic acid amplification tests versus traditional microscopy and culture for detecting Trichomonas vaginalis, with practical consideration of application to higher risk groups. Two speakers stressed the importance of vigilance against growing antimicrobial resistance. The significance of testing for genotypic markers for antimicrobial resistance, and the emergence of point-of-care tests for resistance were also presented. The meeting closed with a first-hand account of tendering, and practical advice on rebuilding professional relationships and services after a competitive process.

  1. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hengyun; Giordano, Francesca; Ning, Zemin

    2016-10-01

    The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS) technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS) technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio), is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that promises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT). MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the genomics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assembly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in genome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  2. The Oxford hip and knee outcome questionnaires for arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Pynsent, P B; Adams, D J; Disney, S P

    2005-02-01

    The Oxford hip and knee scores are used to measure the outcome after primary total hip and knee replacement. We propose a new layout for the instrument in which patients are always asked about both limbs. In addition, we have defined an alternative scoring method which accounts for missing data. Over a period of 4.5 years, 4086 (1423 patients) and 5708 (1458 patients) questionnaires were completed for hips and knees, respectively. The hip score had a pre-operative median of 70.8 (interquartile range (IQR) 58.3 to 81.2) decreasing to 20.8 (IQR 10.4 to 35.4) after one year. The knee score had a pre-operative median of 68.8 (IQR 56.2 to 79.2) decreasing to 29.2 (IQR 14.6 to 45.8). There was no further significant change in either score after one year. As a result of the data analysis, we suggest that the score percentiles can be used as a standard for auditing patients before and after operation.

  3. A gift from Oxford: the Osler-Thomas connection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In June 1926, Dr. Henry M. Thomas Jr. (“Hal”) received as a gift from Grace Osler in Oxford an Einhorn Duodenal Bucket Set that had belonged to Sir William Osler. The Thomases were a distinguished multigenerational physician family of Baltimore with high educational standards and major accomplishments in medicine and medical education. An extraordinary number of the Thomas women earned doctorates and made significant contributions in an era when this was a pioneering achievement. This is exemplified by Martha Carey Thomas, who earned a PhD in 1882 and served as dean and president of Bryn Mawr College for women. As a leading feminist and member of the Women's Fund Committee, she was a major force in providing the endowment that permitted the opening of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine under the strict stipulations that admission requirements include an undergraduate degree and that women be admitted on the basis of total equality with men. Osler established relationships that extended over three generations of the Thomas family during his Baltimore tenure, an influence that proved mutually beneficial. PMID:23077379

  4. The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study.

    PubMed

    Vessey, M P; Lawless, M

    1984-12-01

    The Oxford-Family Planning Association contraceptive study involves over 17 000 women who were recruited at 17 clinics in England and Scotland during the interval 1968-74 and have been followed up ever since. This paper describes the survey methods, the characteristics of the participants, the progress of the study, the main results and publications to date, and the proposals for future work. Although the study was originally mainly concerned with the benefits and risks of oral contraceptives it has, in fact, contributed to knowledge about a wide variety of birth control methods. The data on efficacy are of special value in that they cover all methods of contraception in common use and have been derived from a homogeneous and closely observed population. The mortality figures, while limited in extent, have supplemented the findings in the Royal College of General Practitioners study. Reports on morbidity from many different diseases have been published; these have documented both beneficial and harmful effects of various contraceptive methods. The study data on return of fertility after discontinuation of contraception are unique, while contributions have also been made to knowledge about outcome of pregnancy in those stopping contraception to have a planned baby or becoming accidentally pregnant while using a birth control method. The study, which is supported by the Medical Research Council, is currently funded until mid-1989.

  5. The Oxford electron-beam ion trap: A device for spectroscopy of highly charged ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, J. D.; Varney, A. J.; Margolis, H. S.; Baird, P. E. G.; Grant, I. P.; Groves, P. D.; Hallett, W. A.; Handford, A. T.; Hirst, P. J.; Holmes, A. R.; Howie, D. J. H.; Hunt, R. A.; Nobbs, K. A.; Roberts, M.; Studholme, W.; Wark, J. S.; Williams, M. T.; Levine, M. A.; Dietrich, D. D.; Graham, W. G.; Williams, I. D.; O'Neil, R.; Rose, S. J.

    1994-04-01

    An electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) has just been completed in the Clarendon Laboratory, Oxford. The design is similar to the devices installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is intended that the Oxford EBIT will be used for x-ray and UV spectroscopy of hydrogenic and helium-like ions, laser resonance spectroscopy of hydrogenic ions and measurements of dielectronic recombination cross sections, in order to test current understanding of simple highly charged ions.

  6. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Results Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach’s α: 0.81–0.96), as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument’s development. PMID:27366108

  7. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2014-01-01

    Background With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ). The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs. Methods Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to identify appropriate dimensions and redundant items. Reliability will be assessed by Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations. A second, large-scale postal survey will follow

  8. Revision of medial Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement to a total knee replacement: similar to a primary?

    PubMed

    Wynn Jones, Henry; Chan, Warwick; Harrison, Timothy; Smith, Toby O; Masonda, Patrick; Walton, Neil P

    2012-08-01

    Unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR) is an option for the treatment of isolated medial compartment osteoarthritis. A commonly perceived potential advantage is that revision of a UKR is straightforward. The purpose of this study was to determine the early outcomes and the level of complexity of revisions of Oxford UKRs performed at our hospital. A retrospective review of a prospective database of all phase III Oxford UKRs was undertaken. This identified 89 Oxford UKRs which were revised at our institution between 2002 and 2008. The median time from the primary procedure to revision was 19 months (interquartile range 2-73 months). Nine were revised to another UKR. Eighty were revised to a total knee replacement (TKR). Fifty-three were revised with primary TKR components. Twenty-seven were revised using stems and/or augments. The median overall tibial component thickness (including augments) was 15 mm. Forty-five knees had an overall tibial component thickness greater than 15 mm. A primary Oxford UKR bearing thickness of greater than 6mm was associated with an increased likelihood of requiring revision components. On the basis of this review, tibial bone defects were commonly encountered when revising UKRs. Reconstruction with either an augment and a stem, or thick polyethylene component was often required. We recommend that the potential complexity of revision for UKR failure should be borne in mind when considering a primary Oxford UKR.

  9. Apprenticeship - School Linkage Implementation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Sharon T.; And Others

    Developed to assist interested sponsors in implementing apprenticeship-school linkage projects, this guide is intended to organize the collective experiences of those who have implemented the demonstration projects to highlight the day-to-day mechanics involved. Section 1 overviews apprenticeship-school linkage. In section 2 factors are described…

  10. Assortative Mating and Linkage Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Hedrick, Philip W

    2017-01-05

    Assortative mating has been suggested to result in an increase in heritability and additive genetic variance through an increase in linkage disequilibrium. The impact of assortative mating on linkage disequilibrium was explicitly examined for the two-locus model of Wright (1921) and two selective assortative mating models. For the Wright (1921) model, when the proportion of assortative mating was high, positive linkage disequilibrium was generated. However, when the proportion of assortative mating was similar to that found in some studies, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was quite low. In addition, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was independent of the level of recombination. For two selective assortative models, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was a function of the amount of recombination. For these models, the linkage disequilibrium generated was negative mainly because repulsion heterozygotes were favored over coupling heterozygotes. From these findings, the impact of assortative mating on linkage disequilibrium, and consequently heritability and additive genetic variance, appears to be small and model-specific.

  11. Assortative Mating and Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Hedrick, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Assortative mating has been suggested to result in an increase in heritability and additive genetic variance through an increase in linkage disequilibrium. The impact of assortative mating on linkage disequilibrium was explicitly examined for the two-locus model of Wright (1921) and two selective assortative mating models. For the Wright (1921) model, when the proportion of assortative mating was high, positive linkage disequilibrium was generated. However, when the proportion of assortative mating was similar to that found in some studies, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was quite low. In addition, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was independent of the level of recombination. For two selective assortative models, the amount of linkage disequilibrium was a function of the amount of recombination. For these models, the linkage disequilibrium generated was negative mainly because repulsion heterozygotes were favored over coupling heterozygotes. From these findings, the impact of assortative mating on linkage disequilibrium, and consequently heritability and additive genetic variance, appears to be small and model-specific. PMID:27784755

  12. Antecedents of Neonatal Encephalopathy in the Vermont Oxford Network Encephalopathy Registry

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Peter; Edwards, Erika M.; Horbar, Jeffrey D.; Kenny, Michael J.; Inder, Terrie; Pfister, Robert H.; Raju, Tonse; Soll, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neonatal encephalopathy (NE) is a major predictor of death and long-term neurologic disability, but there are few studies of antecedents of NE. OBJECTIVES: To identify antecedents in a large registry of infants who had NE. METHODS: This was a maternal and infant record review of 4165 singleton neonates, gestational age of ≥36 weeks, meeting criteria for inclusion in the Vermont Oxford Network Neonatal Encephalopathy Registry. RESULTS: Clinically recognized seizures were the most prevalent condition (60%); 49% had a 5-minute Apgar score of ≤3 and 18% had a reduced level of consciousness. An abnormal maternal or fetal condition predated labor in 46%; maternal hypertension (16%) or small for gestational age (16%) were the most frequent risk factors. In 8%, birth defects were identified. The most prevalent birth complication was elevated maternal temperature in labor of ≥37.5°C in 27% of mothers with documented temperatures compared with 2% to 3.2% in controls in population-based studies. Clinical chorioamnionitis, prolonged membrane rupture, and maternal hypothyroidism exceeded rates in published controls. Acute asphyxial indicators were reported in 15% (in 35% if fetal bradycardia included) and inflammatory indicators in 24%. Almost one-half had neither asphyxial nor inflammatory indicators. Although most infants with NE were observably ill since the first minutes of life, only 54% of placentas were submitted for examination. CONCLUSIONS: Clinically recognized asphyxial birth events, indicators of intrauterine exposure to inflammation, fetal growth restriction, and birth defects were each observed in term infants with NE, but much of NE in this large registry remained unexplained. PMID:23071210

  13. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H.

    1981-01-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  14. Personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, H.

    1981-11-01

    The use of a personal miniature electrophysiological tape recorder to measure the physiological reactions of space flight personnel to space flight stress and weightlessness is described. The Oxford Instruments Medilog recorder, a battery-powered, four-channel cassette tape recorder with 24 hour endurance is carried on the person and will record EKG, EOG, EEG, and timing and event markers. The data will give information about heart rate and morphology changes, and document adaptation to zero gravity on the part of subjects who, unlike highly trained astronauts, are more representative of the normal population than were the subjects of previous space flight studies.

  15. A YANKEE AT OXFORD: JOHN WILLIAM DRAPER AT THE BRITISH ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE AT OXFORD, 30 JUNE 1860.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, James C

    2016-06-20

    This paper contributes to the revisionist historiography on the legendary encounter between Samuel Wilberforce and Thomas Henry Huxley at the 1860 meeting in Oxford of the British Association for the Advancement of Science. It discusses the contents of a series of letters written by John William Draper and his family reflecting on his experience at that meeting. The letters have recently been rediscovered and have been neither published nor examined at full length. After a preliminary discussion on the historiography of the Oxford debate, the paper discloses the contents of the letters and then assesses them in the light of other contemporary accounts. The letters offer a nuanced reinterpretation of the event that supports the growing move towards a revisionist account.

  16. 76 FR 2713 - Croscill Acquisition, LLC, Currently Known as Croscill Home, LLC, Plant No. 8, Oxford, NC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-14

    ..., Plant No. 8, Oxford, NC; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment... 25, 2009, applicable to workers of Croscill Acquisition, LLC, formerly doing business as Royal Home Fashions, a subsidiary of Croscill, Inc., Plant No. 8, Oxford, North Carolina. The notice was published...

  17. Faster sequential genetic linkage computations.

    PubMed Central

    Cottingham, R W; Idury, R M; Schäffer, A A

    1993-01-01

    Linkage analysis using maximum-likelihood estimation is a powerful tool for locating genes. As available data sets have grown, the computation required for analysis has grown exponentially and become a significant impediment. Others have previously shown that parallel computation is applicable to linkage analysis and can yield order-of-magnitude improvements in speed. In this paper, we demonstrate that algorithmic modifications can also yield order-of-magnitude improvements, and sometimes much more. Using the software package LINKAGE, we describe a variety of algorithmic improvements that we have implemented, demonstrating both how these techniques are applied and their power. Experiments show that these improvements speed up the programs by an order of magnitude, on problems of moderate and large size. All improvements were made only in the combinatorial part of the code, without restoring to parallel computers. These improvements synthesize biological principles with computer science techniques, to effectively restructure the time-consuming computations in genetic linkage analysis. PMID:8317490

  18. Deliberate Self-Harm in Adolescents in Oxford, 1985-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawton, Keith; Fagg, Joan; Simkin, Sue; Bale, Elizabeth; Bond, Alison

    2000-01-01

    Reviews data collected by the Oxford Monitoring System for Attempted Suicide in teenagers between 1985-1995 to determine trends in acts of deliberate self-harm. Notes substantial increase in number of episodes of deliberate self-harm for both males and females. Discusses implications for hospital and counseling professionals and well as…

  19. The Why, What, and Impact of GPA at Oxford Brookes University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction at Oxford Brookes University of a Grade Point Average (GPA) scheme alongside the traditional honours degree classification. It considers the reasons for the introduction of GPA, the way in which the scheme was implemented, and offers an insight into the impact of GPA at Brookes. Finally, the paper considers…

  20. Trait Anxiety and Final Degree Performance at the University of Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellanby, Jane; Zimdars, Anna

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire was administered to 1,929 applicants to Oxford University, including measures of trait anxiety, behavioural response to examinations and to breakdown in relationships. 635 of these applicants were admitted to the university and of these, 383 also responded to a questionnaire administered 4 years later, just before their final…

  1. Developing a Structured Teaching Plan for Psychiatry Tutors at Oxford University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Taiar, Hasanen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this thesis was to examine the teaching ways I undertook in teaching medical students and to examine the use of a structured teaching plan for the academic and clinical tutors in psychiatry. The teaching plan was developed for use, initially by Oxford University Academic tutors at the Department of Psychiatry. In addition,…

  2. Oxford and the Decline of the Collegiate Tradition. Woburn Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapper, Ted; Palfreyman, David

    This book examines how the idea of collegiality in British higher education is being restructured in response to contemporary pressures of marketization, managerialism, and massification. The focus is on Oxford University, but implications are drawn for the future of higher education in Britain in general. The chapters are: (1) "Collegiality…

  3. Software for relativistic atomic structure theory: The GRASP project at Oxford

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parpia, F. A.; Grant, I. P.

    1991-08-01

    GRASP is an acronym for General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The objective of the GRASP project at Oxford is to produce user-friendly state-of-the-art multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) software packages for relativistic atomic structure theory. Modules for the computation of angular coefficients (all based upon Racah techniques), the generation and manipulation of radial functions (based exclusively on finite-difference methods) and utility modules, have been assembled under an interface to produce the Oxford MCDF package. The three extant versions of the Oxford MCDF software, MCDF + MCBP/BENA, GRASP, and GRASP-2, are described. Planned improvements to GRASP-2 include extending the capabilities of the package so that systems involving continuum electrons can be modelled, and the development of a new generation of algorithms optimised for shared-memory vector processors operating in parallel. Future versions of the Oxford MCDF program are likely to make use of basis-set methods, ideally suited to the use of multi-reference many-body perturbation theory, for the improvement of MCDF estimates of atomic properties.

  4. Teacher Education at Oxford University: James Is Alive but Living in Karachi

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The arguments at Oxford about the start of teacher education within the University have been repeated many times and in many ways, not least in the 1972 James Committee. The strong advocacy there for much greater attention to, and investment in, continuing professional development may not have won the day in England, but, through the influence of…

  5. 75 FR 35829 - Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production Area, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production Area... Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents for Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, Refuge), 7 miles south of... ``Bear Lake CCP EA'' in the subject line of the message. Fax: Attn: Annette de Knijf, 208-847-1319....

  6. Making Academic OER Easy: Reflections on Technology and Openness at Oxford University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Highton, Melissa; Fresen, Jill; Wild, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Due to its stringent entry requirements, academic reputation and world ranking, Oxford University in the United Kingdom is perceived by some as being a closed, exclusive, and elitist institution. As learning technologists working in the institution, we have experienced an enthusiasm amongst academic colleagues for openness in publication and…

  7. If You Build It, They Will Scan: Oxford University's Exploration of Community Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Stuart D.; Lindsay, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Traditional large digitization projects demand massive resources from the central unit (library, museum, or university) that has acquired funding for them. Another model, enabled by easy access to cameras, scanners, and web tools, calls for public contributions to community collections of artifacts. In 2009, the University of Oxford ran a…

  8. The Effects of Children on the Process of Recovery in Oxford Houses.

    PubMed

    Legler, Ray; Chiaramonte, Danielle; Patterson, Meaghan; Allis, Ashley; Runion, Hilary; Jason, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    The effects of children on the process of substance use recovery for adults living in Oxford Houses is explored in two qualitative studies. Oxford Houses are self-run, community-based residential homes for small groups of adults who live together and support each other's efforts to recover from drug and/or alcohol addiction. In the first study, telephone interviews were conducted with 29 adults who were living in Oxford Houses that allowed children to live in the house with their parent. Results suggest that having children in the house supported a positive living environment for the recovery of house members. In the second study, telephone interviews were conducted with an additional 15 mothers who lived in Oxford Houses. These interviews focused on the effects of the mothers' addiction and recovery on their relationships with their children. This study found that most parents acknowledged the negative effects of their addiction on their relationship with their child and the effects of their recovery on improving those relationships.

  9. Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy and C4d deposition; correlation and its implication.

    PubMed

    Rath, Ashutosh; Tewari, Rohit; Mendonca, Satish; Badwal, Sonia; Nijhawan, Vijay Shrawan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is well known to be the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis throughout the world. The histopathological changes are wide and varied as brought out by the various classification systems like the Haas and Oxford systems. C4d is a well-known biomarker of the complement cascade and has recently been implicated in certain native renal diseases. We attempted to characterize C4d deposition in IgAN and correlate this with histopathology by the Oxford classification system. Patients and Methods: This retrospective study included renal biopsies of 15 cases of IgAN diagnosed on histopathology and immunofluorescence over a period of 2 years. Demographic parameters of age and sex were reviewed. The Oxford classification system was applied to score the cases and immunohistochemistry for C4d was done on all cases to characterize staining pattern and intensity and was correlated with Oxford classification. Results: On histological examination, the cases showed various combinations of lesions ranging from M0E0S0T0 to M1E1S1T1. C4d deposition was found to be occurring mainly in mesangial location (12/15 cases, 80%). Forty percent cases showed C4d deposition in the glomerular capillary walls in a segmental fashion and 26.67% showed global pattern. Other patterns of deposition were arteriolar (53.33%), in peritubular capillaries (26.67%) and in tubular epithelium (20%). Conclusion: On comparing the various patterns of deposition of C4d with the four variables of the Oxford classification system, we found that segmental and global deposition of C4d correlated best with endocapillary proliferation.

  10. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids has been studied further. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins

  11. Linkages in thermal copolymers of lysine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Suzuki, F.

    1975-01-01

    The thermal copolymerization of lysine with other alpha-amino acids was studied. The identity of the second amino acid influences various properties of the polymer obtained, including the proportion of alpha and epsilon linkages of lysine. A review of linkages in proteinoids indicates alpha and beta linkages for aspartic acid, alpha and gamma linkages for glutamic acid, alpha and epsilon linkages for lysine, and alpha linkages for other amino acids. Thermal proteinoids are thus more complex in types of linkage than are proteins.

  12. Linkage analysis without defined pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Day-Williams, Aaron G; Blangero, John; Dyer, Thomas D; Lange, Kenneth; Sobel, Eric M

    2011-07-01

    The need to collect accurate and complete pedigree information has been a drawback of family-based linkage and association studies. Even in case-control studies, investigators should be aware of, and condition on, familial relationships. In single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genome scans, relatedness can be directly inferred from the genetic data rather than determined through interviews. Various methods of estimating relatedness have previously been implemented, most notably in PLINK. We present new fast and accurate algorithms for estimating global and local kinship coefficients from dense SNP genotypes. These algorithms require only a single pass through the SNP genotype data. We also show that these estimates can be used to cluster individuals into pedigrees. With these estimates in hand, quantitative trait locus linkage analysis proceeds via traditional variance components methods without any prior relationship information. We demonstrate the success of our algorithms on simulated and real data sets. Our procedures make linkage analysis as easy as a typical genomewide association study.

  13. Data linkage infrastructure for cross-jurisdictional health-related research in Australia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Centre for Data Linkage (CDL) has been established to enable national and cross-jurisdictional health-related research in Australia. It has been funded through the Population Health Research Network (PHRN), a national initiative established under the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy (NCRIS). This paper describes the development of the processes and methodology required to create cross-jurisdictional research infrastructure and enable aggregation of State and Territory linkages into a single linkage “map”. Methods The CDL has implemented a linkage model which incorporates best practice in data linkage and adheres to data integration principles set down by the Australian Government. Working closely with data custodians and State-based data linkage facilities, the CDL has designed and implemented a linkage system to enable research at national or cross-jurisdictional level. A secure operational environment has also been established with strong governance arrangements to maximise privacy and the confidentiality of data. Results The development and implementation of a cross-jurisdictional linkage model overcomes a number of challenges associated with the federated nature of health data collections in Australia. The infrastructure expands Australia’s data linkage capability and provides opportunities for population-level research. The CDL linkage model, infrastructure architecture and governance arrangements are presented. The quality and capability of the new infrastructure is demonstrated through the conduct of data linkage for the first PHRN Proof of Concept Collaboration project, where more than 25 million records were successfully linked to a very high quality. Conclusions This infrastructure provides researchers and policy-makers with the ability to undertake linkage-based research that extends across jurisdictional boundaries. It represents an advance in Australia’s national data linkage capabilities and sets the scene

  14. Real-Time DNA Sequencing in the Antarctic Dry Valleys Using the Oxford Nanopore Sequencer

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sarah S.; Zaikova, Elena; Goerlitz, David S.; Bai, Yu; Tighe, Scott W.

    2017-01-01

    The ability to sequence DNA outside of the laboratory setting has enabled novel research questions to be addressed in the field in diverse areas, ranging from environmental microbiology to viral epidemics. Here, we demonstrate the application of offline DNA sequencing of environmental samples using a hand-held nanopore sequencer in a remote field location: the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Sequencing was performed using a MK1B MinION sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT; Oxford, United Kingdom) that was equipped with software to operate without internet connectivity. One-direction (1D) genomic libraries were prepared using portable field techniques on DNA isolated from desiccated microbial mats. By adequately insulating the sequencer and laptop, it was possible to run the sequencing protocol for up to 2½ h under arduous conditions. PMID:28337073

  15. Mail versus telephone administration of the Oxford Knee and Hip Scores.

    PubMed

    Abdel Messih, Marena; Naylor, J M; Descallar, J; Manickam, A; Mittal, R; Harris, I A

    2014-03-01

    Telephone and postal methods of administration of the Oxford Knee Score (OKS) and the Oxford Hip Score (OHS) were compared on 85 and 61 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty (TKA) and total hip arthroplasty (THA), respectively. The test for equivalence was significant for both the knee (P<0.001) and hip participants (P<0.001) indicating that the modes of administration yielded similar results. The ICCs of the OKS and OHS were 0.79 (95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.70, 0.86) and 0.87 (0.79, 0.92) respectively. The 95% limits of agreement were wide for both scores (OKS LOA, -8.6, 8.2; OHS LOA, -7.7, 5.3). The two modes of administration of the OKS and OHS produce equivalent survey responses at a group level but the same method of administration should be constant for individual monitoring in a clinical setting.

  16. Real-Time DNA Sequencing in the Antarctic Dry Valleys Using the Oxford Nanopore Sequencer.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Sarah S; Zaikova, Elena; Goerlitz, David S; Bai, Yu; Tighe, Scott W

    2017-04-01

    The ability to sequence DNA outside of the laboratory setting has enabled novel research questions to be addressed in the field in diverse areas, ranging from environmental microbiology to viral epidemics. Here, we demonstrate the application of offline DNA sequencing of environmental samples using a hand-held nanopore sequencer in a remote field location: the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Sequencing was performed using a MK1B MinION sequencer from Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT; Oxford, United Kingdom) that was equipped with software to operate without internet connectivity. One-direction (1D) genomic libraries were prepared using portable field techniques on DNA isolated from desiccated microbial mats. By adequately insulating the sequencer and laptop, it was possible to run the sequencing protocol for up to 2½ h under arduous conditions.

  17. Characterization, correction and de novo assembly of an Oxford Nanopore genomic dataset from Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Stéphane; Mudge, Joann; Cameron, Connor; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Anand, Ajith; Fengler, Kevin; Hayes, Kevin; Llaca, Victor; Jones, Todd J; May, Gregory

    2016-06-28

    The MinION is a portable single-molecule DNA sequencing instrument that was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies in 2014, producing long sequencing reads by measuring changes in ionic flow when single-stranded DNA molecules translocate through the pores. While MinION long reads have an error rate substantially higher than the ones produced by short-read sequencing technologies, they can generate de novo assemblies of microbial genomes, after an initial correction step that includes alignment of Illumina sequencing data or detection of overlaps between Oxford Nanopore reads to improve accuracy. In this study, MinION reads were generated from the multi-chromosome genome of Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain LBA4404. Errors in the consensus two-directional (sense and antisense) "2D" sequences were first characterized by way of comparison with an internal reference assembly. Both Illumina-based correction and self-correction were performed and the resulting corrected reads assembled into high-quality hybrid and non-hybrid assemblies. Corrected read datasets and assemblies were subsequently compared. The results shown here indicate that both hybrid and non-hybrid methods can be used to assemble Oxford Nanopore reads into informative multi-chromosome assemblies, each with slightly different outcomes in terms of contiguity and accuracy.

  18. Remaking the medico-legal scene: a social history of the late-Victorian coroner in Oxford.

    PubMed

    Hurren, Elizabeth T

    2010-04-01

    There have been wide-ranging debates about medicine and the law encapsulated in the figure of the coroner in Victorian England. Recently the historical literature on coroners has been enriched by macro-studies. Despite this important research, the social lives of coroners and their daily interactions remain relatively neglected in standard historical accounts. This article redresses that issue by examining the working life of the coroner for Oxford during the late-Victorian era. Edward Law Hussey kept very detailed records of his time in office as coroner. New research material makes it feasible to trace his professional background, from doctor of the sick poor, to hospital house surgeon and then busy coroner. His career trajectory, personal interactions, and professional disputes, provide an important historical prism illuminating contemporary debates that occupied coroners in their working lives. Hussey tried to improve his medico-legal reach and the public image of his coroner's office by reducing infanticide rates, converting a public mortuary, and acquiring a proper coroner's court. His campaigns had limited success because the social scene in which he worked was complicated by the dominance of health and welfare agencies that resented his role as an expanding arm of the Victorian information state.

  19. Education: Linkages with Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouser, Rodney L.

    A review of the literature of research in education and economics revealed very limited linkages between education (human capital) and economic development. Much of the economic development research has been carried out in developing nations and is case-study based. Many case studies concentrate on identifying factors that influence location or…

  20. Can the Oxford Scores be used to monitor symptomatic progression of patients awaiting knee or hip arthroplasty?

    PubMed

    Naylor, Justine M; Kamalasena, Gihan; Hayen, Andrew; Harris, Ian A; Adie, Sam

    2013-10-01

    We report the week-to-week variation of the Oxford Knee and Oxford Hip Score (OKS, OHS) in individuals with severe osteoarthritis. People waitlisted for knee (n=51) or hip arthroplasty (n=52) were assessed twice, 1-week apart. There were no major week-to-week systematic biases in the scores. Limits of agreement (LOA) for both scores were wide (OKS, -9.5 to 6.6; OHS, -7.7 to 7). For most individual questions, the answers varied by ≤ 1 point in over 90% of participants. The week-to-week 95% LOA for the Oxford scores are unacceptably large, but variations within the individual questions are minimal. Consequently, reference to variation in the individual questions may be more useful for monitoring a patient's preoperative clinical change than changes in the total Oxford score. We conclude that the total scores are not suitable for monitoring the progression of OA in individual patients.

  1. 100,000-year-long terrestrial record of millennial-scale linkage between eastern North American mid-latitude paleovegetation shifts and Greenland ice-core oxygen isotope trends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, Ronald J.; Smoot, Joseph P.; Pavich, Milan J.; Markewich, Helaine W.; Brook, George; Durika, Nancy J.

    2013-09-01

    We document frequent, rapid, strong, millennial-scale paleovegetation shifts throughout the late Pleistocene, within a 100,000+ yr interval (~ 115-15 ka) of terrestrial sediments from the mid-Atlantic Region (MAR) of North America. High-resolution analyses of fossil pollen from one core locality revealed a continuously shifting sequence of thermally dependent forest assemblages, ranging between two endmembers: subtropical oak-tupelo-bald cypress-gum forest and high boreal spruce-pine forest. Sedimentary textural evidence indicates fluvial, paludal, and loess deposition, and paleosol formation, representing sequential freshwater to subaerial environments in which this record was deposited. Its total age-depth model, based on radiocarbon and optically stimulated luminescence ages, ranges from terrestrial oxygen isotope stages (OIS) 6 to 1. The particular core sub-interval presented here is correlative in trend and timing to that portion of the oxygen isotope sequence common among several Greenland ice cores: interstades GI2 to GI24 (≈ OIS2-5 d). This site thus provides the first evidence for an essentially complete series of 'Dansgaard-Oeschger' climate events in the MAR. These data reveal that the ~ 100,000 yr preceding the Late Glacial and Holocene in the MAR of North America were characterized by frequently and dynamically changing climate states, and by vegetation shifts that closely tracked the Greenland paleoclimate sequence.

  2. What are the effects of having an illness or injury whilst deployed on post deployment mental health? A population based record linkage study of UK Army personnel who have served in Iraq or Afghanistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The negative impact of sustaining an injury on a military deployment on subsequent mental health is well-documented, however, the relationship between having an illness on a military operation and subsequent mental health is unknown. Methods Population based study, linking routinely collected data of attendances at emergency departments in military hospitals in Iraq and Afghanistan [Operational Emergency Department Attendance Register (OpEDAR)], with data on 3896 UK Army personnel who participated in a military health study between 2007 and 2009 and deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan between 2003 to 2009. Results In total, 13.8% (531/3896) of participants had an event recorded on OpEDAR during deployment; 2.3% (89/3884) were medically evacuated. As expected, those medically evacuated for an injury were at increased risk of post deployment probable PTSD (odds ratio 4.27, 95% confidence interval 1.80-10.12). Less expected was that being medically evacuated for an illness was also associated with a similarly increased risk of probable PTSD (4.39, 1.60-12.07) and common mental disorders (2.79, 1.41-5.51). There was no association between having an OpEDAR event and alcohol misuse. Having an injury caused by hostile action was associated with increased risk of probable PTSD compared to those with a non-hostile injury (3.88, 1.15 to 13.06). Conclusions Personnel sustaining illnesses on deployment are just as, if not more, at risk of having subsequent mental health problems as personnel who have sustained an injury. Monitoring of mental health problems should consider those with illnesses as well as physical injuries. PMID:23095133

  3. Comparison of the Haas and the Oxford classifications for prediction of renal outcome in patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung Sook; Han, Seung Hyeok; Kie, Jeong Hae; Nam, Ki Heon; Lee, Mi Jung; Lim, Beom Jin; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Yung Ly; An, Seong Yeong; Kim, Chan Ho; Doh, Fa Mee; Koo, Hyang Mo; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Yoo, Tae-Hyun

    2014-02-01

    Pathologic features can provide valuable information for determining prognosis in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, it is uncertain whether the Oxford classification, a new classification of IgAN, can predict renal outcome better than previous ones. We conducted a retrospective cohort study in 500 patients with biopsy-proven IgAN between January 2002 and December 2010 to compare the ability of the Haas and the Oxford classifications to predict renal outcome. Primary outcome was a doubling of the baseline serum creatinine concentration (D-SCr). During a mean follow-up of 68 months, 52 (10.4%) and 35 (7.0%) developed D-SCr and end-stage renal disease, respectively. There were graded increases in the development of D-SCr in the higher Haas classes. In addition, the primary endpoint of D-SCr occurred more in patients with the Oxford M and T lesions than those without such lesions. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, the Haas class V (HR, 12.19; P=.002) and the Oxford T1 (hazard ratio [HR], 6.68; P<.001) and T2 (HR, 12.16; P<.001) lesions were independently associated with an increased risk of reaching D-SCr. Harrell's C index of each multivariate model with the Haas and the Oxford classification was 0.867 (P=.015) and 0.881 (P=.004), respectively. This was significantly higher than that of model with clinical factors only (C=0.819). However, there was no difference in C-statistics between the 2 models with the Haas and the Oxford classifications (P=.348). This study suggests that the Haas and the Oxford classifications are comparable in predicting progression of IgAN.

  4. Measuring pressure under burns pressure garments using the Oxford Pressure Monitor.

    PubMed

    Harries, C A; Pegg, S P

    1989-06-01

    Pressure garments are used extensively in the treatment of hypertrophic scarring following burn injuries. The Oxford Pressure Monitor was used to measure garment-scar interface pressure (mmHg) using a number of fabric types over various body parts. The results indicate a wide range of pressure values between different garments and body parts with the greatest pressures found over the dorsum of hands and feet. The problems of achieving 'optimal pressure' over hypertrophic scarring are discussed with emphasis on the need for more accurate measuring equipment.

  5. Geophysical logging at the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Antolino, Dominick J.

    2017-01-01

    The collection of borehole geophysical logs data was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey South Atlantic Water Science Center in the vicinity of the Cristex Drum National Priorities List Superfund Site near Oxford, North Carolina, during January through March 2016. In an effort to assist the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in the development of a conceptual groundwater model for the assessment of current contaminant distribution and future migration of contaminants, borehole geophysical log and image data collection, which included the delineation of more than 150 subsurface features (primarily fracture orientations) in 3 open borehole wells.

  6. Emissivity Measurements and Laboratory Intercalibration at PSF of Oxford University and PEL of DLR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maturilli, A.; Bowles, N. E.; Thomas, I. R.; Helbert, J.

    2013-09-01

    Emissivity spectra of analogue materials are needed for the analysis of remote sensing emission spectra of airless surfaces. The increasing number of planetary missions to the Moon, Mercury, asteroids, and other minor bodies require appropriate laboratory set-ups to fulfill those requirements. Two independent groups, one at Oxford University and the other at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Berlin provide suitable chambers for emissivity measurements in vacuum. The Planetary Spectroscopy Facility (PSF) of the Oxford University favored a high vacuum, low to average sample temperatures, and a limited spectral range for measurements, mostly inspired from lunar and asteroids environment. At the Planetary Emissivity Laboratory (PEL) of DLR, the set-up allows measuring in low-moderate vacuum, for sample temperatures from low to very high (> 1000 K) and in an extended spectral range (1 to over 100μm), with Mercury being the principal driver of chamber design. To understand the influence of environment parameters on emissivity spectra, we measured a fine (0-25 μm) sample of volcanic dust from Iceland (PEL ID 00000240) under several environmental conditions at PSF, and for comparison under standard conditions at PEL.

  7. Recent changes in the treatment of aortoiliac occlusive disease by the Oxford Regional Vascular Service.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Ramarakha, P; Collin, J; Morris, P J

    1990-10-01

    Over the four years from 1 January 1985 to 31 December 1988, 192 patients were treated for aortoiliac occlusive disease by the Oxford Regional Vascular Service. The number of patients treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty increased from two in the first year of the study to 34 in the third year of the study. This increase was accompanied by a decrease in the proportion of patients treated by aortobifemoral bypass but the proportion of patients treated by extra-anatomic bypass remained constant at around 30 per cent. Twice as many patients were treated in the fourth year as in the first year of the study so that the number of surgical operations increased despite many patients being treated exclusively by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty. The number of patients requiring mandatory treatment for limb salvage increased by 109 per cent and optional treatment for intermittent claudication by 85 per cent. The introduction of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty in Oxford has coincided with an increase in the number of patients presenting with symptomatic aortoiliac occlusive disease and has allowed twice as many people to be treated while the number of aortobifemoral bypass operations has remained unchanged. It is concluded that the introduction of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty has not only generated its own workload but has also led to an increased demand for surgical reconstruction for aortoiliac occlusive disease.

  8. Proteinases, their receptors and inflammatory signalling: the Oxford South Parks Road connection*

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, M D

    2015-01-01

    In keeping with the aim of the Paton Memorial Lecture to ‘facilitate the historical study of pharmacology’, this overview, which is my distinct honour to write, represents a ‘Janus-like’ personal perspective looking both backwards and forwards at the birth and growth of ‘receptor molecular pharmacology’ with special relevance to inflammatory diseases. The overview begins in the Oxford Department of Pharmacology in the mid-1960s and then goes on to provide a current perspective of signalling by proteinases. Looking backwards, the synopsis describes the fruitful Oxford Pharmacology Department infrastructure that Bill Paton generated in keeping with the blueprint begun by his predecessor, J H Burn. Looking forwards, the overview illustrates the legacy of that environment in generating some of the first receptor ligand-binding data and providing the inspiration and vision for those like me who were training in the department at the same time. With apologies, I mention only in passing a number of individuals who benefitted from the ‘South Parks Road connection’ using myself as one of the ‘outcome study’ examples. It is also by looking forward that I can meet the complementary aim of summarizing the lecture presented at a ‘BPS 2014 Focused Meeting on Cell Signalling’ to provide an overview of the role of proteinases and their signalling mechanisms in the setting of inflammation. PMID:25521749

  9. Oxford Nanopore sequencing, hybrid error correction, and de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, Sara; Gurtowski, James; Ethe-Sayers, Scott; Deshpande, Panchajanya; Schatz, Michael C.; McCombie, W. Richard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the progress of DNA molecules through a membrane pore has been postulated as a method for sequencing DNA for several decades. Recently, a nanopore-based sequencing instrument, the Oxford Nanopore MinION, has become available, and we used this for sequencing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. To make use of these data, we developed a novel open-source hybrid error correction algorithm Nanocorr specifically for Oxford Nanopore reads, because existing packages were incapable of assembling the long read lengths (5–50 kbp) at such high error rates (between ∼5% and 40% error). With this new method, we were able to perform a hybrid error correction of the nanopore reads using complementary MiSeq data and produce a de novo assembly that is highly contiguous and accurate: The contig N50 length is more than ten times greater than an Illumina-only assembly (678 kb versus 59.9 kbp) and has >99.88% consensus identity when compared to the reference. Furthermore, the assembly with the long nanopore reads presents a much more complete representation of the features of the genome and correctly assembles gene cassettes, rRNAs, transposable elements, and other genomic features that were almost entirely absent in the Illumina-only assembly. PMID:26447147

  10. Reliability and Validity of the Cross-Culturally Adapted German Oxford Hip Score

    PubMed Central

    Sieverding, Marc; Impellizzeri, Franco M.; von Knoch, Fabian; Mannion, Anne F.; Leunig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    There is currently no German version of the Oxford hip score. Therefore we sought to cross-culturally adapt and validate the Oxford hip score for use with German-speaking patients (OHS-D) with osteoarthritis of the hip using a forward-backward translation procedure. We then assessed the new score in 105 consecutive patients (mean age, 63.4 years; 48 women) undergoing THA. We specifically determined: the number of fully completed questionnaires, reliability, concurrent validity by correlation with the WOMAC, Harris hip score, and SF-12, and distribution of floor and ceiling effects. We received 96.6% fully completed questionnaires. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.90 and Cronbach’s alpha of 0.87 suggested the OHS-D was reliable. Correlation coefficients between the OHS-D and the WOMAC total score, pain subscale, stiffness subscale, and physical function subscale were 0.82, 0.70, 0.68, and 0.82, respectively. OHS-D correlated with the Harris hip score (r = 0.63) and the physical component scale of the SF-12 (r = 0.58). We observed no ceiling or floor effects. The OHS-D appeared a reliable and valid measurement tool for assessing pain and disability with German-speaking patients with hip osteoarthritis. Level of Evidence: Level I, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18726655

  11. Oxford Nanopore sequencing, hybrid error correction, and de novo assembly of a eukaryotic genome.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Sara; Gurtowski, James; Ethe-Sayers, Scott; Deshpande, Panchajanya; Schatz, Michael C; McCombie, W Richard

    2015-11-01

    Monitoring the progress of DNA molecules through a membrane pore has been postulated as a method for sequencing DNA for several decades. Recently, a nanopore-based sequencing instrument, the Oxford Nanopore MinION, has become available, and we used this for sequencing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. To make use of these data, we developed a novel open-source hybrid error correction algorithm Nanocorr specifically for Oxford Nanopore reads, because existing packages were incapable of assembling the long read lengths (5-50 kbp) at such high error rates (between ∼5% and 40% error). With this new method, we were able to perform a hybrid error correction of the nanopore reads using complementary MiSeq data and produce a de novo assembly that is highly contiguous and accurate: The contig N50 length is more than ten times greater than an Illumina-only assembly (678 kb versus 59.9 kbp) and has >99.88% consensus identity when compared to the reference. Furthermore, the assembly with the long nanopore reads presents a much more complete representation of the features of the genome and correctly assembles gene cassettes, rRNAs, transposable elements, and other genomic features that were almost entirely absent in the Illumina-only assembly.

  12. Significance of immunohistochemical findings in Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy: The need for more validation studies.

    PubMed

    Mubarak, Muhammed

    2013-07-01

    Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education: Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) has been validated as clinically useful tool for prognostication of individual patients with IgAN. The original classification did not address the significance of immunostaining pattern in IgAN. A subsequent study by the same authors found immunostaining data to be potentially useful in predicting some of the morphological variables of Oxford classification. The study under discussion also addresses the potential significance of these ancillary data in refining the individual prognostication in this disease. Please cite this paper as: Mubarak M. Significance of immunohistochemical findings in Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy: The need for more validation studies. J Nephropathology. 2013; 2(3): 210-213. DOI: 10.5812/nephropathol.11089.

  13. Oxford phase 3 unicompartmental knee arthroplasty in Japan--clinical results in greater than one thousand cases over ten years.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenjiro; Tada, Masahiro; Yoshida, Hirokazu; Takei, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Shinichi; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2013-10-01

    There are few reports of the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) survival rate in Asia. This study describes outcomes of 1279 Oxford UKAs for Japanese patients. The mean follow-up was 5.2 years. We divided patients into two groups based on preoperative indications (extended indications group and strict indications group). The Oxford knee score improved from 22.3 to 40.8 (P=0.041). The 10-year survival rate using revision was 95%. A total of 25 UKAs (2.0%) required revision. The most common reason was subsidence of tibial component. The 5-year cumulative survival rate of the strict indications group was significantly higher than that of the extended indications group (99.1% vs. 93.8%, P<0.001). When we followed inclusion criteria strictly, good clinical results were achieved in Asia.

  14. Confirmatory linkage study of hypochondroplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, J.T.; Herrera, C.; Greenhaw, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Hypochondroplasia is an autosomal dominant form of disproportionate short stature disorder that has clinical and radiographic findings similar to but milder than achondroplasia. Based on these findings it has been suggested that achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia are allelic conditions. We and others have mapped the achondroplasia locus to telomeric region of chromosome 4. Tested linkage to 4p markers in 6 hypochondroplasia families and a maximum LOD score of 1.7 at {theta} = 0 was found for IUDA. Here we report the results of a linkage study in 4 multigenerational families with hypochondroplasia using 7 short tandem repeat markers (D4S127, D4S412, D4S43, D4S115, IUDA, D4S227, D4S169) from the short arm of chromosome 4. These families have been well characterized and show the typical clinical and radiographic features of hypochondroplasia. One family was Afro-American, one Hispanic and two were Caucasian. We found a maximum multipoint LOD score of 2.9 at D4S115. The results of this study provide confirmatory evidence that achondroplasia and hypochondroplasia map to the same chromosomal location and suggests that they are indeed allelic conditions.

  15. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, R.L.; Killian, M.A.

    1993-03-02

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  16. Gripper deploying and inverting linkage

    DOEpatents

    Minichan, Richard L.; Killian, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An end effector deploying and inverting linkage. The linkage comprises an air cylinder mounted in a frame or tube, a sliding bracket next to the air cylinder, a stopping bracket depending from the frame and three, pivotally-attached links that are attached to the end effector and to each other in such a way as to be capable of inverting the end effector and translating it laterally. The first of the three links is a straight element that is moved up and down by the shaft of the air cylinder. The second link is attached at one end to the stopping bracket and to the side of the end effector at the other end. The first link is attached near the middle of the second, sharply angled link so that, as the shaft of the air cylinder moves up and down, the second link rotates about an axis perpendicular to the frame and inverts and translates the end effector. The rotation of the second link is stopped at both ends when the link engages stops on the stopping bracket. The third link, slightly angled, is attached to the sliding bracket at one end and to the end of the end effector at the other. The third helps to control the end effector in its motion.

  17. An introduction to recombination and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mcpeek, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    With a garden as his laboratory, Mendel was able to discern basic probabilistic laws of heredity. Although it first appeared as a baffling exception to one of Mendel`s principles, the phenomenon of variable linkage between characters was soon recognized to be a powerful tool in the process of chromosome mapping and location of genes of interest. In this introduction, we first describe Mendel`s work and the subsequent discovery of linkage. Next we describe the apparent cause of variable linkage, namely recombination, and we introduce linkage analysis. 33 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  18. Italian normative data for a stroke specific cognitive screening tool: the Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS).

    PubMed

    Mancuso, M; Varalta, V; Sardella, L; Capitani, D; Zoccolotti, P; Antonucci, G

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive deficits occur in most stroke patients and cognitive impairment is an important predictor of adverse long term outcome. However, current screening measures, such as the Mini Mental State Examination or the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, do not provide information tuned for evaluating the impact of cognitive impairment in the early phase after stroke. The Oxford Cognitive Screen (OCS) represents an important new development in this regard. The OCS is now available for assessment of Italian individuals and the aim of this study is to standardize the OCS on a large sample of healthy Italian participants stratified for age, gender and education level. Results confirmed the influence of these factors in several of the OCS tasks. Age-, education- and gender-adjusted norms are provided for the ten sub-tests of the test. The availability of normative data represents an important prerequite for the reliable use of OCS with stroke patients.

  19. The Oxford Probe: an open access five-hole probe for aerodynamic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, B. F.; Povey, T.

    2017-03-01

    The Oxford Probe is an open access five-hole probe designed for experimental aerodynamic measurements. The open access probe can be manufactured by the end user via additive manufacturing (metal or plastic). The probe geometry, drawings, calibration maps, and software are available under a creative commons license. The purpose is to widen access to aerodynamic measurement techniques in education and research environments. There are many situations in which the open access probe will allow results of comparable accuracy to a well-calibrated commercial probe. We discuss the applications and limitations of the probe, and compare the calibration maps for 16 probes manufactured in different materials and at different scales, but with the same geometrical design.

  20. Validation of an Italian version of the Oxford happiness inventory in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Meleddu, Mauro; Guicciardi, Marco; Scalas, L Francesca; Fadda, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    An Italian adaptation of the Oxford Happiness Inventory was administered to 782 adolescents. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) was used to examine the first- and second-order factorial structure of the scale and its invariance across gender; internal consistency and construct validity were also investigated. ESEM underlined a 5-factor structure (mastery and self-fulfillment, satisfaction with life, vigor, social interest, and social cheerfulness) that measures positive psychological functioning. These dimensions form a single latent construct of general psychological well-being. The scale showed adequate internal consistency values and strong measurement invariance across gender. Finally, regarding convergent validity, both total scale and subscales were positively correlated with extraversion and self-esteem, were negatively correlated with neuroticism, and displayed no correlation with psychoticism.

  1. A survival analysis of 1084 knees of the Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, N.; Jones, L. D.; Rout, R.; Alvand, A.; Rombach, I.; Evans, T.; Jackson, W. F. M.; Beard, D. J.; Price, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of this to study was to compare the previously unreported long-term survival outcome of the Oxford medial unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) performed by trainee surgeons and consultants. Patients and Methods We therefore identified a previously unreported cohort of 1084 knees in 947 patients who had a UKA inserted for anteromedial knee arthritis by consultants and surgeons in training, at a tertiary arthroplasty centre and performed survival analysis on the group with revision as the endpoint. Results The ten-year cumulative survival rate for revision or exchange of any part of the prosthetic components was 93.2% (95% confidence interval (CI) 86.1 to 100, number at risk 45). Consultant surgeons had a nine-year cumulative survival rate of 93.9% (95% CI 90.2 to 97.6, number at risk 16). Trainee surgeons had a cumulative nine-year survival rate of 93.0% (95% CI 90.3 to 95.7, number at risk 35). Although there was no differences in implant survival between consultants and trainees (p = 0.30), there was a difference in failure pattern whereby all re-operations performed for bearing dislocation (n = 7), occurred in the trainee group. This accounted for 0.6% of the entire cohort and 15% of the re-operations. Conclusion This is the largest single series of the Oxford UKA ever reported and demonstrates that good results can be achieved by a heterogeneous group of surgeons, including trainees, if performed within a high-volume centre with considerable experience with the procedure. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;(10 Suppl B):22–7. PMID:27694512

  2. Photographic monitoring of soiling and decay of roadside walls in central Oxford, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thornbush, Mary J.; Viles, Heather A.

    2008-12-01

    As part of the Environmental Monitoring of Integrated Transport Strategies (EMITS) project, which examined the impact of the Oxford Transport Strategy (OTS) on the soiling and decay of buildings and structures in central Oxford, England, a simple photographic survey of a sample of roadside walls was carried out in 1997, with re-surveys in 1999 and 2003. Thirty photographs were taken each time, covering an area of stonework approximately 30 × 30 cm in dimensions at 1-1.3 m above pavement level. The resulting images have been used to investigate, both qualitatively as well as quantitatively, the progression of soiling and decay. Comparison of images by eye reveals a number of minor changes in soiling and decay patterns, but generally indicates stability except at one site where dramatic, superficial damage occurred over 2 years. Quantitative analysis of decay features (concavities resulting from surface blistering, flaking, and scaling), using simple techniques in Adobe Photoshop, shows variable pixel-based size proportions of concavities across 6 years of survey. Colour images (in Lab Color) generally have a reduced proportion of pixels, representing decay features in comparison to black and white (Grayscale) images. The study conveys that colour images provide more information both for general observations of soiling and decay patterns and for segmentation of decay-produced concavities. The study indicates that simple repeat photography can reveal useful information about changing patterns of both soiling and decay, although unavoidable variation in external lighting conditions between re-surveys is a factor limiting the accuracy of change detection.

  3. Examining the Linkage Between FRAMES and GMS

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.

    2006-02-13

    Because GMS provides so many features, of which some are also addressed by FRAMES, it could represent a platform to link to FRAMES, or FRAMES could represent a platform to link to GMS. The focus of this summary is to examine the strengths and weaknesses of the potential linkage direction and provide recommendations for the linkage between FRAMES and GMS.

  4. International Perspectives on Quality in Higher Education (Oxford, England, July 30-August 5, 2000). EPI Monograph Series on Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janosik, Steven M., Ed.; Creamer, Don G., Ed.; Alexander, M. David, Ed.

    This monograph contains the invited papers of the major speakers at the Educational Policy Institute's Invitational Conference on Quality in Higher Education held at Oxford University, summer 2000. The purpose of the conference was to discuss how quality is being defined and measured in the context of higher education. The papers are: (1) "Quality…

  5. Overview of water quality and water resource research in the Water Quality and Ecology Research Unit, Oxford, MS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Water Quality and Ecology Research Unit (WQERU) is part of the United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) National Sedimentation Laboratory located in Oxford, Mississippi. The stated research mission of the WQERU is to “address issues of water quality/quan...

  6. INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT XRF TECHNOLOGIES FOR MEASURING TRACE ELEMENTS IN SOIL AND SEDIMENT OXFORD ED2000 XRF ANALYZER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Oxford ED2000 x-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer was demonstrated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program. The field portion of the demonstration was conducted in January 2005 at the Kennedy Athletic, Recr...

  7. 77 FR 59639 - Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Bear Lake County, ID and Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Bear Lake County, ID and Oxford Slough... our draft comprehensive conservation plan and environmental assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for the Bear...: FW1PlanningComments@fws.gov . Include ``Bear Lake NWR CCP'' in the subject line. Fax: Attn: Annette de...

  8. 78 FR 33433 - Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Bear Lake County, ID, and Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Bear Lake County, ID, and Oxford Slough... Assessment (EA) for the Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge), 7 miles south of Montpelier, Idaho... ``Bear Lake NWR CCP'' in the subject line of the message. U.S. Mail: Annette de Knijf, Refuge...

  9. The Psychometric Analysis of the Persian Version of the Strategy Inventory for Language Learning of Rebecca L. Oxford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazeli, Seyed Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The current study aims to analyze the psychometric qualities of the Persian adapted version of Strategy Inventory for Language Learning (SILL) developed by Rebecca L. Oxford (1990). Three instruments were used: Persian adapted version of SILL, a Background Questionnaire, and Test of English as a Foreign Language. Two hundred and thirteen Iranian…

  10. A model for linkage analysis with apomixis.

    PubMed

    Hou, Wei; Lin, Shen; Li, Yao; Pang, Xiaoming; Zeng, Yanru; Wu, Rongling

    2011-09-01

    Apomixis, or asexual reproduction through seeds, occurs in over 400 species of angiosperms. Although apomixis can favorably perpetuate desired genotypes through successive seed generation, it may also bring about some difficulty for linkage analysis and quantitative trait locus mapping. In this article, we explore the issue of how apomixis affects the precision and power of linkage analysis with molecular markers. We derive a statistical model for estimating the linkage between different markers when some progeny are derived from apomixis. The model was constructed within the maximum likelihood framework and implemented with the EM algorithm. A series of procedures are formulated to test the linkage of markers, the rate of apomixis, and the degree of genetic interference during meiosis. The model was examined and validated through simulation studies. The model will provide a tool for linkage mapping and evolutionary studies for plant species that undergo apomixis.

  11. Residual linkage: why do linkage peaks not disappear after an association study?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Scott; Visscher, Peter M

    2007-03-01

    Family-based candidate gene and genome-wide association studies are a logical progression from linkage studies for the identification of gene and polymorphisms underlying complex traits. An efficient way to analyse phenotypic and genotypic data is to model linkage and association simultaneously. An important result from such an analysis is whether any evidence for linkage remains after fitting polymorphisms at candidate genes (residual linkage), because this may indicate locus and allelic heterogeneity in the population and will influence subsequent molecular strategies. Here we report that substantial residual linkage is to be expected, even under genetic homogeneity and when the underlying causal polymorphisms are genotyped and fitted in the model. We simulated a powerful design to detect linkage to quantitative trait loci, with 5, 10 or 20 causal SNPs spread throughout the genome. These SNPs were responsible for all genetic variation, and hence for both linkage and association. Residual linkage at the largest linkage peak from a genome-wide scan was substantial, with mean LOD scores of 0.4, 0.7, and 1.4 for the case of 5, 10 and 20 underlying causal SNPs, respectively. For less powerful designs, the proportion of the original LOD scores that remains after association will be even larger. All cases of 'significant' residual linkage are false positives. The reason for the apparent paradox of detecting residual linkage after fitting causal polymorphisms is that the linkage signals at the largest peaks in a genome-scan are severely inflated, even if all peaks correspond to true linkage. Our findings are general and apply to linkage mapping of any phenotype and to any pedigree structure.

  12. Resource linkages and sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anouti, Yahya

    Historically, fossil fuel consumers in most developing hydrocarbon-rich countries have enjoyed retail prices at a discount from international benchmarks. Governments of these countries consider the subsidy transfer to be a means for sharing the wealth from their resource endowment. These subsidies create negative economic, environmental, and social distortions, which can only increase over time with a fast growing, young, and rich population. The pressure to phase out these subsidies has been mounting over the last years. At the same time, policy makers in resource-rich developing countries are keen to obtain the greatest benefits for their economies from the extraction of their exhaustible resources. To this end, they are deploying local content policies with the aim of increasing the economic linkages from extracting their resources. Against this background, this dissertation's three essays evaluate (1) the global impact of rationalizing transport fuel prices, (2) how resource-rich countries can achieve the objectives behind fuel subsidies more efficiently through direct cash transfers, and (3) the economic tradeoffs from deploying local content policies and the presence of an optimal path. We begin by reviewing the literature and building the case for rationalizing transport fuel prices to reflect their direct costs (production), indirect costs (road maintenance) and negative externalities (climate change, local pollutants, traffic accidents and congestion). To do so, we increase the scope of the economic literature by presenting an algorithm to evaluate the rationalized prices in different countries. Then, we apply this algorithm to quantify the rationalized prices across 123 countries in a partial equilibrium setting. Finally, we present the first comprehensive measure of the impact of rationalizing fuel prices on the global demand for gasoline and diesel, environmental emissions, government revenues, and consumers' welfare. By rationalizing transport fuel

  13. Linkage: from particulate to interactive genetics.

    PubMed

    Falk, Raphael

    2003-01-01

    Genetics was established on a strict particulate conception of heredity. Genetic linkage, the deviation from independent segregation of Mendelian factors, was conceived as a function of the material allocation of the factors to the chromosomes, rather than to the multiple effects (pleiotropy) of discrete factors. Although linkage maps were abstractions they provided strong support for the chromosomal theory of inheritance. Direct Cytogenetic evidence was scarce until X-ray induced major chromosomal rearrangements allowed direct correlation of genetic and cytological rearrangements. Only with the discovery of the polytenic giant chromosomes in Drosophila larvae in the 1930s were the virtual maps backed up by physical maps of the genetic loci. Genetic linkage became a pivotal experimental tool for the examination of the integration of genetic functions in development and in evolution. Genetic mapping has remained a hallmark of genetic analysis. The location of genes in DNA is a modern extension of the notion of genetic linkage.

  14. Investigations of Three-Point Linkage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Thomas R.

    1972-01-01

    Describes sequence of activities for teaching three-point linkage concept and gene-mapping to high school biology students. Includes laboratory experiments and hypothetical examples for classroom discussion. (PS)

  15. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  16. Radiological characterization survey results for Gaskill Hall, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (OXO015)

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinhans, K.R.; Murray, M.E.; Carrier, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    Between October 1952 and February 1957, National Lead of Ohio (NLO), a primary contractor for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), subcontracted certain uranium machining operations to Alba Craft Laboratory, Incorporated, located at 10-14 West Rose Avenue, Oxford, Ohio. In 1992, personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) confirmed the presence of residual radioactive materials from the AEC-related operations in and around the facility in amounts exceeding the applicable Department of Energy (DOE) guidelines. Although the amount of uranium found on the property posed little health hazard if left undisturbed, the levels were sufficient to require remediation to bring radiological conditions into compliance with current guidelines, thus ensuring that the public and the environment are protected. Because it was suspected that uranium may have been used in the past in the immediate vicinity of Alba Craft in a Miami University building a team from ORNL, performed a radiological characterization survey of that structure in January 1994. The survey was conducted at the request of DOE as a precautionary measure to ensure that no radioactive residuals were present at levels exceeding guidelines. The survey included the determination of directly measured radiation levels and the collection of smear samples to detect possible removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels, and comparison of these data to the guidelines. Results of the survey showed that all measurements were below the applicable guideline limits set by DOE.

  17. Inside Solomon's house: an archaeological study of the Old Ashmolean chymical laboratory in Oxford.

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, Marcos

    2012-03-01

    This paper is based on the archaeological and analytical study of the laboratory remains from the Officina Chimica of the Old Ashmolean Museum in Oxford. Following a contextualisation of this laboratory, founded in the wake of Bacon's utopian idea of Solomon's Temple, it is argued that the assemblage is likely to date from the late seventeenth century and thus be connected to the work of Robert Plot, Christopher White, and, indirectly, Robert Boyle. The analytical study of the equipment reveals that the chymists at the Old Ashmolean obtained crucibles from the best manufacturers in Europe, and that they used these and other utensils for experiments involving mercury, sulphur, zinc, lead glass, manganese, and antimony. The importance of these elements for early modern chymistry is discussed in the light of relevant historical sources, including some of Boyle's chymical texts. Altogether, these finds illustrate some of the rich diversity of experiments that took place in one of the most prominent laboratories of the period, showing strong connections with longstanding alchemical concerns as well as with cutting-edge research and development ventures.

  18. Galaxy Clusters to z <= 1 from the Oxford Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammell, Molly; Wegner, Gary; Moustakas, Leonidas; Allen, Paul; Dalton, Gavin; Olding, Edward

    2003-05-01

    The properties of galaxy clusters in the local universe have been fairly well determined in the past few decades, and wide field surveys in the near infrared are converging on a statistically significant sample of high redshift clusters. These catalogs may soon allow discrimination between the competing models of galaxy formation and evolution [1]. The Oxford-Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey (ODT) will span four widely separated 3° × 3° fields, to B < 26 in UBVRi'Z with an extension in the near-infrared to K < 19. With more than half of the survey completed, this deep, wide-area, multi-color dataset has yielded a large sample of K-selected clusters to probe the formation and evolution history of galaxies in dense environments. An exploration of cluster color-magnitude slopes and intercepts [2], luminosity functions [3], and morphological distributions [4, 5] should constrain the relative dominance of star formation rates and merger events on cluster galaxy evolution. Here, we present our cluster-finding method and preliminary results.

  19. Report of the 14th Genomic Standards Consortium Meeting, Oxford, UK, September 17-21, 2012.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Barker, Katharine; Bicak, Mesude; Bourlat, Sarah; Coddington, Jonathan; Deck, John; Drummond, Alexei; Gilbert, Jack A.; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Kottmann, Renzo; Meyer, Chris; Morrison, Norman; Obst, Matthias; Robbins, Robert; Schriml, Lynn; Sterk, Peter; Stones-Havas, Steven

    2014-01-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings of the 14th workshop of the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) held at the University of Oxford in September 2012. The primary goal of the workshop was to work towards the launch of the Genomic Observatories (GOs) Network under the GSC. For the first time, it brought together potential GOs sites, GSC members, and a range of interested partner organizations. It thus represented the first meeting of the GOs Network (GOs1). Key outcomes include the formation of a core group of “champions” ready to take the GOs Network forward, as well as the formation of working groups. The workshop also served as the first meeting of a wide range of participants in the Ocean Sampling Day (OSD) initiative, a first GOs action. Three projects with complementary interests – COST Action ES1103, MG4U and Micro B3 – organized joint sessions at the workshop. A two-day GSC Hackathon followed the main three days of meetings.

  20. The Bologna-Oxford total ankle replacement: a mid-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A; Martinelli, N; Sartorelli, E; Malerba, F

    2012-06-01

    The Bologna-Oxford (BOX) total ankle replacement (TAR) was developed with the aim of achieving satisfactory pain-free movement of the ankle. To date, only one single multicentre study has reported its clinical results. The aim of this study was to conduct an independent review of its mid-term results. We retrospectively reviewed a total of 60 prospectively followed patients in whom 62 BOX TARs had been implanted between 2004 and 2008. We used the American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) score to assess the clinical results. Standardised radiographs taken at the time of final follow-up were analysed by two observers. The overall survival was 91.9% at a mean follow-up of 42.5 months (24 to 71). The mean AOFAS score had improved from 35.1 points (sd 16.6; 4 to 73) pre-operatively to 78.0 (sd 10.7; 57 to 100) at final follow-up (p < 0.01). Tibial radiolucencies < 2 mm in width were seen around 16 TARs. Talar radiolucencies < 2 mm were seen around four TARs. A total of 47 patients (78.3%) were very satisfied or satisfied with the outcome. Five patients required revision for functional limitation or continuing pain.

  1. Leading a double life in 17th-century Oxford: Ralph Bathurst (1620-1704), physician-physiologist and cleric.

    PubMed

    Guy, Jean M

    2006-02-01

    Ralph Bathurst spent most of his working life in Trinity College, Oxford. Strongly influenced by William Harvey, he was a friend and colleague of Thomas Willis, Robert Boyle and many other eminent experimentalists. His intended career as an Anglican priest and theologian was frustrated during the Commonwealth. Instead, he trained as a physician and practised in Abingdon in Berkshire and in the Navy. His examination papers for the degrees of Bachelor and Doctor of Medicine survived and were printed many years after his death. This paper, summarizing the three Latin lectures on respiration given for his doctoral degree in 1654, throws light on the physiological research carried out in Oxford at that time. The lectures included clinical observations, the results of experiments performed by himself and others, and speculations on the chemistry of air in the era before Joseph Priestley.

  2. Tackling Shell Shock in Great War Oxford: Thomas Saxty Good, William McDougall, and James Arthur Hadfield.

    PubMed

    Stewart, John

    2016-01-01

    Shell shock was an important object of diagnostic and therapeutic concern in Oxford during the Great War. The efforts of three Oxford physicians--Thomas Saxty Good, William McDougall, and James Arthur Hadfield--are of particular significance to our story. All worked on the problem at various sites throughout the city. They often collaborated. All were committed to employing innovative techniques such as psychotherapy and hypnosis. Each rose, to differing extents, to prominence in the field of psychological medicine during the succeeding decades. Yet all have been neglected in the current historiography. I argue that a close examination of their practices reveals a curious combination of therapeutic pragmatism and psychoanalytically informed techniques that later helped inform clinical psychology's challenge to psychiatry's dominance over the concept and care of mental disorder.

  3. Positional cloning by linkage disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Maniatis, Nikolas; Collins, Andrew; Gibson, Jane; Zhang, Weihua; Tapper, William; Morton, Newton E

    2004-05-01

    Recently, metric linkage disequilibrium (LD) maps that assign an LD unit (LDU) location for each marker have been developed (Maniatis et al. 2002). Here we present a multiple pairwise method for positional cloning by LD within a composite likelihood framework and investigate the operating characteristics of maps in physical units (kb) and LDU for two bodies of data (Daly et al. 2001; Jeffreys et al. 2001) on which current ideas of blocks are based. False-negative indications of a disease locus (type II error) were examined by selecting one single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at a time as causal and taking its allelic count (0, 1, or 2, for the three genotypes) as a pseudophenotype, Y. By use of regression and correlation, association between every pseudophenotype and the allelic count of each SNP locus (X) was based on an adaptation of the Malecot model, which includes a parameter for location of the putative gene. By expressing locations in kb or LDU, greater power for localization was observed when the LDU map was fitted. The efficiency of the kb map, relative to the LDU map, to describe LD varied from a maximum of 0.87 to a minimum of 0.36, with a mean of 0.62. False-positive indications of a disease locus (type I error) were examined by simulating an unlinked causal SNP and the allele count was used as a pseudophenotype. The type I error was in good agreement with Wald's likelihood theorem for both metrics and all models that were tested. Unlike tests that select only the most significant marker, haplotype, or haploset, these methods are robust to large numbers of markers in a candidate region. Contrary to predictions from tagging SNPs that retain haplotype diversity, the sample with smaller size but greater SNP density gave less error. The locations of causal SNPs were estimated with the same precision in blocks and steps, suggesting that block definition may be less useful than anticipated for mapping a causal SNP. These results provide a guide to efficient

  4. Comparing Linkage Designs Based on Land Facets to Linkage Designs Based on Focal Species

    PubMed Central

    Brost, Brian M.; Beier, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Least-cost modeling for focal species is the most widely used method for designing conservation corridors and linkages. However, these designs depend on today's land covers, which will be altered by climate change. We recently proposed an alternative approach based on land facets (recurring landscape units of relatively uniform topography and soils). The rationale is that corridors with high continuity of individual land facets will facilitate movement of species associated with each facet today and in the future. Conservation practitioners might like to know whether a linkage design based on land facets is likely to provide continuity of modeled breeding habitat for species needing connectivity today, and whether a linkage for focal species provides continuity and interspersion of land facets. To address these questions, we compared linkages designed for focal species and land facets in three landscapes in Arizona, USA. We used two variables to measure linkage utility, namely distances between patches of modeled breeding habitat for 5–16 focal species in each linkage, and resistance profiles for focal species and land facets between patches connected by the linkage. Compared to focal species designs, linkage designs based on land facets provided as much or more modeled habitat connectivity for 25 of 28 species-landscape combinations, failing only for the three species with the most narrowly distributed habitat. Compared to land facets designs, focal species linkages provided lower connectivity for about half the land facets in two landscapes. In areas where a focal species approach to linkage design is not possible, our results suggest that conservation practitioners may be able to implement a land facets approach with some confidence that the linkage design would serve most potential focal species. In areas where focal species designs are possible, we recommend using the land facet approach to complement, rather than replace, focal species approaches. PMID

  5. Stem cells - A very short introduction Jonathan Slack Stem cells - A very short introduction Oxford University Press 144pp £7.99 9780199603381 9780199603381 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2012-10-31

    The latest addition to this popular pocket-book series from Oxford University Press is by Jonathan Slack, a prominent researcher and director of the Stem Cell Institute at the University of Minnesota in the United States.

  6. Hydrology of the Little Androscoggin River Valley aquifer, Oxford County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Little Androscoggin River valley aquifer, a 15-square-mile sand and gravel valley-fill aquifer in southwestern Maine, is the source of water for the towns of Norway, Oxford, and South Paris. Estimated inflows to the aquifer during the 1981 water year were 16.4 cubic feet per second from precipitation directly on the aquifer, 11.2 cubic feet per second from till covered uplands adjacent to the aquifer, and 1.4 cubic feet per second from surface-water leakage. Outflows from the aquifer were 26.7 cubic feet per second to surface water and 2.3 cubic feet per second to wells. A finite-difference ground-water flow model was used to simulate conditions observed in the aquifer during 1981. Model conditions observed in the aquifer during 1981. Model simulations indicate that a 50 percent reduction of average 1981 recharge to the aquifer would cause water level declines of up to 20 feet in some areas. Model simulations of increased pumping at a high yield well in the northern part of the aquifer indicate that resulting changes in the water table will not be sufficient to intercept groundwater contaminated by a sludge disposal site. Water in the aquifer is low in dissolved solids (average for 38 samples was 67 mg/L), slightly acidic and soft. Ground-water contamination has occurred near a sludge-disposal site and in the vicinity of a sanitary landfill. Dissolved solids in ground water near the sludge disposal site were as much as ten times greater than average background values for the aquifer. (USGS)

  7. Assessing the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION

    PubMed Central

    Laver, T.; Harrison, J.; O’Neill, P.A.; Moore, K.; Farbos, A.; Paszkiewicz, K.; Studholme, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) MinION is a new sequencing technology that potentially offers read lengths of tens of kilobases (kb) limited only by the length of DNA molecules presented to it. The device has a low capital cost, is by far the most portable DNA sequencer available, and can produce data in real-time. It has numerous prospective applications including improving genome sequence assemblies and resolution of repeat-rich regions. Before such a technology is widely adopted, it is important to assess its performance and limitations in respect of throughput and accuracy. In this study we assessed the performance of the MinION by re-sequencing three bacterial genomes, with very different nucleotide compositions ranging from 28.6% to 70.7%; the high G + C strain was underrepresented in the sequencing reads. We estimate the error rate of the MinION (after base calling) to be 38.2%. Mean and median read lengths were 2 kb and 1 kb respectively, while the longest single read was 98 kb. The whole length of a 5 kb rRNA operon was covered by a single read. As the first nanopore-based single molecule sequencer available to researchers, the MinION is an exciting prospect; however, the current error rate limits its ability to compete with existing sequencing technologies, though we do show that MinION sequence reads can enhance contiguity of de novo assembly when used in conjunction with Illumina MiSeq data. PMID:26753127

  8. Assessing the performance of the Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION.

    PubMed

    Laver, T; Harrison, J; O'Neill, P A; Moore, K; Farbos, A; Paszkiewicz, K; Studholme, D J

    2015-03-01

    The Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) MinION is a new sequencing technology that potentially offers read lengths of tens of kilobases (kb) limited only by the length of DNA molecules presented to it. The device has a low capital cost, is by far the most portable DNA sequencer available, and can produce data in real-time. It has numerous prospective applications including improving genome sequence assemblies and resolution of repeat-rich regions. Before such a technology is widely adopted, it is important to assess its performance and limitations in respect of throughput and accuracy. In this study we assessed the performance of the MinION by re-sequencing three bacterial genomes, with very different nucleotide compositions ranging from 28.6% to 70.7%; the high G + C strain was underrepresented in the sequencing reads. We estimate the error rate of the MinION (after base calling) to be 38.2%. Mean and median read lengths were 2 kb and 1 kb respectively, while the longest single read was 98 kb. The whole length of a 5 kb rRNA operon was covered by a single read. As the first nanopore-based single molecule sequencer available to researchers, the MinION is an exciting prospect; however, the current error rate limits its ability to compete with existing sequencing technologies, though we do show that MinION sequence reads can enhance contiguity of de novo assembly when used in conjunction with Illumina MiSeq data.

  9. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Laura; Jenkinson, Crispin; Dummett, Sarah; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Morley, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF). The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13) were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and to assess its psychometric properties. The final instrument is intended for use in clinical trials and interventions targeted at maintaining or improving activity and participation. PMID:26056503

  10. A catalog of clusters to z ≤ 1 from the Oxford Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammell, Molly C.

    2004-06-01

    A sample of 46 previously unidentified, intermediate- to high-redshift, near-infrared (NIR)-selected galaxy clusters have been discovered in the Andromeda catalog of the Oxford Dartmouth Thirty Degree Survey (ODTS). These clusters vary from low- to high-redshift in distance, 0.1 < z < 0.8, and span galaxy count ranges from poor to rich clusters, richnesses of 10 < NAbell < 100. The clusters were selected from a contiguous field of 1.5 square degrees, imaged in 5 optical passbands, U, B, V, R, i', and one NIR passband, K. Two algorithms were developed to select the clusters from this multi-color dataset, the ODT Friends (ODTF) and the Brightest-color (BC). The ODTF method adapts the classical friends-of- friends method for use with photometric redshifts. The BC technique takes advantage of previous observations that clusters tend to be dominated by a large early-type galaxy, and that nearly all of the early-type galaxies in the cluster occupy a small space in color-magnitude diagrams. Extensive simulations with artificial galaxies have been performed to test how well these algorithms select clusters as a function of cluster richness and redshift. The ODTF method successfully recovers a larger fraction of the artificial clusters at higher redshift and lower richness class than the BC method, but this method also suffers from a larger number of false cluster identifications than the BC method. After correcting for the selection function and false detection rate of our algorithms, the abundances of ODTS clusters were compared to cluster counts found in other comparable surveys and to the abundance of clusters predicted by models of cluster formation. The ODT cluster number densities are very similar to other comparable surveys. The ODT cluster mass function is consistent with other surveys, and all of these surveys are broadly consistent with a range of cosmological models.

  11. Postremediation dose assessment for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site, Oxford, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Kamboj, S.; Nimmagadda, M.; Yu, C.

    1996-04-01

    Potential maximum radiation dose rates were calculated for the former Alba Craft Laboratory site in Oxford, Ohio, which was involved in machining of uranium metal in the 1950s for the U.S. atomic energy program. The site is not currently being used. The residual radioactive material guidelines (RESRAD) computer code, which implements the methodology described in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) manual for establishing residual radioactive material guidelines, was sued in this evaluation. Three potential land use scenarios were considered for the former Alba Craft site; the scenarios vary with regard to the type of site use, time spent at the site by the exposed individual, and sources of food consumed. Scenario A (a possible land use scenario) assumed industrial use of the site; Scenario B (a likely future land use scenario) assumed residential use of the site; and Scenario C (a possible but unlikely land use scenario) assumed the presence of a resident farmer. For scenario A, it was assumed that any water used for domestic or industrial activities would be from uncontaminated off-site municipal sources. The water used for drinking, household purposes, and irrigation was assumed to be from uncontaminated municipal sources in Scenario B; groundwater drawn from a well located at the downgradient edge of the contaminated zone would be the only source of water for drinking, irrigation, and raising livestock in Scenario C. The results of the evaluation indicated that the DOE dose limit of 100 mrem/yr would not be exceeded for any of the scenarios analyzed. The potential maximum dose rates for Scenarios A, B, and C are 0.64, 2.0, and 11 mrem/yr, respectively.

  12. Radiographic total disc replacement angle measurement accuracy using the Oxford Cobbometer: precision and bias

    PubMed Central

    Stafylas, Kosmas; McManus, John; Schizas, Constantin

    2008-01-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) clinical success has been reported to be related to the residual motion of the operated level. Thus, accurate measurement of TDR range of motion (ROM) is of utmost importance. One commonly used tool in measuring ROM is the Oxford Cobbometer. Little is known however on its accuracy (precision and bias) in measuring TDR angles. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of the Cobbometer to accurately measure radiographic TDR angles. An anatomically accurate synthetic L4–L5 motion segment was instrumented with a CHARITE artificial disc. The TDR angle and anatomical position between L4 and L5 was fixed to prohibit motion while the motion segment was radiographically imaged in various degrees of rotation and elevation, representing a sample of possible patient placement positions. An experienced observer made ten readings of the TDR angle using the Cobbometer at each different position. The Cobbometer readings were analyzed to determine measurement accuracy at each position. Furthermore, analysis of variance was used to study rotation and elevation of the motion segment as treatment factors. Cobbometer TDR angle measurements were most accurate (highest precision and lowest bias) at the centered position (95.5%), which placed the TDR directly inline with the x-ray beam source without any rotation. In contrast, the lowest accuracy (75.2%) was observed in the most rotated and off-centered view. A difference as high as 4° between readings at any individual position, and as high as 6° between all the positions was observed. Furthermore, the Cobbometer was unable to detect the expected trend in TDR angle projection with changing position. Although the Cobbometer has been reported to be reliable in different clinical applications, it lacks the needed accuracy to measure TDR angles and ROM. More accurate ROM measurement methods need to be developed to help surgeons and researchers assess radiological success of TDRs. PMID:18496719

  13. A time to pregnancy questionnaire designed for long term recall: validity in Oxford, England.

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, M; Villard, L; Li, Z; Plowman, R; Vessey, M

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To establish the degree of validity of data on time to pregnancy, derived retrospectively using a short questionnaire. DESIGN--Information from the questionnaire was compared with data that had been collected concurrently from the same individuals. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS--Questionnaires were mailed to 1647 women who continue to be followed up by the Oxford Family Planning Association contraceptive study, and a further 424 were approached for personal interview. Response rates were 91% and 79% respectively. MAIN RESULTS--Matching was successful in 91% of pregnancies. Median recall time was 14 years (interquartile range, 11-16 years). At the group level, remarkably good agreement was found between the two sources of information, presented as cumulative percentage distributions of live births. The findings were at least as good with longer recall (> 14 years) as with shorter recall. Digit performance was present to a limited degree. At the individual level, some misclassification was evident, which has implications for statistical power. For detection of clinical infertility (no conception within 12 months), the sensitivity was in the range 67%-91%, and the specificity was 92%-96%. Variations with format, duration of recall, age at delivery, year of birth, parity, social class, smoking habit, last contraceptive method, and outcome (live birth or not) were generally small, and were not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS--Time to pregnancy is a sensitive way of assessing reproductive function in either sex. Valid data at a group level can be derived retrospectively, with a long duration of recall, using a short questionnaire. PMID:7629471

  14. Results after Cementless Medial Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Replacement - Incidence of Radiolucent Lines

    PubMed Central

    Panzram, Benjamin; Bertlich, Ines; Reiner, Tobias; Walker, Tilman; Hagmann, Sébastien; Weber, Marc-André; Gotterbarm, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Tibial radiolucent lines (RL) are commonly seen in cemented unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). In the postoperative course, they can be misinterpreted as signs of loosening, thus leading to unnecessary revision. Since 2004, a cementless OUKR is available. First studies and registry data have shown equally good clinical results of cementless OUKR compared to the cemented version and a significantly reduced incidence of RL in cementless implants. Methods This single-centre retrospective cohort study includes the first 30 UKR (27 patients) implanted between 2007 and 2009 with a mean follow-up of 5 years. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the OKS, AKS, range of movement (ROM) and level of pain (VAS). Standard radiologic evaluation was performed at three months, one and five years after surgery. The results five years after implantation were compared to a group of 27 cemented Oxford UKR (OUKR) in a matched-pair-analysis. Results Tibial RL were seen in 10 implants three months after operation, which significantly decreased to five after one year and to three after five years (p = 0.02). RL did not have a significant influence on revision (p = 1.0) or clinical outcome after five years. RL were always partial, never progressive and strictly limited to the tibia. There was no significant difference in the incidence of tibial RL five years after implantation between cemented and cementless implants (cemented: 4, cementless: 3, p = 1.0). Conclusions After cementless implantation RL were limited to the tibia, partial and never progressive. During short term follow-up the incidence of RL decreased significantly. RL seem to have no influence on clinical outcome and revision. PMID:28103308

  15. Disulphide linkage in mouse ST6Gal-I: determination of linkage positions and mutant analysis.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuichi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Takumi; Ishihara, Yoshimi; Takaki, Yoshie; Kono, Mari; Dohmae, Naoshi; Tsuji, Shuichi

    2012-02-01

    All cloned sialyltransferases from vertebrates are classified into four subfamilies and are characterized as having type II transmembrane topology. The catalytic domain has highly conserved motifs known as sialylmotifs. Besides sialylmotifs, each family has several unique conserved cysteine (Cys) residues mainly in the catalytic domain. The number and loci of conserved amino acids, however, differ with each subfamily, suggesting that the conserved Cys-residues and/or disulphide linkages they make may contribute to linkage specificity. Using Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF)-mass spectrometry, the present study performed disulphide linkage analysis on soluble mouse ST6Gal-I, which has six Cys-residues. Results confirmed that there were no free Cys-residues, and all six residues contributed to disulphide linkage formation, C(139)-C(403), C(181)-C(332) and C(350)-C(361). Study of single amino acid-substituted mutants revealed that the disulphide linkage C(181)-C(332) was necessary for molecular expression of the enzyme, and that the disulphide linkage C(350)-C(361) was necessary for enzyme activity. The remaining disulphide linkage C(139)-C(403) was not necessary for enzyme expression or for activity, including substrate specificity. Crystallographic study of pig ST3Gal I has recently been reported. Interestingly, the loci of disulphide linkages in ST6Gal-I differ from those in ST3Gal I, suggesting that the linkage specificity of sialyltransferase may results from significant structural differences, including the loci of disulphide linkages.

  16. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion-communicative expression and physiological state-to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence.

  17. A Genetic Linkage Map for Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, M. D.; Kappes, S. M.; Keele, J. W.; Stone, R. T.; Sunden, SLF.; Hawkins, G. A.; Toldo, S. S.; Fries, R.; Grosz, M. D.; Yoo, J.; Beattie, C. W.

    1994-01-01

    We report the most extensive physically anchored linkage map for cattle produced to date. Three-hundred thirteen genetic markers ordered in 30 linkage groups, anchored to 24 autosomal chromosomes (n = 29), the X and Y chromosomes, four unanchored syntenic groups and two unassigned linkage groups spanning 2464 cM of the bovine genome are summarized. The map also assigns 19 type I loci to specific chromosomes and/or syntenic groups and four cosmid clones containing informative microsatellites to chromosomes 13, 25 and 29 anchoring syntenic groups U11, U7 and U8, respectively. This map provides the skeletal framework prerequisite to development of a comprehensive genetic map for cattle and analysis of economic trait loci (ETL). PMID:7908653

  18. Intragroup Emotions: Physiological Linkage and Social Presence

    PubMed Central

    Järvelä, Simo; Kätsyri, Jari; Ravaja, Niklas; Chanel, Guillaume; Henttonen, Pentti

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how technologically mediating two different components of emotion—communicative expression and physiological state—to group members affects physiological linkage and self-reported feelings in a small group during video viewing. In different conditions the availability of second screen text chat (communicative expression) and visualization of group level physiological heart rates and their dyadic linkage (physiology) was varied. Within this four person group two participants formed a physically co-located dyad and the other two were individually situated in two separate rooms. We found that text chat always increased heart rate synchrony but HR visualization only with non-co-located dyads. We also found that physiological linkage was strongly connected to self-reported social presence. The results encourage further exploration of the possibilities of sharing group member's physiological components of emotion by technological means to enhance mediated communication and strengthen social presence. PMID:26903913

  19. A reference linkage map for Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetic linkage maps are invaluable resources in plant research. They provide a key tool for many genetic applications including: mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL); comparative mapping; identifying unlinked (i.e. independent) DNA markers for fingerprinting, population genetics and phylogenetics; assisting genome sequence assembly; relating physical and recombination distances along the genome and map-based cloning of genes. Eucalypts are the dominant tree species in most Australian ecosystems and of economic importance globally as plantation trees. The genome sequence of E. grandis has recently been released providing unprecedented opportunities for genetic and genomic research in the genus. A robust reference linkage map containing sequence-based molecular markers is needed to capitalise on this resource. Several high density linkage maps have recently been constructed for the main commercial forestry species in the genus (E. grandis, E. urophylla and E. globulus) using sequenced Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) and microsatellite markers. To provide a single reference linkage map for eucalypts a composite map was produced through the integration of data from seven independent mapping experiments (1950 individuals) using a marker-merging method. Results The composite map totalled 1107 cM and contained 4101 markers; comprising 3880 DArT, 213 microsatellite and eight candidate genes. Eighty-one DArT markers were mapped to two or more linkage groups, resulting in the 4101 markers being mapped to 4191 map positions. Approximately 13% of DArT markers mapped to identical map positions, thus the composite map contained 3634 unique loci at an average interval of 0.31 cM. Conclusion The composite map represents the most saturated linkage map yet produced in Eucalyptus. As the majority of DArT markers contained on the map have been sequenced, the map provides a direct link to the E. grandis genome sequence and will serve as an important reference for

  20. Posterior probability of linkage analysis of autism dataset identifies linkage to chromosome 16

    PubMed Central

    Wassink, Thomas H.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Sheffield, Val C.; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Goedken, Rhinda; Childress, Deborah; Piven, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Objective To apply phenotypic and statistical methods designed to account for heterogeneity to linkage analyses of the autism Collaborative Linkage Study of Autism (CLSA) affected sibling pair families. Method The CLSA contains two sets of 57 families each; Set 1 has been analyzed previously, whereas this study presents the first analyses of Set 2. The two sets were analyzed independently, and were further split based on the degree of phrase speech delay in the siblings. Linkage analysis was carried out using the posterior probability of linkage (PPL), a Bayesian statistic that provides a mathematically rigorous mechanism for combining linkage evidence across multiple samples. Results Two-point PPLs from Set 1 led to the follow-up genotyping of 18 markers around linkage peaks on 1q, 13p, 13q, 16q, and 17q in both sets of families. Multipoint PPLs were then calculated for the entire CLSA sample. These analyses identified four regions with at least modest evidence in support of linkage: 1q at 173 cM, PPL = 0.12; 13p at 21 cM, PPL = 0.16; 16q at 63 cM, PPL= 0.36; Xq at 40 cM, PPL = 0.11. Conclusion We find strengthened evidence for linkage of autism to chromosomes 1q, 13p, 16q, and Xq, and diminished evidence for linkage to 7q and 13q. The verity of these findings will be tested by continuing to update our PPL analyses with data from additional autism datasets. PMID:18349700

  1. Irish study of high-density Schizophrenia families: Field methods and power to detect linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Kendler, K.S.; Straub, R.E.; MacLean, C.J.

    1996-04-09

    Large samples of multiplex pedigrees will probably be needed to detect susceptibility loci for schizophrenia by linkage analysis. Standardized ascertainment of such pedigrees from culturally and ethnically homogeneous populations may improve the probability of detection and replication of linkage. The Irish Study of High-Density Schizophrenia Families (ISHDSF) was formed from standardized ascertainment of multiplex schizophrenia families in 39 psychiatric facilities covering over 90% of the population in Ireland and Northern Ireland. We here describe a phenotypic sample and a subset thereof, the linkage sample. Individuals were included in the phenotypic sample if adequate diagnostic information, based on personal interview and/or hospital record, was available. Only individuals with available DNA were included in the linkage sample. Inclusion of a pedigree into the phenotypic sample required at least two first, second, or third degree relatives with non-affective psychosis (NAP), one of whom had schizophrenia (S) or poor-outcome schizoaffective disorder (PO-SAD). Entry into the linkage sample required DNA samples on at least two individuals with NAP, of whom at least one had S or PO-SAD. Affection was defined by narrow, intermediate, and broad criteria. 75 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Regional Workshops on CETA/Educational Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGough, Robert; And Others

    This document presents a summary of the proceedings of five regional workshops in Virginia which focused on planning for future involvement and linkages, as well as giving an orientation to the capabilities and operational philosophies of both Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) programs and educational organizations. Following…

  3. Past CETA Linkages: Models for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapin, Joel D.

    1982-01-01

    Examines lessons learned from successful linkages between community colleges and Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) sponsors as the basis for future occupational training and employment programs. Reviews research examining CETA funding patterns in California and exemplary arrangements between community colleges and CETA nationwide.…

  4. ARE COASTAL WETLAND-LAKE LINKAGES IMPORTANT?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because coastal werlands typically comprise only a small percentage of the overall surface area in large lakes, an assumption has often been made that functional links between wetlands and the lake proper are of little significance. Recent investigations of functional linkages be...

  5. Linkage Drag: Implication for Plant Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Linkage drag is commonly observed in plant breeding, yet the molecular mechanisms controlling this is unclear. The Pi-ta gene, a single copy gene near the centromere region of chromosome 12, confers resistance to races of Magnaporthe oryzae that contain AVR-Pita. The Pi-ta gene in Tetep has been su...

  6. Dialogic Linkage and Resonance in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, R. Peter; Hobson, Jessica A.; Garcia-Perez, Rosa; Du Bois, John

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated how children with autism make linguistic adjustments when talking with someone else. We devised two novel measures to assess (a) overall conversational linkage and (b) utterance-by-utterance resonance within dialogue between an adult and matched participants with and without autism (n = 12 per group). Participants with autism were…

  7. Developing Industry Linkages: Learning from Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misko, Josie

    Linkages between Australia's vocational education and training (VET) and technical and further education (TAFE) sectors and industry were examined through 13 case studies involving a variety of industrial sectors in South Australia, New South Wales, and Victoria. Special attention was paid to the processes established by school clusters to develop…

  8. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The pos...

  9. Automated linkage analysis in psychiatric disorders

    SciTech Connect

    He, L.; Mansfield, D.C.; Brown, A.F.; Green, D.K.

    1995-06-19

    A genome-wide search for linkage of microsatellite markers to chromosomal loci containing genes responsible for the major psychoses is a laborious task which can be carried out with greater speed and economy by introducing automation to several steps in the procedure. We describe the use of the Automated Linkage Preprocessor (ALP) program for the computer analysis of the waveform generated by fluorescein-labelled markers after electrophoretic separation. (To obtain a copy send a request to A.F. Brown at the below MRC address or use Anonymous FTP to ftp.hgu.mrc.ac.uk. Software is in directory pub/ALP.) The program runs on a PC in the Microsoft Windows environment, and is used in conjunction with an automated laser fluorescence (ALF) sequencer (Pharmacia) and its Fragment Manager{trademark} software to detect and size the PCR products, filter out peaks of fluorescence due to nonallele fragments, and generate genotypes in a format suitable for direct input to standard linkage analysis programs. The method should offer the advantages of speed, accuracy, and reduced cost. Its use in linkage studies in a large family with manic-depressive illness is discussed. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Alocomotino Control Algorithm for Robotic Linkage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dohner, Jeffrey L.

    2016-10-01

    This dissertation describes the development of a control algorithm that transitions a robotic linkage system between stabilized states producing responsive locomotion. The developed algorithm is demonstrated using a simple robotic construction consisting of a few links with actuation and sensing at each joint. Numerical and experimental validation is presented.

  11. Whole genome linkage disequilibrium maps in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine whole genome linkage disequilibrium maps were constructed for eight breeds of cattle. These data provide fundamental information concerning bovine genome organization which will allow the design of studies to associate genetic variation with economically important traits and also provides bac...

  12. Validation of the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy in cohorts with different presentations and treatments.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Rosanna; Troyanov, Stéphan; Bellur, Shubha; Cattran, Daniel; Cook, H Terence; Feehally, John; Roberts, Ian S D; Morando, Laura; Camilla, Roberta; Tesar, Vladimir; Lunberg, Sigrid; Gesualdo, Loreto; Emma, Francesco; Rollino, Cristiana; Amore, Alessandro; Praga, Manuel; Feriozzi, Sandro; Segoloni, Giuseppe; Pani, Antonello; Cancarini, Giovanni; Durlik, Magalena; Moggia, Elisabetta; Mazzucco, Gianna; Giannakakis, Costantinos; Honsova, Eva; Sundelin, B Brigitta; Di Palma, Anna Maria; Ferrario, Franco; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Asunis, Anna Maria; Barratt, Jonathan; Tardanico, Regina; Perkowska-Ptasinska, Agnieszka

    2014-10-01

    The Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) identified mesangial hypercellularity (M), endocapillary proliferation (E), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as independent predictors of outcome. Whether it applies to individuals excluded from the original study and how therapy influences the predictive value of pathology remain uncertain. The VALIGA study examined 1147 patients from 13 European countries that encompassed the whole spectrum of IgAN. Over a median follow-up of 4.7 years, 86% received renin-angiotensin system blockade and 42% glucocorticoid/immunosuppressive drugs. M, S, and T lesions independently predicted the loss of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and a lower renal survival. Their value was also assessed in patients not represented in the Oxford cohort. In individuals with eGFR less than 30 ml/min per 1.73 m(2), the M and T lesions independently predicted a poor survival. In those with proteinuria under 0.5 g/day, both M and E lesions were associated with a rise in proteinuria to 1 or 2 g/day or more. The addition of M, S, and T lesions to clinical variables significantly enhanced the ability to predict progression only in those who did not receive immunosuppression (net reclassification index 11.5%). The VALIGA study provides a validation of the Oxford classification in a large European cohort of IgAN patients across the whole spectrum of the disease. The independent predictive value of pathology MEST score is reduced by glucocorticoid/immunosuppressive therapy.

  13. Validation of the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy in cohorts with different presentations and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Coppo, Rosanna; Troyanov, Stéphan; Bellur, Shubha; Cattran, Daniel; Cook, H Terence; Feehally, John; Roberts, Ian S D; Morando, Laura; Camilla, Roberta; Tesar, Vladimir; Lunberg, Sigrid; Gesualdo, Loreto; Emma, Francesco; Rollino, Cristiana; Amore, Alessandro; Praga, Manuel; Feriozzi, Sandro; Segoloni, Giuseppe; Pani, Antonello; Cancarini, Giovanni; Durlik, Magalena; Moggia, Elisabetta; Mazzucco, Gianna; Giannakakis, Costantinos; Honsova, Eva; Sundelin, B Brigitta; Di Palma, Anna Maria; Ferrario, Franco; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Asunis, Anna Maria; Barratt, Jonathan; Tardanico, Regina; Perkowska-Ptasinska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    The Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) identified mesangial hypercellularity (M), endocapillary proliferation (E), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as independent predictors of outcome. Whether it applies to individuals excluded from the original study and how therapy influences the predictive value of pathology remain uncertain. The VALIGA study examined 1147 patients from 13 European countries that encompassed the whole spectrum of IgAN. Over a median follow-up of 4.7 years, 86% received renin–angiotensin system blockade and 42% glucocorticoid/immunosuppressive drugs. M, S, and T lesions independently predicted the loss of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and a lower renal survival. Their value was also assessed in patients not represented in the Oxford cohort. In individuals with eGFR less than 30 ml/min per 1.73 m2, the M and T lesions independently predicted a poor survival. In those with proteinuria under 0.5 g/day, both M and E lesions were associated with a rise in proteinuria to 1 or 2 g/day or more. The addition of M, S, and T lesions to clinical variables significantly enhanced the ability to predict progression only in those who did not receive immunosuppression (net reclassification index 11.5%). The VALIGA study provides a validation of the Oxford classification in a large European cohort of IgAN patients across the whole spectrum of the disease. The independent predictive value of pathology MEST score is reduced by glucocorticoid/immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:24694989

  14. Three Degree of Freedom Parallel Mechanical Linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelstein, Bernard D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A three degree of freedom parallel mechanism or linkage that couples three degree of freedom translational displacements at an endpoint, such as a handle, a hand grip, or a robot tool, to link rotations about three axes that are fixed with respect to a common base or ground link. The mechanism includes a three degree of freedom spherical linkage formed of two closed loops, and a planar linkage connected to the endpoint. The closed loops are rotatably interconnected, and made of eight rigid links connected by a plurality of single degree of freedom revolute joints. Three of these revolute joints are base joints and are connected to a common ground. such that the axis lines passing through the revolute joints intersect at a common fixed center point K forming the center of a spherical work volume in which the endpoint is capable of moving. 'Me three degrees of freedom correspond to the spatial displacement of the endpoint, for instance. The mechanism provides a new overall spatial kinematic linkage composed of a minimal number of rigid links and rotary joints. The mechanism has improved mechanical stiffness, and conveys mechanical power bidirectionally between the human operator and the electromechanical actuators. It does not require gears, belts. cable, screw or other types of transmission elements, and is useful in applications requiring full backdrivability. Thus, this invention can serve as the mechanical linkage for actively powered devices such as compliant robotic manipulators and force-reflecting hand controllers, and passive devices such as manual input devices for computers and other systems.

  15. Weak linkage between the heaviest rainfall and tallest storms

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Atsushi; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Liu, Chuntao; Zipser, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, the heaviest rainfall has been linked to the tallest, most intense convective storms. However, the global picture of the linkage between extreme rainfall and convection remains unclear. Here we analyse an 11-year record of spaceborne precipitation radar observations and establish that a relatively small fraction of extreme convective events produces extreme rainfall rates in any region of the tropics and subtropics. Robust differences between extreme rainfall and convective events are found in the rainfall characteristics and environmental conditions, irrespective of region; most extreme rainfall events are characterized by less intense convection with intense radar echoes not extending to extremely high altitudes. Rainfall characteristics and environmental conditions both indicate the importance of warm-rain processes in producing extreme rainfall rates. Our results demonstrate that, even in regions where severe convective storms are representative extreme weather events, the heaviest rainfall events are mostly associated with less intense convection. PMID:25708295

  16. External linkage tie permits reduction in ducting system flange thickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfleger, R. O.

    1966-01-01

    External linkage tie reduces flange thickness and increases seal efficiency in high pressure ducting and piping systems. The linkage transmits the pressure separating load to the tube wall behind the flange allowing the flange to support only the seal.

  17. Autosomal dominant familial spastic paraplegia; Linkage analysis and evidence for linkage to chromosome 2p

    SciTech Connect

    Figlewicz, D.A.; Dube, M.P.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1994-09-01

    Familial spastic paraplegia (FSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. Little is known about the pathophysiology of this disorder. FSP can be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or X-linked trait. We have undertaken linkage analysis for a group of 36 AD FSP families from which we have collected blood samples from 427 individuals, including 148 affected individuals. Typing of polymorphic markers has allowed us to exclude more than 50% of the genome. Recently, linkage for AD FSP to a locus on chromosome 14q was reported. Our AD FSP kindreds were tested for linkage to markers spanning the 20 cM region between D14S69 and D14S66; however, we were not able to establish linkage for any of our families to chromosome 14. Lod scores suggestive of linkage for some AD FSP kindreds have been obtained for markers on chromosome 2p. We have tested seven polymorphic markers spanning the region between D2S405 and D2S177. Our highest aggregate lod score, including all families tested, was obtained at the locus D2S352: 2.4 at 20 cM. Results from HOMOG analysis for linkage heterogeneity will be reported.

  18. Sex-linked genes and linkage maps in amphibians.

    PubMed

    Sumida, M; Nishioka1, M

    2000-06-01

    This paper reviews sex-linked genes and linkage maps in amphibians. It appears that there is no common ancestral or conserved sex-linkage group in amphibians, whereas an important proportion of other linkage groups has been conserved in amphibians. Comparisons of amphibian linkage maps with those of fishes and mammals reveal several syntenic associations apparently conserved over a very long period of vertebrate divergence.

  19. 20 CFR 628.545 - Linkages and coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Linkages and coordination. 628.545 Section... the Job Training Partnership Act § 628.545 Linkages and coordination. (a) General requirements. (1) To..., shall establish appropriate linkages and coordination procedures with other Federal programs...

  20. 20 CFR 628.545 - Linkages and coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Linkages and coordination. 628.545 Section... the Job Training Partnership Act § 628.545 Linkages and coordination. (a) General requirements. (1) To..., shall establish appropriate linkages and coordination procedures with other Federal programs...

  1. Standard nomenclature for common bean chromosomes and linkage groups

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several DNA-based linkage maps have been developed for common bean including the core common bean linkage map using the BAT93 x Jalo EEP558 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Correlation of common bean chromosomes to the genetic linkage groups was completed using RFLP markers to assign each l...

  2. Adjustable throttle linkage for outboard motors

    SciTech Connect

    Dunham, W.D.; Miller, G.L.

    1986-02-17

    An adjustable throttle linkage is described for use in controlling operation of an internal combustion engine having a carburetor including a pivotable throttle valve, a throttle valve position control member operably connected to the throttle valve and movable so as to control the position of the throttle valve, and a throttle lever for controlling the position of the throttle valve. The adjustable throttle linkage comprises a connecting link having one end connected to one of the throttle lever and the control member, and having a threaded portion, means for adjustably connecting the threaded portion to the other of the throttle lever and the control member. The adjustable connecting means includes a slot in the other of the throttle lever and the control member, and a rotatable member threaded onto the threaded portion and receive in the slot such that rotation of the rotatable member causes relative movement between the link and the other of the throttle lever and the control member.

  3. Anxiety and Depression: Linkages with Viral Diseases.

    PubMed

    Coughlin, Steven S

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety and mood disorders are common in the general population in countries around the world. This article provides a review of the recent literature on anxiety and depressive disorders with a focus on linkages with several important viral diseases. Although the majority of studies have been conducted in developed countries such as the United States and Great Britain, some studies have been carried out in less developed nations where only a small percentage of persons with mental illness receive treatment for their condition. The studies summarized in this review indicate that there are important linkages between anxiety and depression and viral diseases such as influenza A (H1N1) and other influenza viruses, varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome, and hepatitis C. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the mechanisms for interactions between mental health and communicable diseases, in order to assist patients and further prevention and control efforts.

  4. Varieties of religion-family linkages.

    PubMed

    Snarey, J R; Dollahite, D C

    2001-12-01

    The 4 articles in this special issue make important contributions to both family and religious studies as well as to their interface. This commentary begins by considering 4 unifying themes present across all of the articles, including meaningful religion-family linkages, the importance of gender differences in the faith-family interface, the significance of intergenerational relationships, and the need for better theory. The authors then discuss the unique major strength and secondary limitations of each study. Finally, the commentary focuses on two challenges inhibiting the contemporary study of religion and the family--a relative lack of racial and religious diversity in samples and the lack of a unifying theory of religion-family linkages--and suggests how to adjust the trajectory of future theory and research to address these issues.

  5. Linkages among global and regional air issues

    SciTech Connect

    Maarouf, A.R.

    1997-11-01

    Six air issues are currently on science and policy agendas in Canada and elsewhere. These are climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, acidic deposition, SMOG, suspended particulate matter, and hazardous air pollutants. It is now recognized that these issues are interrelated, and they may interact to cause negative as well as some beneficial effects. The linkages among these issues must therefore be better understood in order to develop effective policies to deal with this ensemble of related issues. This paper illustrates through several examples the linkages among the air issues. It also points to potentially conflicting policies arising from the single-issue approach, and it emphasizes the need for better integration of air issues. 14 refs., 1 tab.

  6. Complete genetic linkage can subvert natural selection

    PubMed Central

    Gerrish, Philip J.; Colato, Alexandre; Perelson, Alan S.; Sniegowski, Paul D.

    2007-01-01

    The intricate adjustment of organisms to their environment demonstrates the effectiveness of natural selection. But Darwin himself recognized that certain biological features could limit this effectiveness, features that generally reduce the efficiency of natural selection or yield suboptimal adaptation. Genetic linkage is known to be one such feature, and here we show theoretically that it can introduce a more sinister flaw: when there is complete linkage between loci affecting fitness and loci affecting mutation rate, positive natural selection and recurrent mutation can drive mutation rates in an adapting population to intolerable levels. We discuss potential implications of this finding for the early establishment of recombination, the evolutionary fate of asexual populations, and immunological clearance of clonal pathogens. PMID:17405865

  7. Linkage of typical pseudoachondroplasia to chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, J.T.; Deere, M.; Conner, B.; Horton, W.A. ); Francomano, C.A. ); Briggs, M.D.; Cohn, D.H. ); Warman, M. ); Blanton, S.H. )

    1993-12-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is an autosomal dominant dwarfing condition associated with disproportionate short stature, marked joint deformities, and early onset osteoarthritis. Previous linkage studies have excluded linkage to cartilage and noncartilagenous extracellular matrix candidate genes. Here, the authors report mapping the pseudoachondroplasia gene to chromosome 19. Maximum lod scores of 4.70, 4.15, and 4.86 at [theta] = 0.00 were found for D19S212, D19S215, and D19S49, respectively. Multipoint analysis suggests the following order: D19S253-D19S199-(D19S212/PSACH/D19S215)-D19S222-D19S49. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Linkage on chromosome 14 in a genomewide linkage study of a broad anxiety phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Middeldorp, Christel M.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Slagboom, P. Eline; Sullivan, Patrick F.; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Posthuma, Danielle; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2014-01-01

    Several linkage studies on anxiety have been carried out in samples ascertained through probands with panic disorder. The results indicated that using a broad anxiety phenotype instead of a DSM-IV anxiety disorder diagnosis might enhance the chance of finding a linkage signal. In the current study, a genome-wide linkage analysis was performed on anxiety measured with a self-report questionnaire whose scores are highly correlated with DSM-IV anxiety disorders. The self-report questionnaire was included in five surveys of a longitudinal study of the Netherlands Twin Register. Genotype and phenotype data were available for 1,602 twins and siblings. To estimate Identity By Descent (IBD), additional genotype data for 564 parents and 22 siblings were used. Linkage analyses were carried out using MERLIN-Regress on the average anxiety scores across time. A linkage signal (LOD-score 3.4, empirical p-value 0.07) was obtained at chromosome 14 for marker D14S65 at 105 cM (90% confidence interval 99 cM - 115 cM bounded by markers D14S1434 and D14S985). This finding replicates a linkage finding for a broad anxiety phenotype in a clinically based sample, indicating that the region might harbor a QTL associated with the whole spectrum of general anxiety, i.e. from the normal to the clinical range. Moreover, genome-wide linkage and association studies on emotionality in mice obtained significant results in a syntenic region on mouse chromosome 12. Two homolog genes lie in this region –Dlk1 (delta-like 1 homolog, Drosophila) and Rtl1 (retrotransposon-like 1). Future association studies of these genes are warranted. PMID:17700576

  9. Molecular linkage maps of the Populus genome.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tongming; Zhang, Xinye; Huang, Minren; Wang, Minxiu; Zhuge, Qiang; Tu, Shengming; Zhu, Li-Huang; Wu, Rongling

    2002-06-01

    We report molecular genetic linkage maps for an interspecific hybrid population of Populus, a model system in forest-tree biology. The hybrids were produced by crosses between P. deltoides (mother) and P. euramericana (father), which is a natural hybrid of P. deltoides (grandmother) and P. nigra (grandfather). Linkage analysis from 93 of the 450 backcross progeny grown in the field for 15 years was performed using random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs), amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs), and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs). Of a total of 839 polymorphic markers identified, 560 (67%) were testcross markers heterozygous in one parent but null in the other (segregating 1:1), 206 (25%) were intercross dominant markers heterozygous in both parents (segregating 3:1), and the remaining 73 (9%) were 19 non-parental RAPD markers (segregating 1:1) and 54 codominant AFLP markers (segregating 1:1:1:1). A mixed set of the testcross markers, non-parental RAPD markers, and codominant AFLP markers was used to construct two linkage maps, one based on the P. deltoides (D) genome and the other based on P. euramericana (E). The two maps showed nearly complete coverage of the genome, spanning 3801 and 3452 cM, respectively. The availability of non-parental RAPD and codominant AFLP markers as orthologous genes allowed for a direct comparison of the rate of meiotic recombination between the two different parental species. Generally, the rate of meiotic recombination was greater for males than females in our interspecific poplar hybrids. The confounded effect of sexes and species causes the mean recombination distance of orthologous markers to be 11% longer for the father (P. euramericana; interspecific hybrid) than for the mother (P. deltoides; pure species). The linkage maps constructed and the interspecific poplar hybrid population in which clonal replicates for individual genotypes are available present a comprehensive foundation for future genomic studies and

  10. Structural synthesis of linkages for quadruped bio-robot legs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonescu, O.; Robu, C.; Antonescu, P.

    2016-08-01

    The paper presents a few kinematic schemes of planar mechanisms with bars (linkages) used as part of the quadruped robot legs. The Dunshee linkage having only four elements as crank-rocker mechanism is analyzed. Further, the Klann linkage, which is accomplished by amplifying the crank-rocker mechanism with a dyadic kinematic chain, is also presented. More than that, the Jansen linkage, which is obtained by extending and amplifying the crank-rocker mechanism with two dyadic kinematic chains, is also analyzed. At the end of the paper, the authors present a novel linkage application consisting of a quadric kinematic chain.

  11. Construction of multilocus genetic linkage maps in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Lander, E S; Green, P

    1987-01-01

    Human genetic linkage maps are most accurately constructed by using information from many loci simultaneously. Traditional methods for such multilocus linkage analysis are computationally prohibitive in general, even with supercomputers. The problem has acquired practical importance because of the current international collaboration aimed at constructing a complete human linkage map of DNA markers through the study of three-generation pedigrees. We describe here several alternative algorithms for constructing human linkage maps given a specified gene order. One method allows maximum-likelihood multilocus linkage maps for dozens of DNA markers in such three-generation pedigrees to be constructed in minutes. PMID:3470801

  12. Kids Talk: Strategic Language Use in Later Childhood. Oxford Studies in Sociolinguistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyle, Susan M., Ed.; Adger, Carolyn Temple, Ed.

    Attention to the language practices of school-age children and teenagers is essential for a complete understanding of how language use can vary in the social construction of everyday activity across the life span. This book examines a wide variety of language practices using data from naturally occurring recorded talk and careful observation of…

  13. The Relevance Aura of Bibliographic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes relevance assessments of topical descriptors for bibliographic records for two dimensions: (1) a vertical conceptual hierarchy of broad to narrow descriptors, and (2) a horizontal linkage of related terms. The data were analyzed for a semantic distance and semantic direction effect as postulated by the Semantic Distance Model. (Author/LRW)

  14. The effect of the Oxford uncemented medial compartment arthroplasty on the bone mineral density and content of the proximal tibia.

    PubMed

    Hooper, G J; Gilchrist, N; Maxwell, R; March, R; Heard, A; Frampton, C

    2013-11-01

    We studied the bone mineral density (BMD) and the bone mineral content (BMC) of the proximal tibia in patients with a well-functioning uncemented Oxford medial compartment arthroplasty using the Lunar iDXA bone densitometer. Our hypothesis was that there would be decreased BMD and BMC adjacent to the tibial base plate and increased BMD and BMC at the tip of the keel. There were 79 consecutive patients (33 men, 46 women) with a mean age of 65 years (44 to 84) with a minimum two-year follow-up (mean 2.6 years (2.0 to 5.0)) after unilateral arthroplasty, who were scanned using a validated standard protocol where seven regions of interest (ROI) were examined and compared with the contralateral normal knee. All had well-functioning knees with a mean Oxford knee score of 43 (14 to 48) and mean Knee Society function score of 90 (20 to 100), showing a correlation with the increasing scores and higher BMC and BMD values in ROI 2 in the non-implanted knee relative to the implanted knee (p = 0.013 and p = 0.015, respectively). The absolute and percentage changes in BMD and BMC were decreased in all ROIs in the implanted knee compared with the non-implanted knee, but this did not reach statistical significance. Bone loss was markedly less than reported losses with total knee replacement. There was no significant association with side, although there was a tendency for the BMC to decrease with age in men. The BMC was less in the implanted side relative to the non-implanted side in men compared with women in ROI 2 (p = 0.027), ROI 3 (p = 0.049) and ROI 4 (p = 0.029). The uncemented Oxford medial compartment arthroplasty appears to allow relative preservation of the BMC and BMD of the proximal tibia, suggesting that the implant acts more physiologically than total knee replacement. Peri-prosthetic bone loss is an important factor in assessing long-term implant stability and survival, and the results of this study are encouraging for the long-term outcome of this arthroplasty.

  15. Genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal hypertension phenotypes using three summary measures

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shaoqi; Li, Lin; Li, Xia; Moser, Kathy L; Guo, Zheng; Shen, Gongqing; Cannata, Ruth; Zirzow, Erich; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing

    2003-01-01

    Background Longitudinal data often have multiple (repeated) measures recorded along a time trajectory. For example, the two cohorts from the Framingham Heart Study (GAW13 Problem 1) contain 21 and 5 repeated measures for hypertension phenotypes as well as epidemiological risk factors, respectively. Direct modelling of a large number of serially and biologically correlated traits in the context of linkage analysis can be prohibitively complex. Alternatively, we may consider using univariate transformation for linkage analysis of longitudinal repeated measures. Results We evaluated the utility of three conventional summary measures (mean, slope, and principal components) for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes by analyzing the chromosome 10 data of the Framingham Heart Study. Except for the temporal slope, all of the summary methods and the multivariate analysis identified the previously reported region, marker GATA64A09, for systolic blood pressure or high blood pressure. Further analysis revealed that this region may harbor gene(s) affecting human blood pressure at multiple stages of life. Conclusion We conclude that mean and principal components are feasible alternatives for genetic linkage analysis of longitudinal phenotypes, but the slope might have a separate genetic basis from that of the original longitudinal phenotypes. PMID:14975092

  16. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. Case Report: We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient’s post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. Conclusion: This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. PMID:28164064

  17. Kosnarite, KZr2(PO4)3, a new mineral from Mount Mica and Black Mountain, Oxford County, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brownfield, M.E.; Foord, E.E.; Sutley, S.J.; Botinelly, T.

    1993-01-01

    Kosnarite, ideally KZr2(PO4)3, has been identified as part of a late-stage, secondary phosphate mineral assemblage from the Mount Mica pegmatite at Paris, and from the Black Mountain pegmatite, Rumford, Oxford County, Maine. Kosnarite from Mount Mica occurs as pseudocubic rhombohedral crystals, as much as 0.9 mm in maximum dimension, that display the dominant {102} form. Color ranges from pale blue to blue-green to nearly colorless. The mineral has a white streak, is transparent, has a vitreous luster, and is nonfluorescent in ultraviolet light. It has a hardness of 4.5, is brittle with a conchoidal fracture, and has perfect {102} cleavage. Kosnarite from Black Mountain is almost pure KZr2(PO4)3 with only trace amounts of Hf, Mn, Na, and Rb. The mineral is one of three known alkali zirconium phosphates; the others are gainesite and the Cs analogue of gainesite. -from Author

  18. Ranking current and prospective NO2 pollution mitigation strategies: An environmental and economic modelling investigation in Oxford Street, London.

    PubMed

    Jeanjean, A P R; Gallagher, J; Monks, P S; Leigh, R J

    2017-03-21

    Air pollution continues to be a problem in the urban environment. A range of different pollutant mitigation strategies that promote dispersion and deposition exist, but there is little evidence with respect to their comparative performance from both an environmental and economic perspective. This paper focuses on examining different NO2 mitigation strategies such as trees, buildings facades coated with photocatalytic paint and solid barriers in Oxford Street in London. The case study findings will support ranking the environmental and economic impacts of these different strategies to improve personal exposure conditions on the footpath and on the road in a real urban street canyon. CFD simulations of airflow and NO2 dispersion in Oxford Street in London were undertaken using the OpenFOAM software platform with the k-ε model, taking into account local prevailing wind conditions. Trees are shown to be the most cost-effective strategy, with a small reduction in NO2 concentrations of up to 0.7% on the road. However, solid barriers with and without the application of photocatalytic paint and an innovative material (20 times more expensive than trees) can improve air quality on the footpaths more substantially, up to 7.4%, yet this has a significant detrimental impact on NO2 concentrations (≤23.8%) on the road. Photocatalytic paint on building surfaces presented a minimal environmental reductions (1.2%) and economic (>100 times more expensive than trees) mitigation strategy. The findings recognised the differences between footpath and road concentrations occurred and that a focused examination of three pollution hotspots can provide more cost effective pollution mitigation. This study considers how a number of pollutant mitigation measures can be applied in a single street canyon and demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of these strategies from economic and environmental perspectives. Further research is required to extrapolate the findings presented here to

  19. Oxford-style debates in a microbiology course for majors: a method for delivering content and engaging critical thinking skills.

    PubMed

    Boucaud, Dwayne W; Nabel, Michael; Eggers, Christian H

    2013-01-01

    Developing scientific expertise in the classroom involves promoting higher-order cognitive skills as well as content mastery. Effective use of constructivism can facilitate these outcomes. However this is often difficult to accomplish when delivery of content is paramount. Utilizing many of the tenets of constructivist pedagogy, we have designed an Oxford-style debate assignment to be used in an introductory microbiology course. Two teams of students were assigned a debatable topic within microbiology. Over a five-week period students completed an informative web page consisting of three parts: background on the topic, data-based positions for each side of the argument, and a data-based persuasive argument to support their assigned position. This was followed by an in-class presentation and debate. Analysis of student performance on knowledge-based questions shows that students retain debate-derived content acquired primarily outside of lectures significantly better than content delivered during a normal lecture. Importantly, students who performed poorly on the lecture-derived questions did as well on debate-derived questions as other students. Students also performed well on questions requiring higher-order cognitive skills and in synthesizing data-driven arguments in support of a position during the debate. Student perceptions of their knowledge-base in areas covered by the debate and their skills in using scientific databases and analyzing primary literature showed a significant increase in pre- and postassignment comparisons. Our data demonstrate that an Oxford-style debate can be used effectively to deliver relevant content, increase higher-order cognitive skills, and increase self-efficacy in science-specific skills, all contributing to developing expertise in the field.

  20. Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Peruvian Andes indicate northern climate linkages.

    PubMed

    Licciardi, Joseph M; Schaefer, Joerg M; Taggart, Jean R; Lund, David C

    2009-09-25

    The role of the tropics in triggering, transmitting, and amplifying interhemispheric climate signals remains a key debate in paleoclimatology. Tropical glacier fluctuations provide important insight on regional paleoclimatic trends and forcings, but robust chronologies are scarce. Here, we report precise moraine ages from the Cordillera Vilcabamba (13 degrees 20'S) of southern Peru that indicate prominent glacial events and associated climatic shifts in the outer tropics during the early Holocene and late in the "Little Ice Age" period. Our glacier chronologies differ from the New Zealand record but are broadly correlative with well-dated glacial records in Europe, suggesting climate linkages between the tropics and the North Atlantic region.

  1. The problem of ascertainment for linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Vieland, V.; Hodge, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    It is generally believed that ascertainment corrections are unnecessary in linkage analysis, provided individuals are selected for study solely on the basis of trait phenotype and not on the basis of marker genotype. The theoretical rationale for this is that standard linkage analytic methods involve conditioning likelihoods on all the trait data, which may be viewed as an application of the ascertainment assumption-free (AAF) method of Ewens and Shute. In this paper, we show that when the observed pedigree structure depends on which relatives within a pedigree happen to have been the probands (proband-dependent, or PD, sampling) conditioning on all the trait data is not a valid application of the AAF method and will result in asymptotically biased estimates of genetic parameters (except under single ascertainment). Furthermore, this result holds even if the recombination fraction R is the only parameter of interest. Since the lod score is proportional to the likelihood of the marker data conditional on all the trait data, this means that when data are obtained under PD sampling the lod score will yield asymptotically biased estimates of R, and that so-called mod scores (i.e., lod scores maximized over both R and parameters {theta} of the trait distribution) will yield asymptotically biased estimates of R and {theta}. Furthermore, the problem appears to be intractable, in the sense that it is not possible to formulate the correct likelihood conditional on observed pedigree structure. In this paper we do not investigate the numerical magnitude of the bias, which may be small in many situations. On the other hand, virtually all linkage data sets are collected under PD sampling. Thus, the existence of this bias will be the rule rather than the exception in the usual applications. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. A Microsatellite Genetic Linkage Map for Xiphophorus

    PubMed Central

    Walter, R. B.; Rains, J. D.; Russell, J. E.; Guerra, T. M.; Daniels, C.; Johnston, Dennis A.; Kumar, Jay; Wheeler, A.; Kelnar, K.; Khanolkar, V. A.; Williams, E. L.; Hornecker, J. L.; Hollek, L.; Mamerow, M. M.; Pedroza, A.; Kazianis, S.

    2004-01-01

    Interspecies hybrids between distinct species of the genus Xiphophorus are often used in varied research investigations to identify genomic regions associated with the inheritance of complex traits. There are 24 described Xiphophorus species and a greater number of pedigreed strains; thus, the number of potential interspecies hybrid cross combinations is quite large. Previously, select Xiphophorus experimental crosses have been shown to exhibit differing characteristics between parental species and among the hybrid fishes derived from crossing them, such as widely differing susceptibilities to chemical or physical agents. For instance, genomic regions harboring tumor suppressor and oncogenes have been identified via linkage association of these loci with a small set of established genetic markers. The power of this experimental strategy is related to the number of genetic markers available in the Xiphophorus interspecies cross of interest. Thus, we have undertaken the task of expanding the suite of easily scored markers by characterization of Xiphophorus microsatellite sequences. Using a cross between Xiphophorus maculatus and X. andersi, we report a linkage map predominantly composed of microsatellite markers. All 24 acrocentric chromosome sets of Xiphophorus are represented in the assembled linkage map with an average intergenomic distance of 7.5 cM. Since both male and female F1 hybrids were used to produce backcross progeny, these recombination rates were compared between “male” and “female” maps. Although several genomic regions exhibit differences in map length, male- and female-derived maps are similar. Thus Xiphophorus, in contrast to zebrafish, Danio rerio, and several other vertebrate species, does not show sex-specific differences in recombination. The microsatellite markers we report can be easily adapted to any Xiphophorus interspecies and some intraspecies crosses, and thus provide a means to directly compare results derived from independent

  3. Population-environment linkages in international law

    SciTech Connect

    Babor, D.D.M.

    1999-03-31

    This article explores population-environment linkages both within developed and developing nations, and considers the consequences of a population growth rate which, as one hectare of arable land is simultaneously lost or destroyed, currently results in eight live births every three seconds. In order to better comprehend the forces governing their perceptions, Part 1 of this article will discuss eight interactive variables which inform decision-making. Part 2 will examine the existence of legal duties under international law to limit or constrain the level of consumption and the right to freely reproduce, particularly as applicable in states considered free of a population problem.

  4. Carburetion system including an adjustable throttle linkage

    SciTech Connect

    Du Bois, C.G.; Falig, J.D.

    1986-03-25

    A throttle linkage assembly is described comprising a throttle shaft rotatable about a throttle shaft axis between an idle position and a wide open throttle position, a throttle plate fixed on the throttle shaft, a driven lever pivotable about the throttle shaft axis between various angles relative to the throttle plate, and means for fixing the driven lever at a selected angle relative to the throttle plate an adjustment lever fixedly connected to the throttle adjacent the driven lever, and means for releasably securing the driven lever to the adjustment lever.

  5. Ethnicity and the ethics of data linkage.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Kenneth M

    2007-11-08

    Linking health data with census data on ethnicity has potential benefits for the health of ethnic minority groups. Ethical objections to linking these data however include concerns about informed consent and the possibility of the findings being misused against the interests of ethnic minority groups. While consent concerns may be allayed by procedures to safeguard anonymity and respect privacy, robust procedures to demonstrate public approval of data linkage also need to be devised. The possibility of findings being misused against the interests of ethnic minority groups may be diminished by informed and open public discussion in mature democracies, but remain a concern in the international context.

  6. Conservative spatial chaos of buckled elastic linkages.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Attila; Károlyi, György

    2006-09-01

    Buckling of an elastic linkage under general loading is investigated. We show that buckling is related to an initial value problem, which is always a conservative, area-preserving mapping, even if the original static problem is nonconservative. In some special cases, we construct the global bifurcation diagrams, and argue that their complicated structure is a consequence of spatial chaos. We characterize spatial chaos by the associated initial value problem's topological entropy, which turns out to be related to the number of buckled configurations.

  7. Magnetic Recording.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Charles E.

    A guide to the technology of magnetic recorders used in such fields as audio recording, broadcast and closed-circuit television, instrumentation recording, and computer data systems is presented. Included are discussions of applications, advantages, and limitations of magnetic recording, its basic principles and theory of operation, and its…

  8. Schooling Effects on Degree Performance: A Comparison of the Predictive Validity of Aptitude Testing and Secondary School Grades at Oxford University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogg, Tom; Zimdars, Anna; Heath, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the cause of school type effects upon gaining a first class degree at Oxford University, whereby for a given level of secondary school performance, private school students perform less well at degree level. We compare the predictive power of an aptitude test and secondary school grades (GCSEs) for final examination…

  9. Developing Schools for Democracy in Europe: An Example of Trans-European Co-operation in Education. Oxford Studies in Comparative Education Series, Volume 5(1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayer, John, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This journal issue describes in detail the work of a Trans-European Mobility Schemes for University Studies (TEMPUS) project, directed by John Sayer and based in the Department of Educational Studies of the University of Oxford. The project's activities, concerned principally with the development of democratic processes in the elementary,…

  10. Reform and Planning of Higher Education, Symposium at Oxford, 31st March-5th April 1974. Council of Europe Information Bulletin. Vol. 3, 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Documentation Center for Education in Europe.

    Presented in this document are the conference papers on Reform and Planning of Higher Education, held in Oxford, England, March 31-April 5, 1974. This symposium was centered on the British experience and the present state of thinking in the United Kingdom, and includes fifteen papers read by British lecturers and five by non-British lecturers that…

  11. Constructing a linkage-linkage disequilibrium map using dominant-segregating markers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuli; Dong, Leiming; Jiang, Libo; Li, Huan; Sun, Lidan; Zhang, Hui; Yu, Weiwu; Liu, Haokai; Dai, Wensheng; Zeng, Yanru; Wu, Rongling

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between linkage disequilibrium (LD) and recombination fraction can be used to infer the pattern of genetic variation and evolutionary process in humans and other systems. We described a computational framework to construct a linkage-LD map from commonly used biallelic, single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers for outcrossing plants by which the decline of LD is visualized with genetic distance. The framework was derived from an open-pollinated (OP) design composed of plants randomly sampled from a natural population and seeds from each sampled plant, enabling simultaneous estimation of the LD in the natural population and recombination fraction due to allelic co-segregation during meiosis. We modified the framework to infer evolutionary pasts of natural populations using those marker types that are segregating in a dominant manner, given their role in creating and maintaining population genetic diversity. A sophisticated two-level EM algorithm was implemented to estimate and retrieve the missing information of segregation characterized by dominant-segregating markers such as single methylation polymorphisms. The model was applied to study the relationship between linkage and LD for a non-model outcrossing species, a gymnosperm species, Torreya grandis, naturally distributed in mountains of the southeastern China. The linkage-LD map constructed from various types of molecular markers opens a powerful gateway for studying the history of plant evolution.

  12. Linkage disequilibrium at the SCA2 locus

    PubMed Central

    Didierjean, O.; Cancel, G.; Stevanin, G.; Durr, A.; Burk, K.; Benomar, A.; Lezin, A.; Belal, S.; Abada-Bendid, M.; Klockgether, T.; Brice, A.

    1999-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) is caused by the expansion of an unstable CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract. Repeats with 32 to 200 CAGs are associated with the disease, whereas normal chromosomes contain 13 to 33 repeats. We tested 220 families of different geographical origins for the SCA2 mutation. Thirty three were positive (15%). Twenty three families with at least two affected subjects were tested for linkage disequilibium (LD) between the SCA2 mutation and three microsatellite markers, two of which (D12S1332-D12S1333) closely flanked the mutation; the other (D12S1672) was intragenic. Many different haplotypes were observed, indicating the occurrence of several ancestral mutations. However, the same haplotype, not observed in controls, was detected in the German, the Serbian, and some of the French families, suggesting a founder effect or recurrent mutations on an at risk haplotype.


Keywords: linkage disequilibrium; SCA2; trinucleotide repeat expansion; founder effect PMID:10353790

  13. Methods for genetic linkage analysis using trisomies

    SciTech Connect

    Feingold, E.; Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.

    1994-09-01

    Certain genetic disorders (e.g. congenital cataracts, duodenal atresia) are rare in the general population, but more common in people with Down`s syndrome. We present a method for using individuals with trisomy 21 to map genes for such traits. Our methods are analogous to methods for mapping autosomal dominant traits using affected relative pairs by looking for markers with greater than expected identity-by-descent. In the trisomy case, one would take trisomic individuals and look for markers with greater than expected reduction to homozygosity in the chromosomes inherited form the non-disjoining parent. We present statistical methods for performing such a linkage analysis, including a test for linkage to a marker, a method for estimating the distance from the marker to the gene, a confidence interval for that distance, and methods for computing power and sample sizes. The methods are described in the context of gene-dosage model for the etiology of the disorder, but can be extended to other models. We also resolve some practical issues involved in implementing the methods, including how to use partially informative markers, how to test candidate genes, and how to handle the effect of reduced recombination associated with maternal meiosis I non-disjunction.

  14. Ionic Covalent Organic Frameworks with Spiroborate Linkage.

    PubMed

    Du, Ya; Yang, Haishen; Whiteley, Justin Michael; Wan, Shun; Jin, Yinghua; Lee, Se-Hee; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-26

    A novel type of ionic covalent organic framework (ICOF), which contains sp(3)  hybridized boron anionic centers and tunable countercations, was constructed by formation of spiroborate linkages. These ICOFs exhibit high BET surface areas up to 1259 m(2)  g(-1) and adsorb a significant amount of H2 (up to 3.11 wt %, 77 K, 1 bar) and CH4 (up to 4.62 wt %, 273 K, 1 bar). Importantly, the materials show good thermal stabilities and excellent resistance to hydrolysis, remaining nearly intact when immersed in water or basic solution for two days. The presence of permanently immobilized ion centers in ICOFs enables the transportation of lithium ions with room-temperature lithium-ion conductivity of 3.05×10(-5)  S cm(-1) and an average Li(+) transference number value of 0.80±0.02. Our approach thus provides a convenient route to highly stable COFs with ionic linkages, which can potentially serve as absorbents for alternative energy sources such as H2, CH4, and also as solid lithium electrolytes/separators for the next-generation lithium batteries.

  15. [Linkage analysis of serial sex crimes].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kaeko; Watanabe, Kazumi; Wachi, Taeko; Otsuka, Yusuke; Kuraishi, Hiroki; Fujita, Goro

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to create an index for a behavioral linkage analysis of serial sex crimes, and second, to construct a predictive model for the analysis. Data on 720 sex crimes (rape, indecent assault) committed by 360 offenders arrested between 1993 and 2005 throughout Japan were collected. The following seven behaviors were examined during a series of analyses aimed at illustrating the effectiveness of crime linkage in serial sex crimes: victim age group, area type, publicness of offense site, weapon, time, contact method, and day of the week. The results indicated that six of the seven behaviors (excluding "day of the week") significantly distinguished between linked and unlinked crime pairs. Under a logistic regression of these six variables, which were dichotomously coded in terms of the concordance or discordance between each pair of incidents, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.85 (95% CI = 0.82-0.87), indicating a high level of discriminative accuracy in identifying disparate sex crimes committed by the same person.

  16. A linkage study of bipolar disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Remick, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    We are currently surveying the genome with polymorphic DNA markers in search of loci linked to bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness) in three populations: 20 families (175 subjects) from the general North American population from San Diego (UCSD) and Vancouver (UBC); 3 Icelandic families (55 subjects); and an Old Order Amish pedigree 110 (118 subjects). Over 50 markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 5, 11, 17, 18, 20 and 21 have been examined. All markers have been tested in the Amish and Icelandic families, and a portion of them in the UCSD/UBC families, which we have only recently begun genotyping. The following candidate genes have been examined: {beta}-TSH, dopamine transporter (HDAT), {beta}2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2), glucocorticoid type II receptor (GRL), D2 dopamine receptor, serotonin transporter (HSERT), and G{alpha}s G protein subunit (GNAS1). Linkage analysis was conducted using an autosomal dominant model with age-dependent reduced penetrance. Subjects with bipolar, schizoaffective, or recurrent major depressive disorders were considered affected. No significant evidence for linkage was obtained. Mildly positive lods ranging between 1.1 and 1.6 were obtained for three loci: D11S29, HDAT, and GRL.

  17. The acceptability of repeat Internet-based hybrid diet assessment of previous 24-h dietary intake: administration of the Oxford WebQ in UK Biobank.

    PubMed

    Galante, Julieta; Adamska, Ligia; Young, Alan; Young, Heather; Littlejohns, Thomas J; Gallacher, John; Allen, Naomi

    2016-02-28

    Although dietary intake over a single 24-h period may be atypical of an individual's habitual pattern, multiple 24-h dietary assessments can be representative of habitual intake and help in assessing seasonal variation. Web-based questionnaires are convenient for the participant and result in automatic data capture for study investigators. This study reports on the acceptability of repeated web-based administration of the Oxford WebQ--a 24-h recall of frequency from a set food list suitable for self-completion from which energy and nutrient values can be automatically generated. As part of the UK Biobank study, four invitations to complete the Oxford WebQ were sent by email over a 16-month period. Overall, 176 012 (53% of those invited) participants completed the online version of the Oxford WebQ at least once and 66% completed it more than once, although only 16% completed it on all four occasions. The response rate for any one round of invitations varied between 34 and 26%. On most occasions, the Oxford WebQ was completed on the same day that they received the invitation, although this was less likely if sent on a weekend. Participants who completed the Oxford WebQ tended to be white, female, slightly older, less deprived and more educated, which is typical of health-conscious volunteer-based studies. These findings provide preliminary evidence to suggest that repeated 24-h dietary assessment via the Internet is acceptable to the public and a feasible strategy for large population-based studies.

  18. The impact of a growing minority population on identification of duplicate records in an enterprise data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Duvall, Scott L; Fraser, Alison M; Kerber, Richard A; Mineau, Geraldine P; Thomas, Alun

    2010-01-01

    Patient medical records are often fragmented across disparate healthcare databases, potentially resulting in duplicate records that may be detrimental to health care services. These duplicate records can be found through a process called record linkage. This paper describes a set of duplicate records in a medical data warehouse found by linking to an external resource containing family history and vital records. Our objective was to investigate the impact database characteristics and linkage methods have on identifying duplicate records using an external resource. Frequency counts were made for demographic field values and compared between the set of duplicate records, the data warehouse, and the external resource. Considerations for understanding the relationship that records labeled as duplicates have with dataset characteristics and linkage methods were identified. Several noticeable patterns were identified where frequency counts between sets deviated from what was expected including how the growth of a minority population affected which records were identified as duplicates. Record linkage is a complex process where results can be affected by subtleties in data characteristics, changes in data trends, and reliance on external data sources. These changes should be taken into account to ensure any anomalies in results describe real effects and are not artifacts caused by datasets or linkage methods. This paper describes how frequency count analysis can be an effective way to detect and resolve anomalies in linkage results and how external resources that provide additional contextual information can prove useful in discovering duplicate records.

  19. Linkage Group Xix of Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii Has a Linear Map

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, J. A.; Johnson, D. E.; Dutcher, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    Linkage group XIX (or the UNI linkage group) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been reported to show a circular meiotic recombination map. A circular map predicts the existence of strong chiasma and chromatid interference, which would lead to an excess number of two-strand double crossovers during meiosis. We have tested this prediction in multipoint crosses. Our results are consistent with a linear linkage group that shows positive chiasma interference and no chromatid interference. Chiasma interference occurs both within arms and across the centromere. Of the original loci that contributed to the circular map, we find that two map to other linkage groups and a third cannot be retested because the mutant strain that defined it has been lost. A second reported unusual property for linkage group XIX was the increase in meiotic recombination with increases in temperature during a period that precedes the onset of meiosis. Although we observed changes in recombination frequencies in some intervals on linkage group XIX in crosses to CC-1952, and in strains heterozygous for the mutation ger1 at 16°, we also show that our strains do not exhibit the previously observed patterns of temperature-sensitive recombination for two different pairs of loci on linkage group XIX. We conclude that linkage group XIX has a linear genetic map that is not significantly different from other Chlamydomonas linkage groups. PMID:8462847

  20. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  1. Linkage arms for minimizing piston wobble

    SciTech Connect

    Langstroth, S.W.

    1992-07-28

    This patent describes an internal combustion engine having a block within which at least one piston is attached to a crankshaft by a connecting rod between the crankpin of the crankshaft and the wrist pin of the piston. This patent describes improvement in a fixed gear concentric with the axis of the crankshaft and coupled to the block; a follower gear concentric with the crankpin; at least one intermediate gear coupling the fixed gear to the follower gear; wherein the ratio of the gears is such that the follower gear orbits the fixed gear and does not rotate; and linkage arms interconnecting the follower gear and the piston for preventing the rotation of the piston about the wrist pin.

  2. Building and Strengthening Linkages between CETA and Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapin, Joel D.

    A study was conducted by Catonsville Community College (Maryland) to identify those factors that foster successful linkages between Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) sponsors and community colleges. The study involved: (1) identifying exemplary CETA/college linkages through consultation with experts in academe and government; (2)…

  3. The Case for Internal Linkage: Functional Intergration Within the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, John

    This paper discusses the increasing attention given recently to change theory and knowledge utilization in education and to the development of dissemination mechanisms in educational systems. Also discussed are the concept of "linkage," a process of connecting users with resources in an efficacious way, and the role of linkage agent, a person who…

  4. Student-Teacher Linkage Verification: Model Process and Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jeffery; Graham, Matthew; Thorn, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    As momentum grows for tracking the role of individual educators in student performance, school districts across the country are implementing projects that involve linking teachers to their students. Programs that link teachers to student outcomes require a verification process for student-teacher linkages. Linkage verification improves accuracy by…

  5. Linkages between ACE Vocational Provision and Mainstream VET.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, John

    A study investigated linkages between adult community education (ACE) and mainstream vocational education and training (VET) in Australia, which enable people to move between the two sectors in their pursuit of vocational learning, and the ways in which linkages might be improved or new ones developed. The data from the study were derived from 69…

  6. The question of linkages in environment and development

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, N.

    1993-05-01

    To make the world more manageable, humans have split it up into disciplinary components such as nations, communities, economic sectors, ecological zones, and scientific disciplines. However, the preoccupation with a certain sector often means the larger perspective is lost. Dynamic interactions between the sectors are as important as the sectors themselves. This article examines the entire issue of linkages. It starts with a conceptual framework analyzing the character and prevalence of linkages, using the oceans as an illustration with its sectors of fisheries, biodiversity, pollution, technology, climate, and energy. Different types of linkages are discussed: linked linages (e.g., economic links serving to reflect or reinforce environmental linkages and vice versa); synergized linkages (e.g.: acid rain in the humid tropics); present/future linages. Examples of super-scope linkages are given: developing world debt; agricultural subsidies; marginal people in marginal environments. Finally the problem of institutional indifference to linkages and world responses to linkages - policy interventions and planning, programing and management - are discussed. 53 refs.

  7. A microsatellite genetic linkage map of black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Guannan; Jiang, Liming; He, Yan; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Zhigang; Jiang, Haibin; Zhang, Quanqi

    2014-12-01

    Ovoviviparous black rockfish ( Sebastes schlegeli) is an important marine fish species for aquaculture and fisheries in China. Genetic information of this species is scarce because of the lack of microsatellite markers. In this study, a large number of microsatellite markers of black rockfish were isolated by constructing microsatellite-enriched libraries. Female- and male-specific genetic linkage maps were constructed using 435 microsatellite markers genotyped in a full-sib family of the fish species. The female linkage map contained 140 microsatellite markers, in which 23 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1334.1 cM and average inter-marker space of 13.3 cM. The male linkage map contained 156 microsatellite markers, in which 25 linkage groups had a total genetic length of 1359.6 cM and average inter-marker distance of 12.4 cM. The genome coverage of the female and male linkage maps was 68.6% and 69.3%, respectively. The female-to-male ratio of the recombination rate was approximately 1.07:1 in adjacent microsatellite markers. This paper presents the first genetic linkage map of microsatellites in black rockfish. The collection of polymorphic markers and sex-specific linkage maps of black rockfish could be useful for further investigations on parental assignment, population genetics, quantitative trait loci mapping, and marker-assisted selection in related breeding programs.

  8. Assessing the utility of the Oxford Nanopore MinION for snake venom gland cDNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Portable DNA sequencers such as the Oxford Nanopore MinION device have the potential to be truly disruptive technologies, facilitating new approaches and analyses and, in some cases, taking sequencing out of the lab and into the field. However, the capabilities of these technologies are still being revealed. Here we show that single-molecule cDNA sequencing using the MinION accurately characterises venom toxin-encoding genes in the painted saw-scaled viper, Echis coloratus. We find the raw sequencing error rate to be around 12%, improved to 0–2% with hybrid error correction and 3% with de novo error correction. Our corrected data provides full coding sequences and 5′ and 3′ UTRs for 29 of 33 candidate venom toxins detected, far superior to Illumina data (13/40 complete) and Sanger-based ESTs (15/29). We suggest that, should the current pace of improvement continue, the MinION will become the default approach for cDNA sequencing in a variety of species. PMID:26623194

  9. Oxford Recovery Housing: Length of stay correlated with improved outcomes for women previously involved with the criminal justice system.

    PubMed Central

    Jason, Leonard A.; Salina, Doreen; Ram, Daphna

    2016-01-01

    Background Housing plays a crucial role in providing resources for and aiding an individual’s reentry into the community following incarceration and substance use treatment. As such, this study examined the influence of recovery homes on a sample of former female substance using women with criminal justice involvement. Methods Two hundred women who had been involved with the criminal justice system within the preceding two years were recruited from multiple sites in metropolitan Chicago. These women were assigned to either one of two conditions: Oxford House (OH) recovery homes or usual aftercare (UA). Results Those with longer stays in OH (6 months or more) had better outcomes in terms of alcohol and drug use, employment, and self-efficacy than those with shorter stays. Outcomes for those who stayed in OH were not appreciably different than the UA condition on substance use and employment, but fewer deaths occurred for those in the OH condition. Conclusions Findings suggest that length of stay of 6 or more months is critical for those in recovery homes, but it is important for us to better understand the processes through which longer stays influence better outcomes. PMID:25962090

  10. Linkage analysis: Inadequate for detecting susceptibility loci in complex disorders?

    SciTech Connect

    Field, L.L.; Nagatomi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) may provide valuable clues about approaches to detecting susceptibility loci in other oligogenic disorders. Numerous studies have demonstrated significant association between IDDM and a VNTR in the 5{prime} flanking region of the insulin (INS) gene. Paradoxically, all attempts to demonstrate linkage of IDDM to this VNTR have failed. Lack of linkage has been attributed to insufficient marker locus information, genetic heterogeneity, or high frequency of the IDDM-predisposing allele in the general population. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is located 2.7 kb from INS on the 5` side of the VNTR and shows linkage disequilibrium with INS region loci. We typed a highly polymorphic microsatellite within TH in 176 multiplex families, and performed parametric (lod score) linkage analysis using various intermediate reduced penetrance models for IDDM (including rare and common disease allele frequencies), as well as non-parametric (affected sib pair) linkage analysis. The scores significantly reject linkage for recombination values of .05 or less, excluding the entire 19 kb region containing TH, the 5{prime} VNTR, the INS gene, and IGF2 on the 3{prime} side of INS. Non-parametric linkage analysis also provided no significant evidence for linkage (mean TH allele sharing 52.5%, P=.12). These results have important implications for efforts to locate genes predisposing to complex disorders, strongly suggesting that regions which are significantly excluded by linkage methods may nevertheless contain predisposing genes readily detectable by association methods. We advocate that investigators routinely perform association analyses in addition to linkage analyses.

  11. Linkages Between the Education and Employment and Training Systems. Volume II. Institutional Linkages. Youth Knowledge Development Report 12.3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Office of Youth Programs.

    Designed to provide basic information on the linkages achieved under the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act (YEDPA), this report focuses on education/Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) linkages, the vocational education/CETA connection, and the role of postsecondary institutions (particularly minority colleges) in…

  12. [MapDraw: a microsoft excel macro for drawing genetic linkage maps based on given genetic linkage data].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-Hu; Meng, Jin-Ling

    2003-05-01

    MAPMAKER is one of the most widely used computer software package for constructing genetic linkage maps.However, the PC version, MAPMAKER 3.0 for PC, could not draw the genetic linkage maps that its Macintosh version, MAPMAKER 3.0 for Macintosh,was able to do. Especially in recent years, Macintosh computer is much less popular than PC. Most of the geneticists use PC to analyze their genetic linkage data. So a new computer software to draw the same genetic linkage maps on PC as the MAPMAKER for Macintosh to do on Macintosh has been crying for. Microsoft Excel,one component of Microsoft Office package, is one of the most popular software in laboratory data processing. Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is one of the most powerful functions of Microsoft Excel. Using this program language, we can take creative control of Excel, including genetic linkage map construction, automatic data processing and more. In this paper, a Microsoft Excel macro called MapDraw is constructed to draw genetic linkage maps on PC computer based on given genetic linkage data. Use this software,you can freely construct beautiful genetic linkage map in Excel and freely edit and copy it to Word or other application. This software is just an Excel format file. You can freely copy it from ftp://211.69.140.177 or ftp://brassica.hzau.edu.cn and the source code can be found in Excel's Visual Basic Editor.

  13. Extended map for the phaseolin linkage group ofPhaseolus vulgaris L.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, C E; Chase, C D

    1991-09-01

    The linkage relationship of 11 bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed proteins (including phaseolin), 9 enzyme loci, and theP locus were analyzed in backcross and F2 progenies by use of the software package "Mapmaker." The progenies were obtained by crossing the breeding line 'XR-235-1' and the cultivar 'Calima'. Allelic differences for seed protein loci were detected with SDS-PAGE and those for enzyme loci with starch gel electrophoresis and activity stains. The seed coat color of 'Calima' is a red/beige mottled pattern and that of 'XR-235-1' is white. Segregation at theP locus was followed by recording the phenotype of the BC1S1 and F3 seed. A linkage group comprising ca. 90 cM was detected with the following gene order:Est-2 - 11 -Pha - 8 - (Spe/Spg) - 24 - P - 9 - (Spa/Spv) - 16 -Spba - 22 -Mdh-1. In addition, another linkage group was detected: (Spd/Spf/Sph) - 5 -Spca. Therefore, the seed proteins appear to be organized in clusters in the bean genome.

  14. Changes in fault length distributions due to fault linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shunshan; Nieto-Samaniego, A. F.; Alaniz-Álvarez, S. A.; Velasquillo-Martínez, L. G.; Grajales-Nishimura, J. M.; García-Hernández, J.; Murillo-Muñetón, G.

    2010-01-01

    Fault linkage plays an important role in the growth of faults. In this paper we analyze a published synthetic model to simulate fault linkage. The results of the simulation indicate that fault linkage is the cause of the shallower local slopes on the length-frequency plots. The shallower local slopes lead to two effects. First, the curves of log cumulative number against log length exhibit fluctuating shapes as reported in literature. Second, for a given fault population, the power-law exponents after linkage are negatively related to the linked length scales. Also, we present datasets of fault length measured from four structural maps at the Cantarell oilfield in the southern Gulf of Mexico (offshore Campeche). The results demonstrate that the fault length data, corrected by seismic resolution at the tip fault zone, also exhibit fluctuating curves of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. The steps (shallower slopes) on the curves imply the scale positions of fault linkage. We conclude that fault linkage is the main reason for the fluctuating shapes of log cumulative frequency vs. log length. On the other hand, our data show that the two-tip faults are better for linear analysis between maximum displacement ( D) and length ( L). Evidently, two-tip faults underwent fewer fault linkages and interactions.

  15. Mitonuclear linkage disequilibrium in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, Daniel B.; Fields, Peter D.; Havird, Justin C.

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence from model systems that disrupting associations between co-adapted mitochondrial and nuclear genotypes can lead to deleterious and even lethal consequences. While it is tempting to extrapolate from these observations and make inferences about the human-health effects of altering mitonuclear associations, the importance of such associations may vary greatly among species, depending on population genetics, demographic history and other factors. Remarkably, despite the extensive study of human population genetics, the statistical associations between nuclear and mitochondrial alleles remain largely uninvestigated. We analysed published population genomic data to test for signatures of historical selection to maintain mitonuclear associations, particularly those involving nuclear genes that encode mitochondrial-localized proteins (N-mt genes). We found that significant mitonuclear linkage disequilibrium (LD) exists throughout the human genome, but these associations were generally weak, which is consistent with the paucity of population genetic structure in humans. Although mitonuclear LD varied among genomic regions (with especially high levels on the X chromosome), N-mt genes were statistically indistinguishable from background levels, suggesting that selection on mitonuclear epistasis has not preferentially maintained associations involving this set of loci at a species-wide level. We discuss these findings in the context of the ongoing debate over mitochondrial replacement therapy. PMID:26378221

  16. Genome scanning for linkage: An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, A.S.

    1996-09-01

    Several different methods for linkage analysis are shown to arise from a single likelihood function L for the observed allele-sharing data at multiple markers in a chromosomal region. These include classical parametric lod-score methods, nonparametric or {open_quotes}model-free{close_quotes} affected-pedigree-member (APM) methods, and the Gaussian process method. Setting the methods in the context of the likelihood function L clarifies their underlying assumptions. A test statistic derived from L, the efficient score statistic, is introduced. It is asymptotically equivalent to the lod score, but it can be easier to compute when the penetrances and frequencies of alleles of the trait gene are not known. APM test statistics and the Gaussian lod score are shown to be special cases of efficient score statistics. This unified framework facilitates exploration of a range of models for the effects of a putative trait-predisposing gene, and it facilitates sensitivity analyses to examine the consequences of model misspecification. 25 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. The Structure-Function Linkage Database.

    PubMed

    Akiva, Eyal; Brown, Shoshana; Almonacid, Daniel E; Barber, Alan E; Custer, Ashley F; Hicks, Michael A; Huang, Conrad C; Lauck, Florian; Mashiyama, Susan T; Meng, Elaine C; Mischel, David; Morris, John H; Ojha, Sunil; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Stryke, Doug; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Ferrin, Thomas E; Holliday, Gemma L; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2014-01-01

    The Structure-Function Linkage Database (SFLD, http://sfld.rbvi.ucsf.edu/) is a manually curated classification resource describing structure-function relationships for functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies. Members of such superfamilies are diverse in their overall reactions yet share a common ancestor and some conserved active site features associated with conserved functional attributes such as a partial reaction. Thus, despite their different functions, members of these superfamilies 'look alike', making them easy to misannotate. To address this complexity and enable rational transfer of functional features to unknowns only for those members for which we have sufficient functional information, we subdivide superfamily members into subgroups using sequence information, and lastly into families, sets of enzymes known to catalyze the same reaction using the same mechanistic strategy. Browsing and searching options in the SFLD provide access to all of these levels. The SFLD offers manually curated as well as automatically classified superfamily sets, both accompanied by search and download options for all hierarchical levels. Additional information includes multiple sequence alignments, tab-separated files of functional and other attributes, and sequence similarity networks. The latter provide a new and intuitively powerful way to visualize functional trends mapped to the context of sequence similarity.

  18. Identifying marker typing incompatibilities in linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stringham, H.M.; Boehnke, M.

    1996-10-01

    A common problem encountered in linkage analyses is that execution of the computer program is halted because of genotypes in the data that are inconsistent with Mendelian inheritance. Such inconsistencies may arise because of pedigree errors or errors in typing. In some cases, the source of the inconsistencies is easily identified by examining the pedigree. In others, the error is not obvious, and substantial time and effort are required to identify the responsible genotypes. We have developed two methods for automatically identifying those individuals whose genotypes are most likely the cause of the inconsistencies. First, we calculate the posterior probability of genotyping error for each member of the pedigree, given the marker data on all pedigree members and allowing anyone in the pedigree to have an error. Second, we identify those individuals whose genotypes could be solely responsible for the inconsistency in the pedigree. We illustrate these methods with two examples: one a pedigree error, the second a genotyping error. These methods have been implemented as a module of the pedigree analysis program package MENDEL. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Linkage and the Limits to Natural Selection

    PubMed Central

    Barton, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    The probability of fixation of a favorable mutation is reduced if selection at other loci causes inherited variation in fitness. A general method for calculating the fixation probability of an allele that can find itself in a variety of genetic backgrounds is applied to find the effect of substitutions, fluctuating polymorphisms, and deleterious mutations in a large population. With loose linkage, r, the effects depend on the additive genetic variance in relative fitness, var (W), and act by reducing effective population size by (N/N(e)) = 1 + var (W)/2r(2). However, tightly linked loci can have a substantial effect not predictable from N(e). Linked deleterious mutations reduce the fixation probability of weakly favored alleles by exp(-2U/R), where U is the total mutation rate and R is the map length in Morgans. Substitutions can cause a greater reduction: an allele with advantage s < s(crit) = (π(2)/6) log(e) (S/s)[var(W)/R] is very unlikely to be fixed. (S is the advantage of the substitution impeding fixation.) Fluctuating polymorphisms at many (n) linked loci can also have a substantial effect, reducing fixation probability by exp [ &2Kn var(W)/R] [K = -1/E((u - u)(2)/uv) depending on the frequencies (u,v) at the selected polymorphisms]. Hitchhiking due to all three kinds of selection may substantially impede adaptation that depends on weakly favored alleles. PMID:7498757

  20. 77 FR 19021 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-29

    ... Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with... following meeting: Name: Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL)....

  1. Bayesian linkage and segregation analysis: factoring the problem.

    PubMed

    Matthysse, S

    2000-01-01

    Complex segregation analysis and linkage methods are mathematical techniques for the genetic dissection of complex diseases. They are used to delineate complex modes of familial transmission and to localize putative disease susceptibility loci to specific chromosomal locations. The computational problem of Bayesian linkage and segregation analysis is one of integration in high-dimensional spaces. In this paper, three available techniques for Bayesian linkage and segregation analysis are discussed: Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), importance sampling, and exact calculation. The contribution of each to the overall integration will be explicitly discussed.

  2. Metabolic profiles of male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the EPIC-Oxford cohort12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julie A; Rinaldi, Sabina; Ferrari, Pietro; Carayol, Marion; Achaintre, David; Scalbert, Augustin; Cross, Amanda J; Gunter, Marc J; Fensom, Georgina K; Appleby, Paul N; Key, Timothy J; Travis, Ruth C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Human metabolism is influenced by dietary factors and lifestyle, environmental, and genetic factors; thus, men who exclude some or all animal products from their diet might have different metabolic profiles than meat eaters. Objective: We aimed to investigate differences in concentrations of 118 circulating metabolites, including acylcarnitines, amino acids, biogenic amines, glycerophospholipids, hexose, and sphingolipids related to lipid, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism between male meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians, and vegans from the Oxford arm of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Design: In this cross-sectional study, concentrations of metabolites were measured by mass spectrometry in plasma from 379 men categorized according to their diet group. Differences in mean metabolite concentrations across diet groups were tested by using ANOVA, and a false discovery rate–controlling procedure was used to account for multiple testing. Principal component analysis was used to investigate patterns in metabolic profiles. Results: Concentrations of 79% of metabolites differed significantly by diet group. In the vast majority of these cases, vegans had the lowest concentration, whereas meat eaters most often had the highest concentrations of the acylcarnitines, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, and fish eaters or vegetarians most often had the highest concentrations of the amino acids and a biogenic amine. A clear separation between patterns in the metabolic profiles of the 4 diet groups was seen, with vegans being noticeably different from the other groups because of lower concentrations of some glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids. Conclusions: Metabolic profiles in plasma could effectively differentiate between men from different habitual diet groups, especially vegan men compared with men who consume animal products. The difference in metabolic profiles was mainly explained by the lower concentrations of

  3. Pollen–pistil interactions and self-incompatibility in the Asteraceae: new insights from studies of Senecio squalidus (Oxford ragwort)

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Alexandra M.; Thorogood, Christopher J.; Hegarty, Matthew J.; Lexer, Christian; Hiscock, Simon J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pollen–pistil interactions are an essential prelude to fertilization in angiosperms and determine compatibility/incompatibility. Pollen–pistil interactions have been studied at a molecular and cellular level in relatively few families. Self-incompatibility (SI) is the best understood pollen–pistil interaction at a molecular level where three different molecular mechanisms have been identified in just five families. Here we review studies of pollen–pistil interactions and SI in the Asteraceae, an important family that has been relatively understudied in these areas of reproductive biology. Scope We begin by describing the historical literature which first identified sporophytic SI (SSI) in species of Asteraceae, the SI system later identified and characterized at a molecular level in the Brassicaceae. Early structural and cytological studies in these two families suggested that pollen–pistil interactions and SSI were similar, if not the same. Recent cellular and molecular studies in Senecio squalidus (Oxford ragwort) have challenged this belief by revealing that despite sharing the same genetic system of SSI, the Brassicaceae and Asteraceae molecular mechanisms are different. Key cellular differences have also been highlighted in pollen–stigma interactions, which may arise as a consequence of the Asteraceae possessing a ‘semi-dry’ stigma, rather than the ‘dry’ stigma typical of the Brassicaceae. The review concludes with a summary of recent transcriptomic analyses aimed at identifying proteins regulating pollen–pistil interactions and SI in S. squalidus, and by implication the Asteraceae. The Senecio pistil transcriptome contains many novel pistil-specific genes, but also pistil-specific genes previously shown to play a role in pollen–pistil interactions in other species. Conclusions Studies in S. squalidus have shown that stigma structure and the molecular mechanism of SSI in the Asteraceae and Brassicaceae are different. The

  4. A comparison of foot kinematics in people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model.

    PubMed

    Levinger, Pazit; Murley, George S; Barton, Christian J; Cotchett, Matthew P; McSweeney, Simone R; Menz, Hylton B

    2010-10-01

    Foot posture is thought to influence predisposition to overuse injuries of the lower limb. Although the mechanisms underlying this proposed relationship are unclear, it is thought that altered foot kinematics may play a role. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate differences in foot motion between people with normal- and flat-arched feet using the Oxford Foot Model (OFM). Foot posture in 19 participants was documented as normal-arched (n=10) or flat-arched (n=9) using a foot screening protocol incorporating measurements from weightbearing antero-posterior and lateral foot radiographs. Differences between the groups in triplanar motion of the tibia, rearfoot and forefoot during walking were evaluated using a three-dimensional motion analysis system incorporating a multi-segment foot model (OFM). Participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated greater peak forefoot plantar-flexion (-13.7° ± 5.6° vs -6.5° ± 3.7°; p=0.004), forefoot abduction (-12.9° ± 6.9° vs -1.8° ± 6.3°; p=0.002), and rearfoot internal rotation (10.6° ± 7.5° vs -0.2°± 9.9°; p=0.018) compared to those with normal-arched feet. Additionally, participants with flat-arched feet demonstrated decreased peak forefoot adduction (-7.0° ± 9.2° vs 5.6° ± 7.3°; p=0.004) and a trend towards increased rearfoot eversion (-5.8° ± 4.4° vs -2.5° ± 2.6°; p=0.06). These findings support the notion that flat-arched feet have altered motion associated with greater pronation during gait; factors that may increase the risk of overuse injury.

  5. Translation, cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Oxford Shoulder Score questionnaire for Brazil, among patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Eider da Silva; Natour, Jamil; Moreira, Emilia; Jones, Anamaria

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Although shoulder questionnaires validated for Brazil do exist, none of them are aimed at populations with rheumatic disease. We believe that the Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) may be useful in this population. The objective of this study was to translate the OSS, adapt it to Brazilian culture and test its reproducibility. DESIGN AND SETTING Validation study conducted in university outpatient clinics. METHODS The OSS was translated into Portuguese by two English teachers and was then retranslated into English by two native English teachers. These translations were reviewed by a committee to establish the version of OSS-Brazil to be administered to 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and shoulder pain, in order to test the cultural adaptation. The validity and reproducibility was tested among another 30 patients with RA and shoulder pain, of both genders and aged 18 to 65 years. The internal consistency and reproducibility were analyzed. The following instruments were evaluated: OSS-Brazil; a numerical scale for shoulder pain; DASH; HAQ and SF-36. RESULTS The internal consistency was 0.957 and the intra and inter-rater reproducibility was 0.917 and 0.861, respectively. A high level of correlation was found between OSS-Brazil and the following: HAQ (-0.663), DASH (-0.731) and the SF-36 domains of functional capacity (0.589), physical aspects (0.507), pain (0.624), general state of health (0.444), vitality (0.634) and mental health (0.578). CONCLUSION OSS-Brazil was successfully translated and adapted, and this version exhibited good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  6. Linkage map for Aedes aegypti using restriction fragment length polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Severson, D W; Mori, A; Zhang, Y; Christensen, B M

    1993-01-01

    We report construction of a genetic linkage map for the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, based on restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). The map consists of 50 DNA markers that identify 53 loci covering 134 map units across three linkage groups. Determination of linkage associations between RFLP markers and several mutant marker loci allowed for partial integration of the RFLP markers with an existing classical genetic linkage map for A. aegypti. The RFLP markers include 42 random cDNA clones, three random genomic DNA clones, and five cDNA clones of known genes. We discuss the influence of autosomal sex determination, characteristic of culicine mosquitoes, in relation to its observed influence on segregation ratios. This has important ramifications for future efforts to identify quantitative trait loci associated with the ability of these mosquitoes to transmit various pathogens and parasites to man and other animals.

  7. An autosomal genetic linkage map of the sheep genome

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, A.M.; Ede, A.J.; Pierson, C.A.

    1995-06-01

    We report the first extensive ovine genetic linkage map covering 2070 cM of the sheep genome. The map was generated from the linkage analysis of 246 polymorphic markers, in nine three-generation full-sib pedigrees, which make up the AgResearch International Mapping Flock. We have exploited many markers from cattle so that valuable comparisons between these two ruminant linkage maps can be made. The markers, used in the segregation analyses, comprised 86 anonymous microsatellite markers derived from the sheep genome, 126 anonymous microsatellites from cattle, one from deer, and 33 polymorphic markers of various types associated with known genes. The maximum number of informative meioses within the mapping flock was 22. The average number of informative meioses per marker was 140 (range 18-209). Linkage groups have been assigned to all 26 sheep autosomes. 102 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. An Autosomal Genetic Linkage Map of the Sheep Genome

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, A. M.; Dodds, K. G.; Ede, A. J.; Pierson, C. A.; Montgomery, G. W.; Garmonsway, H. G.; Beattie, A. E.; Davies, K.; Maddox, J. F.; Kappes, S. W.; Stone, R. T.; Nguyen, T. C.; Penty, J. M.; Lord, E. A.; Broom, J. E.; Buitkamp, J.; Schwaiger, W.; Epplen, J. T.; Matthew, P.; Matthews, M. E.; Hulme, D. J.; Beh, K. J.; McGraw, R. A.; Beattie, C. W.

    1995-01-01

    We report the first extensive ovine genetic linkage map covering 2070 cM of the sheep genome. The map was generated from the linkage analysis of 246 polymorphic markers, in nine three-generation fullsib pedigrees, which make up the AgResearch International Mapping Flock. We have exploited many markers from cattle so that valuable comparisons between these two ruminant linkage maps can be made. The markers, used in the segregation analyses, comprised 86 anonymous microsatellite markers derived from the sheep genome, 126 anonymous microsatellites from cattle, one from deer, and 33 polymorphic markers of various types associated with known genes. The maximum number of informative meioses within the mapping flock was 222. The average number of informative meioses per marker was 140 (range 18-209). Linkage groups have been assigned to all 26 sheep autosomes. PMID:7498748

  9. Genetic Linkage Map of Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung-Ha; Kim, Woo-Jin; Lee, Woo-Jai

    2008-01-01

    Olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, is an important fish species in Asia, both for fisheries and aquaculture. As the first step for better understanding the genomic structure and functional analysis, we constructed a genetic linkage map for olive flounder based on 180 microsatellites and 31 expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived markers. Twenty-four linkage groups were identified, consistent with the 24 chromosomes of this species. The total map distance was 1,001.3 cM based on Kosambi sex-average mapping, and the average inter-locus distance was 4.7 cM. Linkage between the loci was identified by an LOD score of ≥3. This linkage map may be used to map quantitative trait loci associated with important traits of the species and may assist in breeding programs. PMID:18497873

  10. Quantitative linkage: a statistical procedure for its detection and estimation.

    PubMed

    Hill, A P

    1975-05-01

    A new approach for detecting and estimating quantitative linkage which uses sibship data is presented. Using a nested analysis of variance design (with marker genotype nested within sibship), it is shown that under the null hypothesis of no linkage, the expected between marker genotype within sibship mean square (EMSbeta) is equal to the expected within marker genotype within sibship mean square (EMSe), while under the alternative hypothesis of linkage, the first is greater than the second. Thus the regular F-ratio, MSbeta/MSe, can be used to test for quantitative linkage. This is true for both backcross and intercross matings and whether or not there is dominance at the marker locus. A second test involving the comparison of the within marker genotype within sibship variances is available for intercross matings. A maximum likelihood procedure for the estimation for the recombination frequency is also presented.

  11. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis: effect of bin width on the probability of linkage.

    PubMed

    Slager, S L; Juo, S H; Durner, M; Hodge, S E

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed part of the Genetic Analysis Workshop (GAW) 12 simulated data using Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods that are implemented in the computer program Loki. The MCMC method reports the "probability of linkage" (PL) across the chromosomal regions of interest. The point of maximum PL can then be taken as a "location estimate" for the location of the quantitative trait locus (QTL). However, Loki does not provide a formal statistical test of linkage. In this paper, we explore how the bin width used in the calculations affects the max PL and the location estimate. We analyzed age at onset (AO) and quantitative trait number 5, Q5, from 26 replicates of the general simulated data in one region where we knew a major gene, MG5, is located. For each trait, we found the max PL and the corresponding location estimate, using four different bin widths. We found that bin width, as expected, does affect the max PL and the location estimate, and we recommend that users of Loki explore how their results vary with different bin widths.

  12. Quantifying genomic imprinting in the presence of linkage.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Quentin; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Alter, Andrea; Schurr, Erwin; Abel, Laurent

    2006-12-01

    Genomic imprinting decreases the power of classical linkage analysis, in which paternal and maternal transmissions of marker alleles are equally weighted. Several methods have been proposed for taking genomic imprinting into account in the model-free linkage analysis of binary traits. However, none of these methods are suitable for the formal identification and quantification of genomic imprinting in the presence of linkage. In addition, the available methods are designed for use with pure sib-pairs, requiring artificial decomposition in cases of larger sibships, leading to a loss of power. We propose here the maximum likelihood binomial method adaptive for imprinting (MLB-I), which is a unified analytic framework giving rise to specific tests in sibships of any size for (i) linkage adaptive to imprinting, (ii) genomic imprinting in the presence of linkage, and (iii) partial versus complete genomic imprinting. In addition, we propose an original measure for quantifying genomic imprinting. We have derived and validated the distribution of the three tests under their respective null hypotheses for various genetic models, and have assessed the power of these tests in simulations. This method can readily be applied to genome-wide scanning, as illustrated here for leprosy sibships. Our approach provides a novel tool for dissecting genomic imprinting in model-free linkage analysis, and will be of considerable value for identifying and evaluating the contribution of imprinted genes to complex diseases.

  13. Stochastic deletion-insertion algorithm to construct dense linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jixiang; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Gonda, Michael

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we proposed a stochastic deletion-insertion (SDI) algorithm for constructing large-scale linkage maps. This SDI algorithm was compared with three published approximation approaches, the seriation (SER), neighbor mapping (NM), and unidirectional growth (UG) approaches, on the basis of simulated F(2) data with different population sizes, missing genotype rates, and numbers of markers. Simulation results showed that the SDI method had a similar or higher percentage of correct linkage orders than the other three methods. This SDI algorithm was also applied to a real dataset and compared with the other three methods. The total linkage map distance (cM) obtained by the SDI method (148.08 cM) was smaller than the distance obtained by SER (225.52 cM) and two published distances (150.11 cM and 150.38 cM). Since this SDI algorithm is stochastic, a more accurate linkage order can be quickly obtained by repeating this algorithm. Thus, this SDI method, which combines the advantages of accuracy and speed, is an important addition to the current linkage mapping toolkit for constructing improved linkage maps.

  14. Linkages between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bretherton, Francis; Dickinson, Robert E.; Fung, Inez; Moore, Berrien, III; Prather, Michael; Running, Steven W.; Tiessen, Holm

    1992-01-01

    The primary research issue in understanding the role of terrestrial ecosystems in global change is analyzing the coupling between processes with vastly differing rates of change, from photosynthesis to community change. Representing this coupling in models is the central challenge to modeling the terrestrial biosphere as part of the earth system. Terrestrial ecosystems participate in climate and in the biogeochemical cycles on several temporal scales. Some of the carbon fixed by photosynthesis is incorporated into plant tissue and is delayed from returning to the atmosphere until it is oxidized by decomposition or fire. This slower (i.e., days to months) carbon loop through the terrestrial component of the carbon cycle, which is matched by cycles of nutrients required by plants and decomposers, affects the increasing trend in atmospheric CO2 concentration and imposes a seasonal cycle on that trend. Moreover, this cycle includes key controls over biogenic trace gas production. The structure of terrestrial ecosystems, which responds on even longer time scales (annual to century), is the integrated response to the biogeochemical and environmental constraints that develop over the intermediate time scale. The loop is closed back to the climate system since it is the structure of ecosystems, including species composition, that sets the terrestrial boundary condition in the climate system through modification of surface roughness, albedo, and, to a great extent, latent heat exchange. These separate temporal scales contain explicit feedback loops which may modify ecosystem dynamics and linkages between ecosystems and the atmosphere. The long-term change in climate, resulting from increased atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases (e.g., CO2, CH4, and nitrous oxide (N2O)) will further modify the global environment and potentially induce further ecosystem change. Modeling these interactions requires coupling successional models to biogeochemical models to

  15. Use of land facets to design linkages for climate change.

    PubMed

    Brost, Brian M; Beier, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Least-cost modeling for focal species is the most widely used method for designing conservation corridors and linkages. However, these linkages have been based on current species' distributions and land cover, both of which will change with large-scale climate change. One method to develop corridors that facilitate species' shifting distributions is to incorporate climate models into their design. But this approach is enormously complex and prone to error propagation. It also produces outputs at a grain size (km2) coarser than the grain at which conservation decisions are made. One way to avoid these problems is to design linkages for the continuity and interspersion of land facets, or recurring landscape units of relatively uniform topography and soils. This coarse-filter approach aims to conserve the arenas of biological activity rather than the temporary occupants of those arenas. In this paper, we demonstrate how land facets can be defined in a rule-based and adaptable way, and how they can be used for linkage design in the face of climate change. We used fuzzy c-means cluster analysis to define land facets with respect to four topographic variables (elevation, slope angle, solar insolation, and topographic position), and least-cost analysis to design linkages that include one corridor per land facet. To demonstrate the flexibility of our procedures, we designed linkages using land facets in three topographically diverse landscapes in Arizona, USA. Our procedures can use other variables, including soil variables, to define land facets. We advocate using land facets to complement, rather than replace, existing focal species approaches to linkage design. This approach can be used even in regions lacking land cover maps and is not affected by the bias and patchiness common in species occurrence data.

  16. The new philosophy of psychiatry: its (recent) past, present and future: a review of the Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Banner, Natalie F; Thornton, Tim

    2007-01-01

    There has been a recent growth in philosophy of psychiatry that draws heavily (although not exclusively) on analytic philosophy with the aim of a better understanding of psychiatry through an analysis of some of its fundamental concepts. This 'new philosophy of psychiatry' is an addition to both analytic philosophy and to the broader interpretation of mental health care. Nevertheless, it is already a flourishing philosophical field. One indication of this is the new Oxford University Press series International Perspectives in Philosophy and Psychiatry seven volumes of which (by Bolton and Hill; Bracken and Thomas; Fulford, Morris, Sadler, and Stanghellini; Hughes, Louw, and Sabat; Pickering; Sadler; and Stanghellini) are examined in this critical review.

  17. Using the Oxford classification of IgA nephropathy to predict long-term outcomes of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis in adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chan Ho; Lim, Beom Jin; Bae, Yoon Sung; Kwon, Young Eun; Kim, Yung Ly; Nam, Ki Heon; Park, Kyoung Sook; An, Seong Yeong; Koo, Hyang Mo; Doh, Fa Mee; Lee, Mi Jung; Oh, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Tae-Hyun; Kang, Shin-Wook; Choi, Kyu Hun; Jeong, Hyun Joo; Han, Seung Hyeok

    2014-07-01

    Recently, there has been emerging concern that crescents, the main histologic feature of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis, merely reflect active inflammation, and may not be useful in predicting long-term outcomes. We therefore conducted a single-center retrospective study to evaluate whether the new Oxford classification of immunoglobulin A nephropathy can be used to predict long-term outcome in patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis. We included 61 biopsy-proven patients with Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis between January 1991 and August 2010. In addition to the International Study of Kidney Disease in Children classification, pathologic findings were also evaluated by the Oxford classification. Primary outcomes were defined as either the onset of estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min per 1.73 m(2) with ≥30% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline or end-stage renal disease. During a median follow-up of 49.3 months, 13 (21%) patients reached the primary end point. A Kaplan-Meier plot showed that renal event-free survival was significantly longer in patients with <50% crescents than in those with crescents in ≥50% of glomeruli (P=0.003). Among the components of the Oxford classification, patients with endocapillary hypercellularity (E1; P=0.016) and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T1/T2; P=0.018) had lower renal survival rates than those with E0 and T0. In a multivariate Cox model adjusted for clinical and pathologic factors, E1 (hazard ratio=8.91; 95% confidence interval=1.47-53.88; P=0.017) and T1/T2 (hazard ratio=8.74; 95% confidence interval=1.40-54.38; P=0.020) were independently associated with reaching a primary outcome, whereas the extent of crescentic lesions was not. Our findings suggest that the Oxford classification can be used in predicting long-term outcomes of Henoch-Schönlein purpura nephritis.

  18. Evidence Support and Guidelines for Using Heated, Humidified, High-Flow Nasal Cannulae in Neonatology: Oxford Nasal High-Flow Therapy Meeting, 2015.

    PubMed

    Roehr, Charles C; Yoder, Bradley A; Davis, Peter G; Ives, Kevin

    2016-12-01

    Nasal high-flow therapy (nHFT) has become a popular form of noninvasive respiratory support in neonatal intensive care units. A meeting held in Oxford, UK, in June 2015 examined the evidence base and proposed a consensus statement. In summary, nHFT is effective for support of preterm infants following extubation. There is growing evidence evaluating its use in the primary treatment of respiratory distress. Further study is needed to assess which clinical conditions are most amenable to nHFT support, the most effective flow rates, and escalation and weaning strategies. Its suitability as first-line treatment needs to be further evaluated.

  19. Student Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    Another topic involving privacy has attracted considerable attention in recent months--the "student unit record" issue. The U.S. Department of Education concluded in March that it would be feasible to help address lawmakers' concerns about accountability in higher education by constructing a database capable of tracking students from institution…

  20. Landscape response to normal fault growth and linkage in the Southern Apennines, Italy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; Whittaker, Alex

    2016-04-01

    It is now well-established that landscape can record spatial and temporal variations in tectonic rates. However, decoding this information to extract detailed histories of fault growth is often a complex problem that requires careful integration of tectonic and geomorphic data sets. Here, we present new data addressing both normal fault evolution and coupled landscape response for two normal faults in the Southern Apennines: the Vallo di Diano and East Agri faults. By integrating published constraints with new data, we show that these faults have total throws of up to 2100 m, and Holocene throw rates of up to 1 mm/yr at their maximum. We demonstrate that geomorphology is effectively recording tectonics, with relief, channel and catchment slopes varying along fault strike as normal fault activity does. Therefore, valuable information about fault growth and interaction can be extracted from their geomorphic expression. We use the spatial distribution of knickpoints on the footwall channels to infer two episodes of base level change, which can be associated with distinct fault interaction events. From our detailed fault throw profiles, we reconstruct the amount of throw accumulated after each of these events, and the segments involved in each, and we use slip rate enhancement factors derived from fault interaction theory to estimate the magnitude of the tectonic perturbation in each case. From this approach, we are able to reconstruct pre-linkage throw rates, and we estimate that fault linkage events likely took place 0.7 ± 0.2 Ma and 1.9 ± 0.6 Ma in the Vallo di Diano fault, and 1.1 ± 0.1 and 2.3 ± 0.9 Ma in the East Agri fault. Our study suggests that both faults started their activity at 3.6 ± 0.5 Ma. These fault linkage scenarios are consistent with the knickpoint heights, and may relate to soft-linkage interaction with the Southern Apennines normal fault array, the existence of which has been the subject of considerable debate. Our combined geomorphic and

  1. Preliminary genetic linkage map of the abalone Haliotis diversicolor Reeve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yaohua; Guo, Ximing; Gu, Zhifeng; Wang, Aimin; Wang, Yan

    2010-05-01

    Haliotis diversicolor Reeve is one of the most important mollusks cultured in South China. Preliminary genetic linkage maps were constructed with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 2 596 AFLP markers were obtained from 28 primer combinations in two parents and 78 offsprings. Among them, 412 markers (15.9%) were polymorphic and segregated in the mapping family. Chi-square tests showed that 151 (84.4%) markers segregated according to the expected 1:1 Mendelian ratio ( P<0.05) in the female parent, and 200 (85.8%) in the male parent. For the female map, 179 markers were used for linkage analysis and 90 markers were assigned to 17 linkage groups with an average interval length of 25.7 cm. For the male map, 233 markers were used and 94 were mapped into 18 linkage groups, with an average interval of 25.0 cm. The estimated genome length was 2 773.0 cm for the female and 2 817.1 cm for the male map. The observed length of the linkage map was 1 875.2 cm and 1 896.5 cm for the female and male maps, respectively. When doublets were considered, the map length increased to 2 152.8 cm for the female and 2 032.7 cm for the male map, corresponding to genome coverage of 77.6% and 72.2%, respectively.

  2. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Linkage map construction in allotetraploid creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.).

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, N; Bae, J; Warnke, S; Chang, T; Jung, G

    2005-08-01

    Creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) is one of the most adapted bentgrass species for use on golf course fairways and putting greens because of its high tolerance to low mowing height. It is a highly outcrossing allotetraploid species (2n=4x=28, A(2) and A(3) subgenomes). The first linkage map in this species is reported herein, and it was constructed based on a population derived from a cross between two heterozygous clones using 169 RAPD, 180 AFLP, and 39 heterologous cereal and 36 homologous bentgrass cDNA RFLP markers. The linkage map consists of 424 mapped loci covering 1,110 cM in 14 linkage groups, of which seven pairs of homoeologous chromosomes were identified based on duplicated loci. The numbering of all seven linkage groups in the bentgrass map was assigned according to common markers mapped on syntenous chromosomes of ryegrass and wheat. The number of markers linked in coupling and repulsion phase was in a 1:1 ratio, indicating disomic inheritance. This supports a strict allotetraploid inheritance in creeping bentgrass, as suggested by previous work based on chromosomal pairing and isozymes. This linkage map will assist in the tagging and eventually in marker-assisted breeding of economically important quantitative traits like disease resistance to dollar spot (Sclerotinia homoeocarpa F.T. Bennett) and brown patch (Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn).

  4. The first genetic linkage map of Eucommia ulmoides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dawei; Li, Yu; Li, Long; Wei, Yongcheng; Li, Zhouqi

    2014-04-01

    In accordance with pseudo-testcross strategy, the first genetic linkage map of Eucommia ulmoides Oliv. was constructed by an F1 population of 122 plants using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. A total of 22 AFLP primer combinations generated 363 polymorphic markers. We selected 289 markers segregating as 1:1 and used them for constructing the parent-specific linkage maps. Among the candidate markers, 127 markers were placed on the maternal map LF and 108 markers on the paternal map Q1. The maternal map LF spanned 1116.1 cM in 14 linkage groups with a mean map distance of 8.78 cM; the paternal map Q1 spanned 929.6 cM in 12 linkage groups with an average spacing of 8.61 cM. The estimated coverage of the genome through two methods was 78.5 and 73.9% for LF, and 76.8 and 71.2% for Q1, respectively. This map is the first linkage map of E. ulmoides and provides a basis for mapping quantitative-trait loci and breeding applications.

  5. Linkage analysis of a large pedigree with hereditary sideroblastic anaemia.

    PubMed

    Noble, J S; Taylor, G R; Losowsky, M S; Hall, R; Turner, G; Mueller, R F; Stewart, A D

    1995-05-01

    A large pedigree showing a history of pyridoxine responsive X linked sideroblastic anaemia was screened with several polymorphic DNA markers from the X chromosome. Linkage analysis between each marker and disease status was performed, giving a maximum two point lod score of 3.64 at zero recombination with the microsatellite marker PGK1P1 at Xq11.2-12. Close linkage to PGK at Xq13.3, one of the candidate regions for X linked sideroblastic anaemia, was excluded. Linkage to DNA markers distal to PGK and at Xp21 was also excluded. Multipoint linkage analysis was performed with markers located between Xq11.2-21. The maximum map specific lod score obtained was 3.56 at PGK1P1 (Xq11.2-12). Linkage remained significant over the interval 20 cM proximal to PGK1P1 and 5 cM distal to PGK1P1, with definite exclusion around the PGK locus. The most likely location of the gene involved in sideroblastic anaemia in this pedigree is therefore within the pericentromeric region of the X chromosome. This region includes the erythroid 5-aminolaevulinate synthetase gene of the haem synthesis pathway, which is a candidate gene for X linked sideroblastic anaemia located at Xp11.21.

  6. Estimating parental relationship in linkage analysis of recessive traits

    SciTech Connect

    Merette, C.; Ott, J.

    1996-05-17

    In linkage analysis of recessive traits, parental relationship is important. For the case that it is unknown, the question is investigated as to whether estimating parental relationship and using the estimated relationship in linkage analysis is beneficial. Results show that estimating parental relationship can reliably be carried out on the basis of 50-100 genetic marker loci (analysis based on theory by Thompson). Misspecification of parental relationship leads to a loss of linkage informativeness, but not to false-positive evidence for linkage. An asymptotic bias in the recombination fraction estimate occurs when parents are unrelated and falsely taken to be related, but no such bias is seen when related parents are taken to be unrelated. Results from this investigation suggest that an estimated parental relationship may be used in linkage analysis as if it were the correct relationship, when evidence for the estimated relationship is supported by a likelihood ratio of at least 10:1 against the parents being unrelated. 9 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Shin; Rouvier, Roger; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chean-Ping; Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2009-03-17

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands) were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping) and for breeding applications.

  8. Duck (Anas platyrhynchos) linkage mapping by AFLP fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chang-Wen; Cheng, Yu-Shin; Rouvier, Roger; Yang, Kuo-Tai; Wu, Chean-Ping; Huang, Hsiu-Lin; Huang, Mu-Chiou

    2009-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) with multicolored fluorescent molecular markers was used to analyze duck (Anas platyrhynchos) genomic DNA and to construct the first AFLP genetic linkage map. These markers were developed and genotyped in 766 F2 individuals from six families from a cross between two different selected duck lines, brown Tsaiya and Pekin. Two hundred and ninety-six polymorphic bands (64% of all bands) were detected using 18 pairs of fluorescent TaqI/EcoRI primer combinations. Each primer set produced a range of 7 to 29 fragments in the reactions, and generated on average 16.4 polymorphic bands. The AFLP linkage map included 260 co-dominant markers distributed in 32 linkage groups. Twenty-one co-dominant markers were not linked with any other marker. Each linkage group contained three to 63 molecular markers and their size ranged between 19.0 cM and 171.9 cM. This AFLP linkage map provides important information for establishing a duck chromosome map, for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping) and for breeding applications. PMID:19291328

  9. String Comparator Metrics and Enhanced Decision Rules in the Fellegi-Sunter Model of Record Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, William E.

    To locate matches across pairs of lists without unique identifiers it is sometimes necessary to compare strings of letters. String comparators are used in production computer matching software during the Post Enumeration Survey for the 1990 U.S. census. A string comparator metric is described that partially accounts for: (1) typographical…

  10. Estimation of recombination frequency in genetic linkage studies.

    PubMed

    Nordheim, E V; O'Malley, D M; Guries, R P

    1983-09-01

    A binomial-like model is developed that may be used in genetic linkage studies when data are generated by a testcross with parental phase unknown. Four methods of estimation for the recombination frequency are compared for data from a single group and also from several groups; these methods are maximum likelihood, two Bayesian procedures, and an ad hoc technique. The Bayes estimator using a noninformative prior usually has a lower mean squared error than the other estimators and because of this it is the recommended estimator. This estimator appears particularly useful for estimation of recombination frequencies indicative of weak linkage from samples of moderate size. Interval estimates corresponding to this estimator can be obtained numerically by discretizing the posterior distribution, thereby providing researchers with a range of plausible recombination values. Data from a linkage study on pitch pine are used as an example.

  11. Linkage Disequilibrium in a Finite Population That Is Partially Selfing

    PubMed Central

    Golding, G. B.; Strobeck, C.

    1980-01-01

    The linkage disequilibrium expected in a finite, partially selfing population is analyzed, assuming the infinite allele model. Formulas for the expected sum of squares of the linkage disequilibria and the squared standard linkage disequilibrium are derived from the equilibrium values of sixteen inbreeding coefficients required to describe the behavior of the system. These formulas are identical to those obtained with random mating if the effective population size Ne = (1-½S)N and the effective recombination value re = (1-S)r/(1-½S), where S is the proportion of selfing, are substituted for the population size and the recombination value. Therefore, the effect of partial selfing at equilibrium is to reduce the population size by a factor 1-½S and the recombination value by a factor (1-S)/(1-½S). PMID:17249017

  12. A general model for likelihood computations of genetic marker data accounting for linkage, linkage disequilibrium, and mutations.

    PubMed

    Kling, Daniel; Tillmar, Andreas; Egeland, Thore; Mostad, Petter

    2015-09-01

    Several applications necessitate an unbiased determination of relatedness, be it in linkage or association studies or in a forensic setting. An appropriate model to compute the joint probability of some genetic data for a set of persons given some hypothesis about the pedigree structure is then required. The increasing number of markers available through high-density SNP microarray typing and NGS technologies intensifies the demand, where using a large number of markers may lead to biased results due to strong dependencies between closely located loci, both within pedigrees (linkage) and in the population (allelic association or linkage disequilibrium (LD)). We present a new general model, based on a Markov chain for inheritance patterns and another Markov chain for founder allele patterns, the latter allowing us to account for LD. We also demonstrate a specific implementation for X chromosomal markers that allows for computation of likelihoods based on hypotheses of alleged relationships and genetic marker data. The algorithm can simultaneously account for linkage, LD, and mutations. We demonstrate its feasibility using simulated examples. The algorithm is implemented in the software FamLinkX, providing a user-friendly GUI for Windows systems (FamLinkX, as well as further usage instructions, is freely available at www.famlink.se ). Our software provides the necessary means to solve cases where no previous implementation exists. In addition, the software has the possibility to perform simulations in order to further study the impact of linkage and LD on computed likelihoods for an arbitrary set of markers.

  13. Genome Screen to Detect Linkage to Common Susceptibility Genes for Intracranial and Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Worrall, Bradford B.; Foroud, Tatiana; Brown, Robert D.; Connolly, E. Sander; Hornung, Richard W.; Huston, John; Kleindorfer, Dawn; Koller, Daniel L.; Lai, Dongbing; Moomaw, Charles J.; Sauerbeck, Laura; Woo, Daniel; Broderick, Joseph P.

    2008-01-01

    Background and Purpose Risk for both intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and aortic aneurysms (AAs) is thought to be heritable with mounting evidence for genetic predisposition. The concept of shared risk for these conditions is challenged by differences in age of diagnosis and demographic characteristics. We performed a genomewide linkage analysis in multiplex families with both IA and AA from the Familial Intracranial Aneurysm study. Methods Available medical records of subjects who reported IA or abdominal/thoracic AA were reviewed with adjudication as definite/probable, possible, or not a case. To identify genes contributing to the susceptibility for IA and AA, genomewide linkage analysis was performed in the 26 multiplex IA families who had members who also had thoracic or abdominal AA. Individuals (n=91) were defined as affected if they had an IA (definite/probable) or an aortic or thoracic AA (definite/probable). Results Maximum logarithm of odds (LOD) scores were found on chromosomes 11 (144 cM; LOD=3.0) and 6 (33 cM; LOD=2.3). In both chromosomal regions, analyses of these same 26 families considering only IA as the disease phenotype produced LOD scores of 1.8 and 1.6, respectively. Conclusions Our linkage analysis in these 26 families using the broadest disease phenotype, including IA, abdominal AA, and thoracic AA, supports the concept of shared genetic risk. The chromosome 11 locus appears to confirm earlier independent associations in IA and AA. The chromosome 6 finding is novel. Both warrant further investigation. PMID:18948608

  14. Sir Hugh Cairns and World War II British advances in head injury management, diffuse brain injury, and concussion: an Oxford tale.

    PubMed

    Stone, James L; Patel, Vimal; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-11-01

    The authors trace the Oxford, England, roots of World War II (WWII)-related advances in head injury management, the biomechanics of concussion and brain injury, and postwar delineation of pathological findings in severe concussion and diffuse brain injury in man. The prominent figure in these developments was the charismatic and innovative Harvey Cushing-trained neurosurgeon Sir Hugh Cairns. Cairns, who was to closely emulate Cushing's surgical and scholarly approach, is credited with saving thousands of lives during WWII by introducing and implementing innovative programs such as helmets for motorcyclists, mobile neurosurgical units near battle zones, and the military usage of penicillin. In addition, he inspired and taught a generation of neurosurgeons, neurologists, and neurological nurses in the care of brain and spinal cord injuries at Oxford's Military Hospital for Head Injuries. During this time Cairns also trained the first full-time female neurosurgeon. Pivotal in supporting animal research demonstrating the critical role of acceleration in the causation of concussion, Cairns recruited the physicist Hylas Holbourn, whose research implicated rotary acceleration and shear strains as particularly damaging. Cairns' work in military medicine and head injury remain highly influential in efforts to mitigate and manage brain injury.

  15. Evidence from the Oxford Classification cohort supports the clinical value of subclassification of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Bellur, Shubha S; Lepeytre, Fanny; Vorobyeva, Olga; Troyanov, Stéphan; Cook, H Terence; Roberts, Ian S D

    2017-01-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a common finding in IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Here we assessed FSGS lesions in the Oxford Classification patient cohort and correlated histology with clinical presentation and outcome to determine whether subclassification of the S score in IgAN is reproducible and of clinical value. Our subclassification of lesions in 137 individuals with segmental glomerulosclerosis or adhesion (S1) identified 38% with podocyte hypertrophy, 10% with hyalinosis, 9% with resorption droplets within podocytes, 7% with tip lesions, 3% with perihilar sclerosis, and 2% with endocapillary foam cells. Reproducibility was good or excellent for tip lesions, hyalinosis, and perihilar sclerosis; moderate for podocyte hypertrophy; and poor for resorption droplets, adhesion only, and endocapillary foam cells. Podocyte hypertrophy and tip lesions were strongly associated with greater initial proteinuria. During follow-up of patients without immunosuppression, those with these features had more rapid renal function decline and worse survival from a combined event compared to S1 patients without such features and those without FSGS. Also in individuals with podocyte hypertrophy or tip lesions, immunosuppressive therapy was associated with better renal survival. In IgA nephropathy, the presence of podocyte hypertrophy or tip lesions, markers of podocyte injury, were reproducible. These features are strongly associated with proteinuria and, in untreated patients, carry a worse prognosis. Thus, our findings support reporting podocytopathic features alongside the S score of the Oxford Classification.

  16. The Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium as an alternative selective and differential medium for isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from raw or unpasteurized food.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Martínez-Chávez, L; Martínez-Cárdenas, C; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Castillo, A

    2014-04-01

    The Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium (PCOM) was developed to recover Listeria monocytogenes from raw or unpasteurized foods. It contains esculin-ferric ammonium citrate as indicator system for Listeria growth, and ceftazidime and polymyxin B as selective agents, which are available in several Latin American countries. Comparison of PCOM, Modified Oxford Medium (MOX) and Tryptic Soy agar with 0.6% yeast extract (TSAYE) indicated that both selective media were equally effective at recovering four individual strains of L. monocytogenes (Scott A, V7, California and broccoli), and a mixture of these strains (LMM) (P > 0.05). The ability of PCOM, MOX, TSAYE and TSAYE supplemented with 4% NaCl to recover heat, acid and freeze-damaged LMM was similar for all media (P > 0.05). The PCOM proved to be effective at isolating colonies of LMM from inoculated raw beef chunks, unpasteurized orange juice, cabbage, and Mexican-style cheese by direct plating and by the US Department of Agriculture's Food Safety and Inspection Service enrichment method. Differentiation of L. monocytogenes colonies was easier on PCOM than on MOX for foods with high levels of background microbiota. Based on the evaluations performed on foods naturally contaminated with L. monocytogenes, PCOM was a more economical alternative than MOX for selective and differential isolation of Listeria from raw or unpasteurized foods.

  17. Use of a novel medium, the Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium, for isolation of Listeria monocytogenes from raw or non-pasteurized foods.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gonzáles, N E; Martínez-Chávez, L; Cabrera-Díaz, E; Martínez-Cárdenas, C; Gutiérrez-González, P; Castillo, A

    2016-05-01

    Polymyxin Ceftazidime Oxford Medium (PCOM), a novel selective and differential plating medium for Listeria monocytogenes was compared with Modified Oxford Agar (MOX) for efficacy to isolate L. monocytogenes and other Listeria spp. naturally present in non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese (n = 50), non-pasteurized fresh squeezed orange juice (n = 50), raw beef chunks (n = 36), and fresh cabbage (n = 125). Samples were collected from retail markets and farms in Mexico and tested following the US Department of Agriculture enrichment technique. Listeria spp. were isolated from 23.4% of analyzed samples, and from those, 75.0% corresponded to raw beef chunks, 38.0% to non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese, and 30.0% to fresh squeezed orange juice. No Listeria spp. were isolated from fresh cabbage samples. L. monocytogenes was recovered from 15.3% of food samples analyzed. Non-pasteurized Mexican-style cheese showed the highest proportion of L. monocytogenes positive samples (36.0%), followed by orange juice (26.0%) and raw beef (25.0%). The frequency of isolation of Listeria spp. and L. monocytogenes was not different (P > 0.05) between PCOM and MOX. The advantages of using PCOM when comparing to MOX, include the easier way to identify Listeria species, the lower cost per plate and the availability of its ingredients for Latin-American countries.

  18. Mapping autism risk loci using genetic linkage and chromosomal rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Szatmari, Peter; Paterson, Andrew; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Roberts, Wendy; Brian, Jessica; Liu, Xiao-Qing; Vincent, John; Skaug, Jennifer; Thompson, Ann; Senman, Lili; Feuk, Lars; Qian, Cheng; Bryson, Susan; Jones, Marshall; Marshall, Christian; Scherer, Stephen; Vieland, Veronica; Bartlett, Christopher; Mangin, La Vonne; Goedken, Rhinda; Segre, Alberto; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Cuccaro, Michael; Gilbert, John; Wright, Harry; Abramson, Ruth; Betancur, Catalina; Bourgeron, Thomas; Gillberg, Christopher; Leboyer, Marion; Buxbaum, Joseph; Davis, Kenneth; Hollander, Eric; Silverman, Jeremy; Hallmayer, Joachim; Lotspeich, Linda; Sutcliffe, James; Haines, Jonathan; Folstein, Susan; Piven, Joseph; Wassink, Thomas; Sheffield, Val; Geschwind, Daniel; Bucan, Maja; Brown, Ted; Cantor, Rita; Constantino, John; Gilliam, Conrad; Herbert, Martha; Lajonchere, Clara; Ledbetter, David; Lese-Martin, Christa; Miller, Janet; Nelson, Stan; Samango-Sprouse, Carol; Spence, Sarah; State, Matthew; Tanzi, Rudolph; Coon, Hilary; Dawson, Geraldine; Devlin, Bernie; Estes, Annette; Flodman, Pamela; Klei, Lambertus; Mcmahon, William; Minshew, Nancy; Munson, Jeff; Korvatska, Elena; Rodier, Patricia; Schellenberg, Gerard; Smith, Moyra; Spence, Anne; Stodgell, Chris; Tepper, Ping Guo; Wijsman, Ellen; Yu, Chang-En; Rogé, Bernadette; Mantoulan, Carine; Wittemeyer, Kerstin; Poustka, Annemarie; Felder, Bärbel; Klauck, Sabine; Schuster, Claudia; Poustka, Fritz; Bölte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Herbrecht, Evelyn; Schmötzer, Gabi; Tsiantis, John; Papanikolaou, Katerina; Maestrini, Elena; Bacchelli, Elena; Blasi, Francesca; Carone, Simona; Toma, Claudio; Van Engeland, Herman; De Jonge, Maretha; Kemner, Chantal; Koop, Frederieke; Langemeijer, Marjolein; Hijmans, Channa; Staal, Wouter; Baird, Gillian; Bolton, Patrick; Rutter, Michael; Weisblatt, Emma; Green, Jonathan; Aldred, Catherine; Wilkinson, Julie-Anne; Pickles, Andrew; Le Couteur, Ann; Berney, Tom; Mcconachie, Helen; Bailey, Anthony; Francis, Kostas; Honeyman, Gemma; Hutchinson, Aislinn; Parr, Jeremy; Wallace, Simon; Monaco, Anthony; Barnby, Gabrielle; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Lamb, Janine; Sousa, Ines; Sykes, Nuala; Cook, Edwin; Guter, Stephen; Leventhal, Bennett; Salt, Jeff; Lord, Catherine; Corsello, Christina; Hus, Vanessa; Weeks, Daniel; Volkmar, Fred; Tauber, Maïté; Fombonne, Eric; Shih, Andy; Meyer, Kacie

    2007-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are common, heritable neurodevelopmental conditions. The genetic architecture of ASD is complex, requiring large samples to overcome heterogeneity. Here we broaden coverage and sample size relative to other studies of ASD by using Affymetrix 10K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and 1168 families with ≥ 2 affected individuals to perform the largest linkage scan to date, while also analyzing copy number variation (CNV) in these families. Linkage and CNV analyses implicate chromosome 11p12-p13 and neurexins, respectively, amongst other candidate loci. Neurexins team with previously-implicated neuroligins for glutamatergic synaptogenesis, highlighting glutamate-related genes as promising candidates for ASD. PMID:17322880

  19. Linkages between community mental health centers and public mental hospitals.

    PubMed

    Worley, N K; Lowery, B J

    1991-01-01

    Directors of community mental health centers and superintendents of public mental health hospitals in one state were surveyed to gather data on interagency linkages. Implementation of affiliation agreements, exchange of staff training, and exchange of patient information were investigated. Affiliation agreements tended to be implemented with little difficulty and there was more interagency cooperation than that reported in earlier research. However, exchange of training and staff were still areas of minimal interaction. Geographic proximity was found to have a positive influence and competition a negative influence on cooperation. Further attempts at interagency linkages in the interest of continuity of patient care are recommended.

  20. States Monitoring Assisted Reproductive Technology (SMART) Collaborative: data collection, linkage, dissemination, and use.

    PubMed

    Mneimneh, Allison S; Boulet, Sheree L; Sunderam, Saswati; Zhang, Yujia; Jamieson, Denise J; Crawford, Sara; McKane, Patricia; Copeland, Glenn; Mersol-Barg, Michael; Grigorescu, Violanda; Cohen, Bruce; Steele, JoAnn; Sappenfield, William; Diop, Hafsatou; Kirby, Russell S; Kissin, Dmitry M

    2013-07-01

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) refers to fertility treatments in which both eggs and sperm are handled outside the body. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) oversees the National ART Surveillance System (NASS), which collects data on all ART procedures performed in the United States. The NASS, while a comprehensive source of data on ART patient demographics and clinical procedures, includes limited information on outcomes related to women's and children's health. To examine ART-related health outcomes, CDC and three states (Massachusetts, Florida, and Michigan) established the States Monitoring ART (SMART) Collaborative to evaluate maternal and perinatal outcomes of ART and improve state-based ART surveillance. To date, NASS data have been linked with states' vital records, disease registries, and hospital discharge data with a linkage rate of 90.2%. The probabilistic linkage methodology used in the SMART Collaborative has been validated and found to be both accurate and efficient. A wide breadth of applied research within the Collaborative is planned or ongoing, including examinations of the impact of insurance mandates on ART use as well as the relationships between ART and birth defects and cancer, among others. The SMART Collaborative is working to improve state-based ART surveillance by developing state surveillance plans, establishing partnerships, and conducting data analyses. The SMART Collaborative has been instrumental in creating linked datasets and strengthening epidemiologic and research capacity for improving maternal and infant health programs and evaluating the public health impact of ART.

  1. Haplotype Analysis and Linkage Disequilibrium at Five Loci in Eragrostis tef.

    PubMed

    Smith, Shavannor M; Yuan, Yinan; Doust, Andrew N; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2012-03-01

    Eragrostis tef (Zucc.), a member of the Chloridoideae subfamily of grasses, is one of the most important food crops in Ethiopia. Lodging is the most important production problem in tef. The rht1 and sd1 dwarfing genes have been useful for improving lodging resistance in wheat and rice, respectively, in what has been known as the "Green Revolution." All homologs of rht1 and sd1 were cloned and sequenced from 31 tef accessions collected from across Ethiopia. The allotetraploid tef genome was found to carry two rht1 homologs. From sequence variation between these two putative homologs, an approximate ancestral divergence date of 6.4 million years ago was calculated for the two genomes within tef. Three sd1 homologs were identified in tef, with unknown orthologous/paralogous relationships. The genetic diversity in the 31 studied accessions was organized into a relatively small number of haplotypes (2-4) for four of these genes, whereas one rht1 homeologue exhibited 10 haplotypes. A low level of nucleotide diversity was observed at all loci. Linkage disequilibrium analysis demonstrated strong linkage disequilibrium, extending the length of the five genes investigated (2-4 kb), with no significant decline. There was no significant correlation between haplotypes of any of these genes and their recorded site of origin.

  2. The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011) The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers (Oxford, UK, 2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saibene, G.

    2012-11-01

    The 13th International Workshop on H-mode Physics and Transport Barriers, held in Lady Margaret Hall College in Oxford in October 2011 continues the tradition of bi-annual international meetings dedicated to the study of transport barriers in fusion plasmas. The first meeting of this series took place in S Diego (CA, US) in 1987, and since then scientists in the fusion community studying the formation and effects of transport barriers in plasmas have been meeting at this small workshop to discuss progress, new experimental evidence and related theoretical studies. The first workshops were strongly focussed on the characterization and understanding of the H-mode plasma, discovered in ASDEX in 1982. Tokamaks throughout the entire world were able to reproduce the H-mode transition in the following few years and since then the H-mode has been recognised as a pervasive physics feature of toroidally confined plasmas. Increased physics understanding of the H-mode transition and of the properties of H-mode plasmas, together with extensive development of diagnostic capabilities for the plasma edge, led to the development of edge transport barrier studies and theory. The H-mode Workshop reflected this extension in interest, with more and more contributions discussing the phenomenology of edge transport barriers and instabilities (ELMs), L-H transition and edge transport barrier formation theory. In the last 15 years, in response to the development of fusion plasma studies, the scientific scope of the workshop has been broadened to include experimental and theoretical studies of both edge and internal transport barriers, including formation and sustainment of transport barriers for different transport channels (energy, particle and momentum). The 13th H-mode Workshop was organized around six leading topics, and, as customary for this workshop, a lead speaker was selected for each topic to present to the audience the state-of-the-art, new understanding and open issues, as well

  3. A molecular marker based linkage map of Vitis.

    PubMed

    Lodhi, M A; Daly, M J; Ye, G N; Weeden, N F; Reisch, B I

    1995-08-01

    Genetic linkage maps of Vitis (2n = 38) have been constructed from a single interspecific hybrid grape population (60 seedlings) of 'Cayuga White' X 'Aurore'. The maps were primarily based on 422 RAPD markers but also included 16 RFLP and isozyme markers. These maps had an average distance of 6.1 cM between markers and were developed using a double-pseudotestcross strategy. The 'Cayuga White' map had 214 markers covering 1196 cM and that of 'Aurore' spanned over 1477 cM with 225 markers. The 'Cayuga White' map consisted of 20 linkage groups, whereas 22 linkage groups comprised the 'Aurore' map. The number of groups reduced to 19, as in some instances two or more groups from one parent showed homology with a single group from the other parent on the basis of markers heterozygous in both parents. Each linkage group ranged in size from 14 to 135 cM in 'Aurore' and from 14 to 124 cM in 'Cayuga White'. These maps provide enough coverage of the genome to allow quantitative trait locus analysis and map-based gene cloning.

  4. Genomewide Significant Linkage to Stuttering on Chromosome 12

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Naveeda; Steinberg, Stacy; Ahmad, Jamil; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Cox, Nancy J.; Drayna, Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Stuttering is a common and sometimes severe communication disorder, of unknown primary etiology, that exists in populations worldwide. Many types of evidence suggest a genetic contribution to stuttering; however, the complex inheritance of this disorder has hindered identification of these factors. We have employed highly inbred families to increase the power of linkage analysis of this disorder. Forty-four Pakistani families with documented or probable consanguinity, from the city of Lahore and surrounding areas, were included. Each family contained multiple cases of stuttering, which were diagnosed using the Stuttering Severity Instrument. Using the Marshfield Weber 9 marker panel, we performed a genomewide linkage scan focused on affected individuals and their parents. The analysis included 199 genotyped individuals, 144 affected and 55 unaffected. The Pedigree Relationship Statistical Test (PREST) was used to identify pedigrees that required additional specification of inbreeding. Initial nonparametric analysis gave evidence of linkage on chromosomes 1, 5, 7, and 12. Additional genotyping was performed on chromosome 12 to a 5-cM level of resolution, and 16 additional individuals were then included, bringing the number of families to 46. Analysis of the enlarged data set provided consistent evidence of linkage on chromosome 12: the Shomoz scoring function gave a nonparametric LOD score of 4.61, and a LOD score of 3.51 was obtained using the Sall scoring function. These results suggest that a locus on chromosome 12q may contain a gene with a large effect in this sample. PMID:15714404

  5. The Illinois Model for Consulting Linkage Skills Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasaway, Carl, Comp.; Erwin, Cliff, Comp.

    Materials are presented which were used for a consulting/linkage skills training program. The program is divided into three phases. In phase one, various training techniques such as presentations, case studies, role-playing, and simulations are used to lead the participants through a series of knowledge-increasing and skill-enhancing activities.…

  6. Genetic Linkage Map will aid the Whole genome Sequence Assembly

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The allotetraploid peanut genome assembly will be a valuable resource to researchers studying polyploidy species, in addition to peanut genome evolution and domestication other than facilitating QTL analysis and the tools for marker-assisted breeding. Therefore, a peanut linkage map will aid genome ...

  7. Low Cost Computer Graphics Simulation of Basic Kinematic Linkages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Donald A.; Jacquot, Raymond G.

    1984-01-01

    Presents algorithms for the simulation and motion display of the three basic kinematic devices: (1) four bar linkages; (2) the slider crank; and (3) the inverted slider crank mechanisms. The algorithms were implemented on a Commodore-VIC 20 microcomputer system with 6500 bytes of available memory. (Author/JN)

  8. A Genetic Linkage Map of Atlantic Halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Darrin P.; Smith, Cheryl-Anne; Rommens, Melissa; Blanchard, Brian; Martin-Robichaud, Debbie; Reith, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A genetic linkage map has been constructed for Atlantic halibut on the basis of 258 microsatellites and 346 AFLPs. Twenty-four linkage groups were identified, consistent with the 24 chromosomes seen in chromosome spreads. The total map distance is 1562.2 cM in the female and 1459.6 cM in the male with an average resolution of 4.3 and 3.5 cM, respectively. Using diploid gynogens, we estimated centromere locations in 19 of 24 linkage groups. Overall recombination in the female was approximately twice that of the male; however, this trend was not consistent along the linkage groups. In the centromeric regions, females had 11–17.5 times the recombination of the males, whereas this trend reversed toward the distal end with males having three times the recombination of the females. Correspondingly, in the male, markers clustered toward the centromeric region with 50% of markers within 20 cM of the putative centromere, whereas 35% of markers in the female were found between 60 and 80 cM from the putative centromere. Limited interspecies comparisons within Japanese flounder and Tetraodon nigroviridis revealed blocks of conservation in sequence and marker order, although regions of chromosomal rearrangement were also apparent. PMID:17720928

  9. Apprenticeship Linkages to Secondary Education and Other Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantor, Jeffrey A.

    This study was undertaken to identify facilitators barriers to effective linkages of secondary education and other training programs with registered apprenticeship programs. Analysis was conducted through case studies and surveys of programs that were identified nationally. U.S. apprenticeship programs had the following weaknesses: variable…

  10. Linkage of Vocational Education and Related Service Deliverers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiant, Allen; And Others

    A study reviewed research on interagency relations involving vocational education and examined a local vocational agency and some of its linkages. It also determined what further research is needed to facilitate mutually advantageous interagency arrangements. The study used a dyadic perspective. An analytic model of interorganizational behavior,…

  11. 20 CFR 628.545 - Linkages and coordination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TITLE II OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Program Design Requirements for Programs Under Title II of the Job Training Partnership Act § 628.545 Linkages and coordination. (a) General requirements. (1) To..., and with appropriate education and training agencies, such as local JOBS programs, Employment...

  12. Environmental Scientists' Perceptions of the Science-Policy Linkage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alm, Leslie R.; Simon, Marc

    2001-01-01

    Describes the criticisms coming from scientists on the assessment report on acid rain released by the National Acid Preparation Assessment Program (NAPAP) with the purpose of providing relevant information to policy makers about acid rain. Investigates n=129 scientists' point of view on the linkage of science to policy. (YDS)

  13. Linkages over Time between Adolescents' Relationships with Parents and Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Goede, Irene H. A.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2009-01-01

    This 5-wave longitudinal study examines linkages over time between adolescents' perceptions of relationships with parents and friends with respect to support, negative interaction, and power. A total of 575 early adolescents (54.1% boys) and 337 middle adolescents (43.3% boys) participated. Path analyses mainly showed bidirectional associations…

  14. A microsatellite linkage map of striped bass (Morone saxatilis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) is of great importance for fisheries and aquaculture in the US. To construct a linkage map of striped bass, 480 microsatellite markers were screened for polymorphism among three parents of two half-sib mapping families that shared a common dam. A total of 289 markers ...

  15. Development, linkage mapping, and utilization of microsallelites in bermudagrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic linkage maps of bermudagrass species were constructed using 118 triploid individuals derived from a cross of T89 (Cynodon dactylon, 2n= 4x= 36) and T574 (C. transvaalensis, 2n= 2x= 18). Primers were developed from 53 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) wh...

  16. Broad scan linkage analysis in a large Tourette family pedigree

    SciTech Connect

    Peiffer, A.; Leppert, M.; Wetering, B.J.M. van der

    1994-09-01

    Attempts to find a gene causing Tourette syndrome (TS) using linkage analysis have been unsuccessful even though as much as 65% of the autosomal genetic map has been excluded by the pooled results from several laboratories collaborating worldwide. One reason for this failure may be the misclassification of affection status of marry-in spouses. Specifically, we have found that six unrelated spouses in our Utah TS pedigree suffer from TS, obsessive-compulsive disorder or chronic motor tics. In light of these findings we decided to conduct a complete genomic scan from this Utah kindred with polymorphic markers in three related sibships in which there was no assortative mating. A linkage study assuming autosomal dominant inheritance was done using tetranucleotide repeat markers developed at the University of Utah. We selected markers that were less than 300 bp in size and that gave a heterozygosity of over 70% upon analysis in 4 CEPH families. Results to date with 95 markers run at an interval of 30 cM (covering 61% of the genome) show no evidence of linkage. We intend to extend the coverage to 100% of the genome. Pending completion of this scan, failure to provide evidence of linkage in our TS pedigree might then be attributed to phenotypic misclassification or erroneous assumptions regarding the genetic model of transmission.

  17. Data Linkage to Improve Geriatric Oncology Research: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Jennifer L; Meyer, Anne-Marie; Deal, Allison M; Choi, Bong-Jin; Chang, YunKyung; Williams, Grant R; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Guerard, Emily J; Muss, Hyman B; Sanoff, Hanna K

    2017-04-13

    Older adults (aged 65 years and older) diagnosed with cancer account for most cancer-related morbidity and mortality in the United States but are often underrepresented on clinical trials. Recent attention from a variety of professional, research, regulatory, and patient advocacy groups has centered on data linkage and data sharing as a means to capture patient information and outcomes outside of clinical trials to accelerate progress in the fight against cancer. The development of a more robust observational research data infrastructure would help to address gaps in the evidence base regarding optimal approaches to treating cancer among the growing and complex population of older adults. To demonstrate the feasibility of building such a resource, we linked information from a sample of older adults with cancer in North Carolina using three distinct, but complementary, data sources: (a) the Carolina Senior Registry, (b) the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry, and (c) North Carolina fee-for-service Medicare claims data. A description of the linkage process, metrics, and characteristics of the final cohort is reported. This study highlights the potential for data linkage to improve the characterization of health status among older adults with cancer and the possibility to conduct passive follow-up for outcomes of interest over time. Extensions of these linkage efforts in partnership with other institutions will enhance our ability to generate evidence that can inform the management of older adults with cancer. The Oncologist 2017;22:1-4.

  18. Lessons from the Legacy of Canada-China University Linkages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayhoe, Ruth; Pan, Julia; Zha, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at a series of university linkages between Canadian and Chinese universities that were supported by the Canadian International Development Agency as a result of a development agreement signed in 1983 between the two governments. It first reviews relevant theoretical literature on higher education in a global context, and…

  19. Linkage disequilibrium and its expectation in human populations.

    PubMed

    Sved, John A

    2009-02-01

    Abstract Linkage disequilibrium (LD), the association in populations between genes at linked loci, has achieved a high degree of prominence in recent years, primarily because of its use in identifying and cloning genes of medical importance. The field has recently been reviewed by Slatkin (2008). The present article is largely devoted to a review of the theory of LD in populations, including historical aspects.

  20. Structural and Expectancy Linkages within Schools and Organizational Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miskel, Cecil; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Data collected in the fall and spring of 1980-81 from 1,442 teachers and 890 students in 89 Kansas elementary and secondary schools indicate that structural and expectancy linkages (including teacher work interdependence, communication, and expectations) and demographic variables were related to perceived organizational effectiveness, job…

  1. Linkage analysis of Tourette syndrome in a large Utah pedigree.

    PubMed

    Knight, Stacey; Coon, Hilary; Johnson, Michael; Leppert, Mark F; Camp, Nicola J; McMahon, William M

    2010-03-05

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. The heritability of TS has been well established, yet there is a lack of consensus in genome-wide linkage studies. The purpose of this study was to conduct a genome-wide linkage analysis on a unique, large, high-risk TS Utah pedigree. We examined a qualitative trait (TS1) where cases had a definitive diagnosis of TS as observed by a clinical interviewer (n = 66) and a quantitative phenotype based on the total Yale global motor and phonic tic severity scores (n = 102). Both parametric and non-parametric multipoint linkage analyses based on MCMC methods were performed using a 10 cM spaced micro-satellite autosomal marker set. Two regions of interest were identified under affecteds-only recessive models; a LOD score of 3.3 on chromosome 1p for Yale tic severity and a LOD score of 3.1 on chromosome 3p for the TS1 phenotype. Twenty-seven individuals shared linked segregating haplotypes for the 1p region. They had significantly higher Yale tic phonic scores than non-sharers (P = 0.01). There were 46 haplotype sharers on chromosome 3p with significantly higher percentage of females among these individuals compared to the non-sharers (P = 0.03). The significant linkage peaks on chromosomes 1p and 3p are in new areas of the genome for TS, and replication of these findings is necessary.

  2. Genetic linkage study of bipolar disorder and the serotonin transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Kelsoe, J.R.; Morison, M.; Mroczkowski-Parker, Z.; Bergesch, P.; Rapaport, M.H.; Mirow, A.L.

    1996-04-09

    The serotonin transporter (HTT) is an important candidate gene for the genetic transmission of bipolar disorder. It is the site of action of many antidepressants, and plays a key role in the regulation of serotonin neurotransmission. Many studies of affectively ill patients have found abnormalities in serotonin metabolism, and dysregulation of the transporter itself. The human serotonin transporter has been recently cloned and mapped to chromosome 17. We have identified a PstI RFLP at the HTT locus, and here report our examination of this polymorphism for possible linkage to bipolar disorder. Eighteen families were examined from three populations: the Old Order Amish, Iceland, and the general North American population. In addition to HTT, three other microsatellite markers were examined, which span an interval known to contain HTT. Linkage analyses were conducted under both dominant and recessive models, as well as both narrow (bipolar only) and broad (bipolar + recurrent unipolar) diagnostic models. Linkage could be excluded to HTT under all models examined. Linkage to the interval spanned by the microsatellites was similarly excluded under the dominant models. In two individual families, maximum lod scores of 1.02 and 0.84 were obtained at D17S798 and HTT, respectively. However, these data overall do not support the presence of a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder near the serotonin transporter. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  3. Base-Catalyzed Linkage Isomerization: An Undergraduate Inorganic Kinetics Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, W. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes kinetics experiments completed in a single two-hour laboratory period at 25 degrees Centigrade of nitrito to nitro rearrangement, based on the recently discovered base-catalysis path. Includes information on synthesis and characterization of linkage isomers, spectrophotometric techniques, and experimental procedures. (SK)

  4. Linkages between Vocational Education and Training Providers and Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jihee; Misko, Josie; Kang, Kyeong-Jong; Phan, Oanh

    A study described the general and vocational education and training (VET) systems in Korea and Australia, focusing on the role of training providers and industry in the delivery of entry-level vocational education and training in both countries. The study also analyzed the nature of the linkages established between VET institutions in the two…

  5. Teaching Principles of Linkage and Gene Mapping with the Tomato.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawk, James A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    A three-point linkage system in tomatoes is used to explain concepts of gene mapping, linking and statistical analysis. The system is designed for teaching the effective use of statistics, and the power of genetic analysis from statistical analysis of phenotypic ratios. (Author/SA)

  6. Multipoint quantitative-trait linkage analysis in general pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Almasy, L; Blangero, J

    1998-01-01

    Multipoint linkage analysis of quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) has previously been restricted to sibships and small pedigrees. In this article, we show how variance-component linkage methods can be used in pedigrees of arbitrary size and complexity, and we develop a general framework for multipoint identity-by-descent (IBD) probability calculations. We extend the sib-pair multipoint mapping approach of Fulker et al. to general relative pairs. This multipoint IBD method uses the proportion of alleles shared identical by descent at genotyped loci to estimate IBD sharing at arbitrary points along a chromosome for each relative pair. We have derived correlations in IBD sharing as a function of chromosomal distance for relative pairs in general pedigrees and provide a simple framework whereby these correlations can be easily obtained for any relative pair related by a single line of descent or by multiple independent lines of descent. Once calculated, the multipoint relative-pair IBDs can be utilized in variance-component linkage analysis, which considers the likelihood of the entire pedigree jointly. Examples are given that use simulated data, demonstrating both the accuracy of QTL localization and the increase in power provided by multipoint analysis with 5-, 10-, and 20-cM marker maps. The general pedigree variance component and IBD estimation methods have been implemented in the SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) computer package. PMID:9545414

  7. Can University-Industry Linkages Stimulate Student Employability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishengoma, Esther; Vaaland, Terje I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify important university-industry linkage (UIL) activities that can stimulate the likelihood of employability among students. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 404 respondents located in Tanzania, comprising students, faculty members and employees from 20 companies operating within the oil and…

  8. Human Capital Linkages to Labour Productivity: Implications from Thai Manufacturers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rukumnuaykit, Pungpond; Pholphirul, Piriya

    2016-01-01

    Human capital investment is a necessary condition for improving labour market outcomes in most countries. Empirical studies to investigate human capital and its linkages on the labour demand side are, however, relatively scarce due to limitations of firm-level data-sets. Using firm-level data from the Thai manufacturing sector, this paper aims to…

  9. A Genetic Linkage Map of the Mimetic Butterfly Heliconius melpomene

    PubMed Central

    Jiggins, Chris D.; Mavarez, Jesus; Beltrán, Margarita; McMillan, W. Owen; Johnston, J. Spencer; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2005-01-01

    Heliconius melpomene is a mimetic butterfly that exhibits great geographic variation in color pattern. We present here a genetic linkage map based on analysis of genetic markers in 73 individuals from a single F2 family, offspring of a cross between H. m. cythera from western Ecuador and H. m. melpomene from French Guiana. A novel “three-step method” is described for the analysis of dominant markers in an F2 cross, using outbred parental strains and taking advantage of the lack of crossing over in female Lepidoptera. This method is likely to prove useful for future mapping studies in outbred species with crossing over restricted to one sex, such as the Lepidoptera and Drosophila. The resulting linkage map has 21 linkage groups corresponding to the 21 chromosomes of H. melpomene and includes 219 AFLP markers, 23 microsatellites, 19 single-copy nuclear genes, and the color pattern switch genes Yb and Sb. The marker density is high, averaging >1/7 cM. The total map length is 1616 cM and the average chromosome length is 77 cM. The genome size of H. melpomene was estimated to be 292 Mb, giving a relationship of physical-to-map distance of 180 kb/cM. This map forms the basis for future comparative linkage analysis of color pattern evolution in Heliconius. PMID:15489522

  10. Typology of Empirical Attributes: Dissimilarity Linkage Analysis (DLA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dubin, Robert; Champoux, Joseph E.

    Dissimilarity Linkage Analysis (DLA) is an extremely simple procedure for developing a typology from empirical attributes that permits the clustering of entities. First the procedure develops a taxonomy of types from empirical attributes possessed by entities in the sample. Second, the procedure assigns entities to one, and only one, type in the…

  11. Heritability and genome-wide linkage scan of subjective happiness.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Meike; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; de Moor, Marleen H M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2010-04-01

    Causes of individual differences in happiness, as assessed with the Subjective Happiness Scale, are investigated in a large of sample twins and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register. Over 12,000 twins and siblings, average age 24.7 years (range 12 to 88), took part in the study. A genetic model with an age by sex design was fitted to the data with structural equation modeling in Mx. The heritability of happiness was estimated at 22% for males and 41% in females. No effect of age was observed. To identify the genomic regions contributing to this heritability, a genome-wide linkage study for happiness was conducted in sibling pairs. A subsample of 1157 offspring from 441 families was genotyped with an average of 371 micro-satellite markers per individual. Phenotype and genotype data were analyzed in MERLIN with multipoint variance component linkage analysis and age and sex as covariates. A linkage signal (logarithm of odds score 2.73, empirical p value 0.095) was obtained at the end of the long arm of chromosome 19 for marker D19S254 at 110 cM. A second suggestive linkage peak was found at the short arm of chromosome 1 (LOD of 2.37) at 153 cM, marker D1S534 (empirical p value of .209). These two regions of interest are not overlapping with the regions found for contrasting phenotypes (such as depression, which is negatively associated with happiness). Further linkage and future association studies are warranted.

  12. Genomic linkage map of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Criscione, Charles D; Valentim, Claudia LL; Hirai, Hirohisa; LoVerde, Philip T; Anderson, Timothy JC

    2009-01-01

    Background Schistosoma mansoni is a blood fluke that infects approximately 90 million people. The complete life cycle of this parasite can be maintained in the laboratory, making this one of the few experimentally tractable human helminth infections, and a rich literature reveals heritable variation in important biomedical traits such as virulence, host-specificity, transmission and drug resistance. However, there is a current lack of tools needed to study S. mansoni's molecular, quantitative, and population genetics. Our goal was to construct a genetic linkage map for S. mansoni, and thus provide a new resource that will help stimulate research on this neglected pathogen. Results We genotyped grandparents, parents and 88 progeny to construct a 5.6 cM linkage map containing 243 microsatellites positioned on 203 of the largest scaffolds in the genome sequence. The map allows 70% of the estimated 300 Mb genome to be ordered on chromosomes, and highlights where scaffolds have been incorrectly assembled. The markers fall into eight main linkage groups, consistent with seven pairs of autosomes and one pair of sex chromosomes, and we were able to anchor linkage groups to chromosomes using fluorescent in situ hybridization. The genome measures 1,228.6 cM. Marker segregation reveals higher female recombination, confirms ZW inheritance patterns, and identifies recombination hotspots and regions of segregation distortion. Conclusions The genetic linkage map presented here is the first for S. mansoni and the first for a species in the phylum Platyhelminthes. The map provides the critical tool necessary for quantitative genetic analysis, aids genome assembly, and furnishes a framework for comparative flatworm genomics and field-based molecular epidemiological studies. PMID:19566921

  13. Linkage analysis of familial Alzheimer disease, using chromosome 21 markers

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Moore, Deborah K.; Gaskell, Perry C.; Yamaoka, Larry A.; Bebout, Jacqueline L.; Anderson, Leojean; Welsh, Kathleen A.; Clark, Christopher M.; Martin, George M.; Roses, Allen D.; Bird, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    Chromosome 21 markers were tested for linkage to familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) in 48 kindreds. These families had multiple cases of Alzheimer disease (AD) in 2 or more generations with family age-at-onset means (M) ranging from 41 to 83 years. Included in this group are seven Volga German families which are thought to be genetically homogeneous with respect to FAD. Autopsy documentation of AD was available for 32 families. Linkage to the 21 q11-q21 region was tested using D21S16, D21S13, D21S110, D21S1/S11, and the APP gene as genetic markers. When linkage results for all the families were summed, the LOD scores for these markers were consistently negative and the entire region was formally excluded. Linkage results were also summed for the following family groups; late-onset (M > 60), early-onset (M ≤ 60), Volga Germans (M = 56), and early-onset non–Volga Germans (M ≤ 60). For the first three groups, LOD scores were negative for this region. For the early-onset non–Volga German group (six families), small positive LOD scores of Zmax = 0.78 (recombination fraction θ = .15), Zmax = 0.27 (θ = .15), and Zmax = 0.64 (θ = .0), were observed for D21S13, D21S16, and D21S110, respectively. The remainder of the long arm of chromosome 21 was tested for linkage to FAD using seven markers spanning the q22 region. Results for these markers were also predominantly negative. Thus it is highly unlikely that a chromosome 21 gene is responsible for late-onset FAD and at least some forms of early-onset FAD represented by the Volga German kindreds. PMID:1998342

  14. Icefield-to-ocean linkages across the northern Pacific coastal temperate rainforest ecosystem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Neel, Shad; Hood, Eran; Bidlack, Allison L.; Fleming, Sean W.; Arimitsu, Mayumi L.; Arendt, Anthony; Burgess, Evan W.; Sergeant, Christopher J.; Beaudreau, Anne E.; Timm, Kristin; Hayward, Gregory D.; Reynolds, Joel H.; Pyare, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Rates of glacier mass loss in the northern Pacific coastal temperate rainforest (PCTR) are among the highest on Earth, and changes in glacier volume and extent will affect the flow regime and chemistry of coastal rivers, as well as the nearshore marine ecosystem of the Gulf of Alaska. Here we synthesize physical, chemical and biological linkages that characterize the northern PCTR ecosystem, with particular emphasis on the potential impacts of glacier change in the coastal mountain ranges on the surface–water hydrology, biogeochemistry, coastal oceanography and aquatic ecology. We also evaluate the relative importance and interplay between interannual variability and long-term trends in key physical drivers and ecological responses. To advance our knowledge of the northern PCTR, we advocate for cross-disciplinary research bridging the icefield-to-ocean ecosystem that can be paired with long-term scientific records and designed to inform decisionmakers.

  15. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) procedures for glycosidic linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural analysis of complex carbohydrates typically requires the assignment of three parameters: monosaccharide composition, the position of glycosidic linkages between monosaccharides, and the position and nature of non-carbohydrate substituents. The glycosidic linkage positions are often de...

  16. 75 FR 17938 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice for Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-08

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice for Request for Nominations SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Authority: 42 U.S.C. 294f, section 756 of the Public...

  17. 76 FR 43332 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based, Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: October 4, 2011, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.,...

  18. International workshop on Chromosome 12 held at St. Catherine`s College, Oxford, England, September 18--20, 1992. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmill, R.

    1992-12-31

    The First International Mapping Workshop on Human Chromosome 12 was held on Sept. 18--20, 1992, at St Catherine`s College, Oxford, UK. The meeting was hosted by Ian Craig and organized by Drs. Craig, Gemmill and Kutcherlapati. It was attended by 50 participants primarily from Europe and the USA. The workshop was highly successful and achieved the major goal of fostering direct and personal interactions between investigators with strong research interests in this chromosome. Participants reviewed the status of several critical aspects of chromosome mapping and prepared consensus views of the current state of knowledge. In addition, lists of resources available for this chromosome including somatic cell hybrids, individual DNA clones and libraries and genetic markers were prepared.

  19. Oxford-Style Debates in a Microbiology Course for Majors: A Method for Delivering Content and Engaging Critical Thinking Skills †

    PubMed Central

    Boucaud, Dwayne W.; Nabel, Michael; Eggers, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    Developing scientific expertise in the classroom involves promoting higher-order cognitive skills as well as content mastery. Effective use of constructivism can facilitate these outcomes. However this is often difficult to accomplish when delivery of content is paramount. Utilizing many of the tenets of constructivist pedagogy, we have designed an Oxford-style debate assignment to be used in an introductory microbiology course. Two teams of students were assigned a debatable topic within microbiology. Over a five-week period students completed an informative web page consisting of three parts: background on the topic, data-based positions for each side of the argument, and a data-based persuasive argument to support their assigned position. This was followed by an in-class presentation and debate. Analysis of student performance on knowledge-based questions shows that students retain debate-derived content acquired primarily outside of lectures significantly better than content delivered during a normal lecture. Importantly, students who performed poorly on the lecture-derived questions did as well on debate-derived questions as other students. Students also performed well on questions requiring higher-order cognitive skills and in synthesizing data-driven arguments in support of a position during the debate. Student perceptions of their knowledge-base in areas covered by the debate and their skills in using scientific databases and analyzing primary literature showed a significant increase in pre- and postassignment comparisons. Our data demonstrate that an Oxford-style debate can be used effectively to deliver relevant content, increase higher-order cognitive skills, and increase self-efficacy in science-specific skills, all contributing to developing expertise in the field. PMID:23858349

  20. Oxford Classification of IgA nephropathy 2016-the role of crescentic lesions: an update from the IgA Nephropathy Classification Working Group.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, Hernán; Barratt, Jonathan; Cattran, Daniel C; Cook, H Terence; Coppo, Rosanna; Haas, Mark; Liu, Zhi-Hong; Roberts, Ian S D; Yuzawa, Yukio; Zhang, Hong; Feehally, John

    2017-03-21

    Since the Oxford Classification of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) was published in 2009, MEST scores have been increasingly used in clinical practice. Further retrospective cohort studies have confirmed that in biopsy specimens with a minimum of 8 glomeruli, mesangial hypercellularity (M), segmental sclerosis (S), and interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy (T) lesions predict clinical outcome. In a larger, more broadly based cohort than in the original Oxford study, crescents (C) are predictive of outcome, and we now recommend that C be added to the MEST score, and biopsy reporting should provide a MEST-C score. Inconsistencies in the reporting of M and endocapillary cellularity (E) lesions have been reported, so a Web-based educational tool to assist pathologists has been developed. A large study showed E lesions are predictive of outcome in children and adults, but only in those without immunosuppression. A review of S lesions suggests there may be clinical utility in the subclassification of segmental sclerosis, identifying those cases with evidence of podocyte damage. It has now been shown that combining the MEST score with clinical data at biopsy provides the same predictive power as monitoring clinical data for 2 years; this requires further evaluation to assess earlier effective treatment intervention. The IgAN Classification Working Group has established a well-characterized dataset from a large cohort of adults and children with IgAN that will provide a substrate for further studies to refine risk prediction and clinical utility, including the MEST-C score and other factors.

  1. SOFTWARE REVIEW: Oxford Personal Revision Guides: A-level Physics 1999/2000 Syllabus GCSE Physics 1999/2000 Syllabus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Kerry

    2000-09-01

    Is it any better than a textbook and a pad of A4 paper? That's the question we have to ask if we consider investing in a `Revision' CD-ROM. Of course, nothing, in our lifetimes, will quite replace the students' own notes, some paper and a pencil. But, so far as private study is concerned, the computer offers a number of potential advantages: sound, animation, hyperlinks, interactivity, a calculator and a clock. For those with a modem, we can add Internet connections too. A few years ago the only revision materials available for computers were simply electronic versions of textbooks: a few animations and voice commentaries, with maybe a few multiple choice tests was the best you could expect. I was universally disappointed with all such CD-ROMs; they were a waste of money. At last things are changing and theseOxford Personal Revision Guides are definitely software of the new generation: there is commentary, there are animated diagrams (ripple tanks, Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, falling stones...), there are plenty of hyperlinks to other sections of the CD, and to exam board websites on the Internet, so that students can check their own syllabus.... This CD is not a rip-off! The software uses Microscoft Internet Explorer to produce a screen that looks as if you are connected to the Internet. Few students will have any problems in navigating the system. It is a massive piece of programming requiring a fairly modern PC (Pentium 166, 32 MB RAM, quad-speed CD-ROM drive and a good monitor and sound card really are the minimum; I loaded the programme on an older machine and it struggled!). Installation took a good while because the software insists on installing/updating Internet Explorer to 5.0 and checking for, and loading if necessary, Real Player 7, Microsoft Java Virtual Machine and Macromedia Shockwave 7.0.2 Player. Once all this was loaded it worked extremely well, and at first I kept imagining that I was in fact connected to a fantastic educational site on the web

  2. 75 FR 64317 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: December 1, 2010, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., EST... subject as the HRSA Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages. FOR...

  3. 77 FR 70169 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: December 7, 2012, 1:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. EST... subject as the HRSA Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages. For...

  4. 75 FR 56114 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: September 22, 2010, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., EDT... HRSA Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages. The logistical...

  5. HIV and cancer registry linkage identifies a substantial burden of cancers in persons with HIV in India.

    PubMed

    Godbole, Sheela V; Nandy, Karabi; Gauniyal, Mansi; Nalawade, Pallavi; Sane, Suvarna; Koyande, Shravani; Toyama, Joy; Hegde, Asha; Virgo, Phil; Bhatia, Kishor; Paranjape, Ramesh S; Risbud, Arun R; Mbulaiteye, Sam M; Mitsuyasu, Ronald T

    2016-09-01

    We utilized computerized record-linkage methods to link HIV and cancer databases with limited unique identifiers in Pune, India, to determine feasibility of linkage and obtain preliminary estimates of cancer risk in persons living with HIV (PLHIV) as compared with the general population.Records of 32,575 PLHIV were linked to 31,754 Pune Cancer Registry records (1996-2008) using a probabilistic-matching algorithm. Cancer risk was estimated by calculating standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) in the early (4-27 months after HIV registration), late (28-60 months), and overall (4-60 months) incidence periods. Cancers diagnosed prior to or within 3 months of HIV registration were considered prevalent.Of 613 linked cancers to PLHIV, 188 were prevalent, 106 early incident, and 319 late incident. Incident cancers comprised 11.5% AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs), including cervical cancer and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but not Kaposi sarcoma (KS), and 88.5% non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADCs). Risk for any incident cancer diagnosis in early, late, and combined periods was significantly elevated among PLHIV (SIRs: 5.6 [95% CI 4.6-6.8], 17.7 [95% CI 15.8-19.8], and 11.5 [95% CI 10-12.6], respectively). Cervical cancer risk was elevated in both incidence periods (SIRs: 9.6 [95% CI 4.8-17.2] and 22.6 [95% CI 14.3-33.9], respectively), while NHL risk was elevated only in the late incidence period (SIR: 18.0 [95% CI 9.8-30.20]). Risks for NADCs were dramatically elevated (SIR > 100) for eye-orbit, substantially (SIR > 20) for all-mouth, esophagus, breast, unspecified-leukemia, colon-rectum-anus, and other/unspecified cancers; moderately elevated (SIR > 10) for salivary gland, penis, nasopharynx, and brain-nervous system, and mildly elevated (SIR > 5) for stomach. Risks for 6 NADCs (small intestine, testis, lymphocytic leukemia, prostate, ovary, and melanoma) were not elevated and 5 cancers, including multiple myeloma not seen.Our study demonstrates the feasibility of

  6. Assessing patients for joint replacement: can pre-operative Oxford hip and knee scores be used to predict patient satisfaction following joint replacement surgery and to guide patient selection?

    PubMed

    Judge, A; Arden, N K; Price, A; Glyn-Jones, S; Beard, D; Carr, A J; Dawson, J; Fitzpatrick, R; Field, R E

    2011-12-01

    We obtained pre-operative and six-month post-operative Oxford hip (OHS) and knee scores (OKS) for 1523 patients who underwent total hip replacement and 1784 patients who underwent total knee replacement. They all also completed a six-month satisfaction question. Scatter plots showed no relationship between pre-operative Oxford scores and six-month satisfaction scores. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were -0.04 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.09 to 0.01) between OHS and satisfaction and 0.04 (95% CI -0.01 to 0.08) between OKS and satisfaction. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to identify a cut-off point for the pre-operative OHS/OKS that identifies whether or not a patient is satisfied with surgery. We obtained an area under the ROC curve of 0.51 (95% CI 0.45 to 0.56) for hip replacement and 0.56 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.60) for knee replacement, indicating that pre-operative Oxford scores have no predictive accuracy in distinguishing satisfied from dissatisfied patients. In the NHS widespread attempts are being made to use patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) data for the purpose of prioritising patients for surgery. Oxford hip and knee scores have no predictive accuracy in relation to post-operative patient satisfaction. This evidence does not support their current use in prioritising access to care.

  7. An improved recommendation algorithm via weakening indirect linkage effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guang; Qiu, Tian; Shen, Xiao-Quan

    2015-07-01

    We propose an indirect-link-weakened mass diffusion method (IMD), by considering the indirect linkage and the source object heterogeneity effect in the mass diffusion (MD) recommendation method. Experimental results on the MovieLens, Netflix, and RYM datasets show that, the IMD method greatly improves both the recommendation accuracy and diversity, compared with a heterogeneity-weakened MD method (HMD), which only considers the source object heterogeneity. Moreover, the recommendation accuracy of the cold objects is also better elevated in the IMD than the HMD method. It suggests that eliminating the redundancy induced by the indirect linkages could have a prominent effect on the recommendation efficiency in the MD method. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11175079) and the Young Scientist Training Project of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20133BCB23017).

  8. Estimating the recombination frequency for the PTC-Kell linkage.

    PubMed

    Anne-Spence, M; Falk, C T; Neiswanger, K; Field, L L; Marazita, M L; Allen, F H; Siervogel, R M; Roche, A F; Crandall, B F; Sparkes, R S

    1984-01-01

    Two data sets are analyzed for linkage between the PTC and Kell blood group loci. The original report of close linkage for these loci was that of Conneally et al. (1976), where the maximum likelihood estimate of theta was 0.05. These two new data sets give a combined maximum likelihood estimate of theta m = f = 0.28. Estimating the recombination frequency for the sexes separately gave theta m = 0.29, theta f = 0.23. The combined maximum likelihood estimate over all published data sets including this report is theta m = f = 0.14, Zmax = 8.94. There is statistically significant evidence of heterogeneity among the published studies.

  9. Cointegration and causal linkages in fertilizer markets across different regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahmiri, Salim

    2017-04-01

    Cointegration and causal linkages among five different fertilizer markets are investigated during low and high market regimes. The database includes prices of rock phosphate (RP), triple super phosphate (TSP), diammonium phosphate (DAP), urea, and potassium chloride (PC). It is found that fertilizer markets are closely linked to each other during low and high regimes; and, particularly during high regime (after 2007 international financial crisis). In addition, there is no evidence of bidirectional linear relationship between markets during low and high regime time periods. Furthermore, all significant linkages are only unidirectional. Moreover, some causality effects have emerged during high regime. Finally, the effect of an impulse during high regime time period persists longer and is stronger than the effect of an impulse during low regime time period (before 2007 international financial crisis).

  10. Confirmatory linkage of hypochondroplasia to chromosome arm 4p

    SciTech Connect

    Hectht, J.T.; Herrera, C.A.; Greenhaw, G.A.

    1995-07-03

    Hypochondroplasia is an inherited chondrodystrophy that is characterized by disproportionate short stature. A recent linkage study by LeMerrer et al. suggested that hypochondroplasia and achondroplasia are allelic conditions. Three groups have now mapped the achondroplasia locus to the telomeric region of chromosome 4. Recently, two mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) at nucleotide 1138, in the transmembrane domain, were identified in 169 of 170 unrelated individuals with achondroplasia. Here, we report the results of a linkage study in 4 multigenerational families with hypochondroplasia and mutational analysis of nucleotide 1138 in one individual from each of these families, two nonfamilial hypochondroplasia individuals and sequencing of the transmembrane domain of the FGFR3 in three affected unrelated individuals. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Proximal symphalangism: Evidence of linkage to 17q

    SciTech Connect

    Francomano, C.A.; Rubenstein, J.R.; Polymeropoulos, M.H.

    1994-09-01

    Proximal symphalangism (PS; OMIM 185800) is an autosomal dominant disorder which is characterized by ankylosis of the proximal interphalangeal joints and an increased incidence of conductive deafness in some families. A large American kindred with PS was originally described by Cushing in 1916, segregating for this disorder in many generations. Several follow-up studies have confirmed the disorder in members of this kindred and have also suggested that conductive deafness is a pleiotropic effect of the mutant gene in this family. In an effort to localize the gene, we have studied 55 members of Cushing`s kindred with 85 microsatellite repeat polymorphisms spanning the human genome. Genetic linkage analysis with data for marker D17S809 gave significant evidence for linkage with Zmax=3.4 at recombination fraction {theta}=0.05.

  12. Synthesis of Photodegradable Polystyrene with Trithiocarbonate as Linkages.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianbiao; Hu, Xiaoqian; Bai, Ruke

    2015-10-01

    Multiblock polystyrenes (PS) with trithiocarbonate groups as linkages are prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization using polytrithiocarbonate as a chain transfer agent. The photodegradability of the multiblock PS in the solid state is investigated under UV irradiation at room temperature in an air atmosphere. The experimental results demonstrate that the trithiocarbonate linkages in the multiblock PS can be broken under UV light irradiation at room temperature and the multiblock PS is degraded into separate PS blocks. Gel permeation chromatography measurement reveals that the molecular weight of multiblock PS is reduced from 27 900 to 7900 g mol(-1) after UV light irradiation for 745 h. Moreover, the thermal stability of the multiblock PS is examined and the results indicate that the incorporation of trithiocarbonate shows little influence on the thermal stability of multiblock PS.

  13. Genetic Linkage Map of the Edible Basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus

    PubMed Central

    Larraya, Luis M.; Pérez, Gúmer; Ritter, Enrique; Pisabarro, Antonio G.; Ramírez, Lucía

    2000-01-01

    We have constructed a genetic linkage map of the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus (var. Florida). The map is based on the segregation of 178 random amplified polymorphic DNA and 23 restriction fragment length polymorphism markers; four hydrophobin, two laccase, and two manganese peroxidase genes; both mating type loci; one isozyme locus (est1); the rRNA gene sequence; and a repetitive DNA sequence in a population of 80 sibling monokaryons. The map identifies 11 linkage groups corresponding to the chromosomes of P. ostreatus, and it has a total length of 1,000.7 centimorgans (cM) with an average of 35.1 kbp/cM. The map shows a high correlation (0.76) between physical and genetic chromosome sizes. The number of crossovers observed per chromosome per individual cell is 0.89. This map covers nearly the whole genome of P. ostreatus. PMID:11097904

  14. The CEPH consortium linkage map of human chromosome 2

    SciTech Connect

    Spurr, N.K.; Cox, S.; Bryant, S.P. ); Attwood, J. ); Shields, D.C. ); Steinbrueck, T.; Donis-Keller, H. ); Jenkins, T. ); Murray, J.C. ); Kidd, K.K. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper describes the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) consortium linkage map of chromosome 2. The map contains 36 loci defined by genotyping generated from the CEPH family DNAs. A total of 73 different markers were typed by 14 contributing laboratories; of these, 36 loci are ordered on the map with likelihood support of at least 1000:1. Markers are placed along the length of the chromosome but no markers were available to anchor the map at either telomere or the centromere. Multilocus linkage analysis has produced male, female, and sex-averaged maps extending for 261, 430, and 328 cM, respectively. The sex-averaged map contains five intervals greater than 15 cM and the mean genetic distance between the 36 uniquely placed loci is 9.1 cM. 25 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Linkage study between manic-depressive illness and chromosome 21

    SciTech Connect

    Ewald, H.; Mors, O.; Flint, T.

    1996-04-09

    Chromosome 21, of interest as potentially containing a disease gene for manic-depressive illness as possible evidence for a gene predisposing to affective disorder, has recently been reported in a single large family as well as samples of families. The present study investigates for linkage between manic-depressive illness and markers covering the long arm of chromosome 21 in two manic-depressive families, using ten microsatellite polymorphisms as markers. No conclusive evidence for a disease gene on the long arm of chromosome 21 was found. Assuming either a dominant or recessive mode of inheritance, close linkage to the marker PFKL, which has been reported as possibly linked to affective disorder, seems unlikely in the families studied here. PFKL and more telomeric markers yielded small positive lod scores at higher recombination fractions in the largest family, and small positive lod scores at lower recombination fractions in the affecteds-only analyses in the smallest family. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Integration of the feline radiation hybrid and linkage maps.

    PubMed

    Sun, S; Murphy, W J; Menotti-Raymond, M; O'Brien, S J

    2001-06-01

    The recent development of genome mapping resources for the domestic cat provides a unique opportunity to study comparative medicine in this companion animal which can inform and benefit both veterinary and human biomedical concerns. We describe here the integration and order comparison of the feline radiation hybrid (RH) map with the feline interspecies backcross (ISB) genetic linkage map, constructed by a backcross of F1 hybrids between domestic cat (Felis catus) and the Asian leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis). Of 253 microsatellite loci mapped in the ISB, 176 equivalently spaced markers were ordered among a framework of 424 Type I coding markers in the RH map. The integration of the RH and ISB maps resolves the orientation of multiple linkage groups and singleton loci from the ISB genetic map. This integrated map provides the foundation for gene mapping assessments in the domestic cat and in related species of the Felidae family.

  17. High-Density Genetic Linkage Mapping in Turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) Based on SNP Markers and Major Sex- and Growth-Related Regions Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiji; Hu, Yulong; Ma, Yu; Xu, Liyong; Guan, Jiantao; Kong, Jie

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a high density consensus genetic linkage map of a turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) family composed of 149 mapping individuals using Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNP) developed using the restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing technique with the restriction enzyme, PstI. A total of 6,647 SNPs were assigned to 22 linkage groups, which is equal to the number of chromosome pairs in turbot. For the first time, the average marker interval reached 0.3958 cM, which is equal to approximately 0.1203 Mb of the turbot genome. The observed 99.34% genome coverage indicates that the linkage map was genome-wide. A total of 220 Quantitative Traits Locus (QTLs) associated with two body length traits, two body weight traits in different growth periods and sex determination were detected with an LOD > 5.0 in 12 linkage groups (LGs), which explained the corresponding phenotypic variance (R2), ranging from 14.4–100%. Among them, 175 overlapped with linked SNPs, and the remaining 45 were located in regions between contiguous SNPs. According to the QTLs related to growth trait distribution and the changing of LGs during different growth periods, the growth traits are likely controlled by multi-SNPs distributed on several LGs; the effect of these SNPs changed during different growth periods. Most sex-related QTLs were detected at LG 21 with a linkage span of 70.882 cM. Additionally, a small number of QTLs with high feasibility and a narrow R2 distribution were also observed on LG7 and LG14, suggesting that multi LGs or chromosomes might be involved in sex determination. High homology was recorded between LG21 in Cynoglossus semilaevis and turbot. This high-saturated turbot RAD-Seq linkage map is undoubtedly a promising platform for marker assisted selection (MAS) and flatfish genomics research. PMID:25775256

  18. Linkage of Pep-2 and Apk on mouse chromosome 10.

    PubMed

    Womack, J E; Ashley, S; Barnett, L B; Lewis, S E

    1986-10-01

    An ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-induced electrophoretic variant of mouse PEP-2, a tripeptidase, has been used to determine the location of the structural gene on chromosome 10. Gene order and recombination frequencies were estimated as Apk-21.8 +/- 3.9%-Pep-2-3.7 +/- 2.1%-Sl. Methods for rapid determination of Apk and Pep-2 alleles by cellulose acetate electrophoresis and a valuable linkage testing stock carrying the unique Apkm and Pep-2b alleles are described.

  19. Parametric and nonparametric linkage analysis: A unified multipoint approach

    SciTech Connect

    Kruglyak, L.; Daly, M.J.; Reeve-Daly, M.P.; Lander, E.S.

    1996-06-01

    In complex disease studies, it is crucial to perform multipoint linkage analysis with many markers and to use robust nonparametric methods that take account of all pedigree information. Currently available methods fall short in both regards. In this paper, we describe how to extract complete multipoint inheritance information from general pedigrees of moderate size. This information is captured in the multipoint inheritance distribution, which provides a framework for a unified approach to both parametric and nonparametric methods of linkage analysis. Specifically, the approach includes the following: (1) Rapid exact computation of multipoint LOD scores involving dozens of highly polymorphic markers, even in the presence of loops and missing data. (2) Nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis, a powerful new approach to pedigree analysis. We show that NPL is robust to uncertainty about mode of inheritance, is much more powerful than commonly used nonparametric methods, and loses little power relative to parametric linkage analysis. NPL thus appears to be the method of choice for pedigree studies of complex traits. (3) Information-content mapping, which measures the fraction of the total inheritance information extracted by the available marker data and points out the regions in which typing additional markers is most useful. (4) Maximum-likelihood reconstruction of many-marker haplotypes, even in pedigrees with missing data. We have implemented NPL analysis, LOD-score computation, information-content mapping, and haplotype reconstruction in a new computer package, GENEHUNTER. The package allows efficient multipoint analysis of pedigree data to be performed rapidly in a single user-friendly environment. 34 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Genome scan for linkage to Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, C.L.; Livingston, J.; Williamson, R.

    1994-09-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a familial, neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by chronic, intermittent motor and vocal tics. In addition to tics, affected individuals frequently display symptoms such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive compulsive disorder. Genetic analyses of family data have suggested that susceptibility to the disorder is most likely due to a single genetic locus with a dominant mode of transmission and reduced penetrance. In the search for genetic linkage for TS, we have collected well-characterized pedigrees with multiple affected individuals on whom extensive diagnostic evaluations have been done. The first stage of our study is to scan the genome systematically using a panel of uniformly spaced (10 to 20 cM), highly polymorphic, microsatellite markers on 5 families segregating TS. To date, 290 markers have been typed and 3,660 non-overlapping cM of the genome have been excluded for possible linkage under the assumption of genetic homogeneity. Because of the possibility of locus heterogeneity overall summed exclusion is not considered tantamount to absolute exclusion of a disease locus in that region. The results from each family are carefully evaluated and a positive lod score in a single family is followed up by typing closely linked markers. Linkage to TS was examined by two-point analysis using the following genetic model: single autosomal dominant gene with gene frequency .003 and maximum penetrance of .99. An age-of-onset correction is included using a linear function increasing from age 2 years to 21 years. A small rate of phenocopies is also incorporated into the model. Only individuals with TS or CMT according to DSM III-R criteria were regarded as affected for the purposes of this summary. Additional markers are being tested to provide coverage at 5 cM intervals. Moreover, we are currently analyzing the data non-parametrically using the Affected-Pedigree-Member Method of linkage analysis.

  1. Linkage disequilibrium of polymorphic RAET1 genes in Thais.

    PubMed

    Rareongjai, S; Romphruk, A; Romphruk, A V; Sakuntabhai, A; Leelayuwat, C

    2010-09-01

    Retinoic acid early transcripts-1 (RAET1) or unique long 16 (UL-16) binding proteins (ULBPs) is a gene cluster encoding for molecules acting as ligands to natural killer group 2 D (NKG2D), a receptor expressed on immune cells. Binding of these ligands to the receptor activates immune cells leading to killing of tumor cells and also viral-infected cells. The information on polymorphism of RAET1 is limited. In this report, we analyze the linkages between four polymorphic RAET1 genes: RAET1E, RAET1G, RAET1H and RAET1L, in 318 unrelated Thais. The strongest linkage disequilibrium was found between RAET1E and RAET1G, with P-value, D' and r(2) of <5.0 x 10(-5), 0.707 and 0.840, respectively. RAET1E(*)001 was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with RAET1G(*)002, and RAET1E(*)002 with RAET1G(*)001. Evidently, there were possible RAET1 haplotypes with haplotype frequencies of more than 10% consisting of RAET1E(*)001; RAET1G(*)002; RAET1H(*)001; RAET1L(*)001 and RAET1E(*)002; RAET1G(*)001; RAET1H(*)002; RAET1L(*)003. This study provides basic information on polymorphisms of RAET1 and possible RAET1 haplotypes in Thais.

  2. Genomewide suggestive linkage of opioid dependence to chromosome 14q.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Herbert M; Fann, Cathy S J; Bartzis, Michael; Evgrafov, Oleg V; Rosenthal, Richard N; Nunes, Edward V; Miner, Christian; Santana, Maria; Gaffney, Jebediah; Riddick, Amy; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Knowles, James A

    2007-06-01

    The genetic predisposition to addiction to opioids and other substances is transmitted as a complex genetic trait, which investigators are attempting to characterize using genetic linkage and association. We now report a high-density genome-wide linkage study of opioid dependence. We ascertained 305 DSM-IV opioid dependent affected sibling pairs from an ethnically mixed population of methadone maintained subjects and genotyped their DNA using Affymetrix 10K v2 arrays. Analysis with MERLIN identified a region on chromosome 14q with a non-parametric lod (NPL) of 3.30. Secondary analyses indicated that this locus was relatively specific to the self-identified Puerto Rican subset, as the NPL increased from 3.30 to 5.00 (NPL(Caucasian) = 0.05 and NPL(African Amer.) = 0.15). The 14q peak encompasses the NRXN3 gene (neurexin 3), which was previously identified as a potential candidate gene for addiction. Secondary analyses also identified several regions with gender-specific NPL scores greater than 2.00. The most significant was a peak on (10q) that increased from 0.90 to 3.22 when only males were considered (NPL(female) = 0.05). Our linkage data suggest specific chromosomal loci for future fine-mapping genetic analysis and support the hypothesis that ethnic and gender specific genes underlie addiction susceptibility.

  3. Hydrazone linkages in pH responsive drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Sandeep J; Kalhapure, Rahul S; Govender, Thirumala

    2017-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric drug delivery systems using various triggers to release the drug at the sites have become a major focus area. Among various stimuli-responsive materials, pH-responsiveness has been studied extensively. The materials used for fabricating pH-responsive drug delivery systems include a specific chemical functionality in their structure that can respond to changes in the pH of the surrounding environment. Various chemical functionalities, for example, acetal, amine, ortho ester, amine and hydrazone, have been used to design materials that are capable of releasing their payload at the acidic pH conditions of the tumor or infection sites. Hydrazone linkages are significant synthons for numerous transformations and have gained importance in pharmaceutical sciences due to their various biological and clinical applications. These linkages have been employed in various drug delivery vehicles, such as linear polymers, star shaped polymers, dendrimers, micelles, liposomes and inorganic nanoparticles, for pH-responsive drug delivery. This review paper focuses on the synthesis and characterization methods of hydrazone bond containing materials and their applications in pH-responsive drug delivery systems. It provides detailed suggestions as guidelines to materials and formulation scientists for designing biocompatible pH-responsive materials with hydrazone linkages and identifying future studies.

  4. Linkage analysis of the Nail-patella syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Campeau, E.; Watkins, D.; Rouleau, G.A.; Babul, R.; Der Kaloustian, V.M.; Buchanan, J.A.; Meschino, W.

    1995-01-01

    Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by dysplasia of nails and patella, decreased mobility of the elbow, iliac horns, and, in some cases, nephropathy. The disorder has been mapped to the long arm of chromosome 9, but the precise localization and identity of the NPS gene are unknown. Linkage analysis in three NPS families, using highly informative dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms on 9q33-q34, confirmed linkage of NPS to this chromosome. Recombinations were detected, by two-point linkage analysis, between NPS and the centromeric markers D9S60 and the gelsolin gene and the telomeric markers D9S64 and D9S66, in one of the families. Haplotype analysis suggested an additional recombination between NPS and the argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS) gene. These results localize the NPS gene to an interval on 9q34.1, distal to D9S60 an proximal to ASS, comprising a genetic distance of {approximately}9 cM. This represents a significant refinement in the localization of the NPS gene. 25 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Allelic loss and linkage studies in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Bale, A.E.; Lytton, B.

    1994-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in U.S. males. Many examples of familial aggregation have been reported, and segregration analysis suggests that an autosomal dominant gene with a penetrance of 88% by age 85 accounts for 9% of all cases. Because many dominant cancer predisposition syndromes are related to germline mutations in tumor suppressor genes, we analyzed a series of sporadic and hereditary tumors for allelic loss. High grade sporadic, paraffin-embedded, primary prostate tumors were obtained from the archival collection in the Department of Pathology at Yale and hereditary tumors from three families were obtained by an advertisement in the New York Times and from referrals by urologists. PCR analysis showed loss in 4/7 informative sporadic prostate tumors with NEFL (8p21), in 8/22 informative tumors with D10S169 (10q26-qter), in 2/8 informative tumors with D10S108 (10q) and in 4/23 informative tumors with D10S89 (10p) in agreement with previous studies. PYGM on chromosome 11 and D9S127 on chromosome 9 showed no loss. Linkage analysis with NEFL in 3 prostate cancer families gave strongly negative results for close linkage (Z=-2.1 at {theta}=0.01) but LOD scores were very dependent on parameters, e.g. gene frequency, phenocopy rate, and penetrance. Linkage analysis with chromosome 10 markers and systematic analysis of the genome for other area of allelic loss are underway.

  6. Nucleotide diversity and linkage disequilibrium in balsam poplar (Populus balsamifera).

    PubMed

    Olson, Matthew S; Robertson, Amanda L; Takebayashi, Naoki; Silim, Salim; Schroeder, William R; Tiffin, Peter

    2010-04-01

    *Current perceptions that poplars have high levels of nucleotide variation, large effective population sizes, and rapid decay of linkage disequilibrium are based primarily on studies from one poplar species, Populus tremula. *We analysed 590 gene fragments (average length 565 bp) from each of 15 individuals from different populations from throughout the range of Populus balsamifera. *Nucleotide diversity (theta(total) = 0.0028, pi = 0.0027) was low compared with other trees and model agricultural systems. Patterns of nucleotide diversity and site frequency spectra were consistent with purifying selection on replacement and intron sites. When averaged across all loci we found no evidence for decay of linkage disequilibrium across 750 bp, consistent with the low estimates of the scaled recombination parameter, rho = 0.0092. *Compared with P. tremula, a well studied congener with a similar distribution, P. balsamifera has low diversity and low effective recombination, both of which indicate a lower effective population size in P. balsamifera. Patterns of diversity and linkage indicate that there is considerable variation in population genomic patterns among poplar species and unlike P. tremula, association mapping techniques in balsam poplar should consider sampling single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at well-spaced intervals.

  7. Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme Loci in maize.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M M; Stuber, C W; Newton, K; Weissinger, H H

    1980-11-01

    Linkage relationships of 19 enzyme loci have been examined. The chromosomal locations of eight of these loci are formally reported for the first time in this paper. These localizations should assist in the construction of additional useful chromosome marker stocks, especially since several of these enzyme loci lie in regions that were previously poorly mapped. Six loci are on the long arm of chromosome 1. The arrangement is (centromere)-Mdh4-mmm-Pgm1-Adh1-Phi-Gdh1, with about 46% recombination between Mdh4 and Gdh1.-Linkage studies with a2 and pr have resulted in the localization of four enzyme genes to chromosome 5 with arrangement Pgm2-Mdh5-Got3-a2-(centromere)-pr-Got2. Pgm2 lies approximately 35 map units distal to a2 in a previously unmapped region of the short arm of 5, beyond ameiotic.-Approximately 23% recombination was observed between Mdh4 and Pgm1 on chromosome 1, while 17% recombination occurred between Mdh5 and Pgm2 on chromosome 5. Similarly, linkages between Idh1 and Mdh1, about 22 map units apart on chromosome 8, and between Mdh2 and Idh2, less than 5 map units apart on chromosome 6, were observed. Thus, segments of chromosomes 1 and 5 and segments of 6 and 8 may represent duplications on nonhomologous chromosomes.

  8. Linkage mechanics and power amplification of the mantis shrimp's strike.

    PubMed

    Patek, S N; Nowroozi, B N; Baio, J E; Caldwell, R L; Summers, A P

    2007-10-01

    Mantis shrimp (Stomatopoda) generate extremely rapid and forceful predatory strikes through a suite of structural modifications of their raptorial appendages. Here we examine the key morphological and kinematic components of the raptorial strike that amplify the power output of the underlying muscle contractions. Morphological analyses of joint mechanics are integrated with CT scans of mineralization patterns and kinematic analyses toward the goal of understanding the mechanical basis of linkage dynamics and strike performance. We test whether a four-bar linkage mechanism amplifies rotation in this system and find that the rotational amplification is approximately two times the input rotation, thereby amplifying the velocity and acceleration of the strike. The four-bar model is generally supported, although the observed kinematic transmission is lower than predicted by the four-bar model. The results of the morphological, kinematic and mechanical analyses suggest a multi-faceted mechanical system that integrates latches, linkages and lever arms and is powered by multiple sites of cuticular energy storage. Through reorganization of joint architecture and asymmetric distribution of mineralized cuticle, the mantis shrimp's raptorial appendage offers a remarkable example of how structural and mechanical modifications can yield power amplification sufficient to produce speeds and forces at the outer known limits of biological systems.

  9. Genetic linkage analysis in the age of whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Jurg; Wang, Jing; Leal, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    For many years, linkage analysis was the primary tool used for the genetic mapping of Mendelian and complex traits with familial aggregation. Linkage analysis was largely supplanted by the wide adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWASs). However, with the recent increased use of whole-genome sequencing (WGS), linkage analysis is again emerging as an important and powerful analysis method for the identification of genes involved in disease aetiology, often in conjunction with WGS filtering approaches. Here, we review the principles of linkage analysis and provide practical guidelines for carrying out linkage studies using WGS data. PMID:25824869

  10. Enrollment in HIV Care Two Years after HIV Diagnosis in the Kingdom of Swaziland: An Evaluation of a National Program of New Linkage Procedures.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Duncan A; Williams, Daniel; Storer, Nosipho; Okello, Velephi; Azih, Charles; Drummond, Jennifer; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Preko, Peter; Morgan, Rebecca L; Dlamini, Makhosazana; Byrd, Johnita; Agolory, Simon; Baughman, Andrew L; McNairy, Margaret L; Sahabo, Ruben; Ehrenkranz, Peter

    2016-01-01

    To improve early enrollment in HIV care, the Swaziland Ministry of Health implemented new linkage procedures for persons HIV diagnosed during the Soka Uncobe male circumcision campaign (SOKA, 2011-2012) and the Swaziland HIV Incidence Measurement Survey (SHIMS, 2011). Abstraction of clinical records and telephone interviews of a retrospective cohort of HIV-diagnosed SOKA and SHIMS clients were conducted in 2013-2014 to evaluate compliance with new linkage procedures and enrollment in HIV care at 92 facilities throughout Swaziland. Of 1,105 clients evaluated, within 3, 12, and 24 months of diagnosis, an estimated 14.0%, 24.3%, and 37.0% enrolled in HIV care, respectively, after adjusting for lost to follow-up and non-response. Kaplan-Meier functions indicated lower enrollment probability among clients 14-24 (P = 0.0001) and 25-29 (P = 0.001) years of age compared with clients >35 years of age. At 69 facilities to which clients were referred for HIV care, compliance with new linkage procedures was low: referral forms were located for less than half (46.8%) of the clients, and few (9.6%) were recorded in the appointment register or called either before (0.3%) or after (4.9%) their appointment. Of over one thousand clients newly HIV diagnosed in Swaziland in 2011 and 2012, few received linkage services in accordance with national procedures and most had not enrolled in HIV care two years after their diagnosis. Our findings are a call to action to improve linkage services and early enrollment in HIV care in Swaziland.

  11. Physiological linkage in couples and its implications for individual and interpersonal functioning: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Timmons, Adela C; Margolin, Gayla; Saxbe, Darby E

    2015-10-01

    Do partners' levels of physiological arousal become linked in close relationships? The term physiological linkage describes covariation between people in their moment-to-moment physiological states. The current review presents a conceptual framework to guide research on linkage in romantic relationships and discusses the potential implications of being linked. Evidence of linkage was found across a broad range of physiological indices and in a variety of contexts, including during laboratory-based conflict and in daily life. Four hypotheses regarding how linkage relates to individual and interpersonal functioning are evaluated: (a) coactivation of the sympathetic nervous system or the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis is "bad," (b) moderate physiological linkage is "just right," (c) physiological linkage is problematic if the individual or couple is overloaded, and (d) the implications of physiological linkage depend on the emotional context. We found partial support for the first hypothesis and determined that more research is needed to evaluate the remaining hypotheses. Linkage in cortisol was negatively associated with relationship satisfaction; but, at the same time, linkage in multiple systems was positively associated with indices of relationship connectedness, such as the amount of time spent together and the ability to identify the emotions of one's partner. These results suggest that linkage may confer benefits but also may put couples at risk if they become entrenched in patterns of conflict or stress. With research in this area burgeoning in recent years, this review indicates that linkage is a promising construct with applications for interventions targeting individual health and couple functioning.

  12. Linkage and linkage disequilibrium in chromosome band 1p36 in American Chaldeans with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Cho, J H; Nicolae, D L; Ramos, R; Fields, C T; Rabenau, K; Corradino, S; Brant, S R; Espinosa, R; LeBeau, M; Hanauer, S B; Bodzin, J; Bonen, D K

    2000-05-22

    The idiopathic inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), consisting of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, are complex genetic disorders involving chronic inflammation of the intestines. Multiple genetic loci have been implicated through genome-wide searches, but refinement of localization sufficient to undertake positional cloning efforts has been problematic. This difficulty can be obviated through identification of ancestrally shared regions in genetic isolates, such as the Chaldean population, a Roman Catholic group from Iraq. We analyzed four multiply affected American Chaldean families with inflammatory bowel disease not known to be related. We observed evidence for linkage and linkage disequilibrium in precisely the same region of chromosome band 1p36 reported previously in an outbred population. Maximal evidence for linkage was observed near D1S1597 by multipoint analysis (MLOD = 3.01, P = 6.1 x 10(-5)). A shared haplotype (D1S507 to D1S1628) was observed over 27 cM between two families. There was homozygous sharing of a 5 cM portion of that haplotype in one family and over a <1 cM region in the second family. Homozygous sharing of this haplotype near D1S2697 and D1S3669 was observed in one individual in a third multiply affected family, with heterozygous sharing in a fourth family. Linkage in outbred families as well as in this genetic isolate indicates that a pathophysiologically crucial IBD susceptibility gene is located in 1p36. These findings provide a unique opportunity to refine the localization and identify a major susceptibility gene for a complex genetic disorder.

  13. A multipedigree linkage study of X-linked deafness: linkage to Xq13-q21 and evidence for genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Reardon, W; Middleton-Price, H R; Sandkuijl, L; Phelps, P; Bellman, S; Luxon, L; Pembrey, M E; Malcolm, S

    1991-12-01

    A locus for X-linked nonsyndromic deafness has previously been allocated to the Xq13-q21 region based on linkage studies in two separate pedigrees. This has been substantiated by the observation of deafness as a clinical feature of male patients with cytogenetically detectable deletions across this region. The question of a second locus for deafness in this chromosomal region has been raised by the audiologically distinct nature of the deafness in some of the deleted patients compared to that observed in those patients upon whom the linkage data are based. We have performed detailed clinical evaluation and linkage studies on seven pedigrees with nonsyndromic X-linked deafness and conclude that there is evidence for at least two loci for this form of deafness, including one in the Xq13-q21 region. We have observed different radiological features among the pedigrees which map to Xq13-q21, suggesting that even among these pedigrees the deafness is due to different pathological processes. Given these findings, we suggest that the classification of nonsyndromic X-linked deafness based solely on audiological criteria may need to be reviewed.

  14. Linkage mapping in sheep and deer identifies a conserved pecora ruminant linkage group orthologous to two regions of HSA16 and a portion of HSA7Q

    SciTech Connect

    Broom, J.E.; Tate, M.L.; Dodds, K.G.

    1996-05-01

    Two orthologous linkage groups have been mapped in sheep and deer. Seven loci have been mapped in deer, and 12 in sheep. The sheep linkage group is assigned of ovine chromosome 24. The linkage groups consist of loci from the short arm of human chromosome 16, spanning the region containing the human Batten disease locus, and from human chromosome 7. One locus from the long arm of human chromosome 16 is also present, demonstrating a previously unknown rearrangement between human and ruminant chromosomes. There is no significant difference in marker order and distances between the two linkage groups, implying that this linkage pattern was present in the genome of the common ancestor of the pecora ruminants. 35 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Detection of tandam duplications and implications for linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Matise, T.C.; Weeks, D.E. ); Chakravarti, A. ); Patel, P.I.; Lupski, J.R. ); Nelis, E.; Timmerman, V.; Van Broeckhoven, C. )

    1994-06-01

    The first demonstration of an autosomal dominant human disease caused by segmental trisomy came in 1991 for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). For this disorder, the segmental trisomy is due to a large tandem duplication of 1.5 Mb of DNA located on chromosome 17p11.2-p12. The search for the CMT1A disease gene was misdirected and impeded because some chromosome 17 genetic markers that are linked to CMT1A lie within this duplication. To better understand how such a duplication might affect genetic analyses in the context of disease gene mapping, the authors studied the effects of marker duplication on transmission probabilities of marker alleles, on linkage analysis of an autosomal dominant disease, and on tests of linkage homogeneity. They demonstrate that the undetected presence of a duplication distorts transmission ratios, hampers fine localization of the disease gene, and increases false evidence of linkage heterogeneity. In addition, they devised a likelihood-based method for detecting the presence of a tandemly duplicated marker when one is suspected. They tested their methods through computer simulations and on CMT1A pedigrees genotyped at several chromosome 17 markers. On the simulated data, the method detected 96% of duplicated markers (with a false-positive rate of 5%). On the CMT1A data the method successfully identified two of three loci that are duplicated (with no false positives). This method could be used to identify duplicated markers in other regions of the genome and could be used to delineate the extent of duplications similar to that involved in CMT1A. 18 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Geometric design of mechanical linkages for contact specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Nina Patarinsky

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation focuses on the kinematic synthesis of mechanical linkages in order to guide an end-effortor so that it maintains contact with specified objects in its workspace. Assuming the serial chain does not have full mobility in its workspace, the contact geometry is used to determine the dimensions of the serial chain. The approach to this problem, is to use the relative curvature of the contact of the end-effector with one or more objects to define velocity and acceleration specifications for its movement. This provides kinematic constraints that are used to synthesize the dimensions of the serial chain. The mathematical formulation of the geometric design problem, leads to systems of multivariable polynomial equations, which are solved exactly using sparse matrix resultants and polynomial homotopy methods. The results from this research yield planar RR and 4R linkages that match a specified contact geometry, spatial TS, parallel RRS and perpendicular RRS linkages that have a required acceleration specification. A new strategy for a robot recovery from actuator failures is demonstrated for the Mars Exploratory Rover Arm. In extending this work to spatial serial chains, a new method based on sparse matrix resultants was developed, which solves exact synthesis problems with acceleration constraints. Further the research builds on the theoretical concepts of contact relationships for spatial movement. The connection between kinematic synthesis and contact problems and its extension to spatial synthesis are developed in this dissertation for the first time and are new contributions. The results, which rely upon the use of surface curvature effects to reduce the number of fixtures needed to immobilize an object, find applications in robot grasping and part-fixturing. The recovery strategy, presented in this research is also a new concept. The recognition that it is possible to reconfigure a crippled robotic system to achieve mission critical tasks can guide

  17. A genetic linkage map of red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, D S; Renshaw, M A; Hollenbeck, C M; Gold, J R

    2010-12-01

    Second-generation, sex-specific genetic linkage maps were generated for the economically important estuarine-dependent marine fish Sciaenops ocellatus (red drum). The maps were based on F(1) progeny from each of two single-pair mating families. A total of 237 nuclear-encoded microsatellite markers were mapped to 25 linkage groups. The female map contained 226 markers, with a total length of 1270.9 centiMorgans (cM) and an average inter-marker interval of 6.53 cM; the male map contained 201 markers, with a total length of 1122.9 cM and an average inter-marker interval of 6.03 cM. The overall recombination rate was approximately equal in the two sexes (♀:♂=1.03:1). Recombination rates in a number of linkage intervals, however, differed significantly between the same sex in both families and between sexes within families. The former occurred in 2.4% of mapped intervals, while the latter occurred in 51.2% of mapped intervals. Sex-specific recombination rates varied within chromosomes, with regions of both female-biased and male-biased recombination. Original clones from which the microsatellite markers were generated were compared with genome sequence data for the spotted green puffer, Tetraodon nigroviridis; a total of 43 matches were located in 17 of 21 chromosomes of T. nigroviridis, while seven matches were in unknown portions of the T. nigroviridis genome. The map for red drum provides a new, useful tool for aquaculture, population genetics, and comparative genomics of this economically important marine species.

  18. A Novel Framework for Sib Pair Linkage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Poznik, G. David; Adamska, Katarzyna; Xu, Xin; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Rogus, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Sib pair linkage analysis of a dichotomous trait is a popular method for narrowing the search for genes that influence complex diseases. Although the pedigree structures are uncomplicated and the underlying genetic principles straightforward, a surprising degree of complexity is involved in implementing a sib pair study and interpreting the results. Ascertainment may be based on affected, discordant, or unaffected sib pairs, as well as on pairs defined by threshold values for quantitative traits, such as extreme discordant sib pairs. To optimize power, various domain restrictions and null hypotheses have been proposed for each of these designs, yielding a wide array of choices for the analyst. To begin, we systematically classify the major sources of discretion in sib pair linkage analysis. Then, we extend the work of Kruglyak and Lander (1995), to bring the various forms into a unified framework and to facilitate a more general approach to the analysis. Finally, we describe a new, freely available computer program, Splat (Sib Pair Linkage Analysis Testing), that can perform any sib pair statistical test currently in use, as well as any user-defined test yet to be proposed. Splat uses the expectation maximization algorithm to calculate maximum-likelihood estimates of sharing (subject to user-specified conditions) and then plots LOD scores versus chromosomal position. It includes a novel grid-scanning capability that enables simultaneous visualization of multiple test statistics. This can lead to further insight into the genetic basis of the disease process under consideration. In addition, phenotype definitions can be modified without the recalculation of inheritance vectors, thereby providing considerable flexibility for exploratory analysis. The application of Splat will be illustrated with data from studies on the genetics of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:16358216

  19. Detection of tandem duplications and implications for linkage analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Matise, T. C.; Chakravarti, A.; Patel, P. I.; Lupski, J. R.; Nelis, E.; Timmerman, V.; Van Broeckhoven, C.; Weeks, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    The first demonstration of an autosomal dominant human disease caused by segmental trisomy came in 1991 for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A). For this disorder, the segmental trisomy is due to a large tandem duplication of 1.5 Mb of DNA located on chromosome 17p11.2-p12. The search for the CMT1A disease gene was misdirected and impeded because some chromosome 17 genetic markers that are linked to CMT1A lie within this duplication. To better understand how such a duplication might affect genetic analyses in the context of disease gene mapping, we studied the effects of marker duplication on transmission probabilities of marker alleles, on linkage analysis of an autosomal dominant disease, and on tests of linkage homogeneity. We demonstrate that the undetected presence of a duplication distorts transmission ratios, hampers fine localization of the disease gene, and increases false evidence of linkage heterogeneity. In addition, we devised a likelihood-based method for detecting the presence of a tandemly duplicated marker when one is suspected. We tested our methods through computer simulations and on CMT1A pedigrees genotyped at several chromosome 17 markers. On the simulated data, our method detected 96% of duplicated markers (with a false-positive rate of 5%). On the CMT1A data our method successfully identified two of three loci that are duplicated (with no false positives). This method could be used to identify duplicated markers in other regions of the genome and could be used to delineate the extent of duplications similar to that involved in CMT1A. PMID:8198134

  20. Prioritizing tiger conservation through landscape genetics and habitat linkages.

    PubMed

    Yumnam, Bibek; Jhala, Yadvendradev V; Qureshi, Qamar; Maldonado, Jesus E; Gopal, Rajesh; Saini, Swati; Srinivas, Y; Fleischer, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Even with global support for tiger (Panthera tigris) conservation their survival is threatened by poaching, habitat loss and isolation. Currently about 3,000 wild tigers persist in small fragmented populations within seven percent of their historic range. Identifying and securing habitat linkages that connect source populations for maintaining landscape-level gene flow is an important long-term conservation strategy for endangered carnivores. However, habitat corridors that link regional tiger populations are often lost to development projects due to lack of objective evidence on their importance. Here, we use individual based genetic analysis in combination with landscape permeability models to identify and prioritize movement corridors across seven tiger populations within the Central Indian Landscape. By using a panel of 11 microsatellites we identified 169 individual tigers from 587 scat and 17 tissue samples. We detected four genetic clusters within Central India with limited gene flow among three of them. Bayesian and likelihood analyses identified 17 tigers as having recent immigrant ancestry. Spatially explicit tiger occupancy obtained from extensive landscape-scale surveys across 76,913 km(2) of forest habitat was found to be only 21,290 km(2). After accounting for detection bias, the covariates that best explained tiger occupancy were large, remote, dense forest patches; large ungulate abundance, and low human footprint. We used tiger occupancy probability to parameterize habitat permeability for modeling habitat linkages using least-cost and circuit theory pathway analyses. Pairwise genetic differences (FST) between populations were better explained by modeled linkage costs (r>0.5, p<0.05) compared to Euclidean distances, which was in consonance with observed habitat fragmentation. The results of our study highlight that many corridors may still be functional as there is evidence of contemporary migration. Conservation efforts should provide legal status

  1. Genetic linkage studies in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    SciTech Connect

    Mansfield, D.C.; Teague, P.W.; Barber, A.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) is a severe retinal dystrophy characterized by night blindness, progressive constriction of the visual fields and loss of central vision in the fourth or fifth decades. The frequency of this form of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) varies in different populations. Mutations within the rhodopsin, cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase-{beta} subunit and cGMP-gated channel genes have been reported in some arRP families. The genetic loci responsible for the majority of cases have yet to be identified. Genetic heterogeneity is likely to be extensive. In order to minimize the amount of genetic heterogenity, a set of arRP families was ascertained within the South-Central Sardinian population, in which 81% of families with a known mode of inheritance show an autosomal recessive form of RP. The Sardinian population is an ethnic {open_quotes}outlier{close_quotes}, having remained relatively isolated from mainland and other cultures. Genetic linkage data has been obtained in a set of 11 Sardinian arRP kindreds containing 26 affected members. Under the assumption of genetic homogeneity, no evidence of linkage was found in the arRP kindreds using 195 markers, which excluded 62% of the genome (Z<-2). Positive lod scores were obtained with D14S80 which showed no recombination in a subset of 5 families. Heterogeneity testing using D14S80 and arRP showed no significant evidence of heterogeneity (p=0.18) but evidence of linkage ({chi}{sup 2}=3.64, p=0.028). We are currently screening the neural retina-specific leucine zipper gene (NRL) in 14q11 for mutations as a candidate locus.

  2. Prioritizing Tiger Conservation through Landscape Genetics and Habitat Linkages

    PubMed Central

    Yumnam, Bibek; Jhala, Yadvendradev V.; Qureshi, Qamar; Maldonado, Jesus E.; Gopal, Rajesh; Saini, Swati; Srinivas, Y.; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Even with global support for tiger (Panthera tigris) conservation their survival is threatened by poaching, habitat loss and isolation. Currently about 3,000 wild tigers persist in small fragmented populations within seven percent of their historic range. Identifying and securing habitat linkages that connect source populations for maintaining landscape-level gene flow is an important long-term conservation strategy for endangered carnivores. However, habitat corridors that link regional tiger populations are often lost to development projects due to lack of objective evidence on their importance. Here, we use individual based genetic analysis in combination with landscape permeability models to identify and prioritize movement corridors across seven tiger populations within the Central Indian Landscape. By using a panel of 11 microsatellites we identified 169 individual tigers from 587 scat and 17 tissue samples. We detected four genetic clusters within Central India with limited gene flow among three of them. Bayesian and likelihood analyses identified 17 tigers as having recent immigrant ancestry. Spatially explicit tiger occupancy obtained from extensive landscape-scale surveys across 76,913 km2 of forest habitat was found to be only 21,290 km2. After accounting for detection bias, the covariates that best explained tiger occupancy were large, remote, dense forest patches; large ungulate abundance, and low human footprint. We used tiger occupancy probability to parameterize habitat permeability for modeling habitat linkages using least-cost and circuit theory pathway analyses. Pairwise genetic differences (FST) between populations were better explained by modeled linkage costs (r>0.5, p<0.05) compared to Euclidean distances, which was in consonance with observed habitat fragmentation. The results of our study highlight that many corridors may still be functional as there is evidence of contemporary migration. Conservation efforts should provide legal status to

  3. The Reduction of Aileron Operating Force by Differential Linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert T; Nerken, Albert I

    1936-01-01

    It is shown that the control force of ordinary ailerons may be reduced to zero over a range of deflections and at a given flight condition by the use of an appropriate differential movement. Approximations to the ideal motion obtainable with a simple linkage are discussed and a chart that enables the selection of an appropriate crank arrangement is presented. Various aspects of the practical application of the system are discussed and it is concluded that a small fixed tab, deflected to trim both ailerons upward, would be advantageous.

  4. Nonpaternity in linkage studies of extremely discordant sib pairs.

    PubMed

    Neale, Michael C; Neale, Benjamin M; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2002-02-01

    An approach commonly used to increase statistical power in linkage studies is the study of extremely discordant sibling pairs. This design is powerful under both additive and dominant-gene models and across a wide range of allele frequencies. A practical problem with the design is that extremely discordant pairs that are ostensibly full sibs may be half sibs. Although estimates vary, the population rates of such nonpaternity may be as high as 5%-10%. The proportion in discordant pairs may be much higher. The present article explores this potential inflation as a function of the resemblance of sib pairs and the criteria for discordance used for selection.

  5. Linkage disequilibrium, haplotype analysis and Werner`s syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wijsman, E.M.; Goddard, K.A.B.; Martin, G.M.

    1994-09-01

    Werner`s syndrome (WS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive disorder of premature aging. Although the underlying defect is unknown, the gene for the disorder, WRN, has been mapped to the 8p11.1-21.1 region. We have assembled a sample of 30 Japanese and 24 non-Japanese (primary Caucasian) WS patients, as well as a control sample from each population. 25 of the Japanese patients and 10 of the Caucasian patients are from consanguineous marriages. We recently presented evidence from these families which places WRN in the 10.2 cM interval between D8S87 and D8S137. However, because WS is so rare and because many patients are from consanguineous marriages, fine localization of the gene by traditional meiotic mapping methods is unlikely to succeed. The existence of linkage disequilibrium is now recognized as a key piece of evidence in defining a small region (typically under 1-2 cM) containing a gene of interest. Thus an alternative approach for refining the location of WRN may be to identify linked markers which are in linkage disequilibrium with the disease. We recently suggested that WRN may be close to D8S339 and GSR in the above interval because of the presence of statistically significant evidence of linkage disequilibrium in the Japanese sample. In addition, there was evidence in both populations that a limited number of haplotypes was associated with the disease. Here we report an extension of this study to include a number of additional markers. We present additional evidence that there is linkage disequilibrium between many of these markers and WRN in both the Japanese and Caucasian samples. In addition, the additional markers do not markedly subdivide the disease haplotypes defined by D8S339 and GSR, while at the same time they introduce substantial numbers of new haplotypes into the control populations. These results suggest that the haplotypes associated with WS may be used to further define the limits of WRN.

  6. A Genetic Linkage Map of Saccharum Spontaneum L. `ses 208'

    PubMed Central

    Al-Janabi, S. M.; Honeycutt, R. J.; McClelland, M.; Sobral, BWS.

    1993-01-01

    The arbitrarily primed polymerase chain reaction was used to detect single-dose polymorphisms that, in turn, were used to generate a linkage map of a polyploid relative of cultivated sugarcane, Saccharum spontaneum `SES 208' (2n = 64). The mapping population was composed of 88 progeny from a cross between SES 208 and a diploidized haploid derived from SES 208 by anther culture, ADP 85-0068. This cross allowed direct analysis of meiosis in SES 208 and gametic segregation ratios to be observed. One hundred twenty-seven 10-mer oligonucleotide primers of arbitrary sequence were selected from a pool of 420 primers used to screen the mapping parents. Three hundred thirty-six of the 420 primers amplified 4,540 loci or 13.5 loci per primer. The selected 127 primers revealed 2,160 loci of which 279 were present in SES 208 and absent in ADP 85-0068 and easily scored. Two hundred and eight (74.6%) of these 279 polymorphisms were single-dose polymorphisms (i.e., they displayed 1:1 segregation, χ(2) at 98% confidence level). Linkage analysis (θ = 0.25, LOD = 9.0 for two-point analysis, then θ = 0.25, LOD = 6.0 for multipoint analysis) of single-dose polymorphisms placed them into 42 linkage groups containing at least 2 markers. These single-dose markers span 1,500 contiguous centimorgans (cM) with 32 markers remaining unlinked (15.4%). From this 208-marker map we estimated the genome size of SES 208 to be 2,550 cM. The map has a predicted coverage of 85.1% at 30 cM, meaning that any new marker placed has an 85.1% chance of being within 30 cM of an existing marker. Furthermore, we show that SES 208 behaves like an autopolyploid because (i) the ratio of single-dose markers to higher dose markers fit the assumption of autooctaploidy and (ii) the absence of repulsion phase linkages. This is the first genetic map constructed directly on a polyploid species for which no diploid relatives are known. PMID:8375659

  7. A Monte Carlo method for combined segregation and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, S.W. ); Thompson, E.A. )

    1992-11-01

    The authors introduce a Monte Carlo approach to combined segregation and linkage analysis of a quantitative trait observed in an extended pedigree. In conjunction with the Monte Carlo method of likelihood-ratio evaluation proposed by Thompson and Guo, the method provides for estimation and hypothesis testing. The greatest attraction of this approach is its ability to handle complex genetic models and large pedigrees. Two examples illustrate the practicality of the method. One is of simulated data on a large pedigree; the other is a reanalysis of published data previously analyzed by other methods. 40 refs, 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Linkage of preaxial polydactyly type 2 to 7q36

    SciTech Connect

    Hing, A.V.; Slaugh, R.; Dowton, S.B.

    1995-08-28

    We have characterized a 6-generation North American Caucasian kindred segregating one form of preaxial polydactyly type 2 (PPD-2). We demonstrate linkage to the 7q36 region and describe a submicroscopic telomeric chromosomal deletion in phase with the PPD-2 phenotype. Recently, several kindreds segregating triphalangeal thumb (TPT) with and without associated hand anomalies (syndactyly and/or postaxial polydactyly) have also been linked to the subtelomeric region of chromosome 7q. We demonstrate by haplotype analysis that our North American pedigree represents a PPD allele that is independent of the founder PPD allele present in the previously described kindreds. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Canada's unemployment-immigration linkage: demographic, economic, and political influences.

    PubMed

    Foot, D K

    1994-01-01

    "This paper rejects Veugelers and Klassen's initial suggestion that greater concern with demographic considerations might provide a useful explanation for their empirical finding of a post-1989 change in the unemployment-immigration linkage [in Canada] and offers alternative explanations consistent with economic and, especially, sociological-political theories. It shows how elements of Hawkins's (1988) ¿bureaucratic control' and Simmons and Keohane's (1991) ¿political legitimacy' theories can be combined to explain both continuity and change in Canada's postwar immigration policy."

  10. Efficient Privacy-Aware Record Integration

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, Mehmet; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Inan, Ali; Bertino, Elisa; Durham, Elizabeth; Malin, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    The integration of information dispersed among multiple repositories is a crucial step for accurate data analysis in various domains. In support of this goal, it is critical to devise procedures for identifying similar records across distinct data sources. At the same time, to adhere to privacy regulations and policies, such procedures should protect the confidentiality of the individuals to whom the information corresponds. Various private record linkage (PRL) protocols have been proposed to achieve this goal, involving secure multi-party computation (SMC) and similarity preserving data transformation techniques. SMC methods provide secure and accurate solutions to the PRL problem, but are prohibitively expensive in practice, mainly due to excessive computational requirements. Data transformation techniques offer more practical solutions, but incur the cost of information leakage and false matches. In this paper, we introduce a novel model for practical PRL, which 1) affords controlled and limited information leakage, 2) avoids false matches resulting from data transformation. Initially, we partition the data sources into blocks to eliminate comparisons for records that are unlikely to match. Then, to identify matches, we apply an efficient SMC technique between the candidate record pairs. To enable efficiency and privacy, our model leaks a controlled amount of obfuscated data prior to the secure computations. Applied obfuscation relies on differential privacy which provides strong privacy guarantees against adversaries with arbitrary background knowledge. In addition, we illustrate the practical nature of our approach through an empirical analysis with data derived from public voter records. PMID:24500681

  11. Introducing the Oxford Vocal (OxVoc) Sounds database: a validated set of non-acted affective sounds from human infants, adults, and domestic animals

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Christine E.; Young, Katherine S.; Craske, Michelle G.; Stein, Alan L.; Kringelbach, Morten L.

    2014-01-01

    Sound moves us. Nowhere is this more apparent than in our responses to genuine emotional vocalizations, be they heartfelt distress cries or raucous laughter. Here, we present perceptual ratings and a description of a freely available, large database of natural affective vocal sounds from human infants, adults and domestic animals, the Oxford Vocal (OxVoc) Sounds database. This database consists of 173 non-verbal sounds expressing a range of happy, sad, and neutral emotional states. Ratings are presented for the sounds on a range of dimensions from a number of independent participant samples. Perceptions related to valence, including distress, vocalizer mood, and listener mood are presented in Study 1. Perceptions of the arousal of the sound, listener motivation to respond and valence (positive, negative) are presented in Study 2. Perceptions of the emotional content of the stimuli in both Study 1 and 2 were consistent with the predefined categories (e.g., laugh stimuli perceived as positive). While the adult vocalizations received more extreme valence ratings, rated motivation to respond to the sounds was highest for the infant sounds. The major advantages of this database are the inclusion of vocalizations from naturalistic situations, which represent genuine expressions of emotion, and the inclusion of vocalizations from animals and infants, providing comparison stimuli for use in cross-species and developmental studies. The associated website provides a detailed description of the physical properties of each sound stimulus along with cross-category descriptions. PMID:25009511

  12. Computer-Based Internet-Hosted Assessment of L2 Literacy: Computerizing and Administering of the Oxford Quick Placement Test in ExamView and Moodle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meurant, Robert C.

    Sorting of Korean English-as-a-Foreign-Language (EFL) university students by Second Language (L2) aptitude allocates students to classes of compatible ability level, and was here used to screen candidates for interview. Paper-and-pen versions of the Oxford Quick Placement Test were adapted to computer-based testing via online hosting using FSCreations ExamView. Problems with their online hosting site led to conversion to the popular computer-based learning management system Moodle, hosted on www.ninehub.com. 317 sophomores were tested online to encourage L2 digital literacy. Strategies for effective hybrid implementation of Learning Management Systems in L2 tertiary education include computer-based Internet-hosted L2 aptitude tests. These potentially provide a convenient measure of student progress in developing L2 fluency, and offer a more objective and relevant means of teacher- and course-assessment than student evaluations, which tend to confuse entertainment value and teacher popularity with academic credibility and pedagogical effectiveness.

  13. The Hong Kong version of the Oxford Cognitive Screen (HK-OCS): validation study for Cantonese-speaking chronic stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Kong, Anthony Pak-Hin; Lam, Pinky Hiu-Ping; Ho, Diana Wai-Lam; Lau, Johnny King; Humphreys, Glyn W; Riddoch, Jane; Weekes, Brendan

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the validation of the Hong Kong version of Oxford Cognitive Screen (HK-OCS). Seventy Cantonese-speaking healthy individuals participated to establish normative data and 46 chronic stroke survivors were assessed using the HK-OCS, Albert's Test of Visual Neglect, short test of gestural production, and Hong Kong version of the following assessments: Western Aphasia Battery, MMSE, MoCA, Modified Barthel Index, and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living scale. The validity of the HK-OCS was appraised by the difference between the two participant groups. Neurologically unimpaired individuals performed significantly better than stroke survivors on the HK-OCS. Positive and significant correlations found between cognitive subtests in the HK-OCS and related assessments indicated good concurrent validity. Excellent intra-rater and inter-rater reliabilities, fair test-retest reliability, and acceptable internal consistency suggested that the HK-OCS had good reliability. Specific HK-OCS subtests including semantics, episodic memory, number writing, and orientation were the best predictors of functional outcomes.

  14. Validation study of Oxford Classification of IgA Nephropathy: the significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and mesangial IgG immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Ştefan, Gabriel; Ismail, Gener; Stancu, Simona; Zugravu, Adrian; Andronesi, Andreea; Mandache, Eugen; Mircescu, Gabriel

    2016-08-01

    The Oxford classification (OC) of IgA Nephropathy (IgAN) identified mesangial hypercellularity (M), endocapillary hypercellularity (E), segmental glomerulosclerosis (S), and tubular atrophy/interstitial fibrosis (T) as predictors of outcome. We aimed to validate the OC and to investigate the clinical significance of extracapillary hypercellularity and IgG immunostaining. We examined the renal outcome at December 31, 2014, of 121 adult patients with biopsy proven primary IgAN between 2003 and 2013. The primary endpoint was doubling of serum creatinine or renal replacement therapy initiation. The mean observation period was 59.7 months. Thirty-one percent of the patients presented with a grade of extracapillary hypercellularity. In comparison with the group with no crescents, they had higher grade of inflammation, lower eGFR and increased proteinuria. There were no differences between the IgA and IgA&IgG immunostaining groups regarding the disease progression risk factors. Mean kidney survival time for the entire cohort was 10.6 (9.1, 12.0) years. In the Cox regression model, the independent predictors of decreased renal survival were eGFR at time of biopsy, S1 and the presence of crescents. Our study showed that extracapillary proliferation and S1 had the greatest importance in establishing the renal prognosis of patients with IgAN.

  15. Cardiovascular disease treatment among patients with severe mental illness: a data linkage study between primary and secondary care

    PubMed Central

    Woodhead, Charlotte; Ashworth, Mark; Broadbent, Matthew; Callard, Felicity; Hotopf, Matthew; Schofield, Peter; Soncul, Murat; Stewart, Robert J; Henderson, Max J

    2016-01-01

    Background Suboptimal treatment of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among patients with severe mental illness (SMI) may contribute to physical health disparities. Aim To identify SMI characteristics associated with meeting CVD treatment and prevention guidelines. Design and setting Population-based electronic health record database linkage between primary care and the sole provider of secondary mental health care services in south east London, UK. Method Cardiovascular disease prevalence, risk factor recording, and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF) clinical target achievement were compared among 4056 primary care patients with SMI whose records were linked to secondary healthcare records and 270 669 patients without SMI who were not known to secondary care psychiatric services, using multivariate logistic regression modelling. Data available from secondary care records were then used to identify SMI characteristics associated with QOF clinical target achievement. Results Patients with SMI and with coronary heart disease and heart failure experienced reduced prescribing of beta blockers and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers (ACEI/ARB). A diagnosis of schizophrenia, being identified with any indicator of risk or illness severity, and being prescribed with depot injectable antipsychotic medication was associated with the lowest likelihood of prescribing. Conclusion Linking primary and secondary care data allows the identification of patients with SMI most at risk of undertreatment for physical health problems. PMID:27114210

  16. A detailed linkage map of medaka, Oryzias latipes: comparative genomics and genome evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Naruse, K; Fukamachi, S; Mitani, H; Kondo, M; Matsuoka, T; Kondo, S; Hanamura, N; Morita, Y; Hasegawa, K; Nishigaki, R; Shimada, A; Wada, H; Kusakabe, T; Suzuki, N; Kinoshita, M; Kanamori, A; Terado, T; Kimura, H; Nonaka, M; Shima, A

    2000-01-01

    We mapped 633 markers (488 AFLPs, 28 RAPDs, 34 IRSs, 75 ESTs, 4 STSs, and 4 phenotypic markers) for the Medaka Oryzias latipes, a teleost fish of the order Beloniformes. Linkage was determined using a reference typing DNA panel from 39 cell lines derived from backcross progeny. This panel provided unlimited DNA for the accumulation of mapping data. The total map length of Medaka was 1354.5 cM and 24 linkage groups were detected, corresponding to the haploid chromosome number of the organism. Thirteen to 49 markers for each linkage group were obtained. Conserved synteny between Medaka and zebrafish was observed for 2 independent linkage groups. Unlike zebrafish, however, the Medaka linkage map showed obvious restriction of recombination on the linkage group containing the male-determining region (Y) locus compared to the autosomal chromosomes. PMID:10747068

  17. Linkage analysis by two-dimensional DNA typing

    SciTech Connect

    Meerman, G.J. te; Meulen, M.A. van der ); Mullaart, E.; Morolli, B.; Uitterlinden, A.G. ); Daas, J.H.G. den ); Vijg, J. Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    In two-dimensional (2-D) DNA typing, genomic DNA fragments are separated, first according to size by electrophoresis in a neutral polyacrylamide gel and second according to sequence by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, followed by hybridization analysis using micro- and minisatellite core probes. The 2-D DNA typing method generates a large amount of information on polymorphic loci per gel. Here, the authors demonstrate the potential usefulness of 2-D DNA typing in an empirical linkage study on the red factor in cattle, and the authors show an example of the 2-D DNA typing analysis of a human pedigree. The power efficiency of 2-D DNA typing in general is compared with that of single-locus typing by simulation. The results indicate that, although 2-D DNA typing is very efficient in generating data on polymorphic loci, its power to detect linkage is lower than single-locus typing, because it is not obvious whether a spot represents the presence of one or two alleles. It is possible to compensate for this lower informativeness by increasing the sample size. Genome scanning by 2-D DNA typing has the potential to be more efficient than current genotyping methods in scoring polymorphic loci. Hence, it could become a method of choice in mapping genetic traits in humans and animals. 13 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Joint linkage of multiple loci for a complex disorder

    SciTech Connect

    MacLean, C.J.; Kendler, K.S.; Sham, P.C. )

    1993-08-01

    Many investigators who have been searching for linkage to complex diseases have by now accumulated a drawer full of negative results. If disease is actually caused by genes at several loci, these data might contain multiple-locus system (MLS) information that the investigator does not realize. Trying to obtain this information formally, through the MLS likelihood, leads to severe computational and statistical difficulties. Therefore, the authors propose a scheme of inference based on single-locus (SL) statistics, considered jointly. By simulation, they find that the MLS lod score is closely approximated by the sum of SL lod scores. However, they also find that for moderately large systems, say three or four loci, both MLS and SL lod scores are likely to be inconclusive. Nonetheless, MLS can often be detected through the correlation of individual pedigree SL lod scores. Significant correlation is itself evidence of an MLS, because, in the absence of linkage, false-positive lod scores are necessarily random. Under epistasis SL lod scores tend to be positively correlated among pedigrees, while under independent action SL lod scores from high-density samples tend to be negatively correlated. 24 refs., 10 tabs.

  19. Extracellular rigidity sensing by talin isoform–specific mechanical linkages

    PubMed Central

    Austen, Katharina; Ringer, Pia; Mehlich, Alexander; Chrostek-Grashoff, Anna; Kluger, Carleen; Klingner, Christoph; Sabass, Benedikt; Zent, Roy; Rief, Matthias; Grashoff, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    The ability of cells to adhere and sense differences in tissue stiffness is crucial for organ development and function. The central mechanisms by which adherent cells detect extracellular matrix compliance, however, are still unknown. Using two single-molecule–calibrated biosensors that allow the analysis of a previously inaccessible but physiologically highly relevant force regime in cells, we demonstrate that the integrin activator talin establishes mechanical linkages upon cell adhesion, which are indispensable for cells to probe tissue stiffness. Talin linkages are exposed to a range of piconewton (pN) forces and bear, on average, 7–10 pN during cell adhesion depending on their association with f-actin and vinculin. Disruption of talin’s mechanical engagement does not impair integrin activation and initial cell adhesion but prevents focal adhesion reinforcement and thus extracellular rigidity sensing. Intriguingly, talin mechanics are isoform-specific so that expression of either talin-1 or talin-2 modulates extracellular rigidity sensing. PMID:26523364

  20. Primary genetic linkage maps of the ascidian, Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Kano, Shungo; Satoh, Nori; Sordino, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    For whole-genome analysis in a basal chordate (protochordate), we used F1 pseudo-testcross mapping strategy and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to construct primary linkage maps of the ascidian tunicate Ciona intestinalis. Two genetic maps consisted of 14 linkage groups, in agreement with the haploid chromosome number, and contained 276 and 125 AFLP loci derived from crosses between British and Neapolitan individuals. The two maps covered 4218.9 and 2086.9 cM, respectively, with an average marker interval of 16.1 and 18.9 cM. We observed a high recombinant ratio, ranging from 25 to 49 kb/cM, which can explain the high degree of polymorphism in this species. Some AFLP markers were converted to sequence tagged sites (STSs) by sequence determination, in order to create anchor markers for the fragmental physical map. Our recombination tools provide basic knowledge of genetic status and whole genome organization, and genetic markers to assist positional cloning in C. intestinalis.

  1. Linkage of familial dilated cardiomyopathy to chromosome 9

    SciTech Connect

    Krajinovic, M.; Vatta, M.; Milasin, J.

    1995-10-01

    Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy is a heart muscle disease of unknown etiology, characterized by impaired myocardial contractility and ventricular dilatation. The disorder is an important cause of morbidity and mortality and represents the chief indication for heart transplantation. Familial transmission is often recognized (familial dilated cardiomyopathy, or FDC), mostly with autosomal dominant inheritance. In order to understand the molecular genetic basis of the disease, a large six-generation kindred with autosomal dominant FDC was studied for linkage analysis. A genome-wide search was undertaken after a large series of candidate genes were excluded and was then extended to two other families with autosomal dominant pattern of transmission and identical clinical features. Coinheritance of the disease gene was excluded for >95% of the genome, after 251 polymorphic markers were analyzed. Linkage was found for chromosome 9q13-q22, with a maximum multipoint lod score of 4.2. There was no evidence of heterogeneity. The FDC locus was placed in the interval between loci D9S153 and D9S152. Several candidate genes for causing dilated cardiomyopathy map in this region. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular characterization of Blau syndrome: Genetic linkage to chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Tromp, G.; Duivaniemi, H.; Christiano, A.

    1994-09-01

    The Blau syndrome is an autosomal, dominantly-inherited disease characterized by multi-organ, tissue-specific inflammation. Its clinical phenotype includes granulomatous uveitis, arthritis and skin rash. The syndrome is unique in that it is the sole human model for a variety of multi-system inflammatory diseases that afflict a significant percentage of the population. Karyotypic analysis of the large, three generation kindred whose disease originally characterized the syndrome was unremarkable. Following exclusion of a number of extracellular matrix candidates genes, a genome-wide search was undertaken of the Blau susceptibility locus. Fifty-seven members of the family were genotyped for about 200 highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers. Linkage analysis was performed using the LINKAGE package of programs under a model of dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance. Five liability classes were used to specify penetrances and phenocopy rates for those affected the arthritis, uveitis, skin rash and combinations thererof. In addition, five age-dependent penetrance classes were used for unaffected individuals. The marker D16S298 gave a maximum lod score of 3.6 at {theta} = 0.05 with two-point analysis. Lod scores for flanking markers were consistent. These data provide convincing evidence that the Blau susceptibility locus is situated within the 16p12-q21 interval. Fine mapping of the candidate interval with additional families exhibiting the Blau phenotype, as well as with more polymorphic markers, is underway.

  3. Preloaded compliant linkage for fuel injection pump rack

    SciTech Connect

    Brisbon, E.S.; Krosney, M.

    1989-07-25

    This patent describes in a fuel injection pump system for an internal combustion engine. The improvement comprising: a compliant linkage in the pump rack means positioned between a first portion of the pump rack means engaged by the gear and a second portion thereof which is connected to the plunger means. The linkage comprising a precompressed spring urging the first and second portions of the pump rack means apart from each other with a force greater than the value of load forces acting on the rack means during normal operation in the absence of abnormally strong transient load forces, but less than the driving force produced by the stepper output shaft; whereby the spring remains in its normal precompressed state during normal operation; is additionally compressed when transient load forces occur so as to permit continue normal operation of the gear even though the second portion of the rack means is arrested; and returns to its normal precompressed state when the transient local forces disappear, thus permitting the second portion of the pump rack means to assume its proper controlled position. Herein the first portion of the rack means is pivotable about an axis normal to the length of the pump rack means and is biased toward the gear by a spring.

  4. Health governance: principal-agent linkages and health system strengthening.

    PubMed

    Brinkerhoff, Derick W; Bossert, Thomas J

    2014-09-01

    Governance is increasingly recognized as an important factor in health system performance, yet conceptually and practically it remains poorly understood and subject to often vague and competing notions of both what its role is and how to address its weaknesses. This overview article for the symposium on health governance presents a model of health governance that focuses on the multiplicity of societal actors in health systems, the distribution of roles and responsibilities among them and their ability and willingness to fulfil these roles and responsibilities. This focus highlights the principal-agent linkages among actors and the resulting incentives for good governance and health system performance. The discussion identifies three disconnects that constitute challenges for health system strengthening interventions that target improving governance: (1) the gap between the good governance agenda and existing capacities, (2) the discrepancy between formal and informal governance and (3) the inattention to sociopolitical power dynamics. The article summarizes the three country cases in the symposium and highlights their governance findings: health sector reform in China, financial management of health resources in Brazilian municipalities and budget reform in hospitals in Lesotho. The concluding sections clarify how the three cases apply the model's principal-agent linkages and highlight the importance of filling the gaps remaining between problem diagnosis and the development of practical guidance that supports 'best fit' solutions and accommodates political realities in health systems strengthening.

  5. Linkage studies on chromosome 22 in familial schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Vallada, H.P.; Gill, M.; Sham, P.

    1995-04-24

    As part of a systematic search for a major genetic locus for schizophrenia we have examined chromosome 22 using 14 highly polymorphic markers in 23 disease pedigrees. The markers were distributed at an average distance of 6.6 cM, covering 70-80% of the chromosome. We analyzed the data by the lod score method using five plausible genetic models ranging from dominant to recessive, after testing the power of our sample under the same genetic parameters. The most positive lod score found was 1.51 under a recessive model for the marker D22S278, which is insufficient to conclude linkage. However, an excess of shared alleles in affected siblings (P < .01) was found for both D22S278 and D22S283. For D22S278, the A statistic was equal to the lod score (1.51) and therefore did not provide additional evidence for linkage allowing for heterogeneity, but the Liang statistic was more significant (P = .002). Our results suggest the possibility that the region around D22S278 and D22S283 contains a gene which contributes to the etiology of schizophrenia. 60 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  6. A PCR-based linkage map of human chromosome 1

    SciTech Connect

    Engelstein, M.; Hudson, T.J.; Lane, J.M.; Lee, M.K.; Dracopoli, C. ); Leverone, B.; Landes, G.M. ); Peltonen, L. ); Weber, J.L. )

    1993-02-01

    A genetic linkage map of human chromosome 1 based entirely on PCR-typable markers has been developed using 38 simple sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphisms. These SSRs include 36 dinucleotide repeats and 2 tetranucleotide repeats. The average heterozygosity at these markers was 0.73 and ranged form 0.52 to 0.95. Multipoint linkage analysis was used to develop a map of these 38 markers in which the relative placement of each locus is supported by likelihood odds > 1000:1. This PCR-based map was anchored at the centromere by the D1Z5 [alpha]-satellite polymorphism, and the ends of the map were defined by D1Z2 and D1S68, which are the most distal loci in the CEPH consortium map of chromosome 1. The sex-averaged, male, and female maps extend for 328, 273, and 409 cM, respectively. The average distance between markers on the sex-averaged map is 8 cM, and the largest interval is 32 cM. This map of highly informative PCR-based markers will provide a rapid means of screening human chromosome 1 for the presence of disease genes. 36 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. HLA region excluded by linkage analyses of early onset periodontitis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Wang, S.; Lopez, N.

    1994-09-01

    Previous studies suggested that HLA genes may influence susceptibility to early-onset periodontitis (EOP). Segregation analyses indicate that EOP may be due to a single major gene. We conducted linkage analyses to assess possible HLA effects on EOP. Fifty families with two or more close relatives affected by EOP were ascertained in Virginia and Chile. A microsatellite polymorphism within the HLA region (at the tumor necrosis factor beta locus) was typed using PCR. Linkage analyses used a donimant model most strongly supported by previous studies. Assuming locus homogeneity, our results exclude a susceptibility gene within 10 cM on either side of our marker locus. This encompasses all of the HLA region. Analyses assuming alternative models gave qualitatively similar results. Allowing for locus heterogeneity, our data still provide no support for HLA-region involvement. However, our data do not statistically exclude (LOD <-2.0) hypotheses of disease-locus heterogeneity, including models where up to half of our families could contain an EOP disease gene located in the HLA region. This is due to the limited power of even our relatively large collection of families and the inherent difficulties of mapping genes for disorders that have complex and heterogeneous etiologies. Additional statistical analyses, recruitment of families, and typing of flanking DNA markers are planned to more conclusively address these issues with respect to the HLA region and other candidate locations in the human genome. Additional results for markers covering most of the human genome will also be presented.

  8. The Effects of Selection on Linkage Analysis for Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Mackinnon, M. J.; Georges, MAJ.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of within-sample selection on the outcome of analyses detecting linkage between genetic markers and quantitative traits were studied. It was found that selection by truncation for the trait of interest significantly reduces the differences between marker genotype means thus reducing the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). The size of this reduction is a function of proportion selected, the magnitude of the QTL effect, recombination rate between the marker locus and the QTL, and the allele frequency of the QTL. Proportion selected was the most influential of these factors on bias, e.g., for an allele substitution effect of one standard deviation unit, selecting the top 80%, 50% or 20% of the population required 2,6 or 24 times the number of progeny, respectively, to offset the loss of power caused by this selection. The effect on power was approximately linear with respect to the size of gene effect, almost invariant to recombination rate, and a complex function of QTL allele frequency. It was concluded that experimental samples from animal populations which have been subjected to even minor amounts of selection will be inefficient in yielding information on linkage between markers and loci influencing the quantitative trait under selection. PMID:1459434

  9. A genetic linkage map for tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter].

    PubMed

    Yu, Ju-Kyung; Kantety, Ramesh V; Graznak, Elizabeth; Benscher, David; Tefera, Hailu; Sorrells, Mark E

    2006-10-01

    Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is the major cereal crop in Ethiopia. Tef is an allotetraploid with a base chromosome number of 10 (2n = 4x = 40) and a genome size of 730 Mbp. Ninety-four F(9) recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the interspecific cross, Eragrostis tef cv. Kaye Murri x Eragrostis pilosa (accession 30-5), were mapped using restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP), simple sequence repeats derived from expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR), single nucleotide polymorphism/insertion and deletion (SNP/INDEL), intron fragment length polymorphism (IFLP) and inter-simple sequence repeat amplification (ISSR). A total of 156 loci from 121 markers was grouped into 21 linkage groups at LOD 4, and the map covered 2,081.5 cM with a mean density of 12.3 cM per locus. Three putative homoeologous groups were identified based on multi-locus markers. Sixteen percent of the loci deviated from normal segregation with a predominance of E. tef alleles, and a majority of the distorted loci were clustered on three linkage groups. This map will be useful for further genetic studies in tef including mapping of loci controlling quantitative traits (QTL), and comparative analysis with other cereal crops.

  10. Linkage and mutation analysis of Thomsen and Becker myotonia families

    SciTech Connect

    Koty, P.P.; Pegoraro, E.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-09-01

    Thomsen (autosomal dominant) and Becker (autosomal recessive) myotonias are characterized by the inability for muscle relaxation after voluntary, mechanical, or electrical stimulation. Families with both diseases have been linked to the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLC1) on chromosome 7q35; however, only 2 gene mutations have been identified, and the reasons underlying the alternative dominant or recessive inheritance are not clear. We used linkage analysis and SSCP of 23 exons to screen 8 families (56 individuals) and 7 isolated cases with the diagnosis of Thomsen/Becker myotonia. A novel mutation (1290M) in exon 8 was detected in a family with Thomsen disease. Three additional families showed the previously described G230E change. Thus, chloride channel mutations could be identified in 4/5 families showing dominant inheritance. We were able to exclude linkage to the CLC1 gene in the fifth family. In patients with recessive Becker disease, an isolated case had two unique conformers, one causing a novel A437T change in exon 12. We also identified the previously reported F413C change in a second family. We found significant differences in the clinical picture between families with different mutations but also in families with the same mutation. Our data indicates that DNA studies are critical for correct diagnosis of the myotonias.

  11. Linkage of autosomal recessive lamellar ichthyosis to chromosome 14q

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.J.; Compton, J.G.; Bale, S.J.; DiGiovanna, J.J.; Hashem, N.

    1994-12-01

    The authors have mapped the locus for lamellar ichthyosis (LI), an autosomal recessive skin disease characterized by abnormal cornification of the epidermis. Analysis using both inbred and outbred families manifesting severe LI showed complete linkage to several markers within a 9.3-cM region on chromosome 14q11. Affected individuals in inbred families were also found to have striking homozygosity for markers in this region. Linkage-based genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis is now available for informative at-risk families. Several transcribed genes have been mapped to the chromosome 14 region containing the LI gene. The transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1), which encodes one of the enzymes responsible for cross-linking epidermal proteins during formation of the stratum corneum, maps to this interval. The TGM1 locus was completely linked to LI (Z = 9.11), suggesting that TGM1 is a good candidate for further investigation of this disorder. The genes for four serine proteases also map to this region but are expressed only in hematopoietic or mast cells, making them less likely candidates.

  12. Linkage disequilibrium interval mapping of quantitative trait loci

    PubMed Central

    Boitard, Simon; Abdallah, Jihad; de Rochambeau, Hubert; Cierco-Ayrolles, Christine; Mangin, Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    Background For many years gene mapping studies have been performed through linkage analyses based on pedigree data. Recently, linkage disequilibrium methods based on unrelated individuals have been advocated as powerful tools to refine estimates of gene location. Many strategies have been proposed to deal with simply inherited disease traits. However, locating quantitative trait loci is statistically more challenging and considerable research is needed to provide robust and computationally efficient methods. Results Under a three-locus Wright-Fisher model, we derived approximate expressions for the expected haplotype frequencies in a population. We considered haplotypes comprising one trait locus and two flanking markers. Using these theoretical expressions, we built a likelihood-maximization method, called HAPim, for estimating the location of a quantitative trait locus. For each postulated position, the method only requires information from the two flanking markers. Over a wide range of simulation scenarios it was found to be more accurate than a two-marker composite likelihood method. It also performed as well as identity by descent methods, whilst being valuable in a wider range of populations. Conclusion Our method makes efficient use of marker information, and can be valuable for fine mapping purposes. Its performance is increased if multiallelic markers are available. Several improvements can be developed to account for more complex evolution scenarios or provide robust confidence intervals for the location estimates. PMID:16542433

  13. Effect of Hospital–SNF Referral Linkages on Rehospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Momotazur; Foster, Andrew D; Grabowski, David C; Zinn, Jacqueline S; Mor, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether the rate of rehospitalization is lower among patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) with which a hospital has a strong linkage. Data Sources/Collection. We used national Medicare enrollment, claims, and the Minimum Data Set to examine 2.8 million newly discharged patients to 15,063 SNFs from 2,477 general hospitals between 2004 and 2006. Study Design. We examined the relationship between the proportion of discharges from a hospital and alternative SNFs on the rehospitalization of patients treated by that hospital–SNF pair using an instrumental variable approach. We used distances to alternative SNFs from residence of the patients of the originating hospital as the instrument. Principal Findings. Our estimates suggest that if the proportion of a hospital's discharges to an SNF was to increase by 10 percentage points, the likelihood of patients treated by that hospital–SNF pair to be rehospitalized within 30 days would decline by 1.2 percentage points, largely driven by fewer rehospitalizations within a week of hospital discharge. Conclusions. Stronger hospital–SNF linkages, independent of hospital ownership, were found to reduce rehospitalization rates. As hospitals are held accountable for patients' outcomes postdischarge under the Affordable Care Act, hospitals may steer their patients preferentially to fewer SNFs. PMID:24134773

  14. [City and County Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Judith O.; And Others

    Six papers presented at the Institute were concerned with city and county records. They are: "EWEB and Its Records," which discusses the history, laws and records of the Eugene Water and Electric Board (EWEB);""Police Records: Eugene, Oregon," classifies police records, other than administrative, into three general…

  15. Development of the Oxford Hills Healthy Moms Project using a social marketing process: a community-based physical activity and nutrition intervention for low-socioeconomic-status mothers in a rural area in Maine.

    PubMed

    Dharod, Jigna M; Drewette-Card, Rebecca; Crawford, David

    2011-03-01

    A physical activity and nutrition community intervention called the Oxford Hills Healthy Moms (OHHM) Project was developed using a multifaceted social marketing process, including review of state surveillance results, key informant interviews, and a survey and focus group discussions with low-socioeconomic-status (low-SES) mothers. This formative work was used to make key decisions on the selection of the intervention region, segmentation of the audience, and design of intervention strategies addressing multiple levels of the socioecological model. The OHHM Project aims to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity levels among low-SES mothers in the Oxford Hills region of Maine. The OHHM Project includes five components: (a) physical activity buddy program, (b) cooking club with education, (c) fruit and vegetable discount buying club with education, (d) increased access to produce vendors, and (e) increased access to places for physical activity.

  16. McCrillisite, NaCs(Be,Li)Zr2(PO4)4.1-2H2O, a new mineral species from Mount Mica, Oxford County, Maine, and new data for gainesite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foord, E.E.; Brownfield, M.E.; Lichte, F.E.; Davis, A.M.; Sutley, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    McCrillisite, a member of the gainesite group, occurs in the Mount Mica granitic pegmatite, South Paris, Oxford County, Maine. The mineral is a product of late-stage hydrothermal alteration and is associated with approximately 20 other silicate, oxide, carbonate, arsenite and phosphate minerals. Crystals occur in mm- to cm-sized cavities, and individuals are up to 1.2 mm in maximum dimension. The crystallography and mineral chemistry of McCrillisite are described. -from Authors

  17. Failure to find a chromosome 18 pericentric linkage in families with schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    De Lisi, L.E.; Shields, G.; Lehner, T.

    1995-12-18

    A recent report of a possible linkage of bipolar affective disorder to a pericentric region of chromosome 18 initiated the present investigation to search for a similar linkage in 32 families with schizophrenia. The results of a study using 5 markers mapped to this region show negative lod scores and only weak evidence for any linkage by nonparametric analyses. If the previously reported finding is a true positive linkage for bipolar disorder, then either it is unlikely to be related to the genetics of schizophrenia, or the proportion of families linked to this region is small. 12 refs., 4 tabs.

  18. Genetic Linkage Map of Fishes of the Genus Xiphophorus (Teleostei: Poeciliidae)

    PubMed Central

    Morizot, D. C.; Slaugenhaupt, S. A.; Kallman, K. D.; Chakravarti, A.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of genotypes of 76 polymorphic loci in more than 2600 backcross hybrid individuals derived from intra- and interspecific genetic crosses of fishes of the genus Xiphophorus (Poeciliidae) resulted in the identification of 17 multipoint linkage groups containing 55 protein-coding loci and one sex chromosome-linked pigment pattern gene. Multipoint linkage analyses identified highly probable gene orders for 10 linkage groups. The total genome length was estimated to be ~18 Morgans. Comparisons of the Xiphophorus linkage map with those of other fishes, amphibians and mammals suggested that fish gene maps are remarkably similar and probably retain many syntenic groups present in the ancestor of all vertebrates. PMID:2004711

  19. INDICATING, RECORDING, AND CONTROLLING APPARATUS

    DOEpatents

    Gregory, C.H.; Hall, J.

    1950-12-26

    An accurate and sensitive apparatus for indicating the difference between two fluid pressures is described. The specific device suspended from flexible strip type springs to control the fluid pressure in a main line. The mechanical linkage is biased in a position by the pressure from the two sources under measurement, the pressures acting in opposite directions on the linkage. A second pressure acts on the linkage derived from the main line, such that a change in the pressure differential between the two measured lines will move the linkage to change the valve flow, altering the main line pressure which in turn repositions the linkage. By metering the main line pressure, the pressure differential between the two lines is continuously monitored and measured.

  20. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... sometimes, but many health care providers now keep electronic records. You might hear medical people call these EHRs — short for electronic health records . Electronic records make it easier for ...

  1. How home HIV testing and counselling with follow-up support achieves high testing coverage and linkage to treatment and prevention: a qualitative analysis from Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Norma C; Wyatt, Monique A; Asiimwe, Stephen; Turyamureeba, Bosco; Tumwesigye, Elioda; van Rooyen, Heidi; Barnabas, Ruanne V; Celum, Connie L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The successes of HIV treatment scale-up and the availability of new prevention tools have raised hopes that the epidemic can finally be controlled and ended. Reduction in HIV incidence and control of the epidemic requires high testing rates at population levels, followed by linkage to treatment or prevention. As effective linkage strategies are identified, it becomes important to understand how these strategies work. We use qualitative data from The Linkages Study, a recent community intervention trial of community-based testing with linkage interventions in sub-Saharan Africa, to show how lay counsellor home HIV testing and counselling (home HTC) with follow-up support leads to linkage to clinic-based HIV treatment and medical male circumcision services. Methods We conducted 99 semi-structured individual interviews with study participants and three focus groups with 16 lay counsellors in Kabwohe, Sheema District, Uganda. The participant sample included both HIV+ men and women (N=47) and HIV-uncircumcised men (N=52). Interview and focus group audio-recordings were translated and transcribed. Each transcript was summarized. The summaries were analyzed inductively to identify emergent themes. Thematic concepts were grouped to develop general constructs and framing propositional statements. Results Trial participants expressed interest in linking to clinic-based services at testing, but faced obstacles that eroded their initial enthusiasm. Follow-up support by lay counsellors intervened to restore interest and inspire action. Together, home HTC and follow-up support improved morale, created a desire to reciprocate, and provided reassurance that services were trustworthy. In different ways, these functions built links to the health service system. They worked to strengthen individuals’ general sense of capability, while making the idea of accessing services more manageable and familiar, thus reducing linkage barriers. Conclusions Home HTC with follow

  2. Keeping the Records Straight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clift, Phil; Keynes, Milton

    1982-01-01

    Guidelines are given regarding keeping and using educational records for exceptional children in Great Britain. Procedures related to anecdotal records, observation inventories, and rating scales are delineated. (CL)

  3. Robustness of linkage strategy that leads to large-scale cooperation.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Misato; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Ohtsuki, Hisashi

    2016-11-21

    One of the most well-known models to characterize cooperation among unrelated individuals is Social dilemma (SD). However there is no consensus about how to solve the SD by itself. Since SDs are often embedded in other social interactions, including indirect reciprocity games (IR), human can coordinate their behaviors across multiple games. Such coordination is called 'linkage'. Recently linkage has been considered as a promising solution to resolve SDs, since excluding SD defectors (i.e. those who defected in SD) from indirectly reciprocal relationships functions as a costless sanction. A previous study performed mathematical modeling and revealed that a linkage strategy, which cooperates in SD and engages in the Standing strategy in IR based on the recipients' behaviors in both SD and IR, was an ESS against a non-linkage strategy which defects in SD and engages in the Standing strategy in IR based on recipients' behaviors only in IR (Panchanathan and Boyd, 2004). In order to investigate the robustness of the linkage strategy, we devised a non-linkage strategy, which cooperates in SD but does not link two games. First, we conducted a mathematical analysis and demonstrated that the linkage strategy was not an ESS against cooperating non-linkage strategy. Second, we conducted a series of agent-based computer simulations to examine how the strategies perform in situations in which various types of errors can occur. Our results showed that the linkage strategy was an ESS only when there are implementation errors in SD. However, the equilibrium of the linkage strategy was unstable when there are perception errors. Since we know that humans are not free from perception errors in their social life, future studies will need to show how perception errors can be overcome in order to provide support for the conclusion that linkage is a plausible solution to SDs.

  4. The linkage of Baltimore's mental health and public health systems.

    PubMed

    Collier, M T; Lambropoulos, A S; Williams-Glasser, G; Baron, S T; Birkmeyer, J

    1991-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's The Future of Public Health calls for a strengthening of linkages between public health and mental health, with a view to integrating the functions at the service delivery level. This paper details the history of the mental health/public health interface in Baltimore, Maryland. In 1977, mental health and addiction services were merged into the Department of Health. More recently, in 1988 adult mental health services were split off into a quasi-public corporation. Children's mental health, however, was retained as a distinct service within the Department of Health in order to enhance coordination with other health services for children. Replication of such coordinated-care models is certainly feasible.

  5. Modeling Continuous Admixture Using Admixture-Induced Linkage Disequilibrium.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Qiu, Hongxiang; Xu, Shuhua

    2017-02-23

    Recent migrations and inter-ethnic mating of long isolated populations have resulted in genetically admixed populations. To understand the complex population admixture process, which is critical to both evolutionary and medical studies, here we used admixture induced linkage disequilibrium (LD) to infer continuous admixture events, which is common for most existing admixed populations. Unlike previous studies, we expanded the typical continuous admixture model to a more general scenario with isolation after a certain duration of continuous gene flow. Based on the new models, we developed a method, CAMer, to infer the admixture history considering continuous and complex demographic process of gene flow between populations. We evaluated the performance of CAMer by computer simulation and further applied our method to real data analysis of a few well-known admixed populations.

  6. Structure of linkage region between chondroitin polysulfates and peptides.

    PubMed

    Seno, N; Sekizuka, E

    1978-04-01

    Three different types of chondroitin polysulfate-peptide, chondroitin sulfate D-peptide, chondroitin sulfate E-peptide, and chondroitin sulfate K-peptide, all contained xylose, galactose, and serine in a molar ratio of about 1 : 2 : 1. After treatment with alkali in the presence of NaBH4 and PdCl2, they produced alanine and xylitol in amounts equivalent to the decrease in the amount of serine. Consequently, it was proved that these chondroitin polysulfates are all linked to peptides by O-glycosidic bonds between xylose and serine, as in chondroitin sulfates A and C. It is suggested that the carbohydrate-peptide linkage regions have the same structure in all the chondroitin sulfates, regardless of differences in the structure of the polysaccharide chains, such as the position of sulfate groups and the degree of sulfation.

  7. Modeling Continuous Admixture Using Admixture-Induced Linkage Disequilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Qiu, Hongxiang; Xu, Shuhua

    2017-01-01

    Recent migrations and inter-ethnic mating of long isolated populations have resulted in genetically admixed populations. To understand the complex population admixture process, which is critical to both evolutionary and medical studies, here we used admixture induced linkage disequilibrium (LD) to infer continuous admixture events, which is common for most existing admixed populations. Unlike previous studies, we expanded the typical continuous admixture model to a more general scenario with isolation after a certain duration of continuous gene flow. Based on the new models, we developed a method, CAMer, to infer the admixture history considering continuous and complex demographic process of gene flow between populations. We evaluated the performance of CAMer by computer simulation and further applied our method to real data analysis of a few well-known admixed populations. PMID:28230170

  8. Spin Transfer in Polymer Degradation of Abnormal Linkage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tianrong; Tian, Chuanjin; Liu, Xizhe; Wang, Jia; Gao, Yang; Wang, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    The degradation of polymer materials plays an important role in production and life. In this work, the degradation mechanism of poly-α-methylstyrene (PAMS) tetramers with abnormal linkage was investigated by using density functional theory (DFT). Calculated results indicate that the head-to-head and the tail-to-tail reactions needed to overcome the energy barriers are about 0.15 eV and about 1.26 eV, respectively. The broken C-C bond at the unsaturated end of the chain leads to the dissociation of alpha-methylstyrene (AMS) monomers one by one. Furthermore, the analyses of bond characteristics are in good agreement with the results of energy barriers. In addition, the spin population analysis presents an interesting net spin transfer process in depolymerization reactions. We hope that the current theoretical results provide useful help to understand the degradation mechanism of polymers.

  9. Re-identification of DNA through an automated linkage process.

    PubMed Central

    Malin, B.; Sweeney, L.

    2001-01-01

    This work demonstrates how seemingly anonymous DNA database entries can be related to publicly available health information to uniquely and specifically identify the persons who are the subjects of the information even though the DNA information contains no accompanying explicit identifiers such as name, address, or Social Security number and contains no additional fields of personal information. The software program, REID (Re-Identification of DNA), iteratively uncovers unique occurrences in visit-disease patterns across data collections that reveal inferences about the identities of the patients who are the subject of the DNA. Using real-world data, REID established identifiable linkages in 33-100% of the 10,886 cases explicitly surveyed over 8 gene-based diseases. PMID:11825223

  10. Flow and Noise Control: Toward a Closer Linkage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Russell H.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Joslin, Ronald D.

    2002-01-01

    Motivated by growing demands for aircraft noise reduction and for revolutionary new aerovehicle concepts, the late twentieth century witnessed the beginning of a shift from single-discipline research, toward an increased emphasis on harnessing the potential of flow and noise control as implemented in a more fully integrated, multidisciplinary framework. At the same time, technologies for developing radically new aerovehicles, which promise quantum leap benefits in cost, safety and performance benefits with environmental friendliness, have appeared on the horizon. Transitioning new technologies to commercial applications will also require coupling further advances in traditional areas of aeronautics with intelligent exploitation of nontraditional and interdisciplinary technologies. Physics-based modeling and simulation are crucial enabling capabilities for synergistic linkage of flow and noise control. In these very fundamental ways, flow and noise control are being driven to be more closely linked during the early design phases of a vehicle concept for optimal and mutual noise and performance benefits.

  11. HIV-1 quasispecies delineation by tag linkage deep sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Nicholas C; De La Cruz, Justin; Al-Mawsawi, Laith Q; Olson, C Anders; Qi, Hangfei; Luan, Harding H; Nguyen, Nguyen; Du, Yushen; Le, Shuai; Wu, Ting-Ting; Li, Xinmin; Lewis, Martha J; Yang, Otto O; Sun, Ren

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between throughput, read length, and error rates in high-throughput sequencing limit certain applications such as monitoring viral quasispecies. Here, we describe a molecular-based tag linkage method that allows assemblage of short sequence reads into long DNA fragments. It enables haplotype phasing with high accuracy and sensitivity to interrogate individual viral sequences in a quasispecies. This approach is demonstrated to deduce ∼ 2000 unique 1.3 kb viral sequences from HIV-1 quasispecies in vivo and after passaging ex vivo with a detection limit of ∼ 0.005% to ∼ 0.001%. Reproducibility of the method is validated quantitatively and qualitatively by a technical replicate. This approach can improve monitoring of the genetic architecture and evolution dynamics in any quasispecies population.

  12. Genetic variation and linkage disequilibrium in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Zwick, Michael E; Thomason, Maureen Kiley; Chen, Peter E; Johnson, Henry R; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga; Mateczun, Alfred; Read, Timothy D

    2011-01-01

    We performed whole-genome amplification followed by hybridization of custom-designed resequencing arrays to resequence 303 kb of genomic sequence from a worldwide panel of 39 Bacillus anthracis strains. We used an efficient algorithm contained within a custom software program, UniqueMER, to identify and mask repetitive sequences on the resequencing array to reduce false-positive identification of genetic variation, which can arise from cross-hybridization. We discovered a total of 240 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and showed that B. anthracis strains have an average of 2.25 differences per 10,000 bases in the region we resequenced. Common SNVs in this region are found to be in complete linkage disequilibrium. These patterns of variation suggest there has been little if any historical recombination among B. anthracis strains since the origin of the pathogen. This pattern of common genetic variation suggests a framework for recognizing new or genetically engineered strains.

  13. Genetic linkage analysis of manic depression in Iceland.

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, D; Sherrington, R; Brett, P; Holmes, D S; Kalsi, G; Brynjolfsson, J; Petursson, H; Rifkin, L; Murphy, P; Moloney, E

    1993-01-01

    Genetic linkage analysis has been used to study five Icelandic pedigrees multiply affected with manic depression. Genetic markers were chosen from regions which had been implicated by other studies or to which candidate genes had been localized. The transmission model used was of a dominant gene with incomplete penetrance and allowing for a large number of phenocopies, especially for unipolar rather than bipolar cases. Multipoint analysis with linked markers enabled information to be gained from regions spanning large distances. Using this approach we have excluded regions of chromosome 11p, 11q, 8q, 5q, 9q and Xq. Candidate genes excluded include those for tyrosine hydroxylase, the dopamine type 2 receptor, proenkephalin, the 5HT1A receptor and dopamine beta hydroxylase. Nevertheless, we remain optimistic that this approach will eventually identify at least some of the genes predisposing to manic depression. PMID:8105081

  14. Toward a framework linkage map of the canine genome.

    PubMed

    Langston, A A; Mellersh, C S; Wiegand, N A; Acland, G M; Ray, K; Aguirre, G D; Ostrander, E A

    1999-01-01

    Selective breeding to maintain specific physical and behavioral traits has made the modern dog one of the most physically diverse species on earth. One unfortunate consequence of the common breeding practices used to develop lines of dogs with the desired traits is amplification and propagation of genetic diseases within distinct breeds. To map disease loci we have constructed a first-generation framework map of the canine genome. We developed large numbers of highly polymorphic markers, constructed a panel of canine-rodent hybrid cell lines, and assigned those markers to chromosome groups using the hybrid cell lines. Finally, we determined the order and spacing of markers on individual canine chromosomes by linkage analysis using a reference panel of 17 outbred pedigrees. This article describes approaches and strategies to accomplish these goals.

  15. Serum Uric Acid Concentrations in Meat Eaters, Fish Eaters, Vegetarians and Vegans: A Cross-Sectional Analysis in the EPIC-Oxford Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julie A.; Crowe, Francesca L.; Appleby, Paul N.; Key, Timothy J.; Travis, Ruth C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Circulating concentrations of uric acid may be affected by dietary components such as meat, fish and dairy products, but only a few studies have compared uric acid concentrations among individuals who exclude some or all of these foods from their diet. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in serum uric acid concentrations between meat eaters, fish eaters, vegetarians and vegans. Subjects and Methods A sample of 670 men and 1,023 women (424 meat eaters, 425 fish eaters, 422 vegetarians and 422 vegans, matched on age and sex) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Oxford cohort were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Diet was assessed using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and serum concentrations of uric acid were measured. Mean concentrations of uric acid by diet group were calculated after adjusting for age, body mass index, calcium and alcohol intake. Results In both men and women, serum uric acid concentrations differed significantly by diet group (p<0.0001 and p = 0.01, respectively). The differences between diet groups were most pronounced in men; vegans had the highest concentration (340, 95% confidence interval 329–351 µmol/l), followed by meat eaters (315, 306–324 µmol/l), fish eaters (309, 300–318 µmol/l) and vegetarians (303, 294–312 µmol/l). In women, serum uric acid concentrations were slightly higher in vegans (241, 234–247 µmol/l) than in meat eaters (237, 231–242 µmol/l) and lower in vegetarians (230, 224–236 µmol/l) and fish eaters (227, 221–233 µmol/l). Conclusion Individuals consuming a vegan diet had the highest serum concentrations of uric acid compared to meat eaters, fish eaters and vegetarians, especially in men. Vegetarians and individuals who eat fish but not meat had the lowest concentrations of serum uric acid. PMID:23418557

  16. A comparison of the Oxford shoulder score and shoulder pain and disability index: factor structure in the context of a large randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Jill; Harris, Kristina K; Doll, Helen; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Carr, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background To explore and compare the factor structure of the 12-item Oxford shoulder score (OSS) and 13-item shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI). Methods Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of data from 660 patients attending 46 hospitals in the UK. Complete OSS and SPADI data were available for 648 (98.2%) and 628 (95.2%) participants, respectively. Results For both instruments, either one or two factors were indicated, depending on the extraction method. On EFA, most OSS items loaded saliently on either of two “Pain” (4 items) and “Function” (8 items) factors, although some items cross-loaded. Cronbach’s alphas were 0.75, 0.90, and 0.91 for “Pain” and “Function” subscales, and all 12 OSS items, respectively. CFA suggested marginally better fit for two factors, with neither one- nor two-factor models rejected. EFA indicated two factors for the SPADI, with three of the eight “Disability” items contributing to an 8-item “Pain factor”, with 2 items within the 5-item “Disability factor” cross-loading. Cronbach’s alpha was 0.87 and 0.93 for the original 5- and 8-item pain and disability scales; 0.94 for all 13 SPADI items, respectively. CFA suggested marginally better fit for the two-factor (original conceptualization) model of the SPADI, with neither one- nor two-factor models rejected. Conclusion EFA and CFA demonstrated that, in addition to single summary scales usage, separate information on pain and self-reported disability/function can be extracted in a meaningful way, as subscales, from both the OSS and the SPADI. This information can help researchers in choosing primary study endpoints appropriately. PMID:27920590

  17. Linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12, edition 8.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, B J

    1990-01-01

    The linkage map of Escherichia coli K-12 depicts the arrangement of genes on the circular chromosome of this organism. The basic units of the map are minutes, determined by the time-of-entry of markers from Hfr into F- strains in interrupted-conjugation experiments. The time-of-entry distances have been refined over the years by determination of the frequency of cotransduction of loci in transduction experiments utilizing bacteriophage P1, which transduces segments of DNA approximately 2 min in length. In recent years, the relative positions of many genes have been determined even more precisely by physical techniques, including the mapping of restriction fragments and the sequencing of many small regions of the chromosome. On the whole, the agreement between results obtained by genetic and physical methods has been remarkably good considering the different levels of accuracy to be expected of the methods used. There are now few regions of the map whose length is still in some doubt. In some regions, genetic experiments utilizing different mutant strains give different map distances. In other regions, the genetic markers available have not been close enough to give accurate cotransduction data. The chromosome is now known to contain several inserted elements apparently derived from lambdoid phages and other sources. The nature of the region in which the termination of replication of the chromosome occurs is now known to be much more complex than the picture given in the previous map. The present map is based upon the published literature through June of 1988. There are now 1,403 loci placed on the linkage group, which may represent between one-third and one-half of the genes in this organism. PMID:2194094

  18. Exploiting semantic linkages among multiple sources for semantic information retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, JianQiang; Yang, Ji-Jiang; Liu, Chunchen; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Bo; Shi, Yuliang

    2014-07-01

    The vision of the Semantic Web is to build a global Web of machine-readable data to be consumed by intelligent applications. As the first step to make this vision come true, the initiative of linked open data has fostered many novel applications aimed at improving data accessibility in the public Web. Comparably, the enterprise environment is so different from the public Web that most potentially usable business information originates in an unstructured form (typically in free text), which poses a challenge for the adoption of semantic technologies in the enterprise environment. Considering that the business information in a company is highly specific and centred around a set of commonly used concepts, this paper describes a pilot study to migrate the concept of linked data into the development of a domain-specific application, i.e. the vehicle repair support system. The set of commonly used concepts, including the part name of a car and the phenomenon term on the car repairing, are employed to build the linkage between data and documents distributed among different sources, leading to the fusion of documents and data across source boundaries. Then, we describe the approaches of semantic information retrieval to consume these linkages for value creation for companies. The experiments on two real-world data sets show that the proposed approaches outperform the best baseline 6.3-10.8% and 6.4-11.1% in terms of top five and top 10 precisions, respectively. We believe that our pilot study can serve as an important reference for the development of similar semantic applications in an enterprise environment.

  19. A metric linkage disequilibrium map of a human chromosome.

    PubMed

    Tapper, W J; Maniatis, N; Morton, N E; Collins, A

    2003-11-01

    We used LDMAP (Maniatis et al. 2002) to analyse SNP data spanning chromosome 22 (Dawson et al. 2002), to obtain a whole-chromosome metric LD map. The LD map, with map distances analogous to the centiMorgan scale of linkage maps, identifies regions of high LD as plateaus ('blocks') and characterises steps which define the relationship between these regions. From this map we estimate that block regions comprise between 32% and 55% of the euchromatic portion of chromosome 22 and that increasing marker density within steps may increase block coverage. Steps are regions of low LD which correspond to areas of variable recombination intensity. The intensity of recombination is related to the height of the step and thus intense recombination hot-spots can be distinguished from more randomly distributed historical events. The LD maps are more closely related to the high-resolution linkage map (Kong et al. 2002) than average measures of rho with recombination accounting for between 34% and 52% of the variance in patterns of LD (r=0.58 - 0.71, p=0.0001). Step regions are closely correlated with a range of sequence motifs including GT/CA repeats. The LD map identifies holes in which greater marker density is required and defines the optimal SNP spacing for positional cloning, which suggests that some multiple of around 50,000 SNPs will be required to efficiently screen Caucasian genomes. Further analyses which investigate selection of informative SNPs and the effect of SNP allele frequency and marker density will refine this estimate.

  20. Association and Linkage Analysis of Aluminum Tolerance Genes in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Krill, Allison M.; Kirst, Matias; Kochian, Leon V.; Buckler, Edward S.; Hoekenga, Owen A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major worldwide constraint to crop productivity on acidic soils. Al becomes soluble at low pH, inhibiting root growth and severely reducing yields. Maize is an important staple food and commodity crop in acidic soil regions, especially in South America and Africa where these soils are very common. Al exclusion and intracellular tolerance have been suggested as two important mechanisms for Al tolerance in maize, but little is known about the underlying genetics. Methodology An association panel of 282 diverse maize inbred lines and three F2 linkage populations with approximately 200 individuals each were used to study genetic variation in this complex trait. Al tolerance was measured as net root growth in nutrient solution under Al stress, which exhibited a wide range of variation between lines. Comparative and physiological genomics-based approaches were used to select 21 candidate genes for evaluation by association analysis. Conclusions Six candidate genes had significant results from association analysis, but only four were confirmed by linkage analysis as putatively contributing to Al tolerance: Zea mays AltSB like (ZmASL), Zea mays aluminum-activated malate transporter2 (ALMT2), S-adenosyl-L-homocysteinase (SAHH), and Malic Enzyme (ME). These four candidate genes are high priority subjects for follow-up biochemical and physiological studies on the mechanisms of Al tolerance in maize. Immediately, elite haplotype-specific molecular markers can be developed for these four genes and used for efficient marker-assisted selection of superior alleles in Al tolerance maize breeding programs. PMID:20376361

  1. Enriching rare variants using family-specific linkage information.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gang; Simino, Jeannette; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2011-11-29

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants for common complex traits in recent years. However, common variants have generally failed to explain substantial proportions of the trait heritabilities. Rare variants, structural variations, and gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, among others, have been suggested as potential sources of the so-called missing heritability. With the advent of exome-wide and whole-genome next-generation sequencing technologies, finding rare variants in functionally important sites (e.g., protein-coding regions) becomes feasible. We investigate the role of linkage information to select families enriched for rare variants using the simulated Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data. In each replicate of simulated phenotypes Q1 and Q2 on 697 subjects in 8 extended pedigrees, we select one pedigree with the largest family-specific LOD score. Across all 200 replications, we compare the probability that rare causal alleles will be carried in the selected pedigree versus a randomly chosen pedigree. One example of successful enrichment was exhibited for gene VEGFC. The causal variant had minor allele frequency of 0.0717% in the simulated unrelated individuals and explained about 0.1% of the phenotypic variance. However, it explained 7.9% of the phenotypic variance in the eight simulated pedigrees and 23.8% in the family that carried the minor allele. The carrier's family was selected in all 200 replications. Thus our results show that family-specific linkage information is useful for selecting families for sequencing, thus ensuring that rare functional variants are segregating in the sequencing samples.

  2. Stability of the guinea pigs personality - cognition - linkage over time.

    PubMed

    Brust, Vera; Guenther, Anja

    2017-01-01

    In human psychological research, personality traits as well as cognitive traits are usually validated for both, their stability over time and contexts. While stability over time gives an estimate on how genetically fixated a trait can be, correlations across traits have the power to reveal linkages or trade - offs. In animals, these validations have widely been done for personality but not for cognitive traits. We tested guinea pigs in four consecutive discrimination tasks using four unique pairs of objects with two objects of the same form but different size in each pair. The same animals were tested twice each for three personality traits, i.e. boldness, aggression and sociopositive behaviour. The animals did not learn to "always choose the larger item" in the cognitive task but learned to discriminate the two objects of each stimulus pair anew, so that we did test for learning speed in four slightly different task setups. Performance over the four tasks was significantly repeatable as well as all tested personality traits. A stable linkage over time was found between sociopositive behaviour and learning performance, probably indicating an ecological relevance for a correlation between these two traits. Still, not all traits seem to be connected amongst each other, as in our case boldness and aggression are both not linked to individual learning performance. Future studies will hopefully further investigate the repeatability of various cognitive traits in several species and thus lead to a better understanding of the interdependence of personality and cognition. This will help to unravel which suites of traits facilitate individual life histories and hence improve our understanding of the emergence and maintenance of individual differences.

  3. Urban road traffic deaths: data linkage and identification of high-risk population sub-groups.

    PubMed

    Paixão, Lúcia Maria Miana Mattos; Gontijo, Eliana Dias; Mingoti, Sueli Aparecida; Costa, Dário Alves da Silva; Friche, Amélia Augusta de Lima; Caiaffa, Waleska Teixeira

    2015-11-01

    This study analyzes the profile of deaths from road traffic accidents in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, by linking two public databases, the Information System of the Urban Transportation and Transit Company (BH10) and the Mortality Information System (SIM). The linked database (n = 306) identified a 24% under-recording rate for deaths and differed in the age distribution from the BH10 database and in roadway user category when compared to the mortality database. The mortality rate for road traffic accidents within the city limits was 10.2 per 100,000 thousand, and was higher among men, young adults, and the elderly. Poisson multivariate regression showed a higher mean death rate for motorcycle occupants (rate ratio - RR: 1.81); pedestrians (RR: 1.32); males (RR: 1.24); single/divorced (RR: 1.27); young adults 18-29 years of age (RR: 1.75); elderly (RR: 1.59); and deaths at the crash site (RR: 1.39) when compared to the reference categories. The study unveils the city's traffic violence, expressed by the large proportion of deaths at the crash site and within the first 24 hours, and confirms the relevance of database linkage for characterizing vulnerable groups and traffic accident mortality in the urban setting.

  4. Exploring Linkages Between Gulf of Mexico Sea Surface Conditions and North American Hydroclimate during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. N.; Thirumalai, K.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is part of the Atlantic Warm Pool, a feature that drives oceanic moisture flux to the surrounding continent. It is connected to the North Atlantic Ocean via the loop current, which transports salt and heat from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico poleward via the Gulf Stream. As such, variations in Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) are linked to changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation and North American hydroclimate. Although SST and SSS variability in the Gulf of Mexico are well understood on inter-annual and glacial-interglacial timescales, little is known about centennial scale variability in these sea surface parameters through the Holocene. We present here the first continuous multi-decadal resolution time series of SST and SSS spanning the entire Holocene from the Gulf of Mexico. This proxy reconstruction is based on paired measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O in the planktic foraminifer, Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) in the Garrison Basin. Using these data, in combination with additional Gulf of Mexico SST and SSS records from the late Holocene, we explore linkages between North American precipitation patterns and ocean circulation on centennial timescales.

  5. Your Medical Records

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Your Medical Records KidsHealth > For Teens > Your Medical Records A ... Records? en español Tus historias clínicas What Are Medical Records? Each time you climb up on a ...

  6. Spoken Records. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Helen

    Surveying 75 years of accomplishment in the field of spoken recording, this reference work critically evaluates commercially available recordings selected for excellence of execution, literary or historical merit, interest, and entertainment value. Some types of spoken records included are early recording, documentaries, lectures, interviews,…

  7. Nickel-catalyzed proton-deuterium exchange (HDX) for linkage analysis of complex carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The structural assignment of complex carbohydrates typically requires the analysis of at least three parameters: 1. composition; 2. linkage; and 3. substituents. These are often assigned on a small scale by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Linkage positions are determined by permethylat...

  8. For the Common Good. A Guide for Developing Local Interagency Linkage Teams. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    This guide provides a framework for individuals and organizations to develop or strengthen local interagency linkage teams. The guide is revised from an earlier publication stemming from a project that facilitated the formation of local interagency linkage teams throughout Ohio. These teams focus on improving services to at-risk youth and adults…

  9. Genetic linkage map and comparative genome analysis for the estuarine Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Genetic linkage maps are valuable tools in evolutionary biology; however, their availability for wild populations is extremely limited. Fundulus heteroclitus (Atlantic killifish) is a non-migratory estuarine fish that exhibits high allelic and phenotypic diversity partitioned among subpopulations that reside in disparate environmental conditions. An ideal candidate model organism for studying gene-environment interactions, the molecular toolbox for F. heteroclitus is limited. We identified hundreds of novel microsatellites which, when combined with existing microsatellites and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), were used to construct the first genetic linkage map for this species. By integrating independent linkage maps from three genetic crosses, we developed a consensus map containing 24 linkage groups, consistent with the number of chromosomes reported for this species. These linkage groups span 2300 centimorgans (cM) of recombinant genomic space, intermediate in size relative to the current linkage maps for the teleosts, medaka and zebrafish. Comparisons between fish genomes support a high degree of synteny between the consensus F. heteroclitus linkage map and the medaka and (to a lesser extent) zebrafish physical genome assemblies.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Waits , E., J. Martinson , B. Rinner, S. Morris, D. Proestou, D. Champlin , and D. Nacci. Genetic linkage map and comparative genome analysis for the estuarine Atlanti

  10. Hereditary spastic paraplegia: LOD-score considerations for confirmation of linkage in a heterogeneous trait

    SciTech Connect

    Dube, M.P.; Kibar, Z.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is a degenerative disorder of the motor system, defined by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower limbs. HSP may be inherited as an autosomal dominant (AD), autosomal recessive, or an X-linked trait. AD HSP is genetically heterogeneous, and three loci have been identified so far: SPG3 maps to chromosome 14q, SPG4 to 2p, and SPG4a to 15q. We have undertaken linkage analysis with 21 uncomplicated AD families to the three AD HSP loci. We report significant linkage for three of our families to the SPG4 locus and exclude several families by multipoint linkage. We used linkage information from several different research teams to evaluate the statistical probability of linkage to the SPG4 locus for uncomplicated AD HSP families and established the critical LOD-score value necessary for confirmation of linkage to the SPG4 locus from Bayesian statistics. In addition, we calculated the empirical P-values for the LOD scores obtained with all families with computer simulation methods. Power to detect significant linkage, as well as type I error probabilities, were evaluated. This combined analytical approach permitted conclusive linkage analyses on small to medium-size families, under the restrictions of genetic heterogeneity. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Genome-wide linkage analysis in families with infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis indicates novel susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Svenningsson, Anna; Söderhäll, Cilla; Persson, Sofia; Lundberg, Fredrik; Luthman, Holger; Chung, Eddie; Gardiner, Mark; Kockum, Ingrid; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2012-02-01

    Infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS) is a common cause of upper gastrointestinal obstruction during infancy. A multifactorial background of the disease is well established. Multiple susceptibility loci including the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) gene have previously been linked to IHPS, but contradictory results of linkage studies in different materials indicate genetic heterogeneity. To identify IHPS susceptibility loci, we conducted a genome-wide linkage analysis in 37 Swedish families. In regions where the Swedish material showed most evidence in favor of linkage, 31 additional British IHPS families were analyzed. Evidence in favor of significant linkage was observed in the Swedish material to two loci on chromosome 2q24 (non-parametric linkage (NPL) =3.77) and 7p21 (NPL=4.55). In addition, evidence of suggestive linkage was found to two loci on chromosome 6p21 (NPL=2.97) and 12q24 (NPL=2.63). Extending the material with British samples did not enhance the level of significance. Regions with linkage harbor interesting candidate genes, such as glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2 encoded by the glucagon gene GCG), NOS1, motilin (MLN) and neuropeptide Y (NPY). The coding exons for GLP-2, and NPY were screened for mutations with negative results. In conclusion, we could confirm suggestive linkage to the region harboring the NOS1 gene and detected additional novel susceptibility loci for IHPS.

  12. POSITIONING THREE QUALITATIVE TRAIT LOCI ON SOYBEAN MOLECULAR LINKAGE GROUP E

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] three qualitative trait loci (Pb, Y9, and Y17) are located on classical linkage group 14, which corresponds to molecular linkage group E. The Pb locus conditions sharp/blunt pubescence tip; the y9 and y17 loci condition green/chlorotic foliage. The gene order is...

  13. 76 FR 4121 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: February 24, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.,...

  14. Academia-Industry-Government Linkages in Tanzania: Trends, Challenges and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mpehongwa, Gasper

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzed trends, challenges and prospects of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania. Using case study design, and documentary review to gather the required data, the study sought to answer three research questions: (1) what are the trends of academia-industry-government linkages in Tanzania?, (2) what are the challenges…

  15. 75 FR 81624 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: January 27, 2011, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.,...

  16. 75 FR 43993 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Dates and Times: August 19, 2010, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.,...

  17. 78 FR 32404 - Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-30

    ..., Community-Based Linkages; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory... Interdisciplinary, Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL). Date and Time: June 5, 2013 (10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.)....

  18. Developing Effective Linkages between Job Corps and One-Stop Systems: A Technical Assistance Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Katherine; Soukamneuth, Sengsouvanh

    This document is intended to help Job Corps centers and Office of Acquisition Policy contractors establish linkages with one-stop systems. Chapter 1 summarizes the requirements for linkages between Job Corps and one-stop systems that are specified in the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 and compares one-stop delivery systems before and under…

  19. Combined segregation and linkage analysis of Graves disease with a thyroid autoantibody diathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, D.C.; Ratanachaiyavong, S.; McGregor, A.M.; Collins, A.; Morton, N.E.

    1994-09-01

    Combined segregation and linkage analysis is a powerful technique for modeling linkage to diseases whose etiology is more complex than the effect of a well-described single genetic locus and for investigating the influence of single genes on various aspects of the disease phenotype. Graves disease is familial and is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele DR3. Probands with Graves disease, as well as close relatives, have raised levels of thyroid autoantibodies. This phenotypic information additional to affection status may be considered by the computer program COMDS for combined segregation and linkage analysis, when normals are classified into diathesis classes of increasing thyroid autoantibody titer. The ordinal model considers the cumulative odds of lying in successive classes, and a single additional parameter is introduced for each gene modeled. Distributional assumptions are avoided by providing estimates of the population frequencies of each class. Evidence for linkage was increased by considering the thyroid autoantibody diathesis and by testing two-locus models. The analysis revealed evidence for linkage to HLA-DR when the strong coupling of the linked locus to allele DR3 was considered (lod score of 6.6). Linkage analysis of the residual variation revealed no evidence of linkage to Gm, but a suggestion of linkage to Km. 32 refs., 10 tabs.

  20. Enzymatic Synthesis of Nucleic Acids with Defined Regioisomeric 2'-5' Linkages.

    PubMed

    Cozens, Christopher; Mutschler, Hannes; Nelson, Geoffrey M; Houlihan, Gillian; Taylor, Alexander I; Holliger, Philipp

    2015-12-14

    Information-bearing nucleic acids display universal 3'-5' linkages, but regioisomeric 2'-5' linkages occur sporadically in non-enzymatic RNA synthesis and may have aided prebiotic RNA replication. Herein we report on the enzymatic synthesis of both DNA and RNA with site-specific 2'-5' linkages by an engineered polymerase using 3'-deoxy- or 3'-O-methyl-NTPs as substrates. We also report the reverse transcription of the resulting modified nucleic acids back to 3'-5' linked DNA with good fidelity. This enables a fast and simple method for "structural mutagenesis" by the position-selective incorporation of 2'-5' linkages, whereby nucleic acid structure and function may be probed through local distortion by regioisomeric linkages while maintaining the wild-type base sequence as we demonstrate for the 10-23 RNA endonuclease DNAzyme.