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Sample records for oxidase-derived reactive oxygen

  1. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Alison; Grieve, David; Johar, Sofian; Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, secondary to left ventricular hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, is a condition with increasing morbidity and mortality. Although the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this condition remain a subject of intense interest, there is now growing evidence that redox-sensitive pathways play an important role. This article focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from a family of superoxide-generating enzymes, termed NADPH oxidases (NOXs), in the pathophysiology of ventricular hypertrophy, the accompanying interstitial fibrosis and subsequent heart failure. In particular, the apparent ability of the different NADPH oxidase isoforms to define the response of a cell to a range of physiological and pathophysiological stimuli is reviewed. If confirmed, these data would suggest that independently targeting different members of the NOX family may hold the potential for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of cardiac disease. PMID:16321803

  2. NADPH Oxidase-Derived Overproduction of Reactive Oxygen Species Impairs Postischemic Neovascularization in Mice with Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P.; Levy, Bernard I.; Shah, Ajay M.; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-01-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91phox-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 μg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91phox deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 μmol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 μmol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91phox-deficient diabetic mice increased neovascularization by ∼1.5-fold greater than untreated diabetic BM-MNCs (P < 0.05). Thus, inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction improves the angiogenic and vasculogenic processes and restores postischemic neovascularization in type 1 diabetic mice. PMID:16877369

  3. NADPH oxidase-derived overproduction of reactive oxygen species impairs postischemic neovascularization in mice with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimian, Téni G; Heymes, Christophe; You, Dong; Blanc-Brude, Olivier; Mees, Barend; Waeckel, Ludovic; Duriez, Micheline; Vilar, José; Brandes, Ralph P; Levy, Bernard I; Shah, Ajay M; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2006-08-01

    We hypothesized that diabetes-induced oxidative stress may affect postischemic neovascularization. The response to unilateral femoral artery ligation was studied in wild-type or gp91(phox)-deficient control or type 1 diabetic mice or in animals treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or with in vivo electrotransfer of a plasmid encoding dominant-negative Rac1 (50 microg) for 21 days. Postischemic neovascularization was reduced in diabetic mice in association with down-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor-A protein levels. In diabetic animals vascular endothelial growth factor levels and postischemic neovascularization were restored to nondiabetic levels by the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NAC administration or the inhibition of ROS generation by gp91(phox) deficiency or by administration of dominant-negative Rac1. Finally, diabetes reduced the ability of adherent bone marrow-derived mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to differentiate into endothelial progenitor cells. Treatment with NAC (3 mmol/L), apocynin (200 micromol/L), or the p38MAPK inhibitor LY333351 (10 micromol/L) up-regulated the number of endothelial progenitor cell colonies derived from diabetic BM-MNCs by 1.5-, 1.6-, and 1.5-fold, respectively (P < 0.05). In the ischemic hindlimb model, injection of diabetic BM-MNCs isolated from NAC-treated or gp91(phox)-deficient diabetic mice increased neovascularization by approximately 1.5-fold greater than untreated diabetic BM-MNCs (P < 0.05). Thus, inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction improves the angiogenic and vasculogenic processes and restores postischemic neovascularization in type 1 diabetic mice.

  4. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species contribute to impaired cutaneous microvascular function in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    DuPont, Jennifer J; Ramick, Meghan G; Farquhar, William B; Townsend, Raymond R; Edwards, David G

    2014-06-15

    Oxidative stress promotes vascular dysfunction in chronic kidney disease (CKD). We utilized the cutaneous circulation to test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species derived from NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase impair nitric oxide (NO)-dependent cutaneous vasodilation in CKD. Twenty subjects, 10 stage 3 and 4 patients with CKD (61 ± 4 yr; 5 men/5 women; eGFR: 39 ± 4 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) and 10 healthy controls (55 ± 2 yr; 4 men/6 women; eGFR: >60 ml·min(-1)·1.73 m(-2)) were instrumented with 4 intradermal microdialysis fibers for the delivery of 1) Ringer solution (Control), 2) 10 μM tempol (scavenge superoxide), 3) 100 μM apocynin (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibition), and 4) 10 μM allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibition). Skin blood flow was measured via laser-Doppler flowmetry during standardized local heating (42°C). N(g)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mM) was infused to quantify the NO-dependent portion of the response. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) was calculated as a percentage of the maximum CVC achieved during sodium nitroprusside infusion at 43°C. Cutaneous vasodilation was attenuated in patients with CKD (77 ± 3 vs. 88 ± 3%, P = 0.01), but augmented with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 88 ± 2 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 91 ± 2% (P = 0.001). The NO-dependent portion of the response was reduced in patients with CKD (41 ± 4 vs. 58 ± 2%, P = 0.04), but improved with tempol and apocynin (tempol: 58 ± 3 (P = 0.03), apocynin: 58 ± 4% (P = 0.03). Inhibition of xanthine oxidase did not alter cutaneous vasodilation in either group (P > 0.05). These data suggest that NAD(P)H oxidase is a source of reactive oxygen species and contributes to microvascular dysfunction in patients with CKD.

  5. NADPH oxidase derived reactive oxygen species are involved in human neutrophil IL-1β secretion but not in inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gabelloni, María Laura; Sabbione, Florencia; Jancic, Carolina; Fuxman Bass, Juan; Keitelman, Irene; Iula, Leonardo; Oleastro, Matías; Geffner, Jorge R; Trevani, Analía S

    2013-12-01

    Neutrophils are essential players in acute inflammatory responses. Upon stimulation, neutrophils activate NADPH oxidase, generating an array of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is a major proinflammatory cytokine synthesized as a precursor that has to be proteolytically processed to become biologically active. The role of ROS in IL-1β processing is still controversial and has not been previously studied in neutrophils. We report here that IL-1β processing in human neutrophils is dependent on caspase-1 and on the serine proteases elastase and/or proteinase 3. NADPH oxidase deficient neutrophils activated caspase-1 and did not exhibit differences in NALP3 expression, indicating that ROS are neither required for inflammasome activation nor for its priming, as has been reported for macrophages. Strikingly, ROS exerted opposite effects on the processing and secretion of IL-1β; whereas ROS negatively controlled caspase-1 activity, as reported in mononuclear phagocytes, ROS were found to be necessary for the exportation of mature IL-1β out of the cell, a role never previously described. The complex ROS-mediated regulation of neutrophil IL-1β secretion might constitute a physiological mechanism to control IL-1β-dependent inflammatory processes where neutrophils play a crucial role.

  6. Direct current electrical fields induce apoptosis in oral mucosa cancer cells by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wartenberg, Maria; Wirtz, Nina; Grob, Alexander; Niedermeier, Wilhelm; Hescheler, Jürgen; Peters, Saskia C; Sauer, Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    The presence of more than one dental alloy in the oral cavity often causes pathological galvanic currents and voltage resulting in superficial erosions of the oral mucosa and eventually in the emergence of oral cancer. In the present study the mechanisms of apoptosis of oral mucosa cancer cells in response to electromagnetic fields was investigated. Direct current (DC) electrical fields with field strengths between 2 and 16 V/m, applied for 24 h to UM-SCC-14-C oral mucosa cancer cells, dose-dependently resulted in decreased cell proliferation as evaluated by Ki-67 immunohistochemistry and upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21(cip1/waf1) and p27(kip1), which are associated with cell cycle arrest. Electrical field treatment (4 V/m, 24 h) increased apoptosis as evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of cleaved caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Furthermore, robust reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits as well as Hsp70 was observed. Electrical field treatment (4 V/m, 24 h) resulted in increased expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and decreased intracellular concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), whereas the expression of catalase remained unchanged. Pre-treatment with the free radical scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and the superoxide dismutase mimetic EUK-8 abolished caspase-3 and PARP-1 induction, suggesting that apoptosis in oral mucosa cancer cells is initated by ROS generation in response to DC electrical field treatment. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species, via endogenous carbon monoxide, promote survival of brain endothelial cells during TNF-α-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Basuroy, Shyamali; Tcheranova, Dilyara; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Leffler, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in promoting cell survival during oxidative stress induced by the inflammatory mediator tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (CMVEC) from newborn piglets. Nox4 is the major isoform of NADPH oxidase responsible for TNF-α-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in CMVEC. We present novel data that Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived ROS also initiate a cell survival mechanism by increasing production of a gaseous antioxidant mediator carbon monoxide (CO) by constitutive heme oxygenase-2 (HO-2). TNF-α rapidly enhanced endogenous CO production in a superoxide- and NADPH oxidase-dependent manner in CMVEC with innate, but not with small interfering RNA (siRNA)-downregulated Nox4 activity. CORM-A1, a CO-releasing compound, inhibited Nox4-mediated ROS production and enhanced cell survival in TNF-α-challenged CMVEC. The ROS-induced CO-mediated survival mechanism requires functional interactions between the protein kinase B/Akt and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)/p38 MAPK signaling pathways activated by TNF-α. In Akt siRNA-transfected CMVEC and in cells with pharmacologically inhibited Akt, Erk1/2, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activities, CORM-A1 was no longer capable of blocking Nox4 activation and apoptosis caused by TNF-α. Overall, Nox4 NADPH oxidase-derived ROS initiate both death and survival pathways in TNF-α-challenged CMVEC. The ROS-dependent cell survival pathway is mediated by an endogenous antioxidant CO, which inhibits Nox4 activation via a mechanism that includes Akt, ERK1/2, and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. The ability of CO to inhibit TNF-α-induced ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK activities in an Akt-dependent manner appears to be the key element in ROS-dependent survival of endothelial cells during TNF-α-mediated brain inflammatory disease. PMID:21123734

  8. Ethanol-induced erectile dysfunction and increased expression of pro-inflammatory proteins in the rat cavernosal smooth muscle are mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Leite, Letícia N; do Vale, Gabriel T; Simplicio, Janaina A; De Martinis, Bruno S; Carneiro, Fernando S; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-06-05

    Ethanol consumption is associated with an increased risk of erectile dysfunction (ED), but the molecular mechanisms through which ethanol causes ED remain elusive. Reactive oxygen species are described as mediators of ethanol-induced cell toxicity/damage in distinctive tissues. The enzyme NADPH oxidase is the main source of reactive oxygen species in the endothelium and vascular smooth muscle cells and ethanol is described to increase NADPH oxidase activation and reactive oxygen species generation. This study evaluated the contribution of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species to ethanol-induced ED, endothelial dysfunction and production of pro-inflammatory and redox-sensitive proteins in the rat cavernosal smooth muscle (CSM). Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol (20% v/v) or ethanol plus apocynin (30mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage) for six weeks. Apocynin prevented both the decreased in acetylcholine-induced relaxation and intracavernosal pressure induced by ethanol. Ethanol increased superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation and catalase activity in CSM, and treatment with apocynin prevented these responses. Similarly, apocynin prevented the ethanol-induced decreased of nitrate/nitrite (NOx), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and SOD activity. Treatment with ethanol increased p47phox translocation to the membrane as well as the expression of Nox2, COX-1, catalase, iNOS, ICAM-1 and p65. Apocynin prevented the effects of ethanol on protein expression and p47phox translocation. Finally, treatment with ethanol increased both TNF-α production and neutrophil migration in CSM. The major new finding of this study is that NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species play a role on chronic ethanol consumption-induced ED and endothelial dysfunction in the rat CSM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. TMEM16A Contributes to Endothelial Dysfunction by Facilitating Nox2 NADPH Oxidase-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ming-Ming; Gao, Min; Guo, Kai-Min; Wang, Mi; Li, Xiang-Yu; Zeng, Xue-Lin; Sun, Lu; Lv, Xiao-Fei; Du, Yan-Hua; Wang, Guan-Lei; Zhou, Jia-Guo; Guan, Yong-Yuan

    2017-05-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels play a crucial role in various physiological processes. However, the role of TMEM16A in vascular endothelial dysfunction during hypertension is unclear. In this study, we investigated the specific involvement of TMEM16A in regulating endothelial function and blood pressure and the underlying mechanism. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, coimmunoprecipitation, confocal imaging, patch-clamp recordings, and TMEM16A endothelial-specific transgenic and knockout mice were used. We found that TMEM16A was expressed abundantly and functioned as a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channel in endothelial cells. Angiotensin II induced endothelial dysfunction with an increase in TMEM16A expression. The knockout of endothelial-specific TMEM16A significantly lowered the blood pressure and ameliorated endothelial dysfunction in angiotensin II-induced hypertension, whereas the overexpression of endothelial-specific TMEM16A resulted in the opposite effects. These results were related to the increased reactive oxygen species production, Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase activation, and Nox2 and p22phox protein expression that were facilitated by TMEM16A on angiotensin II-induced hypertensive challenge. Moreover, TMEM16A directly bound with Nox2 and reduced the degradation of Nox2 through the proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Therefore, TMEM16A is a positive regulator of endothelial reactive oxygen species generation via Nox2-containing NADPH oxidase, which induces endothelial dysfunction and hypertension. Modification of TMEM16A may be a novel therapeutic strategy for endothelial dysfunction-associated diseases.

  10. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are essential for differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideyuki; Yamamoto, Hironori; Tominaga, Kumiko; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Tomoko; Teshima-Kondo, Shigetada; Rokutan, Kazuhito

    2009-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from NADPH oxidase (Nox) homologues have been suggested to regulate osteoclast differentiation. However, no bone abnormalities have been documented in Nox1 deficient, Nox2 deficient, or Nox3 mutant mice. During receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-stimulated differentiation of a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264.7) into osteoclasts, mRNA levels of Nox enzymes (Nox1-4) and their adaptor proteins were monitored by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. RAW264.7 cells constitutively expressed abundant Nox2 mRNA and small amounts of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. RANKL markedly attenuated Nox2 mRNA expression in association with reciprocal up-regulation of Nox1 and Nox3 transcripts. Introduction of small interference RNA targeting p67(phox) or p22(phox) into RAW264.7 cells effectively down-regulated ROS generation and significantly suppressed the RANKL-stimulated differentiation, which was assessed by appearance of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive, multinucleated cells having an ability to form resorption pits on calcium phosphate thin film-coated disks, and by expression of osteoclast marker genes (TRAP, cathepsin K, Atp6i, ClC-7, and NFATc1). Our results suggest that RANKL may stimulate switching between Nox homologues during osteoclast differentiation, and Nox-derived ROS may be crucial for RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation.

  11. Urotensin II-induced insulin resistance is mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigated the effects of urotensin II (UII) on hepatic insulin resistance in HepG2 cells and the potential mechanisms involved. METHODS: Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were cultured with or without exogenous UII for 24 h, in the presence or absence of 100 nmol/L insulin for the last 30 min. Glucose levels were detected by the glucose-oxidase method and glycogen synthesis was analyzed by glycogen colorimetric/fluorometric assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected with a multimode reader using a 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. The protein expression and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), insulin signal essential molecules such as insulin receptor substrate -1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and glucose transporter-2 (Glut 2), and NADPH oxidase subunits such as gp91phox, p67phox, p47phox, p40phox, and p22phox were evaluated by Western blot. RESULTS: Exposure to 100 nmol/L UII reduced the insulin-induced glucose consumption (P < 0.05) and glycogen content (P < 0.01) in HepG2 cells compared with cells without UII. UII also abolished insulin-stimulated protein expression (P < 0.01) and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.05), associated with down-regulation of Akt (P < 0.05) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05) phosphorylation levels, and the expression of Glut 2 (P < 0.001), indicating an insulin-resistance state in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, UII enhanced the phosphorylation of JNK (P < 0.05), while the activity of JNK, insulin signaling, such as total protein of IRS-1 (P < 0.001), phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.001) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05), and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.001) could be reversed by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Besides, UII markedly improved ROS generation (P < 0.05) and NADPH oxidase subunit expression (P < 0.05). However, the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could decrease UII-induced ROS production (P < 0.05), JNK phosphorylation (P < 0

  12. Urotensin II-induced insulin resistance is mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2016-07-07

    To investigated the effects of urotensin II (UII) on hepatic insulin resistance in HepG2 cells and the potential mechanisms involved. Human hepatoma HepG2 cells were cultured with or without exogenous UII for 24 h, in the presence or absence of 100 nmol/L insulin for the last 30 min. Glucose levels were detected by the glucose-oxidase method and glycogen synthesis was analyzed by glycogen colorimetric/fluorometric assay. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected with a multimode reader using a 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe. The protein expression and phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), insulin signal essential molecules such as insulin receptor substrate -1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B (Akt), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and glucose transporter-2 (Glut 2), and NADPH oxidase subunits such as gp91(phox), p67(phox), p47(phox), p40(phox), and p22(phox) were evaluated by Western blot. Exposure to 100 nmol/L UII reduced the insulin-induced glucose consumption (P < 0.05) and glycogen content (P < 0.01) in HepG2 cells compared with cells without UII. UII also abolished insulin-stimulated protein expression (P < 0.01) and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.05), associated with down-regulation of Akt (P < 0.05) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05) phosphorylation levels, and the expression of Glut 2 (P < 0.001), indicating an insulin-resistance state in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, UII enhanced the phosphorylation of JNK (P < 0.05), while the activity of JNK, insulin signaling, such as total protein of IRS-1 (P < 0.001), phosphorylation of IRS-1 (P < 0.001) and GSK-3β (P < 0.05), and glycogen synthesis (P < 0.001) could be reversed by pretreatment with the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Besides, UII markedly improved ROS generation (P < 0.05) and NADPH oxidase subunit expression (P < 0.05). However, the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin could decrease UII-induced ROS production (P < 0.05), JNK phosphorylation (P < 0.05), and insulin

  13. The effects of urotensin II on migration and invasion are mediated by NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species through the c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-Ying; Shi, Zheng-Ming; Yu, Xiao-Tong; Feng, Ping; Wang, Xue-Jiang

    2017-02-01

    Urotensin II (UII) is a vasoactive neuropeptide involved in migration and invasion in various cell types. However, the effects of UII on human hepatoma cells still remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanism of UII on migration and invasion in human hepatoma cells. Migration was measured by wound healing assays and a Transwell(®) methodology, and invasion was analyzed using Matrigel(®) invasion chambers. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were detected using a 2', 7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate probe, and flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were evaluated by western blotting. Cell proliferation and actin polymerization were examined using cell proliferation reagent WST-1 and F-actin immunohistochemistry staining. Exposure to UII promoted migration and invasion in hepatoma cells compared with that in cells without UII. UII also increased matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) expression in a time-independent manner. Furthermore, UII markedly enhanced ROS generation and NADPH oxidase subunit expression, and consequently facilitated the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The UT antagonist urantide or the antioxidant/NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin decreased UII-induced ROS production. JNK phosphorylation, migration, invasion, and MMP9/2 expression were also reversed by pretreatment with apocynin. Urantide and JNK inhibitor SP600125 abrogated migration, invasion, or MMP9/2 expression in response to UII. UII induced actin polymerization and fascin protein expression, and could be reversed by apocynin and SP600125. Exogenous UII induced migration and invasion in hepatoma cells that mainly involved NADPH oxidase-derived ROS through JNK activation. UT played an additional role in regulating hepatoma cells migration and invasion. Thus, our data suggested an important effect of UII in hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  15. Reactive oxygen species in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Dahiya, Parveen; Kamal, Reet; Gupta, Rajan; Bhardwaj, Rohit; Chaudhary, Karun; Kaur, Simerpreet

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies reveal that more than two-third of the world's population suffers from one of the chronic forms of periodontal disease. The primary etiological agent of this inflammatory disease is a polymicrobial complex, predominantly Gram negative anaerobic or facultative bacteria within the sub-gingival biofilm. These bacterial species initiate the production of various cytokines such as interleukin-8 and TNF-α, further causing an increase in number and activity of polymorphonucleocytes (PMN) along with these cytokines, PMNs also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide via the respiratory burst mechanism as the part of the defence response to infection. ROS just like the interleukins have deleterious effects on tissue cells when produced in excess. To counter the harmful effects of ROS, human body has its own defence mechanisms to eliminate them as soon as they are formed. The aim of this review is to focus on the role of different free radicals, ROS, and antioxidants in the pathophysiology of periodontal tissue destruction. PMID:24174716

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugamura, Koichi; Keaney, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ‘free-radical theory’ of disease, researchers have been trying to elucidate the role of oxidative stress from free radicals in cardiovascular disease. Considerable data indicate that ROS and oxidative stress are important features of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. However, blanket strategies with antioxidants to ameliorate cardiovascular disease have not generally yielded favorable results. However, our understanding or reactive oxygen species has evolved to the point that we now realize these species have important roles in physiology as well as pathophysiology. Thus, it is overly simplistic to assume a general antioxidant strategy will yield specific effects on cardiovascular disease. Indeed, there are several sources of reactive oxygen species that are known to be active in the cardiovascular system. This review will address our understanding of reactive oxygen species sources in cardiovascular disease and both animal and human data defining how reactive oxygen species contribute to physiology and pathology. PMID:21627987

  17. Phytate, reactive oxygen species and colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, R W; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    1998-05-01

    Reproducible high-performance liquid chromatography methods have been developed and validated which allow an accurate quantification of phytic acid in faeces and food and reactive oxygen species in an in vitro model system and in faecal specimens. When applied to the evaluation of reactive oxygen species generation by faeces, this method has shown that 1:100 dilutions of matrix obtained from stool samples of adenoma patients are capable of generating significant quantities of reactive oxygen species as evinced by the production of diphenols from salicylic acid. Moreover, it has been shown that the major product of HO. attack on salicylic acid is 2,5-dihydroxy benzoic acid and not 2, 3-dihydroxy benzoic acid as previously reported. In the presence of the antioxidant ascorbic acid the inhibitory capacity of phytic acid on the generation of reactive oxygen species is completely subverted. Therefore, the kinetics of reactive oxygen species production by faeces is currently under further investigation by high-performance liquid chromatography and chemiluminescence in various patient groups and may give an insight into the role of reactive oxygen species in the aetiology of colorectal cancer.

  18. Role of mitochondria and NADPH oxidase derived reactive oxygen species in hyperoxaluria induced nephrolithiasis: therapeutic intervention with combinatorial therapy of N-acetyl cysteine and Apocynin.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Minu; Kaur, Tanzeer; Singla, S K

    2016-03-01

    The interactions between the main cellular sources of ROS, such as mitochondria and NADPH oxidase, are known to play an imperative role in the pathogenesis of hyperoxaluria-induced nephrolithiasis. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effect of a combinatorial therapy based on the attenuation of oxidative stress with antioxidant (N-acetyl cysteine), and NADPH oxidase inhibitor (apocynin), that might be required to effectively eliminate hyperoxaluric manifestations. Hyperoxaluria was induced in male Wistar rats by administering 0.4% ethylene glycol with 1% ammonium chloride in drinking water for 9 days. Hyperoxaluria accentuated renal oxidative stress in terms of increased ROS production and lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial dysfunction, a central deleterious event in renal stone crystallization, was evident by decreased activities of electron transport chain complex I, II and IV, augmented mitochondrial ROS, reduced GSH/GSSG ratio, which resulted in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening as indicated by increased mitochondrial swelling in hyperoxaluric rats. Furthermore, NADPH oxidase activity was significantly increased, with raised expression of NOX1, NOX2, NOX4, p38MAPK and MnSOD, in the renal tissue of hyperoxaluric rats compared to control. However, combinatorial therapy with N-acetyl cysteine (50mg/kg/day) and apocynin (200mg/kg/day), intraperitoneally, significantly improved renal functions in hyperoxaluric rats and considerably ameliorated mitochondrial dysfunction. NAC with apocynin was also found to be effective in reducing the redundant activity of NADPH oxidase in renal tissue of hyperoxaluric rats. Hence, our investigation provides novel mechanistic insights that combinatorial approaches using targeted modulators of ROS offer therapeutic benefits in hyperoxaluria-induced nephrolithiasis.

  19. Rosacea, reactive oxygen species, and azelaic Acid.

    PubMed

    Jones, David A

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea.

  20. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea. PMID:20967185

  1. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  2. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  3. Reactive oxygen species in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuhui; Bazhin, Alexandr V; Werner, Jens; Karakhanova, Svetlana

    2013-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a group of highly reactive chemicals containing oxygen produced either exogenously or endogenously. ROS are related to a wide variety of human disorders, such as chronic inflammation, age-related diseases and cancers. Besides, ROS are also essential for various biological functions, including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation and differentiation, and immune response. At present there are a number of excellent publications including some reviews about functions of these molecules either in normal cell biology or in pathophysiology. In this work, we reviewed available information and recent advances about ROS in the main immune cell types and gave summary about functions of these highly reactive molecules both in innate immunity as conservative defense mechanisms and in essential immune cells involved in adaptive immunity, and particularly in immune suppression.

  4. Superoxide Dismutases and Reactive Oxygen Species

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The 'free radical theory' of aging was introduced over a half-century ago. In this theory, much of the deleterious effects of aging were attributed to the cumulative buildup of damage from reactive oxygen species. When discussing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aerobic systems, both superoxide radicals (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and superoxide dismutases (SODs) are considered to play prominent roles. O{sub 2}{sup -} is formed by attachment of the electron to oxygen (O{sub 2}) that is present in tens to hundreds of micromolar concentration in vivo. SODs are enzymes that serve to eliminate O{sub 2}{sup -} by rapidly converting it to O{sub 2} and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Both the radical and the enzyme will be discussed with the focus on the systems that are present in humans.

  5. Mitochondrial formation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Turrens, Julio F

    2003-01-01

    The reduction of oxygen to water proceeds via one electron at a time. In the mitochondrial respiratory chain, Complex IV (cytochrome oxidase) retains all partially reduced intermediates until full reduction is achieved. Other redox centres in the electron transport chain, however, may leak electrons to oxygen, partially reducing this molecule to superoxide anion (O2−•). Even though O2−• is not a strong oxidant, it is a precursor of most other reactive oxygen species, and it also becomes involved in the propagation of oxidative chain reactions. Despite the presence of various antioxidant defences, the mitochondrion appears to be the main intracellular source of these oxidants. This review describes the main mitochondrial sources of reactive species and the antioxidant defences that evolved to prevent oxidative damage in all the mitochondrial compartments. We also discuss various physiological and pathological scenarios resulting from an increased steady state concentration of mitochondrial oxidants. PMID:14561818

  6. Reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress, glaucoma and hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    McMonnies, Charles

    2017-07-28

    This review examines the role of oxidative stress in damage to cells of the trabecular meshwork and associated impaired aqueous drainage as well as damage to retinal ganglion cells and associated visual field losses. Consideration is given to the interaction between vascular and mechanical explanations for pathological changes in glaucoma. For example, elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) forces may contribute to ischaemia but there is increasing evidence that altered blood flow in a wider sense is also involved. Both vascular and mechanical theories are involved through fluctuations in intraocular pressure and dysregulation of blood flow. Retinal function is very sensitive to changes in haemoglobin oxygen concentration and the associated variations in the production of reactive oxygen species. Reperfusion injury and production of reactive oxygen species occurs when IOP is elevated or blood pressure is low and beyond the capacity for blood flow autoregulation to maintain appropriate oxygen concentration. Activities such as those associated with postural changes, muscular effort, eye wiping and rubbing which cause IOP fluctuation, may have significant vascular, mechanical, reperfusion and oxidative stress consequences. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy exposes the eye to increased oxygen concentration and the risk of oxidative damage in susceptible individuals. However, oxygen concentration in aqueous humour, and the risk of damage to trabecular meshwork cells may be greater if hyperbaric oxygen is delivered by a hood which exposes the anterior ocular surface to higher than normal oxygen levels. Oronasal mask delivery of hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to be indicated in these cases. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactive oxygen species in phagocytic leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Phagocytic leukocytes consume oxygen and generate reactive oxygen species in response to appropriate stimuli. The phagocyte NADPH oxidase, a multiprotein complex, existing in the dissociated state in resting cells becomes assembled into the functional oxidase complex upon stimulation and then generates superoxide anions. Biochemical aspects of the NADPH oxidase are briefly discussed in this review; however, the major focus relates to the contributions of various modes of microscopy to our understanding of the NADPH oxidase and the cell biology of phagocytic leukocytes. PMID:18597105

  8. Antimicrobial Actions of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Everything should be as simple as it can be, but not simpler.—Attributed to Albert Einstein (1) Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by host phagocytes and exert antimicrobial actions against a broad range of pathogens. The observable antimicrobial actions of ROS are highly dependent on experimental conditions. This perspective reviews recent controversies regarding ROS in Salmonella-phagocyte interactions and attempts to reconcile conflicting observations from different laboratories. PMID:21896680

  9. Pressor Effect of Apelin-13 in the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla: Role of NAD(P)H Oxidase-Derived Superoxide

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Fanrong; Modgil, Amit; Zhang, Qi; Pingili, Ajeeth; Singh, Neha; O'Rourke, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    Microinjection of apelin-13 into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in the brainstem increases blood pressure in rats. In the present study, we tested the hypotheses that apelin-13 directly stimulates neuronal activity in neurons cultured from the brainstem and that NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species are involved in this action of apelin-13. Microinjection of apelin-13 into the RVLM resulted in increases in arterial pressure and in renal sympathetic nerve activity in Sprague-Dawley rats. The pressor effect of apelin-13 was attenuated by the specific NAD(P)H-oxidase inhibitor gp91ds-tat. In neurons cultured from the ventral brainstem, spontaneous action potentials were recorded using current-clamp recording. Superfusion of neurons with apelin-13 (100 nM) increased the neuronal firing rate from 0.79 ± 0.14 to 1.45 ± 0.26 Hz (n = 7, P < 0.01) in angiotensin II receptor-like 1-positive neurons, identified with single-cell reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Neither the angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonist losartan nor the angiotensin II type 2 receptor antagonist 1-[[4-(dimethylamino)-3-methylphenyl[methyl]-5-(diphenylacetyl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]pyridine-6-carboxylic acid ditrifluoroacetate (PD123319) altered the positive chronotropic effect of apelin-13. Pretreatment of cells with either the reactive oxygen species scavenger superoxide dismutase [polyethylene glycol-superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), 25 U/ml] or with gp91ds-tat significantly attenuated the chronotropic action of apelin-13. PEG-SOD and gp91ds-tat alone had no effect on basal neuronal firing. In addition, apelin-13 significantly increased NAD(P)H oxidase activity and elevated intracellular superoxide levels in neuronal cultures. The superoxide generator xanthine-xanthine oxidase also increased neuronal activity in neurons, mimicking the neuronal response to apelin-13. These observations provide the first evidence that apelin-13 directly increases

  10. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES: IMPACT ON SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Ji, Li Li; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that contracting muscles produce both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Although the sources of oxidant production during exercise continue to be debated, growing evidence suggests that mitochondria are not the dominant source. Regardless of the sources of oxidants in contracting muscles, intense and prolonged exercise can result in oxidative damage to both proteins and lipids in the contracting myocytes. Further, oxidants regulate numerous cell signaling pathways and modulate the expression of many genes. This oxidant-mediated change in gene expression involves changes at transcriptional, mRNA stability, and signal transduction levels. Furthermore, numerous products associated with oxidant-modulated genes have been identified and include antioxidant enzymes, stress proteins, and mitochondrial electron transport proteins. Interestingly, low and physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required for normal force production in skeletal muscle, but high levels of reactive oxygen species result in contractile dysfunction and fatigue. Ongoing research continues to explore the redox-sensitive targets in muscle that are responsible for both redox-regulation of muscle adaptation and oxidant-mediated muscle fatigue. PMID:23737208

  11. The role of the NADPH oxidase derived brain oxidative stress in the cocaine-related death associated with excited delirium: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Schiavone, Stefania; Neri, Margherita; Mhillaj, Emanuela; Pomara, Cristoforo; Trabace, Luigia; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-09-06

    Excited delirium syndrome (ExDS) is a term used to describe a clinical condition characterized by bizarre and aggressive behaviour, commonly associated with the use of psychoactive compounds, especially cocaine. The pathophysiology of ExDS is complex and not yet fully understood. In addition to a central dopamine hypothesis, other mechanisms are thought to be involved in cocaine-related ExDS, such as increased reactive oxygen species production by the family of the NADPH oxidase NOX enzymes. In this review, we will summarize current knowledge on the crucial contribution of brain NADPH oxidase derived oxidative stress in the development of cocaine-induced ExDS. Data from animal models as well as human evidence will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Endotoxin priming of neutrophils requires endocytosis and NADPH oxidase-dependent endosomal reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Fred S; Hook, Jessica S; Hilkin, Brieanna M; Huber, Jody N; Volk, A Paige Davis; Moreland, Jessica G

    2012-04-06

    NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2)-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical for neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)) microbicidal function. Nox2 also plays a role in intracellular signaling, but the site of oxidase assembly is unknown. It has been proposed to occur on secondary granules. We previously demonstrated that intracellular NADPH oxidase-derived ROS production is required for endotoxin priming. We hypothesized that endotoxin drives Nox2 assembly on endosomes. Endotoxin induced ROS generation within an endosomal compartment as quantified by flow cytometry (dihydrorhodamine 123 and Oxyburst Green). Inhibition of endocytosis by the dynamin-II inhibitor Dynasore blocked endocytosis of dextran, intracellular generation of ROS, and priming of PMN by endotoxin. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a ROS-containing endosomal compartment that co-labeled with gp91(phox), p40(phox), p67(phox), and Rab5, but not with the secondary granule marker CD66b. To further characterize this compartment, PMNs were fractionated by nitrogen cavitation and differential centrifugation, followed by free flow electrophoresis. Specific subfractions made superoxide in the presence of NADPH by cell-free assay (cytochrome c). Subfraction content of membrane and cytosolic subunits of Nox2 correlated with ROS production. Following priming, there was a shift in the light membrane subfractions where ROS production was highest. CD66b was not mobilized from the secondary granule compartment. These data demonstrate a novel, nonphagosomal intracellular site for Nox2 assembly. This compartment is endocytic in origin and is required for PMN priming by endotoxin.

  13. Protective effect of HDL on NADPH oxidase-derived super oxide anion mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wen, Su-Ying; Tamilselvi, Shanmugam; Shen, Chia-Yao; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Chun, Li-Chin; Cheng, Li-Yi; Ou, Hsiu-Chung; Chen, Ray-Jade; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death of death in Taiwan. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including heart attack, stroke, or even death. Coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs when plaque builds up in the coronary arteries to cause the ischemic heart disease which will enhance myocardial remodeling and also induce myocardial hypoxia. High density lipoprotein (HDL) has been proposed to have cardio-protective effects. Under hypoxic conditions (1%O2 for 24hr), in H9c2 cells, reactive oxygen species (ROS) is induced which leads to cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac dysfunction. Therefore, the present study described the protective effect of HDL on hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte damage. We investigated the NADPH oxidase-produced ROS-related signaling pathways and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes under hypoxia conditions. Results showed that the ROS mediated cardiac damage might occur via AT1 and PKC activation. Furthermore, hypoxia downregulated the survival protein (p-AKTser473) and anti-apoptotic protein (BCL2), whereas pro-apoptotic protein, Bax and caspase 3 were upregulated. These detrimental effects by ROS and apoptosis were prevented by HDL pretreatment. Our findings revealed the underlying molecular mechanism by which HDL suppresses the hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte dysfunction. Further, we elucidated the role of HDL on preventing hypoxia induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis is mediated through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS.

  14. NADPH oxidases, reactive oxygen species, and hypertension: clinical implications and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Paravicini, Tamara M; Touyz, Rhian M

    2008-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) influence many physiological processes including host defense, hormone biosynthesis, fertilization, and cellular signaling. Increased ROS production (termed "oxidative stress") has been implicated in various pathologies, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. A major source for vascular and renal ROS is a family of nonphagocytic NAD(P)H oxidases, including the prototypic Nox2 homolog-based NAD(P)H oxidase, as well as other NAD(P)H oxidases, such as Nox1 and Nox4. Other possible sources include mitochondrial electron transport enzymes, xanthine oxidase, cyclooxygenase, lipoxygenase, and uncoupled nitric oxide synthase. NAD(P)H oxidase-derived ROS plays a physiological role in the regulation of endothelial function and vascular tone and a pathophysiological role in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis, and rarefaction, important processes underlying cardiovascular and renal remodeling in hypertension and diabetes. These findings have evoked considerable interest because of the possibilities that therapies against nonphagocytic NAD(P)H oxidase to decrease ROS generation and/or strategies to increase nitric oxide (NO) availability and antioxidants may be useful in minimizing vascular injury and renal dysfunction and thereby prevent or regress target organ damage associated with hypertension and diabetes. Here we highlight current developments in the field of reactive oxygen species and cardiovascular disease, focusing specifically on the recently identified novel Nox family of NAD(P)H oxidases in hypertension. We also discuss the potential role of targeting ROS as a therapeutic possibility in the management of hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Complex cellular responses to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Temple, Mark D; Perrone, Gabriel G; Dawes, Ian W

    2005-06-01

    Genome-wide analyses of yeast provide insight into cellular responses to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Many deletion mutants are sensitive to at least one ROS, but no one oxidant is representative of 'oxidative stress' despite the widespread use of a single compound such as H(2)O(2). This has major implications for studies of pathological situations. Cells have a range of mechanisms for maintaining resistance that involves either induction or repression of many genes and extensive remodeling of the transcriptome. Cells have constitutive defense systems that are largely unique to each oxidant, but overlapping, inducible repair systems. The pattern of the transcriptional response to a particular ROS depends on its concentration, and 'classical' antioxidant systems that are induced by high concentrations of ROS can be repressed when cells adapt to low concentrations of ROS.

  16. Physiological roles of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Sena, Laura A; Chandel, Navdeep S

    2012-10-26

    Historically, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) were thought to exclusively cause cellular damage and lack a physiological function. Accumulation of ROS and oxidative damage have been linked to multiple pathologies, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, cancer, and premature aging. Thus, mROS were originally envisioned as a necessary evil of oxidative metabolism, a product of an imperfect system. Yet few biological systems possess such flagrant imperfections, thanks to the persistent optimization of evolution, and it appears that oxidative metabolism is no different. More and more evidence suggests that mROS are critical for healthy cell function. In this Review, we discuss this evidence following some background on the generation and regulation of mROS.

  17. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  18. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the sterilization of microbes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The influence of reactive oxygen species on living cells, including various microbes, is discussed. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores reveals that an argoneoxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby indicating that oxygen radic...

  19. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  20. Reactive oxygen species and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Taverne, Yannick J H J; Bogers, Ad J J C; Duncker, Dirk J; Merkus, Daphne

    2013-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of free radicals, many hypotheses on the deleterious actions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been proposed. However, increasing evidence advocates the necessity of ROS for cellular homeostasis. ROS are generated as inherent by-products of aerobic metabolism and are tightly controlled by antioxidants. Conversely, when produced in excess or when antioxidants are depleted, ROS can inflict damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. Such a state of oxidative stress is associated with many pathological conditions and closely correlated to oxygen consumption. Although the deleterious effects of ROS can potentially be reduced by restoring the imbalance between production and clearance of ROS through administration of antioxidants (AOs), the dosage and type of AOs should be tailored to the location and nature of oxidative stress. This paper describes several pathways of ROS signaling in cellular homeostasis. Further, we review the function of ROS in cardiovascular pathology and the effects of AOs on cardiovascular outcomes with emphasis on the so-called oxidative paradox.

  1. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species and Neutrophil Function.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2016-06-02

    Neutrophils are essential for killing bacteria and other microorganisms, and they also have a significant role in regulating the inflammatory response. Stimulated neutrophils activate their NADPH oxidase (NOX2) to generate large amounts of superoxide, which acts as a precursor of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive oxygen species that are generated by their heme enzyme myeloperoxidase. When neutrophils engulf bacteria they enclose them in small vesicles (phagosomes) into which superoxide is released by activated NOX2 on the internalized neutrophil membrane. The superoxide dismutates to hydrogen peroxide, which is used by myeloperoxidase to generate other oxidants, including the highly microbicidal species hypochlorous acid. NOX activation occurs at other sites in the cell, where it is considered to have a regulatory function. Neutrophils also release oxidants, which can modify extracellular targets and affect the function of neighboring cells. We discuss the identity and chemical properties of the specific oxidants produced by neutrophils in different situations, and what is known about oxidative mechanisms of microbial killing, inflammatory tissue damage, and signaling.

  3. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species and Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Worldwide, the number of cancer cases is increasing. Typically, they are treated by either surgery or chemotherapy. However, these treatments may be undesirable in elderly patients or those who are under medication with antiplatelet drugs. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) represents a potentially attractive treatment option for these types of patients, since it does not involve surgery and has considerably reduced side effects compared to chemotherapy. Porphyrin, one of the most commonly used photosensitizers, has the convenient property of cancer-specific accumulation and therefore, is commonly used in PDT. However, the mechanism by which this cancer-specific accumulation occurs remains unclear. We previously reported that a heme-transport protein, HCP1, was capable of transporting porphyrin compounds. HCP1 expression is associated with increased hypoxia, although the detailed mechanism by which this regulation occurs is also unknown. Here, we review available data on the mechanism of regulation of HCP1 expression through mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mitROS). Specifically, cancer cells show increased expression of HCP1 compared to normal cells and this over-expression is reduced in cancer cells over-expressing the mitROS scavenging enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Thus we conclude that mitROS is involved in regulating HCP1 expression. PMID:27853344

  4. Cell Proliferation, Reactive Oxygen and Cellular Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Day, Regina M.; Suzuki, Yuichiro J.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of cellular activities, including metabolism, growth, and death, are regulated and modulated by the redox status of the environment. A biphasic effect has been demonstrated on cellular proliferation with reactive oxygen species (ROS)—especially hydrogen peroxide and superoxide—in which low levels (usually submicromolar concentrations) induce growth but higher concentrations (usually >10–30 micromolar) induce apoptosis or necrosis. This phenomenon has been demonstrated for primary, immortalized and transformed cell types. However, the mechanism of the proliferative response to low levels of ROS is not well understood. Much of the work examining the signal transduction by ROS, including H2O2, has been performed using doses in the lethal range. Although use of higher ROS doses have allowed the identification of important signal transduction pathways, these pathways may be activated by cells only in association with ROS-induced apoptosis and necrosis, and may not utilize the same pathways activated by lower doses of ROS associated with increased cell growth. Recent data has shown that low levels of exogenous H2O2 up-regulate intracellular glutathione and activate the DNA binding activity toward antioxidant response element. The modulation of the cellular redox environment, through the regulation of cellular glutathione levels, may be a part of the hormetic effect shown by ROS on cell growth. PMID:18648617

  5. Indoor particulate reactive oxygen species concentrations.

    PubMed

    Khurshid, Shahana S; Siegel, Jeffrey A; Kinney, Kerry A

    2014-07-01

    Despite the fact that precursors to reactive oxygen species (ROS) are prevalent indoors, the concentration of ROS inside buildings is unknown. ROS on PM2.5 was measured inside and outside twelve residential buildings and eleven institutional and retail buildings. The mean (± s.d.) concentration of ROS on PM2.5 inside homes (1.37 ± 1.2 nmoles/m(3)) was not significantly different from the outdoor concentration (1.41 ± 1.0 nmoles/m(3)). Similarly, the indoor and outdoor concentrations of ROS on PM2.5 at institutional buildings (1.16 ± 0.38 nmoles/m(3) indoors and 1.68 ± 1.3 nmoles/m(3) outdoors) and retail stores (1.09 ± 0.93 nmoles/m(3) indoors and 1.12 ± 1.1 nmoles/m(3) outdoors) were not significantly different and were comparable to those in residential buildings. The indoor concentration of particulate ROS cannot be predicted based on the measurement of other common indoor pollutants, indicating that it is important to separately assess the concentration of particulate ROS in air quality studies. Daytime indoor occupational and residential exposure to particulate ROS dominates daytime outdoor exposure to particulate ROS. These findings highlight the need for further study of ROS in indoor microenvironments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca(2+) or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species in Combustion Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, R.; See, S.

    2007-12-01

    Research on airborne particulate matter (PM) has received increased concern in recent years after it was identified as a major component of the air pollution mix that is strongly associated with premature mortality and morbidity. Particular attention has been paid to understanding the potential health impacts of fine particles (PM2.5), which primarily originate from combustion sources. One group of particulate-bound chemical components of health concern is reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), ions such as hypochlorite ion (OCl-), free radicals such as hydroxyl radical (·OH) and superoxide anion (·O2-) which is both an ion and a radical. However, the formation of ROS in PM is not clearly understood yet. Furthermore, the concentration of ROS in combustion particles of different origin has not been quantified. The primary objective of this work is to study the effect of transition metals on the production of ROS in PM2.5 by determining the concentrations of ROS and metals. Both soluble and total metals were measured to evaluate their respective associations with ROS. PM2.5 samples were collected from several outdoor and indoor combustion sources, including those emitted from on-road vehicles, food cooking, incense sticks, and cigarette smoke. PM2.5 samples were also collected from the background air in both the ambient outdoor and indoor environments to assess the levels of particulate-bound transition metals and ROS with no combustion activities in the vicinity of sampling locations. Results obtained from this comprehensive study on particulate-bound ROS will be presented and discussed.

  8. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Gat; Shkolnik, Doron; Miller, Gad; Fromm, Hillel

    2016-10-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. Copyright © 2015 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. Sphingosine kinase functionally links elevated transmural pressure and increased reactive oxygen species formation in resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Keller, Matthias; Lidington, Darcy; Vogel, Lukas; Peter, Bernhard Friedrich; Sohn, Hae-Young; Pagano, Patrick J; Pitson, Stuart; Spiegel, Sarah; Pohl, Ulrich; Bolz, Steffen-Sebastian

    2006-04-01

    Myogenic vasoconstriction, an intrinsic response to elevated transmural pressure (TMP), requires the activation of sphingosine kinase (Sk1) and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We hypothesized that pressure-induced Sk1 signaling and ROS generation are functionally linked. Using a model of cannulated resistance arteries isolated from the hamster gracilis muscle, we monitored vessel diameter and smooth muscle cell (SMC) Ca2+i (Fura-2) or ROS production (dichlorodihydrofluorescein). Elevation of TMP stimulated the translocation of a GFP-tagged Sk1 fusion protein from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, indicative of enzymatic activation. Concurrently, elevation of TMP initiated a rapid and transient production of ROS, which was enhanced by expression of wild-type Sk1 (hSk(wt)) and inhibited by its dominant-negative mutant (hSk(G82D)). Exogenous sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) also stimulated ROS generation is isolated vessels. Chemical (1 micromol/L DPI), peptide (gp91ds-tat/gp91ds), and genetic (N17Rac) inhibition strategies indicated that NADPH oxidase was the source of the pressure-induced ROS. NADPH oxidase inhibition attenuated myogenic vasoconstriction and reduced the apparent Ca2+ sensitivity of the SMC contractile apparatus, without affecting Ca2+-independent, RhoA-mediated vasoconstriction in response to exogenous S1P. Our results indicate a mandatory role for Sk1/S1P in mediating pressure-induced, NADPH oxidase-derived ROS formation. In turn, ROS generation appears to increase Ca2+ sensitivity, necessary for full myogenic vasoconstriction.

  12. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-12-07

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.

  13. Are Reactive Oxygen Species Involved in Microcystin-LR Intoxication?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-12

    peroxidation in paracetamol intoxication, did not alter the effect of BHA pretreatment., -- 2-A 4" 4 2 - INTRODUCTION The toxic cyclic heptapeptide...changes, we hypothesized that compounds that alter the concentration N of reactive oxygen species would alter the toxic effects of the peptide...reactive oxygen species would alter the toxic effects of the peptide-hepatotoxin produced by Microcystis aeruginosa. We show here that pretreatment with a

  14. [Formation of reactive oxygen species during pollen grain germination].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Matveeva, N P; Polesskaia, O G; Ermakov, I P

    2009-01-01

    The formation of reactive oxygen species in pollen at the early germination stage, which precedes the formation of the pollen tube, was studied. During this period, pollen grain is being hydrated, abruptly increasing its volume, and it passes from the resting state to active metabolism. Fluorescent methods have made it possible to reveal reactive oxygen species in the cytoplasm and inner layer of the pollen wall, intine. The cytoplasmic reactive oxygen species were mostly found in mitochondria, while extracellular ones were localized in aperture zones of intine, as well as in the solution surrounding pollen grains in vitro. The content of extracellular reactive oxygen species decreased after superoxide dismutase (100 units per ml) and diphenylene iodonium (100 microM), which indicates NADPH oxidase as one of possible producent of them. In conditions of suppression of extracellular reactive oxygen species production (100 microM diphenilene iodonium) or their promoted removal (after addition of 10 to 100 microM ascorbic acid), the number of germinating pollen grains increased. This effect disappeared after further increase in the concentration of the listed reagents. The result is evidence of the significance of processes of generation/removal of extracellular reactive oxygen species for pollen germination.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation/atomic oxygen synergism in materials reactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Albyn, Keith; Cross, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which indicate that low fluxes of vacuum UV (VUV) radiation exert a pronounced influence on the atomic oxygen reactivity of such fluorocarbon and fluorocarbon spacecraft materials as the FEP Teflon and PCTFE that are under consideration for the Space Station Freedom. With simultaneous exposure to VUV fluxes comparable to those experienced in LEO, the reactivity of these materials becomes comparable to that of Kapton; VUV radiation has also been shown to increase the reactivity of Kapton with thermal-energy oxygen atoms.

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation/atomic oxygen synergism in materials reactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Albyn, Keith; Cross, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which indicate that low fluxes of vacuum UV (VUV) radiation exert a pronounced influence on the atomic oxygen reactivity of such fluorocarbon and fluorocarbon spacecraft materials as the FEP Teflon and PCTFE that are under consideration for the Space Station Freedom. With simultaneous exposure to VUV fluxes comparable to those experienced in LEO, the reactivity of these materials becomes comparable to that of Kapton; VUV radiation has also been shown to increase the reactivity of Kapton with thermal-energy oxygen atoms.

  17. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  18. Oxygen Reactivity of a Carbon Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron Devol; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2002-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are often suggested as armor material for the first wall of a fusion plasma chamber due to carbon's low atomic number, high thermal conductivity, and high melting point. However, carbon is chemically reactive in air and will react with ingress air during a Loss of Vacuum Accident and release tritium fuel that has been retained in the carbon. Tritium mobilization and carbon monoxide generation via CFC oxidation are both safety concerns. This paper discusses chemical reactivity experiments that were performed using the state-of-the-art 3-dimensional NB31 CFC produced by SNECMA and a laminar reaction gas of Ar–21 vol% O2. Oxidation reaction rates were measured for CFC temperatures of 525, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and a 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) Ar–O2 flow rate. Experiments were also performed at CFC temperatures of 700 and 1000 °C and a 1000 sccm Ar–O2 flow rate. Mass spectral analyses of the exhaust reaction gas suggested that carbon monoxide was the primary reaction at the CFC surface and carbon dioxide was readily produced in the exiting reaction gas. The measured reaction rates compare well with the literature and were used to produce a CFC oxidation curve that is recommended for use in fusion safety analyses.

  19. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  20. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  1. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  2. Age and exercise training alter signaling through reactive oxygen species in the endothelium of skeletal muscle arterioles

    PubMed Central

    Sindler, Amy L.; Reyes, Rafael; Chen, Bei; Ghosh, Payal; Gurovich, Alvaro N.; Kang, Lori S.; Cardounel, Arturo J.; Delp, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Exercise training ameliorates age-related impairments in endothelium-dependent vasodilation in skeletal muscle arterioles. Additionally, exercise training is associated with increased superoxide production. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of superoxide and superoxide-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling in mediating endothelium-dependent vasodilation of soleus muscle resistance arterioles from young and old, sedentary and exercise-trained rats. Young (3 mo) and old (22 mo) male rats were either exercise trained or remained sedentary for 10 wk. To determine the impact of ROS signaling on endothelium-dependent vasodilation, responses to acetylcholine were studied under control conditions and during the scavenging of superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide. To determine the impact of NADPH oxidase-derived ROS, endothelium-dependent vasodilation was determined following NADPH oxidase inhibition. Reactivity to superoxide and hydrogen peroxide was also determined. Tempol, a scavenger of superoxide, and inhibitors of NADPH oxidase reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in all groups. Similarly, treatment with catalase and simultaneous treatment with tempol and catalase reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in all groups. Decomposition of peroxynitrite also reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Aging had no effect on arteriolar protein content of SOD-1, catalase, or glutathione peroxidase-1; however, exercise training increased protein content of SOD-1 in young and old rats, catalase in young rats, and glutathione peroxidase-1 in old rats. These data indicate that ROS signaling is necessary for endothelium-dependent vasodilation in soleus muscle arterioles, and that exercise training-induced enhancement of endothelial function occurs, in part, through an increase in ROS signaling. PMID:23288555

  3. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  4. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  5. Investigation of the reactivity of organic materials in liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D.; Irwin, K.; Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.; Stringham, R.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of impact-ignition sensitivity and studies of the relative reactivity of t-butoxy and t-butyl peroxy radicals toward a variety of organic compounds reveal improved methods of selection of materials for safe use in a liquid oxygen environment.

  6. Increased monocyte-derived reactive oxygen species in type 2 diabetes: role of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Restaino, Robert M; Deo, Shekhar H; Parrish, Alan R; Fadel, Paul J; Padilla, Jaume

    2017-02-01

    What is the central question of this study? Patients with type 2 diabetes exhibit increased oxidative stress in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, including monocytes; however, the mechanisms remain unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? The main finding of this study is that factors contained within the plasma of patients with type 2 diabetes can contribute to increased oxidative stress in monocytes, making them more adherent to endothelial cells. We show that these effects are largely mediated by the interaction between endoplasmic reticulum stress and NADPH oxidase activity. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of human monocytes to glucolipotoxic media to mimic the composition of plasma of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) results in the induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The extent to which these findings translate to patients with T2D remains unclear. Thus, we first measured ROS (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from whole blood of T2D patients (n = 8) and compared the values with age-matched healthy control subjects (n = 8). The T2D patients exhibited greater basal intracellular ROS (mean ± SD, +3.4 ± 1.4-fold; P < 0.05) compared with control subjects. Next, the increase in ROS in PBMCs isolated from T2D patients was partly recapitulated in cultured human monocytes (THP-1 cells) exposed to plasma from T2D patients for 36 h (+1.3 ± 0.08-fold versus plasma from control subjects; P < 0.05). In addition, we found that increased ROS formation in THP-1 cells treated with T2D plasma was NADPH oxidase derived and led to increased endothelial cell adhesion (+1.8 ± 0.5-fold; P < 0.05) and lipid uptake (+1.3 ± 0.3-fold; P < 0.05). Notably, we found that T2D plasma-induced monocyte ROS and downstream functional effects were abolished by treating cells with tauroursodeoxycholic acid, a chemical chaperone known to

  7. Nebivolol prevents ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat kidney by regulating NADPH oxidase activation and expression.

    PubMed

    do Vale, Gabriel T; Gonzaga, Natália A; Simplicio, Janaina A; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2017-03-15

    We studied whether the β1-adrenergic antagonist nebivolol would prevent ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the rat renal cortex. Male Wistar rats were treated with ethanol (20% v/v) for 2 weeks. Nebivolol (10mg/kg/day; p.o. gavage) prevented both the increase in superoxide anion (O2(-)) generation and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) concentration induced by ethanol in the renal cortex. Ethanol decreased nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration in the renal cortex, and nebivolol prevented this response. Nebivolol did not affect the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) concentration induced by ethanol. Nebivolol prevented the ethanol-induced increase of catalase (CAT) activity. Both SOD activity and the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected by treatment with nebivolol or ethanol. Neither ethanol nor nebivolol affected the expression of Nox1, Nox4, eNOS, nNOS, CAT, Nox organizer 1 (Noxo1), c-Src, p47(phox) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms in the renal cortex. On the other hand, treatment with ethanol increased Nox2 expression, and nebivolol prevented this response. Finally, nebivolol reduced the expression of protein kinase (PK) Cδ and Rac1. The major finding of our study is that nebivolol prevented ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species generation and lipoperoxidation in the kidney by a mechanism that involves reduction on the expression of Nox2, a catalytic subunit of NADPH oxidase. Additionally, we demonstrated that nebivolol reduces NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species by decreasing the expression of PKCδ and Rac1, which are important activators of NADPH oxidase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Oxygen-Sensitive Potassium Flux in Rainbow Trout Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated if reactive oxygen species are involved in the oxygen-dependent regulation of potassium-chloride cotransport activity in trout erythrocyte membrane. An increase in the oxygen level caused an increase in chloride-sensitive potassium transport (K+-Cl− cotransport). 5 mM hydrogen peroxide caused an increase in K+-Cl− cotransport at 5% oxygen. The increase in flux could be inhibited by adding extracellular catalase in the incubation. Pretreatment of the cells with mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species showing preference for hydroxyl radicals, abolished the activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter by increased oxygen levels. The inhibition by MPG was reversible, and MPG could not inhibit the activation of transporter by the sulfhydryl reagent, N-ethylmaleimide, indicating that the effect of MPG was due to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and not to the reaction of MPG with the cotransporter. Copper ions, which catalyze the production of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction, activated K+-Cl− cotransport significantly at hypoxic conditions (1% O2). These data suggest that hydroxyl radicals, formed from O2 in close vicinity to the cell membrane, play an important role in the oxygen-dependent activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter. PMID:11158169

  9. Generation of reactive oxygen species by leukocytes of Prochilodus lineatus.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Marcos Tucunduva; Cury-Boaventura, Maria Fernanda; Lopes, Lucia Rossetti; da Silva, José Roberto Machado Cunha

    2014-04-01

    Prochilodus lineatus (curimbatá), from the Procholodontidae family, is a Brazilian freshwater fish, which is important commercially, nutritionally and ecologically. It is encountered in the Rio da Prata Bay in Southern South America. Studies on the immune system of this fish are scarce, but the physiological mechanisms of the species are analogous to those of other vertebrates. Thus, this work discusses the present study, which correlates P. lineatus leukocytes and the generation of reactive oxygen species after modulatory stimuli. Leukocytes were characterized by light and electron transmission microscopy and investigated by the generation of H2O2 and O2 (-), using phenol red, flow-cytometry and electron transmission histochemistry. The study determined that monocytes and neutrophils are the main cells responsible for generating O2 after stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate. Superoxide dismutase successfully inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species in neutrophils and monocytes, but stimulated generation when in association with phorbol myristate acetate. Fish leukocyte samples from P. lineatus showed cross-reactivity with antibodies directed against human NADPH-oxidase antibody subunits (p47(phox) and p67(phox)). Thus, catalase enhanced the presence of p47(phox). Neutrophil mitochondria were shown to be generators of H2O2 (charged by cerium precipitate), being enlarged and changing their format. The present study contributes to a better understanding of the respiratory burst pathways in this species and suggests mitochondria as the organelle responsible for generation of reactive oxygen species.

  10. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23528859

  11. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  12. HIV-1, Reactive Oxygen Species and Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Kristi M.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2012-01-01

    Over 1 million people in the United States and 33 million individuals worldwide suffer from HIV/AIDS. Since its discovery, HIV/AIDS has been associated with an increased susceptibility to opportunistic infection due to immune dysfunction. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) restore immune function and, as a result, people infected with HIV-1 are living longer. This improved survival of HIV-1 patients has revealed a previously unrecognized risk of developing vascular complications, such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms underlying these HIV-associated vascular disorders are poorly understood. However, HIV-induced elevations in reactive oxygen species, including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, may contribute to vascular disease development and progression by altering cell function and redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the clinical and experimental evidence demonstrating HIV- and HIV antiretroviral therapy-induced alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and how these effects likely contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. PMID:22564529

  13. Unusual Reactivity of the Martian Soil: Oxygen Release Upon Humidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent lab results show that oxygen evolves from superoxide-coated mineral grains upon exposure to water vapor. This observation is additional support of the hypothesis that UV-generated O2 is responsible for the reactivity of the martian soil. Discussion of current NASA research opportunities, status of various programs within the Solar System Exploration Division, and employment opportunities within NASA Headquarters to support these programs. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Excess reactive oxygen species production mediates monoclonal antibody-induced human embryonic stem cell death via oncosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji Yun; Tan, Heng Liang; Matsudaira, Paul Thomas; Choo, Andre

    2017-03-01

    Antibody-mediated cell killing has significantly facilitated the elimination of undesired cells in therapeutic applications. Besides the well-known Fc-dependent mechanisms, pathways of antibody-induced apoptosis were also extensively studied. However, with fewer studies reporting the ability of antibodies to evoke an alternative form of programmed cell death, oncosis, the molecular mechanism of antibody-mediated oncosis remains underinvestigated. In this study, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), TAG-A1 (A1), was generated to selectively kill residual undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESC) so as to prevent teratoma formation upon transplantation of hESC-derived products. We revealed that A1 induces hESC death via oncosis. Aided with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), we uncovered nanoscale morphological changes in A1-induced hESC oncosis, as well as A1 distribution on hESC surface. A1 induces hESC oncosis via binding-initiated signaling cascade, most likely by ligating receptors on surface microvilli. The ability to evoke excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production via the Nox2 isoform of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is critical in the cell death pathway. Excess ROS production occurs downstream of microvilli degradation and homotypic adhesion, but upstream of actin reorganization, plasma membrane damage and mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. To our knowledge, this is the first mechanistic model of mAb-induced oncosis on hESC revealing a previously unrecognized role for NAPDH oxidase-derived ROS in mediating oncotic hESC death. These findings in the cell death pathway may potentially be exploited to improve the efficiency of A1 in eliminating undifferentiated hESC and to provide insights into the study of other mAb-induced cell death.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Hydrogen Peroxide Mediates Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Reactivation from Latency

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Fengchun; Zhou, Fuchun; Bedolla, Roble G.; Jones, Tiffany; Lei, Xiufen; Kang, Tao; Guadalupe, Moraima; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a latent infection in the host following an acute infection. Reactivation from latency contributes to the development of KSHV-induced malignancies, which include Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in untreated AIDS patients, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. However, the physiological cues that trigger KSHV reactivation remain unclear. Here, we show that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces KSHV reactivation from latency through both autocrine and paracrine signaling. Furthermore, KSHV spontaneous lytic replication, and KSHV reactivation from latency induced by oxidative stress, hypoxia, and proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines are mediated by H2O2. Mechanistically, H2O2 induction of KSHV reactivation depends on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 pathways. Significantly, H2O2 scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and glutathione inhibit KSHV lytic replication in culture. In a mouse model of KSHV-induced lymphoma, NAC effectively inhibits KSHV lytic replication and significantly prolongs the lifespan of the mice. These results directly relate KSHV reactivation to oxidative stress and inflammation, which are physiological hallmarks of KS patients. The discovery of this novel mechanism of KSHV reactivation indicates that antioxidants and anti-inflammation drugs could be promising preventive and therapeutic agents for effectively targeting KSHV replication and KSHV-related malignancies. PMID:21625536

  16. Reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide mediates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus reactivation from latency.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fengchun; Zhou, Fuchun; Bedolla, Roble G; Jones, Tiffany; Lei, Xiufen; Kang, Tao; Guadalupe, Moraima; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2011-05-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) establishes a latent infection in the host following an acute infection. Reactivation from latency contributes to the development of KSHV-induced malignancies, which include Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in untreated AIDS patients, primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. However, the physiological cues that trigger KSHV reactivation remain unclear. Here, we show that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) induces KSHV reactivation from latency through both autocrine and paracrine signaling. Furthermore, KSHV spontaneous lytic replication, and KSHV reactivation from latency induced by oxidative stress, hypoxia, and proinflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines are mediated by H₂O₂. Mechanistically, H₂O₂ induction of KSHV reactivation depends on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK1/2, JNK, and p38 pathways. Significantly, H₂O₂ scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and glutathione inhibit KSHV lytic replication in culture. In a mouse model of KSHV-induced lymphoma, NAC effectively inhibits KSHV lytic replication and significantly prolongs the lifespan of the mice. These results directly relate KSHV reactivation to oxidative stress and inflammation, which are physiological hallmarks of KS patients. The discovery of this novel mechanism of KSHV reactivation indicates that antioxidants and anti-inflammation drugs could be promising preventive and therapeutic agents for effectively targeting KSHV replication and KSHV-related malignancies.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  18. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} − N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  19. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N(3) - N(4), where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  20. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N3 - N4, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species are Ubiquitous along Subsurface Redox Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nico, P. S.; Yuan, X.; Davis, J. A.; Dwivedi, D.; Williams, K. H.; Bhattacharyya, A.; Fox, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (hydroxyl radical, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, etc.) are known to be important intermediates in many biological and earth system processes. They have been particularly well studied in the realms of atmospheric chemistry and aquatic photochemistry. However, recently there is increasing evidence that they are also present in impactful quantities in dark systems as a result of both biotic and abiotic reactions. Herein we will present a complementary suite of laboratory and field studies examining the presence and production of hydrogen peroxide under relevant subsurface conditions. The laboratory work examines the redox cycling between reduced organic matter, molecular oxygen, and Fe which results in not only the production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of organic functional groups but also the maintenance of steady-state concentration of Fe(II) under fully oxygenated aqueous conditions. The field studies involve three distinct locations, namely a shallow subsurface aquifer, a hyporheic zone redox gradient across a river meander, and a hillside shale seep. In all cases detectable quantities (tens of nanomolar) of hydrogen peroxide were measured. In general, concentrations peak under transitional redox conditions where there is the simultaneous presence of reduced Fe, organic matter, and at least trace dissolved oxygen. Many, but not all, of the observed dynamics in hydrogen peroxide production can be reproduced by a simple kinetic model representing the reactions between Fe, organic matter, and molecular oxygen, but many questions remain regarding the role of microorganisms and other redox active chemical species in determining the detected hydrogen peroxide concentrations. The consistent detection of hydrogen peroxide at these disparate locations supports the hypothesis that hydrogen peroxide, and by extension, the entire suite of reactive oxygen species are ubiquitous along subsurface redox gradients.

  2. Reactive oxygen species in iridium-based OER catalysts.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Verena; Jones, Travis E; Wrabetz, Sabine; Massué, Cyriac; Velasco Vélez, Juan J; Arrigo, Rosa; Scherzer, Michael; Piccinin, Simone; Hävecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel; Schlögl, Robert

    2016-11-18

    Tremendous effort has been devoted towards elucidating the fundamental reasons for the higher activity of hydrated amorphous Ir(III/IV) oxyhydroxides (IrO x ) in the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in comparison with their crystalline counterpart, rutile-type IrO2, by focusing on the metal oxidation state. Here we demonstrate that, through an analogy to photosystem II, the nature of this reactive species is not solely a property of the metal but is intimately tied to the electronic structure of oxygen. We use a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoemission and absorption spectroscopies, ab initio calculations, and microcalorimetry to show that holes in the O 2p states in amorphous IrO x give rise to a weakly bound oxygen that is extremely susceptible to nucleophilic attack, reacting stoichiometrically with CO already at room temperature. As such, we expect this species to play the critical role of the electrophilic oxygen involved in O-O bond formation in the electrocatalytic OER on IrO x . We propose that the dynamic nature of the Ir framework in amorphous IrO x imparts the flexibility in Ir oxidation state required for the formation of this active electrophilic oxygen.

  3. Quantification of reactive oxygen species for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Zou; Zhang, Jinde; Lin, Lisheng; Li, Buhong

    2016-10-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective therapeutic modality that uses a light source to activate light-sensitive photosensitizers to treat both oncologic and nononcological indications. Photosensitizers are excited to the long-lived triplet state, and they react with biomolecules via type I or II mechanism resulted in cell death and tumor necrosis. Free radicals and radical ions are formed by electron transfer reactions (type I), which rapidly react with oxygen leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide ions, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Singlet molecular oxygen is produced in a Type II reaction, in which the excited singlet state of the photosensitizer generated upon photon absorption by the ground-state photosensitizer molecule undergoes intersystem crossing to a long-lived triplet state. In this talk, the fundmental mechanisms and detection techniques for ROS generation in PDT will be introduced. In particular, the quantification of singlet oxygen generation for pre-clinical application will be highlighted, which plays an essential role in the establishment of robust singlet oxygen-mediated PDT dosimetry.

  4. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  5. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  6. Multiple antioxidant proteins protect Chlorobaculum tepidum against oxygen and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Jubelirer, Sara; Garcia Costas, Amaya M; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Bryant, Donald A

    2009-11-01

    The genome of the green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum (Cba.) tepidum, a strictly anaerobic photolithoautotroph, is predicted to encode more than ten genes whose products are potentially involved in protection from reactive oxygen species and an oxidative stress response. The encoded proteins include cytochrome bd quinol oxidase, NADH oxidase, rubredoxin oxygen oxidoreductase, several thiol peroxidases, alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, superoxide dismutase, methionine sulfoxide reductase, and rubrerythrin. To test the physiological functions of some of these proteins, ten genes were insertionally inactivated. Wild-type Cba. tepidum cells were very sensitive to oxygen in the light but were remarkably resistant to oxygen in the dark. When wild-type and mutant cells were subjected to air for various times under dark or light condition, significant decreases in viability were detected in most of the mutants relative to wild type. Treatments with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH) and methyl viologen resulted in more severe effects in most of the mutants than in the wild type. The results demonstrated that these putative antioxidant proteins combine to form an effective defense against oxygen and reactive oxygen species. Reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction studies showed that the genes with functions in oxidative stress protection were constitutively transcribed under anoxic growth conditions.

  7. Control of root growth and development by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively simple molecules that exist within cells growing in aerobic conditions. ROS were originally associated with oxidative stress and seen as highly reactive molecules that are injurious to many cell components. More recently, however, the function of ROS as signal molecules in many plant cellular processes has become more evident. One of the most important functions of ROS is their role as a plant growth regulator. For example, ROS are key molecules in regulating plant root development, and as such, are comparable to plant hormones. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ROS that are mainly associated with plant root growth are discussed. The molecular links between root growth regulation by ROS and other signals will also be briefly discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Activation mechanism of Gi and Go by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Motohiro; Schey, Kevin L; Takagahara, Shuichi; Kontani, Kenji; Katada, Toshiaki; Urano, Yasuteru; Nagano, Tetsuo; Nagao, Taku; Kurose, Hitoshi

    2002-03-15

    Reactive oxygen species are proposed to work as intracellular mediators. One of their target proteins is the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins (Galpha(i) and Galpha(o)), leading to activation. H(2)O(2) is one of the reactive oxygen species and activates purified Galpha(i2). However, the activation requires the presence of Fe(2+), suggesting that H(2)O(2) is converted to more reactive species such as c*OH. The analysis with mass spectrometry shows that seven cysteine residues (Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), Cys(287), Cys(326), and Cys(352)) of Galpha(i2) are modified by the treatment with *OH. Among these cysteine residues, Cys(66), Cys(112), Cys(140), Cys(255), and Cys(352) are not involved in *OH-induced activation of Galpha(i2). Although the modification of Cys(287) but not Cys(326) is required for subunit dissociation, the modification of both Cys(287) and Cys(326) is necessary for the activation of Galpha(i2) as determined by pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, conformation-dependent change of trypsin digestion pattern or guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)triphosphate binding. Wild type Galpha(i2) but not Cys(287)- or Cys(326)-substituted mutants are activated by UV light, singlet oxygen, superoxide anion, and nitric oxide, indicating that these oxidative stresses activate Galpha(i2) by the mechanism similar to *OH-induced activation. Because Cys(287) exists only in G(i) family, this study explains the selective activation of G(i)/G(o) by oxidative stresses.

  9. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant biotic interactions.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Claudia; Durner, Jörg; Astier, Jeremy

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants. Recent progress has been made in defining their role during plant biotic interactions. Over the last decade, their function in disease resistance has been highlighted and focused a lot of investigations. Moreover, NO and ROS have recently emerged as important players of defense responses after herbivore attacks. Besides their role in plant adaptive response development, NO and ROS have been demonstrated to be involved in symbiotic interactions between plants and microorganisms. Here we review recent data concerning these three sides of NO and ROS functions in plant biotic interactions.

  10. On reactive oxygen species measurement in living systems.

    PubMed

    Pavelescu, L A

    2015-01-01

    Studies devoted to the detection and measurement of free radicals in biological systems generally generated accepted methods of reactive oxygen species (ROS) level analysis. When out of control, ROS induces tissue damage, chronic inflammatory processes and cellular functional disturbances. Aerobic organisms have adapted to defense against ROS aggression by developing potent antioxidant mechanisms. Recent advances in ROS measurement methodology allow the study of ROS biology at a previously unachievable level of precision. However, their high activity, very short life span and extremely low concentration, make ROS measurement a challenging subject for researchers.

  11. Manganese Neurotoxicity and the Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J.; Gavin, Claire E; Aschner, Michael; Gunter, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary nutrient but excess or accumulations can be toxic. Disease states, like manganism, are associated with overexposure or accumulation of Mn and are due to the production of reactive oxygen species, free radicals and toxic metabolites, alteration of mitochondrial function and ATP production and depletion of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. This review focuses on all of the preceding mechanisms and the scientific studies that support them as well as provides an overview of the absorption, distribution, and excretion of Mn and the stability and transport of Mn compounds in the body. PMID:23395780

  12. Manganese neurotoxicity and the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J; Gavin, Claire E; Aschner, Michael; Gunter, Thomas E

    2013-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary nutrient, but an excess or accumulation can be toxic. Disease states, such as manganism, are associated with overexposure or accumulation of Mn and are due to the production of reactive oxygen species, free radicals, and toxic metabolites; alteration of mitochondrial function and ATP production; and depletion of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. This review focuses on all of the preceding mechanisms and the scientific studies that support them as well as providing an overview of the absorption, distribution, and excretion of Mn and the stability and transport of Mn compounds in the body.

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles: reactive oxygen species generation and potential therapeutic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Trang; Hilt, J. Zach

    2017-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been demonstrated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play a major role in various cellular pathways, via Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. ROS act as a double-edged sword inside the body. At normal conditions, the generation of ROS is in balance with their elimination by scavenger systems, and they can promote cell proliferation as well as differentiation. However, at an increased level, they can cause damages to protein, lead to cellular apoptosis, and contribute to many diseases including cancer. Many recent studies proposed a variety of strategies to either suppress toxicity of ROS generation or exploit the elevated ROS levels for cancer therapy.

  14. Reactive oxygen species in regulation of fungal development.

    PubMed

    Gessler, N N; Aver'yanov, A A; Belozerskaya, T A

    2007-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed by fungi in the course of metabolic activity. ROS production increases in fungi due to various stress agents such as starvation, light, mechanical damage, and interactions with some other living organisms. Regulation of ROS level appears to be very important during development of the fungal organism. ROS sources in fungal cells, their sensors, and ROS signal transduction pathways are discussed in this review. Antioxidant defense systems in different classes of fungi are characterized in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on ROS functions in interactions of phytopathogenic fungi with plant cells.

  15. Reactive oxygen species produced from chromate pigments and ascorbate.

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Y; Pezerat, H

    1994-01-01

    The reactions of various chromate pigments and ascorbate were investigated by an ESR spin trapping technique. Production of Cr(V) was detected directly and productions of very electrophilic reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected via the oxidation of formate. We demonstrated previously that both dissolved oxygen and Cr (V) were essential in the production of ROS in this system, and that ROS production was inhibited by catalase. We studied here the effect of solubility of different chromate pigments: sodium, calcium, strontium, basic zinc, basic lead supported on silica, and lead and barium chromates on the production of ROS in buffered medium and cell culture medium (Dublecco's Modified Eagle medium + fetal calf serum). Sodium, calcium, basic zinc, and basic lead chromates were active in the production of ROS in presence of cell culture medium, whereas lead and barium chromates were inactive. PMID:7843106

  16. Oxygen delivery, consumption, and conversion to reactive oxygen species in experimental models of diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Eshaq, Randa S.; Wright, William S.; Harris, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal tissue receives its supply of oxygen from two sources – the retinal and choroidal circulations. Decreases in retinal blood flow occur in the early stages of diabetes, with the eventual development of hypoxia thought to contribute to pathological neovascularization. Oxygen consumption in the retina has been found to decrease in diabetes, possibly due to either a reduction in neuronal metabolism or to cell death. Diabetes also enhances the rate of conversion of oxygen to superoxide in the retina, with experimental evidence suggesting that mitochondrial superoxide not only drives the overall production of reactive oxygen species, but also initiates several pathways leading to retinopathy, including the increased activity of the polyol and hexosamine pathways, increased production of advanced glycation end products and expression of their receptors, and activation of protein kinase C. PMID:24936440

  17. Neutrophils from patients with SAPHO syndrome show no signs of aberrant NADPH oxidase-dependent production of intracellular reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wekell, Per; Björnsdottir, Halla; Björkman, Lena; Sundqvist, Martina; Christenson, Karin; Osla, Veronica; Berg, Stefan; Fasth, Anders; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. We aimed to investigate if aberrant intracellular production of NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in neutrophils is a disease mechanism in the autoinflammatory disease SAPHO syndrome, characterized by synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, as has previously been suggested based on a family with SAPHO syndrome-like disease. Methods. Neutrophil function was explored in a cohort of four patients with SAPHO syndrome, two of whom were sampled during both inflammatory and non-inflammatory phase. Intracellular neutrophil ROS production was determined by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence in response to phorbol myristate acetate. Results. Cells from all patients produced normal amounts of ROS, both intra- and extracellularly, when compared with internal controls as well as with a large collection of healthy controls assayed in the laboratory over time (showing an extensive inter-personal variability in a normal population). Further, intracellular production of ROS increased during the inflammatory phase. Neutrophil activation markers were comparable between patients and controls. Conclusion. Dysfunctional generation of intracellular ROS in neutrophils is not a generalizable feature in SAPHO syndrome. Secondly, serum amyloid A appears to be a more sensitive inflammatory marker than CRP during improvement and relapses in SAPHO syndrome. PMID:27121779

  18. Minodronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, inhibits advanced glycation end product-induced vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 expression in endothelial cells by suppressing reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, S; Matsui, T; Nakamura, K; Takeuchi, M

    2005-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), the senescent macroprotein derivatives that form in increased amounts in diabetes, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications. Indeed, AGEs elicit oxidative stress generation in vascular wall cells through an interaction with their receptor (RAGE), thus playing an important role in vascular inflammation and altered gene expression of growth factors and cytokines. We have previously shown that minodronate, a nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, blocked the angiogenic signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in ECs through its antioxidative properties. However, the effects of minodronate on AGE-exposed ECs remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated whether and how minodronate could inhibit AGE-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and subsequent vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Minodronate or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, diphenylene iodonium, completely inhibited the AGE-induced ROS generation in HUVEC. Geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate reversed the antioxidative properties of minodronate in AGE-exposed ECs. Furthermore, minodronate was found to prevent AGE-induced nuclear factor--KB activation and subsequently suppress VCAM-1 gene expression in HUVEC. These results demonstrate that minodronate could inhibit VCAM- 1 expression in AGE-exposed ECs by suppressing NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation, probably via inhibition of geranylgeranylation of Rac, a component of endothelial NADPH oxidase. Our present study suggests that minodronate may have a therapeutic potential in the treatment of patients with diabetic vascular complications.

  19. [The role of reactive oxygen species and mitochondria in aging].

    PubMed

    Piotrowska, Agnieszka; Bartnik, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a biological phenomenon concerning all living multicellular organisms. Many studies have been conducted to identify the mechanisms underlying this process. To date, multiple theories have been proposed to explain the causes of aging. One of them is the free radical theory which postulates that reactive oxygen species (ROS), extremely reactive chemical molecules, are the major cause of the aging process. These free radicals are mainly produced by the mitochondrial respiratory chain as a result of electron transport and the reduction of the oxygen molecule. Toxic effects of ROS on cellular components lead to accumulation of oxidative damage which causes cellular dysfunction with age. The free radical theory has been one of the most popular theories of aging for many years. Scientific research on different model organisms aiming to verify the theory has produced abundant data, supporting the theory or, on the contrary, suggesting strong evidence against it. At present, the free radical theory of aging is no longer considered to be true.

  20. Shark cartilage-containing preparation: protection against reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Felzenszwalb, I; Pelielo de Mattos, J C; Bernardo-Filho, M; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A

    1998-12-01

    There is overwhelming evidence to indicate that free radicals cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids and are involved in the pathogenesis of several degenerative diseases. Therefore, antioxidants, which can neutralize free radicals, may be of central importance in the prevention of these disease states. The protection that fruits and vegetables provide against disease has been attributed to the various antioxidants contained in them. Recently, an anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity of a water-soluble fraction from shark cartilage has been described. Using electrophoretical assays, bacteria survival and transformation and the Salmonella/mammalian-microsome assay, we investigated the putative role of shark cartilage-containing preparation in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species induced DNA damage and mutagenesis. If antimutagens are to have any impact on human disease, it is essential that they are specifically directed against the most common mutagens in daily life. Our data suggest that shark cartilage-containing preparation can play a scavenger role for reactive oxygen species and protects cells against inactivation and mutagenesis.

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species: A Key Hallmark of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been the prime cause of mortality worldwide for decades. However, the underlying mechanism of their pathogenesis is not fully clear yet. It has been already established that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the progression of CVDs. ROS are chemically unstable reactive free radicals containing oxygen, normally produced by xanthine oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, lipoxygenases, or mitochondria or due to the uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase in vascular cells. When the equilibrium between production of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of human physiology gets altered due to several pathophysiological conditions, oxidative stress is induced, which in turn leads to tissue injury. This review focuses on pathways behind the production of ROS, its involvement in various intracellular signaling cascades leading to several cardiovascular disorders (endothelial dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion, and atherosclerosis), methods for its detection, and therapeutic strategies for treatment of CVDs targeting the sources of ROS. The information generated by this review aims to provide updated insights into the understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiovascular complications mediated by ROS. PMID:27774507

  2. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  3. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Griendling, Kathy K.; Touyz, Rhian M.; Zweier, Jay L.; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G.; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species. PMID:27418630

  4. Reactive oxygen species induce procalcitonin expression in trigeminal ganglia glia

    PubMed Central

    Raddant, Ann C.; Russo, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) gene expression under inflammatory conditions using trigeminal ganglia organ cultures as an experimental system. These cultures have increased proinflammatory signaling that may mimic neurogenic inflammation in the migraine state. Background The trigeminal nerve sends peripheral pain signals to the central nervous system during migraine. Understanding the dynamic processes that occur within the trigeminal nerve and ganglion may provide insights into events that contribute to migraine pain. A neuropeptide of particular interest is CGRP, which can be elevated and play a causal role in migraine. However, most studies have overlooked a second splice product of the CALCA gene, which encodes calcitonin (CT), a peptide hormone involved in calcium homeostasis. Importantly, a precursor form of calcitonin called procalcitonin (proCT) can act as a partial agonist at the CGRP receptor and elevated proCT has recently been reported during migraine. Methods We used a trigeminal ganglion whole organ explant model, which has previously been demonstrated to induce pro-inflammatory agents in vitro. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate changes in mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and proCT. Results Whole mouse trigeminal ganglia cultured for 24 h showed a 10-fold increase in CT mRNA, with no change in CGRP mRNA. A similar effect was observed in ganglia from adult rats. ProCT immunoreactivity was localized in glial cells. Cutting the tissue blunted the increase in CT, suggesting that induction required the close environment of the intact ganglia. Consistent with this prediction, there were increased reactive oxygen species in the ganglia and the elevated CT mRNA was reduced by antioxidant treatment. Surprisingly, reactive oxygen species were increased in neurons, not glia. Conclusions These results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species can activate proCT expression from the CGRP gene in trigeminal

  5. Reactive oxygen species in programmed death of pea guard cells.

    PubMed

    Samuilov, V D; Kiselevsky, D B; Shestak, A A; Nesov, A V; Vasil'ev, L A

    2008-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide potentiates CN(-)-induced apoptosis of guard cells recorded as destruction of cell nuclei in the epidermis from pea leaves. A still stronger effect was exerted by the addition of H2O2 and NADH, which are the substrates of the plant cell wall peroxidase producing O2*- coupled to the oxidation of NADH. The CN(-)-or (CN(-) + H2O2)-induced destruction of guard cell nuclei was completely removed by nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) oxidizing O2*- and preventing there-by the subsequent generation of H2O2. The reduced NBT was deposited in the cells as formazan crystals. Cyanide-induced apoptosis was diminished by mannitol and ethanol, which are OH* traps. The dyes Rose Bengal (RB) and tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE) photosensitizing singlet oxygen production suppressed the CN(-)-induced destruction of the cell nuclei in the light. This suppression was removed by exogenous NADH, which reacts with 1O2 yielding O2*-. Incubation of leaf slices with RB in the light lowered the photosynthetic O2 evolution rate and induced the permeability of guard cells for propidium iodide, which cannot pass across intact membranes. Inhibition of photosynthetic O2 evolution by 3-(3',4'-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea or bromoxynil prevented CN(-)-induced apoptosis of guard cells in the light but not in the dark. RB in combination with exogenous NADH caused H2O2 production that was sensitive to NBT and estimated from dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence. Data on NBT reduction and DCF and TMRE fluorescence obtained using a confocal microscope and data on the NADH-dependent H2O2 production are indicative of generation of reactive oxygen species in the chloroplasts, mitochondria, and nuclear region of guard cells as well as with participation of apoplastic peroxidase. Cyanide inhibited generation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria and induced their generation in chloroplasts. The results show that H2O2, OH*, and O2*- resources utilized for H2O2 production are

  6. Reactive oxygen species: A radical role in development?

    PubMed

    Hernández-García, David; Wood, Christopher D; Castro-Obregón, Susana; Covarrubias, Luis

    2010-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), mostly derived from mitochondrial activity, can damage various macromolecules and consequently cause cell death. This ROS activity has been characterized in vitro, and correlative evidence suggests a role in various pathological conditions. In addition to this passive ROS activity, ROS also participate in cell signaling processes, though the relevance of this function in vivo is poorly understood. Throughout development, elevated cell activity is probably accompanied by highly active metabolism and, consequently, the production of large amounts of ROS. To allow proper development, cells must protect themselves from these potentially damaging ROS. However, to what degree ROS could participate as signaling molecules controlling fundamental and developmentally relevant cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and death is an open question. Here we discuss why available data do not yet provide conclusive evidence on the role of ROS in development, and we review recent methods to detect ROS in vivo and genetic strategies that can be exploited specifically to resolve these uncertainties.

  7. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic Action and Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Daniel J; Kohanski, Michael A; Collins, James J

    2009-01-01

    The alarming spread of bacterial strains exhibiting resistance to current antibiotic therapies necessitates that we elucidate the specific genetic and biochemical responses underlying drug-mediated cell killing, so as to increase the efficacy of available treatments and develop new antibacterials. Recent research aimed at identifying such cellular contributions has revealed that antibiotics induce changes in metabolism that promote the formation of reactive oxygen species, which play a role in cell death. Here we discuss the relationship between drug-induced oxidative stress, the SOS response and their potential combined contribution to resistance development. Additionally, we describe ways in which these responses are being taken advantage of to combat bacterial infections and arrest the rise of resistant strains. PMID:19647477

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  9. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  10. Reactive oxygen species-targeted therapeutic interventions for atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia that requires medical attention, and its incidence is increasing. Current ion channel blockade therapies and catheter ablation have significant limitations in treatment of AF, mainly because they do not address the underlying pathophysiology of the disease. Oxidative stress has been implicated as a major underlying pathology that promotes AF; however, conventional antioxidants have not shown impressive therapeutic effects. A more careful design of antioxidant therapies and better selection of patients likely are required to treat effectively AF with antioxidant agents. Current evidence suggest inhibition of prominent cardiac sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and targeting subcellular compartments with the highest levels of ROS may prove to be effective therapies for AF. Increased serum markers of oxidative stress may be an important guide in selecting the AF patients who will most likely respond to antioxidant therapy. PMID:22934062

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  12. In vitro degradation of tropoelastin by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, A; Ryu, A; Suzuki, T; Kawada, A; Tajima, S

    1998-09-01

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on elastin molecules (tropoelastin) were studied in vitro. ROS generated by ultraviolet A and hematoporphyrin rapidly degraded tropoelastin within 5 min. Their degradative activity was inhibited by the addition of NaN3. Treatment of tropoelastin with copper sulfate/ascorbic acid resulted in degradation of tropoelastin producing fragments of molecular weight 45, 30 and 10 kDa within 30 min. The degradation of tropoelastin was partially blocked by the addition of mannitol. ROS induced by the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system also degraded tropoelastin within 6 h. The degradation was blocked by catalase but not by superoxide dismutase (SOD). ROS generated by copper-ascorbate seems to be unique in that it cleaves relatively specific sites of the tropoelastin molecule. Thus ROS may play a degradative role in elastin metabolism which may cause the elastolytic changes or the deposition of fragmented elastic fibers in photoaged skin or age-related elastolytic disorders.

  13. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy: role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Premkumar, Louis S; Pabbidi, Reddy M

    2013-11-01

    The prevalence of diabetes has reached epidemic proportions. There are two forms of diabetes: type 1 diabetes mellitus is due to auto-immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic β-cells resulting in absolute insulin deficiency and type 2 diabetes mellitus is due to reduced insulin secretion and or insulin resistance. Both forms of diabetes are characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, leading to the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) and microvascular pathology. DPN is characterized by enhanced or reduced thermal, chemical, and mechanical pain sensitivities. In the long-term, DPN results in peripheral nerve damage and accounts for a substantial number of non-traumatic lower-limb amputations. This review will address the mechanisms, especially the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the development and progression of DPN.

  14. The mystery of reactive oxygen species derived from cell respiration.

    PubMed

    Nohl, Hans; Gille, Lars; Staniek, Katrin

    2004-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is considered to provide reactive oxygen species (ROS) as byproduct of regular electron transfer. Objections were raised since results obtained with isolated mitochondria are commonly transferred to activities of mitochondria in the living cell. High electrogenic membrane potential was reported to trigger formation of mitochondrial ROS involving complex I and III. Suggested bioenergetic parameters, starting ROS formation, widely change with the isolation mode. ROS detection systems generally applied may be misleading due to possible interactions with membrane constituents or electron carriers. Avoiding these problems no conditions reported to transform mitochondrial respiration to a radical source were confirmed. However, changing the physical membrane state affected the highly susceptible interaction of the ubiquinol/bc(1) redox complex such that ROS formation became possible.

  15. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  16. Investigating the role of reactive oxygen species in regulating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Spencer B

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular lysosomal degradation process induced under stress conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulate autophagy implicated in cell survival, death, development, and many human diseases. This could be through generation of ROS from intracellular compartments such as the mitochondria or an external source such as oxidative stress. Various methods have been developed for the detection of autophagy; however, the implementation of these methods and the interpretation of results often differ. In this chapter, we summarize the current understanding of autophagy and ROS regulation of autophagy. Methods available for detecting autophagy under ROS conditions are described and considerations that need to be addressed when designing experimental protocols discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Stomatal Movements.

    PubMed

    Sierla, Maija; Waszczak, Cezary; Vahisalu, Triin; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2016-07-01

    Guard cells form stomatal pores that optimize photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake with minimal water loss. Stomatal movements are controlled by complex signaling networks that respond to environmental and endogenous signals. Regulation of stomatal aperture requires coordinated activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating enzymes, signaling proteins, and downstream executors such as ion pumps, transporters, and plasma membrane channels that control guard cell turgor pressure. Accumulation of ROS in the apoplast and chloroplasts is among the earliest hallmarks of stomatal closure. Subsequent increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration governs the activity of multiple kinases that regulate the activity of ROS-producing enzymes and ion channels. In parallel, ROS directly regulate the activity of multiple proteins via oxidative posttranslational modifications to fine-tune guard cell signaling. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the role of ROS in stomatal closure and discuss the importance of ROS in regulation of signal amplification and specificity in guard cells.

  18. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  19. How reactive oxygen species and proline face stress together.

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb, Kilani; Abdelly, Chedly; Savouré, Arnould

    2014-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated as a consequence of plant metabolic processes due to incomplete reduction of O2. Previously considered to be only toxic by-products of metabolism, ROS are now known to act as second messengers in intracellular signalling cascades to trigger tolerance of various abiotic and biotic stresses. The accumulation of proline is frequently observed during the exposure of plants to adverse environmental conditions. Interestingly proline metabolism may also contribute to ROS formation in mitochondria, which play notably a role in hypersensitive response in plants, life-span extension in worms and tumor suppression in animals. Here we review current knowledge about the regulation of proline metabolism in response to environmental constraints and highlight the key role of ROS in the regulation of this metabolism. The impact of proline on ROS generation is also investigated. Deciphering and integrating these relationships at the whole plant level will bring new perspectives on how plants adapt to environmental stresses.

  20. Serum Reactive Oxygen Metabolite Levels Predict Severe Exacerbations of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Watanabe, Masato; Sada, Mitsuru; Inui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Masuo; Honda, Kojiro; Wada, Hiroo; Mikami, Yu; Matsuzaki, Hirotaka; Horie, Masafumi; Noguchi, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Koyama, Hikari; Kogane, Toshiyuki; Kohyama, Tadashi; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bronchial asthma (BA) is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, which are intimately linked to chronic airway inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide are generated by inflammatory cells that are involved in the pathogenesis of BA. However, the role of ROS in the management of BA patients is not yet clear. We attempted to determine the role of ROS as a biomarker in the clinical setting of BA. Subjects and Methods We enrolled patients with BA from 2013 through 2015 and studied the degrees of asthma control, anti-asthma treatment, pulmonary function test results, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), serum reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels, and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Results We recruited 110 patients with BA. Serum ROM levels correlated with white blood cell (WBC) count (rs = 0.273, p = 0.004), neutrophil count (rs = 0.235, p = 0.014), CRP (rs = 0.403, p < 0.001), and IL-6 (rs = 0.339, p < 0.001). Serum ROM levels and IL-8 and CRP levels negatively correlated with %FEV1 (rs = -0.240, p = 0.012, rs = -0.362, p < 0.001, rs = -0.197, p = 0.039, respectively). Serum ROM levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe exacerbation within 3 months than in patients who did not (339 [302–381] vs. 376 [352–414] CARR U, p < 0.025). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed that ROM levels correlated significantly with the occurrence of severe exacerbation (area under the curve: 0.699, 95% CI: 0.597–0.801, p = 0.025). Conclusions Serum levels of ROM were significantly associated with the degrees of airway obstruction, WBC counts, neutrophil counts, IL-6, and severe exacerbations. This biomarker may be useful in predicting severe exacerbations of BA. PMID:27776186

  1. Reactive oxygen species and the free radical theory of aging.

    PubMed

    Liochev, Stefan I

    2013-07-01

    The traditional view in the field of free radical biology is that free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are toxic, mostly owing to direct damage of sensitive and biologically significant targets, and are thus a major cause of oxidative stress; that complex enzymatic and nonenzymatic systems act in concert to counteract this toxicity; and that a major protective role is played by the phenomenon of adaptation. Another part of the traditional view is that the process of aging is at least partly due to accumulated damage done by these harmful species. However, recent workers in this and in related fields are exploring the view that superoxide radical and reactive oxygen species exert beneficial effects. Thus, such ROS are viewed as involved in cellular regulation by acting as (redox) signals, and their harmful effects are seen mostly as a result of compromised signaling, rather than due to direct damage to sensitive targets. According to some followers of this view, ROS such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide are not just causative agents of aging but may also be agents that increase the life span by acting, for example, as prosurvival signals. The goal of this review is to recall that many of the effects of ROS that are interpreted as beneficial may actually represent adaptations to toxicity and that some of the most extravagant recent claims may be due to misinterpretation, oversimplification, and ignoring the wealth of knowledge supporting the traditional view. Whether it is time to abandon the free radical (oxidative stress) theory of aging is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Response of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Garbe, T. R.; Hibler, N. S.; Deretic, V.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a significant human pathogen capable of replicating in mononuclear phagocytic cells. Exposure to reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates is likely to represent an important aspect of the life cycle of this organism. The response of M. tuberculosis to these agents may be of significance for its survival in the host. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patterns of de novo proteins synthesized in M. tuberculosis H37Rv exposed to compounds that generate reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates were studied by metabolic labeling and two-dimensional electrophoresis. RESULTS: Menadione, a redox cycling compound which increases intracellular superoxide levels, caused enhanced synthesis of seven polypeptides, six of which appeared to be heat shock proteins. Chemical release of nitric oxide induced eight polypeptides of which only one could be identified as a heat shock protein. Nitric oxide also exhibited a mild inhibitory action on general protein synthesis in the concentration range tested. Hydrogen peroxide did not cause differential gene expression and exerted a generalized inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Cumene hydroperoxide caused mostly inhibition but induction of two heat shock proteins was detectable. CONCLUSIONS: The presented findings indicate major differences between M. tuberculosis and the paradigms of oxidative stress response in enteric bacteria, and are consistent with the multiple lesions found in oxyR of this organism. The effect of hydrogen peroxide, which in Escherichia coli induces eight polypeptides known to be controlled by the central regulator oxyR, appears to be absent in M. tuberculosis. Superoxide and nitric oxide responses, which in E. coli overlap and are controlled by the same regulatory system soxRS, represent discrete and independent phenomena in M. tuberculosis. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 FIG. 4 FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:8900541

  3. The influence of reactive oxygen species on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Redox conditions in natural waters are a fundamental control on biogeochemical processes and ultimately many ecosystem functions. While the dioxygen/water redox couple controls redox thermodynamics in oxygenated aquatic environments on geological timescales, it is kinetically inert in the extracellular environment on the much shorter timescales on which many biogeochemical processes occur. Instead, electron transfer processes on these timescales are primarily mediated by a relatively small group of trace metals and stable radicals, including the reactive oxygen species superoxide. Such processes are of critical biogeochemical importance because many of these chemical species are scarce nutrients, but may also be toxic at high concentrations. Furthermore, their bioavailability and potentially toxicity is typically strongly influenced by their redox state. In this paper, I examine to what extent redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters are expected to be reflected in the redox states of labile redox-active compounds that readily exchange electrons with the dioxygen/superoxide redox couple, and potentially with each other. Additionally, I present the hypothesis that that the relative importance of the dioxygen/superoxide and superoxide/hydrogen peroxide redox couples exerts a governing control on local redox conditions in oxygenated natural waters on biogeochemically important timescales. Given the recent discovery of widespread extracellular superoxide production by a diverse range of organisms, this suggests the existence of a fundamental mechanism for organisms to tightly regulate local redox conditions in their extracellular environment in oxygenated natural waters.

  4. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  5. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. Nanotechnology for Electroanalytical Biosensors of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species.

    PubMed

    Seenivasan, Rajesh; Kolodziej, Charles; Karunakaran, Chandran; Burda, Clemens

    2017-09-01

    Over the past several decades, nanotechnology has contributed to the progress of biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and the development of highly sensitive electroanalytical / electrochemical biosensors for in vitro and in vivo monitoring, and quantification of oxidative and nitrosative stress markers like reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). A major source of ROS and RNS is oxidative stress in cells, which can cause many human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, the detection of local concentrations of ROS (e. g. superoxide anion radical; O2(•-) ) and RNS (e. g. nitric oxide radical; NO(•) and its metabolites) released from biological systems is increasingly important and needs a sophisticated detection strategy to monitor ROS and RNS in vitro and in vivo. In this review, we discuss the nanomaterials-based ROS and RNS biosensors utilizing electrochemical techniques with emphasis on their biomedical applications. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Bordetella bronchiseptica responses to physiological reactive nitrogen and oxygen stresses

    PubMed Central

    Omsland, Anders; Miranda, Katrina M.; Friedman, Richard L.; Boitano, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can establish prolonged airway infection consistent with a highly developed ability to evade mammalian host immune responses. Upon initial interaction with the host upper respiratory tract mucosa, B. bronchiseptica are subjected to antimicrobial reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), effector molecules of the innate immune system. However, the responses of B. bronchiseptica to redox species at physiologically relevant concentrations (nM-µM) have not been investigated. Using predicted physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2.−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on low numbers of colony forming units (CFU) of B. bronchiseptica, all redox active species displayed dose-dependent antimicrobial activity. Susceptibility to individual redox active species was significantly increased upon introduction of a second species at sub-antimicrobial concentrations. An increased bacteriostatic activity of NO was observed relative to H2O2. The understanding of Bordetella responses to physiologically relevant levels of exogenous RNS and ROS will aid in defining the role of endogenous production of these molecules in host innate immunity against Bordetella and other respiratory pathogens. PMID:18462394

  8. Soot-driven reactive oxygen species formation from incense burning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim P; Lung, Shih-Chun C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2011-10-15

    This study investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated as a function of the physicochemistry of incense particulate matter (IPM), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and carbon black (CB). Microscopical and elemental analyses were used to determine particle morphology and inorganic compounds. ROS was determined using the reactive dye, Dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH), and the Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA), which determine DNA damage. Two common types of soot were observed within IPM, including nano-soot and micro-soot, whereas DEP and CB mainly consisted of nano-soot. These PM were capable of causing oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, especially IPM and DEP. A dose of IPM (36.6-102.3μg/ml) was capable of causing 50% oxidative DNA damage. ROS formation was positively correlated to smaller nano-soot aggregates and bulk metallic compounds, particularly Cu. These observations have important implications for respiratory health given that inflammation has been recognised as an important factor in the development of lung injury/diseases by oxidative stress. This study supports the view that ROS formation by combustion-derived PM is related to PM physicochemistry, and also provides new data for IPM.

  9. Photosensitizing Nanoparticles and The Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Dayane; Baptista, Mauricio

    2015-05-01

    The association of PhotoSensitizer (PS) molecules with nanoparticles (NPs) forming photosensitizing NPs, has emerged as a therapeutic strategy to improve PS tumor targeting, to protect PS from deactivation reactions and to enhance both PS solubility and circulation time. Since association with NPs usually alters PS photophysical and photochemical properties, photosensitizing NPs are an important tool to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Depending on the design of the photosensitizing NP, i.e., type of PS, the NP material and the method applied for the construction of the photosensitizing NP, the deactivation routes of the excited state can be controlled, allowing the generation of either singlet oxygen or other ROS. Controlling the type of generated ROS is desirable not only in biomedical applications, as in Photodynamic Therapy where the type of ROS affects therapeutic efficiency, but also in other technological relevant fields like energy conversion, where the electron and energy transfer processes are necessary to increase the efficiency of photoconversion cells. The current review highlights some of the recent developments in the design of Photosensitizing NPs aimed at modulating the primary photochemical events after light absorption.

  10. The immunopathogenic role of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, cancer, and aging. Basal levels of ROS production in cells could be related to several physiological functions including cell proliferation, apoptosis and homeostasis. However, excessive ROS production above basal levels would impair and oxidize DNA, lipids, sugars and proteins and consequently result in dysfunction of these molecules within cells and finally cell death. A leading theory of the cause of aging indicates that free radical damage and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Because the brain utilizes 20% more oxygen than other tissues that also undergo mitochondrial respiration, the potential for ROS exposure increases. In fact, AD has been demonstrated to be highly associated with cellular oxidative stress, including augmentation of protein oxidation, protein nitration, glycoloxidation and lipid peroxidation as well as accumulation of Amyloid β (Aβ). The treatment with anti-oxidant compounds can provide protection against oxidative stress and Aβ toxicity. In this review, our aim was to clarify the role of ROS in pathogenesis of AD and will discuss therapeutic efficacy of some antioxidants studies in recent years in this disease.

  11. SINGLET OXYGEN RESISTANT 1 links reactive electrophile signaling to singlet oxygen acclimation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Beat B; Ledford, Heidi K; Wakao, Setsuko; Huang, ShihYau Grace; Casero, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Koller, Andreas; Eggen, Rik I L; Niyogi, Krishna K

    2012-05-15

    Acclimation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii cells to low levels of singlet oxygen, produced either by photoreactive chemicals or high light treatment, induces a specific genetic response that strongly increases the tolerance of the algae to subsequent exposure to normally lethal singlet oxygen-producing conditions. The genetic response includes the increased expression of various oxidative stress response and detoxification genes, like the glutathione peroxidase homologous gene GPXH/GPX5 and the σ-class glutathione-S-transferase gene GSTS1. To identify components involved in the signal transduction and activation of the singlet oxygen-mediated response, a mutant selection was performed. This selection led to the isolation of the singlet oxygen resistant 1 (sor1) mutant, which is more tolerant to singlet oxygen-producing chemicals and shows a constitutively higher expression of GPXH and GSTS1. Map-based cloning revealed that the SOR1 gene encodes a basic leucine zipper transcription factor, which controls its own expression and the expression of a large number of oxidative stress response and detoxification genes. In the promoter region of many of these genes, a highly conserved 8-bp palindromic sequence element was found to be enriched. This element was essential for GSTS1 induction by increased levels of lipophilic reactive electrophile species (RES), suggesting that it functions as an electrophile response element (ERE). Furthermore, GSTS1 overexpression in sor1 requires the ERE, although it is unknown whether it occurs through direct binding of SOR1 to the ERE. RES can be formed after singlet oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation, indicating that RES-stimulated and SOR1-mediated responses of detoxification genes are part of the singlet oxygen-induced acclimation process in C. reinhardtii.

  12. A case of mistaken identity: are reactive oxygen species actually reactive sulfide species?

    PubMed Central

    DeLeon, Eric R.; Gao, Yan; Huang, Evelyn; Arif, Maaz; Arora, Nitin; Divietro, Alexander; Patel, Shivali

    2016-01-01

    Stepwise one-electron reduction of oxygen to water produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are chemically and biochemically similar to reactive sulfide species (RSS) derived from one-electron oxidations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Both ROS and RSS are endogenously generated and signal via protein thiols. Given the similarities between ROS and RSS, we wondered whether extant methods for measuring the former would also detect the latter. Here, we compared ROS to RSS sensitivity of five common ROS methods: redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), 2′, 7′-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, MitoSox Red, Amplex Red, and amperometric electrodes. All methods detected RSS and were as, or more, sensitive to RSS than to ROS. roGFP, arguably the “gold standard” for ROS measurement, was more than 200-fold more sensitive to the mixed polysulfide H2Sn (n = 1–8) than to H2O2. These findings suggest that RSS may be far more prevalent in intracellular signaling than previously appreciated and that the contribution of ROS may be overestimated. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that estimated daily sulfur metabolism and ROS production are approximately equal and the fact that both RSS and antioxidant mechanisms have been present since the origin of life, nearly 4 billion years ago, long before the rise in environmental oxygen 600 million years ago. Although ROS are assumed to be the most biologically relevant oxidants, our results question this paradigm. We also anticipate our findings will direct attention toward development of novel and clinically relevant anti-(RSS)-oxidants. PMID:26764057

  13. A case of mistaken identity: are reactive oxygen species actually reactive sulfide species?

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Eric R; Gao, Yan; Huang, Evelyn; Arif, Maaz; Arora, Nitin; Divietro, Alexander; Patel, Shivali; Olson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Stepwise one-electron reduction of oxygen to water produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are chemically and biochemically similar to reactive sulfide species (RSS) derived from one-electron oxidations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Both ROS and RSS are endogenously generated and signal via protein thiols. Given the similarities between ROS and RSS, we wondered whether extant methods for measuring the former would also detect the latter. Here, we compared ROS to RSS sensitivity of five common ROS methods: redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), 2', 7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, MitoSox Red, Amplex Red, and amperometric electrodes. All methods detected RSS and were as, or more, sensitive to RSS than to ROS. roGFP, arguably the "gold standard" for ROS measurement, was more than 200-fold more sensitive to the mixed polysulfide H2Sn(n = 1-8) than to H2O2 These findings suggest that RSS may be far more prevalent in intracellular signaling than previously appreciated and that the contribution of ROS may be overestimated. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that estimated daily sulfur metabolism and ROS production are approximately equal and the fact that both RSS and antioxidant mechanisms have been present since the origin of life, nearly 4 billion years ago, long before the rise in environmental oxygen 600 million years ago. Although ROS are assumed to be the most biologically relevant oxidants, our results question this paradigm. We also anticipate our findings will direct attention toward development of novel and clinically relevant anti-(RSS)-oxidants.

  14. Signaling of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Afanas'ev, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Disorder of physiological signaling functions of reactive oxygen species(ROS) superoxide and hydrogen peroxide and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) nitric oxide and peroxynitrite is an important feature of diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2. It is now known that hyperglycemic conditions of cells are associated with the enhanced levels of ROS mainly generated by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase. It has been established that ROS stimulate many enzymatic cascades under normal physiological conditions, but hyperglycemia causes ROS overproduction and the deregulation of ROS signaling pathways initiating the development of diabetes mellitus. On the other hand the deregulation of RNS signaling leads basically to a decrease in NO formation with subsequent damaging disorders. In the present work we will consider the pathological changes of ROS and RNS signaling in enzyme/gene regulated processes catalyzed by protein kinases C and B (Akt/B), phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase (PI3-kinase), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and some others. Furthermore we will discuss a particularly important role of several ROS-regulated genes and adapter proteins such as the p66shc, FOXO3a and Sirt2. The effects of low and high ROS levels in diabetes will be also considered. Thus the regulation of damaging ROS levels in diabetes by antioxidants and free radical scavengers must be one of promising treatment of this disease, however, because of the inability of traditionalantioxidative vitamin E and C to interact with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide,new free radical scavengers such as flavonoids, quinones and synthetic mimetics of superoxide dismutase (SOD) should be intensively studied. PMID:21311214

  15. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  16. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  17. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided.

  18. Reactive oxygen species at the crossroads of inflammasome and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Harijith, Anantha; Ebenezer, David L.; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes form a crucial part of the innate immune system. These are multi-protein oligomer platforms that are composed of intracellular sensors which are coupled with caspase and interleukin activating systems. Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP) 3, and 6 and NLRC4 and AIM2 are the prominent members of the inflammasome family. Inflammasome activation leads to pyroptosis, a process of programmed cell death distinct from apoptosis through activation of Caspase and further downstream targets such as IL-1β and IL-18 leading to activation of inflammatory cascade. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serves as important inflammasome activating signals. ROS activates inflammasome through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Dysregulation of inflammasome plays a significant role in various pathological processes. Viral infections such as Dengue and Respiratory syncytial virus activate inflammasomes. Crystal compounds in silicosis and gout also activate ROS. In diabetes, inhibition of autophagy with resultant accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria leads to enhanced ROS production activating inflammasomes. Activation of inflammasomes can be dampened by antioxidants such as SIRT-1. Inflammasome and related cascade could serve as future therapeutic targets for various pathological conditions. PMID:25324778

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Protrusion Efficiency by Controlling Actin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Taulet, Nicolas; Delorme-Walker, Violaine D.; DerMardirossian, Céline

    2012-01-01

    Productive protrusions allowing motile cells to sense and migrate toward a chemotactic gradient of reactive oxygen species (ROS) require a tight control of the actin cytoskeleton. However, the mechanisms of how ROS affect cell protrusion and actin dynamics are not well elucidated yet. We show here that ROS induce the formation of a persistent protrusion. In migrating epithelial cells, protrusion of the leading edge requires the precise regulation of the lamellipodium and lamella F-actin networks. Using fluorescent speckle microscopy, we showed that, upon ROS stimulation, the F-actin retrograde flow is enhanced in the lamellipodium. This event coincides with an increase of cofilin activity, free barbed ends formation, Arp2/3 recruitment, and ERK activity at the cell edge. In addition, we observed an acceleration of the F-actin flow in the lamella of ROS-stimulated cells, which correlates with an enhancement of the cell contractility. Thus, this study demonstrates that ROS modulate both the lamellipodium and the lamella networks to control protrusion efficiency. PMID:22876286

  20. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  1. Roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in pain.

    PubMed

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L

    2011-09-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN; ONOO⁻) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO; O₂•⁻) are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contributions of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel nonnarcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the roles of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is because, unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the past 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO and PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area.

  2. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis AJ; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria. PMID:26432659

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species from silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor-liquid-solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals.

  4. Production of ozone and reactive oxygen species after welding.

    PubMed

    Liu, H H; Wu, Y C; Chen, H L

    2007-11-01

    Many toxic substances including heavy metals, ozone, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen oxides are generated during welding. Ozone (O(3)) is a strong oxidant that generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in tissue, and ambient ROS exposure associated with particles has been determined to cause DNA damage. Ozone is produced within 30 seconds during welding. However, the length of time that O(3) remains in the air after welding is completed (post-welding) is unknown. The current study aimed to assess the distributions of ambient ROS and O(3) before the start of welding (pre-welding), during welding, and after welding. The highest O(3) levels, equal to 195 parts per billion (ppb), appeared during welding. Ozone levels gradually decreased to 60 ppb 10 minutes after the welding was completed. The highest ROS level was found in samples taken during welding, followed by samples taken after the welding was completed. The lowest ROS level was found in samples taken before the welding had started. Ozone and ROS levels were poorly correlated, but a similar trend was found for O(3) and ROS levels in particles (microM/mg). Although particles were not generated after welding, ROS and O(3) still persisted for more than 10 minutes. Meanwhile, because O(3) continues after welding, how long the occupational protective system should be used depends on the welding materials and the methods used. In addition, the relationship between metal fumes and ROS generation during the welding process should be further investigated.

  5. Reactive oxygen species at the crossroads of inflammasome and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Harijith, Anantha; Ebenezer, David L; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2014-01-01

    Inflammasomes form a crucial part of the innate immune system. These are multi-protein oligomer platforms that are composed of intracellular sensors which are coupled with caspase and interleukin activating systems. Nod-like receptor protein (NLRP) 3, and 6 and NLRC4 and AIM2 are the prominent members of the inflammasome family. Inflammasome activation leads to pyroptosis, a process of programmed cell death distinct from apoptosis through activation of Caspase and further downstream targets such as IL-1β and IL-18 leading to activation of inflammatory cascade. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serves as important inflammasome activating signals. ROS activates inflammasome through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). Dysregulation of inflammasome plays a significant role in various pathological processes. Viral infections such as Dengue and Respiratory syncytial virus activate inflammasomes. Crystal compounds in silicosis and gout also activate ROS. In diabetes, inhibition of autophagy with resultant accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria leads to enhanced ROS production activating inflammasomes. Activation of inflammasomes can be dampened by antioxidants such as SIRT-1. Inflammasome and related cascade could serve as future therapeutic targets for various pathological conditions.

  6. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  7. Ethanol stimulates epithelial sodium channels by elevating reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Song, John Z; Duke, Billie J; Ma, He-Ping; Denson, Donald D; Eaton, Douglas C

    2012-12-01

    Alcohol affects total body sodium balance, but the molecular mechanism of its effect remains unclear. We used single-channel methods to examine how ethanol affects epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in A6 distal nephron cells. The data showed that ethanol significantly increased both ENaC open probability (P(o)) and the number of active ENaC in patches (N). 1-Propanol and 1-butanol also increased ENaC activity, but iso-alcohols did not. The effects of ethanol were mimicked by acetaldehyde, the first metabolic product of ethanol, but not by acetone, the metabolic product of 2-propanol. Besides increasing open probability and apparent density of active channels, confocal microscopy and surface biotinylation showed that ethanol significantly increased α-ENaC protein in the apical membrane. The effects of ethanol on ENaC P(o) and N were abolished by a superoxide scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) and blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Consistent with an effect of ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on ENaC, primary alcohols and acetaldehyde elevated intracellular ROS, but secondary alcohols did not. Taken together with our previous finding that ROS stimulate ENaC, the current results suggest that ethanol stimulates ENaC by elevating intracellular ROS probably via its metabolic product acetaldehyde.

  8. Mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex generates reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Fiskum, Gary; Chinopoulos, Christos; Lorenzo, Beverly J; Browne, Susan E; Patel, Mulchand S; Beal, M Flint

    2004-09-08

    Mitochondria-produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to contribute to cell death caused by a multitude of pathological conditions. The molecular sites of mitochondrial ROS production are not well established but are generally thought to be located in complex I and complex III of the electron transport chain. We measured H(2)O(2) production, respiration, and NADPH reduction level in rat brain mitochondria oxidizing a variety of respiratory substrates. Under conditions of maximum respiration induced with either ADP or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone,alpha-ketoglutarate supported the highest rate of H(2)O(2) production. In the absence of ADP or in the presence of rotenone, H(2)O(2) production rates correlated with the reduction level of mitochondrial NADPH with various substrates, with the exception of alpha-ketoglutarate. Isolated mitochondrial alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDHC) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDHC) complexes produced superoxide and H(2)O(2). NAD(+) inhibited ROS production by the isolated enzymes and by permeabilized mitochondria. We also measured H(2)O(2) production by brain mitochondria isolated from heterozygous knock-out mice deficient in dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase (Dld). Although this enzyme is a part of both KGDHC and PDHC, there was greater impairment of KGDHC activity in Dld-deficient mitochondria. These mitochondria also produced significantly less H(2)O(2) than mitochondria isolated from their littermate wild-type mice. The data strongly indicate that KGDHC is a primary site of ROS production in normally functioning mitochondria.

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  10. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Modifications in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Bačić, Goran; Bridal, Lori; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.; Tavitian, Bertrand; Viel, Thomas; Utsumi, Hideo; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) may regulate signaling, ion channels, transcription factors, and biosynthetic processes. ROS-related diseases can be due to either a shortage or an excess of ROS. Recent Advances: Since the biological activity of ROS depends on not only concentration but also spatiotemporal distribution, real-time imaging of ROS, possibly in vivo, has become a need for scientists, with potential for clinical translation. New imaging techniques as well as new contrast agents in clinically established modalities were developed in the previous decade. Critical Issues: An ideal imaging technique should determine ROS changes with high spatio-temporal resolution, detect physiologically relevant variations in ROS concentration, and provide specificity toward different redox couples. Furthermore, for in vivo applications, bioavailability of sensors, tissue penetration, and a high signal-to-noise ratio are additional requirements to be satisfied. Future Directions: None of the presented techniques fulfill all requirements for clinical translation. The obvious way forward is to incorporate anatomical and functional imaging into a common hybrid-imaging platform. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 939–958. PMID:27139586

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS): Beneficial Companions of Plants’ Developmental Processes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Mishra, Rohit K.; Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Singh, Vijay P.; Chauhan, Devendra K.; Prasad, Sheo M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated inevitably in the redox reactions of plants, including respiration and photosynthesis. In earlier studies, ROS were considered as toxic by-products of aerobic pathways of the metabolism. But in recent years, concept about ROS has changed because they also participate in developmental processes of plants by acting as signaling molecules. In plants, ROS regulate many developmental processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, programmed cell death, seed germination, gravitropism, root hair growth and pollen tube development, senescence, etc. Despite much progress, a comprehensive update of advances in the understanding of the mechanisms evoked by ROS that mediate in cell proliferation and development are fragmentry and the matter of ROS perception and the signaling cascade remains open. Therefore, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to summarize the recent findings regarding updates made in the regulatory action of ROS at various plant developmental stages, which are still not well-known. PMID:27729914

  12. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Reactive oxygen metabolites produced by the carcinogenic fibrous mineral erionite.

    PubMed

    Urano, N; Yano, E; Evans, P H

    1991-02-01

    Erionite, a fibrous mineral and the causative agent of the endemic outbreak of mesothelioma in Turkey, has been shown to generate reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In order to investigate the mechanism of the production of ROM by erionite from PMN, a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method was utilized. Human peripheral blood PMN were incubated with 50-800 micrograms/ml of erionite. PMN CL was produced immediately after the addition of erionite; the maximal CL production was reached within 2 to 6 min and the CL response increased with the dose of erionite. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethyl sulfoxide were utilized as scavengers of O2-, H2O2, and OH., respectively. These scavengers inhibited the production of erionite-stimulated PMN CL dose dependently, thus indicating the production of O2-, H2O2, and OH. by erionite-stimulated PMN. The less phagocytically active cells, namely, mononuclear cells and erythrocytes, produced CL immediately after the addition of erionite or phorbol myristate acetate and displayed a significant delay period after the addition of zymosan. Therefore, the direct interaction between the cell surface membrane and erionite would appear to be more important than phagocytosis, per se, for the production of ROM by erionite.

  14. Reactive oxygen species and vascular biology: implications in human hypertension.

    PubMed

    Touyz, Rhian M; Briones, Ana M

    2011-01-01

    Increased vascular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; termed oxidative stress) has been implicated in various chronic diseases, including hypertension. Oxidative stress is both a cause and a consequence of hypertension. Although oxidative injury may not be the sole etiology, it amplifies blood pressure elevation in the presence of other pro-hypertensive factors. Oxidative stress is a multisystem phenomenon in hypertension and involves the heart, kidneys, nervous system, vessels and possibly the immune system. Compelling experimental and clinical evidence indicates the importance of the vasculature in the pathophysiology of hypertension and as such much emphasis has been placed on the (patho)biology of ROS in the vascular system. A major source for cardiovascular, renal and neural ROS is a family of non-phagocytic nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases (Nox), including the prototypic Nox2 homolog-based NADPH oxidase, as well as other Noxes, such as Nox1 and Nox4. Nox-derived ROS is important in regulating endothelial function and vascular tone. Oxidative stress is implicated in endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, hypertrophy, apoptosis, migration, fibrosis, angiogenesis and rarefaction, important processes involved in vascular remodeling in hypertension. Despite a plethora of data implicating oxidative stress as a causative factor in experimental hypertension, findings in human hypertension are less conclusive. This review highlights the importance of ROS in vascular biology and focuses on the potential role of oxidative stress in human hypertension.

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species in fungal cellular differentiations.

    PubMed

    Scott, Barry; Eaton, Carla J

    2008-12-01

    Regulated synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by specific fungal NADPH oxidases (Noxs) plays a key role in fungal cellular differentiation and development. Fungi have up to three different Nox isoforms, NoxA, B and C. The NoxA isoform has a key role in triggering the development of fruiting bodies in several sexual species whereas NoxB plays a key role in ascospore germination. The function of NoxC remains unknown. Both NoxA and NoxB are required for the development of fungal infection structures by some plant pathogens. ROS production by NoxA is critical for maintaining a fungal-plant symbiosis. Localised synthesis of ROS is also important in establishing and maintaining polarised hyphal growth. Activation of NoxA/NoxB requires the regulatory subunit, NoxR, and the small GTPase RacA. The BemA scaffold protein may also be involved in the assembly of the Nox complex. By analogy with mammalian systems MAP and PAK kinases may regulate fungal Nox activation. How fungal cells sense and respond to ROS associated with cellular differentiations remains to be discovered.

  16. Ethanol stimulates epithelial sodium channels by elevating reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hui-Fang; Song, John Z.; Duke, Billie J.; Ma, He-Ping; Denson, Donald D.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol affects total body sodium balance, but the molecular mechanism of its effect remains unclear. We used single-channel methods to examine how ethanol affects epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) in A6 distal nephron cells. The data showed that ethanol significantly increased both ENaC open probability (Po) and the number of active ENaC in patches (N). 1-Propanol and 1-butanol also increased ENaC activity, but iso-alcohols did not. The effects of ethanol were mimicked by acetaldehyde, the first metabolic product of ethanol, but not by acetone, the metabolic product of 2-propanol. Besides increasing open probability and apparent density of active channels, confocal microscopy and surface biotinylation showed that ethanol significantly increased α-ENaC protein in the apical membrane. The effects of ethanol on ENaC Po and N were abolished by a superoxide scavenger, 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPOL) and blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Consistent with an effect of ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) on ENaC, primary alcohols and acetaldehyde elevated intracellular ROS, but secondary alcohols did not. Taken together with our previous finding that ROS stimulate ENaC, the current results suggest that ethanol stimulates ENaC by elevating intracellular ROS probably via its metabolic product acetaldehyde. PMID:22895258

  17. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cancer: Role of antioxidative nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Gupta, Subash C; Tyagi, Amit K

    2017-02-28

    Extensive research over the past half a century indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in cancer. Although low levels of ROS can be beneficial, excessive accumulation can promote cancer. One characteristic of cancer cells that distinguishes them from normal cells is their ability to produce increased numbers of ROS and their increased dependence on an antioxidant defense system. ROS are produced as a byproduct intracellularly by mitochondria and other cellular elements and exogenously by pollutants, tobacco, smoke, drugs, xenobiotics, and radiation. ROS modulate various cell signaling pathways, which are primarily mediated through the transcription factors NF-κB and STAT3, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, kinases, growth factors, cytokines and other proteins, and enzymes; these pathways have been linked to cellular transformation, inflammation, tumor survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. ROS are also associated with epigenetic changes in genes, which is helpful in diagnosing diseases. This review considers the role of ROS in the various stages of cancer development. Finally, we provide evidence that nutraceuticals derived from Mother Nature are highly effective in eliminating cancer cells.

  18. Roles of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W.; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO−) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO, O2·−), are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including in the development of pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contribution of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel non-narcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the role of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is due to the fact that unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory [1]. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the last 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO/PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area. PMID:21277369

  19. Reactive oxygen metabolites produced by the carcinogenic fibrous mineral erionite

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Naoko; Yano, Eiji ); Evans, P.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Erionite, a fibrous mineral and the causative agent of the endemic outbreak of mesothelioma in Turkey, has been shown to generate reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In order to investigate the mechanism of the production of ROM by erionite from PMN, a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method was utilized. Human peripheral blood PMN were incubated with 50-800 {mu}g/ml of erionite. PMN CL was produced immediately after the addition of erionite; the maximal CL production was reached within 2 to 6 minutes and the CL response increased with the dose of erionite. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethyl sulfoxide were utilized as scavengers of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and OH, respectively. These scavengers inhibited the production of erionite-stimulated PMN CL dose dependently, thus indicating the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and OH by erionite-stimulated PMN. The less phagocytically active cells, namely, mononuclear cells and erythrocytes, produced CL immediately after the addition of erionite or phorbol myristate acetate and displayed a significant delay period after the addition of zymosan. Therefore, the direct interaction between the cell surface membrane and erionite would appear to be more important than phagocytosis, per se, for the production of ROM by erionite.

  20. Reactive oxygen species in response of plants to gravity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers can induce stress response of plants. Thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) can function as sensors and transmitters of the ROS in stress signaling and antioxidant response. 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana have been investigated. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 20 g during 30 and 90 min and than intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence (SChL/ROS content), Trx and Prx activities were determined. All experiments were repeated from 3 to 5 times and the obtained data were statistically treated. In the tissue culture under development of the stress there were an increase in intensity of SChL and Trx and Prx activities. Thus, under hypergravity stress in the plant occurred early increase in the ROS level and the ROS induced the increase in the Trx and Prx activities. Prx and Trx can also participate in the formation of stress respons as acceptors and transducers of the redox signals. Increase in the activity of these enzymes primarily aimed at increasing of the total antioxidant activity in the cells to prevent of the plant to development of oxidative degradation by ROS.

  1. Mechanism of teratogenesis: electron transfer, reactive oxygen species, and antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2006-12-01

    Teratogenesis has been a topic of increasing interest and concern in recent years, generating controversy in association with danger to humans and other living things. A veritable host of chemicals is known to be involved, encompassing a wide variety of classes, both organic and inorganic. Contact with these chemicals is virtually unavoidable due to contamination of air, water, ground, food, beverages, and household items, as well as exposure to medicinals. The resulting adverse effects on reproduction are numerous. There is uncertainty regarding the mode of action of these chemicals, although various theories have been advanced, e.g., disruption of the central nervous system (CNS), DNA attack, enzyme inhibition, interference with hormonal action, and insult to membranes, proteins, and mitochondria. This review provides extensive evidence for involvement of oxidative stress (OS) and electron transfer (ET) as a unifying theme. Successful application of the mechanistic approach is made to all of the main classes of toxins, in addition to large numbers of miscellaneous types. We believe it is not coincidental that the vast majority of these substances incorporate ET functionalities (quinone, metal complex, ArNO2, or conjugated iminium) either per se or in metabolites, potentially giving rise to reactive oxygen species (ROS) by redox cycling. Some categories, e.g., peroxides and radiation, appear to generate ROS by non-ET routes. Other mechanisms are briefly addressed; a multifaceted approach to mode of action appears to be the most logical. Our framework should increase understanding and contribute to preventative measures, such as use of antioxidants.

  2. Geochemical production of reactive oxygen species from biogeochemically reduced Fe.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah A; Solomon, Benson M; Meng, Shengnan; Copeland, Justin M; Shaw, Timothy J; Ferry, John L

    2014-04-01

    The photochemical reduction of Fe(III) complexes to Fe(II) is a well-known initiation step for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in sunlit waters. Here we show a geochemical mechanism for the same in dark environments based on the tidally driven, episodic movement of anoxic groundwaters through oxidized, Fe(III) rich sediments. Sediment samples were collected from the top 5 cm of sediment in a saline tidal creek in the estuary at Murrell's Inlet, South Carolina and characterized with respect to total Fe, acid volatile sulfides, and organic carbon content. These sediments were air-dried, resuspended in aerated solution, then exposed to aqueous sulfide at a range of concentrations chosen to replicate the conditions characteristic of a tidal cycle, beginning with low tide. No detectable ROS production occurred from this process in the dark until sulfide was added. Sulfide addition resulted in the rapid production of hydrogen peroxide, with maximum concentrations of 3.85 μM. The mechanism of hydrogen peroxide production was tested using a simplified three factor representation of the system based on hydrogen sulfide, Fe(II) and Fe(III). The resulting predictive model for maximum hydrogen peroxide agreed with measured hydrogen peroxide in field-derived samples at the 95% level of confidence, although with a persistent negative bias suggesting a minor undiscovered peroxide source in sediments.

  3. Reactive oxygen species a double-edged sword for mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Serena; Nuvoli, Barbara; Catalani, Simona; Galati, Rossella

    2015-07-10

    It is well known that oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation which, in turn, could mediate most chronic diseases including cancer. Oxidants have been implicated in the activity of crocidolite and amosite, the most powerful types of asbestos associated to the occurrence of mesothelioma. Currently rates of mesothelioma are rising and estimates indicate that the incidence of mesothelioma will peak within the next 10-15 years in the western world, while in Japan the peak is predicted not to occur until 40 years from now. Although the use of asbestos has been banned in many countries around the world, production of and the potentially hazardous exposure to asbestos is still present with locally high incidences of mesothelioma. Today a new man-made material, carbon nanotubes, has arisen as a concern; carbon nanotubes may display 'asbestos-like' pathogenicity with mesothelioma induction potential. Carbon nanotubes resulted in the greatest reactive oxygen species generation. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the transformation of a normal cell to a tumor cell, to tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, is the aim of this review.

  4. Reactive oxygen species a double-edged sword for mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Simona; Galati, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation which, in turn, could mediate most chronic diseases including cancer. Oxidants have been implicated in the activity of crocidolite and amosite, the most powerful types of asbestos associated to the occurrence of mesothelioma. Currently rates of mesothelioma are rising and estimates indicate that the incidence of mesothelioma will peak within the next 10–15 years in the western world, while in Japan the peak is predicted not to occur until 40 years from now. Although the use of asbestos has been banned in many countries around the world, production of and the potentially hazardous exposure to asbestos is still present with locally high incidences of mesothelioma. Today a new man-made material, carbon nanotubes, has arisen as a concern; carbon nanotubes may display ‘asbestos-like’ pathogenicity with mesothelioma induction potential. Carbon nanotubes resulted in the greatest reactive oxygen species generation. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the transformation of a normal cell to a tumor cell, to tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, is the aim of this review. PMID:26078352

  5. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis Aj; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria.

  6. Extracellular Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, R. J.; Roe, K. L.; Voelker, B. M.; Hansel, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    The reactive oxygen species (ROS) superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are important to the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. Previous studies have shown that biological ROS production in the ocean may be significant. We examined the ability of five common species of diatoms to produce and break down ROS in the presence and absence of light by suspending cells on filters and measuring downstream ROS concentrations using chemiluminescence probes. Results show a wide range of rates (undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1) and suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways. H2O2 decay appears to be mediated primarily by active cell processes, while O2- appears to occur through a combination of active and passive cell processes. Extracellular H2O2 production and decay were also determined for twelve species of heterotrophic bacteria using two different methodologies. Measured decay rates were consistent despite methodological differences. By contrast, large variability of production rates was observed could vary significantly even among between replicates of the same species measured using the same methodology. Although production rates cannot be stated with certainty, it is likely that extracellular H2O2 production occurs in most bacterial species.

  7. Methods for Detection of Mitochondrial and Cellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial and cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in both physiological and pathological processes. Different ROS, such as superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite (ONOO•−), stimulate distinct cell-signaling pathways and lead to diverse outcomes depending on their amount and subcellular localization. A variety of methods have been developed for ROS detection; however, many of these methods are not specific, do not allow subcellular localization, and can produce artifacts. In this review, we will critically analyze ROS detection and present advantages and the shortcomings of several available methods. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new fluorescent probes, electron-spin resonance approaches, and immunoassays have been developed. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and subcellular resolution for ROS detection. Critical Issues: Although new methods for HPLC superoxide detection, application of fluorescent boronate-containing probes, use of cell-targeted hydroxylamine spin probes, and immunospin trapping have been available for several years, there has been lack of translation of these into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. Future Directions: Additional studies to translate these new technologies from the test tube to physiological applications are needed and could lead to a wider application of these approaches to study mitochondrial and cellular ROS. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 372–382. PMID:22978713

  8. Signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, Igor B

    2010-06-01

    For many years the formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS) and (RNS) in living organisms has been considered to be dangerous phenomenon due to their damaging action on biomolecules. However, present studies demonstrated another important activity of ROS and RNS: their signaling functions in physiological and pathological processes. In this work we discuss the new data concerning a role of ROS and RNS in many enzymatic/gene cascades causing damaging changes during the development of skin diseases and pathological disorders (skin cancer, the toxic effects of irradiation on the skin, and skin wounding). It has been suggested that the enhancement of ROS formation in tumor cells through the inactivation of mitochondrial MnSOD or the activation of NADPH oxidase leads to apoptosis and might be applied for developing a new cancer therapy. On the other hand ROS overproduction might stimulate malignant transformation of melanoma. Role of ROS signaling is also considered in the damaging action of UVA, UVB, and IRA irradiation on the skin and the processes of wound healing. In the last part of review the possibility of the right choice of antioxidants and free radical scavengers for the treatment of skin disease is discussed.

  9. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  10. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  11. Light irradiation helps magnetotactic bacteria eliminate intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Li, Kefeng; Wang, Pingping; Chen, Chuanfang; Chen, Changyou; Li, Lulu; Song, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) demonstrate photoresponse. However, little is known about the biological significance of this behaviour. Magnetosomes exhibit peroxidase-like activity and can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). Magnetosomes extracted from the Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 show enhanced peroxidase-like activity under illumination. The present study investigated the effects of light irradiation on nonmagnetic (without magnetosomes) and magnetic (with magnetosomes) AMB-1 cells. Results showed that light irradiation did not affect the growth of nonmagnetic and magnetic cells but significantly increased magnetosome synthesis and reduced intracellular ROS level in magnetic cells. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to analyse the expression level of magnetosome formation-associated genes (mamA, mms6, mms13 and mmsF) and stress-related genes (recA, oxyR, SOD, amb0664 and amb2684). Results showed that light irradiation upregulated the expression of mms6, mms13 and mmsF. Furthermore, light irradiation upregulated the expression of stress-related genes in nonmagnetic cells but downregulated them in magnetic cells. Additionally, magnetic cells exhibited stronger phototactic behaviour than nonmagnetic ones. These results suggested that light irradiation could heighten the ability of MTB to eliminate intracellular ROS and help them adapt to lighted environments. This phenomenon may be related to the enhanced peroxidase-like activity of magnetosomes under light irradiation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  13. Reactive oxygen species, essential molecules, during plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Daymi; Guzmán-Cedeño, Ángel; Moreno, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continually generated as a consequence of the normal metabolism in aerobic organisms. Accumulation and release of ROS into cell take place in response to a wide variety of adverse environmental conditions including salt, temperature, cold stresses and pathogen attack, among others. In plants, peroxidases class III, NADPH oxidase (NOX) locates in cell wall and plasma membrane, respectively, may be mainly enzymatic systems involving ROS generation. It is well documented that ROS play a dual role into cells, acting as important signal transduction molecules and as toxic molecules with strong oxidant power, however some aspects related to its function during plant-pathogen interactions remain unclear. This review focuses on the principal enzymatic systems involving ROS generation addressing the role of ROS as signal molecules during plant-pathogen interactions. We described how the chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes perceive the external stimuli as pathogen invasion, and trigger resistance response using ROS as signal molecule. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Salicylic acid signaling inhibits apoplastic reactive oxygen species signaling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are used by plants as signaling molecules during stress and development. Given the amount of possible challenges a plant face from their environment, plants need to activate and prioritize between potentially conflicting defense signaling pathways. Until recently, most studies on signal interactions have focused on phytohormone interaction, such as the antagonistic relationship between salicylic acid (SA)-jasmonic acid and cytokinin-auxin. Results In this study, we report an antagonistic interaction between SA signaling and apoplastic ROS signaling. Treatment with ozone (O3) leads to a ROS burst in the apoplast and induces extensive changes in gene expression and elevation of defense hormones. However, Arabidopsis thaliana dnd1 (defense no death1) exhibited an attenuated response to O3. In addition, the dnd1 mutant displayed constitutive expression of defense genes and spontaneous cell death. To determine the exact process which blocks the apoplastic ROS signaling, double and triple mutants involved in various signaling pathway were generated in dnd1 background. Simultaneous elimination of SA-dependent and SA-independent signaling components from dnd1 restored its responsiveness to O3. Conversely, pre-treatment of plants with SA or using mutants that constitutively activate SA signaling led to an attenuation of changes in gene expression elicited by O3. Conclusions Based upon these findings, we conclude that plants are able to prioritize the response between ROS and SA via an antagonistic action of SA and SA signaling on apoplastic ROS signaling. PMID:24898702

  15. Redox Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a major cause of mortality in the world, has been extensively studied over the past decade. However, the exact mechanism underlying its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in the progression of CVD. Particularly, ROS are commonly engaged in developing typical characteristics of atherosclerosis, one of the dominant CVDs. This review will discuss the involvement of ROS in atherosclerosis, specifically their effect on inflammation, disturbed blood flow and arterial wall remodeling. Pharmacological interventions target ROS in order to alleviate oxidative stress and CVD symptoms, yet results are varied due to the paradoxical role of ROS in CVD. Lack of effectiveness in clinical trials suggests that understanding the exact role of ROS in the pathophysiology of CVD and developing novel treatments, such as antioxidant gene therapy and nanotechnology-related antioxidant delivery, could provide a therapeutic advance in treating CVDs. While genetic therapies focusing on specific antioxidant expression seem promising in CVD treatments, multiple technological challenges exist precluding its immediate clinical applications. PMID:26610475

  16. UV activates growth factor receptors via reactive oxygen intermediates

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to UV irradiation induces rapid and transient expression of early growth response-1 gene (Egr-1) encoding a transcription factor that plays a role in cell survival. These signals from the irradiated cell surface are likely to involve more than one pathway, and we show here that an essential pathway involves activation of several growth factor receptors by reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). UVC irradiation causes the tyrosine phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts and HC11 mouse mammary cells. EGFR activation by irradiation of cells is abrogated by suramin, by antioxidants, and by the presence of a dominant negative EGFR. UV induces the formation of complexes between activated EGFR and SOS, Grb2, PLC gamma, and SHC that can be precipitated with antibodies to EGFR. The activation of EGFR by UV is mimicked by H2O2, suggesting that ROI may function upstream of EGFR activation. Our observations support the hypothesis that ROI and growth factor receptors operate in the early steps of the UV signal that lead to the enhanced expression and activity of Egr-1. PMID:8601609

  17. Relationship between obesity and serum reactive oxygen metabolites in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kogawa, Terumi; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2013-11-01

    Various cross-sectional studies have revealed a significant positive relationship between systemic oxidative stress and obesity-related indices such as body mass index (BMI, kg/m²). However, little is known of the role of oxidative stress during adolescence. The aim of this study was to determine the association between obesity and serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) in adolescents. A total of 595 healthy junior high school students from northern Japan were enrolled in the study. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring serum levels of ROM. Obesity indices included BMI and percentage body fat (PBF). The analyses were stratified by sex and controlled for age and menarche. Partial correlation coefficients and analysis of covariance were also analyzed. In female students, ROM levels increased with increasing BMI and PBF. Therefore, ROM levels were significantly higher in the underweight group than in the BMI-classified overweight-obese (P < 0.001) and normal weight groups (P < 0.05). ROM levels were significantly higher in the high PBF group than in the underweight (P < 0.05) and normal groups (P < 0.001). The results of this study show that, regardless of menarche, obesity indicators such as BMI and PBF are correlated with the level of oxidative stress in female adolescents.

  18. Are Reactive Oxygen Species Always Detrimental to Pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are deadly weapons used by phagocytes and other cell types, such as lung epithelial cells, against pathogens. ROS can kill pathogens directly by causing oxidative damage to biocompounds or indirectly by stimulating pathogen elimination by various nonoxidative mechanisms, including pattern recognition receptors signaling, autophagy, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and T-lymphocyte responses. Thus, one should expect that the inhibition of ROS production promote infection. Increasing evidences support that in certain particular infections, antioxidants decrease and prooxidants increase pathogen burden. In this study, we review the classic infections that are controlled by ROS and the cases in which ROS appear as promoters of infection, challenging the paradigm. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which ROS could promote particular infections. These mechanisms are still not completely clear but include the metabolic effects of ROS on pathogen physiology, ROS-induced damage to the immune system, and ROS-induced activation of immune defense mechanisms that are subsequently hijacked by particular pathogens to act against more effective microbicidal mechanisms of the immune system. The effective use of antioxidants as therapeutic agents against certain infections is a realistic possibility that is beginning to be applied against viruses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1000–1037. PMID:23992156

  19. Vascular-derived reactive oxygen species for homeostasis and diseases.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kimio; Berk, Bradford C; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2011-08-01

    Numerous basic and clinical studies have clearly identified that reactive oxygen species (ROS, i.e., H(2)O(2), O(2)(-), and ()OH) has a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, we still have no strong therapeutic strategy for clinical benefits of antioxidant administration. One potential reason for those could be a crucial role of ROS for intracellular signaling pathways that is important for vascular functions in a very low concentration. ROS contributes to the physiology and pathology of vasculature, but precise molecular regulations remain elusive. The mechanism how excessive ROS (oxidative stress) deteriorate vascular function and promote vascular diseases has not been clearly elucidated. Cyclophilin A (CyPA) has been studied as a multifunctional protein that is upregulated in a variety of inflammatory conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, autoimmune disease, and cancer. CyPA has been classified as an immunophilins and has a variety of intracellular functions including intracellular signaling, protein trafficking, and the regulating other proteins. Besides intracellular functions, we revealed that CyPA is a secreted molecule that has a pathological role in the cardiovascular system. CyPA has emerged as a potential biomarker and mediator of cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reactive oxygen species, nutrition, hypoxia and diseases: Problems solved?

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Petry, Andreas; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Within the last twenty years the view on reactive oxygen species (ROS) has changed; they are no longer only considered to be harmful but also necessary for cellular communication and homeostasis in different organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. In the latter, ROS were shown to modulate diverse physiological processes including the regulation of growth factor signaling, the hypoxic response, inflammation and the immune response. During the last 60–100 years the life style, at least in the Western world, has changed enormously. This became obvious with an increase in caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure as well as the appearance of alcoholism and smoking; These changes were shown to contribute to generation of ROS which are, at least in part, associated with the occurrence of several chronic diseases like adiposity, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, and cancer. In this review we discuss aspects and problems on the role of intracellular ROS formation and nutrition with the link to diseases and their problematic therapeutical issues. PMID:26339717

  1. Serum levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Roscino, Maria Teresa; Minoia, Giuseppe; Trisolini, Carmelinda; Spedicato, Massimo; Mutinati, Maddalena; Pantaleo, Marianna; Jirillo, Felicita; Sciorsci, Raffaele L

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the serum concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the different phases of the estrous cycle in the bitch, in order to establish their physiological values. 56 healthy mixed-breed bitches were enrolled at this purpose and divided into 4 groups, standing on the different phases of the estrus cycle. Blood samples were collected in all groups and serum ROS concentrations were determined. Proestral concentrations were statistically higher than anestral ones, and statistically lower than those found in estrus (p<0.001). The highest concentrations of ROS were detected at estrus, that is, in the peri-ovulatory period. This sharp increase in ROS concentrations is related to the acute inflammatory process underlying ovulation and to the increase in immune and metabolic activities, cytological changes and myometrial contractility promoted by the high levels of estrogens. In diestrus, the mean concentration of ROS decreases. This reduction did not show any statistically significant difference with the mean value observed in proestrus. In this phase, in fact, the high concentrations of progesterone, exerting an antioxidant and immunodepressive effect, justify the lower mean concentration of ROS detected. In anestrus, the lowest concentrations of ROS were observed, for the reduced metabolic and endocrine activity occurring in this phase of the estrous cycle. In conclusion our results establish the physiologic levels of ROS during the estrous cycle in the bitch and reflect the endocrine morphologic and metabolic changes occurring during it.

  2. Carbocisteine can scavenge reactive oxygen species in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nogawa, Hisashi; Ishibashi, Yuji; Ogawa, Akitsu; Masuda, Kayoko; Tsubuki, Takeshi; Kameda, Tomoko; Matsuzawa, Shigeki

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of various respiratory diseases. Carbocisteine, a mucoregulatory drug, is used in the treatment of several disease states but little information is available about its scavenger effects on ROS. The present study was designed to examine the scavenger effects of carbocisteine on ROS. The oxidation-reduction potential of carbocisteine was measured, and its scavenger effects on hypochlorous acid (HOCl), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hydroxyl radical (OH(*)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) were examined in cell-free conditions. The effects of carbocisteine on ROS generated from rat neutrophils, intracellular oxidative stress and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) from IL-1 beta-induced airway epithelial cells, NCI-H292 cells, were investigated. Carbocisteine provided a reducing stage and showed scavenger effects on H(2)O(2), HOCl, OH(*) and ONOO(-) in cell-free conditions. Carbocisteine inhibited ROS generation from rat neutrophils, intracellular oxidative stress and release of IL-8 and IL-6 from NCI-H292 cells. N-acetyl-L-cysteine, a radical scavenger, also inhibited these events related to ROS as well as carbocisteine. These results suggest that carbocisteine could exert anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects through directly scavenging ROS in addition to its previously known mucoregulatory effect.

  3. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  4. NSAIDs and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly used drugs worldwide. NSAIDs are used for a variety of conditions including pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and musculoskeletal disorders. The beneficial effects of NSAIDs in reducing or relieving pain are well established, and other benefits such as reducing inflammation and anticancer effects are also documented. The undesirable side effects of NSAIDs include ulcers, internal bleeding, kidney failure, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some of these side effects may be due to the oxidative stress induced by NSAIDs in different tissues. NSAIDs have been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different cell types including cardiac and cardiovascular related cells. Increases in ROS result in increased levels of oxidized proteins which alters key intracellular signaling pathways. One of these key pathways is apoptosis which causes cell death when significantly activated. This review discusses the relationship between NSAIDs and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the role of NSAID-induced ROS in CVD. PMID:26457127

  5. Formation of protein S-nitrosylation by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, K Htet; Clément, M-V

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, the formation of whole cellular S-nitrosylated proteins (protein-SNOs) by the reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and superoxide (O2(•-)) is demonstrated. A spectrum of protein cysteine oxidative modifications was detected upon incubation of serum-starved mouse embryonic fibroblasts with increasing concentrations of exogenous H2O2, ranging from exclusive protein-SNOs at low concentrations to a mixture of protein-SNOs and other protein oxidation at higher concentrations to exclusively non-SNO protein oxidation at the highest concentrations of the oxidant used. Furthermore, formation of protein-SNOs was also detected upon inhibition of the antioxidant protein Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase that results in an increase in intracellular concentration of O2(•-). These results were further validated using the phosphatase and tensin homologue, PTEN, as a model of a protein sensitive to oxidative modifications. The formation of protein-SNOs by H2O2 and O2(•-) was prevented by the NO scavenger, c-PTIO, as well as the peroxinitrite decomposition catalyst, FETPPS, and correlated with the production or the consumption of nitric oxide (NO), respectively. These data suggest that the formation of protein-SNOs by H2O2 or O2(•-) requires the presence or the production of NO and involves the formation of the nitrosylating intermediate, peroxinitrite.

  6. Redox Mechanism of Reactive Oxygen Species in Exercise

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Li, Juan; Liu, Zewen; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Yang, Wenge; Zuo, Li

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that regular exercise can benefit health by enhancing antioxidant defenses in the body. However, unaccustomed and/or exhaustive exercise can generate excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to oxidative stress-related tissue damages and impaired muscle contractility. ROS are produced in both aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Mitochondria, NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidases have all been identified as potential contributors to ROS production, yet the exact redox mechanisms underlying exercise-induced oxidative stress remain elusive. Interestingly, moderate exposure to ROS is necessary to induce body's adaptive responses such as the activation of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Dietary antioxidant manipulation can also reduce ROS levels and muscle fatigue, as well as enhance exercise recovery. To elucidate the complex role of ROS in exercise, this review updates on new findings of ROS origins within skeletal muscles associated with various types of exercises such as endurance, sprint and mountain climbing. In addition, we will examine the corresponding antioxidant defense systems as well as dietary manipulation against damages caused by ROS. PMID:27872595

  7. Reactive oxygen species in phytopathogenic fungi: signaling, development, and disease.

    PubMed

    Heller, Jens; Tudzynski, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a major role in pathogen-plant interactions: recognition of a pathogen by the plant rapidly triggers the oxidative burst, which is necessary for further defense reactions. The specific role of ROS in pathogen defense is still unclear. Studies on the pathogen so far have focused on the importance of the oxidative stress response (OSR) systems to overcome the oxidative burst or of its avoidance by effectors. This review focuses on the role of ROS for fungal virulence and development. In the recent years, it has become obvious that (a) fungal OSR systems might not have the predicted crucial role in pathogenicity, (b) fungal pathogens, especially necrotrophs, can actively contribute to the ROS level in planta and even take advantage of the host's response, (c) fungi possess superoxide-generating NADPH oxidases similar to mammalian Nox complexes that are important for pathogenicity; however, recent data indicate that they are not directly involved in pathogen-host communication but in fungal differentiation processes that are necessary for virulence. Copyright © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Production Induced by the Gut Microbiota: Pharmacotherapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.M.; Mercante, J.W.; Neish, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the mammalian intestine influences diverse homeostatic functions, including regulation of cellular growth, maintenance of barrier function, and modulation of immune responses. However, it is unknown how commensal prokaryotic organisms mechanistically influence eukaryotic signaling networks. Recent data has demonstrated that gut epithelia contacted by enteric commensal bacteria rapidly generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the induced generation of ROS via stimulation of formyl peptide receptors is a cardinal feature of the cellular response of phagocytes to pathogenic or commensal bacteria, evidence is accumulating that ROS are also similarly elicited in other cell types, including intestinal epithelia, in response to microbial signals. Additionally, ROS have been shown to serve as critical second messengers in multiple signal transduction pathways stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This physiologically-generated ROS is known to participate in cellular signaling via the rapid and transient oxidative inactivation of a defined class of sensor proteins bearing oxidant-sensitive thiol groups. These proteins include tyrosine phosphatases that serve as regulators of MAP kinase pathways, cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as components involved in control of ubiquitination-mediated NF-κB activation. Consistently, microbial-elicited ROS has been shown to mediate increased cellular proliferation and motility and to modulate innate immune signaling. These results demonstrate how enteric microbiota influence regulatory networks of the mammalian intestinal epithelia. We hypothesize that many of the known effects of the normal microbiota on intestinal physiology, and potential beneficial effects of candidate probiotic bacteria, may be at least partially mediated by this ROS-dependent mechanism. PMID:22360484

  9. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Eric; Cízková, Alena; Demont, Jocelyne; Vojtísková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, Nicole L W; Keijer, Jaap; Simonnet, Hélène; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, Stanislav; Godinot, Catherine; Houstek, Josef

    2008-08-01

    A decrease in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is characteristic of many cancer types and, in particular, of clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) deficient in von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) gene. In the absence of functional pVHL, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1-alpha and HIF2-alpha subunits are stabilized, which induces the transcription of many genes including those involved in glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Transfection of these cells with vhl is known to restore HIF-alpha subunit degradation and to reduce glycolytic genes transcription. We show that such transfection with vhl of 786-0 CCRC (which are devoid of HIF1-alpha) also increased the content of respiratory chain subunits. However, the levels of most transcripts encoding OXPHOS subunits were not modified. Inhibition of HIF2-alpha synthesis by RNA interference in pVHL-deficient 786-0 CCRC also restored respiratory chain subunit content and clearly demonstrated a key role of HIF in OXPHOS regulation. In agreement with these observations, stabilization of HIF-alpha subunit by CoCl(2) decreased respiratory chain subunit levels in CCRC cells expressing pVHL. In addition, HIF stimulated ROS production and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase content. OXPHOS subunit content was also decreased by added H(2)O(2.) Interestingly, desferrioxamine (DFO) that also stabilized HIF did not decrease respiratory chain subunit level. While CoCl(2) significantly stimulates ROS production, DFO is known to prevent hydroxyl radical production by inhibiting Fenton reactions. This indicates that the HIF-induced decrease in OXPHOS is at least in part mediated by hydroxyl radical production.

  10. Respiration in adipocytes is inhibited by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong; Si, Yaguang; Shirihai, Orian S; Si, Huiqing; Schultz, Vera; Corkey, Richard F; Hu, Liping; Deeney, Jude T; Guo, Wen; Corkey, Barbara E

    2010-08-01

    It is a desirable goal to stimulate fuel oxidation in adipocytes and shift the balance toward less fuel storage and more burning. To understand this regulatory process, respiration was measured in primary rat adipocytes, mitochondria, and fat-fed mice. Maximum O(2) consumption, in vitro, was determined with a chemical uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation (carbonylcyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP)). The adenosine triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio was measured by luminescence. Mitochondria were localized by confocal microscopy with MitoTracker Green and their membrane potential (Delta psi(M)) measured using tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester perchlorate (TMRE). The effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on respiration and body composition in vivo was assessed in mice. Addition of FCCP collapsed Delta psi(M) and decreased the ATP/ADP ratio. However, we demonstrated the same rate of adipocyte O(2) consumption in the absence or presence of fuels and FCCP. Respiration was only stimulated when reactive oxygen species (ROS) were scavenged by pyruvate or NAC: other fuels or fuel combinations had little effect. Importantly, the ROS scavenging role of pyruvate was not affected by rotenone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I. In addition, mice that consumed NAC exhibited increased O(2) consumption and decreased body fat in vivo. These studies suggest for the first time that adipocyte O(2) consumption may be inhibited by ROS, because pyruvate and NAC stimulated respiration. ROS inhibition of O(2) consumption may explain the difficulty to identify effective strategies to increase fat burning in adipocytes. Stimulating fuel oxidation in adipocytes by decreasing ROS may provide a novel means to shift the balance from fuel storage to fuel burning.

  11. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Gat

    2016-01-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS. Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. PMID:27535793

  13. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms in teratogenesis involving reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; Bhuller, Yadvinder; Chen, Connie S; Jeng, Winnie; Kasapinovic, Sonja; Kennedy, Julia C; Kim, Perry M; Laposa, Rebecca R; McCallum, Gordon P; Nicol, Christopher J; Parman, Toufan; Wiley, Michael J; Wong, Andrea W

    2005-09-01

    Developmental pathologies may result from endogenous or xenobiotic-enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules and/or alter signal transduction. This minireview focuses upon several model drugs (phenytoin, thalidomide, methamphetamine), environmental chemicals (benzo[a]pyrene) and gamma irradiation to examine this hypothesis in vivo and in embryo culture using mouse, rat and rabbit models. Embryonic prostaglandin H synthases (PHSs) and lipoxygenases bioactivate xenobiotics to free radical intermediates that initiate ROS formation, resulting in oxidation of proteins, lipids and DNA. Oxidative DNA damage and embryopathies are reduced in PHS knockout mice, and in mice treated with PHS inhibitors, antioxidative enzymes, antioxidants and free radical trapping agents. Thalidomide causes embryonic DNA oxidation in susceptible (rabbit) but not resistant (mouse) species. Embryopathies are increased in mutant mice deficient in the antioxidative enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), or by glutathione (GSH) depletion, or inhibition of GSH peroxidase or GSH reductase. Inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout mice are partially protected. Inhibition of Ras or NF-kB pathways reduces embryopathies, implicating ROS-mediated signal transduction. Atm and p53 knockout mice deficient in DNA damage response/repair are more susceptible to xenobiotic or radiation embryopathies, suggesting a teratological role for DNA damage, consistent with enhanced susceptibility to methamphetamine in ogg1 knockout mice with deficient repair of oxidative DNA damage. Even endogenous embryonic oxidative stress carries a risk, since untreated G6PD- or ATM-deficient mice have increased embryopathies. Thus, embryonic processes regulating the balance of ROS formation, oxidative DNA damage and repair, and ROS-mediated signal transduction may be important determinants of teratological risk.

  14. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianfei; Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  15. Free radicals, reactive oxygen species, oxidative stress and its classification.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-12-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) initially considered as only damaging agents in living organisms further were found to play positive roles also. This paper describes ROS homeostasis, principles of their investigation and technical approaches to investigate ROS-related processes. Especial attention is paid to complications related to experimental documentation of these processes, their diversity, spatiotemporal distribution, relationships with physiological state of the organisms. Imbalance between ROS generation and elimination in favor of the first with certain consequences for cell physiology has been called "oxidative stress". Although almost 30years passed since the first definition of oxidative stress was introduced by Helmut Sies, to date we have no accepted classification of oxidative stress. In order to fill up this gape here classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity is proposed. Due to that oxidative stress may be classified as basal oxidative stress (BOS), low intensity oxidative stress (LOS), intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS), and high intensity oxidative stress (HOS). Another classification of potential interest may differentiate three categories such as mild oxidative stress (MOS), temperate oxidative stress (TOS), and finally severe (strong) oxidative stress (SOS). Perspective directions of investigations in the field include development of sophisticated classification of oxidative stresses, accurate identification of cellular ROS targets and their arranged responses to ROS influence, real in situ functions and operation of so-called "antioxidants", intracellular spatiotemporal distribution and effects of ROS, deciphering of molecular mechanisms responsible for cellular response to ROS attacks, and ROS involvement in realization of normal cellular functions in cellular homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The impact of reactive oxygen species on anticancer therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Donika; Bakalova, Rumiana; Lazarova, Dessisslava; Gadjeva, Veselina; Zhelev, Zhivko

    2013-01-01

    Over 50 years of experience in free radical biology and medicine shows that normal cells of healthy mammals are characterized by a low steady-state level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a constant (reference) level of reducing equivalents. A lasting increase of ROS above the critical level leads to permanent oxidative stress in the cells. This could cause genomic instability and mutations, which are responsible for adaptation of cells to oxidative stress and their survival in an oxidative environment. In turn, these events could provoke malignancy. It is widely accepted that the balance between ROS and reducing equivalents in cells and tissues determines their redox status. The evaluation of tissue redox status has great diagnostic potential in cancer, as well as prognostic potential for cancer therapy, and could significantly contribute to the planning of appropriate treatment and to increasing the patients' quality of life. The conventional therapeutic strategy is based on drugs that increase ROS generation and induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, this therapeutic approach has serious disadvantages: the expression of various toxic side effects in normal (non-cancer) tissues. The current review describes the basics of free radical biology in carcinogenesis. The authors emphasize the different redox status of normal and cancer cells, which permits the use of this parameter as a new therapeutic target. The authors also outline some directions for the development of promising therapeutic strategies based on the regulation of redox signaling using combined therapy. The review is intended for a broad readership - from non-specialists to researchers in the field of cancer biochemistry and pharmacy.

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Alter Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Weber, Thomas J.; Tan, Ruimin; Markillie, Lye Meng; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant P450 protein in human liver and intestine and is highly inducible by a variety of drugs and other compounds. The P450 catalytic cycle is known to uncouple and release reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the effects of ROS from P450 and other enzymes in the endo-plasmic reticulum have been poorly studied from the perspective of effects on cell biology. In this study, we expressed low levels of CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, and examined effects on intracellular levels of ROS and on the secretion of a variety of growth factors that are important in extracellular communication. Using the redox-sensitive dye RedoxSensor red, we demonstrate that CYP3A4 expression increases levels of ROS in viable cells. A customELISA microarray platform was employed to demonstrate that expression of CYP3A4 increased secretion of amphiregulin, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, matrix metalloprotease 2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor, but suppressed secretion of CD14. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine suppressed all P450-dependent changes in protein secretion except for CD14. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that changes in protein secretion were consistently associated with corresponding changes in gene expression. Inhibition of the NF-{kappa}B pathway blocked P450 effects on PDGF secretion. CYP3A4 expression also altered protein secretion in human mammary epithelial cells and C10 mouse lung cells. Overall, these results suggest that increased ROS production in the endoplasmic reticulum alters the secretion of proteins that have key roles in paracrine and autocrine signaling.

  18. Physiologic and pathologic levels of reactive oxygen species in neat semen of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Desai, Nisarg; Sharma, Rakesh; Makker, Kartikeya; Sabanegh, Edmund; Agarwal, Ashok

    2009-11-01

    To define physiologic levels of reactive oxygen species in infertile men and establish a cutoff value of reactive oxygen species level in neat semen with a high sensitivity and specificity to differentiate infertile men from fertile donors (controls). Reactive oxygen species levels were measured in the neat semen samples (n = 51) from fertile donors and infertile patients (n = 54). Reproductive research laboratory at a tertiary care hospital. Infertile patients from male infertility clinic. Reactive oxygen species measurement in neat semen sample using luminol-based chemiluminescence method, receiver operating characteristic curves. Seminal reactive oxygen species levels, cutoff value, sensitivity and specificity, positive and negative predictive values. The best cutoff value to distinguish between healthy fertile donors and infertile men was 0.0185 x 10(6) counted photons per minute/20 x 10(6) sperm. At this threshold, the specificity was 82% and the sensitivity was 78%. This value can be defined as basal reactive oxygen species level in infertile men. Reactive oxygen species levels in neat semen samples as measured by luminol-based chemiluminescence are a highly specific and sensitive test in the diagnosis of infertility. This test also may help clinicians treat patients with seminal oxidative stress.

  19. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-08-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7' -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen species generation by cavitation incepted efficiently using nonlinear propagation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-10-01

    Sonodynamic treatment is a treatment method that uses chemical bio-effect of cavitation bubbles. Reactive oxygen species that can kill cancerous tissue is induced by such chemical effect of cavitation bubbles and it is important to generate them efficiently for effective sonodynamic treatment. Cavitation cloud can be formed by an effect of nonlinear propagation and focus and in this study, it was experimentally investigated if cavitation cloud was useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species. As a result, it was demonstrated that cavitation cloud would be useful for efficient generation of reactive oxygen species.

  1. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  2. Upsides and Downsides of Reactive Oxygen Species for Cancer: The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumorigenesis, Prevention, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Hevia, David; Patchva, Sridevi; Park, Byoungduck; Koh, Wonil

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Extensive research during the last quarter century has revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the body, primarily by the mitochondria, play a major role in various cell-signaling pathways. Most risk factors associated with chronic diseases (e.g., cancer), such as stress, tobacco, environmental pollutants, radiation, viral infection, diet, and bacterial infection, interact with cells through the generation of ROS. Recent Advances: ROS, in turn, activate various transcription factors (e.g., nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells [NF-κB], activator protein-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), resulting in the expression of proteins that control inflammation, cellular transformation, tumor cell survival, tumor cell proliferation and invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Paradoxically, ROS also control the expression of various tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and PTEN). Similarly, γ-radiation and various chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer mediate their effects through the production of ROS. Interestingly, ROS have also been implicated in the chemopreventive and anti-tumor action of nutraceuticals derived from fruits, vegetables, spices, and other natural products used in traditional medicine. Critical Issues: These statements suggest both “upside” (cancer-suppressing) and “downside” (cancer-promoting) actions of the ROS. Thus, similar to tumor necrosis factor-α, inflammation, and NF-κB, ROS act as a double-edged sword. This paradox provides a great challenge for researchers whose aim is to exploit ROS stress for the development of cancer therapies. Future Directions: The various mechanisms by which ROS mediate paradoxical effects are discussed in this article. The outstanding questions and future directions raised by our current understanding are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1295–1322. PMID:22117137

  3. KRIT1 Regulates the Homeostasis of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-01-01

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1−/− cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45α, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the

  4. KRIT1 regulates the homeostasis of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Goitre, Luca; Balzac, Fiorella; Degani, Simona; Degan, Paolo; Marchi, Saverio; Pinton, Paolo; Retta, Saverio Francesco

    2010-07-26

    KRIT1 is a gene responsible for Cerebral Cavernous Malformations (CCM), a major cerebrovascular disease characterized by abnormally enlarged and leaky capillaries that predispose to seizures, focal neurological deficits, and fatal intracerebral hemorrhage. Comprehensive analysis of the KRIT1 gene in CCM patients has suggested that KRIT1 functions need to be severely impaired for pathogenesis. However, the molecular and cellular functions of KRIT1 as well as CCM pathogenesis mechanisms are still research challenges. We found that KRIT1 plays an important role in molecular mechanisms involved in the maintenance of the intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) homeostasis to prevent oxidative cellular damage. In particular, we demonstrate that KRIT1 loss/down-regulation is associated with a significant increase in intracellular ROS levels. Conversely, ROS levels in KRIT1(-/-) cells are significantly and dose-dependently reduced after restoration of KRIT1 expression. Moreover, we show that the modulation of intracellular ROS levels by KRIT1 loss/restoration is strictly correlated with the modulation of the expression of the antioxidant protein SOD2 as well as of the transcriptional factor FoxO1, a master regulator of cell responses to oxidative stress and a modulator of SOD2 levels. Furthermore, we show that the KRIT1-dependent maintenance of low ROS levels facilitates the downregulation of cyclin D1 expression required for cell transition from proliferative growth to quiescence. Finally, we demonstrate that the enhanced ROS levels in KRIT1(-/-) cells are associated with an increased cell susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage and a marked induction of the DNA damage sensor and repair gene Gadd45alpha, as well as with a decline of mitochondrial energy metabolism. Taken together, our results point to a new model where KRIT1 limits the accumulation of intracellular oxidants and prevents oxidative stress-mediated cellular dysfunction and DNA damage by enhancing the cell

  5. Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saeed R

    2014-09-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall's plaques (RPs) or Randall's plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall's plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles at

  6. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  8. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  9. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  10. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  11. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species.

  12. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  13. NADPH oxidase-derived ROS and the regulation of pulmonary vessel tone

    PubMed Central

    Frazziano, G.; Champion, H. C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary vessel constriction results from an imbalance between vasodilator and vasoconstrictor factors released by the endothelium including nitric oxide, endothelin, prostanoids, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS, generated by a variety of enzymatic sources (such as mitochondria and NADPH oxidases, a.k.a. Nox), appear to play a pivotal role in vascular homeostasis, whereas elevated levels effect vascular disease. The pulmonary circulation is very sensitive to changes in the partial pressure of oxygen and differs from the systemic circulation in its response to this change. In fact, the pulmonary vessels contract in response to low oxygen tension, whereas systemic vessels dilate. Growing evidence suggests that ROS production and ROS-related pathways may be key factors that underlie this differential response to oxygen tension. A major emphasis of our laboratory is the role of Nox isozymes in cardiovascular disease. In this review, we will focus our attention on the role of Nox-derived ROS in the control of pulmonary vascular tone. PMID:22427511

  14. [Effects of water and light interaction on reactive oxygen metabolism in ginger leaves].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zheng; Li, Hai-Dong; Li, Xiu; Xiao, Jing; Xu, Kun

    2013-12-01

    To explore the relationship between water supply in roots, light intensity on leaves and reactive oxygen metabolism, the effects of various treatments including natural light plus normal watering (T1), 50% shading plus normal watering (T2), natural light plus PEG-6000 simulated drought (T3), 50% shading plus simulated drought (T4) on reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activity in ginger leaves were studied. The results showed that, 6 days after treatment, the O2* production rate and H2O2 and MDA contents remarkably increased in ginger leaves at midday. Treatment T3 showed the greatest increment, followed by T4, T1 and T2 in order. In addition, the activities of SOD and POD in all treatments and CAT in T3 and T4 noticeably decreased, while CAT in T1 and T2 exhibited a high activity at midday. Throughout the whole treatment, reactive oxygen level and antioxidant enzyme activities of ginger leaves in T1 and T2 remained stable, with a higher activity in T1 than in T2. However, the reactive oxygen level kept increasing in leaves exposed to treatments T3 and T4. Meanwhile, the activities of antioxidant enzymes increased firstly and then decreased. Taken together, this study demonstrated that drought stress, especially drought plus light stress, led to an increased accumulation of reactive oxygen in ginger leaves, while shading was conducive to maintaining high activity of protective enzymes, and therefore to reducing reactive oxygen level and alleviate drought-induced injury.

  15. Oxygen sensitivity of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation depends on metabolic conditions.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Brookes, Paul S

    2009-06-12

    The mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a central role in many cell signaling pathways, but debate still surrounds its regulation by factors, such as substrate availability, [O2] and metabolic state. Previously, we showed that in isolated mitochondria respiring on succinate, ROS generation was a hyperbolic function of [O2]. In the current study, we used a wide variety of substrates and inhibitors to probe the O2 sensitivity of mitochondrial ROS generation under different metabolic conditions. From such data, the apparent Km for O2 of putative ROS-generating sites within mitochondria was estimated as follows: 0.2, 0.9, 2.0, and 5.0 microM O2 for the complex I flavin site, complex I electron backflow, complex III QO site, and electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase of beta-oxidation, respectively. Differential effects of respiratory inhibitors on ROS generation were also observed at varying [O2]. Based on these data, we hypothesize that at physiological [O2], complex I is a significant source of ROS, whereas the electron transfer flavoprotein quinone oxidoreductase may only contribute to ROS generation at very high [O2]. Furthermore, we suggest that previous discrepancies in the assignment of effects of inhibitors on ROS may be due to differences in experimental [O2]. Finally, the data set (see supplemental material) may be useful in the mathematical modeling of mitochondrial metabolism.

  16. Oxygen Pathway Modeling Estimates High Reactive Oxygen Species Production above the Highest Permanent Human Habitation

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper; Roca, Josep; Wagner, Peter D.; Cascante, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the inner mitochondrial membrane is one of many fundamental processes governing the balance between health and disease. It is well known that ROS are necessary signaling molecules in gene expression, yet when expressed at high levels, ROS may cause oxidative stress and cell damage. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia may alter ROS production by changing mitochondrial Po2 (). Because depends on the balance between O2 transport and utilization, we formulated an integrative mathematical model of O2 transport and utilization in skeletal muscle to predict conditions to cause abnormally high ROS generation. Simulations using data from healthy subjects during maximal exercise at sea level reveal little mitochondrial ROS production. However, altitude triggers high mitochondrial ROS production in muscle regions with high metabolic capacity but limited O2 delivery. This altitude roughly coincides with the highest location of permanent human habitation. Above 25,000 ft., more than 90% of exercising muscle is predicted to produce abnormally high levels of ROS, corresponding to the “death zone” in mountaineering. PMID:25375931

  17. Oxygen pathway modeling estimates high reactive oxygen species production above the highest permanent human habitation.

    PubMed

    Cano, Isaac; Selivanov, Vitaly; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Tegnér, Jesper; Roca, Josep; Wagner, Peter D; Cascante, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from the inner mitochondrial membrane is one of many fundamental processes governing the balance between health and disease. It is well known that ROS are necessary signaling molecules in gene expression, yet when expressed at high levels, ROS may cause oxidative stress and cell damage. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia may alter ROS production by changing mitochondrial Po2 (PmO2). Because PmO2 depends on the balance between O2 transport and utilization, we formulated an integrative mathematical model of O2 transport and utilization in skeletal muscle to predict conditions to cause abnormally high ROS generation. Simulations using data from healthy subjects during maximal exercise at sea level reveal little mitochondrial ROS production. However, altitude triggers high mitochondrial ROS production in muscle regions with high metabolic capacity but limited O2 delivery. This altitude roughly coincides with the highest location of permanent human habitation. Above 25,000 ft., more than 90% of exercising muscle is predicted to produce abnormally high levels of ROS, corresponding to the "death zone" in mountaineering.

  18. Aging and estrogen alter endothelial reactivity to reactive oxygen species in coronary arterioles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Lori S; Chen, Bei; Reyes, Rafael A; Leblanc, Amanda J; Teng, Bunyen; Mustafa, S Jamal; Muller-Delp, Judy M

    2011-06-01

    Endothelium-dependent, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasodilation can be impaired by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this deleterious effect of ROS on NO availability may increase with aging. Endothelial function declines rapidly after menopause, possibly because of loss of circulating estrogen and its antioxidant effects. The purpose of the current study was to determine the role of O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) in regulating flow-induced dilation in coronary arterioles of young (6-mo) and aged (24-mo) intact, ovariectomized (OVX), or OVX + estrogen-treated (OVE) female Fischer 344 rats. Both aging and OVX reduced flow-induced NO production, whereas flow-induced H(2)O(2) production was not altered by age or estrogen status. Flow-induced vasodilation was evaluated before and after treatment with the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic Tempol (100 μM) or the H(2)O(2) scavenger catalase (100 U/ml). Removal of H(2)O(2) with catalase reduced flow-induced dilation in all groups, whereas Tempol diminished vasodilation in intact and OVE, but not OVX, rats. Immunoblot analysis revealed elevated nitrotyrosine with aging and OVX. In young rats, OVX reduced SOD protein while OVE increased SOD in aged rats; catalase protein did not differ in any group. Collectively, these studies suggest that O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) are critical components of flow-induced vasodilation in coronary arterioles from female rats; however, a chronic deficiency of O(2)(-) buffering by SOD contributes to impaired flow-induced dilation with aging and loss of estrogen. Furthermore, these data indicate that estrogen replacement restores O(2)(-) homeostasis and flow-induced dilation of coronary arterioles, even at an advanced age.

  19. Nanoparticle Inhalation Impairs Coronary Microvascular Reactivity via a Local Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, A. J.; Moseley, A. M.; Chen, B. T.; Frazer, D.; Castranova, V.

    2010-01-01

    We have shown that nanoparticle inhalation impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilation in coronary arterioles. It is unknown whether local reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to this effect. Rats were exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles via inhalation to produce a pulmonary deposition of 10 µg. Coronary arterioles were isolated from the left anterior descending artery distribution, and responses to acetylcholine, arachidonic acid, and U46619 were assessed. Contributions of nitric oxide synthase and prostaglandin were assessed via competitive inhibition with NG-Monomethyl-L-Arginine (L-NMMA) and indomethacin. Microvascular wall ROS were quantified via dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence. Coronary arterioles from rats exposed to nano-TiO2 exhibited an attenuated vasodilator response to ACh, and this coincided with a 45% increase in DHE fluorescence. Coincubation with 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl and catalase ameliorated impairments in ACh-induced vasodilation from nanoparticle exposed rats. Incubation with either L-NMMA or indomethacin significantly attenuated Ach-induced vasodilation in sham-control rats, but had no effect in rats exposed to nano-TiO2. Arachidonic acid induced vasoconstriction in coronary arterioles from rats exposed to nano-TiO2, but dilated arterioles from sham-control rats. These results suggest that nanoparticle exposure significantly impairs endothelium-dependent vasoreactivity in coronary arterioles, and this may be due in large part to increases in microvascular ROS. Furthermore, altered prostanoid formation may also contribute to this dysfunction. Such disturbances in coronary microvascular function may contribute to the cardiac events associated with exposure to particles in this size range. PMID:20033351

  20. Reactive oxygen species controllable non-thermal helium plasmas for evaluation of plasmid DNA strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Kim, Jae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Ballato, John; Cao, Weiguo; Kim, Sung-O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, oxygen-rich helium plasmas were investigated to achieve an enhanced reactive oxygen species concentration at low voltage driving conditions. A non-thermal plasma device was fabricated based on a theta-shaped tube, and its potential was investigated for use in topological alteration of plasmid DNA. The optical emission spectra of the plasma showed that the oxygen flow affected the plasma properties, even though an oxygen plasma was not produced. The plasmid DNA strand breaks became more significant with the addition of oxygen flow to the helium in a single hollow, theta-shaped tube with other experimental conditions being unchanged.

  1. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Louis M T; Shumskaya, Maria; Tzfadia, Oren; Wu, Shi-Biao; Kennelly, Edward J; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2012-07-03

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids serve essential roles in photosynthesis and photoprotection. A previous report designated CruP as a secondary lycopene cyclase involved in carotenoid biosynthesis [Maresca J, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:11784-11789]. However, we found that cruP KO or cruP overexpression plants do not exhibit correspondingly reduced or increased production of cyclized carotenoids, which would be expected if CruP was a lycopene cyclase. Instead, we show that CruP aids in preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby reducing accumulation of β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, a ROS-catalyzed autoxidation product, and inhibiting accumulation of anthocyanins, which are known chemical indicators of ROS. Plants with a nonfunctional cruP accumulate substantially higher levels of ROS and β-carotene-5,6-epoxide in green tissues. Plants overexpressing cruP show reduced levels of ROS, β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, and anthocyanins. The observed up-regulation of cruP transcripts under photoinhibitory and lipid peroxidation-inducing conditions, such as high light stress, cold stress, anoxia, and low levels of CO(2), fits with a role for CruP in mitigating the effects of ROS. Phylogenetic distribution of CruP in prokaryotes showed that the gene is only present in cyanobacteria that live in habitats characterized by large variation in temperature and inorganic carbon availability. Therefore, CruP represents a unique target for developing resilient plants and algae needed to supply food and biofuels in the face of global climate change.

  2. Production of reactive oxygen species from abraded silicates. Implications for the reactivity of the Martian soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bak, Ebbe N.; Zafirov, Kaloyan; Merrison, Jonathan P.; Jensen, Svend J. Knak; Nørnberg, Per; Gunnlaugsson, Haraldur P.; Finster, Kai

    2017-09-01

    The results of the Labeled Release and the Gas Exchange experiments conducted on Mars by the Viking Landers show that compounds in the Martian soil can cause oxidation of organics and a release of oxygen in the presence of water. Several sources have been proposed for the oxidizing compounds, but none has been validated in situ and the cause of the observed oxidation has not been resolved. In this study, laboratory simulations of saltation were conducted to examine if and under which conditions wind abrasion of silicates, a process that is common on the Martian surface, can give rise to oxidants in the form of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radicals (ṡOH). We found that silicate samples abraded in simulated Martian atmospheres gave rise to a significant production of H2O2 and ṡOH upon contact with water. Our experiments demonstrated that abraded silicates could lead to a production of H2O2 facilitated by atmospheric O2 and inhibited by carbon dioxide. Furthermore, during simulated saltation the silicate particles became triboelectrically charged and at pressures similar to the Martian surface pressure we observed glow discharges. Electrical discharges can cause dissociation of CO2 and through subsequent reactions lead to a production of H2O2. These results indicate that the reactions linked to electrical discharges are the dominant source of H2O2 during saltation of silicates in a simulated Martian atmosphere, given the low pressure and the relatively high concentration of CO2. Our experiments provide evidence that wind driven abrasion could enhance the reactivity of the Martian soil and thereby could have contributed to the oxidation of organic compounds and the O2 release observed in the Labeled Release and the Gas Exchange experiments. Furthermore, the release of H2O2 and ṡOH from abraded silicates could have a negative effect on the persistence of organic compounds in the Martian soil and the habitability of the Martian surface.

  3. The Role of External and Matrix pH in Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation*

    PubMed Central

    Selivanov, Vitaly A.; Zeak, Jennifer A.; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta; Trucco, Massimo; Votyakova, Tatyana V.

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria as a side product of electron and proton transport through the inner membrane is important for normal cell operation as well as development of pathology. Matrix and cytosol alkalization stabilizes semiquinone radical, a potential superoxide producer, and we hypothesized that proton deficiency under the excess of electron donors enhances reactive oxygen species generation. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pH dependence of reactive oxygen species released by mitochondria. The experiments were performed in the media with pH varying from 6 to 8 in the presence of complex II substrate succinate or under more physiological conditions with complex I substrates glutamate and malate. Matrix pH was manipulated by inorganic phosphate, nigericine, and low concentrations of uncoupler or valinomycin. We found that high pH strongly increased the rate of free radical generation in all of the conditions studied, even when ΔpH = 0 in the presence of nigericin. In the absence of inorganic phosphate, when the matrix was the most alkaline, pH shift in the medium above 7 induced permeability transition accompanied by the decrease of ROS production. ROS production increase induced by the alkalization of medium was observed with intact respiring mitochondria as well as in the presence of complex I inhibitor rotenone, which enhanced reactive oxygen species release. The phenomena revealed in this report are important for understanding mechanisms governing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, in particular that related with uncoupling proteins. PMID:18687689

  4. Asymmetric dimethylarginine and reactive oxygen species: unwelcome twin visitors to the cardiovascular and kidney disease tables.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Christopher S

    2012-02-01

    Plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine or markers of reactive oxygen species are increased in subjects with risk factors for cardiovascular disease or chronic kidney disease. We tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species generate cellular asymmetric dimethylarginine that together cause endothelial dysfunction that underlies the risk of subsequent disease. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells transfected with p22(phox) had increased NADPH oxidase activity, enhanced activity and expression of protein arginine methyltransferase, and reduced activity and protein expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminotransferase and of cationic amino acid transferase 1 resulting in increased cellular levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine. Rats infused with angiotensin II had oxidative stress. The endothelial function of their mesenteric arterioles was changed from vasodilatation to vasoconstriction, accompanied by increased vascular asymmetric dimethylarginine. All of these changes were prevented by Tempol. In vivo silencing of dimethylarginine dimethylaminotransferase 1 increased plasma levels of asymmetric dimethylarginine, whereas silencing of dimethylarginine dimethylaminotransferase 2 impaired endothelial function. We suggest that initiation factors, such as angiotensin II, expressed in blood vessels or tissues of subjects with cardiovascular and kidney disease risk factors generate reactive oxygen species from NADPH oxidase that enhances cellular asymmetric dimethylarginine in an amplification loop. This leads to adverse changes in vascular and organ functions, as a consequence of reduced tissue levels of NO and increased reactive oxygen species. Thus, we conclude that reactive oxygen species and asymmetric dimethylarginine form a tightly coupled amplification system that translates cardiovascular/kidney risk into overt disease.

  5. Injectable Phosphorescence-based Oxygen Biosensors Identify Post Ischemic Reactive Hyperoxia.

    PubMed

    Chien, Jennifer S; Mohammed, Mahmoud; Eldik, Hysem; Ibrahim, Mohamed M; Martinez, Jeremy; Nichols, Scott P; Wisniewski, Natalie; Klitzman, Bruce

    2017-08-15

    Novel injectable biosensors were used to measure interstitial oxygenation before, during, and after transient ischemia. It is well known that reactive hyperemia occurs following a period of ischemia. However, increased blood flow does not necessarily mean increased oxygen tension in the tissue. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that tissue reactive hyperoxia occurs following release of hind-limb tourniquet occlusions. Rats were injected with bilateral hind-limb biosensors and were simultaneously subjected to a unilateral femoral vessel ligation. After approximately one and three months, the rats underwent a series of oxygenation challenges, including transient hind-limb tourniquet occlusion. Along with the biosensors, near infrared spectroscopy was used to measure percent oxyhemoglobin in capillaries and laser Doppler flowmetry was used to measure blood flow. Post-occlusion reactive hyperemia was observed. It was accompanied by tissue reactive hyperoxia, affirming that the post-occlusion oxygen supply must have exceeded the expected increased oxygen consumption. The measurement of the physiologic phenomenon of reactive hyperoxia could prove clinically beneficial for both diagnosis and optimizing therapy.

  6. The role of external and matrix pH in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation.

    PubMed

    Selivanov, Vitaly A; Zeak, Jennifer A; Roca, Josep; Cascante, Marta; Trucco, Massimo; Votyakova, Tatyana V

    2008-10-24

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in mitochondria as a side product of electron and proton transport through the inner membrane is important for normal cell operation as well as development of pathology. Matrix and cytosol alkalization stabilizes semiquinone radical, a potential superoxide producer, and we hypothesized that proton deficiency under the excess of electron donors enhances reactive oxygen species generation. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pH dependence of reactive oxygen species released by mitochondria. The experiments were performed in the media with pH varying from 6 to 8 in the presence of complex II substrate succinate or under more physiological conditions with complex I substrates glutamate and malate. Matrix pH was manipulated by inorganic phosphate, nigericine, and low concentrations of uncoupler or valinomycin. We found that high pH strongly increased the rate of free radical generation in all of the conditions studied, even when DeltapH=0 in the presence of nigericin. In the absence of inorganic phosphate, when the matrix was the most alkaline, pH shift in the medium above 7 induced permeability transition accompanied by the decrease of ROS production. ROS production increase induced by the alkalization of medium was observed with intact respiring mitochondria as well as in the presence of complex I inhibitor rotenone, which enhanced reactive oxygen species release. The phenomena revealed in this report are important for understanding mechanisms governing mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, in particular that related with uncoupling proteins.

  7. Singlet oxygen as a reactive intermediate in the photodegradation of an electroluminescent polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Wang, B.; Ogilby, P.R.; Sheats, J.R.; Clough, R.L.

    1995-10-18

    Singlet molecular oxygen (a{sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) is shown to be a reactive intermediate in the photoinduced oxidative decomposition of the electroluminescent material poly(2,5-bis(5,6-dihydrocholestanoxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) [BCHA-PPV] in both liquid solutions and solid films. Upon irradiation of this polymer in CS{sub 2}, singlet oxygen is produced by energy transfer from the BCHA-PPV triplet state to ground state oxygen with a quantum yield of nearly 0.025. Singlet oxygen reacts with BCHA-PPV, resulting in extensive chain scission of the macromolecule. The reaction with singlet oxygen is unique to the polymer; the monomeric analog of this system, stilbene, does not appreciably react with singlet oxygen. Polymer degradation is proposed to proceed via addition of singlet oxygen in a{sub {pi}} 2+{sub {pi}}2 cycloaddition reaction to the double bond that connects phenylene groups in the macromolecule. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C. M.; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The activation of molecular O2as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction.

  9. Mitochondrial Structure and Reactive Oxygen Species in Mammary Oncogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    for the subunits of this Complex responsible for the hereditary paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma (2- 4,12,13,30,31,32) suggest that Complex II... physiologic equilibrium or homeostasis (48). The cell might use such ROS homeostatic balance as one of its oxygen sensing mechanisms (9,11,26). The...activities. Hence, the transgene expression could be heavily dependent on these physiological changes that require quite lengthy experimental and/or

  10. Impact reactivity of materials at very high oxygen pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, H. W.; Minchey, J. G.; Crowder, R.; Davidson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The requirements for impact testing of materials in an oxygen atmosphere at pressures from 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) to 172 MPa (25,000 psi) were evaluated. The impact tester system was evaluated for potential pressure increases from 69 MPa (10,000 psi) to 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi). The low pressure oxygen and nitrogen systems, the impact tower, the impact test cell, and the high pressure oxygen system were evaluated individually. Although the structural integrity of the impact test cell and the compressor were sufficient for operation at 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), studies revealed possible material incompatibility at that pressure and above. It was recommended that if a component should be replaced for 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) operation the replacement should meet the final objectives of 172 MPa (25,000 psi). Recommended changes in the system include; use of Monel 400 for pressures above 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), use of bellows to replace the seal in the impact tester, use of a sapphire window attached to a fiber optic for event sensing, and use of a three diaphragm compressor.

  11. Oxygen-sulfur exchange and the gas-phase reactivity of cobalt sulfide cluster anions with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mei-Ye; Luo, Zhixun; He, Sheng-Gui; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2014-09-18

    We present here a study of gas-phase reactivity of cobalt sulfide cluster anions Co(m)S(n)(-) with molecular oxygen. Nascent Co(m)S(n)(-) clusters were prepared via a laser ablation source and reacted with oxygen in a fast flow reactor under thermal collision conditions. We chose (18)O2 in place of (16)O2 to avoid mass degeneration with sulfur, and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was used to detect the cluster distributions in the absence and presence of the reactant. It was found that oxygen-sulfur exchange occurs in the reactions for those with specific compositions (CoS)(n)(-) and (CoS)(n)S(-) (n = 2-5) according to a consistent pathway, "Co(m)S(n)(-) + (18)O2 → Co(m)S(n-1)(18)O(-) + S(18)O". Typically, for "Co2S2(-) + (18)O2" we have calculated the reaction coordinates by employing the density functional theory (DFT), where both the oxygen-sulfur exchange and SO molecule release are thermodynamically and kinetically favorable. It is noteworthy that the reaction with molecular oxygen (triplet ground state) needs to overcome a spin excitation as well as a large O-O activation energy. This study sheds light on the activation of molecular oxygen by cobalt sulfides on one hand and also provides insight into the regeneration mechanism of cobalt oxides from the counterpart sulfides in the presence of oxygen gas on the other hand.

  12. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate lethality induced by far-UV in Escherichia coli cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, A A; Silva-Júnior, A C T; Oliveira, E B; Asad, L M B O; Reis, N C S C; Felzenszwalb, I; Kovary, K; Asad, N R

    2005-01-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the induction of DNA damage to Escherichia coli cells caused by UVC (254 nm) irradiation was studied. We verified the expression of the soxS gene induced by UVC (254 nm) and its inhibition by sodium azide, a singlet oxygen (1O2) scavenger. Additional results showed that a water-soluble carotenoid (norbixin) protects against the lethal effects of UVC. These results suggest that UVC radiation can also cause ROS-mediated lethality.

  14. Genotoxicity of volatile and secondary reactive oxygen species generated by photosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Camoirano, A.; De Flora, S.; Dahl, T.A. Tufts Univ. Veterinary, Boston, MA )

    1993-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species were generated in the gas phase by photosensitization involving illumination of Rose Bengal. Depending on whether the chromophore is dry or solubilized, this system produces either energy-transfer reactions leading to generation of singlet oxygen specifically, or a combination of energy-transfer and electron-transfer reactions, providing both singlet oxygen and reduced forms of oxygen, such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. In neither case were the reactive species mutagenic in strain TA104 of Salmonella typhimurium, which had been previously shown to be reverted by oxygen species generated by the hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system in aqueous medium. However, mixed oxygen species induced an increased lethality in a variety of DNA repair-deficient Escherichia coli strains. This genotoxic effect, mainly reparable by the uvrA and recA mechanisms, was efficiently prevented by the thiol N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Singlet oxygen itself failed to exert direct genotoxic effects, although secondary reactants produced by its reaction with cell components enhanced lethality in some repair-deficient bacteria. Distance-dependence analyses provided measurements of the lifetimes of the oxygen species generated in the gas phase. 35 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Effect of space charge on the negative oxygen flux during reactive sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moens, F.; Kalvas, T.; Van Steenberge, S.; Depla, D.

    2017-03-01

    Negative ions often play a distinctive role in the phase formation during reactive sputter deposition. The path of these high energetic ions is often assumed to be straight. In this paper, it is shown that in the context of reactive magnetron sputtering space charge effects are decisive for the energetic negative ion trajectories. To investigate the effect of space charge spreading, reactive magnetron sputter experiments were performed in compound mode with target materials that are expected to have a high secondary ion emission yield (MgO and CeO2). By the combination of energy flux measurements, and simulations, a quantitative value for the negative oxygen ion yield can be derived.

  16. Involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates in tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent bacteriostasis of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed Central

    Sarmento, A; Appelberg, R

    1996-01-01

    We studied the involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates and reactive nitrogen intermediates in the bacteriostasis of two Mycobacterium avium strains differing in virulence by resident peritoneal macrophages. We found that both the highly virulent strain (25291) and the low-virulence strain (1983) of M. avium induced superoxide production but inhibited nitrite production in vitro. This inhibition was due to the production of superoxide, a nitric oxide scavenger. The stimulation of superoxide production was two- to fivefold higher in strain 1983-infected than in strain 25291-infected resident peritoneal macrophages and was independent of contaminating T cells or NK cells. Superoxide secretion was dependent on the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) produced endogenously by the macrophages. This was also true when macrophages were isolated from infected mice. Addition of TNF to the infected resident peritoneal macrophages caused only a slight, albeit significant, increase in superoxide production by strain 25291-infected macrophages. Incubation of resident peritoneal macrophages with different scavengers of reactive oxygen intermediates showed that strain 1983 was susceptible to hydrogen peroxide produced by resident peritoneal macrophages. Strain 25291 was shown to decrease superoxide secretion inside heavily infected bone marrow-derived macrophages. This strain was also shown to be a better trigger for production of reactive oxygen intermediates than strain 1983. In summary, strain 1983 induced high levels of TNF synthesis that acted in an autocrine fashion to stimulate production of reactive oxygen intermediates by macrophages leading to growth restriction mediated by hydrogen peroxide. The highly virulent strain 25291 induced low levels of TNF synthesis, and therefore little reactive oxygen intermediate production, and could also inhibit superoxide production by the infected macrophages. PMID:8757857

  17. Reactive scattering of a supersonic oxygen atom beam : O IBr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkin, A.; Smith, D. J.; Grice, R.

    Reactive scattering of O atoms with IBr molecules has been studied at an initial translational energy E = 40 kJ mol-1 using a supersonic beam of O atoms seeded in He, and at E = 15 kJ mol-1 using O atoms seeded in Ne. Velocity distributions of OI product were measured by cross-correlation time-of-flight analysis. Full contour maps of the differential reaction cross section were obtained which show mild peaking equally in the forward and backward directions at both initial translational energies. The product translational energy distributions are consistent with a long-lived collision complex dissociating via a loose transition state. The triplet O-I-Br complex is more stable with respect to reaction products than the corresponding O-Br-Br complex of the O + Br2 reaction, due to the lower electronegativity of the central halogen atom. The emergence of rebound dynamics in the O + Br2 reaction is attributed to a shallower well in the exit valley of the potential energy surface compared with that for O + IBr.

  18. Unexpected Sources of Reactive Oxygen Species in Natural Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahan, T.; Grossman, J. N.

    2016-12-01

    We report novel formation methods of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and singlet oxygen (1O2) relevant to surface waters and aqueous aerosols. In one set of studies, we demonstrate that 1O2 can be produced photochemically in aqueous solutions containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halide ions under environmentally relevant conditions. This process may be important to oxidizing capacity and pollutant fate in saline waters including oceans and aqueous aerosols. In a second set of studies, we present a potentially important dark radical source. The Fenton reaction is a major dark radical source in natural waters, but it is negligibly slow at neutral pH due to the insolubility of Fe(III). We demonstrate that OH production rates from the dark Fenton reaction at pH 7 can be greatly increased by the iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella Oneidensis (SO). Our results suggest that OH production (and therefore oxidizing capacity) may be much greater than currently expected in dark circumneutral waters containing iron-reducing bacteria.

  19. Bactericidal activity of Ag-zeolite mediated by reactive oxygen species under aerated conditions.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Masanobu; Takahashi, Hiroo; Noguchi, Tomoko; Murata, Tomomi; Kanzaki, Yasushi; Hamashima, Hajime; Sasatsu, Masanori

    2002-09-30

    The bactericidal activity induced by the introduction of silver ions into zeolite was studied. Escherichia coli was used as the test microorganism. Silver ions were loaded into zeolite by the ion-exchange method. Silver-loaded zeolite was demonstrated the strong bactericidal activity. Dissolved oxygen was an essential factor for the occurrence of the bactericidal activity because the activity was observed only under aerated condition. Superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals and singlet oxygen were formed. Scavengers of these each reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibited the bactericidal activity. This means that all ROS contributed to the activity.

  20. Super-oxidation of silicon nanoclusters: magnetism and reactive oxygen species at the surface

    SciTech Connect

    Lepeshkin, Sergey; Baturin, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Evgeny; Matsko, Nikita; Uspenskii, Yurii; Naumova, Anastasia; Feya, Oleg; Schoonen, Martin A.; Oganov, Artem R.

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of silicon nanoclusters depending on the temperature and oxygen pressure is explored from first principles using the evolutionary algorithm, and structural and thermodynamic analysis. From our calculations of 90 SinOm clusters we found that under normal conditions oxidation does not stop at the stoichiometric SiO2 composition, as it does in bulk silicon, but goes further placing extra oxygen atoms on the cluster surface. These extra atoms are responsible for light emission, relevant to reactive oxygen species and many of them are magnetic. We argue that the super-oxidation effect is size-independent and discuss its relevance to nanotechnology and miscellaneous applications, including biomedical ones.

  1. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the electrochemical inhibition of barnacle (Amphibalanus amphitrite) settlement

    Treesearch

    Rodolfo E. Perez-Roa; Marc A. Anderson; Dan Rittschof; Christopher G. Hunt; Daniel R. Noguera

    2009-01-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in electrochemical biofouling inhibition was investigated using a series of abiotic tests and settlement experiments with larvae of the barnacle Amphibalanus amphitrite, a cosmopolitan fouler. Larval settlement, a measure of biofouling potential, was reduced from 43% ± 14% to 5% ± 6% upon the application of...

  2. Significant levels of extracellular reactive oxygen species produced by brown rot basidiomycetes on cellulose

    Treesearch

    Roni Cohen; Kenneth A. Jensen; Carl J. Houtman; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2002-01-01

    It is often proposed that brown rot basidiomycetes use extracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to accomplish the initial depolymerization of cellulose in wood, but little evidence has been presented to show that the fungi produce these oxidants in physiologically relevant quantities. We used [14C]phenethyl polyacrylate as a radical trap to estimate extracellular...

  3. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  4. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  5. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  6. Release of elicitors from rice blast spores under the action of reactive oxygen species

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on secretion of hypothesized elicitors from spores of rice blast causal fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied. For spore exposure to exogenous ROS, they were germinated for 5 h in 50 µM H2O2 followed by addition of catalase E.C. 1.11.1.6 (to decompose pe...

  7. [Reactive oxygen species and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde in pathogenesis of Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Rybakowska, Iwona; Szreder, Grzegorz; Kaletha, Krystian; Barwina, Małgorzata; Waldman, Wojciech; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species, which plays a role in pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, seems to be important also in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease. Experiments performed recently, revealed in the cerebrum of patients suffering from this disease (induced by the oxidative stress) elevated levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL)--a strong endogenous neurotoxin to dopamine neurons.

  8. Mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species action in relation to boar motility.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Flow cytometric assays of viable boar sperm were developed to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation (oxidization of hydroethidine to ethidium), membrane lipid peroxidation (oxidation of lipophilic probe C11-BODIPY581/591), and mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (aggregation of mit...

  9. Reactive species in atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasmas with humid air impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Niemi, Kari; Gans, Timo; O'Connell, Deborah; Graham, William G.

    2012-10-01

    In most applications helium-based plasma jets operate in an open air environment. The presence of humid-air in the plasma jet will influence the plasma chemistry and can lead to the production of a broader range of reactive species. We explore the influence of humid air on the reactive species in rf driven atmospheric-pressure helium-oxygen mixture plasmas (helium with 5000 ppm admixture of oxygen) for wide air impurity levels of 0-500 ppm with relative humidities of from 0 to 100% using a zero-dimensional, time-dependent global model. Comparisons are made with experimental measurements in an rf driven micro-scale atmospheric pressure plasma jet and with one-dimensional semi-kinetic simulations of the same plasma jet. The evolution of species concentration is described for reactive oxygen species, metastable species, radical species and positively- and negatively-charged ions (and its clusters). Effects of the air impurity containing water humidity on electronegativity and chemical activity are clarified with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species.

  10. Effects of reactive oxygen species action on sperm function in spermatozoa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipid peroxidation have been recognized as problems for sperm survival and fertility. The precise roles and detection of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and membrane lipid peroxidation have been problematic because of the low specificity and sens...

  11. Unveiling the Reactivity of a Synthetic Mimic of the Oxygen Evolving Complex.

    PubMed

    Raucci, Umberto; Ciofini, Ilaria; Adamo, Carlo; Rega, Nadia

    2016-12-15

    We simulated for the first time the oxygen-oxygen bond formation in a synthetic calcium-tetra manganese complex recently developed by Zhang and co-workers. In spite of promising structural similarities to the native oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in Photosystem II, several uncertainties on the mimic stability in water and on its potential catalytic activity still persist. Here, we characterized at density functional theory level the electronic and structural features of the Sn states of the complex, along with the oxygen-oxygen bond formation reaction, proposing a reasonable model for the hydrate complex. As a main finding, both the synthetic compound and the natural OEC show very close energetic barriers for the oxo-oxyl coupling process, suggesting that key electronic features of the natural OEC reactivity are well reproduced. This result strongly encourages the use of this synthetic complex in combination with other molecular assemblies for the design of successful artificial leaves.

  12. Characterization and Reactivity of a Terminal Nickel(III)-Oxygen Adduct

    PubMed Central

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R.; Swart, Marcel; Fitzpatrick, Anthony J.; Morgan, Grace G.; McDonald, Aidan R.

    2015-01-01

    High-valent terminal metal-oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidising reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel-oxygen adducts are sparse, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. In this study, a monoanionic NiII-bicarbonate complex was found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (~95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S = ½), square planar NiIII-oxygen adduct. This rare example of a high-valent terminal nickel-oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-ditertbutylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively. PMID:25612563

  13. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  14. Chemistry and biology of reactive oxygen species in signaling or stress responses

    PubMed Central

    dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a family of molecules that are continuously generated, transformed and consumed in all living organisms as a consequence of aerobic life. The traditional view of these reactive oxygen metabolites is one of oxidative stress and damage that leads to decline of tissue and organ systems in aging and disease. However, emerging data show that ROS produced in certain situations can also contribute to physiology and increased fitness. This Perspective provides a focused discussion on what factors lead ROS molecules to become signal and/or stress agents, highlighting how increasing knowledge of the underlying chemistry of ROS can lead to advances in understanding their disparate contributions to biology. An important facet of this emerging area at the chemistry-biology interface is the development of new tools to study these small molecules and their reactivity in complex biological systems. PMID:21769097

  15. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species on the Early Earth and Survival of Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balk, Melikea; Mason, Paul; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Freund, Friedemann; Rothschild, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    An oxygen-rich atmosphere appears to have been a prerequisite for complex, multicellular life to evolve on Earth and possibly elsewhere in the Universe. However it remains unclear how free oxygen first became available on the early Earth. A potentially important, and as yet poorly constrained pathway, is the production of oxygen through the weathering of rocks and release into the near-surface environment. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), as precursors to molecular oxygen, are a key step in this process, and may have had a decisive impact on the evolution of life, present and past. ROS are generated from minerals in igneous rocks during hydrolysis of peroxy defects, which consist of pairs of oxygen anions oxidized to the valence state -1 and during (bio) transformations of iron sulphide minerals. ROS are produced and consumed by intracellular and extracellular reactions of Fe, Mn, C, N, and S species. We propose that, despite an overall reducing or neutral oxidation state of the macroenvironment and the absence of free O2 in the atmosphere, organisms on the early Earth had to cope with ROS in their microenvironments. They were thus under evolutionary pressure to develop enzymatic and other defences against the potentially dangerous, even lethal effects of oxygen and its derived ROS. Conversely it appears that microorganisms learned to take advantage of the enormous reactive potential and energy gain provided by nascent oxygen. We investigate how oxygen might be released through weathering. We test microorganisms in contact with rock surfaces and iron sulphides. We model bacteria such as Deionococcus radiodurans and Desulfotomaculum, Moorella and Bacillus species for their ability to grow or survive in the presence of ROS. We examine how early Life might have adapted to oxygen.

  17. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  18. Elevated Cytosolic Na+ Increases Mitochondrial Formation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Failing Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhaas, Michael; Liu, Ting; Knopp, Andreas; Zeller, Tanja; Ong, Mei Fang; Böhm, Michael; O'Rourke, Brian; Maack, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Background —Oxidative stress is causally linked to the progression of heart failure, and mitochondria are critical sources of reactive oxygen species in failing myocardium. We previously observed that in heart failure, elevated cytosolic Na+ ([Na+]i) reduces mitochondrial Ca2+ ([Ca2+]m) by accelerating Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Because the regeneration of antioxidative enzymes requires NADPH, which is indirectly regenerated by the Krebs cycle, and Krebs cycle dehydrogenases are activated by [Ca2+]m, we speculated that in failing myocytes, elevated [Na+]i promotes oxidative stress. Methods and Results —We used a patch-clamp–based approach to simultaneously monitor cytosolic and mitochondrial Ca2+ and, alternatively, mitochondrial H2O2 together with NAD(P)H in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Cells were depolarized in a voltage-clamp mode (3 Hz), and a transition of workload was induced by β-adrenergic stimulation. During this transition, NAD(P)H initially oxidized but recovered when [Ca2+]m increased. The transient oxidation of NAD(P)H was closely associated with an increase in mitochondrial H2O2 formation. This reactive oxygen species formation was potentiated when mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was blocked (by Ru360) or Ca2+ efflux was accelerated (by elevation of [Na+]i). In failing myocytes, H2O2 formation was increased, which was prevented by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ efflux via the mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. Conclusions —Besides matching energy supply and demand, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake critically regulates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production. In heart failure, elevated [Na+]i promotes reactive oxygen species formation by reducing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. This novel mechanism, by which defects in ion homeostasis induce oxidative stress, represents a potential drug target to reduce reactive oxygen species production in the failing heart. PMID:20351235

  19. Deoxyamphimedine, a Pyridoacridine Alkaloid, Damages DNA via the Production of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kathryn M.; Andjelic, Cynthia D.; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P.; Ireland, Chris M.; Barrows, Louis R.

    2009-01-01

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity. PMID:19597581

  20. Deoxyamphimedine, a pyridoacridine alkaloid, damages DNA via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-05-25

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity.

  1. The interplay of light and oxygen in the reactive oxygen stress response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii dissected by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barth, Johannes; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Schulze, Stefan; Scholz, Martin; Fufezan, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Light and oxygen are factors that are very much entangled in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress response network in plants, algae and cyanobacteria. The first obligatory step in understanding the ROS network is to separate these responses. In this study, a LC-MS/MS based quantitative proteomic approach was used to dissect the responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ROS, light and oxygen employing an interlinked experimental setup. Application of novel bioinformatics tools allow high quality retention time alignment to be performed on all LC-MS/MS runs increasing confidence in protein quantification, overall sequence coverage and coverage of all treatments measured. Finally advanced hierarchical clustering yielded 30 communities of co-regulated proteins permitting separation of ROS related effects from pure light effects (induction and repression). A community termed redox(II) was identified that shows additive effects of light and oxygen with light as the first obligatory step. Another community termed 4-down was identified that shows repression as an effect of light but only in the absence of oxygen indicating ROS regulation, for example, possibly via product feedback inhibition because no ROS damage is occurring. In summary the data demonstrate the importance of separating light, O₂ and ROS responses to define marker genes for ROS responses. As revealed in this study, an excellent candidate is DHAR with strong ROS dependent induction profiles.

  2. The Interplay of Light and Oxygen in the Reactive Oxygen Stress Response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dissected by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Johannes; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Schulze, Stefan; Scholz, Martin; Fufezan, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Light and oxygen are factors that are very much entangled in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress response network in plants, algae and cyanobacteria. The first obligatory step in understanding the ROS network is to separate these responses. In this study, a LC-MS/MS based quantitative proteomic approach was used to dissect the responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ROS, light and oxygen employing an interlinked experimental setup. Application of novel bioinformatics tools allow high quality retention time alignment to be performed on all LC-MS/MS runs increasing confidence in protein quantification, overall sequence coverage and coverage of all treatments measured. Finally advanced hierarchical clustering yielded 30 communities of co-regulated proteins permitting separation of ROS related effects from pure light effects (induction and repression). A community termed redoxII was identified that shows additive effects of light and oxygen with light as the first obligatory step. Another community termed 4-down was identified that shows repression as an effect of light but only in the absence of oxygen indicating ROS regulation, for example, possibly via product feedback inhibition because no ROS damage is occurring. In summary the data demonstrate the importance of separating light, O2 and ROS responses to define marker genes for ROS responses. As revealed in this study, an excellent candidate is DHAR with strong ROS dependent induction profiles. PMID:24482124

  3. On the oxygen reactivity of flavoprotein oxidases: an oxygen access tunnel and gate in brevibacterium sterolicum cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Piubelli, Luciano; Pedotti, Mattia; Molla, Gianluca; Feindler-Boeckh, Susanne; Ghisla, Sandro; Pilone, Mirella S; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2008-09-05

    The flavoprotein cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum (BCO) possesses a narrow channel that links the active center containing the flavin to the outside solvent. This channel has been proposed to serve for the access of dioxygen; it contains at its "bottom" a Glu-Arg pair (Glu-475-Arg-477) that was found by crystallographic studies to exist in two forms named "open" and "closed," which in turn was suggested to constitute a gate functioning in the control of oxygen access. Most mutations of residues that flank the channel have minor effects on the oxygen reactivity. Mutations of Glu-311, however, cause a switch in the basic kinetic mechanism of the reaction of reduced BCO with dioxygen; wild-type BCO and most mutants show a saturation behavior with increasing oxygen concentration, whereas for Glu-311 mutants a linear dependence is found that is assumed to reflect a "simple" second order process. This is taken as support for the assumption that residue Glu-311 finely tunes the Glu-475-Arg-477 pair, forming a gate that functions in modulating the access/reactivity of dioxygen.

  4. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  5. Production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species by angiosperm stigmas and pollen: potential signalling crosstalk?

    PubMed

    McInnis, Stephanie M; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John T; Hiscock, Simon J

    2006-01-01

    Angiosperm stigmas exhibit high levels of peroxidase activity when receptive to pollen. To explore possible function(s) of this peroxidase activity we investigated amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), particularly hydrogen peroxide, in stigmas and pollen. Because nitric oxide (NO) was recently implicated in pollen tube growth, we also investigated amounts of NO in pollen and stigmas. Reactive oxygen species accumulation was assessed with confocal microscopy and light microscopy using ROS probes DCFH2-DA and TMB, respectively. NO was assayed using the NO probe DAF-2DA and confocal microscopy. Stigmas from various different angiosperms were found to accumulate ROS, predominantly H2O2, constitutively. In Senecio squalidus and Arabidopsis thaliana high amounts of ROS/H2O2 were localized to stigmatic papillae. ROS/H2O2 amounts appeared reduced in stigmatic papillae to which pollen grains had adhered. S. squalidus and A. thaliana pollen produced relatively high amounts of NO compared with stigmas; treating stigmas with NO resulted in reduced amounts of stigmatic ROS/H2O2. Constitutive accumulation of ROS/H2O2 appears to be a feature of angiosperm stigmas. This novel finding is discussed in terms of a possible role for stigmatic ROS/H2O2 and pollen-derived NO in pollen-stigma interactions and defence.

  6. Reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation and enzymatic defence systems in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Griveau, J F; Dumont, E; Renard, P; Callegari, J P; Le Lannou, D

    1995-01-01

    The reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide anion (O2o-), were generated with a xanthine-xanthine oxidase system and their effect on human sperm function was studied. The action of reactive oxygen species on selected human spermatozoa resulted in a decreased capacity for ionophore-induced acrosome reaction, a decrease in sperm motility, an increase in the concentration of lipid hydroperoxides and a loss of membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids. H2O2 was the key intermediate of the deleterious effects exerted by the xanthine and xanthine oxidase. Among these parameters, the acrosome reaction appeared most susceptible to the reactive oxygen species generated by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system, and was decreased without sperm motility being affected. Treatment with H2O2 was shown to inactivate several enzymatic activities involved in the antioxidant defence of spermatozoa: glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. H2O2 and O2o- were shown to be involved in the lipid alterations triggered by the xanthine-xanthine oxidase system. Singlet oxygen is proposed to intervene in the lipoperoxidation process. The inefficacy of mannitol in protecting spermatozoa suggests that hydroxyl radicals were not produced in the extracellular medium.

  7. Cdh1 inhibits reactive astrocyte proliferation after oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jin; Zhang, Chuanhan; Lv, Youyou; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chang; Wang, Xueren; Yao, Wenlong

    2013-08-01

    Anaphase-promoting complex (APC) and its co-activator Cdh1 are required for cell cycle regulation in proliferating cells. Recent studies have defined diverse functions of APC-Cdh1 in nervous system development and injury. Our previous studies have demonstrated the activity of APC-Cdh1 is down-regulated in hippocampus after global cerebral ischemia. But the detailed mechanisms of APC-Cdh1 in ischemic nervous injury are unclear. It is known that astrocyte proliferation is an important pathophysiological process following cerebral ischemia. However, the role of APC-Cdh1 in reactive astrocyte proliferation is not determined yet. In the present study, we cultured primary cerebral astrocytes and set up in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion model. Our results showed that the expression of Cdh1 was decreased while Skp2 (the downstream substrate of APC-Cdh1) was increased in astrocytes after 1h oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. The down-regulation of APC-Cdh1 was coupled with reactive astrocyte proliferation. By constructing Cdh1 expressing lentivirus system, we also found exogenous Cdh1 can down-regulate Skp2 and inhibit reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion. Moreover, Western blot showed that other downstream proteins of APC-Cdh1, PFK-1 and SnoN, were decreased in the inhibition of reactive astrocyte proliferation with Cdh1 expressing lentivirus treatment. These results suggest that Cdh1 plays an important role in the regulation of reactive astrocyte proliferation induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion.

  8. Photo-Irradiation of Proanthocyanidin as a New Disinfection Technique via Reactive Oxygen Species Formation

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin was evaluated in relation to reactive oxygen species formation. Staphylococcus aureus suspended in proanthocyanidin aqueous solution was irradiated with light from a laser at 405 nm. The bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power. When proanthocyanidin was used at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, the laser irradiation of the bacterial suspension could kill the bacteria with a >5-log reduction of viable cell counts. By contrast, bactericidal effect was not observed when proanthocyanidin was not irradiated. In electron spin resonance analysis, reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion radicals, and hydrogen peroxide, were detected in the photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin aqueous solution. The yields of the reactive oxygen species also depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power as is the case with the bactericidal assay. Thus, it is indicated that the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin is exerted via the reactive oxygen species formation. The bactericidal effect as well as the yield of the oxygen radicals increased with the concentration of proanthocyanidin up to 4 mg/mL, and then decreased with the concentration. These findings suggest that the antioxidative activity of proanthocyanidin might prevail against the radical generation potency of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin resulting in the decreased bactericidal effect when the concentration is over 4 mg/mL. The present study suggests that photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin whenever used in an optimal concentration range can be a new disinfection technique. PMID:23527299

  9. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  10. Reactive Oxygen-Doped 3D Interdigital Carbonaceous Materials for Li and Na Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling; Lu, Bingan

    2016-05-01

    Carbonaceous materials as anodes usually exhibit low capacity for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials have the potential of high capacity and super rate performance. However, up to now, the reported oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials usually exhibit inferior electrochemical performance. To overcome this problem, a high reactive oxygen-doped 3D interdigital porous carbonaceous material is designed and synthesized through epitaxial growth method and used as anodes for LIBs and SIBs. It delivers high reversible capacity, super rate performance, and long cycling stability (473 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles for LIBs and 223 mA h g(-1) after 1200 cycles for SIBs, respectively, at the current density of 1000 mA g(-1) ), with a capacity decay of 0.0214% per cycle for LIBs and 0.0155% per cycle for SIBs. The results demonstrate that constructing 3D interdigital porous structure with reactive oxygen functional groups can significantly enhance the electrochemical performance of oxygen-doped carbonaceous material. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  12. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  13. Oxidases and reactive oxygen species during hematopoiesis: a focus on megakaryocytes

    PubMed Central

    Eliades, Alexia; Matsuura, Shinobu; Ravid, Katya

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated as a result of various reactions, control an array of cellular processes. The role of ROS during megakaryocyte (MK) development has been a subject of interest and research. The bone marrow niche is the major site of MK differentiation and maturation. In this environment, a gradient of oxygen tension, from normoxia to hypoxia results in different levels of ROS, impacting cellular physiology. This article provides an overview of major sources of ROS, their implication in different signaling pathways, and their effect on cellular physiology, with a focus on megakaryopoiesis. The importance of ROS-generating oxidases in MK biology and pathology, including myelofibrosis, is also described. PMID:22331622

  14. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  15. Tumor reactive ringlet oxygen approach for Monte Carlo modeling of photodynamic therapy dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Lopez, N; Mulet, R; Rodríguez, R

    2016-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emergent technique used for the treatment of several diseases. It requires the interaction of three components: a photosensitizer, a light source and tissue oxygen. Knowledge of the biophysical aspects of PDT is important for improving dosimetry protocols and treatment planning. In this paper we propose a model to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of ground state oxygen ((3)O2), cumulative singlet excited state oxygen ((1)O2)rx and photosensitizer, in this case protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in an ALA mediated PDT treatment. The results are analyzed in order to improve the treatment dosimetry. We compute the light fluence in the tissue using Monte Carlo simulations running in a GPU system. The concentration of (3)O2, ((1)O2)rx and the photosensitizer are calculated using this light fluence and a set of differential equations describing the photochemical reactions involved in PDT. In the model the initial photosensitizer concentration depends on tissue depth and type, moreover we consider blood vessel damage and its effect in the ground state oxygen concentration in the tissue. We introduce the tumor reactive single oxygen (TRSO) as a new dosimetry metric. It represents the amount of singlet oxygen per tumor volume that reacts, during the treatment, with the molecules in the tumor. This quantity integrates the effect of the light irradiance, the optical properties of the tumor and the normal tissue, the oxygen consumption and supply, and the photosensitizer biodistribution on the skin.

  16. Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Photosystem II as a Response to Light and Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pospíšil, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The effect of various abiotic stresses on photosynthetic apparatus is inevitably associated with formation of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, recent progress on ROS production by photosystem II (PSII) as a response to high light and high temperature is overviewed. Under high light, ROS production is unavoidably associated with energy transfer and electron transport in PSII. Singlet oxygen is produced by the energy transfer form triplet chlorophyll to molecular oxygen formed by the intersystem crossing from singlet chlorophyll in the PSII antennae complex or the recombination of the charge separated radical pair in the PSII reaction center. Apart to triplet chlorophyll, triplet carbonyl formed by lipid peroxidation transfers energy to molecular oxygen forming singlet oxygen. On the PSII electron acceptor side, electron leakage to molecular oxygen forms superoxide anion radical which dismutes to hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by the non-heme iron to hydroxyl radical. On the PSII electron donor side, incomplete water oxidation forms hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by manganese to hydroxyl radical. Under high temperature, dark production of singlet oxygen results from lipid peroxidation initiated by lipoxygenase, whereas incomplete water oxidation forms hydrogen peroxide which is reduced by manganese to hydroxyl radical. The understanding of molecular basis for ROS production by PSII provides new insight into how plants survive under adverse environmental conditions. PMID:28082998

  17. Contemporary evidence on the physiological role of reactive oxygen species in human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Stefan S; Agarwal, Ashok; Halabi, Jacques; Tvrda, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in male fertility. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been associated with a variety of male fertility complications, including leukocytospermia, varicocele and idiopathic infertility. The subsequent oxidative insult to spermatozoa can manifest as insufficient energy metabolism, lipid peroxidation and DNA damage, leading to loss of motility and viability. However, various studies have demonstrated that physiological amounts of ROS play important roles in the processes of spermatozoa maturation, capacitation, hyperactivation and acrosome reaction. It is therefore crucial to define and understand the delicate oxidative balance in male reproductive cells and tissues for a better understanding of both positive as well as negative impact of ROS production on the fertilizing ability. This review will discuss the specific physiological roles, mechanisms of action and effects that ROS have on the acquisition of structural integrity and physiological activity of spermatozoa.

  18. Computational investigation of reactive to nonreactive capture of carbon dioxide by oxygen-containing Lewis bases.

    PubMed

    Teague, Craig M; Dai, Sheng; Jiang, De-en

    2010-11-04

    Recent work has shown that room temperature ionic liquid systems reactively absorb CO(2) and offer distinct advantages over current CO(2) capture technologies. Here we computationally evaluated CO(2) interaction energies with a series of oxygen-containing Lewis base anions (including cyclohexanolate and phenolate and their respective derivatives). Our results show that the interaction energy can be tuned across a range from reactive to nonreactive (or physical) interactions. We evaluated different levels of theory as well as possible corrections to the interaction energy, and we explained our calculated trends on the basis of properties of the individual anions. We found that the interaction energy between CO(2) and the Lewis bases examined here correlates most strongly with the atomic charge on the oxygen atom. This insight provides a useful handle to tune the anion-CO(2) interaction energy for future experimental and computational studies of novel CO(2) capture systems.

  19. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David I.; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here we review the current literature regarding ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25634975

  20. Selection of functional human sperm with higher DNA integrity and fewer reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Velasco, Vanessa; Kingsley, James L.; Shoukat, Muhammad S.; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Tüzel, Erkan; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization and reproduction are central to the survival and propagation of a species. Couples who cannot reproduce naturally have to undergo in vitro clinical procedures. An integral part of these clinical procedures includes isolation of healthy sperm from raw semen. Existing sperm sorting methods are not efficient and isolate sperm having high DNA fragmentation and reactive oxygen species, and suffer from multiple manual steps and variations between embryologists. Inspired by in vivo natural sperm sorting mechanisms where vaginal mucus becomes less viscous to form microchannels to guide sperm towards egg, we present a chip that efficiently sorts healthy, motile and morphologically normal sperm without centrifugation. Higher percentage of sorted sperm show significantly lesser reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation than the conventional swim-up method. The presented chip is an easy-to-use high throughput sperm sorter that provides standardized sperm sorting assay with less reliance on embryologist’s skills, facilitating reliable operational steps. PMID:24753434

  1. Theoretical Studies of Oxygen Reactivity of Free-Standing and Supported Boron-Doped Graphene.

    PubMed

    Di Valentin, Cristiana; Ferrighi, Lara; Fazio, Gianluca

    2016-05-23

    Graphene inertness towards chemical reactivity can be considered as an accepted postulate by the research community. This limit has been recently overcome by chemically and physically modifying graphene through non-metal doping or interfacing with acceptor/donor materials (metals or semiconductors). As a result, outstanding performances as catalytic, electrocatalytic, and photocatalytic material have been observed. In this critical Review we report computational work performed, by our group, on the reactivity of free-standing, metal- and semiconductor-supported B-doped graphene towards oxygen, which is at the basis of extremely important energy-related chemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction. It appears that a combination of doping and interfacing approaches for the activation of graphene can open unconventional and unprecedented reaction paths, thus boosting the potential of modified graphene in many chemical applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. DNA Oxidation by Reactive Oxygen Species Produced by Atmospheric Pressure Microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Joao Santos; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Sage, Evelyne; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Puech, Vincent

    Arrays of microcathode sustained discharges (MCSD's) have been ­developed for the production of high fluxes of singlet delta oxygen (SDO) and ozone (O3) at atmospheric pressure. SDO and O3 densities higher than 1017 and 1016 cm-3, respectively, have been efficiently produced and transported over distances longer than 50 cm. These arrays of MCSD's have been optimized to supply well-quantified and tunable fluxes of either SDO or O3. This plasma source has been found to be very useful for examining the reactivity of these reactive oxygen species with biological components. Preliminary results indicate that both SDO and O3 are able to oxidize DNA, originating great damages in DNA such as single- and double-strand breaks and base oxidation. It has been observed that while all bases of DNA are almost indifferently and quite effectively oxidized by O3, SDO reacts mainly with guanine.

  3. Probing oxidative stress: Small molecule fluorescent sensors of metal ions, reactive oxygen species, and thiols

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Lynne M.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature shared by many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Factors that contribute to cellular oxidative stress include elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, diminished availability of detoxifying thiols, and the misregulation of metal ions (both redox-active iron and copper as well as non-redox active calcium and zinc). Deciphering how each of these components interacts to contribute to oxidative stress presents an interesting challenge. Fluorescent sensors can be powerful tools for detecting specific analytes within a complicated cellular environment. Reviewed here are several classes of small molecule fluorescent sensors designed to detect several molecular participants of oxidative stress. We focus our review on describing the design, function and application of probes to detect metal cations, reactive oxygen species, and intracellular thiol-containing compounds. In addition, we highlight the intricacies and complications that are often faced in sensor design and implementation. PMID:23440254

  4. Reactive oxygen species mediate pollen tube rupture to release sperm for fertilization in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Johnson, Eric A.; Aggarwal, Mini; Gates, Laura; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    In flowering plants, sperm are transported inside pollen tubes to the female gametophyte for fertilization. The female gametophyte induces rupture of the penetrating pollen tube, resulting in sperm release and rendering them available for fertilization. Here we utilize the Arabidopsis FERONIA (FER) receptor kinase mutants, whose female gametophytes fail to induce pollen tube rupture, to decipher the molecular mechanism of this critical male-female interactive step. We show that FER controls the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species at the entrance to the female gametophyte to induce pollen tube rupture and sperm release. Pollen tube growth assays in vitro and in the pistil demonstrate that hydroxyl free radicals are likely the most reactive oxygen molecules, and they induce pollen tube rupture in a Ca2+-dependent process involving Ca2+ channel activation. Our results provide evidence for a RHO GTPase-based signalling mechanism to mediate sperm release for fertilization in plants.

  5. Modulation of pressure-natriuresis by renal medullary reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Paul M; Cowley, Allen W

    2010-04-01

    The renal pressure-natriuresis mechanism is the dominant controller of body fluid balance and long-term arterial pressure. In recent years, it has become clear that the balance of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species within the renal medullary region is a key determinant of the set point of the renal pressure-natriuresis curve. The development of renal medullary oxidative stress causes dysfunction of the pressure-natriuresis mechanism and contributes to the development of hypertension in numerous disease models. The purpose of this review is to point out the known mechanisms within the renal medulla through which reactive oxygen and nitrogen species modulate the pressure-natriuresis response and to update the reader on recent advances in this field.

  6. Phosphate Shifted Oxygen Reduction Pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanowires for Enhanced Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Aerobic 4-Chlorophenol Degradation.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yi; Ai, Zhihui; Zhang, Lizhi

    2017-07-18

    Phosphate ions widely exist in the environment. Previous studies revealed that the adsorption of phosphate ions on nanoscale zerovalent iron would generate a passivating oxide shell to block reactive sites and thus decrease the direct pollutant reduction reactivity of zerovalent iron. Given that molecular oxygen activation process is different from direct pollutant reduction with nanoscale zerovalent iron, it is still unclear how phosphate ions will affect molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation with nanoscale zerovalent iron. In this study, we systematically studied the effect of phosphate ions on molecular oxygen activation with Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, a special nanoscale zerovalent iron, taking advantages of rotating ring disk electrochemical analysis. It was interesting to find that the oxygen reduction pathway on Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires was gradually shifted from a four-electron reduction pathway to a sequential one-electron reduction one, along with increasing the phosphate ions concentration from 0 to 10 mmol·L(-1). This oxygen reduction pathway change greatly enhanced the molecular oxygen activation and reactive oxygen species generation performances of Fe@Fe2O3 nanowires, and thus increased their aerobic 4-chlorophenol degradation rate by 10 times. These findings shed insight into the possible roles of widely existed phosphate ions in molecular oxygen activation and organic pollutants degradation with nanoscale zerovalent iron.

  7. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defense mechanisms in the oral cavity: a literature review.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, Symone M; Opperman, Lynne A; Allen, Edward P; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2011-01-01

    Through dental procedures and environment, periodontal tissues are exposed to many types of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, various forms of antioxidants have been introduced as an approach to fight dental diseases and improve general gingival health. This article focuses on the classification of antioxidants and the link between oxidative stress and periodontal disease. The protective mechanisms of antioxidants and how routine dental procedures may increase ROS is discussed. The final section reviews the effect of tobacco products on gingival health and disease.

  8. Fusogenic Reactive Oxygen Species Triggered Charge-Reversal Vector for Effective Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Xiang, Jiajia; Zhu, Dingcheng; Jiang, Liming; Zhou, Zhuxian; Tang, Jianbin; Liu, Xiangrui; Huang, Yongzhuo; Shen, Youqing

    2016-03-02

    A novel fusogenic lipidic polyplex (FLPP) vector is designed to fuse with cell membranes, mimicking viropexis, and eject the polyplex into the cytosol, where the cationic polymer is subsequently oxidized by intracellular reactive oxygen species and converts to being negatively charged, efficiently releasing the DNA. The vector delivering suicide gene achieves significantly better inhibition of tumor growth than doxorubicin. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species at the Heart of the Matter: New Therapeutic Approaches for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kornfeld, Opher S.; Hwang, Sunhee; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Chen, Che-Hong; Qvit, Nir; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a variety of age-related diseases including multiple cardiovascular disorders. However, translation of ROS scavengers (anti-oxidants) into the clinic has not been successful. These anti-oxidants grossly reduce total levels of cellular ROS including ROS that participate in physiological signaling. In this review, we challenge the traditional anti-oxidant therapeutic approach that targets ROS directly with novel approaches that improve mitochondrial functions to more effectively treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25999419

  10. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  11. Neuroprotection of taurine against reactive oxygen species is associated with inhibiting NADPH oxidases.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhou; Gao, Li-Yan; Lin, Yu-Hui; Chang, Lei; Wu, Hai-Yin; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-04-15

    It is well established that taurine shows potent protection against glutamate-induced injury to neurons in stroke. The neuroprotection may result from multiple mechanisms. Increasing evidences suggest that NADPH oxidases (Nox), the primary source of superoxide induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation, are involved in the process of oxidative stress. We found that 100μM NMDA induced oxidative stress by increasing the reactive oxygen species level, which contributed to the cell death, in vitro. Neuron cultures pretreated with 25mM taurine showed lower percentage of death cells and declined reactive oxygen species level. Moreover, taurine attenuated Nox2/Nox4 protein expression and enzyme activity and declined intracellular calcium intensity during NMDA-induced neuron injury. Additionally, taurine also showed neuroprotection against H2O2-induced injury, accompanying with Nox inhibition. So, we suppose that protection of taurine against reactive oxygen species during NMDA-induced neuron injury is associated with Nox inhibition, probably in a calcium-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Action of Ciprofloxacin against Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, M.; Mangoli, S. H.; Jawali, N.

    2006-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin is an important and commonly used member of the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Ciprofloxacin inhibits DNA topoisomerase II and DNA topoisomerase IV activities, eventually leading to bacterial cell death. In addition, an increase of reactive oxygen species in the bacterial cells in response to ciprofloxacin has been shown. We investigated the role of reactive oxygen species in the antibacterial action of ciprofloxacin by studying the effects of different antioxidant compounds on ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Escherichia coli. Among the antioxidants checked, glutathione and ascorbic acid provided substantial protection against ciprofloxacin. The involvement of superoxide anion (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the antibacterial action of ciprofloxacin was analyzed using superoxide dismutase, catalase, and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase knockout strains of E. coli. The effects of multicopy sod genes on ciprofloxacin susceptibility of E. coli were also analyzed. On the basis of our results, we conclude that O2− and H2O2 may be involved in antibacterial action of ciprofloxacin. Our findings that glutathione gave protection against other fluoroquinolones and not against nonfluoroquinolone antibiotics imply that reactive oxygen species may have a similar role in the antibacterial action of all these fluoroquinolones and that glutathione-mediated protection is not a general phenomenon but specific to fluoroquinolones. These observations are of significance, as fluoroquinolones are important antibiotics with immense therapeutic value, and the effectiveness of treatment by these drugs may be affected by dietary intake and cellular levels of these antioxidants. PMID:16495256

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate phorbol ester-stimulated cAMP response in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Ezeamuzie, Charles I; Taslim, Najla

    2006-08-14

    Recently, we showed that phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) can cause a direct, PKC-dependent, stimulation of intracellular cAMP in human eosinophils. Since PMA also stimulates the release of reactive oxygen species in these cells, we have investigated whether reactive oxygen species are involved in the cAMP response. Provided eosinophils were incubated for <20 min at 37 degrees C before stimulation, PMA potently stimulated cAMP generation that surpassed that of histamine. Pre-treatment of the cells with the NADPH oxidase inhibitors, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) and apocynin, strongly inhibited the cAMP production induced by PMA, but not that induced by histamine. This treatment also strongly inhibited the release of superoxide anions (O(2)(-)). The cAMP response was also inhibited by pre-treatment with the specific peroxide scavenger, ebselen, but not superoxide dismutase, or NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), thus, suggesting the possible involvement of a peroxide rather than O(2)(-) or nitric oxide (NO). These results reveal a novel involvement of intracellular reactive oxygen species in protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent stimulation of cAMP production in human eosinophils.

  14. Inhibition of astrocyte glutamate uptake by reactive oxygen species: role of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Sorg, O.; Horn, T. F.; Yu, N.; Gruol, D. L.; Bloom, F. E.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recent literature suggests that free radicals and reactive oxygen species may account for many pathologies, including those of the nervous system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The influence of various reactive oxygen species on the rate of glutamate uptake by astrocytes was investigated on monolayers of primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes. RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite inhibited glutamate uptake in a concentration-dependent manner. Addition of copper ions and ascorbate increased the potency and the efficacy of the hydrogen peroxide effect, supporting the potential neurotoxicity of the hydroxyl radical. The free radical scavenger dimethylthiourea effectively eliminated the inhibitory potential of a mixture containing hydrogen peroxide, copper sulphate, and ascorbate on the rate of glutamate transport into astrocytes. The inhibitory effect of hydrogen peroxide on glutamate uptake was not altered by the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase, whereas the inhibition of catalase by sodium azide clearly potentiated this effect. Superoxide and nitric oxide had no effect by themselves on the rate of glutamate uptake by astrocytes. The absence of an effect of nitric oxide is not due to an inability of astrocytes to respond to this substance, since the same cultures did respond to nitric oxide with a sustained increase in cytoplasmic free calcium. CONCLUSION: These results confirm that reactive oxygen species have a potential neurotoxicity by means of impairing glutamate transport into astrocytes, and they suggest that preventing the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in the extracellular space of the brain, especially during conditions that favor hydroxyl radical formation, could be therapeutic. PMID:9260155

  15. Assessment of skin blood content and oxygenation in spinal cord injured subjects during reactive hyperemia.

    PubMed

    Hagisawa, S; Ferguson-Pell, M; Cardi, M; Miller, S D

    1994-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the reactive hyperemia response following ischemia in spinal cord injured (SCI) individuals is different from that which occurs in able-bodied (AB) individuals. The reactive hyperemia response was produced by applying a pressure of 150 mmHg for 300 s, 600 s, and 900 s to the skin over the greater trochanter in 10 SCI and 10 AB subjects using a computer-controlled pneumatic indentation system. The changes in blood content and oxygenation in the superficial vessels of the skin, associated with indentation, were monitored using reflectance spectrophotometry. A brief pressure of 80 mmHg, to simulate finger pressing (blanching), was applied to the same site to detect changes in reflow behavior during the hyperemic period. The results indicate that the reactive hyperemia response in SCI group was not substantially different from AB group although the reflow rate after load release was slower in the SCI group compared with the AB group.

  16. Evidence for photochemical production of reactive oxygen species in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Sun, Henry J; McKay, Christopher P; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Gaosen; Koutsopoulou, Eleni; Christidis, George E; Margiolaki, Irene

    2015-05-11

    The combination of intense solar radiation and soil desiccation creates a short circuit in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, where soils release significant amounts of CO2 and reactive nitrogen oxides by abiotic oxidation. Here we show that desert soils accumulate metal superoxides and peroxides at higher levels than non-desert soils. We also show the photogeneration of equimolar superoxide and hydroxyl radical in desiccated and aqueous soils, respectively, by a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism supported by their mineralogical composition. Reactivity of desert soils is further supported by the generation of hydroxyl radical via aqueous extracts in the dark. Our findings extend to desert soils the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by certain mineral oxides and also explain previous studies on desert soil organic oxidant chemistry and microbiology. Similar processes driven by ultraviolet radiation may be operating in the surface soils on Mars.

  17. Analyses of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in relation to seed longevity and germination.

    PubMed

    Bailly, Christophe; Kranner, Ilse

    2011-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, together with plant hormones and other reactive species, such as reactive nitrogen species, are part of signalling networks pertinent to plant stress responses, cell division, and cell death. Consequently, they play pivotal roles in the regulation of seed development and maturation, germination and dormancy, seedling establishment, and seed ageing. Importantly, ROS, although essentially required at low concentrations, must be kept under stringent control by antioxidants. If the balance between pro- and antioxidative processes is lost and ROS production prevails, oxidative stress is the result, which can induce cell death and ultimately seed death. This chapter offers a variety of protocols for the determination of ROS, antioxidants, and stress markers aimed at enabling the reader to quantify these compounds. Protocols are also described to visualize ROS and localize the sites of ROS production, hoping to stimulate more research into ROS signalling and antioxidant control in key physiological and biochemical processes in seeds.

  18. In vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José Luís Fontes da Costa; Bragagnolo, Neura

    2011-07-15

    Bixa orellana L. (annatto), from Bixaceae family, is a native plant of tropical America, which accumulates several carotenoids (including bixin and norbixin), terpenoids, tocotrienols and flavonoids with potential antioxidant activity. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated and compared to the bixin standard. Annatto extracts were obtained using solvents with different polarities and their phenolic compounds and bixin levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector. All annatto extracts were able to scavenge all the reactive species tested at the low μg/mL range, with the exception of superoxide radical. The ethanol:ethyl acetate and ethyl acetate extracts of annatto seeds, which presented the highest levels of hypolaetin and bixin, respectively, were the extracts with the highest antioxidant capacity, although bixin standard presented the lowest IC(50) values. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Crosstalk between nitrite, myoglobin and reactive oxygen species to regulate vasodilation under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response.

  20. Crosstalk between Nitrite, Myoglobin and Reactive Oxygen Species to Regulate Vasodilation under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2014-01-01

    The systemic response to decreasing oxygen levels is hypoxic vasodilation. While this mechanism has been known for more than a century, the underlying cellular events have remained incompletely understood. Nitrite signaling is critically involved in vessel relaxation under hypoxia. This can be attributed to the presence of myoglobin in the vessel wall together with other potential nitrite reductases, which generate nitric oxide, one of the most potent vasodilatory signaling molecules. Questions remain relating to the precise concentration of nitrite and the exact dose-response relations between nitrite and myoglobin under hypoxia. It is furthermore unclear whether regulatory mechanisms exist which balance this interaction. Nitrite tissue levels were similar across all species investigated. We then investigated the exact fractional myoglobin desaturation in an ex vivo approach when gassing with 1% oxygen. Within a short time frame myoglobin desaturated to 58±12%. Given that myoglobin significantly contributes to nitrite reduction under hypoxia, dose-response experiments using physiological to pharmacological nitrite concentrations were conducted. Along all concentrations, abrogation of myoglobin in mice impaired vasodilation. As reactive oxygen species may counteract the vasodilatory response, we used superoxide dismutase and its mimic tempol as well as catalase and ebselen to reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species during hypoxic vasodilation. Incubation of tempol in conjunction with catalase alone and catalase/ebselen increased the vasodilatory response to nitrite. Our study shows that modest hypoxia leads to a significant nitrite-dependent vessel relaxation. This requires the presence of vascular myoglobin for both physiological and pharmacological nitrite levels. Reactive oxygen species, in turn, modulate this vasodilation response. PMID:25148388

  1. Binding of oxygen on vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces: Reactivity of iron and sulfur surface sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlich, A. G.; Nesbitt, H. W.; Bancroft, G. M.; Szargan, R.

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) has been used to study the interaction of oxygen with vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces. Especially valence band spectra obtained with 30 eV photon energy were analyzed to provide a mechanism of the incipient steps of pyrite oxidation. These spectra are far more sensitive to the oxidation than sulfur or iron core level spectra. It is shown that oxygen is adsorbed on Fe(II) surface sites restoring the octahedral coordination of the Fe(II) sites. This process leads to the removal of two surface states in the valence band which are located at the low and high binding energy sides of the outer valence band, respectively. The existence of these surface states which have been proposed by calculations is experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is shown, that the sulfur sites are more reactive than expected. Sulfite like species are already formed after the lowest oxygen exposure of 10 L. This oxidation occurs at sulfur sites neighboring the Fe(II) surface sites. Oxidation of the S2 - surface sites which were considered as the most reactive species in former studies is second. No iron(III) oxides are formed during oxygen exposure, supporting the assumption that water plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of pyrite surfaces.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species Function to Mediate the Fe Deficiency Response in an Fe-Efficient Apple Genotype: An Early Response Mechanism for Enhancing Reactive Oxygen Production

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaohua; Wu, Ting; Zhai, Longmei; Li, Duyue; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Huiqin; Wang, Yi; Han, Zhenhai

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation. This study demonstrated that ROS play a critical role in Fe deficiency-induced signaling at an early stage in Malus xiaojinensis. Once ROS production has been initiated, prolonged Fe starvation leads to activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. Further, we demonstrated that ROS scavengers are involved in maintaining the cellular redox homeostasis during prolonged Fe deficiency treatment. Taken together, our results describe a feedback repression loop for ROS to preserve redox homeostasis and maintain a continuous Fe deficiency response in the Fe-efficient woody plant M. xiaojinensis. More broadly, this study reveals a new mechanism in which ROS mediate both positive and negative regulation of plant responses to Fe deficiency stress. PMID:27899933

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species Function to Mediate the Fe Deficiency Response in an Fe-Efficient Apple Genotype: An Early Response Mechanism for Enhancing Reactive Oxygen Production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chaohua; Wu, Ting; Zhai, Longmei; Li, Duyue; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Xuefeng; Ma, Huiqin; Wang, Yi; Han, Zhenhai

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation. This study demonstrated that ROS play a critical role in Fe deficiency-induced signaling at an early stage in Malus xiaojinensis. Once ROS production has been initiated, prolonged Fe starvation leads to activation of ROS scavenging mechanisms. Further, we demonstrated that ROS scavengers are involved in maintaining the cellular redox homeostasis during prolonged Fe deficiency treatment. Taken together, our results describe a feedback repression loop for ROS to preserve redox homeostasis and maintain a continuous Fe deficiency response in the Fe-efficient woody plant M. xiaojinensis. More broadly, this study reveals a new mechanism in which ROS mediate both positive and negative regulation of plant responses to Fe deficiency stress.

  4. Effect of oxygen deficiency on the photoresponse and reactivity of mixed phase titania thin films

    SciTech Connect

    DeSario, Paul A.; Chen Le; Graham, Michael E.; Gray, Kimberly A.

    2011-05-15

    Nonstoichiometric mixed phased titania nanocomposites (TiO{sub 2-x}) were deposited by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering. The authors explored the role of nonstoichiometry (as defined by oxygen deficiency in synthesis) in mixed phase titania thin films and its effects on the photoresponse and photocatalytic performance for CO{sub 2} reduction to methane under UV and visible light. Oxygen partial pressure was varied during film deposition, yielding different levels of oxygen deficiency in the films. Optimized nonstoichiometric films showed a strong redshift. The authors have identified an optimum set of synthesis conditions for TiO{sub 2-x} films that produce a relative maximum in photocatalytically produced methane under both UV and visible light.

  5. Quantum dot-mediated photoproduction of reactive oxygen species for cancer cell annihilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Yao; Lee, Yee-Man; Zhao, Dan; Mak, Nai-Ki; Wong, Ricky Ngok-Shun; Chan, Wing-Hong; Cheung, Nai-Ho

    2010-01-01

    While semiconductor quantum dots produce little singlet oxygen, they may undergo Type I photoreactions to produce other reactive oxygen species (ROS) to kill cells. CdTe quantum dots coated with thioglycolic acid were used to test that possibility. Some thiol ligands were purposely removed to regenerate the surface electron traps that were passivated by the ligand. This allowed photoinduced electrons to dwell on the surface long enough to be gathered by nearby oxygen molecules to produce ROS. The photocytotoxicity of these quantum dots was tested on nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. Photokilling was shown to be drug and light dose dependent. Using 0.6 mum quantum dots for incubation and 4.8 J cm(-2) for irradiation, about 80% of the cells were annihilated. These quantum dots promised to be potent sensitizers for photoannihilation of cancer cells.

  6. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the vascular responses to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kvietys, Peter R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and potentially life-threatening condition that involves the participation of a variety of chemical mediators, signaling pathways, and cell types. The microcirculation, which is critical for the initiation and perpetuation of an inflammatory response, exhibits several characteristic functional and structural changes in response to inflammation. These include vasomotor dysfunction (impaired vessel dilation and constriction), the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, endothelial barrier dysfunction (increased vascular permeability), blood vessel proliferation (angiogenesis), and enhanced thrombus formation. These diverse responses of the microvasculature largely reflect the endothelial cell dysfunction that accompanies inflammation and the central role of these cells in modulating processes as varied as blood flow regulation, angiogenesis, and thrombogenesis. The importance of endothelial cells in inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction is also predicated on the ability of these cells to produce and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inflammation seems to upset the balance between nitric oxide and superoxide within (and surrounding) endothelial cells, which is necessary for normal vessel function. This review is focused on defining the molecular targets in the vessel wall that interact with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide to produce the characteristic functional and structural changes that occur in response to inflammation. This analysis of the literature is consistent with the view that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contribute significantly to the diverse vascular responses in inflammation and supports efforts that are directed at targeting these highly reactive species to maintain normal vascular health in pathological conditions that are associated with acute or chronic inflammation. PMID:22154653

  7. Role of reactive oxygen in bile salt stimulation of colonic epithelial proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Craven, P A; Pfanstiel, J; DeRubertis, F R

    1986-01-01

    Our previous studies had suggested a link between bile salt stimulation of colonic epithelial proliferation and the release and oxygenation of arachidonate via the lipoxygenase pathway. In the present study, we examined the role of reactive oxygen versus end products of arachidonate metabolism via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways in bile salt stimulation of rat colonic epithelial proliferation. Intracolonic instillation of 5 mM deoxycholate increased mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA. Responses to deoxycholate were abolished by the superoxide dismutase mimetic CuII (3,5 diisopropylsalicylic acid)2 (CuDIPS), and by phenidone or esculetin, which inhibit both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activities. By contrast, indomethacin potentiated the response. Phenidone and esculetin suppressed deoxycholate-induced increases in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), leukotriene B4 (LTB4), and 5, 12, and 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE), whereas CuDIPS had no effect. Indomethacin suppressed only PGE2. Deoxycholate (0.5-5 mM) increased superoxide dismutase sensitive chemiluminescence 2-10-fold and stimulated superoxide production as measured by cytochrome c reduction in colonic mucosal scrapings or crypt epithelium. Bile salt-induced increases in chemiluminescence were abolished by CuDIPS, phenidone, and esculetin, but not by indomethacin. Intracolonic generation of reactive oxygen by xanthine-xanthine oxidase increased colonic mucosal ornithine decarboxylase activity and [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA approximately twofold. These effects were abolished by superoxide dismutase. The findings support a key role for reactive oxygen, rather than more distal products of either the lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase pathways, in the stimulation of colonic mucosal proliferation by bile salts. PMID:3005368

  8. The mystery of gold's chemical activity: local bonding, morphology and reactivity of atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Baker, Thomas A; Liu, Xiaoying; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-01-07

    Recently, gold has been intensely studied as a catalyst for key synthetic reactions. Gold is an attractive catalyst because, surprisingly, it is highly active and very selective for partial oxidation processes suggesting promise for energy-efficient "green" chemistry. The underlying origin of the high activity of Au is a controversial subject since metallic gold is commonly thought to be inert. Herein, we establish that one origin of the high activity for gold catalysis is the extremely reactive nature of atomic oxygen bound in 3-fold coordination sites on metallic gold. This is the predominant form of O at low concentrations on the surface, which is a strong indication that it is most relevant to catalytic conditions. Atomic oxygen bound to metallic Au in 3-fold sites has high activity for CO oxidation, oxidation of olefins, and oxidative transformations of alcohols and amines. Among the factors identified as important in Au-O interaction are the morphology of the surface, the local binding site of oxygen, and the degree of order of the oxygen overlayer. In this Perspective, we present an overview of both theory and experiments that identify the reactive forms of O and their associated charge density distributions and bond strengths. We also analyze and model the release of Au atoms induced by O binding to the surface. This rough surface also has the potential for O(2) dissociation, which is a critical step if Au is to be activated catalytically. We further show the strong parallels between product distributions and reactivity for O-covered Au at low pressure (ultrahigh vacuum) and for nanoporous Au catalysts operating at atmospheric pressure as evidence that atomic O is the active species under working catalytic conditions when metallic Au is present. We briefly discuss the possible contributions of oxidants that may contain intact O-O bonds and of the Au-metal oxide support interface in Au catalysis. Finally, the challenges and future directions for fully

  9. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  10. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  11. Characterization and Reactivity of a Terminal Nickel(III)-Oxygen Adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R.; Swart, Marcel; Fitzpatrick, Anthony J.; Morgan, Grace G.; McDonald, Aidan R.

    2015-01-22

    Here, high-valent terminal metal–oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidizing reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen adducts are scarce, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. A monoanionic NiII-bicarbonate complex has been found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (ca. 95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S=1/2), square planar NiIIIoxygen adduct. Moreover, this rare example of a high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively.

  12. Characterization and Reactivity of a Terminal Nickel(III)-Oxygen Adduct

    DOE PAGES

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R.; Swart, Marcel; ...

    2015-01-22

    Here, high-valent terminal metal–oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidizing reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen adducts are scarce, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. A monoanionic NiII-bicarbonate complex has been found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (ca. 95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S=1/2), square planar NiIII–oxygen adduct. Moreover, this rare example of amore » high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively.« less

  13. Characterization and reactivity of a terminal nickel(III)-oxygen adduct.

    PubMed

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R; Swart, Marcel; Fitzpatrick, Anthony J; Morgan, Grace G; McDonald, Aidan R

    2015-02-23

    High-valent terminal metal-oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidizing reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel-oxygen adducts are scarce, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. A monoanionic Ni(II)-bicarbonate complex has been found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (ca. 95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S = 1/2), square planar Ni(III)-oxygen adduct. This rare example of a high-valent terminal nickel-oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Palladium-Based Nanomaterials: A Platform to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species for Catalyzing Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Huang, Hao; Li, Yaping; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-11-25

    Oxidation reactions by molecular oxygen (O2 ) over palladium (Pd)-based nanomaterials are a series of processes crucial to the synthesis of fine chemicals. In the past decades, investigations of related catalytic materials have mainly been focused on the synthesis of Pd-based nanomaterials from the angle of tailoring their surface structures, compositions and supporting materials, in efforts to improve their activities in organic reactions. From the perspective of rational materials design, it is imperative to address the fundamental issues associated with catalyst performance, one of which should be oxygen activation by Pd-based nanomaterials. Here, the fundamentals that account for the transformation from O2 to reactive oxygen species over Pd, with a focus on singlet O2 and its analogue, are introduced. Methods for detecting and differentiating species are also presented to facilitate future fundamental research. Key factors for tuning the oxygen activation efficiencies of catalytic materials are then outlined, and recent developments in Pd-catalyzed oxygen-related organic reactions are summarized in alignment with each key factor. To close, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields.

  15. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe; Cui, Xiaoli; Ye, Xiangrong

    2005-02-02

    The electrocatalytic reactivity of palladium-modified carbon nanotubes (Pd-CNTs) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was investigated at the glassy carbon electrode surface in 1 M H2SO4 saturated by oxygen. Carbon nanotubes modified by palladium nanoparticles were synthesized in supercritical carbon dioxide and characterized by transmission electron micrograph. The electrocatalytic activity of the CNTs film and Pd–CNTs film toward oxygen reduction was studied using cyclic voltammetry and linear sweep voltammetry methods. The molecular oxygen reduction at the Pd-CNTs electrode started at a more positive potential than that at the CNTs electrode. A possible reaction mechanism was proposed in which the ORR may proceed through two-step two-electron processes for the Pd-CNTs modified electrode. Experimental results revealed that Pd-CNTs possess a remarkable activity and high stability for oxygen reduction in acid medium, which implies the potential applications of the Pd–CNTs for constructing electrodes of fuel cells.

  16. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-02-10

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters.

  17. Methionine oxidation by peroxymonocarbonate, a reactive oxygen species formed from CO2/bicarbonate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David E; Regino, Celeste A S; Yao, Huirong; Johnson, Jodie V

    2003-12-15

    Kinetic and thermodynamic evidence is reported for the role of the peroxymonocarbonate ion, HCO4-, as a reactive oxygen species in biology. Peroxymonocarbonate results from the equilibrium reaction of hydrogen peroxide with bicarbonate via the perhydration of CO2. The kinetic parameters for HCO4- oxidation of free methionine have been obtained (k1 = 0.48 +/- 0.08 M(-1)s(-1) by a spectrophotometric initial rate method). At the physiological concentration of bicarbonate in blood ( approximately 25 mM), it is estimated that peroxymonocarbonate formed in equilibrium with hydrogen peroxide will oxidize methionine approximately 2-fold more rapidly than plasma H2O2 itself. As an example of methionine oxidation in proteins, the bicarbonate-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide oxidation of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI) has been investigated via its inhibitory effect on porcine pancreatic elastase activity. The second-order rate constant for HCO4- oxidation of alpha1-PI (0.36 +/- 0.06 M(-1)s(-1)) is comparable to that of free methionine, suggesting that methionine oxidation is occurring. Further evidence for methionine oxidation, specifically involving Met358 and Met351 of the alpha1-PI reactive center loop, has been obtained through amino acid analyses and mass spectroscopic analyses of proteolytic digests of the oxidized alpha1-PI. These results strongly suggest that HCO4- should be considered a reactive oxygen species in aerobic metabolism.

  18. Photoluminescent Gold Nanoclusters in Cancer Cells: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Matulionyte, Marija; Dapkute, Dominyka; Budenaite, Laima; Jarockyte, Greta; Rotomskis, Ricardas

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, photoluminescent gold nanoclusters have attracted considerable interest in both fundamental biomedical research and practical applications. Due to their ultrasmall size, unique molecule-like optical properties, and facile synthesis gold nanoclusters have been considered very promising photoluminescent agents for biosensing, bioimaging, and targeted therapy. Yet, interaction of such ultra-small nanoclusters with cells and other biological objects remains poorly understood. Therefore, the assessment of the biocompatibility and potential toxicity of gold nanoclusters is of major importance before their clinical application. In this study, the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of bovine serum albumin-encapsulated (BSA-Au NCs) and 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES)-capped photoluminescent gold nanoclusters (Au-MES NCs) were investigated. The results showed that BSA-Au NCs accumulate in cells in a similar manner as BSA alone, indicating an endocytotic uptake mechanism while ultrasmall Au-MES NCs were distributed homogeneously throughout the whole cell volume including cell nucleus. The cytotoxicity of BSA-Au NCs was negligible, demonstrating good biocompatibility of such BSA-protected Au NCs. In contrast, possibly due to ultrasmall size and thin coating layer, Au-MES NCs exhibited exposure time-dependent high cytotoxicity and higher reactivity which led to highly increased generation of reactive oxygen species. The results demonstrate the importance of the coating layer to biocompatibility and toxicity of ultrasmall photoluminescent gold nanoclusters. PMID:28208642

  19. Mild hyperthermia enhances sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death.

    PubMed

    Ba, Ming-Chen; Long, Hui; Cui, Shu-Zhong; Gong, Yuan-Feng; Yan, Zhao-Fei; Wang, Shuai; Wu, Yin-Bing

    2017-06-01

    Mild hyperthermia enhances anti-cancer effects of chemotherapy, but the precise biochemical mechanisms involved are not clear. This study was carried out to investigate whether mild hyperthermia sensitizes gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy through reactive oxygen species-induced autophagic death. In total, 20 BABL/c mice of MKN-45 human gastric cancer tumor model were divided into hyperthermia + chemotherapy group, hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group. Reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1, LC3B, and mammalian target of rapamycin were determined. The relationships between tumor growth regression, expression of autophagy-related genes, and reactive oxygen species production were evaluated. Tumor size and wet weight of hyperthermia + chemotherapy group was significantly decreased relative to values from hyperthermia group, chemotherapy group, N-acetyl-L-cysteine group, and mock group ( F = 6.92, p < 0.01 and F = 5.36, p < 0.01, respectively). Reactive oxygen species production was significantly higher in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. The expression levels of Beclin1 and LC3B were significantly higher, while those of mammalian target of rapamycin were significantly lower in hyperthermia + chemotherapy group than in hyperthermia, chemotherapy, and mock groups. Tumor growth regression was consistent with changes in reactive oxygen species production and expression of autophagy-related genes. N-acetyl-L-cysteine inhibited changes in the expression of the autophagy-related genes and also suppressed reactive oxygen species production and tumor growth. Hyperthermia + chemotherapy increase expression of autophagy-related genes Beclin1 and LC3B, decrease expression of mammalian target of rapamycin, and concomitantly increase reactive oxygen species generation. These results strongly indicate

  20. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  1. Fluorescence-based assay for reactive oxygen species: A protective role for creatinine

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, A.N. )

    1988-06-01

    Attack by reactive oxygen species leads to a decay in phycoerythrin fluorescence emission. This phenomenon provides a versatile new assay for small molecules and macromolecules that can function as protective compounds. With 1-2 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} M phycoerythrin, under conditions where peroxyl radical generation is rate-limiting, the fluorescence decay follows apparent zero-order kinetics. On reaction with HO{center dot}, generated with the ascorbate-Cu{sup 2+} system, the fluorescence decays with apparent first-order kinetics. Examination of the major components of human urine in this assay confirms that at physiological concentrations, urate protects against both types of oxygen radicals. A novel finding is that creatinine protects efficiently by a chelation mechanism against radical damage in the ascorbate-Cu{sup 2+} system at creatinine, ascorbate, and Cu{sup 2+} concentrations comparable to those in normal urine. Urate and creatinine provide complementary modes of protection against reactive oxygen species in the urinary tract.

  2. Oleic acid increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and decreases endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity in cultured endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gremmels, Hendrik; Bevers, Lonneke M; Fledderus, Joost O; Braam, Branko; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Verhaar, Marianne C; Joles, Jaap A

    2015-03-15

    Elevated plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) are associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This may be related to FFA-induced elevation of oxidative stress in endothelial cells. We hypothesized that, in addition to mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated reactive oxygen species production contributes to oleic acid (OA)-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells, due to eNOS uncoupling. We measured reactive oxygen species production and eNOS activity in cultured endothelial cells (bEnd.3) in the presence of OA bound to bovine serum albumin, using the CM-H2DCFDA assay and the L-arginine/citrulline conversion assay, respectively. OA induced a concentration-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species production, which was inhibited by the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA). OA had little effect on eNOS activity when stimulated by a calcium-ionophore, but decreased both basal and insulin-induced eNOS activity, which was restored by TTFA. Pretreatment of bEnd.3 cells with tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) prevented OA-induced reactive oxygen species production and restored inhibition of eNOS activity by OA. Elevation of OA levels leads to both impairment in receptor-mediated stimulation of eNOS and to production of mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species and hence endothelial dysfunction.

  3. [Ways of realizing apoptosis of human lymphocytes induced by UV-light and reactive oxygen species].

    PubMed

    Artiukhov, V G; Trubitsyna, M S; Nakvasina, M A; Solov'eva, E V; Lidokhova, O V

    2011-01-01

    Changes of DNA structural condition, the level of membrane Fas-receptor expression, caspase-3 functional activity, concentrations of Ca2+, p53 and cytochrome c proteins of human lymphocytes in dynamics of apoptosis development induced by UV-light (240-390 nm) at doses 151, 1510, 3020 J/m2 and reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion-radical, hydroxyl radicals, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen) have been studied. UV-light and reactive oxygen species have been established to induce fragmentation of lymphocyte DNA after 20 h incubation of the modified cells. It has been shown, that the increase in the expression level of membrane death Fas-receptors is observed during 1-5 h after exposure oflymphocytes to UV-light and ROS compared with intact cells. Also revealed is augmentation of lymphocyte caspase-3 functional activity 4 h after generation of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide addition, as well as 8 and 24 and 6 and 8 h after UV-irradiation of the cells at doses 151 and 1510 J/m2, correspondingly. Using DNA-comet method made it possible to tape that DNA damages (single-strand breaks) appear 15-20 min after lymphocyte UV-irradiation at doses 1510 and 3020 J/m and addition of hydrogen peroxide in concentration 10(-6) mol/l (C1 type comet) and reach their maximum 6 h after modification of the cells (C2 and C3 type comets). It has been observed, that 6 h after exposure oflymphocytes to hydrogen peroxide and UV-light at doses 1510 and 3020 J/m2, the p53 level of investigated cells raises. It has also been shown that the higher level of calcium in lymphocyte cytosol in conditions of UV-light exposure (1510 J/m2) and exogenous generation of reactive oxygen species is caused by Ca2+ exit from intracellular depots as a result of activating the components of the phosphoinositide mechanism for transferring information into a cell. Ideas about correlation between alterations of the calcium level and initiation of programmed cellular destruction of human

  4. Response of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation to steady-state oxygen tension: implications for hypoxic cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, David L; Salter, Jason D; Brookes, Paul S

    2007-01-01

    Mitochondria are proposed to play an important role in hypoxic cell signaling. One currently accepted signaling paradigm is that the mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases in hypoxia. This is paradoxical, because oxygen is a substrate for ROS generation. Although the response of isolated mitochondrial ROS generation to [O(2)] has been examined previously, such investigations did not apply rigorous control over [O(2)] within the hypoxic signaling range. With the use of open-flow respirometry and fluorimetry, the current study determined the response of isolated rat liver mitochondrial ROS generation to defined steady-state [O(2)] as low as 0.1 microM. In mitochondria respiring under state 4 (quiescent) or state 3 (ATP turnover) conditions, decreased ROS generation was always observed at low [O(2)]. It is concluded that the biochemical mechanism to facilitate increased ROS generation in response to hypoxia in cells is not intrinsic to the mitochondrial respiratory chain alone but may involve other factors. The implications for hypoxic cell signaling are discussed.

  5. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  6. Biological and physiological role of reactive oxygen species--the good, the bad and the ugly.

    PubMed

    Zuo, L; Zhou, T; Pannell, B K; Ziegler, A C; Best, T M

    2015-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are chemically reactive molecules that are naturally produced within biological systems. Research has focused extensively on revealing the multi-faceted and complex roles that ROS play in living tissues. In regard to the good side of ROS, this article explores the effects of ROS on signalling, immune response and other physiological responses. To review the potentially bad side of ROS, we explain the consequences of high concentrations of molecules that lead to the disruption of redox homeostasis, which induces oxidative stress damaging intracellular components. The ugly effects of ROS can be observed in devastating cardiac, pulmonary, neurodegenerative and other disorders. Furthermore, this article covers the regulatory enzymes that mitigate the effects of ROS. Glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase are discussed in particular detail. The current understanding of ROS is incomplete, and it is imperative that future research be performed to understand the implications of ROS in various therapeutic interventions.

  7. Modulation of macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity by kerosene soot: Possible role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Arif, J.M.; Khan, S.G.; Ashquin, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1993-05-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytotoxicity of soot on rat alveolar macrophages has been postulated. A single intratracheal injection of soot (5 mg) in corn oil significantly induced the macrophage population, hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]) generation, thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substanced of lipid peroxidation, and the activities of extracellular acid phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at 1, 4, 8, and 16 days of postinoculation. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were significantly inhibited at all the stages, while glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) showed a different pattern. These results show that soot is cytotoxic to alveolar macrophages and suggest that ROS may play a primary role in the cytotoxic process. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Characterizing semen parameters and their association with reactive oxygen species in infertile men

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A routine semen analysis is a first step in the laboratory evaluation of the infertile male. In addition, other tests such as measurement of reactive oxygen species can provide additional information regarding the etiology of male infertility. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of semen parameters with reactive oxygen species (ROS) in two groups: healthy donors of unproven and proven fertility and infertile men. In addition, we sought to establish an ROS cutoff value in seminal plasma at which a patient may be predicted to be infertile. Methods Seminal ejaculates from 318 infertile patients and 56 donors, including those with proven fertility were examined for semen parameters and ROS levels. Correlations were determined between traditional semen parameters and levels of ROS among the study participants. ROS levels were measured using chemiluminescence assay. Receiver operating characteristic curves were obtained to calculate a cutoff value for these tests. Results Proven Donors (n = 28) and Proven Donors within the past 2 years (n = 16) showed significantly better semen parameters than All Patients group (n = 318). Significantly lower ROS levels were seen in the two Proven Donor groups compared with All Patients. The cutoff value of ROS in Proven Donors was determined to be 91.9 RLU/s with a specificity of 68.8% and a sensitivity of 93.8%. Conclusions Infertile men, irrespective of their clinical diagnoses, have reduced semen parameters and elevated ROS levels compared to proven fertile men who have established a pregnancy recently or in the past. Reactive oxygen species are negatively correlated with traditional semen parameters such as concentration, motility and morphology. Measuring ROS levels in the seminal ejaculates provides clinically-relevant information to clinicians. PMID:24885775

  9. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  10. Arginine deiminase modulates endothelial tip cells via excessive synthesis of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Wei; Song, Xiaomin; Zhou, Hao; Luo, Yongzhang

    2011-10-01

    ADI (arginine deiminase), an enzyme that hydrolyses arginine, has been reported as an anti-angiogenesis agent. However, its molecular mechanism is unclear. We have demonstrated for the first time that ADI modulates the angiogenic activity of endothelial tip cells. By arginine depletion, ADI disturbs actin filament in endothelial tip cells, causing disordered migratory direction and decreased migration ability. Furthermore, ADI induces excessive synthesis of ROS (reactive oxygen species), and activates caspase 8-, but not caspase 9-, dependent apoptosis in endothelial cells. These findings provide a novel mechanism by which ADI inhibits tumour angiogenesis through modulating endothelial tip cells.

  11. Inflammatory joint disease: the role of cytokines, cyclooxygenases and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Moulton, P J

    1996-12-01

    Cytokines are known to have a key role in the onset and development of inflammatory joint disease, including rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The effects of some cytokines on the cells and tissues involved in inflammation of the joint are well catalogued, but recent discoveries of new cytokines, and interest in intracellular signalling molecules, have thrown new light on the way in which cytokines mediate the cellular responses that lead to inflammation. Here, recent work on the roles of cytokines, cyclooxygenases, nitric oxide and other reactive oxygen species, in the cellular pathways that lead from cytokine receptor to inflammation, are discussed.

  12. Function of reactive oxygen species during animal development: passive or active?

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Luis; Hernández-García, David; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Castro-Obregón, Susana

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative stress is considered causal of aging and pathological cell death, however, very little is known about its function in the natural processes that support the formation of an organism. It is generally thought that cells must continuously protect themselves from the possible damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (passive ROS function). However, presently, ROS are recognized as physiologically relevant molecules that mediate cell responses to a variety of stimuli, and the activities of several molecules, some developmentally relevant, are directly or indirectly regulated by oxidative stress (active ROS function). Here we review recent data that are suggestive of specific ROS functions during development of animals, particularly mammals.

  13. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes activity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanobacterium) under simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Li, Gen-bao; Liu, Yong-ding; Wang, Gao-hong; Song, Li-rong

    2004-12-01

    It was found that reactive oxygen species in Anabaena cells increased under simulated microgravity provided by clinostat. Activities of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase were higher than those in the controlled samples during the 7 days' experiment. However, the contents of glutathione [correction of gluathione], an intracellular antioxidant, decreased in comparison with the controlled samples. The results suggested that microgravity provided by clinostat might break the oxidative/antioxidative balance. It indicated a protective mechanism in algal cells, that the total antioxidant system activity increased, which might play an important role for algal cells to adapt the environmental stress of microgravity.

  14. Calcium and Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Generation: How to Read the Facts

    PubMed Central

    Adam-Vizi, Vera; Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2011-01-01

    A number of recent discoveries indicate that abnormal Ca2+ signaling, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the neuronal damage in Alzheimer’s disease. However, the literature on the interactions between these factors is controversial especially in the interpretation of the cause-effect relationship between mitochondrial damage induced by Ca2+ overload and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, we survey the experimental observations on the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial ROS production, explain the sources of controversy in interpreting these results, and discuss the different molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of Ca2+ on the ROS emission by brain mitochondria. PMID:20421693

  15. Generation of reactive oxygen species and photon emission from a browned product.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tetsuo; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Someya, Shinich; Okubo, Kazuyoshi

    2002-08-01

    The properties of photon emission arising from a browned product were investigated. The photon intensity of the browned product was proportional to the absorbancy at 420 nm, and was influenced by the amino acid structure. The fluorescence spectrum showed similar compounds in the browned product to be related with this photon emission. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide contributed highly to this photon emission, and several redox compounds enhanced the photon intensity at appropriate concentrations. Our work suggests that the photon intensity was closely related to the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated from the browned product, and this effect may be utilized to evaluate the function and quality of browned food.

  16. Generation of reactive oxygen species by interaction between antioxidants used as food additive and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Oda, Momoko; Tsukuda, Yuri; Nagamori, Yuki; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Food additives, such as preservatives, sweeteners, coloring agents, and flavoring agents, are widely used in food manufacturing. However, their combined effects on the human body are not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether combinations of antioxidants and metal ions generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under in vitro conditions using electron spin resonance (ESR). Among the metal ions examined, only iron and copper generated ROS in the presence of antioxidants. Moreover, certain phenolic antioxidants having pro-oxidant activity induced DNA oxidation and degradation via the generation of high levels of ROS in the presence of copper ion, resulting in complete degradation of DNA in vitro.

  17. Unified Synthesis of 10-Oxygenated Lycopodium Alkaloids: Impact of C10-Stereochemistry on Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Saha, Mrinmoy; Li, Xin; Collett, Nathan D; Carter, Rich G

    2016-07-15

    The pronounced impact of the C10 stereochemistry on the successful construction of a polycyclic Lycopodium alkaloid scaffold has been explored. A wide range of reaction conditions and functionality were investigated to control a keto sulfone Michael addition to construct the C7-C12 linkage. An unexpected, overriding impact of the C10 stereochemistry in stereoselectivity and reaction rate in the Michael addition was observed. Furthermore, divergent reactivity of a conformationally accelerated, intramolecular Mannich cyclization based on the C10 stereochemistry was discovered. The successful execution of this synthetic route resulted in the total synthesis of all three known 10-oxygenated Lycopodium alkaloids: 10-hydroxylycopodine, paniculine, and deacetylpaniculine.

  18. Role of Auxin-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species in Root Gravitropism1

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jung Hee; Bae, Yun Soo; Lee, June Seung

    2001-01-01

    We report our studies on root gravitropism indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may function as a downstream component in auxin-mediated signal transduction. A transient increase in the intracellular concentration of ROS in the convex endodermis resulted from either gravistimulation or unilateral application of auxin to vertical roots. Root bending was also brought about by unilateral application of ROS to vertical roots pretreated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Furthermore, the scavenging of ROS by antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, and Trolox) inhibited root gravitropism. These results indicate that the generation of ROS plays a role in root gravitropism. PMID:11457956

  19. NQO2 Is a Reactive Oxygen Species Generating Off-Target for Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:25313982

  20. Calcium and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation: how to read the facts.

    PubMed

    Adam-Vizi, Vera; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2010-01-01

    A number of recent discoveries indicate that abnormal Ca2+ signaling, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction are involved in the neuronal damage in Alzheimer's disease. However, the literature on the interactions between these factors is controversial especially in the interpretation of the cause-effect relationship between mitochondrial damage induced by Ca2+ overload and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this review, we survey the experimental observations on the Ca2+-induced mitochondrial ROS production, explain the sources of controversy in interpreting these results, and discuss the different molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of Ca2+ on the ROS emission by brain mitochondria.

  1. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-09-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Consequently, the bacteria are selectively killed on the cathode surface. However, the cell experiment suggested that the level of ROS is safe for normal mammalian cells.

  2. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  3. Reaction of Paprika Carotenoids, Capsanthin and Capsorubin, with Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Azusa; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Maoka, Takashi

    2016-06-15

    The reaction of paprika carotenoids, capsanthin and capsorubin, with reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion radical (·O2(-)), hydroxyl radical (·OH), and singlet oxygen ((1)O2), was analyzed by LC/PDA ESI-MS and ESR spectrometry. Capsanthin formed both the 5,6-epoxide and 5,8-epoxide by reaction with ·O2(-) and ·OH. Furthermore, capsanthin also formed 5,6- and 5,8-endoperoxide on reaction with (1)O2. The same results were obtained in the case of capsanthin diacetate. On the other hand, capsorubin showed higher stability against these ROS. Capsorubin formed 7,8-epoxide on reaction with ·O2(-) and ·OH and 7,8-endoperoxide on reaction with (1)O2.

  4. The Quantum Biology of Reactive Oxygen Species Partitioning Impacts Cellular Bioenergetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Castello, Pablo R.; Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten; Dratz, Edward A.; Singel, David J.; Martino, Carlos F.

    2016-12-01

    Quantum biology is the study of quantum effects on biochemical mechanisms and biological function. We show that the biological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells can be influenced by coherent electron spin dynamics, providing a new example of quantum biology in cellular regulation. ROS partitioning appears to be mediated during the activation of molecular oxygen (O2) by reduced flavoenzymes, forming spin-correlated radical pairs (RPs). We find that oscillating magnetic fields at Zeeman resonance alter relative yields of cellular superoxide (O2•‑) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ROS products, indicating coherent singlet-triplet mixing at the point of ROS formation. Furthermore, the orientation-dependence of magnetic stimulation, which leads to specific changes in ROS levels, increases either mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis rates. Our results reveal quantum effects in live cell cultures that bridge atomic and cellular levels by connecting ROS partitioning to cellular bioenergetics.

  5. The Quantum Biology of Reactive Oxygen Species Partitioning Impacts Cellular Bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Usselman, Robert J.; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Castello, Pablo R.; Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten; Dratz, Edward A.; Singel, David J.; Martino, Carlos F.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum biology is the study of quantum effects on biochemical mechanisms and biological function. We show that the biological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells can be influenced by coherent electron spin dynamics, providing a new example of quantum biology in cellular regulation. ROS partitioning appears to be mediated during the activation of molecular oxygen (O2) by reduced flavoenzymes, forming spin-correlated radical pairs (RPs). We find that oscillating magnetic fields at Zeeman resonance alter relative yields of cellular superoxide (O2•−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ROS products, indicating coherent singlet-triplet mixing at the point of ROS formation. Furthermore, the orientation-dependence of magnetic stimulation, which leads to specific changes in ROS levels, increases either mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis rates. Our results reveal quantum effects in live cell cultures that bridge atomic and cellular levels by connecting ROS partitioning to cellular bioenergetics. PMID:27995996

  6. On the in vivo photochemical rate parameters for PDT reactive oxygen species modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Michele M.; Ghogare, Ashwini A.; Greer, Alexander; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-03-01

    Photosensitizer photochemical parameters are crucial data in accurate dosimetry for photodynamic therapy (PDT) based on photochemical modeling. Progress has been made in the last few decades in determining the photochemical properties of commonly used photosensitizers (PS), but mostly in solution or in vitro. Recent developments allow for the estimation of some of these photochemical parameters in vivo. This review will cover the currently available in vivo photochemical properties of photosensitizers as well as the techniques for measuring those parameters. Furthermore, photochemical parameters that are independent of environmental factors or are universal for different photosensitizers will be examined. Most photosensitizers discussed in this review are of the type II (singlet oxygen) photooxidation category, although type I photosensitizers that involve other reactive oxygen species (ROS) will be discussed as well. The compilation of these parameters will be essential for ROS modeling of PDT.

  7. The Quantum Biology of Reactive Oxygen Species Partitioning Impacts Cellular Bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Usselman, Robert J; Chavarriaga, Cristina; Castello, Pablo R; Procopio, Maria; Ritz, Thorsten; Dratz, Edward A; Singel, David J; Martino, Carlos F

    2016-12-20

    Quantum biology is the study of quantum effects on biochemical mechanisms and biological function. We show that the biological production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in live cells can be influenced by coherent electron spin dynamics, providing a new example of quantum biology in cellular regulation. ROS partitioning appears to be mediated during the activation of molecular oxygen (O2) by reduced flavoenzymes, forming spin-correlated radical pairs (RPs). We find that oscillating magnetic fields at Zeeman resonance alter relative yields of cellular superoxide (O2(•-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ROS products, indicating coherent singlet-triplet mixing at the point of ROS formation. Furthermore, the orientation-dependence of magnetic stimulation, which leads to specific changes in ROS levels, increases either mitochondrial respiration and glycolysis rates. Our results reveal quantum effects in live cell cultures that bridge atomic and cellular levels by connecting ROS partitioning to cellular bioenergetics.

  8. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Reactive oxygen intermediates from eosinophils in mice infected with Hymenolepis nana.

    PubMed

    Niwa, A; Miyazato, T

    1996-06-01

    A large number of eosinophils were recruited to the intestinal villi after infection with Hymenolepis nana. Eosinophil numbers were increased more rapidly in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Local intestinal eosinophils from challenged mice showed more extracellular oxygen radical release, as assessed by histochemical methods using nitro blue tetrazolium, accompanied with tissue injury and larval degradation. Intestinal eosinophils isolated from the lamina propria induced specific oxygen radical generation in response to H. nana oncosphere extract as measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. This response was stronger in challenged mice than in primary infected mice. Radical generation from uninfected mice was negligible. Lipid peroxidation in the small intestine, as measured by formation of malondialdehyde, was increased during H. nana challenge infection, the peak activity coinciding with the elimination of challenge larvae. Continuous administration of a NADPH oxidase inhibitor to sensitized mice interfered with the degeneration of challenge larvae. These results suggest that intestinal eosinophils may be the major contributor to oxygen radical production in response to H. nana and that reactive oxygen species may play a part of effector molecule in the resistance to reinfection with H. nana.

  10. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-02

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants.

  11. Increase of reactive oxygen species generation in cerebral cortex slices after the transiently enhanced metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toru; Awaji, Takuji; Shimada, Kazuyoshi; Sasaki, Haruyo

    2017-10-01

    Under certain conditions such as hypoxia-reoxygenation, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases following hypoxia caused by a decreased oxygen supply. As another hypoxic condition, an excess neural activity status including epileptic seizure induces a decrease in tissue oxygen partial pressure (pO2) caused by enhanced oxygen utilization; however, whether ROS generation increases following the hypoxic status induced by transiently enhanced energy metabolism in brain tissue currently remains unknown. We herein investigated ROS-dependent chemiluminescence in cerebral cortex slices during the restoration of transiently enhanced energy metabolism induced by a high-potassium treatment with tissue pO2 changes and redox balance. ROS generation in the tissue was enhanced after high-potassium-induced hypoxia, but not by the reversed order of the treatment: control-potassium then high-potassium treatment, high-potassium treatment alone, and control-potassium treatment alone. The high-potassium treatment induced a transient decrease in tissue pO2 and a shift in the tissue redox balance towards reduction. The transient shift in the tissue redox balance towards reduction with enhanced metabolic activity and its recovery may correlate with ROS generation. This phenomenon may mimic ROS generation following the hypoxic status induced by transiently enhanced energy metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantification of reactive oxygen species generation by photoexcitation of PEGylated quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Yaghini, Elnaz; Pirker, Katharina F; Kay, Christopher W M; Seifalian, Alexander M; MacRobert, Alexander J

    2014-12-29

    Photocatalytic generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from quantum dots (QDs) has been widely reported yet quantitative studies of ROS formation and their quantum yields are lacking. This study investigates the generation of ROS by water soluble PEGylated CdSe/ZnS QDs with red emission. PEGylation of QDs is commonly used to confer water solubility and minimise uptake by organs of the reticuloendothelial system; therefore studies of ROS formation are of biomedical relevance. Using non-photolytic visible wavelength excitation, the superoxide anion radical is shown to be the primary ROS species generated with a quantum efficiency of 0.35%. The yield can be significantly enhanced in the presence of the electron donor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), as demonstrated by oxygen consumption measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy with in situ illumination. Direct production of singlet oxygen is not detectable from the QDs alone. A comparison is made with ROS generation by the same QDs complexed with a sulfonated phthalocyanine which can generate singlet oxygen via Förster resonance energy transfer between the QDs and the phthalocyanine. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study between tetrahydrozoline and naphazoline toward photogenerated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the vitamin B2 (riboflavin [Rf])-sensitized photo-oxidation of the imidazoline derivates (IDs) naphazoline (NPZ) and tetrahydrozoline (THZ) were investigated in aqueous solution. The process appears as important on biomedical grounds, considering that the vitamin is endogenously present in humans, and IDs are active components of ocular medicaments of topical application. Under aerobic visible light irradiation, a complex picture of competitive interactions between sensitizer, substrates and dissolved oxygen takes place: the singlet and triplet ((3)Rf*) excited states of Rf are quenched by the IDs: with IDs concentrations ca. 5.0 mM and 0.02 mM Rf, (3)Rf* is quenched by IDs, in a competitive fashion with dissolved ground state oxygen. Additionally, the reactive oxygen species: O(2)((1)Delta(g)), O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2), generated from (3)Rf* and Rf(*-), were detected with the employment of time-resolved methods or specific scavengers. Oxygen uptake experiments indicate that, for NPZ, only H(2)O(2) was involved in the photo-oxidation. In the case of THZ, O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2) were detected, whereas only HO(*) was unambiguously identified as THZ oxidative agents. Upon direct UV light irradiation NPZ and THZ generate O(2)((1)Delta(g)), with quantum yields of 0.2 (literature value, employed as a reference) and 0.08, respectively, in acetonitrile.

  14. Metabolism of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) plants under low temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Airaki, Morad; Leterrier, Marina; Mateos, Rosa M; Valderrama, Raquel; Chaki, Mounira; Barroso, Juan B; Del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M; Corpas, Francisco J

    2012-02-01

    Low temperature is an environmental stress that affects crop production and quality and regulates the expression of many genes, and the level of a number of proteins and metabolites. Using leaves from pepper (Capsicum annum L.) plants exposed to low temperature (8 °C) for different time periods (1 to 3 d), several key components of the metabolism of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species (RNS and ROS, respectively) were analysed. After 24 h of exposure at 8 °C, pepper plants exhibited visible symptoms characterized by flaccidity of stems and leaves. This was accompanied by significant changes in the metabolism of RNS and ROS with an increase of both protein tyrosine nitration (NO(2) -Tyr) and lipid peroxidation, indicating that low temperature induces nitrosative and oxidative stress. During the second and third days at low temperature, pepper plants underwent cold acclimation by adjusting their antioxidant metabolism and reverting the observed nitrosative and oxidative stress. In this process, the levels of the soluble non-enzymatic antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione, and the activity of the main NADPH-generating dehydrogenases were significantly induced. This suggests that ascorbate, glutathione and the NADPH-generating dehydrogenases have a role in the process of cold acclimation through their effect on the redox state of the cell.

  15. Indomethacin inactivates gastric peroxidase to induce reactive-oxygen-mediated gastric mucosal injury and curcumin protects it by preventing peroxidase inactivation and scavenging reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Ishita; Bandyopadhyay, Uday; Biswas, Kaushik; Maity, Pallab; Banerjee, Ranajit K

    2006-04-15

    We have investigated the mechanism of indomethacin-induced gastric ulcer caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the gastroprotective effect of curcumin thereon. Curcumin dose-dependently blocks indomethacin-induced gastric lesions, showing 82% protection at 25 mg/kg. Indomethacin-induced oxidative damage by ROS as shown by increased lipid peroxidation and thiol depletion is almost completely blocked by curcumin. Indomethacin causes nearly fivefold increase in hydroxyl radical (()OH) and significant inactivation of gastric mucosal peroxidase to elevate endogenous H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2)-derived ()OH, which is prevented by curcumin. In vitro studies indicate that indomethacin inactivates peroxidase irreversibly only in presence of H(2)O(2) by acting as a suicidal substrate. 5,5-Dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) protects the peroxidase, indicating involvement of indomethacin radical in the inactivation. Indomethacin radical was also detected in the peroxidase-indomethacin-H(2)O(2) system as DMPO adduct (a(N) = 15 G, a(beta)(H) = 16 G) by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Curcumin protects the peroxidase in a concentration-dependent manner and consumes H(2)O(2) for its oxidation as a suitable substrate of the peroxidase, thereby blocking indomethacin oxidation. Curcumin can also scavenge ()OH in vitro. We suggest that curcumin protects gastric damage by efficient removal of H(2)O(2) and H(2)O(2) -derived ()OH by preventing peroxidase inactivation by indomethacin.

  16. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are required for systemic acquired resistance in plants

    PubMed Central

    El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Wang, Caixia; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of broad-spectrum disease resistance that is induced in response to primary infection and that protects uninfected portions of the plant against secondary infections by related or unrelated pathogens. SAR is associated with an increase in chemical signals that operate in a collective manner to confer protection against secondary infections. These include, the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), azelaic acid (AzA) and more recently identified signals nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). NO, ROS, AzA and G3P function in the same branch of the SAR pathway, and in parallel to the SA-regulated branch. NO and ROS function upstream of AzA/G3P and different reactive oxygen species functions in an additive manner to mediate chemical cleavage of the C9 double bond on C18 unsaturated fatty acids to generate AzA. The parallel and additive functioning of various chemical signals provides important new insights in the overlapping pathways leading to SAR. PMID:26375184

  17. New enzymatic pathways for the reduction of reactive oxygen species in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Matías S; Guerrero, Sergio A; Iglesias, Alberto A; Arias, Diego G

    2015-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an intestinal parasite that is the causative agent of amoebiasis, is exposed to elevated amounts of highly toxic reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during tissue invasion. A flavodiiron protein and a rubrerythrin have been characterized in this human pathogen, although their physiological reductants have not been identified. The present work deals with biochemical studies performed to reach a better understanding of the kinetic and structural properties of rubredoxin reductase and two ferredoxins from E. histolytica. We complemented the characterization of two different metabolic pathways for O2 and H2O2 detoxification in E. histolytica. We characterized a novel amoebic protein with rubredoxin reductase activity that is able to catalyze the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of heterologous rubredoxins, amoebic rubrerythrin and flavodiiron protein but not ferredoxins. In addition, the protein exhibited an NAD(P)H oxidase activity, which generates hydrogen peroxide from molecular oxygen. We describe how different ferredoxins were also efficient reducing substrates for both flavodiiron protein and rubrerythrin. The enzymatic systems herein characterized could contribute to the in vivo detoxification of O2 and H2O2, playing a key role for the parasite defense against reactive oxidant species. To the best of our knowledge this is the first characterization of a eukaryotic rubredoxin reductase, including a novel kinetic study on ferredoxin-dependent reduction of flavodiiron and rubrerythrin proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. CLOCK Promotes Endothelial Damage by Inducing Autophagy through Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao; Lin, Changpo; Guo, Daqiao; Qian, Ruizhe; Li, Xiaobo; Shi, Zhenyu; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    A number of recent studies have implicated that autophagy was activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our previous report indicated that CLOCK increased the accumulation of ROS under hypoxic conditions. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms by which CLOCK mediated endothelial damage, focusing on the involvement of oxidative damage and autophagy. Overexpression of CLOCK in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) showed inhibition of cell proliferation and higher autophagosome with an increased expression of Beclin1 and LC3-I/II under hypoxic conditions. In contrast, CLOCK silencing reversed these effects. Interestingly, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) resulted in the attenuation of CLOCK-induced cell autophagy and but did not influence the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, Tiron (4,5-dihydroxy-1,3-benzene disulfonic acid-disodium salt), a ROS scavenger, significantly attenuated CLOCK-induced cell autophagy. In addition, we found that overexpression of CLOCK had no significant effects on the production of ROS and expression of Beclin1 and LC3-I/II under normoxic conditions in HUVEC. In this present investigation, our results suggested a novel mechanism of action of CLOCK in HUVECs, opening up the possibility of targeting CLOCK for the treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:28058089

  19. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  20. Functional characterization of a reactive oxygen species modulator 1 gene in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    He, Hong-Hui; Chi, Yi-Miao; Yuan, Kai; Li, Xiao-Yun; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2017-09-06

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) imparts a dual effect on multicellular organisms, wherein high levels are usually harmful, and low levels could facilitate in combating pathogenic microorganisms; therefore, the regulation of ROS production is critical. Previous studies have suggested that ROS contributes to resistance to the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) or Vibrio alginolyticus in Litopenaeus vannamei. However, the regulation of ROS metabolism in L. vannamei remains elusive. In the present study, we proved that the overexpression of L. vannamei reactive oxygen species modulator 1 (LvROMO1) increases ROS production in Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that LvROMO1 is induced by WSSV or V. alginolyticus infection and β-glucan or microcystin (MC-LR) injection. Further investigation showed that LvROMO1 responding to MC-LR, thereby inducing hemocytes to undergo apoptosis, and ultimately resulting in hepatopancreatic damage. And LvROMO1 downregulation induced an increase in the cumulative mortality of WSSV-infected shrimp by reducing ROS production and suppressing the expression of antimicrobial peptides genes. The findings of present study suggest that LvROMO1 plays an important role in ROS production in L. vannamei and is involved in innate immunity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species are required for systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    El-Shetehy, Mohamed; Wang, Caixia; Shine, M B; Yu, Keshun; Kachroo, Aardra; Kachroo, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a form of broad-spectrum disease resistance that is induced in response to primary infection and that protects uninfected portions of the plant against secondary infections by related or unrelated pathogens. SAR is associated with an increase in chemical signals that operate in a collective manner to confer protection against secondary infections. These include, the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA), glycerol-3-phosphate (G3P), azelaic acid (AzA) and more recently identified signals nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). NO, ROS, AzA and G3P function in the same branch of the SAR pathway, and in parallel to the SA-regulated branch. NO and ROS function upstream of AzA/G3P and different reactive oxygen species functions in an additive manner to mediate chemical cleavage of the C9 double bond on C18 unsaturated fatty acids to generate AzA. The parallel and additive functioning of various chemical signals provides important new insights in the overlapping pathways leading to SAR.

  2. Effects of Reactive Oxygen Species on Tubular Transport along the Nephron.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Vicente, Agustin; Garvin, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-23

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are oxygen-containing molecules naturally occurring in both inorganic and biological chemical systems. Due to their high reactivity and potentially damaging effects to biomolecules, cells express a battery of enzymes to rapidly metabolize them to innocuous intermediaries. Initially, ROS were considered by biologists as dangerous byproducts of respiration capable of causing oxidative stress, a condition in which overproduction of ROS leads to a reduction in protective molecules and enzymes and consequent damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA. In fact, ROS are used by immune systems to kill virus and bacteria, causing inflammation and local tissue damage. Today, we know that the functions of ROS are not so limited, and that they also act as signaling molecules mediating processes as diverse as gene expression, mechanosensation, and epithelial transport. In the kidney, ROS such as nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O₂(-)), and their derivative molecules hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and peroxynitrite (ONO₂(-)) regulate solute and water reabsorption, which is vital to maintain electrolyte homeostasis and extracellular fluid volume. This article reviews the effects of NO, O₂(-), ONO₂(-), and H₂O₂ on water and electrolyte reabsorption in proximal tubules, thick ascending limbs, and collecting ducts, and the effects of NO and O₂(-) in the macula densa on tubuloglomerular feedback.

  3. Intracellular reactive oxygen species in monocytes generated by photosensitive chromophores activated with blue light.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Owen, Brandi; Wataha, John C; Campo, Marino A; Lange, Norbert; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2008-08-01

    Disinfection of the tooth pulp-canal system is imperative to successful endodontic therapy. Yet, studies suggest that 30-50% of current endodontic treatments fail from residual bacterial infection. Photodynamic therapy using red-light chromophores (630 nm) to induce antimicrobial death mediated by generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported, but red-light also may thermally damage resident tissues. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that several blue light chromophores (380-500 nm) generate intracellular reactive oxygen species but are not cytotoxic to mammalian cells. THP1 monocytes were exposed to 10 microM of four chromophores (chlorin e6, pheophorbide-a, pheophorbide-a-PLL, and riboflavin) for 30 min before activation with blue light (27J/cm(2), 60s). After activation, intracellular ROS were measured using a dihydrofluorescein diacetate technique, and cytotoxicity was determined by measuring mitochondrial activity with the MTT method. All photosensitizers produced intracellular ROS levels that were dependent on both the presence of the photosensitizer and blue light exposure. Riboflavin and pheophorbide-a-PLL produced the highest levels of ROS. Photosensitizers except riboflavin exhibited cytotoxicity above 10 microM, and all except pheophorbide-a-PLL were more cytotoxic after blue light irradiation. The current study demonstrated the possible utility of blue light chromophores as producers of ROS that would be useful for endodontic disinfection.

  4. Reactive oxygen species exacerbate autoimmune hemolytic anemia in New Zealand Black mice.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tasuku; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kibe, Noriko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage occur in the red blood cells (RBCs) of SOD1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. This leads to autoimmune responses against RBCs in aged mice that are similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We examined whether a SOD1 deficiency and/or the human SOD1 transgene (hSOD1) would affect phenotypes of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice by establishing three congenic strains: those lacking SOD1, those expressing hSOD1 under a GATA-1 promoter, and those lacking mouse SOD1 but expressing hSOD1. Levels of intracellular ROS and oxidative stress markers increased, and the severity of the AIHA phenotype was aggravated by a SOD1 deficiency. In contrast, the transgenic expression of hSOD1 in an erythroid cell-specific manner averted most of the AIHA phenotype evident in the SOD1-deficient mice and also ameliorated the AIHA phenotype in the mice possessing intrinsic SOD1. These data suggest that oxidative stress in RBCs may be an underlying mechanism for autoimmune responses in NZB mice. These results were consistent with the hypothetical role of reactive oxygen species in triggering the autoimmune reaction in RBCs and may provide a novel approach to mitigating the progression of AIHA by reducing oxidative stress.

  5. The role of reactive oxygen species in the induction of Ty1 retrotransposition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stoycheva, Teodora; Pesheva, Margarita; Venkov, Pencho

    2010-05-01

    Here we provide evidence for a dependence between the increased production of reactive oxygen species and the activation of Ty1 retrotransposition. We have found that the strong activator of Ty1 mobility, methylmethane sulphonate, can not induce Ty1 retrotransposition in cells with compromised mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (rho(-); sco1Delta), which is the major source for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The quantitative estimation of superoxide anions in living cells showed that rho(+) cells exposed to methylmethane sulphonate increase Ty1 retrotransposition and superoxide levels. The increase of superoxide anions by the superoxide generator menadione is accompanied by induction of Ty1 mobility without any treatment with a DNA-damaging agent. Higher frequencies of retrotransposition were found in rho(+) and rho(-) cells treated with exogenously added hydrogen peroxide or in cells with disrupted YAP1 gene characterized by increased intracellular levels of hydrogen peroxide. These data indicate that increased levels of ROS may have an independent and key role in the induction of Ty1 retrotransposition.

  6. Role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in age-related inflammatory activation of endothelium.

    PubMed

    Zinovkin, Roman A; Romaschenko, Valeria P; Galkin, Ivan I; Zakharova, Vlada V; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Chernyak, Boris V; Popova, Ekaterina N

    2014-08-01

    Vascular aging is accompanied by increases in circulatory proinflammatory cytokines leading to inflammatory endothelial response implicated in early atherogenesis. To study the possible role of mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this phenomenon, we applied the effective mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1, the conjugate of plastoquinone with dodecyltriphenylphosphonium. Eight months treatment of (CBAxC57BL/6) F1 mice with SkQ1 did not prevent age-related elevation of the major proinflammatory cytokines TNF and IL-6 in serum, but completely abrogated the increase in adhesion molecule ICAM1 expression in aortas of 24-month-old animals. In endothelial cell culture, SkQ1 also attenuated TNF-induced increase in ICAM1, VCAM, and E-selectin expression and secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, and prevented neutrophil adhesion to the endothelial monolayer. Using specific inhibitors to transcription factor NF-κB and stress-kinases p38 and JNK, we demonstrated that TNF-induced ICAM1 expression depends mainly on NF-κB activity and, to a lesser extent, on p38. SkQ1 had no effect on p38 phosphorylation (activation) but significantly reduced NF-κB activation by inhibiting phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of the inhibitory subunit IκBα. The data indicate an important role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in regulation of the NF-κB pathway and corresponding age-related inflammatory activation of endothelium.

  7. Cysteine protects rabbit spermatozoa against reactive oxygen species-induced damages

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Xiaoteng; Pan, Yang; Lv, Shan; Pan, Chuanying; Lei, Anmin

    2017-01-01

    The process of cryopreservation results in over-production of reactive oxygen species, which is extremely detrimental to spermatozoa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of cysteine to freezing extender would facilitate the cryosurvival of rabbit spermatozoa, and if so, how cysteine protects spermatozoa from cryodamages. Freshly ejaculated semen was diluted with Tris-citrate-glucose extender supplemented with different concentrations of cysteine. The motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials, 8-hydroxyguanosine level and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity were examined. Furthermore, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, glutathione content (GSH), and level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hydrogen peroxide of spermatozoa were analyzed. The values of motility, intact acrosomes, membrane integrity, mitochondrial potentials and sperm-zona pellucida binding capacity of the frozen-thawed spermatozoa in the treatment of cysteine were significantly higher than those of the control. Addition of cysteine to extenders improved the GPx activity and GSH content of spermatozoa, while lowered the ROS, DNA oxidative alterations and lipid peroxidation level, which makes spermatozoa avoid ROS to attack DNA, the plasma membrane and mitochondria. In conclusion, cysteine protects spermatozoa against ROS-induced damages during cryopreservation and post-thaw incubation. Addition of cysteine is recommended to facilitate the improvement of semen preservation for the rabbit breeding industry. PMID:28700739

  8. Measurement of reactive oxygen metabolites produced by human monocyte-derived macrophages exposed to mineral dusts.

    PubMed Central

    Nyberg, P.; Klockars, M.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to develop an in-vitro model for studying mineral dust-induced production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human macrophages. Monocytes isolated from human buffy coats were cultured in vitro for 1-6 days. Quartz particles induced both luminol- and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) by the adherent cells. However, the luminol response decreased form day to day, obviously due to a decrease in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the cells, whereas the lucigenin response showed no such MPO dependence. The luminol response was inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and the MPO-inhibitor azide, while the lucigenin response was inhibited by SOD and catalase but stimulated by azide. There was a positive correlation between the lucigenin responses and the results obtained with the established cytochrome c assay for superoxide, when opsonized zymosan was used as a stimulant. The effects of quartz, titanium dioxide, chrysotile asbestos, and wollastonite particles were investigated with the lucigenin assay. Quartz and chrysotile caused prominent light emission by 6-day-old macrophages, whereas titanium dioxide and wollastonite caused weak responses. We conclude that mineral dusts induce production of reactive oxygen metabolites by human monocyte-derived macrophages, and that the quantitative responses depend on both physical and physicochemical dust properties, the nature of which are still to be defined. PMID:2169299

  9. Detecting, visualizing and quantitating the generation of reactive oxygen species in an amoeba model system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2013-11-05

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) comprise a range of reactive and short-lived, oxygen-containing molecules, which are dynamically interconverted or eliminated either catalytically or spontaneously. Due to the short life spans of most ROS and the diversity of their sources and subcellular localizations, a complete picture can be obtained only by careful measurements using a combination of protocols. Here, we present a set of three different protocols using OxyBurst Green (OBG)-coated beads, or dihydroethidium (DHE) and Amplex UltraRed (AUR), to monitor qualitatively and quantitatively various ROS in professional phagocytes such as Dictyostelium. We optimised the beads coating procedures and used OBG-coated beads and live microscopy to dynamically visualize intraphagosomal ROS generation at the single cell level. We identified lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli as a potent stimulator for ROS generation in Dictyostelium. In addition, we developed real time, medium-throughput assays using DHE and AUR to quantitatively measure intracellular superoxide and extracellular H2O2 production, respectively.

  10. Extensive Dark Biological Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brackish and Freshwater Ponds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M; Lamborg, Carl H

    2016-03-15

    Within natural waters, photodependent processes are generally considered the predominant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a suite of biogeochemically important molecules. However, recent discoveries of dark particle-associated ROS production in aquatic environments and extracellular ROS production by various microorganisms point to biological activity as a significant source of ROS in the absence of light. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of dark biological production of the ROS superoxide (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in brackish and freshwater ponds. Here we show that the ROS superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were present in dark waters at comparable concentrations as in sunlit waters. This suggests that, at least for the short-lived superoxide species, light-independent processes were an important control on ROS levels in these natural waters. Indeed, we demonstrated that dark biological production of ROS extensively occurred in brackish and freshwater environments, with greater dark ROS production rates generally observed in the aphotic relative to the photic zone. Filtering and formaldehyde inhibition confirmed the biological nature of a majority of this dark ROS production, which likely involved phytoplankton, particle-associated heterotrophic bacteria, and NADH-oxidizing enzymes. We conclude that biological ROS production is widespread, including regions devoid of light, thereby expanding the relevance of these reactive molecules to all regions of our oxygenated global habit.

  11. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought.

  12. Novel Approach to Reactive Oxygen Species in Nontransfusion-Dependent Thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Tyan, Paul I.; Radwan, Amr H.; Eid, Assaad; Haddad, Anthony G.; Wehbe, David; Taher, Ali T.

    2014-01-01

    The term Nontransfusion dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) was suggested to describe patients who had clinical manifestations that are too severe to be termed minor yet too mild to be termed major. Those patients are not entirely dependent on transfusions for survival. If left untreated, three main factors are responsible for the clinical sequelae of NTDT: ineffective erythropoiesis, chronic hemolytic anemia, and iron overload. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in NTDT patients is caused by 2 major mechanisms. The first one is chronic hypoxia resulting from chronic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis leading to mitochondrial damage and the second is iron overload also due to chronic anemia and tissue hypoxia leading to increase intestinal iron absorption in thalassemic patients. Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (generated by free globin chains and labile plasma iron) is believed to be one of the main contributors to cell injury, tissue damage, and hypercoagulability in patients with thalassemia. Independently increased ROS has been linked to a myriad of pathological outcomes such as leg ulcers, decreased wound healing, pulmonary hypertension, silent brain infarcts, and increased thrombosis to count a few. Interestingly many of those complications overlap with those found in NTDT patients. PMID:25121095

  13. Novel approach to reactive oxygen species in nontransfusion-dependent thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Tyan, Paul I; Radwan, Amr H; Eid, Assaad; Haddad, Anthony G; Wehbe, David; Taher, Ali T

    2014-01-01

    The term Nontransfusion dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) was suggested to describe patients who had clinical manifestations that are too severe to be termed minor yet too mild to be termed major. Those patients are not entirely dependent on transfusions for survival. If left untreated, three main factors are responsible for the clinical sequelae of NTDT: ineffective erythropoiesis, chronic hemolytic anemia, and iron overload. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in NTDT patients is caused by 2 major mechanisms. The first one is chronic hypoxia resulting from chronic anemia and ineffective erythropoiesis leading to mitochondrial damage and the second is iron overload also due to chronic anemia and tissue hypoxia leading to increase intestinal iron absorption in thalassemic patients. Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (generated by free globin chains and labile plasma iron) is believed to be one of the main contributors to cell injury, tissue damage, and hypercoagulability in patients with thalassemia. Independently increased ROS has been linked to a myriad of pathological outcomes such as leg ulcers, decreased wound healing, pulmonary hypertension, silent brain infarcts, and increased thrombosis to count a few. Interestingly many of those complications overlap with those found in NTDT patients.

  14. The role of reactive oxygen species in mesenchymal stem cell adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation: a review.

    PubMed

    Atashi, Fatemeh; Modarressi, Ali; Pepper, Michael S

    2015-05-15

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The multipotent stem cell component of MSC isolates is able to differentiate into derivatives of the mesodermal lineage including adipocytes, osteocytes, chondrocytes, and myocytes. Many common pathways have been described in the regulation of adipogenesis and osteogenesis. However, stimulation of osteogenesis appears to suppress adipogenesis and vice-versa. Increasing evidence implicates a tight regulation of these processes by reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are short-lived oxygen-containing molecules that display high chemical reactivity toward DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. Mitochondrial complexes I and III, and the NADPH oxidase isoform NOX4 are major sources of ROS production during MSC differentiation. ROS are thought to interact with several pathways that affect the transcription machinery required for MSC differentiation including the Wnt, Hedgehog, and FOXO signaling cascades. On the other hand, elevated levels of ROS, defined as oxidative stress, lead to arrest of the MSC cell cycle and apoptosis. Tightly regulated levels of ROS are therefore critical for MSC terminal differentiation, although the precise sources, localization, levels and the exact species of ROS implicated remain to be determined. This review provides a detailed overview of the influence of ROS on adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation in MSCs.

  15. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Aliyu, M; Isiaka, I; Haliru, F Z; Ibitoye, O B; Uwazie, J N; Muritala, H F; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Mohammed, A O

    2016-10-25

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality was investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were investigated using 96-well microtitre plate. MIC and MBC of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus are 600 and 700; 600 and 800; 600 and 800 μg/mL respectively. The optical densities and colony forming units of (+)-catechin-treated bacteria decreased. (+)-Catechin (4× MIC) significantly increased the superoxide anion content of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus compared to DMSO. Superoxide dismutase and catalase in (+)-catechin treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus increased significantly. Conversely, level of reduced glutathione in (+)-catechin-treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus decreased significantly while glutathione disulfide increased significantly. Furthermore, malondialdehyde and fragmented DNA increased significantly following exposure to (+)-catechin. From the above findings, (+)-catechin enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical) in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, possibly by autoxidation, Fenton chemistry and inhibiting electron transport chain resulting into lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation and consequentially bacterial cell death.

  16. Reactive oxygen product formation by human neutrophils as an early marker for biocompatibility of dialysis membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenkranz, A R; Templ, E; Traindl, O; Heinzl, H; Zlabinger, G J

    1994-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI) by neutrophils (PMN) in vivo was examined by a whole blood assay using dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) in 10 patients each dialysed consecutively with two different dialyser membranes. Haemodialysis (HD) with cuprophan membrane (CM) led to a significantly (P < 0.001) more pronounced ROI production by PMN (2.4 +/- 0.5-fold increase in intracellular oxidation of DCFH-DA) compared with HD with polysulfone membranes (PM; 1.5 +/- 0.2-fold). HD with CM induced a decrease in PMN count by about 90%, whereas PM induced a decrease by only 25% (P < 0.001). In CM patients maximal ROI production coincided with the nadir in PMN count. All patients dialysed with CM showed a clear increase in serum levels of Bb fragments, whereas PM-dialysed patients did not. In this respect, however, no clear time relationship was seen to the kinetics of ROI production, nor to the disappearance of neutrophils from the circulation. Evaluating a direct effect of the dialysis membranes on PMN demonstrated that incubation of neutrophils with hollow fibres of the CM but not of the PM in the absence of plasma induces significant ROI production by PMN. Our study thus indicates that ROI production by PMN during HD correlates to membrane biocompatibility. Furthermore, one might speculate that also independently from but perhaps in addition to complement activation, reactive oxygen products are critically involved in the generation of haemodialysis-associated neutrophil emigration. PMID:7955536

  17. Multiple signaling pathways coordinately mediate reactive oxygen species dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Adiga, Indira K; Nair, Renuka R

    2008-04-01

    The heart responds to an increased demand arising due to physiological stimuli or pathological insults by hypertrophy of myocytes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have recently been identified as the molecular intermediates in the translation of mechanical stimuli to cellular response. Different signal transduction pathways have been implicated with cardiac hypertrophy, prominent among them being, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), protein kinase C (PKC) and calcineurin. It remains unclear whether the ROS induced hypertrophy is mediated through one or more of these pathways. This study was taken up with the objective to affirm the role of ROS in the induction of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and examine the contribution of specific pathways in the mediation of the hypertrophic response. The cellular response to enzyme-generated reactive oxygen species was examined in cultured cells from newborn rat heart. Pathway specific inhibitors were used to identify the role of each pathway in the mediation of cellular hypertrophy. Cellular hypertrophy in response to hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase was prevented by inhibition of any one of the pathways; leading to the inference that oxidative stress induced hypertrophy is mediated by coordinative regulation of the three major pathways.

  18. Tetrandrine blocks cardiac hypertrophy by disrupting reactive oxygen species-dependent ERK1/2 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Di-Fei; Tang, Qi-Zhu; Yan, Ling; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Li-Hua; Wang, Lang; Liu, Chen; Bian, Zhou-Yan; Li, Hongliang

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Tetrandrine, a well-known naturally occurring calcium antagonist with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-fibrogenetic activities, has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and arrhythmia. However, little is known about the effect of tetrandrine on cardiac hypertrophy. The aims of the present study were to determine whether tetrandrine could attenuate cardiac hypertrophy and to clarify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Experimental approach: Tetrandrine (50 mg·kg−1·day−1) was administered by oral gavage three times a day for one week and then the mice were subjected to either chronic pressure overload generated by aortic banding (AB) or sham surgery (control group). Cardiac function was determined by echocardiography. Key results: Tetrandrine attenuated the cardiac hypertrophy induced by AB, as assessed by heart weight/body weight and lung weight/body weight ratios, cardiac dilatation and the expression of genes of hypertrophic markers. Tetrandrine also inhibited fibrosis and attenuated the inflammatory response. The cardioprotective effects of tetrandrine were mediated by blocking the increased production of reactive oxygen species and the activation of ERK1/2-dependent nuclear factor-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells that occur in response to hypertrophic stimuli. Conclusions and implications: Taken together, our results suggest that tetrandrine can improve cardiac function and prevent the development of cardiac hypertrophy by suppressing the reactive oxygen species-dependent ERK1/2 signalling pathway. PMID:20105174

  19. Reactive oxygen species as universal constraints in life-history evolution

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Damian K.; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary theory is firmly grounded on the existence of trade-offs between life-history traits, and recent interest has centred on the physiological mechanisms underlying such trade-offs. Several branches of evolutionary biology, particularly those focusing on ageing, immunological and sexual selection theory, have implicated reactive oxygen species (ROS) as profound evolutionary players. ROS are a highly reactive group of oxygen-containing molecules, generated as common by-products of vital oxidative enzyme complexes. Both animals and plants appear to intentionally harness ROS for use as molecular messengers to fulfil a wide range of essential biological processes. However, at high levels, ROS are known to exert very damaging effects through oxidative stress. For these reasons, ROS have been suggested to be important mediators of the cost of reproduction, and of trade-offs between metabolic rate and lifespan, and between immunity, sexual ornamentation and sperm quality. In this review, we integrate the above suggestions into one life-history framework, and review the evidence in support of the contention that ROS production will constitute a primary and universal constraint in life-history evolution. PMID:19324792

  20. Overexpression of stanniocalcin-1 inhibits reactive oxygen species and renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Luping; Belousova, Tatiana; Chen, Minyi; DiMattia, Gabriel; Liu, Dajun; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2012-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, and mitogen-activated protein kinases have important roles in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) suppresses superoxide generation in many systems through the induction of mitochondrial uncoupling proteins and blocks the cytokine-induced rise in endothelial permeability. Here we tested whether transgenic overexpression of STC1 protects from bilateral ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury. This injury in wild-type mice caused a halving of the creatinine clearance; severe tubular vacuolization and cast formation; increased infiltration of macrophages and T cells; higher vascular permeability; greater production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide; and higher ratio of activated extracellular regulated kinase/activated Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38, all compared to sham-treated controls. Mice transgenic for human STC1 expression, however, had resistance to equivalent ischemia/reperfusion injury indicated as no significant change from controls in any of these parameters. Tubular epithelial cells in transgenic mice expressed higher mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and lower superoxide generation. Pre-treatment of transgenic mice with paraquat, a generator of reactive oxygen species, before injury restored the susceptibility to ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury, suggesting that STC1 protects by an anti-oxidant mechanism. Thus, STC1 may be a therapeutic target for ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury.

  1. Hypoxia-Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Cause Chromosomal Abnormalities in Endothelial Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Yasuhiro; Maishi, Nako; Towfik, Alam Mohammad; Inoue, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    There is much evidence that hypoxia in the tumor microenvironment enhances tumor progression. In an earlier study, we reported abnormal phenotypes of tumor-associated endothelial cells such as those resistant to chemotherapy and chromosomal instability. Here we investigated the role of hypoxia in the acquisition of chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells. Tumor-associated endothelial cells isolated from human tumor xenografts showed chromosomal abnormalities, >30% of which were aneuploidy. Aneuploidy of the tumor-associated endothelial cells was also shown by simultaneous in-situ hybridization for chromosome 17 and by immunohistochemistry with anti-CD31 antibody for endothelial staining. The aneuploid cells were surrounded by a pimonidazole-positive area, indicating hypoxia. Human microvascular endothelial cells expressed hypoxia-inducible factor 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor A in response to either hypoxia or hypoxia-reoxygenation, and in these conditions, they acquired aneuploidy in 7 days. Induction of aneuploidy was inhibited by either inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor signaling with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 inhibitor or by inhibition of reactive oxygen species by N-acetyl-L-cysteine. These results indicate that hypoxia induces chromosomal abnormalities in endothelial cells through the induction of reactive oxygen species and excess signaling of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24260373

  2. Pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular reactivity in asphyxiated term lambs resuscitated with 21 and 100% oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.; Wedgwood, Stephen; Savorgnan, Fabio; Nair, Jayasree; Mathew, Bobby; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Russell, James A.; Swartz, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in oxygen tension is an important factor in decreasing pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at birth. Birth asphyxia results in acidosis and increased PVR. We determined the effect of resuscitation with 21 vs. 100% O2 on pulmonary hemodynamics, pulmonary arterial (PA) reactivity, and oxidant stress in a lamb model of in utero asphyxia. Term fetal lambs were acutely asphyxiated by intrauterine umbilical cord occlusion for 10 min resulting in acidosis (pH 6.96 ± 0.05 and Pco2 103 ± 5 Torr), bradycardia, systemic hypotension, and increased PVR. Lambs were treated with 30 min of resuscitation with 21% or 100% O2 (n = 6 each). PaO2 was significantly elevated with 100% O2 resuscitation compared with 21% O2 (430 ± 38 vs. 64 ± 8 Torr), but changes in pH and PaCO2 were similar. The 100% O2 induced greater increase in pulmonary blood flow and decrease in PVR at 1 min of life, but subsequent values were similar to 21% O2 group between 2 and 30 min of life. Oxygen uptake from the lung and systemic oxygen extraction was similar between the two groups. Pulmonary arteries showed increased staining for superoxide anions and increased contractility to norepinephrine following resuscitation with 100% O2. The increased PA contractility induced by 100% O2 was reversed by scavenging superoxide anions with superoxide dismutase and catalase. We conclude that resuscitation of asphyxiated lambs with 100% O2 increases PaO2 but does not improve lung oxygen uptake, decrease PVR at 30 min, or increase systemic oxygen extraction ratios. Furthermore, 100% O2 also induces oxidative stress and increases PA contractility. These findings support the new neonatal resuscitation guidelines recommending 21% O2 for initial resuscitation of asphyxiated neonates. PMID:21799125

  3. Flavonoids in Microheterogeneous Media, Relationship between Their Relative Location and Their Reactivity towards Singlet Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Germán; Berríos, Eduardo; Pizarro, Nancy; Valdés, Karina; Montero, Guillermo; Arriagada, Francisco; Morales, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between the molecular structure of three flavonoids (kaempferol, quercetin and morin), their relative location in microheterogeneous media (liposomes and erythrocyte membranes) and their reactivity against singlet oxygen was studied. The changes observed in membrane fluidity induced by the presence of these flavonoids and the influence of their lipophilicity/hydrophilicity on the antioxidant activity in lipid membranes were evaluated by means of fluorescent probes such as Laurdan and diphenylhexatriene (DPH). The small differences observed for the value of generalized polarization of Laurdan (GP) curves in function of the concentration of flavonoids, indicate that these three compounds promote similar alterations in liposomes and erythrocyte membranes. In addition, these compounds do not produce changes in fluorescence anisotropy of DPH, discarding their location in deeper regions of the lipid bilayer. The determined chemical reactivity sequence is similar in all the studied media (kaempferol < quercetin < morin). Morin is approximately 10 times more reactive than quercetin and 20 to 30 times greater than kaempferol, depending on the medium. PMID:26098745

  4. Oxygen precursor to the reactive intermediate in methanol synthesis by Cu-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Pieter J; Hadt, Ryan G; Woertink, Julia S; Vanelderen, Pieter; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2010-10-27

    The reactive oxidizing species in the selective oxidation of methane to methanol in oxygen activated Cu-ZSM-5 was recently defined to be a bent mono(μ-oxo)dicopper(II) species, [Cu(2)O](2+). In this communication we report the formation of an O(2)-precursor of this reactive site with an associated absorption band at 29,000 cm(-1). Laser excitation into this absorption feature yields a resonance Raman (rR) spectrum characterized by (18)O(2) isotope sensitive and insensitive vibrations, νO-O and νCu-Cu, at 736 (Δ(18)O(2) = 41 cm(-1)) and 269 cm(-1), respectively. These define the precursor to be a μ-(η(2):η(2)) peroxo dicopper(II) species, [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+). rR experiments in combination with UV-vis absorption data show that this [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+) species transforms directly into the [Cu(2)O](2+) reactive site. Spectator Cu(+) sites in the zeolite ion-exchange sites provide the two electrons required to break the peroxo bond in the precursor. O(2)-TPD experiments with (18)O(2) show the incorporation of the second (18)O atom into the zeolite lattice in the transformation of [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+) into [Cu(2)O](2+). This study defines the mechanism of oxo-active site formation in Cu-ZSM-5.

  5. The chemistry of cell signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and 4-hydroxynonenal

    PubMed Central

    Forman, Henry Jay; Fukuto, Jon M.; Miller, Tom; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Levy, Smadar

    2008-01-01

    During the past several years, major advances have been made in understanding how reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) participate in signal transduction. Identification of the specific targets and the chemical reactions involved still remains to be resolved with many of the signaling pathways in which the involvement of reactive species has been determined. Our understanding is that ROS and RNS have second messenger roles. While cysteine residues in the thiolate (ionized) form found in several classes of signaling proteins can be specific targets for reaction with H2O2 and RNS, better understanding of the chemistry, particularly kinetics, suggests that for many signaling events in which ROS and RNS participate, enzymatic catalysis is more likely to be involved than non-enzymatic reaction. Due to increased interest in how oxidation products, particularly lipid peroxidation products, also are involved with signaling, a review of signaling by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is included. This article focuses on the chemistry of signaling by ROS, RNS, and HNE and will describe reactions with selected target proteins as representatives of the mechanisms rather attempt to comprehensively review the many signaling pathways in which the reactive species are involved. PMID:18602883

  6. Light-responsive polymer nanoreactors: a source of reactive oxygen species on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Patric; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Onaca-Fischer, Ozana; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Palivan, Cornelia G.

    2012-12-01

    Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that encapsulate photosensitizer-protein conjugates in polymer vesicles as a source of ``on demand'' reactive oxygen species. Vesicles made of poly(2-methyloxazoline)-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) successfully encapsulated the photosensitizer Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin conjugate (RB-BSA) during a self-assembly process, as demonstrated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A combination of light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanoreactors are stable over time. They serve a dual role: protecting the photosensitizer in the inner cavity and producing in situ reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with appropriate electromagnetic radiation. Illumination with appropriate wavelength light allows us to switch on/off and to control the production of ROS. Because of the oxygen-permeable nature of the polymer membrane of vesicles, ROS escape into the environment around vesicles, as established by electron paramagnetic resonance. The light-sensitive nanoreactor is taken up by HeLa cells in a Trojan horse fashion: it is nontoxic and, when irradiated with the appropriate laser light, produces ROS that induce cell death in a precise area corresponding to the irradiation zone. These nanoreactors can be used in theranostic approaches because they can be detected via the fluorescent photosensitizer signal and simultaneously produce ROS efficiently ``on demand''.Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that

  7. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  8. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  9. The Effect of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Valence State on Reactive Oxygen Species and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Katherine M; Pillai, Rajalekshmi; Pisane, Kelly L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sabolsky, Edward M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2015-07-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles, which are used in a variety of products including solar cells, gas sensors, and catalysts, are expected to increase in industrial use. This will subsequently lead to additional occupational exposures, making toxicology screenings crucial. Previous toxicology studies have presented conflicting results as to the extent of CeO2 toxicity, which is hypothesized to be due to the ability of Ce to exist in both a +3 and +4 valence state. Thus, to study whether valence state and oxygen vacancy concentration are important in CeO2 toxicity, CeO2 nanoparticles were doped with gadolinium to adjust the cation (Ce, Gd) and anion (O) defect states. The hypothesis that doping would increase toxicity and decrease antioxidant abilities as a result of increased oxygen vacancies and inhibition of +3 to +4 transition was tested. Differences in toxicity and reactivity based on valence state were determined in RLE-6TN rat alveolar epithelial and NR8383 rat alveolar macrophage cells using enhanced dark field microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and annexin V/propidium iodide cell viability stain. Results from EPR indicated that as doping increased, antioxidant potential decreased. Alternatively, doping had no effect on toxicity at 24 h. The present results imply that as doping increases, thus subsequently increasing the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio, antioxidant potential decreases, suggesting that differences in reactivity of CeO2 are due to the ability of Ce to transition between the two valence states and the presence of increased oxygen vacancies, rather than dependent on a specific valence state.

  10. High-throughput spectrophotometric assay of reactive oxygen species in serum.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ikue; Morishita, Yukari; Imai, Kazue; Nakamura, Masakazu; Nakachi, Kei; Hayashi, Tomonori

    2007-07-10

    The derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites (D-ROM) test has been developed to determine the amount of oxygen-centered free radicals in a blood sample as a marker of oxidative stress. This study aims to improve the D-ROM test and develop an automated assay system by use of a clinical chemistry analyzer. Five microliters of serum was added to 1 well of a 96-well microtiter plate for a total 240microl of reaction solution containing alkylamine and metals. This was followed by automatic mixing, incubation and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels as a color development at 505nm using a spectrophotometer with catalytic capability for transition metals. This assay system was used to measure serum levels of ROS in cigarette smokers and never-smokers, by way of example. The levels of serum ROS determined by this system correlate with the amounts of free radicals and peroxides, which reacted with various molecules in the body and formed stable metabolites. This test can use frozen sera as well as fresh ones. The inter- and intra-deviation of this system was within 5% and showed consistent linearity in the range between 4 and 500mg/l of hydrogen peroxides. Serum ROS levels among smokers increased with the number of cigarettes smoked per day (36.5% increment per pack per day; P<0.0001). This assay system will be a simple, inexpensive, and reliable tool for assessing oxidative stress in human populations. Our preliminary results on cigarette smoking imply that this assay system has potential for application in various epidemiological and clinical settings.

  11. Copper elevated embryonic hemoglobin through reactive oxygen species during zebrafish erythrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin-Ying; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Long; Wu, Jun-Jie; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Jing-Xia

    2016-06-01

    Copper, as an essential trace mineral, can cause diseases such as childhood leukemia at excess levels, but has been applied in anemia therapy for a long time. However, few reports have studied its role during hematopoiesis at the molecular level in an animal model. In this study, by microarray, qRT-PCR, whole-mount in situ hybridization and O-dianisidine staining detections, we revealed the increased expression of hemoglobin in copper-exposed embryos. Secondly, we found that copper-exposed embryos exhibited high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and genes in oxygen binding and oxygen transporting were up-regulated in the embryos. Finally, we found that ROS scavengers NAC, GSH, and DMTU not only inhibited in vivo ROS levels induced by copper, but also significantly decreased high expression of hemoglobin back to almost normal levels in copper exposed embryos, and also helped with copper elimination from the embryos. Our data first demonstrated that ROS mediated copper induced hemoglobin expression in vertebrates, partly revealing the underlying molecular mechanism of copper therapy for anemia. Moreover, we revealed that copper homeostasis was broken by its induced ROS and ROS helped with copper overloading in the body, which could be applied as a novel therapy target for copper-caused diseases.

  12. Oxygen Interstitial Defects in Sc2O3 Thin Films Deposited with Reactive Ion Beam Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiltz, Drew; Langston, Peter; Krous, Erik; Patel, Dinesh; Markosyan, Ashot; Route, Rodger; Menoni, Carmen; Colorado State University Team; Stanford University Team

    2014-03-01

    Numerous defects may develop when depositing amorphous thin films with reactive ion beam sputtering, including interstitials and vacancies. In many cases, these defects limit the functionality of the film, degrading both the mechanical and optical properties. This study aims to investigate the nature of oxygen interstitial point defects in scandium oxide thin films and characterize the effect on composition, optical absorption and mechanical stress. The films are deposited with argon ion beam sputtering of a scandium metal target. The density of defects is correlated with the oxygen partial pressure, revealing an optimal condition where defects are minimized. Furthermore, the defect density also demonstrates a direct correlation with the main ion beam accelerating voltage. The native oxygen defects behave as shallow levels, with binding energies in the 1-2 eV range. Work supported by the DoD Office of Naval Research and the High Energy Laser Program of the DoD Joint Technology Office. National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA.

  13. Reactive oxygen species production, induced by atmospheric modification, alter conidial quality of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guzmán, D; Montesinos-Matías, R; Arce-Cervantes, O; Gómez-Quiroz, L E; Loera, O; Garza-López, P M

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and conidial infectivity in Beauveria bassiana. Beauveria bassiana Bb 882.5 was cultured in solid-state culture (SSC) using rice under three oxygen conditions (21%, or pulses at 16 and 26%). Hydrophobicity was determined using exclusion phase assay. Bioassays with larvae or adults of Tenebrio molitor allowed the measurements of infectivity parameters. A fluorometric method was used for ROS quantification (superoxide and total peroxides). NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity was determined by specific inhibition. Conidial hydrophobicity decreased by O2 pulses. Mortality of larvae was only achieved with conidia harvested from cultures under 21% O2 ; whereas for adult insects, the infectivity parameters deteriorated in conidia obtained after pulses at 16 and 26% O2 . At day 7, ROS production increased after 16 and 26% O2 treatments. NOX activity induced ROS production at early stages of the culture. Modification of atmospheric oxygen increases ROS production, reducing conidial quality and infectivity. This is the first study in which conidial infectivity and ROS production in B. bassiana has been related, enhancing the knowledge of the effect of O2 pulses in B. bassiana. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. The role of reactive oxygen species in the degradation of lignin derived dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waggoner, Derek C.; Wozniak, Andrew S.; Cory, Rose M.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important in transforming the chemical composition of the large pool of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from land to water annually. However, due to the challenges inherent in isolating the effects of individual ROS on DOM composition, the role of ROS in the photochemical alteration of DOM remains poorly characterized. In this work, terrestrial DOM was independently exposed to singlet oxygen (1O2), and superoxide (O2-rad under controlled laboratory conditions). Using ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry to track molecular level alterations of DOM by ROS, these findings suggest exposure to 1O2 (generated using Rose Bengal and visible light) removed formulas with an O/C > 0.3, and primarily resulted in DOM comprised of formulas with higher oxygen content, while O2-rad exposure (from KO2 in DMSO) removed formulas with O/C < 0.3 and produced aliphatic formulas (H/C > 1.5). Comparison of DOM altered by ROS in this study to riverine and coastal DOM showed that (20-80%) overlap in formulas, providing evidence for the role of ROS in shaping the composition of DOM exported from rivers to oceans.

  15. Reactive oxygen species: role in the development of cancer and various chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Waris, Gulam; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen derived species such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide, singlet oxygen and hydroxyl radical are well known to be cytotoxic and have been implicated in the etiology of a wide array of human diseases, including cancer. Various carcinogens may also partly exert their effect by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) during their metabolism. Oxidative damage to cellular DNA can lead to mutations and may, therefore, play an important role in the initiation and progression of multistage carcinogenesis. The changes in DNA such as base modification, rearrangement of DNA sequence, miscoding of DNA lesion, gene duplication and the activation of oncogenes may be involved in the initiation of various cancers. Elevated levels of ROS and down regulation of ROS scavengers and antioxidant enzymes are associated with various human diseases including various cancers. ROS are also implicated in diabtes and neurodegenerative diseases. ROS influences central cellular processes such as proliferation a, apoptosis, senescence which are implicated in the development of cancer. Understanding the role of ROS as key mediators in signaling cascades may provide various opportunities for pharmacological intervention. PMID:16689993

  16. Inhibitory activities of soluble and bound millet seed phenolics on free radicals and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara, Anoma; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    Oxidative stress, caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS), is responsible for modulating several pathological conditions and aging. Soluble and bound phenolic extracts of commonly consumed millets, namely, kodo, finger (Ravi), finger (local), foxtail, proso, little, and pearl, were investigated for their phenolic content and inhibition of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical and ROS, namely, hydroxyl radical, peroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). Inhibition of DPPH and hydroxyl radicals was detrmined using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The peroxyl radical inhibitory activity was measured using the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. The scavenging of H(2)O(2), HOCl, and (1)O(2) was evaluated using colorimetric methods. The results were expressed as micromoles of ferulic acid equivalents (FAE) per gram of grain on a dry weight basis. In addition, major hydroxycinnamic acids were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS). All millet varieties displayed effective radical and ROS inhibition activities, which generally positively correlated with phenolic contents, except for hydroxyl radical. HPLC analysis revealed the presence of ferulic and p-coumaric acids as major hydroxycinnamic acids in phenolic extract and responsible for the observed effects. Bound extracts of millet contributed 38-99% to ROS scavenging, depending on the variety and the test system employed. Hence, bound phenolics must be included in the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of millets and other cereals.

  17. Physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required to maintain genomic stability in stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao-Sheng; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-07-01

    Stem cell cytogenetic abnormalities constitute a roadblock to regenerative therapies. We investigated the possibility that reactive oxygen species (ROSs) influence genomic stability in cardiac and embryonic stem cells. Karyotypic abnormalities in primary human cardiac stem cells were suppressed by culture in physiological (5%) oxygen, but addition of antioxidants to the medium unexpectedly increased aneuploidy. Intracellular ROS levels were moderately decreased in physiological oxygen, but dramatically decreased by the addition of high-dose antioxidants. Quantification of DNA damage in cardiac stem cells and in human embryonic stem cells revealed a biphasic dose-dependence: antioxidants suppressed DNA damage at low concentrations, but potentiated such damage at higher concentrations. High-dose antioxidants decreased cellular levels of ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and other DNA repair enzymes, providing a potential mechanistic basis for the observed effects. These results indicate that physiological levels of intracellular ROS are required to activate the DNA repair pathway for maintaining genomic stability in stem cells. The concept of an "oxidative optimum" for genomic stability has broad implications for stem cell biology and carcinogenesis.

  18. Auranofin radiosensitizes tumor cells through targeting thioredoxin reductase and resulting overproduction of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Bouzakoura, Soumaya; de Mey, Sven; Jiang, Heng; Law, Kalun; Dufait, Inès; Corbet, Cyril; Verovski, Valeri; Gevaert, Thierry; Feron, Olivier; Van den Berge, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2017-05-30

    Auranofin (AF) is an anti-arthritic drug considered for combined chemotherapy due to its ability to impair the redox homeostasis in tumor cells. In this study, we asked whether AF may in addition radiosensitize tumor cells by targeting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), a critical enzyme in the antioxidant defense system operating through the reductive protein thioredoxin. Our principal findings in murine 4T1 and EMT6 tumor cells are that AF at 3-10 μM is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro, and that at least two mechanisms are involved in TrxR-mediated radiosensitization. The first one is linked to an oxidative stress, as scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetyl cysteine counteracted radiosensitization. We also observed a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption with spared oxygen acting as a radiosensitizer under hypoxic conditions. Overall, radiosensitization was accompanied by ROS overproduction, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptosis, a common mechanism underlying both cytotoxic and antitumor effects of AF. In tumor-bearing mice, a simultaneous disruption of the thioredoxin and glutathione systems by the combination of AF and buthionine sulfoximine was shown to significantly improve tumor radioresponse. In conclusion, our findings illuminate TrxR in cancer cells as an exploitable radiobiological target and warrant further validation of AF in combination with radiotherapy.

  19. Auranofin radiosensitizes tumor cells through targeting thioredoxin reductase and resulting overproduction of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Bouzakoura, Soumaya; de Mey, Sven; Jiang, Heng; Law, Kalun; Dufait, Inès; Corbet, Cyril; Verovski, Valeri; Gevaert, Thierry; Feron, Olivier; Van den Berge, Dirk; Storme, Guy; De Ridder, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) is an anti-arthritic drug considered for combined chemotherapy due to its ability to impair the redox homeostasis in tumor cells. In this study, we asked whether AF may in addition radiosensitize tumor cells by targeting thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), a critical enzyme in the antioxidant defense system operating through the reductive protein thioredoxin. Our principal findings in murine 4T1 and EMT6 tumor cells are that AF at 3–10 μM is a potent radiosensitizer in vitro, and that at least two mechanisms are involved in TrxR-mediated radiosensitization. The first one is linked to an oxidative stress, as scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by N-acetyl cysteine counteracted radiosensitization. We also observed a decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption with spared oxygen acting as a radiosensitizer under hypoxic conditions. Overall, radiosensitization was accompanied by ROS overproduction, mitochondrial dysfunction, DNA damage and apoptosis, a common mechanism underlying both cytotoxic and antitumor effects of AF. In tumor-bearing mice, a simultaneous disruption of the thioredoxin and glutathione systems by the combination of AF and buthionine sulfoximine was shown to significantly improve tumor radioresponse. In conclusion, our findings illuminate TrxR in cancer cells as an exploitable radiobiological target and warrant further validation of AF in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:28415723

  20. Protective effect of flavonoids against reactive oxygen species production in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Henneberg, Railson; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Hermann, Priscila; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Leonart, Maria Suely Soares

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of quercetin, rutin, hesperidin and myricetin against reactive oxygen species production with the oxidizing action of tert-butylhydroperoxide in erythrocytes from normal subjects and sickle cell anemia carriers treated with hydroxyurea. Methods Detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species was carried out using a liposoluble probe, 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). A 10% erythrocyte suspension was incubated with flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, hesperidin or myricetin; 30, 50, and 100 µmol/L), and then incubated with tert-butylhydroperoxide (75 µmol/L). Untreated samples were used as controls. Results Red blood cell exposure to tert-butylhydroperoxide resulted in significant increases in the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species compared to basal levels. Reactive oxygen species production was significantly inhibited when red blood cells were pre-incubated with flavonoids, both in normal individuals and in patients with sickle cell anemia. Quercetin and rutin had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by myricetin and hesperidin. CONCLUSION: Flavonoids, in particular quercetin and rutin, showed better antioxidant effects against damage caused by excess reactive oxygen species characteristic of sickle cell anemia. Results obtained with patients under treatment with hydroxyurea suggest an additional protective effect when associated with the use of flavonoids. PMID:23580885

  1. Transparent oxygen impermeable AlO x thin films on polycarbonate deposited by reactive ion beam sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Jin-Wook; Kim, Sang-Mun; Choi, Daiwon; Yoon, K. H.

    2005-08-01

    The AlO x thin films were deposited on the polycarbonate by reactive ion beam sputtering (RIBS) at different oxygen partial pressures where the AlO x thin film with O/Al ratio of 1.5 was formed when oxygen partial pressure increased from 4 × 10 -5 to 2 × 10 -4 Torr. As a result, oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the barrier significantly decreased from 24 cm 3/m 2 day to around 2 cm 3/m 2 day with increase in oxygen partial pressure. Optical transmittances of the films were in the 86-88% range at 550 nm versus 89% for the pure polycarbonate film.

  2. Age-related increase of reactive oxygen generation in the brains of mammals and birds: is reactive oxygen a signaling molecule to determine the aging process and life span?

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Toru; Unno, Keiko; Tahara, Shoichi; Kaneko, Takao

    2010-07-01

    Since Harman proposed the "free-radical theory of aging", oxidative stress has been postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. The accumulation of oxidative stress-induced oxidatively modified macromolecules, including protein, DNA and lipid, were found in tissues during the aging process; however, it is not necessarily clear which factor is more critical, an increase in endogenous reactive oxygen and/or a decrease in anti-oxidative defense, to the age-related increase in oxidative damage. To clarify the increasing production of reactive oxygen with age, we examined reactive oxygen-dependent chemiluminescent (CL) signals in ex vivo brain slices prepared from different-aged animal brains during hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment using a novel photonic imaging method. The CL signal was intensified during reoxygenation. The signals in SAMP10 (short-life strain) and SAMR1 (control) brain slices increased with aging. The slope of the increase of CL intensity with age in P10 was steeper than in R1. Age-dependent increase of CL intensity was also observed in C57BL/6 mice, Wistar rats and pigeons; however, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the brain did not change with age. These results suggest that reactive oxygen production itself increased with aging. The rate of age-related increases of CL intensity was inversely related to the maximum lifespan of animals. We speculate that reactive oxygen might be a signaling molecule and its levels in tissue might determine the aging process and lifespan. Decelerating age-related increases of reactive oxygen production are expected to be a potent strategy for anti-aging interventions.

  3. Changes in Cerebral Partial Oxygen Pressure and Cerebrovascular Reactivity During Intracranial Pressure Plateau Waves.

    PubMed

    Lang, Erhard W; Kasprowicz, Magdalena; Smielewski, Peter; Pickard, John; Czosnyka, Marek

    2015-08-01

    Plateau waves in intracranial pressure (ICP) are frequently recorded in neuro intensive care and are not yet fully understood. To further investigate this phenomenon, we analyzed partial pressure of cerebral oxygen (pbtO2) and a moving correlation coefficient between ICP and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP), called PRx, along with the cerebral oxygen reactivity index (ORx), which is a moving correlation coefficient between cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) and pbtO2 in an observational study. We analyzed 55 plateau waves in 20 patients after severe traumatic brain injury. We calculated ABP, ABP pulse amplitude (ampABP), ICP, CPP, pbtO2, heart rate (HR), ICP pulse amplitude (ampICP), PRx, and ORx, before, during, and after each plateau wave. The analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc test was used to compare the differences in the variables before, during, and after the plateau wave. We considered all plateau waves, even in the same patient, independent because they are separated by long intervals. We found increases for ICP and ampICP according to our operational definitions for plateau waves. PRx increased significantly (p = 0.00026), CPP (p < 0.00001) and pbtO2 (p = 0.00007) decreased significantly during the plateau waves. ABP, ampABP, and HR remained unchanged. PRx during the plateau was higher than before the onset of wave in 40 cases (73 %) with no differences in baseline parameters for those with negative and positive ΔPRx (difference during and after). ORx showed an increase during and a decrease after the plateau waves, however, not statistically significant. PbtO2 overshoot after the wave occurred in 35 times (64 %), the mean difference was 4.9 ± 4.6 Hg (mean ± SD), and we found no difference in baseline parameters between those who overshoot and those who did not overshoot. Arterial blood pressure remains stable in ICP plateau waves, while cerebral autoregulatory indices show distinct changes, which indicate cerebrovascular

  4. Cell respiration and formation of reactive oxygen species: facts and artefacts.

    PubMed

    Nohl, H; Kozlov, A V; Gille, L; Staniek, K

    2003-12-01

    It is generally taken as an established fact that mitochondrial respiration is associated with the generation of small amounts of ROS (reactive oxygen species). There are many arguments supporting this side activity. A major argument is the particular physico-chemical configuration of dioxygen, which prevents the transfer of a pair of electrons. Instead, oxygen is reduced by the successive transfer of single electrons, necessarily leading to intermediates with odd electrons. The high rate of turnover of oxygen in the respiratory chain in combination with the existence of single-electron carriers supports the concept of mitochondria as the major cellular ROS generator. Experimental evidence on the ability of mitochondria to generate ROS was, however, based essentially on in vitro experiments with isolated mitochondria. A variety of structural and functional alterations associated with the removal of mitochondria from the cell, as well as the routinely applied ROS detection methods, may lead to artefactual deviation of odd electrons to dioxygen. We therefore checked these correlations in view of ROS formation, including the often reported effect of the membrane potential on the establishment of a redox couple with oxygen out of sequence. For this purpose we developed novel methods to prove the authenticity of mitochondria for ROS generation in the living cell. Based on our experiments, we can exclude spontaneous release of ROS from mitochondria. However, we describe conditions under which mitochondria can be transformed to mild ROS generators. The site of single-electron deviation to dioxygen was found to be ubiquinol interacting with the Rieske iron-sulphur protein and low-potential cytochrome b of the bc (1) complex.

  5. Reduction in generation of reactive oxygen species and endothelial dysfunction during postprandial state.

    PubMed

    Sodré, F L; Paim, B A; Urban, A; Vercesi, A E; Faria, E C

    2011-10-01

    To characterise changes in generation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in healthy males during the postprandial state, and to analyse the influence of the postprandial state on endothelial ROS generation and endothelial dysfunction. Seventeen healthy subjects were recruited. Blood samples were collected in the fasting state and 2, 4, 6 and 8h after liquid-meal intake (composition: 25% fat, 55% dextromaltose and 14% protein), providing 40 gfat m(-2) body surface. Plasma lipids, apolipoproteins, glucose and insulin were measured during this period. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated by density-gradient centrifugation. The influence of postprandial state on intracellular ROS generation was measured by two different methods in PBMCs and in a human immortalised endothelial cell line (ECV 304). Artery flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD) was used to evaluate the endothelial function, and oxygen consumption by PBMCs was measured. Reduced ROS generation was observed in all methods and cells during the postprandial period. FMD was impaired 8h after meal intake (23±6 vs. 13±2, P<0.05 vs. baseline). The consumption of oxygen was reduced in PBMCs (-14% into 2h, P<0.05 vs. baseline and -27% after 4h, P<0.01 vs. baseline). ROS generation was correlated with plasma lipids, insulin, apolipoproteins and oxygen consumption. In contrast to the previously reported elevation of postprandial oxidative stress, this study shows reduced ROS generation in PBMCs and in ECV 304. Data obtained in both cellular models suggest the existence of a protective response against plasma postprandial oxidative stress. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  7. Enzymatic reactive oxygen species assay to evaluate phototoxic risk of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kato, Masashi; Ohtake, Hiroto; Sato, Hideyuki; Seto, Yoshiki; Onoue, Satomi

    2017-08-15

    The present study aimed to verify the feasibility of an enzymatic reactive oxygen species (eROS) assay to evaluate the phototoxic risk of compounds after their metabolization. The eROS assay was designed based on the combined use of an in vitro drug metabolism system and a ROS assay. The incubation time of compounds with human hepatic S9 fractions was optimized with the use of fenofibrate (FF), a typical phototoxicant with metabolite-related phototoxicity, and the reproducibility and robustness of the eROS assay were examined using FF. The eROS assay was applied to 12 phototoxic compounds, including 7 phototoxicants with metabolite-related phototoxicity, to clarify the assay performance. According to the eROS data on singlet oxygen generation from FF and metabolic conversion profiles of FF and fenofibric acid, the incubation time of chemicals with human hepatic S9-mix was determined to be 4min. The singlet oxygen-based evaluation system in the eROS assay was found to be acceptable as a high-throughput assay because of its favorable intra-/inter-day reproducibility (coefficient of variation: ca. 8%) and robustness (Z'-factor: 0.23). Singlet oxygen data on phototoxicants with phototoxic metabolites tended to exceed 120% of control, suggesting the feasibility of the eROS assay to evaluate metabolite-related phototoxic potentials. However, further data accumulation is still needed to improve the assay performance because the eROS assay provided false predictions for some compounds. The present eROS assay may be applicable in part for evaluating the phototoxic risk of drug candidates after their metabolization in the early stage of drug discovery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mitochondrial STAT3 and reactive oxygen species: A fulcrum of adipogenesis?

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Adam H; Kadye, Rose; Houseman, Pascalene S; Prinsloo, Earl

    2015-01-01

    The balance between cellular lineages can be controlled by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Cellular differentiation into adipocytes is highly dependent on the production of ROS to initiate the process through activation of multiple interlinked factors that stimulate mitotic clonal expansion and cellular maturation. The signal transducer and activator of transcription family of signaling proteins have accepted roles in adipogenesis and associated lipogenesis. Non-canonical mitochondrial localization of STAT3 and other members of the STAT family however opens up new avenues for investigation of its role in the aforementioned processes. Following recent observations of differences in mitochondrially localized serine 727 phosphorylated STAT3 (mtSTAT3-pS727) in preadipocytes and adipocytes, here, we hypothesize and speculate further on the role of mitochondrial STAT3 in adipogenesis. PMID:27127727

  9. Killing by bactericidal antibiotics does not depend on reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Keren, Iris; Wu, Yanxia; Inocencio, Julio; Mulcahy, Lawrence R; Lewis, Kim

    2013-03-08

    Bactericidal antibiotics kill by modulating their respective targets. This traditional view has been challenged by studies that propose an alternative, unified mechanism of killing, whereby toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in the presence of antibiotics. We found no correlation between an individual cell's probability of survival in the presence of antibiotic and its level of ROS. An ROS quencher, thiourea, protected cells from antibiotics present at low concentrations, but the effect was observed under anaerobic conditions as well. There was essentially no difference in survival of bacteria treated with various antibiotics under aerobic or anaerobic conditions. This suggests that ROS do not play a role in killing of bacterial pathogens by antibiotics.

  10. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as early signals in root hair cells responding to rhizobial nodulation factors

    PubMed Central

    Quinto, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in supporting polar growth in pollen tubes, fucoid cells and root hair cells. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legume roots and rhizobia. We recently reported using Phaseolus vulgaris as a model system, the occurrence of a transient increase of ROS, within seconds, at the tip of actively growing root hair cells after treatment with Nod factors (NFs).1 This transient response is NFs-specific, and clearly distinct from the ROS changes induced by a fungal elicitor, with which sustained increases in ROS signal, is observed. Since ROS levels are transiently elevated after NFs perception, we propose that this ROS response is specific of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, the observed ROS changes correlate spatially and temporarily with the reported transient increases in calcium levels suggesting key roles for calcium and ROS during the early NF perception. PMID:19704506

  11. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as early signals in root hair cells responding to rhizobial nodulation factors.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2008-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in supporting polar growth in pollen tubes, fucoid cells and root hair cells. However, there is limited evidence showing ROS changes during the earliest stages of the interaction between legume roots and rhizobia. We recently reported using Phaseolus vulgaris as a model system, the occurrence of a transient increase of ROS, within seconds, at the tip of actively growing root hair cells after treatment with Nod factors (NFs).1 This transient response is NFs-specific, and clearly distinct from the ROS changes induced by a fungal elicitor, with which sustained increases in ROS signal, is observed. Since ROS levels are transiently elevated after NFs perception, we propose that this ROS response is specific of the symbiotic interaction. Furthermore, the observed ROS changes correlate spatially and temporarily with the reported transient increases in calcium levels suggesting key roles for calcium and ROS during the early NF perception.

  12. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  13. Regulatory mechanisms of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation and their role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Mase, Keisuke; Yoshioka, Miki; Kobayashi, Michie; Asai, Shuta

    2011-08-01

    Rapid production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in diverse physiological processes, such as programmed cell death, development, cell elongation and hormonal signaling, in plants. Much attention has been paid to the regulation of plant innate immunity by these signal molecules. Recent studies provide evidence that an NADPH oxidase, respiratory burst oxidase homolog, is responsible for pathogen-responsive ROS burst. However, we still do not know about NO-producing enzymes, except for nitrate reductase, although many studies suggest the existence of NO synthase-like activity responsible for NO burst in plants. Here, we introduce regulatory mechanisms of NO and ROS bursts by mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades, calcium-dependent protein kinase or riboflavin and its derivatives, flavin mononucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide, and we discuss the roles of the bursts in defense responses against plant pathogens.

  14. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular “pulse” of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  15. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  16. Reactive Oxygen-Related Diseases: Therapeutic Targets and Emerging Clinical Indications.

    PubMed

    Casas, Ana I; Dao, V Thao-Vi; Daiber, Andreas; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Di Lisa, Fabio; Kaludercic, Nina; Leach, Sonia; Cuadrado, Antonio; Jaquet, Vincent; Seredenina, Tamara; Krause, Karl H; López, Manuela G; Stocker, Roland; Ghezzi, Pietro; Schmidt, Harald H H W

    2015-11-10

    Enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with different disease states. Most attempts to validate and exploit these associations by chronic antioxidant therapies have provided disappointing results. Hence, the clinical relevance of ROS is still largely unclear. We are now beginning to understand the reasons for these failures, which reside in the many important physiological roles of ROS in cell signaling. To exploit ROS therapeutically, it would be essential to define and treat the disease-relevant ROS at the right moment and leave physiological ROS formation intact. This breakthrough seems now within reach. Rather than antioxidants, a new generation of protein targets for classical pharmacological agents includes ROS-forming or toxifying enzymes or proteins that are oxidatively damaged and can be functionally repaired. Linking these target proteins in future to specific disease states and providing in each case proof of principle will be essential for translating the oxidative stress concept into the clinic.

  17. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Van Aken, Olivier; Schwarzländer, Markus; Belt, Katharina; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  19. Inactivation of Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase 2 by Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Hurd, Thomas R.; Collins, Yvonne; Abakumova, Irina; Chouchani, Edward T.; Baranowski, Bartlomiej; Fearnley, Ian M.; Prime, Tracy A.; Murphy, Michael P.; James, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are byproducts of mitochondrial respiration and thus potential regulators of mitochondrial function. Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 2 (PDHK2) inhibits the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, thereby regulating entry of carbohydrates into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Here we show that PDHK2 activity is inhibited by low levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated by the respiratory chain. This occurs via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues 45 and 392 on PDHK2 and results in increased pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity. H2O2 derives from superoxide (O2˙̄), and we show that conditions that inhibit PDHK2 also inactivate the TCA cycle enzyme, aconitase. These findings suggest that under conditions of high mitochondrial O2˙̄ production, such as may occur under nutrient excess and low ATP demand, the increase in O2˙̄ and H2O2 may provide feedback signals to modulate mitochondrial metabolism. PMID:22910903

  20. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in osteoclastogenesis, skeletal aging and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Danielle A; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts are cells derived from bone marrow macrophages and are important in regulating bone resorption during bone homeostasis. Understanding what drives osteoclast differentiation and activity is important when studying diseases characterized by heightened bone resorption relative to formation, such as osteoporosis. In the last decade, studies have indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are crucial components that regulate the differentiation process of osteoclasts. However, there are still many unanswered questions that remain. This review will examine the mechanisms by which ROS can be produced in osteoclasts as well as how it may affect osteoclast differentiation and activity through its actions on osteoclastogenesis signaling pathways. In addition, the contribution of ROS to the aging-associated disease of osteoporosis will be addressed and how targeting ROS may lead to the development of novel therapeutic treatment options.

  1. Mitochondria, reactive oxygen species, and chronological aging: a message from yeast.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yong

    2011-11-01

    As a major intracellular source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondria are involved in aging and lifespan regulation. Using the yeast chronological aging model, researchers have identified conserved signaling pathways that affect lifespan by modulating mitochondrial functions. Caloric restriction and a genetic mimetic with reduced target of rapamycin signaling globally upregulate the mitochondrial proteome and respiratory functions. Recent discoveries support the notion that an altered mitochondrial proteome induces mitohormesis. Mitohormesis involves a variety of ROS during several growth stages and extends lifespan in yeast and other organisms. Here we recap recent advances in understanding of ROS as signals that decelerate chronological aging in yeast. We also discuss parallels between yeast and worm hypoxic signaling. In sum, this mini-review covers mitochondrial regulation by nutrient-sensing pathways and the complex underlying interactions of ROS, metabolic pathways, and chronological aging.

  2. Role of reactive oxygen species in the defective regeneration seen in aging muscle.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2013-12-01

    The ability of muscles to regenerate successfully following damage diminishes with age and this appears to be a major contributor to the development of muscle weakness and physical frailty. Successful muscle regeneration is dependent on appropriate reinnervation of regenerating muscle. Age-related changes in the interactions between nerve and muscle are poorly understood but may play a major role in the defective regeneration. During aging there is defective redox homeostasis and an accumulation of oxidative damage in nerve and muscle that may contribute to defective regeneration. The aim of this review is to summarise the evidence that abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in nerve and/or muscle may be responsible for the defective regeneration that contributes to the degeneration of skeletal muscle observed during aging. Identifying the importance of ROS generation in skeletal muscle during aging could have fundamental implications for interventions to prevent muscle degeneration and treatments to reverse the age-related decline in muscle mass and function.

  3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by amoebocytes of Asterias rubens (Echinodermata).

    PubMed

    Coteur, Geoffroy; Warnau, Michel; Jangoux, Michel; Dubois, Philippe

    2002-03-01

    An adapted peroxidase, luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence method in an EDTA-free, Ca++-containing medium is described and used to characterise reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by starfish immunocytes using a standard microplate reader luminometer. ROS production was stimulated by direct interaction of immunocytes with bacteria or bacterial wall components, but not by the soluble stimulant PMA nor the lectin concanavalin A. Produced ROS detected by this method are apparently superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite. Comparison with other chemiluminescence methods indicates that the described method is the only one to detect the stimulation of starfish immunocytes by the Gram-positive bacteria, Micrococcus luteus, a fact that questions previous reports indicating a lack of stimulation by pathogens. The adapted method provides a rapid determination of the overall ROS production, which is suitable for both disease control and immunotoxicological studies in echinoderms.

  4. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  5. Early Increase of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pea Seedling Roots Under Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy; Syvash, Alexander; Klymchuk, Dmytro

    Early increase of intensity of peroxidation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells take place under various impacts. The ROS can act as second messengers in mechanism of cell responses (Mittler et al 2006; Jadko et al 2007). Early stages of ROS content (chemiluminescence, ChL) in pea root cells under 3, 5, 10 and 15g during centrifugation have been investigated. After 30 min of centrifugation, especially under 10 and 15g, the intensity of ChL increased and was higher on 40-50% comparing to controls. Than the ChL slowly decreased and reached the controls in 1 hour. The changes of the ChL depend on both the dose and the duration of centrifugation. The role of ROS in mechanism of cell response to hypergravity is discussed.

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-03

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1.

  7. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40phox and p47phox) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  8. Protective mechanisms of helminths against reactive oxygen species are highly promising drug targets.

    PubMed

    Perbandt, Markus; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Liebau, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Helminths that are the causative agents of numerous neglected tropical diseases continue to be a major problem for human global health. In the absence of vaccines, control relies solely on pharmacoprophylaxis and pharmacotherapy to reduce transmission and to relieve symptoms. There are only a few drugs available and resistance in helminths of lifestock has been observed to the same drugs that are also used to treat humans. Clearly there is an urgent need to find novel antiparasitic compounds. Not only are helminths confronted with their own metabolically derived toxic and redox-active byproducts but also with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the host immune system, adding to the overall oxidative burden of the parasite. Antioxidant enzymes of helminths have been identified as essential proteins, some of them biochemically distinct to their host counterpart and thus appealing drug targets. In this review we have selected a few enzymatic antioxidants of helminths that are thought to be druggable.

  9. Pharmacology of Free Radicals and the Impact of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Aprioku, Jonah Sydney

    2013-01-01

    The role of free radicals in normal cellular functions and different pathological conditions has been a focus of pharmacological studies in the recent past. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals in general are essential for cell signaling and other vital physiological functions; however, excessive amounts can cause alteration in cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) balance, and disrupt normal biological functions. When there is an imbalance between activities of ROS and antioxidant/scavenging defense systems, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. A good number of studies have shown OS is involved in the development of several disease conditions, including male infertility. In the present article, generation of free radicals and their effects, as well as the mechanisms of antioxidant/scavenging defense systems are discussed, with particular focus on the testis. The review also discusses the contribution of OS on testicular dysfunction and briefly focuses on some OS-induced conditions that will alter testicular function. PMID:24551570

  10. Using consensus bayesian network to model the reactive oxygen species regulatory pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liangdong; Wang, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian network is one of the most successful graph models for representing the reactive oxygen species regulatory pathway. With the increasing number of microarray measurements, it is possible to construct the bayesian network from microarray data directly. Although large numbers of bayesian network learning algorithms have been developed, when applying them to learn bayesian networks from microarray data, the accuracies are low due to that the databases they used to learn bayesian networks contain too few microarray data. In this paper, we propose a consensus bayesian network which is constructed by combining bayesian networks from relevant literatures and bayesian networks learned from microarray data. It would have a higher accuracy than the bayesian networks learned from one database. In the experiment, we validated the bayesian network combination algorithm on several classic machine learning databases and used the consensus bayesian network to model the Escherichia coli's ROS pathway.

  11. The Role of Mitochondria in Reactive Oxygen Species Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Starkov, Anatoly A.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor to the etiology of both “normal” senescence and severe pathologies with serious public health implications. Several cellular sources, including mitochondria, are known to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to intracellular oxidative stress. Mitochondria possess at least 10 known sites that are capable of generating ROS, but they also feature a sophisticated multilayered ROS defense system that is much less studied. This review summarizes the current knowledge about major components involved in mitochondrial ROS metabolism and factors that regulate ROS generation and removal at the level of mitochondria. An integrative systemic approach is applied to analysis of mitochondrial ROS metabolism, which is “dissected” into ROS generation, ROS emission, and ROS scavenging. The in vitro ROS-producing capacity of several mitochondrial sites is compared in the metabolic context and the role of mitochondria in ROS-dependent intracellular signaling is discussed. PMID:19076429

  12. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  13. Cadmium induces reactive oxygen species generation and lipid peroxidation in cortical neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    López, E; Arce, C; Oset-Gasque, M J; Cañadas, S; González, M P

    2006-03-15

    Cadmium is a toxic agent that it is also an environmental contaminant. Cadmium exposure may be implicated in some humans disorders related to hyperactivity and increased aggressiveness. This study presents data indicating that cadmium induces cellular death in cortical neurons in culture. This death could be mediated by an apoptotic and a necrotic mechanism. The apoptotic death may be mediated by oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation which could be induced by mitochondrial membrane dysfunction since this cation produces: (a) depletion of mitochondrial membrane potential and (b) diminution of ATP levels with ATP release. Necrotic death could be mediated by lipid peroxidation induced by cadmium through an indirect mechanism (ROS formation). On the other hand, 40% of the cells survive cadmium action. This survival seems to be mediated by the ability of these cells to activate antioxidant defense systems, since cadmium reduced the intracellular glutathione levels and induced catalase and SOD activation in these cells.

  14. Reactive oxygen species-mediated unfolded protein response pathways in preimplantation embryos

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ihsan; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhong-Shu; Ullah, Obaid

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated responses are critical to embryonic development in the challenging in vitro environment. ROS production increases during early embryonic development with the increase in protein requirements for cell survival and growth. The ER is a multifunctional cellular organelle responsible for protein folding, modification, and cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors including ROS. Such stress leads to activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis. However, chronic stress can exceed the toleration level of the ER, resulting in cellular apoptosis. In this review, we briefly describe the generation and impact of ROS in preimplantation embryo development, the ROS-mediated activation mechanism of the UPR via the ER, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways following ER stress in preimplantation embryos. PMID:28057903

  15. Signaling Networks Involving Reactive Oxygen Species and Ca2+ in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although plants never evolved central information processing organs such as brains, plants have evolved distributed information processing systems and are able to sense various environmental changes and reorganize their body plan coordinately without moving. Recent molecular biological studies revealed molecular bases for elementary processes of signal transduction in plants. Though reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly toxic substances produced through aerobic respiration and photosynthesis, plants possess ROS-producing enzymes whose activity is highly regulated by binding of Ca2+. In turn, Ca2+- permeable channel proteins activated by ROS are shown to be localized to the cell membrane. These two components are proposed to constitute a positive feedback loop to amplify cellular signals. Such molecular physiological studies should be important steps to understand information processing systems in plants and future application for technology related to environmental, energy and food sciences.

  16. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  17. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  18. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Mediated Killing of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Van Acker, Heleen; Coenye, Tom

    2017-01-12

    Recently, it was proposed that there is a common mechanism behind the activity of bactericidal antibiotics, involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the involvement of ROS in antibiotic-mediated killing has become the subject of much debate. In the present review, we provide an overview of the data supporting the ROS hypothesis; we also present data that explain the contradictory results often obtained when studying antibiotic-induced ROS production. For this latter aspect we will focus on the importance of taking the experimental setup into consideration and on the importance of some technical aspects of the assays typically used. Finally, we discuss the link between ROS production and toxin-antitoxin modules, and present an overview of implications for treatment.

  19. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulate the strength of inhibitory GABA-mediated synaptic transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Michael V.; Daniels, Bryan A.; Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Bowie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal communication imposes a heavy metabolic burden in maintaining ionic gradients essential for action potential firing and synaptic signalling. Although cellular metabolism is known to regulate excitatory neurotransmission, it is still unclear whether the brain’s energy supply affects inhibitory signalling. Here we show that mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS) regulate the strength of postsynaptic GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses of cerebellar stellate cells. Inhibition is strengthened through a mechanism that selectively recruits α3-containing GABAA receptors into synapses with no discernible effect on resident α1-containing receptors. Since mROS promotes the emergence of postsynaptic events with unique kinetic properties, we conclude that newly recruited α3-containing GABAA receptors are activated by neurotransmitter released onto discrete postsynaptic sites. Although traditionally associated with oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease, our data identify mROS as a putative homeostatic signalling molecule coupling cellular metabolism to the strength of inhibitory transmission.

  20. p38alpha MAP kinase as a sensor of reactive oxygen species in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dolado, Ignacio; Swat, Aneta; Ajenjo, Nuria; De Vita, Gabriella; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-02-01

    p38alpha is a stress-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates malignant transformation induced by oncogenic H-Ras, although the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Here, we show that p38alpha is not a general inhibitor of oncogenic signaling, but that it specifically modulates transformation induced by oncogenes that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). This inhibitory effect is due to the ROS-induced activation of p38alpha early in the process of transformation, which induces apoptosis and prevents the accumulation of ROS and their carcinogenic effects. Accordingly, highly tumorigenic cancer cell lines have developed a mechanism to uncouple p38alpha activation from ROS production. Our results indicate that oxidative stress sensing plays a key role in the inhibition of tumor initiation by p38alpha.

  1. Autophagy, programmed cell death and reactive oxygen species in sexual reproduction in plants.

    PubMed

    Kurusu, Takamitsu; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2017-05-01

    Autophagy is one of the major cellular processes of recycling of proteins, metabolites and intracellular organelles, and plays crucial roles in the regulation of innate immunity, stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD) in many eukaryotes. It is also essential in development and sexual reproduction in many animals. In plants, although autophagy-deficient mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana show phenotypes in abiotic and biotic stress responses, their life cycle seems normal and thus little had been known until recently about the roles of autophagy in development and reproduction. Rice mutants defective in autophagy show sporophytic male sterility and immature pollens, indicating crucial roles of autophagy during pollen maturation. Enzymatic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by respiratory burst oxidase homologues (Rbohs) play multiple roles in regulating anther development, pollen tube elongation and fertilization. Significance of autophagy and ROS in the regulation of PCD of transient cells during plant sexual reproduction is discussed in comparison with animals.

  2. Reactive oxygen species-dependent wound responses in animals and plants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Mittler, Ron

    2012-12-15

    Animals and plants evolved sophisticated mechanisms that regulate their responses to mechanical injury. Wound response in animals mainly promotes wound healing processes, nerve cell regeneration, and immune system responses at the vicinity of the wound site. In contrast, wound response in plants is primarily directed at sealing the wound site via deposition of various compounds and generating systemic signals that activate multiple defense mechanisms in remote tissues. Despite these differences between animals and plants, recent studies have shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play very common signaling and coordination roles in the wound responses of both systems. This review provides an update on recent findings related to ROS-regulated coordination of intercellular communications and signal transduction during wound response in plants and animals. In particular, differences and similarities in H2O2-dependent long-distance signaling between zebrafish and Arabidopsis thaliana are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Regulation of plant reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stress responses: learning from AtRBOHD.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yukun; He, Chengzhong

    2016-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are constantly produced in plants, as the metabolic by-products or as the signaling components in stress responses. High levels of ROS are harmful to plants. In contrast, ROS play important roles in plant physiology, including abiotic and biotic tolerance, development, and cellular signaling. Therefore, ROS production needs to be tightly regulated to balance their function. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue (RBOH) proteins, also known as plant nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases, are well studied enzymatic ROS-generating systems in plants. The regulatory mechanisms of RBOH-dependent ROS production in stress responses have been intensively studied. This has greatly advanced our knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate plant ROS production. This review attempts to integrate the regulatory mechanisms of RBOHD-dependent ROS production by discussing the recent advance. AtRBOHD-dependent ROS production could provide a valuable reference for studying ROS production in plant stress responses.

  4. Fhit interaction with ferredoxin reductase triggers generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Trapasso, Francesco; Pichiorri, Flavia; Gaspari, Marco; Palumbo, Tiziana; Aqeilan, Rami I; Gaudio, Eugenio; Okumura, Hiroshi; Iuliano, Rodolfo; Di Leva, Giampiero; Fabbri, Muller; Birk, David E; Raso, Cinzia; Green-Church, Kari; Spagnoli, Luigi G; Venuta, Salvatore; Huebner, Kay; Croce, Carlo M

    2008-05-16

    Fhit protein is lost in most cancers, its restoration suppresses tumorigenicity, and virus-mediated FHIT gene therapy induces apoptosis and suppresses tumors in preclinical models. We have used protein cross-linking and proteomics methods to characterize a Fhit protein complex involved in triggering Fhit-mediated apoptosis. The complex includes Hsp60 and Hsp10 that mediate Fhit stability and may affect import into mitochondria, where it interacts with ferredoxin reductase, responsible for transferring electrons from NADPH to cytochrome P450 via ferredoxin. Viral-mediated Fhit restoration increases production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, followed by increased apoptosis of lung cancer cells under oxidative stress conditions; conversely, Fhit-negative cells escape apoptosis, carrying serious oxidative DNA damage that may contribute to an increased mutation rate. Characterization of Fhit interacting proteins has identified direct effectors of the Fhit-mediated apoptotic pathway that is lost in most cancers through loss of Fhit.

  5. Anthrax edema toxin inhibits Nox1-mediated formation of reactive oxygen species by colon epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sub; Bokoch, Gary M

    2009-01-01

    One major route of intoxication by Bacillus anthracis (anthrax) spores is via their ingestion and subsequent uptake by the intestinal epithelium. Anthrax edema toxin (ETx) is an adenylate cyclase that causes persistent elevation of cAMP in intoxicated cells. NADPH oxidase enzymes (Nox1-Nox5, Duox1 and 2) generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as components of the host innate immune response to bacteria, including Nox1 in gastrointestinal epithelial tissues. We show that ETx effectively inhibits ROS formation by Nox1 in HT-29 colon epithelial cells. This inhibition requires the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the Nox1-regulatory component, NoxA1, and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3zeta. Inhibition of Nox1-mediated ROS formation in the gut epithelium may be a mechanism used by B. anthracis to circumvent the innate immune response.

  6. Computational Models of Reactive Oxygen Species as Metabolic Byproducts and Signal-Transduction Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Elizabeth J.; Smolko, Christian M.; Janes, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely involved in intracellular signaling and human pathologies, but their precise roles have been difficult to enumerate and integrate holistically. The context- and dose-dependent intracellular effects of ROS can lead to contradictory experimental results and confounded interpretations. For example, lower levels of ROS promote cell signaling and proliferation, whereas abundant ROS cause overwhelming damage to biomolecules and cellular apoptosis or senescence. These complexities raise the question of whether the many facets of ROS biology can be joined under a common mechanistic framework using computational modeling. Here, we take inventory of some current models for ROS production or ROS regulation of signaling pathways. Several models captured non-intuitive observations or made predictions that were later verified by experiment. There remains a need for systems-level analyses that jointly incorporate ROS production, handling, and modulation of multiple signal-transduction cascades. PMID:27965578

  7. Cross-talk of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in plant programed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiqin; Loake, Gary J.; Chu, Chengcai

    2013-01-01

    In plants, programed cell death (PCD) is an important mechanism to regulate multiple aspects of growth and development, as well as to remove damaged or infected cells during responses to environmental stresses and pathogen attacks. Under biotic and abiotic stresses, plant cells exhibit a rapid synthesis of nitric oxide (NO) and a parallel accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Frequently, these responses trigger a PCD process leading to an intrinsic execution of plant cells. The accumulating evidence suggests that both NO and ROS play key roles in PCD. These redox active small molecules can trigger cell death either independently or synergistically. Here we summarize the recent progress on the cross-talk of NO and ROS signals in the hypersensitive response, leaf senescence, and other kinds of plant PCD caused by diverse cues. PMID:23967004

  8. Reactive oxygen species induce neurite degeneration before induction of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) induce neuronal cell death in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Treatment of cultured cells with a low concentration of hydrogen peroxide induces neurite degeneration, but not cell death. Neurites (axons and dendrites) are vulnerable to ROS. Neurite degeneration (shrinkage, accumulation, and fragmentation) has been found in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. However, the mechanism of ROS-related neurite degeneration is not fully understood. Many studies have demonstrated the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and microtubule destabilization. These dysfunctions are deeply related to changes in calcium homeostasis and ROS production in neurites. Treatment with antioxidant substances, such as vitamin E, prevents neurite degeneration in cultured cells. This review describes the possibility that ROS induces neurite degeneration before the induction of cell death. PMID:27895381

  9. Mold elicits atopic dermatitis by reactive oxygen species: Epidemiology and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Lee, Eun; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kang, Mi-Jin; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2015-12-01

    Mold has been implicated in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD); however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of mold exposure in early life through epidemiologic and mechanistic studies in vivo and in vitro. Exposure to visible mold inside the home during the first year of life was associated with an increased risk for current AD by two population-based cross-sectional human studies. Children with the AG+GG genotype of GSTP1 showed increased risk for current AD when exposed to mold. In the mouse model, treatment with patulin induced and aggravated clinically significant AD and Th2-related inflammation of the affected mouse skin. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were released in the mouse skin as well by human keratinocytes. In conclusions, mold exposure increases the risk for AD related to ROS generation mediated by Th2-promoting inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Brown, David I; Griendling, Kathy K

    2015-01-30

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by ROS are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here, we review the current literature on ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress.

  11. Targeted interception of signaling reactive oxygen species in the vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated as injurious and as signaling agents in human maladies including inflammation, hyperoxia, ischemia-reperfusion and acute lung injury. ROS produced by the endothelium play an important role in vascular pathology. They quench, for example, nitric oxide, and mediate pro-inflammatory signaling. Antioxidant interventions targeted for the vascular endothelium may help to control these mechanisms. Animal studies have demonstrated superiority of targeting ROS-quenching enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase to endothelial cells over nontargeted formulations. A diverse arsenal of targeted antioxidant formulations devised in the last decade shows promising results for specific quenching of endothelial ROS. In addition to alleviation of toxic effects of excessive ROS, these targeted interventions suppress pro-inflammatory mechanisms, including endothelial cytokine activation and barrier disruption. These interventions may prove useful in experimental biomedicine and, perhaps, in translational medicine. PMID:22834201

  12. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Chen, Weixiang; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required. PMID:27293511

  13. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not a promotor of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingrui; Chen, Tongsheng

    2009-02-01

    we have previously reported that taxol, a potent anticancer agent, induces caspase-independent cell death and cytoplasmic vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. However, the mechanisms of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization are poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported to be involved in the taxol-induced cell death. Here, we employed confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to explore the role of ROS in taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization. We found that ROS inhibition by addition of N-acetycysteine (NAC), a total ROS scavenger, did not suppress these vacuolization but instead increased vacuolization. Take together, our results showed that ROS is not a promotor of the taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization.

  14. Reactive oxygen species, redox signaling and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: the NF-κB connection.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Upinder; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Bir, Aritri; Sinha, Maitrayee; Biswas, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are important elements of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the role of redox signaling cascade and its cross-talk with inflammatory mediators have not been elucidated in details in this disorder. The review summarizes the facts about redox-signaling cascade in the cells operating through an array of kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors and their downstream components. The biology of NF-κB and its activation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of AD have been specially highlighted citing evidence both from post-mortem studies in AD brain and experimental research in animal or cell-based models of AD. The possibility of identifying new disease-modifying drugs for AD targeting NF-κBsignaling cascade has been discussed in the end.

  15. Catalytic Coupling of Oxidative Phosphorylation, ATP Demand, and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation

    PubMed Central

    Bazil, Jason N.; Beard, Daniel A.; Vinnakota, Kalyan C.

    2016-01-01

    Competing models of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the heart are highly disputed. In addition, the mechanisms of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and scavenging are not well understood. To deepen our understanding of these processes, a computer model was developed to integrate the biophysical processes of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS generation. The model was calibrated with experimental data obtained from isolated rat heart mitochondria subjected to physiological conditions and workloads. Model simulations show that changes in the quinone pool redox state are responsible for the apparent inorganic phosphate activation of complex III. Model simulations predict that complex III is responsible for more ROS production during physiological working conditions relative to complex I. However, this relationship is reversed under pathological conditions. Finally, model analysis reveals how a highly reduced quinone pool caused by elevated levels of succinate is likely responsible for the burst of ROS seen during reperfusion after ischemia. PMID:26910433

  16. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Marcia Cristina; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; de Souza, Cíntia Fernandes; Nogueira, Natália Pereira de Almeida; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology. PMID:22007287

  17. Reactive oxygen species mediate compensatory glomerular hypertrophy in rat uninephrectomized kidney.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Masahito; Nagasu, Hajime; Satoh, Minoru; Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Tomita, Naruya; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2009-09-01

    Hyperfiltration in glomeruli is the most common pathway to progressive renal dysfunction. Moreover, reduction of renal mass by unilateral nephrectomy results in an immediate increase in glomerular flow to the remnant kidney, followed by compensatory glomerular hypertrophy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in renal hypertrophic responses; however, the role of ROS in compensatory glomerular hypertrophy remains unclear. Therefore, this role was investigated in the present study. Wistar rats were randomly placed into two groups: uninephrectomized rats (Nx) and uninephrectomized rats treated with tempol (Nx + TP). The glomerular volume increased in the Nx 1 week after surgery, but was significantly suppressed in the Nx + TP. Levels of phospho-Akt and phospho-ribosomal protein S6, which are critical for cell growth and hypertrophy, were markedly increased in the glomeruli of the Nx, while tempol treatment almost abolished the activation of these proteins. These results suggest that ROS have important roles in compensatory hypertrophy in glomeruli.

  18. The association between microenvironmental reactive oxygen species and embryo development in assisted reproduction technology cycles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tsung-Hsien; Lee, Maw-Sheng; Liu, Chung-Hsien; Tsao, Hui-Mei; Huang, Chun-Chia; Yang, Yu-Shih

    2012-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the relevance between the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microenvironment (follicular fluid or culture media) and the embryo development in IVF/ICSI cycles. A total of 466 follicles from 174 IVF/ICSI cycles were collected for this study. The ROS levels in monofollicular fluid and spent culture media were evaluated by chemiluminescence assay with luminol as a probe. The results demonstrated that it is in ICSI cycles that elevated ROS levels in follicular fluid were associated with day 3 poor embryo quality. The ROS levels in spent culture media were correlated with advanced degree of fragmentation. In addition, ROS levels in culture media, instead of in follicular fluid, were negatively correlated with implantation potential of embryos. The ROS levels in culture media may be viewed as an embryo metabolic marker and function as an adjuvant criterion for embryo selection.

  19. The role of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species metabolism and signaling.

    PubMed

    Starkov, Anatoly A

    2008-12-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major contributor to the etiology of both "normal" senescence and severe pathologies with serious public health implications. Several cellular sources, including mitochondria, are known to produce significant amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that may contribute to intracellular oxidative stress. Mitochondria possess at least 10 known sites that are capable of generating ROS, but they also feature a sophisticated multilayered ROS defense system that is much less studied. This review summarizes the current knowledge about major components involved in mitochondrial ROS metabolism and factors that regulate ROS generation and removal at the level of mitochondria. An integrative systemic approach is applied to analysis of mitochondrial ROS metabolism, which is "dissected" into ROS generation, ROS emission, and ROS scavenging. The in vitro ROS-producing capacity of several mitochondrial sites is compared in the metabolic context and the role of mitochondria in ROS-dependent intracellular signaling is discussed.

  20. Atrial fibrillation in the elderly: the potential contribution of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Schillinger, Kurt J.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most commonly encountered cardiac arrhythmia, and is a significant source of healthcare expenditures throughout the world. It is an arrhythmia with a very clearly defined predisposition for individuals of advanced age, and this fact has led to intense study of the mechanistic links between aging and AF. By promoting oxidative damage to multiple subcellular and cellular structures, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to induce the intra- and extra-cellular changes necessary to promote the pathogenesis of AF. In addition, the generation and accumulation of ROS have been intimately linked to the cellular processes which underlie aging. This review begins with an overview of AF pathophysiology, and introduces the critical structures which, when damaged, predispose an otherwise healthy atrium to AF. The available evidence that ROS can lead to damage of these critical structures is then reviewed. Finally, the evidence linking the process of aging to the pathogenesis of AF is discussed. PMID:23341843

  1. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  2. The involvement of reactive oxygen species in hypoxic injury to rat liver.

    PubMed

    Younes, M; Strubelt, O

    1988-03-01

    Isolated perfused livers from fasted, but not from fed rats showed hepatotoxic responses when subjected to 30 min of hypoxia followed by 60 min of reoxygenation. Toxicity was evident by a release of glutamate-pyruvate-transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and glutathione into the perfusate, by a depletion of hepatic glutathione and by an accumulation of calcium in the liver. This indicates, that the liver is resistant to hypoxic injury as long as glycogen is present to maintain anaerobic ATP-synthesis. This is substantiated by the fact that addition of fructose--but not glucose--to the medium resulted in a protection of the liver against hypoxic injury concomitant with its degradation to lactate + pyruvate. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, desferrioxamine and allopurinol prevented hypoxic liver injury suggesting a substantial role of reactive oxygen species formed via the xanthine oxidase reaction in mediating hypoxic liver injury.

  3. Betulin induces reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liu, Xiaokang; Jiang, Dan; Lin, Yingjia; Wang, Yushi; Li, Qing; Liu, Linlin; Jin, Ying-Hua

    2016-09-01

    Betulin, an abundant natural compound, significantly inhibited the cell viability of advanced human gastric cancer SGC7901 cells. Mechanism study demonstrated that betulin induced apoptosis through mitochondrial Bax and Bak accumulation-mediated intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Downregulation of the anti-apoptosis proteins Bcl-2 and XIAP was involved during betulin-induced cell apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was generated in cells after betulin treatment in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) significantly attenuated betulin-induced ROS generation as well as Bcl-2 and XIAP downregulation. The mitochondrial accumulation of Bax and Bak, as well as caspase activity, was also remarkably inhibited by NAC treatment, indicating that ROS are important signaling intermediates that lead to betulin-induced apoptosis by modulating multiple apoptosis-regulating proteins in SGC7901 cells.

  4. Mechanisms that Regulate Production of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cytochrome P450

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Davydov, Dmitri R.; Verma, Seema

    2004-09-15

    Mammalian cytochromes P450 (P450) are a family of heme-thiolate enzymes involved in the oxidative metabolism of a variety of endogenous and exogenous lipophilic compounds. Poor coupling of the P450 catalytic cycle results in continuous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which affect signaling pathways and other cellular functions. P450 generation of ROS is tightly controlled by regulation of gene transcription, as well as by modulation of interactions between protein constituents of the monooxygenase that affects its activity, coupling and stability. Malfunction of these mechanisms may result in a burst of ROS production, which can cause lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress downregulates P450 levels by a variety of feedback mechanisms. This review provides an overview of recent advances in our understanding of these feedback mechanisms that serve to limit P450 production of ROS. Some of the more likely physiological and cellular effects of P450 generation of ROS are also discussed.

  5. Pseudomonas syringae enhances herbivory by suppressing the reactive oxygen burst in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Simon C.; Humphrey, Parris T.; Chevasco, Daniela; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Pierce, Naomi E.; Whiteman, Noah K.

    2015-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions have evolved in the presence of plant-colonizing microbes. These microbes can have important third-party effects on herbivore ecology, as exemplified by drosophilid flies that evolved from ancestors feeding on plant-associated microbes. Leaf-mining flies in the genus Scaptomyza, which is nested within the paraphyletic genus Drosophila, show strong associations with bacteria in the genus Pseudomonas, including Pseudomonas syringae. Adult females are capable of vectoring these bacteria between plants and larvae show a preference for feeding on P. syringae-infected leaves. Here we show that Scaptomyza flava larvae can also vector P. syringae to and from feeding sites, and that they not only feed more, but also develop faster on plants previously infected with P. syringae. Our genetic and physiological data show that P. syringae enhances S. flava feeding on infected plants at least in part by suppressing anti-herbivore defenses mediated by reactive oxygen species. PMID:26205072

  6. Synergistic microglial reactive oxygen species generation induced by pesticides lindane and dieldrin.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haoyu; Liu, Bin

    2008-08-27

    Elevated environmental exposure to pesticides is a known risk factor to the development of sporadic Parkinson's disease resulting from the degeneration of nigral dopamine neurons. Among the suspected agents are the highly persistent and bioaccumulative organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs). We report here that lindane and dieldrin, two widely present OCPs that are found enriched in the nigra of postmortem Parkinson's disease brains synergistically induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in microglia. Inhibitor studies indicated that the lindane and dieldrin-induced ROS generation was mediated by NADPH oxidase. As microglial ROS is a key contributor to the degeneration of the oxidative damage-vulnerable dopamine neurons, our findings shed significant light on the role of OCPs in the development of Parkinson's disease.

  7. Wolbachia Do Not Induce Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Immune Pathway Activation in Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Jennifer C.; Sinkins, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is a major vector of dengue (DENV) and chikungunya (CHIKV) viruses, causing millions of infections annually. It naturally carries, at high frequency, the intracellular inherited bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia strains wAlbA and wAlbB; transinfection with the higher-density Wolbachia strain wMel from Drosophila melanogaster led to transmission blocking of both arboviruses. The hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced immune activation plays a role in arbovirus inhibition in this species was examined. In contrast to previous observations in Ae. aegypti, elevation of ROS levels was not observed in either cell lines or mosquito lines carrying the wild-type Wolbachia or higher-density Drosophila Wolbachia strains. There was also no upregulation of genes controlling innate immune pathways or with antioxidant/ROS-producing functions. These data suggest that ROS-mediated immune activation is not an important component of the viral transmission-blocking phenotype in this species. PMID:26287231

  8. Using Consensus Bayesian Network to Model the Reactive Oxygen Species Regulatory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liangdong; Wang, Limin

    2013-01-01

    Bayesian network is one of the most successful graph models for representing the reactive oxygen species regulatory pathway. With the increasing number of microarray measurements, it is possible to construct the Bayesian network from microarray data directly. Although large numbers of Bayesian network learning algorithms have been developed, when applying them to learn Bayesian networks from microarray data, the accuracies are low due to that the databases they used to learn Bayesian networks contain too few microarray data. In this paper, we propose a consensus Bayesian network which is constructed by combining Bayesian networks from relevant literatures and Bayesian networks learned from microarray data. It would have a higher accuracy than the Bayesian networks learned from one database. In the experiment, we validated the Bayesian network combination algorithm on several classic machine learning databases and used the consensus Bayesian network to model the 's ROS pathway. PMID:23457624

  9. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and dimethylated sulphur compounds in coral explants under acute thermal stress.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Stephanie G; Raina, Jean-Baptiste; Ralph, Peter J; Petrou, Katherina

    2017-03-08

    Coral bleaching is intensifying with global climate change. While the causes for these catastrophic events are well understood, the cellular mechanism that triggers bleaching is not well established. Our understanding of coral bleaching processes is hindered by the lack of robust methods for studying interactions between host and symbiont at the single-cell level. Here we exposed coral explants to acute thermal stress and measured oxidative stress, more specifically, reactive oxygen species (ROS), in individual symbiont cells. Furthermore, we measured concentrations of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) to elucidate the role of these compounds in coral antioxidant function. This work demonstrates the application of coral explants for investigating coral physiology and biochemistry under thermal stress and delivers a new approach to study host-symbiont interactions at the microscale, allowing us to directly link intracellular ROS with DMSP and DMSO dynamics.

  10. Simultaneous detection of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in guinea pig vestibular sensory cells.

    PubMed

    Takumida, Masaya; Anniko, Matti

    2002-01-01

    Gentamicin-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of nitric oxide (NO) in the vestibular end organs of the guinea pig was investigated by applying two new fluorescence indicators, 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate for direct detection of NO and dihydrotetramethylrosamine for ROS. The vestibular sensory cells produced both NO and ROS after exposure to gentamicin. A nonspecific inhibitor of NO synthase, L-NAME, inhibited the production of NO but did not appear to affect the production of ROS following exposure to gentamicin. In contrast, a radical scavenger, D-methionine, or the neurotrophin BDNF suppressed the production of ROS, in turn stimulating NO production. These findings could indicate that both NO and ROS play an important role in aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  11. Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in the Activation of Cellular Signals, Molecules, and Function.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Hawkins, Clare L; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Davies, Michael J; St Clair, Daret K; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2017-02-08

    Mitochondria are a major source of intracellular energy and reactive oxygen species in cells, but are also increasingly being recognized as a controller of cell death. Here, we review evidence of signal transduction control by mitochondrial superoxide generation via the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and GATA signaling pathways. We have also reviewed the effects of ROS on the activation of MMP and HIF. There is significant evidence to support the hypothesis that mitochondrial superoxide can initiate signaling pathways following transport into the cytosol. In this study, we provide evidence of TATA signal transductions by mitochondrial superoxide. Oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transfer chain, glycolysis, and generation of superoxide from mitochondria could be important factors in regulating signal transduction, cellular homeostasis, and cell death.

  12. Interaction of hyperlipidemia and reactive oxygen species: Insights from the lipid-raft platform

    PubMed Central

    Amiya, Eisuke

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress are closely associated with the development of atherosclerosis, and the most important regulator of ROS production in endothelial cells is NADPH oxidase. Activation of NADPH oxidase requires the assembly of multiple subunits into lipid rafts, which include specific lipid components, including free cholesterol and specific proteins. Disorders of lipid metabolism such as hyperlipidemia affect the cellular lipid components included in rafts, resulting in modification of cellular reactions that produce ROS. In the similar manner, several pathways associating ROS production are affected by the presence of lipid disorder through raft compartments. In this manuscript, we review the pathophysiological implications of hyperlipidemia and lipid rafts in the production of ROS. PMID:28070236

  13. Synthesis and biological evaluation of lovastatin-derived aliphatic hydroxamates that induce reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ruo-Kai; Lin, Yuh-Feng; Hsu, Ming-Jen; Hsieh, Chang-Lin; Wang, Chen-Yu; Huang, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Wei-Jan

    2016-11-15

    Some hydroxamate compounds induce cancer cell death by intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study introduced the hydroxamate core into lovastatin, a fungus metabolite clinically used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. The resulting compounds were evaluated for the activity for inducing ROS production. Most compounds exhibited higher activity than original lovastatin. Of these compounds, compound 3c had the most potent activity. Test of cytotoxicity in a panel of human cancer cell lines indicated compound 3c had activities superior to cisplatin in prostate cancer PC-3 cells and breast cancer T47D cells. In contrast, it in amounts up to 40μM had a much lower cytotoxic effect on normal human IMR-90 cells. Further profiling of cell cycle progression, cell apoptosis, and DNA damage activated checkpoint signaling pathway revealed the important role of compound 3c-mediated cytotoxicity in ROS generation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Caffeine protects human skin fibroblasts from acute reactive oxygen species-induced necrosis.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Jonathan I; Patel, Mital; Brody, Neil; Jagdeo, Jared

    2012-11-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a major role in aging and carcinogenesis. Little is known about either the effects of acute ROS in necrosis and inflammation of skin or the therapeutic agents for prevention and treatment. Previously, our laboratory identified caffeine as an inhibitor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-generated lipid peroxidation products in human skin fibroblasts. Here, we study effects of caffeine on acute ROS-mediated necrosis. Human skin fibroblasts were incubated with caffeine, followed by H2O2 challenge. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell morphology, counts, apoptosis and necrosis, and ROS. We found that caffeine protects from H2O2 cell damage at lower (0.01 mM) and intermediate (0.1 mM) doses. The beneficial effects of caffeine appear to be mediated by a mechanism other than antioxidant function.

  15. UVB dependence of quantum dot reactive oxygen species generation in common skin cell models

    PubMed Central

    MORTENSEN, LUKE J.; FAULKNOR, RENEA; RAVICHANDRAN, SUPRIYA; ZHENG, HONG; DELOUISE, LISA A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  16. Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species by Copper Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Miao; Kwon, Hyun Soo; Peng, Zhenmeng; Elder, Alison; Yang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Mercaptocarboxylic acids with different carbon chain lengths were used for stabilizing uniform 15 nm copper nanoparticles. The effects of surface chemistry such as ligand type and surface oxidation on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the copper nanoparticles were examined. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-vis spectroscopy, and an acellular ROS assay show that ROS generation is closely related to the surface oxidation of copper nanoparticles. It was found that the copper nanoparticles with longer chain ligands had surfaces that were better protected from oxidation and a corresponding lower ROS generating capacity than did particles with shorter chain ligands. Conversely, the copper nanoparticles with greater surface oxidation also had higher ROS generating capacity. PMID:22390268

  17. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Selective Sensitization of Zinc Finger Protein Oxidation by Reactive Oxygen Species through Arsenic Binding*

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xixi; Cooper, Karen L.; Sun, Xi; Liu, Ke J.; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) on redox-sensitive targets such as zinc finger proteins plays a critical role in redox signaling and subsequent biological outcomes. We found that arsenic exposure led to oxidation of certain zinc finger proteins based on arsenic interaction with zinc finger motifs. Analysis of zinc finger proteins isolated from arsenic-exposed cells and zinc finger peptides by mass spectrometry demonstrated preferential oxidation of C3H1 and C4 zinc finger configurations. C2H2 zinc finger proteins that do not bind arsenic were not oxidized by arsenic-generated ROS in the cellular environment. The findings suggest that selectivity in arsenic binding to zinc fingers with three or more cysteines defines the target proteins for oxidation by ROS. This represents a novel mechanism of selective protein oxidation and demonstrates how an environmental factor may sensitize certain target proteins for oxidation, thus altering the oxidation profile and redox regulation. PMID:26063799

  19. Pomegranate-Derived Polyphenols Reduce Reactive Oxygen Species Production via SIRT3-Mediated SOD2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chong; Sakaguchi, Takenori; Fujita, Kosuke; Ito, Hideyuki; Nishida, Norihisa; Nagatomo, Akifumi; Tanaka-Azuma, Yukimasa

    2016-01-01

    Pomegranate-derived polyphenols are expected to prevent life-style related diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of 8 pomegranate-derived polyphenols, along with other polyphenols, to augment SIRT3, a mammalian SIR2 homolog localized in mitochondria. We established a system for screening foods/food ingredients that augment the SIRT3 promoter in Caco-2 cells and identified 3 SIRT3-augmenting pomegranate-derived polyphenols (eucalbanin B, pomegraniin A, and eucarpanin T1). Among them, pomegraniin A activated superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) through SIRT3-mediated deacetylation, thereby reducing intracellular reactive oxygen species. The other SIRT3-augmenting polyphenols tested also activated SOD2, suggesting antioxidant activity. Our findings clarify the underlying mechanisms involved in the antioxidant activity of pomegraniin A. PMID:27840668

  20. Balance of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in myocardial reperfusion injury and protection.

    PubMed

    Folino, Anna; Losano, Gianni; Rastaldo, Raffaella

    2013-12-01

    Depending on their concentrations, both nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) take part either in myocardial ischemia reperfusion injury or in protection by ischemic and pharmacological preconditioning (Ipre) and postconditioning (Ipost). At the beginning of reperfusion, a transient release of NO is promptly scavenged by ROS to form the highly toxic peroxynitrite, which is responsible for a further increase of ROS through endothelial nitric oxide synthase uncoupling. The protective role of NO has suggested the use of NO donors to mimic Ipre and Ipost. However, NO donors have not always given the expected protection, possibly because they are responsible for the production of different amounts of ROS that depend on the amount of released NO. This review is focused on the role of the balance of NO and ROS in myocardial injury and its prevention by Ipre and Ipost and after the use of NO donors given with or without antioxidant compounds to mimic Ipre and Ipost.

  1. The regulatory roles of ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant salt stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P; Jiang, Caifu

    2016-08-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most commonly encountered environmental stresses affecting plant growth and crop productivity. Accordingly, plants have evolved a variety of morphological, physiological and biochemical strategies that enable them to adapt to saline growth conditions. For example, it has long been known that salinity-stress increases both the production of the gaseous stress hormone ethylene and the in planta accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there has been significant progress in understanding how the fine-tuning of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling transduction can promote salinity tolerance, and how salinity-induced ROS accumulation also acts as a signal in the mediation of salinity tolerance. Furthermore, recent advances have indicated that ethylene signaling modulates salinity responses largely via regulation of ROS-generating and ROS-scavenging mechanisms. This review focuses on these recent advances in understanding the linked roles of ethylene and ROS in salt tolerance.

  2. A role for reactive oxygen species in the antibacterial properties of carbon monoxide-releasing molecules.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Ana Filipa N; Nobre, Lígia S; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2012-11-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) are, in general, transition metal carbonyl complexes that liberate controlled amounts of CO. In animal models, CO-RMs have been shown to reduce myocardial ischaemia, inflammation and vascular dysfunction, and to provide a protective effect in organ transplantation. Moreover, CO-RMs are bactericides that kill both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Herein are reviewed the microbial genetic and biochemical responses associated with CO-RM-mediated cell death. Particular emphasis is given to the data revealing that CO-RMs induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to the antibacterial activity of these compounds.

  3. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Reciprocal regulation of TGF-β and reactive oxygen species: A perverse cycle for fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Desai, Leena P.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is the most potent pro-fibrogenic cytokine and its expression is increased in almost all of fibrotic diseases. Although signaling through Smad pathway is believed to play a central role in TGF-β's fibrogenesis, emerging evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate TGF-β's signaling through different pathways including Smad pathway. TGF-β1 increases ROS production and suppresses antioxidant enzymes, leading to a redox imbalance. ROS, in turn, induce/activate TGF-β1 and mediate many of TGF-β's fibrogenic effects, forming a vicious cycle (see graphic flow chart on the right). Here, we review the current knowledge on the feed-forward mechanisms between TGF-β1 and ROS in the development of fibrosis. Therapeutics targeting TGF-β-induced and ROS-dependent cellular signaling represents a novel approach in the treatment of fibrotic disorders. PMID:26496488

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy Modulation in Non-Marine Drugs and Marine Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Fayyaz, Sundas; Hou, Ming-Feng; Li, Kun-Tzu; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming more understandable that an existing challenge for translational research is the development of pharmaceuticals that appropriately target reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated molecular networks in cancer cells. In line with this approach, there is an overwhelmingly increasing list of many non-marine drugs and marine drugs reported to be involved in inhibiting and suppressing cancer progression through ROS-mediated cell death. In this review, we describe the strategy of oxidative stress-based therapy and connect the ROS modulating effect to the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, we focus on exploring the function and mechanism of cancer therapy by the autophagy modulators including inhibitors and inducers from non-marine drugs and marine drugs. PMID:25402829

  6. Resveratrol scavenges reactive oxygen species and effects radical-induced cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Stephen S; Xia, Chang; Jiang, Bin-Hua; Stinefelt, Beth; Klandorf, Hillar; Harris, Gabriel K; Shi, Xianglin

    2003-10-03

    Scavenging or quenching of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) involved in oxidative stress has been the subject of many recent studies. Resveratrol, found in various natural food products, has been linked to decreased coronary artery disease and preventing cancer development. The present study measured the effect of resveratrol on several different systems involving the hydroxyl, superoxide, metal/enzymatic-induced, and cellular generated radicals. The rate constant for reaction of resveratrol with the hydroxyl radical was determined, and resveratrol was found to be an effective scavenger of hydroxyl, superoxide, and metal-induced radicals as well as showing antioxidant abilities in cells producing ROS. Resveratrol exhibits a protective effect against lipid peroxidation in cell membranes and DNA damage caused by ROS. Resveratrol was also found to have a significant inhibitory effect on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway after cellular exposure to metal-induced radicals. It was concluded that resveratrol in foods plays an important antioxidant role.

  7. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Induces HO-1 Expression Mediated Partially by FOXO1 and Reduces Mitochondria-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meixia; Xu, Haifeng; Zuo, Jin; Fang, Fude; Chang, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species arise in the mitochondria as byproducts of respiration and oxidase activity and have important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The level of reactive oxygen species is regulated by a number of enzymes and physiological antioxidants, including HO-1, Sod2, catalase and COX-2, etc. And HO-1 against oxidative stress requires an increase in stress-responsive genes, such as Sod2 and catalase. Especially for the activity of HO-1, cobalt protoporphyrin is known to be a potent and effective inducer in many tissues. The transcription factor, FOXO1 is resistant to oxidative stress through downregulating reactive oxygen species production. Previous study showed that FOXO1 induces HO-1 expression by binding to HO-1 promoter. The question whether cobalt protoporphyrin induces HO-1 expression mediated by FOXO1 and subsequently lessens reactive oxygen species production remains to be elucidated. Results Cobalt protoporphyrin enhances the expression of FOXO1 and facilitates FOXO1 binding to HO-1 promoter and increasing its transcriptional activity without influencing the FOXO1 protein stability. CoPP induces HO-1 and other oxidative stress-r