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Sample records for oxidation processes aop

  1. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOPS) FOR DESTRUCTION OF METHYL TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE -AN UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT) IN DRINKING WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) provide a promising treatment option for the destruction of MTBE directly in surface and ground waters. An ongoing study is evaluating the ability of three AOPs; hydrogen peroxide/ozone (H2O2/ O3), ultraviolet irradiation/ozone (UV/O3) and ultr...

  2. Fully solar-driven thermo- and electrochemistry for advanced oxidation processes (STEP-AOPs) of 2-nitrophenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chunhong; Shao, Nan; Wang, Baohui; Yuan, Dandan; Sui, Xin; Wu, Hongjun

    2016-07-01

    The STEP (Solar Thermal Electrochemical Process) for Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs, combined to STEP-AOPs), fully driven by solar energy without the input of any other forms of energy and chemicals, is introduced and demonstrated from the theory to experiments. Exemplified by the persistent organic pollutant 2-nitrophenol in water, the fundamental model and practical system are exhibited for the STEP-AOPs to efficiently transform 2-nitrophenol into carbon dioxide, water, and the other substances. The results show that the STEP-AOPs system performs more effectively than classical AOPs in terms of the thermodynamics and kinetics of pollutant oxidation. Due to the combination of solar thermochemical reactions with electrochemistry, the STEP-AOPs system allows the requisite electrolysis voltage of 2-nitrophenol to be experimentally decreased from 1.00 V to 0.84 V, and the response current increases from 18 mA to 40 mA. STEP-AOPs also greatly improve the kinetics of the oxidation at 30 °C and 80 °C. As a result, the removal rate of 2-nitrophenol after 1 h increased from 19.50% at 30 °C to 32.70% at 80 °C at constant 1.90 V. Mechanistic analysis reveals that the oxidation pathway is favorably changed because of thermal effects. The tracking of the reaction displayed that benzenediol and hydroquinone are initial products, with maleic acid and formic acid as sequential carboxylic acid products, and carbon dioxide as the final product. The theory and experiments on STEP-AOPs system exemplified by the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol provide a broad basis for extension of the STEP and AOPs for rapid and efficient treatment of organic wastewater. PMID:27093694

  3. Fully solar-driven thermo- and electrochemistry for advanced oxidation processes (STEP-AOPs) of 2-nitrophenol wastewater.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chunhong; Shao, Nan; Wang, Baohui; Yuan, Dandan; Sui, Xin; Wu, Hongjun

    2016-07-01

    The STEP (Solar Thermal Electrochemical Process) for Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs, combined to STEP-AOPs), fully driven by solar energy without the input of any other forms of energy and chemicals, is introduced and demonstrated from the theory to experiments. Exemplified by the persistent organic pollutant 2-nitrophenol in water, the fundamental model and practical system are exhibited for the STEP-AOPs to efficiently transform 2-nitrophenol into carbon dioxide, water, and the other substances. The results show that the STEP-AOPs system performs more effectively than classical AOPs in terms of the thermodynamics and kinetics of pollutant oxidation. Due to the combination of solar thermochemical reactions with electrochemistry, the STEP-AOPs system allows the requisite electrolysis voltage of 2-nitrophenol to be experimentally decreased from 1.00 V to 0.84 V, and the response current increases from 18 mA to 40 mA. STEP-AOPs also greatly improve the kinetics of the oxidation at 30 °C and 80 °C. As a result, the removal rate of 2-nitrophenol after 1 h increased from 19.50% at 30 °C to 32.70% at 80 °C at constant 1.90 V. Mechanistic analysis reveals that the oxidation pathway is favorably changed because of thermal effects. The tracking of the reaction displayed that benzenediol and hydroquinone are initial products, with maleic acid and formic acid as sequential carboxylic acid products, and carbon dioxide as the final product. The theory and experiments on STEP-AOPs system exemplified by the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol provide a broad basis for extension of the STEP and AOPs for rapid and efficient treatment of organic wastewater.

  4. Biofilm control in water by advanced oxidation process (AOP) pre-treatment: effect of natural organic matter (NOM).

    PubMed

    Lakretz, Anat; Ron, Eliora Z; Harif, Tali; Mamane, Hadas

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the efficiency of H₂O₂/UV advanced oxidation process (AOP) as a preventive treatment for biofilm control. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm-forming bacteria were suspended in water and exposed to various AOP conditions with different NOM concentrations, and compared to natural waters. H₂O₂/UV prevented biofilm formation: (a) up to 24 h post treatment - when residual H₂O₂ was neutralized; (b) completely (days) - when residual H₂O₂ was maintained. At high NOM concentrations (i.e. 25 mg/L NOM or 12.5 mg/L DOC) an additive biofilm control effect was observed for the combined H₂O₂/UV system compared to UV irradiation alone, after short biofilm incubation times (<24 h). This effect was H₂O₂ concentration dependent and can be explained by the high organic content of these water samples, whereby an increase in NOM could enhance (•)OH production and promote the formation of additional reactive oxygen species. In addition, maintaining an appropriate ratio of bacterial surviving conc.: residual H₂O₂ conc. post-treatment could prevent bacterial regrowth and biofilm formation.

  5. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) involving ultrasound for waste water treatment: a review with emphasis on cost estimation.

    PubMed

    Mahamuni, Naresh N; Adewuyi, Yusuf G

    2010-08-01

    Two things are needed for any technology to be suitable for use in the industry, viz. 1. Technical feasibility and 2. Economical feasibility. The use of ultrasound for waste water treatment has been shown to be technically feasible by numerous reports in the literature over the years. But there are hardly any exhaustive reports which address the issue of economical feasibility of the use of ultrasound for waste water treatment on industrial scale. Hence an attempt was made to estimate the cost for the waste water treatment using ultrasound. The costs have been calculated for 1000 L/min capacity treatment plant. The costs were calculated based upon the rate constants for pollutant degradation. The pollutants considered were phenol, trichloroethylene (TCE) and reactive azo dyes. Time required for ninety percent degradation of pollutant was taken as the residence time. The amount of energy required to achieve the target degradation was calculated from the energy density (watt/ml) used in the treatability study. The cost of treatment was calculated by considering capital cost and operating cost involved for the waste water treatment. Quotations were invited from vendors to ascertain the capital cost of equipments involved and operating costs were calculated based on annual energy usage. The cost was expressed in dollars per 1000 gallons of waste water treated. These treatment costs were compared with other established Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) technologies. The cost of waste water treatment for phenol was in the range of $89 per 1000 gallons for UV/US/O(3) to $15,536 per 1000 gallons for US alone. These costs for TCE were in the range of $25 per 1000 gallons to $91 for US+UV treatment and US alone, respectively. The cost of waste water treatment for reactive azo dyes was in the range of $65 per 1000 gallon for US+UV+H(2)O(2) to $14,203 per 1000 gallon for US alone. This study should help in quantifying the economics of waste water treatment using ultrasound on

  6. Comparison of halide impacts on the efficiency of contaminant degradation by sulfate and hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Pignatello, Joseph J; Ma, Jun; Mitch, William A

    2014-02-18

    The effect of halides on organic contaminant destruction efficiency was compared for UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) AOP treatments of saline waters; benzoic acid, 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid, and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid were used as models for aromatic, alkene, and alkane constituents of naphthenic acids in oil-field waters. In model freshwater, contaminant degradation was higher by UV/S2O8(2-) because of the higher quantum efficiency for S2O8(2-) than H2O2 photolysis. The conversion of (•)OH and SO4(•-) radicals to less reactive halogen radicals in the presence of seawater halides reduced the degradation efficiency of benzoic acid and cyclohexanecarboxylic acid. The UV/S2O8(2-) AOP was more affected by Cl(-) than the UV/H2O2 AOP because oxidation of Cl(-) is more favorable by SO4(•-) than (•)OH at pH 7. Degradation of 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid, was not affected by halides, likely because of the high reactivity of halogen radicals with alkenes. Despite its relatively low concentration in saline waters compared to Cl(-), Br(-) was particularly important. Br(-) promoted halogen radical formation for both AOPs resulting in ClBr(•-), Br2(•-), and CO3(•-) concentrations orders of magnitude higher than (•)OH and SO4(•-) concentrations and reducing differences in halide impacts between the two AOPs. Kinetic modeling of the UV/H2O2 AOP indicated a synergism between Br(-) and Cl(-), with Br(-) scavenging of (•)OH leading to BrOH(•-), and further reactions of Cl(-) with this and other brominated radicals promoting halogen radical concentrations. In contaminant mixtures, the conversion of (•)OH and SO4(•-) radicals to more selective CO3(•-) and halogen radicals favored attack on highly reactive reaction centers represented by the alkene group of 3-cyclohexene-1-carboxylic acid and the aromatic group of the model compound, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, at the expense of less reactive reaction centers such as aromatic rings and alkane groups

  7. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  8. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields. PMID:24503715

  9. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms.

  10. Destruction of microcystins (cyanotoxins) by UV-254 nm-based direct photolysis and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): influence of variable amino acids on the degradation kinetics and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; Hiskia, Anastasia; Kaloudis, Triantafyllos; O'Shea, Kevin; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2015-05-01

    Hepatotoxic microcystins (MCs) are the most frequently detected group of cyanobacterial toxins. This study investigated the degradation of common MC variants in water, MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-YR and MC-LA, by UV-254 nm-based processes, UV only, UV/H2O2, UV/S2O8(2-) and UV/HSO5(-). Limited direct photolysis of MCs was observed, while the addition of an oxidant significantly improved the degradation efficiency with an order of UV/S2O8(2-) > UV/HSO5(-) > UV/H2O2 at the same initial molar concentration of the oxidant. The removal of MC-LR by UV/H2O2 appeared to be faster than another cyanotoxin, cylindrospermopsin, at either the same initial molar concentration or the same initial organic carbon concentration of the toxin. It suggested a faster reaction of MC-LR with hydroxyl radical, which was further supported by the determined second-order rate constant of MCs with hydroxyl radical. Both isomerization and photohydration byproducts were observed in UV only process for all four MCs; while in UV/H2O2, hydroxylation and diene-Adda double bond cleavage byproducts were detected. The presence of a tyrosine in the structure of MC-YR significantly promoted the formation of monohydroxylation byproduct m/z 1061; while the presence of a second arginine in MC-RR led to the elimination of a guanidine group and the absence of double bond cleavage byproducts. It was therefore demonstrated in this study that the variable amino acids in the structure of MCs influenced not only the degradation kinetics but also the preferable reaction mechanisms. PMID:25744186

  11. Applicability of fluidized bed reactor in recalcitrant compound degradation through advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Farhana; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-12-15

    Treatment of industrial waste water (e.g. textile waste water, phenol waste water, pharmaceutical etc) faces limitation in conventional treatment procedures. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) do not suffer from the limits of conventional treatment processes and consequently degrade toxic pollutants more efficiently. Complexity is faced in eradicating the restrictions of AOPs such as sludge formation, toxic intermediates formation and high requirement for oxidants. Increased mass-transfer in AOPs is an alternate solution to this problem. AOPs combined with Fluidized bed reactor (FBR) can be a potential choice compared to fixed bed or moving bed reactor, as AOP catalysts life-span last for only maximum of 5-10 cycles. Hence, FBR-AOPs require lesser operational and maintenance cost by reducing material resources. The time required for AOP can be minimized using FBR and also treatable working volume can be increased. FBR-AOP can process from 1 to 10 L of volume which is 10 times more than simple batch reaction. The mass transfer is higher thus the reaction time is lesser. For having increased mass transfer sludge production can be successfully avoided. The review study suggests that, optimum particle size, catalyst to reactor volume ratio, catalyst diameter and liquid or gas velocity is required for efficient FBR-AOP systems. However, FBR-AOPs are still under lab-scale investigation and for industrial application cost study is needed. Cost of FBR-AOPs highly depends on energy density needed and the mechanism of degradation of the pollutant. The cost of waste water treatment containing azo dyes was found to be US$ 50 to US$ 500 per 1000 gallons where, the cost for treating phenol water was US$ 50 to US$ 800 per 1000 gallons. The analysis for FBR-AOP costs has been found to depend on the targeted pollutant, degradation mechanism (zero order, 1st order and 2nd order) and energy consumptions by the AOPs.

  12. Applicability of fluidized bed reactor in recalcitrant compound degradation through advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Tisa, Farhana; Abdul Raman, Abdul Aziz; Wan Daud, Wan Mohd Ashri

    2014-12-15

    Treatment of industrial waste water (e.g. textile waste water, phenol waste water, pharmaceutical etc) faces limitation in conventional treatment procedures. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) do not suffer from the limits of conventional treatment processes and consequently degrade toxic pollutants more efficiently. Complexity is faced in eradicating the restrictions of AOPs such as sludge formation, toxic intermediates formation and high requirement for oxidants. Increased mass-transfer in AOPs is an alternate solution to this problem. AOPs combined with Fluidized bed reactor (FBR) can be a potential choice compared to fixed bed or moving bed reactor, as AOP catalysts life-span last for only maximum of 5-10 cycles. Hence, FBR-AOPs require lesser operational and maintenance cost by reducing material resources. The time required for AOP can be minimized using FBR and also treatable working volume can be increased. FBR-AOP can process from 1 to 10 L of volume which is 10 times more than simple batch reaction. The mass transfer is higher thus the reaction time is lesser. For having increased mass transfer sludge production can be successfully avoided. The review study suggests that, optimum particle size, catalyst to reactor volume ratio, catalyst diameter and liquid or gas velocity is required for efficient FBR-AOP systems. However, FBR-AOPs are still under lab-scale investigation and for industrial application cost study is needed. Cost of FBR-AOPs highly depends on energy density needed and the mechanism of degradation of the pollutant. The cost of waste water treatment containing azo dyes was found to be US$ 50 to US$ 500 per 1000 gallons where, the cost for treating phenol water was US$ 50 to US$ 800 per 1000 gallons. The analysis for FBR-AOP costs has been found to depend on the targeted pollutant, degradation mechanism (zero order, 1st order and 2nd order) and energy consumptions by the AOPs. PMID:25190594

  13. AOP description: Acetylcholinesterase inhibition

    EPA Science Inventory

    This adverse outcome pathway (AOP) leverages existing knowledge in the open literature to describe the linkage between inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and the subsequent mortality resulting from impacts at cholinergic receptors. The AOP takes a chemical category approa...

  14. DESTRUCTION OF PAHS AND PCBS IN WATER USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CATALYTIC ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new class of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on sulfate radicals is being tested for the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aqueous solution. These AOPs are based on the generation of sulfate radicals through...

  15. Oxidative degradation of endotoxin by advanced oxidation process (O3/H2O2 & UV/H2O2).

    PubMed

    Oh, Byung-Taek; Seo, Young-Suk; Sudhakar, Dega; Choe, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Park, Youn-Jong; Cho, Min

    2014-08-30

    The presence of endotoxin in water environments may pose a serious public health hazard. We investigated the effectiveness of advanced oxidative processes (AOP: O3/H2O2 and UV/H2O2) in the oxidative degradation of endotoxin. In addition, we measured the release of endotoxin from Escherichia coli following typical disinfection methods, such as chlorine, ozone alone and UV, and compared it with the use of AOPs. Finally, we tested the AOP-treated samples in their ability to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in mouse peritoneal macrophages. The production of hydroxyl radical in AOPs showed superior ability to degrade endotoxin in buffered solution, as well as water samples from Korean water treatment facilities, with the ozone/H2O2 being more efficient compared to UV/H2O2. In addition, the AOPs proved effective not only in eliminating E. coli in the samples, but also in endotoxin degradation, while the standard disinfection methods lead to the release of endotoxin following the bacteria destruction. Furthermore, in the experiments with macrophages, the AOPs-deactivated endotoxin lead to the smallest induction of TNF-α, which shows the loss of inflammation activity, compared to ozone treatment alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that AOPs offer an effective and mild method for endotoxin degradation in the water systems.

  16. Comparison of Integrated AOP Systems for BTEX Removal From Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Mohammad, Jan

    2004-03-31

    This paper investigates the removal of BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene) from water using different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) used singly or in combination with one another. This research is an extension of our work performed under the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) which addressed treating chlorinated organic contaminated water using sonication, vapor stripping and combined sonication + vapor stripping. In our current study, various AOP processes were investigated for their ability to remove BTEX compounds from solution, including the following. ? Ultraviolet (UV) light alone ? UV light + hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) ? Sonication alone ? Air sparging alone ? Air sparging + sonication ? Air sparging + UV light ? Sonication + UV light ? Sonication + H2O2 ? Sonication + air sparging + UV light ? Sonication + air sparging + H2O2 ? Sonication + air sparging + H2O2 + UV light ? Sonication + air sparging with O3 ? Sonication + O3 + H2O2 ? Sonication + O3 + H2O2 + UV light

  17. Combining Advanced Oxidation Processes: Assessment Of Process Additivity, Synergism, And Antagonism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Robert W.; Sharma, M.P.; Gbadebo Adewuyi, Yusuf

    2007-07-01

    This paper addresses the process interactions from combining integrated processes (such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), biological operations, air stripping, etc.). AOPs considered include: Fenton's reagent, ultraviolet light, titanium dioxide, ozone (O{sub 3}), hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), sonication/acoustic cavitation, among others. A critical review of the technical literature has been performed, and the data has been analyzed in terms of the processes being additive, synergistic, or antagonistic. Predictions based on the individual unit operations are made and compared against the behavior of the combined unit operations. The data reported in this paper focus primarily on treatment of petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents. (authors)

  18. Application of advanced oxidation processes for TNT removal: A review.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Kaidar; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Cassir, Michel; Bermond, Alain

    2010-06-15

    Nowadays, there are increasingly stringent regulations requiring drastic treatment of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) contaminated waters to generate treated waters which could be easily reused or released into the environment without any harmful effects. TNT is among the most highly suspected explosive compounds that interfere with groundwater system due to its high toxicity and low biodegradability. The present work is an overview of the literature on TNT removal from polluted waters and soils and, more particularly, its treatability by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Among the remediation technologies, AOPs constitute a promising technology for the treatment of wastewaters containing non-easily biodegradable organic compounds. Data concerning the degradation of TNT reported during the period 1990-2009 are evaluated in this review. Among the AOPs, the following techniques are successively debated: processes based on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)+UV, Fenton, photo-Fenton and Fenton-like processes), photocatalysis, processes based on ozone (O(3), O(3)+UV) and electrochemical processes. Kinetic constants related to TNT degradation and the different mechanistic degradation pathways are discussed. Possible future treatment strategies, such as, coupling AOP with biological treatment is also considered as a mean to improve TNT remediation efficiency and kinetic.

  19. Comprehensive study on effects of water matrices on removal of pharmaceuticals by three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, Masahiro; Sugawara, Asato; Raknuzzaman, Mohammad; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    Simple semi-theoretical models were developed to estimate the performance of three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in the degradation of pharmaceuticals. The AOPs included the photo-Fenton process as an example of a liquid-liquid reaction, the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process as a solid-liquid reaction, and the combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process as a gas-liquid reaction; the effects of the aqueous matrices (CESs: co-existing substances) of actual wastewater on the removal of pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and diclofenac) was taken into account. By comparing the characteristic parameters of the models, obtained from the experiments using pure water and actual wastewater, the effects of CESs on the respective removal mechanisms could be separately and quantitatively evaluated. As a general tendency, the AOPs proceeded less effectively (were inhibited) in the matrices containing CESs, as observed with the use of a lower initial concentration of pharmaceuticals. The inhibition mechanisms differed for the three types of AOPs. In the photo-Fenton process, the Fenton reaction was improved by the incorporation of CESs, while the photo-reduction reaction was significantly inhibited. In the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process, competition between the pharmaceuticals and CESs for adsorption on the catalyst surface was a less significant inhibitory factor than the scavenger effects of the CESs. The combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process was most strongly inhibited by CESs among the AOPs investigated in this study. PMID:27317938

  20. Comprehensive study on effects of water matrices on removal of pharmaceuticals by three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Tokumura, Masahiro; Sugawara, Asato; Raknuzzaman, Mohammad; Habibullah-Al-Mamun, Md; Masunaga, Shigeki

    2016-09-01

    Simple semi-theoretical models were developed to estimate the performance of three different kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in the degradation of pharmaceuticals. The AOPs included the photo-Fenton process as an example of a liquid-liquid reaction, the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process as a solid-liquid reaction, and the combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process as a gas-liquid reaction; the effects of the aqueous matrices (CESs: co-existing substances) of actual wastewater on the removal of pharmaceuticals (carbamazepine and diclofenac) was taken into account. By comparing the characteristic parameters of the models, obtained from the experiments using pure water and actual wastewater, the effects of CESs on the respective removal mechanisms could be separately and quantitatively evaluated. As a general tendency, the AOPs proceeded less effectively (were inhibited) in the matrices containing CESs, as observed with the use of a lower initial concentration of pharmaceuticals. The inhibition mechanisms differed for the three types of AOPs. In the photo-Fenton process, the Fenton reaction was improved by the incorporation of CESs, while the photo-reduction reaction was significantly inhibited. In the TiO2 photocatalytic oxidation process, competition between the pharmaceuticals and CESs for adsorption on the catalyst surface was a less significant inhibitory factor than the scavenger effects of the CESs. The combined ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation process was most strongly inhibited by CESs among the AOPs investigated in this study.

  1. The 2010 AOP Workshop Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.; Morrow, John H.; Brown, James W.; Firestone, Elaine R.

    2011-01-01

    The rationale behind the current workshop, which was hosted by Biospherical Instruments Inc. (BSI), was to update the community and get community input with respect to the following: topics not addressed during the first workshop, specifically the processing of above-water apparent optical property (AOP data) within the Processing of Radiometric Observations of Seawater using Information Technologies (PROSIT) architecture; PROSIT data processing issues that have developed or tasks that have been completed, since the first workshop; and NASA instrumentation developments, both above- and in-water, that are relevant to both workshops and next generation mission planning. The workshop emphasized presentations on new AOP instrumentation, desired and required features for processing above-water measurements of the AOPs of seawater, working group discussions, and a community update for the in-water data processing already present in PROSIT. The six working groups were organized as follows: a) data ingest and data products; b) required and desired features for optically shallow and optically deep waters; c) contamination rejection (clouds), corrections, and data filtering; d) sun photometry and polarimetry; e) instrumentation networks; and f) hyperspectral versus fixed-wavelength sensors. The instrumentation networks working group was intended to provide more detailed information about desired and required features of autonomous sampling systems. Plenary discussions produced a number of recommendations for evolving and documenting PROSIT.

  2. Biofilm control in water by a UV-based advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lakretz, Anat; Ron, Eliora Z; Mamane, Hadas

    2011-03-01

    An ultraviolet (UV)-based advanced oxidation process (AOP), with hydrogen peroxide and medium-pressure (MP) UV light (H(2)O(2)/UV), was used as a pretreatment strategy for biofilm control in water. Suspended Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells were exposed to UV-based AOP treatment, and the adherent biofilm formed by the surviving cells was monitored. Control experiments using H(2)O(2) or MP UV irradiation alone could inhibit biofilm formation for only short periods of time (<24 h) post-treatment. In a H(2)O(2)/filtered-UV (>295 nm) system, an additive effect on biofilm control was shown vs filtered-UV irradiation alone, probably due to activity of the added hydroxyl radical (OH•). In a H(2)O(2)/full-UV (ie full UV spectrum, not filtered) system, this result was not obtained, possibly due to the germicidal UV photons overwhelming the AOP system. Generally, however, H(2)O(2)/UV prevented biofilm formation for longer periods (days) only when maintained with residual H(2)O(2). The ratio of surviving bacterial concentration post-treatment to residual H(2)O(2) concentration played an important role in biofilm prevention and bacterial regrowth. H(2)O(2) treatments alone resulted in poorer biofilm control compared to UV-based AOP treatments maintained with similar levels of residual H(2)O(2), indicating a possible advantage of AOP.

  3. A comparison of the environmental impact of different AOPs: risk indexes.

    PubMed

    Giménez, Jaime; Bayarri, Bernardí; González, Óscar; Malato, Sixto; Peral, José; Esplugas, Santiago

    2014-12-31

    Today, environmental impact associated with pollution treatment is a matter of great concern. A method is proposed for evaluating environmental risk associated with Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) applied to wastewater treatment. The method is based on the type of pollution (wastewater, solids, air or soil) and on materials and energy consumption. An Environmental Risk Index (E), constructed from numerical criteria provided, is presented for environmental comparison of processes and/or operations. The Operation Environmental Risk Index (EOi) for each of the unit operations involved in the process and the Aspects Environmental Risk Index (EAj) for process conditions were also estimated. Relative indexes were calculated to evaluate the risk of each operation (E/NOP) or aspect (E/NAS) involved in the process, and the percentage of the maximum achievable for each operation and aspect was found. A practical application of the method is presented for two AOPs: photo-Fenton and heterogeneous photocatalysis with suspended TiO2 in Solarbox. The results report the environmental risks associated with each process, so that AOPs tested and the operations involved with them can be compared.

  4. Advanced oxidation process using hydrogen peroxide/microwave system for solubilization of phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ping Huang; Wong, Wayne T; Lo, Kwang Victor

    2005-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process (AOP) combining hydrogen peroxide and microwave heating was used for the solubilization of phosphate from secondary municipal sludge from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal process. The microwave irradiation is used as a generator agent of oxidizing radicals as well as a heating source in the process. This AOP process could facilitate the release of a large amount of the sludge-bound phosphorus from the sewage sludge. More than 84% of the total phosphorous could be released at a microwave heating time of 5 min at 170 degrees C. This innovative process has the potential of being applied to simple sludge treatment processes in domestic wastewater treatment and to the recovery of phosphorus from the wastewater.

  5. Novel imazethapyr detoxification applying advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Stathis, Ioannis; Hela, Dimitra G; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Emanuele, Lucia; Bufo, Sabino A

    2011-01-01

    Different degradation methods have been applied to assess the suitability of advanced oxidation process (AOPs) to promote mineralization of imazethapyr [(RS)-5-ethyl-2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid], a widely used imidazolinone class herbicide, the persistence of which has been demonstrated in surface and ground waters destined to human uses. Independent of the oxidation process assessed, the decomposition of imazethapyr always followed a pseudo-first order kinetic. The direct UV-irradiation (UV) of the herbicide as well as its oxidation with ozone (O₃), and hydrogen peroxide tied to UV-irradiation (H₂O₂/UV) were sufficiently slow to permit the identification of intermediate products, the formation pathway of which has been proposed. Ozonation joined to UV-irradiation (O₃/UV), ozonation joined to titanium dioxide photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV+O₃), sole photo-catalysis (TiO₂/UV), and photo-catalysis reinforced with hydrogen peroxide-oxidation (TiO₂/UV+H₂O₂) were characterized by a faster degradation and rapid formation of a lot of small molecules, which were quickly degraded to complete mineralization. The most effective oxidation methods were those using titanium dioxide photo-catalysis enhanced either by ozonation or hydrogen peroxide. Most of all, these last processes were useful to avoid the development of dangerous by-products. PMID:21726140

  6. Enhancement of Electron Transfer in Various Photo-Assisted Oxidation Processes for Nitro-Phenolic Compound Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khue, Do Ngoc; Lam, Tran Dai; Minh, Do Binh; Loi, Vu Duc; Nam, Nguyen Hoai; Bach, Vu Quang; Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Hoang, Nguyen; Hu'ng, Dao Duy

    2016-08-01

    The present study focuses on photo-assisted advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) with strongly enhanced electron transfer for degradation of nitro-phenolic compounds in aqueous medium. The effectiveness of these processes was estimated based on the pseudo-first order rate constant k determined from high-performance liquid chromatography. The degradation of four different nitro-phenolic compounds was systematically studied using selected AOPs; these four compounds were nitrophenol, dinitrophenol, trinitrophenol and trinitroresorcin. It was observed that the combination of ultraviolet light with hydrogen peroxide H2O2 enhanced and maintained hydroxyl radicals, and therefore increased the conversion yield of organic pollutants. These AOPs provided efficient and green removal of stable organic toxins found in a wide range of industrial wastewater.

  7. Giardia duodenalis: Number and Fluorescence Reduction Caused by the Advanced Oxidation Process (H2O2/UV)

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, José Roberto; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno; Guadagnini, Regiane Aparecida; dos Santos, Luciana Urbano

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of peroxidation assisted by ultraviolet radiation (H2O2/UV), which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP), on Giardia duodenalis cysts. The cysts were inoculated in synthetic and surface water using a concentration of 12 g H2O2 L−1 and a UV dose (λ = 254 nm) of 5,480 mJcm−2. The aqueous solutions were concentrated using membrane filtration, and the organisms were observed using a direct immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The AOP was effective in reducing the number of G. duodenalis cysts in synthetic and surface water and was most effective in reducing the fluorescence of the cyst walls that were present in the surface water. The AOP showed a higher deleterious potential for G. duodenalis cysts than either peroxidation (H2O2) or photolysis (UV) processes alone. PMID:27379301

  8. Reduction of organic trace compounds and fresh water consumption by recovery of advanced oxidation processes treated industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Bierbaum, S; Öller, H-J; Kersten, A; Klemenčič, A Krivograd

    2014-01-01

    Ozone (O(3)) has been used successfully in advanced wastewater treatment in paper mills, other sectors and municipalities. To solve the water problems of regions lacking fresh water, wastewater treated by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) can substitute fresh water in highly water-consuming industries. Results of this study have shown that paper strength properties are not impaired and whiteness is slightly impaired only when reusing paper mill wastewater. Furthermore, organic trace compounds are becoming an issue in the German paper industry. The results of this study have shown that AOPs are capable of improving wastewater quality by reducing organic load, colour and organic trace compounds.

  9. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-01-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter–β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  10. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged.

  11. Three genes encoding AOP2, a protein involved in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis, are differentially expressed in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jifang; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liang, Jianli; Wu, Jian; Cheng, Feng; Wang, Xiaowu

    2015-10-01

    The glucosinolate biosynthetic gene AOP2 encodes an enzyme that plays a crucial role in catalysing the conversion of beneficial glucosinolates into anti-nutritional ones. In Brassica rapa, three copies of BrAOP2 have been identified, but their function in establishing the glucosinolate content of B. rapa is poorly understood. Here, we used phylogenetic and gene structure analyses to show that BrAOP2 proteins have evolved via a duplication process retaining two highly conserved domains at the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, while the middle part has experienced structural divergence. Heterologous expression and in vitro enzyme assays and Arabidopsis mutant complementation studies showed that all three BrAOP2 genes encode functional BrAOP2 proteins that convert the precursor methylsulfinyl alkyl glucosinolate to the alkenyl form. Site-directed mutagenesis showed that His356, Asp310, and Arg376 residues are required for the catalytic activity of one of the BrAOP2 proteins (BrAOP2.1). Promoter-β-glucuronidase lines revealed that the BrAOP2.3 gene displayed an overlapping but distinct tissue- and cell-specific expression profile compared with that of the BrAOP2.1 and BrAOP2.2 genes. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays demonstrated that BrAOP2.1 showed a slightly different pattern of expression in below-ground tissue at the seedling stage and in the silique at the reproductive stage compared with BrAOP2.2 and BrAOP2.3 genes in B. rapa. Taken together, our results revealed that all three BrAOP2 paralogues are active in B. rapa but have functionally diverged. PMID:26188204

  12. Measurement of hydrogen peroxide in an advanced oxidation process using an automated biosensor.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewska, B; Guwy, A J; Dinsdale, R; Hawkes, D L

    2007-01-01

    A hydrogen peroxide biosensor was used to monitor hydrogen peroxide concentrations in a UV/hydrogen peroxide immobilised Fenton advanced oxidation process (AOP). The biosensor is based on gas phase monitoring and thus is more resistant to fouling from the liquid phase constituents of industrial processes. The biosensor is supplied with catalase continually, therefore overcoming any problems with enzyme degradation, which would occur in an immobilised enzyme biosensor. The biosensors response was linear within the experimental range 30-400mg H(2)O(2)l(-1) with a R(2) correlation of 0.99. The hydrogen peroxide monitor was used to monitor residual peroxide in an AOP, operated with a step overload of hydrogen peroxide, with correlation factors of 0.96-0.99 compared to offline hydrogen peroxide determinations by UV spectroscopy. Sparging the sample with nitrogen was found to be effective in reducing the interference from dissolved gases produced with the AOP itself. It is proposed that this biosensor could be used to improve the effectiveness of AOPs via hydrogen peroxide control.

  13. Formation of disinfection by-products in the ultraviolet/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ding; Bolton, James R; Andrews, Susan A; Hofmann, Ron

    2015-06-15

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) formation may be a concern when applying ultraviolet light and free chlorine (UV/chlorine) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) for drinking water treatment, due to typically large chlorine doses (e.g. 5-10 mg L(-1) as free chlorine). A potential mitigating factor is the low chlorine contact times for this AOP treatment (e.g. seconds). Full-scale and pilot-scale test results showed minimal trihalomethane (THM) and haloacetic acid (HAA) formation during UV/chlorine treatment, while dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) and bromochloroacetonitrile (BCAN) were produced rapidly. Adsorbable organic halide (AOX) formation was significant when applying the UV/chlorine process in water that had not been previously chlorinated, while little additional formation was observed in prechlorinated water. Chlorine photolysis led to chlorate and bromate formation, equivalent to approximately 2-17% and 0.01-0.05% of the photolyzed chlorine, respectively. No perchlorate or chlorite formation was observed. During simulated secondary disinfection of AOP-treated water, DBP formation potential for THMs, HAAs, HANs, and AOX was observed to increase approximately to the same extent as was observed for pretreatment using the more common AOP of UV combined with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2).

  14. Treatment of dairy manure using the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process under a continuous mode operation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Lo, Ing W; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2010-11-01

    The microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP) was used to treat dairy manure for solubilization of nutrients and organic matters. This study investigated the effectiveness of the MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP under a continuous mode of operation, and compared the results to those of batch operations. The main factors affecting solubilization by the MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP were heating temperature and hydrogen peroxide dosage. Soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) and volatile fatty acids (VFA) increased with an increase of microwave (MW) heating temperature; very high concentrations were obtained at 90°C. Insignificant amounts of ammonia and reducing sugars were released in all runs. An acidic pH condition was required for phosphorus solubilisation from dairy manure. The best yield was obtained at 90°C with an acid dosage of 1.0 %; about 92 % of total phosphorus and 90 % of total chemical oxygen demand were in the soluble forms. The MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP operated in a continuous operation mode showed pronounced synergistic effects between hydrogen peroxide and microwave irradiation when compared to a batch system under similar operating conditions, resulting in much better yields.

  15. Removal of disinfection by-product precursors with ozone-UV advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chin, A; Bérubé, P R

    2005-05-01

    The efficacy of using ozone (O3), ultraviolet irradiation (UV) and the combined O3-UV advanced oxidation process (AOP) to remove 2 classes of disinfection by-product (DBP) precursors from raw surface water samples have been evaluated and compared. In particular, trihalomethane and haloacetic acids formation potentials were measured. Laboratory batch scale experiments were carried out as a function of ozone and UV dosage in order to study the removal kinetics. It is concluded that the combined O3-UV AOP is more effective than either the ozone or UV treatment alone. Ozone-UV AOP is capable of mineralizing up to 50% of the total organic carbon from the raw source water at an ozone dose of 0.62+/-0.019 mg O3/mL and a UV dose of 1.61 W s/cm2. In addition, O3-UV AOP can reduce trihalomethane formation potential by roughly 80% and haloacetic acids formation potential by roughly 70% at the same ozone and UV dosage.

  16. Comparison of advanced oxidation processes for the removal of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Lamsal, Rupa; Walsh, Margaret E; Gagnon, Graham A

    2011-05-01

    This study examined the impact of UV, ozone (O(3)), advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) including O(3)/UV, H(2)O(2)/UV H(2)O(2)/O(3) in the change of molecular weight distribution (MWD) and disinfection by-product formation potential (DBPFP). Bench-scale experiments were conducted with surface river water and changes in the UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV(254)), total organic carbon (TOC), trihalomethane and haloacetic acid formation potential (THMFP, HAAFP) and MWD of the raw and oxidized water were analyzed to evaluate treatment performance. Combination of O(3) and UV with H(2)O(2) was found to result in more TOC and UV(254) reduction than the individual processes. The O(3)/UV process was found to be the most effective AOP for NOM reduction, with TOC and UV(254) reduced by 31 and 88%, respectively. Application of O(3)/UV and H(2)O(2)/UV treatments to the source waters organics with 190-1500 Da molecular weight resulted in the near complete alteration of the molecular weight of NOM from >900 Da to <300 Da H(2)O(2)/UV was found to be the most effective treatment for the reduction of THM and HAA formation under uniform formation conditions. These results could hold particular significance for drinking water utilities with low alkalinity source waters that are investigating AOPs, as there are limited published studies that have evaluated the treatment efficacy of five different oxidation processes in parallel.

  17. Framework for computationally-predicted AOPs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Framework for computationally-predicted AOPs Given that there are a vast number of existing and new chemicals in the commercial pipeline, emphasis is placed on developing high throughput screening (HTS) methods for hazard prediction. Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) represent a...

  18. Impact of hydrodynamics on pollutant degradation and energy efficiency of VUV/UV and H2O2/UV oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mehdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2015-12-01

    The Vacuum-UV/UV process, an incipient catalyst/chemical-free advanced oxidation process (AOP), is potentially a cost-effective solution for the removal of harmful micropollutants from water. Utilizing a novel mechanistic numerical model, this work aimed to establish a thorough understanding of the degradation mechanisms in the VUV/UV process operating under continuous flow conditions, when compared with the widely applied H2O2/UV AOP. Of particular interest was the examination of the impact of flow characteristics (hydrodynamics) on the degradation efficacy of a target micropollutant during the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs. While hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation was the dominant degradation pathway in both processes, the degradation efficacy of the VUV/UV process showed much stronger correlation with the extent of mixing in the photoreactor. Under a uniform flow regime, the degradation efficiency of the target pollutant achieved by the H2O2/UV process with 2- and 5 ppm H2O2 was greater than that provided by the VUV/UV process. Nonetheless, introduction of mixing and circulation zones to the VUV/UV reactor resulted in superior performance compared with the H2O2/UV AOP. Based on the electrical energy-per-order (EEO) analysis, incorporation of circulation zones resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the overall energy cost of the VUV/UV AOP, while the corresponding reduction for the 5-ppm H2O2/UV system was less than 5%. Furthermore, the extent of OH scavenging of natural organic matter (NOM) on energy efficiency of the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs under continuous flow conditions was assessed using the EEO analysis.

  19. Impact of hydrodynamics on pollutant degradation and energy efficiency of VUV/UV and H2O2/UV oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Mehdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2015-12-01

    The Vacuum-UV/UV process, an incipient catalyst/chemical-free advanced oxidation process (AOP), is potentially a cost-effective solution for the removal of harmful micropollutants from water. Utilizing a novel mechanistic numerical model, this work aimed to establish a thorough understanding of the degradation mechanisms in the VUV/UV process operating under continuous flow conditions, when compared with the widely applied H2O2/UV AOP. Of particular interest was the examination of the impact of flow characteristics (hydrodynamics) on the degradation efficacy of a target micropollutant during the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs. While hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation was the dominant degradation pathway in both processes, the degradation efficacy of the VUV/UV process showed much stronger correlation with the extent of mixing in the photoreactor. Under a uniform flow regime, the degradation efficiency of the target pollutant achieved by the H2O2/UV process with 2- and 5 ppm H2O2 was greater than that provided by the VUV/UV process. Nonetheless, introduction of mixing and circulation zones to the VUV/UV reactor resulted in superior performance compared with the H2O2/UV AOP. Based on the electrical energy-per-order (EEO) analysis, incorporation of circulation zones resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the overall energy cost of the VUV/UV AOP, while the corresponding reduction for the 5-ppm H2O2/UV system was less than 5%. Furthermore, the extent of OH scavenging of natural organic matter (NOM) on energy efficiency of the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs under continuous flow conditions was assessed using the EEO analysis. PMID:26363258

  20. Kinetics and pathways of ibuprofen degradation by the UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yingying; Fang, Jingyun; Shang, Chii

    2016-03-01

    The UV/chlorine advanced oxidation process (AOP), which forms reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals (HO) and reactive chlorine species (RCS) such as chlorine atoms (Cl) and Cl2(-), is being considered as an alternative to the UV/H2O2 AOP for the degradation of emerging contaminants. This study investigated the kinetics and pathways of the degradation of a recalcitrant pharmaceutical and personal care product (PPCP)-ibuprofen (IBP)-by the UV/chlorine AOP. The degradation of IBP followed the pseudo first-order kinetics. The first-order rate constant was 3.3 times higher in the UV/chlorine AOP than in the UV/H2O2 AOP for a given chemical molar dosage at pH 6. The first-order rate constant decreased from 3.1 × 10(-3) s(-1) to 5.5 × 10(-4) s(-1) with increasing pH from 6 to 9. Both HO and RCS contributed to the degradation, and the contribution of RCS increased from 22% to 30% with increasing pH from 6 to 9. The degradation was initiated by HO-induced hydroxylation and Cl-induced chlorine substitution, and sustained through decarboxylation, demethylation, chlorination and ring cleavage to form more stable products. Significant amounts of chlorinated intermediates/byproducts were formed from the UV/chlorine AOP, and four chlorinated products were newly identified. The yield of total organic chlorine (TOCl) was 31.6 μM after 90% degradation of 50 μM IBP under the experimental conditions. The known disinfection by-products (DBPs) comprised 17.4% of the TOCl. The effects of water matrix in filtered drinking water on the degradation were not significant, demonstrating the practicality of the UV/chlorine AOP for the control of some refractory PPCPs. However, the toxicity of the chlorinated products should be further assessed.

  1. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-08-14

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes-catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH-need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities.

  2. UV-H2O2 based AOP and its integration with biological activated carbon treatment for DBP reduction in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Toor, Ramn; Mohseni, Madjid

    2007-02-01

    The presence of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) such as trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) in drinking water is of great concern due to their adverse effects on human health. Emerging regulation limiting the concentration of DBPs in drinking water has increased demands for technologies and processes which reduce the formation of DBPs in drinking water. In this study, UV-H2O2 based advance oxidation process (AOP) was used to treat raw surface water. Experiments were conducted using low pressure mercury vapor UV lamps in collimated beam and flow-through annular photoreactors. The effect of UV fluence (0-3500 mJ cm(-2)) and hydrogen peroxide concentration (0-23 mg l(-1)) in reducing the concentration of THMs and HAAs was examined. The UV-H2O2 AOP was then coupled with a downstream biological activated carbon (BAC) treatment to assess the synergetic benefits of combining the two treatments. It was observed that UV-H2O2 AOP was only effective at reducing DBPs at UV fluences of more than 1000 mJ cm(-2) and initial H2O2 concentrations of about or greater than 23 mg l(-1). However, the combined AOP-BAC treatment showed significant reductions of 43%, 52%, and 59% relative to untreated raw water for DBPs, TOC, and UV254, respectively.

  3. Solar-Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Processes for Water Treatment: Simultaneous Removal of Pathogens and Chemical Pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Tsydenova, Oyuna; Batoev, Valeriy; Batoeva, Agniya

    2015-01-01

    The review explores the feasibility of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by solar-enhanced advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The AOPs are based on in-situ generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), most notably hydroxyl radicals •OH, that are capable of destroying both pollutant molecules and pathogen cells. The review presents evidence of simultaneous removal of pathogens and chemical pollutants by photocatalytic processes, namely TiO2 photocatalysis and photo-Fenton. Complex water matrices with high loads of pathogens and chemical pollutants negatively affect the efficiency of disinfection and pollutant removal. This is due to competition between chemical substances and pathogens for generated ROS. Other possible negative effects include light screening, competitive photon absorption, adsorption on the catalyst surface (thereby inhibiting its photocatalytic activity), etc. Besides, some matrix components may serve as nutrients for pathogens, thus hindering the disinfection process. Each type of water/wastewater would require a tailor-made approach and the variables that were shown to influence the processes—catalyst/oxidant concentrations, incident radiation flux, and pH—need to be adjusted in order to achieve the required degree of pollutant and pathogen removal. Overall, the solar-enhanced AOPs hold promise as an environmentally-friendly way to substitute or supplement conventional water/wastewater treatment, particularly in areas without access to centralized drinking water or sewage/wastewater treatment facilities. PMID:26287222

  4. Modular Advanced Oxidation Process Enabled by Cathodic Hydrogen Peroxide Production

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO•) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d–1. The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO• scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m–3, with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  5. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices.

  6. Modular advanced oxidation process enabled by cathodic hydrogen peroxide production.

    PubMed

    Barazesh, James M; Hennebel, Tom; Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2015-06-16

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is frequently used in combination with ultraviolet (UV) light to treat trace organic contaminants in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In small-scale applications, such as wellhead and point-of-entry water treatment systems, the need to maintain a stock solution of concentrated H2O2 increases the operational cost and complicates the operation of AOPs. To avoid the need for replenishing a stock solution of H2O2, a gas diffusion electrode was used to generate low concentrations of H2O2 directly in the water prior to its exposure to UV light. Following the AOP, the solution was passed through an anodic chamber to lower the solution pH and remove the residual H2O2. The effectiveness of the technology was evaluated using a suite of trace contaminants that spanned a range of reactivity with UV light and hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) in three different types of source waters (i.e., simulated groundwater, simulated surface water, and municipal wastewater effluent) as well as a sodium chloride solution. Irrespective of the source water, the system produced enough H2O2 to treat up to 120 L water d(-1). The extent of transformation of trace organic contaminants was affected by the current density and the concentrations of HO(•) scavengers in the source water. The electrical energy per order (EEO) ranged from 1 to 3 kWh m(-3), with the UV lamp accounting for most of the energy consumption. The gas diffusion electrode exhibited high efficiency for H2O2 production over extended periods and did not show a diminution in performance in any of the matrices. PMID:26039560

  7. Integrative data mining of high-throughput in vitro screens, in vivo data, and disease information to identify Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) signatures:ToxCast high-throughput screening data and Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) as a case study.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a systematic way to describe linkages between molecular and cellular processes and organism or population level effects. The current AOP assembly methods however, are inefficient. Our goal is to generate computationally-pr...

  8. Removing Fats, Oils and Greases from Grease Trap by Hybrid AOPs (Ozonation and Sonication)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatkowski, Michal Piotr; Satoh, Saburoh; Yamabe, Chobei; Ihara, Satoshi; Nieda, Masanori

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrical energy for the environmental applications using AOPs (advanced oxidation processes) combined with ozonation and sonication to remove the FOG (fats, oils and greases) from wastewater of the sewage system. This study focused on FOG removal from a grease trap using the hybrid AOPs. Fatty acids (linoleic, oleic, stearic and palmitic acids) were used as representative standards of FOG. The studies were conducted experimentally in a glass reactor under various operational conditions. The oxidation efficiency using the combination of the ozonation and sonication was determined by the KI dosimetry method and the calorimetry method. Fatty acids concentration were measured by GC/MS. The local reaction field of the high temperature and high pressure, so-called hot spot, was generated by the quasi-adiabatic collapse of bubbles produced in the water under sonication, which is called cavitation phenomenon. Mixing the ozone bubbles into the water under acoustic cavitation, the formation of OH radicals increased. The mechanical effect of acoustic cavitation such as microstreaming and shock waves have an influence on the probability of reactions of ozone and radicals with fatty acids.

  9. The degradation of dissolved organic nitrogen associated with melanoidin using a UV/H2O2 AOP.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, Jason; Kavanagh, Lydia; Lant, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the simultaneous degradation of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and associated colour from wastewater containing melanoidins by an advanced oxidation process (AOP). UV irradiation of H2O2 was used as the mechanism to create the hydroxyl radical for oxidation. Melanoidins are large nitrogenous organic compounds that are refractory during biological wastewater treatment processes. The simultaneous degradation of DON and colour, present as a result of these compounds, was investigated using an AOP. The oxidation process was much more capable of removing colour (99% degradation), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (50% degradation) and DON (25% degradation) at the optimal applied dose of hydrogen peroxide for the system (3300 mg l(-1)). This indicated that colour and DON removal were decoupled problems for the purpose of treating melanoidin by an AOP and thus colour removal can not be used as an indication of DON removal Colour was caused by organic molecules with molecular weight greater than 10 kDa. Oxidation caused a partial reduction of the DON (41-15% of the total dissolved nitrogen) and DOC (29-14% of the DOC) associated with the large molecular weight fraction (>10 kDa) and almost complete colour removal (87-3% of the total colour). The degraded DON was mostly accounted for by the formation of ammonia (31% of the nitrogen removed from the large fraction) and small molecular weight compounds (66% of the nitrogen removed from the large fraction). The degraded DOC appeared to be mostly mineralised (to CO2) with only 20% of the degraded compounds appearing as small molecular weight DOC.

  10. Role of mixing on microwave-enhanced advanced oxidation process in treating sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Kenge, Anju A; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2008-10-01

    The microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H2O2-AOP) was used for the release of nutrients and the disintegration of suspended solids from both anaerobic sludge and aerobic sludge. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mixing on the performance of the process, in terms of soluble ammonia, orthophosphate and soluble chemical oxygen demands. Experiments were conducted on sludge samples with various total solids concentrations (1.1-3.7%) and hydrogen peroxide dosage (1% per 1% of total solids) at 80 degrees C of microwave temperature and five minutes of heating time. The results indicated that mixing affected solids disintegration and nutrient solubilization of sewage sludge, regardless of the sludge used, anaerobic or aerobic. However, the effects of mixing on the MW/H2O2-AOP were dependent on the total solids concentration of the sludge. A paired t-test was performed on data for aerobic sludge: at 2.9% of total solids (TS), the difference for solubilization of nutrients and solids disintegration was statistically significant at a 95% confidence level between mixing and non-mixing samples. At a lower TS of 1.7% only soluble chemical oxygen demand showed significant difference between mixing and non-mixing. The results suggest that, for sludge with higher solids content, the MW/H2O2-AOP can be more effective if a mixing device is implemented.

  11. NEPTUNIUM OXIDE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, J; Watkins, R; Hensel, S

    2009-05-27

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a campaign in which fifty nine cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. The neptunium campaign was divided into two parts: Part 1 which consisted of oxide made from H-Canyon neptunium solution which did not require any processing prior to conversion into an oxide, and Part 2 which consisted of oxide made from additional H-Canyon neptunium solutions which required processing to purify the solution prior to conversion into an oxide. The neptunium was received as a nitrate solution and converted to oxide through ion-exchange column extraction, precipitation, and calcination. Numerous processing challenges were encountered in order make a final neptunium oxide product that could be shipped in a 9975 shipping container. Among the challenges overcome was the issue of scale: translating lab scale production into full facility production. The balance between processing efficiency and product quality assurance was addressed during this campaign. Lessons learned from these challenges are applicable to other processing projects.

  12. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Network Development for Fatty Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are descriptive biological sequences that start from a molecular initiating event (MIE) and end with an adverse health outcome. AOPs provide biological context for high throughput chemical testing and further prioritize environmental health risk re...

  13. [Effects of organic pollutants in drinking water on the removal of dimethyl phthalate by advanced oxidation processes].

    PubMed

    Rui, Min; Gao, Nai-yun; Xu, Bin; Li, Fu-sheng; Zhao, Jian-fu; Le, Lin-sheng

    2006-12-01

    Humic acids were used to simulate natural organic compounds in water for the investigation of DMP oxidation by three different AOPs (advanced oxidation processes) of UV-H2O2, O3 and UV-O3. The results showed that pseudo-first-order reaction equation could describe the oxidation of DMP by UV-H2O2 perfectly, which was strongly affected humic acids in water. The relationship between pseudo-first-order reaction rate and TOC value could be expressed as K = 0. 162 0 [TOC]-0.8171. It was also found that humic acids in the water exhibited obvious influence on the oxidation of DMP by UV-O3. However, effect of humic acids on the oxidation of DMP by ozone was not obvious. It was also analyzed that oxidation of DMP was dominated by ozone oxidation both in ozonation process and UV-O3 process; the importance of "OH in the oxidation of DMP was enhanced as the concentration of DMP decreased in UV-O3 process. The degree of impact form humic acids towards different AOPs could be ranked in a decreasing order as UV-H2O3, UV-O3, 03. PMID:17304847

  14. Micropollutant degradation, bacterial inactivation and regrowth risk in wastewater effluents: Influence of the secondary (pre)treatment on the efficiency of Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Voumard, Margaux; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2016-10-01

    In this work, disinfection by 5 Advanced Oxidation Processes was preceded by 3 different secondary treatment systems present in the wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland). 5 AOPs after two biological treatment methods (conventional activated sludge and moving bed bioreactor) and a physiochemical process (coagulation-flocculation) were tested in laboratory scale. The dependence among AOPs efficiency and secondary (pre)treatment was estimated by following the bacterial concentration i) before secondary treatment, ii) after the different secondary treatment methods and iii) after the various AOPs. Disinfection and post-treatment bacterial regrowth were the evaluation indicators. The order of efficiency was Moving Bed Bioreactor > Activated Sludge > Coagulation-Flocculation > Primary Treatment. As far as the different AOPs are concerned, the disinfection kinetics were: UVC/H2O2 > UVC and solar photo-Fenton > Fenton or solar light. The contextualization and parallel study of microorganisms with the micropollutants of the effluents revealed that higher exposure times were necessary for complete degradation compared to microorganisms for the UV-based processes and inversed for the Fenton-related ones. Nevertheless, in the Fenton-related systems, the nominal 80% removal of micropollutants deriving from the Swiss legislation, often took place before the elimination of bacterial regrowth risk. PMID:27403873

  15. Micropollutant degradation, bacterial inactivation and regrowth risk in wastewater effluents: Influence of the secondary (pre)treatment on the efficiency of Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Voumard, Margaux; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2016-10-01

    In this work, disinfection by 5 Advanced Oxidation Processes was preceded by 3 different secondary treatment systems present in the wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland). 5 AOPs after two biological treatment methods (conventional activated sludge and moving bed bioreactor) and a physiochemical process (coagulation-flocculation) were tested in laboratory scale. The dependence among AOPs efficiency and secondary (pre)treatment was estimated by following the bacterial concentration i) before secondary treatment, ii) after the different secondary treatment methods and iii) after the various AOPs. Disinfection and post-treatment bacterial regrowth were the evaluation indicators. The order of efficiency was Moving Bed Bioreactor > Activated Sludge > Coagulation-Flocculation > Primary Treatment. As far as the different AOPs are concerned, the disinfection kinetics were: UVC/H2O2 > UVC and solar photo-Fenton > Fenton or solar light. The contextualization and parallel study of microorganisms with the micropollutants of the effluents revealed that higher exposure times were necessary for complete degradation compared to microorganisms for the UV-based processes and inversed for the Fenton-related ones. Nevertheless, in the Fenton-related systems, the nominal 80% removal of micropollutants deriving from the Swiss legislation, often took place before the elimination of bacterial regrowth risk.

  16. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) development via computationally predicted AOP networks

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. Ho...

  17. AOP Knowledge Base/Wiki Tool Set

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin Is...

  18. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Colin P. Horwitz; Dr. Terrence J. Collins

    2003-11-04

    The removal of recalcitrant sulfur species, dibenzothiophene and its derivatives, from automotive fuels is an integral component in the development of cleaner burning and more efficient automobile engines. Oxidative desulfurization (ODS) wherein the dibenzothiophene derivative is converted to its corresponding sulfoxide and sulfone is an attractive approach to sulfur removal because the oxidized species are easily extracted or precipitated and filtered from the hydrocarbon phase. Fe-TAML{reg_sign} activators of hydrogen peroxide (TAML is Tetra-Amido-Macrocyclic-Ligand) catalytically convert dibenzothiophene and its derivatives rapidly and effectively at moderate temperatures (50-60 C) and ambient pressure to the corresponding sulfoxides and sulfones. The oxidation process can be performed in both aqueous systems containing alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, or t-butanol, and in a two-phase hydrocarbon/aqueous system containing tert-butanol or acetonitrile. In the biphasic system, essentially complete conversion of the DBT to its oxidized products can be achieved using slightly longer reaction times than in homogeneous solution. Among the key features of the technology are the mild reaction conditions, the very high selectivity where no over oxidation of the sulfur compounds occurs, the near stoichiometric use of hydrogen peroxide, the apparent lack of degradation of sensitive fuel components, and the ease of separation of oxidized products.

  19. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Development I: Strategies and Principles

    PubMed Central

    Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H.; LaLone, Carlie A.; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework that organizes existing knowledge concerning biologically plausible, and empirically supported, links between molecular-level perturbation of a biological system and an adverse outcome at a level of biological organization of regulatory relevance. Systematic organization of information into AOP frameworks has potential to improve regulatory decision-making through greater integration and more meaningful use of mechanistic data. However, for the scientific community to collectively develop a useful AOP knowledgebase that encompasses toxicological contexts of concern to human health and ecological risk assessment, it is critical that AOPs be developed in accordance with a consistent set of core principles. Based on the experiences and scientific discourse among a group of AOP practitioners, we propose a set of five fundamental principles that guide AOP development: (1) AOPs are not chemical specific; (2) AOPs are modular and composed of reusable components—notably key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs); (3) an individual AOP, composed of a single sequence of KEs and KERs, is a pragmatic unit of AOP development and evaluation; (4) networks composed of multiple AOPs that share common KEs and KERs are likely to be the functional unit of prediction for most real-world scenarios; and (5) AOPs are living documents that will evolve over time as new knowledge is generated. The goal of the present article was to introduce some strategies for AOP development and detail the rationale behind these 5 key principles. Consideration of these principles addresses many of the current uncertainties regarding the AOP framework and its application and is intended to foster greater consistency in AOP development. PMID:25466378

  20. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development I: strategies and principles.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Daniel L; Crump, Doug; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Hecker, Markus; Hutchinson, Thomas H; LaLone, Carlie A; Landesmann, Brigitte; Lettieri, Teresa; Munn, Sharon; Nepelska, Malgorzata; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Vergauwen, Lucia; Whelan, Maurice

    2014-12-01

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework that organizes existing knowledge concerning biologically plausible, and empirically supported, links between molecular-level perturbation of a biological system and an adverse outcome at a level of biological organization of regulatory relevance. Systematic organization of information into AOP frameworks has potential to improve regulatory decision-making through greater integration and more meaningful use of mechanistic data. However, for the scientific community to collectively develop a useful AOP knowledgebase that encompasses toxicological contexts of concern to human health and ecological risk assessment, it is critical that AOPs be developed in accordance with a consistent set of core principles. Based on the experiences and scientific discourse among a group of AOP practitioners, we propose a set of five fundamental principles that guide AOP development: (1) AOPs are not chemical specific; (2) AOPs are modular and composed of reusable components-notably key events (KEs) and key event relationships (KERs); (3) an individual AOP, composed of a single sequence of KEs and KERs, is a pragmatic unit of AOP development and evaluation; (4) networks composed of multiple AOPs that share common KEs and KERs are likely to be the functional unit of prediction for most real-world scenarios; and (5) AOPs are living documents that will evolve over time as new knowledge is generated. The goal of the present article was to introduce some strategies for AOP development and detail the rationale behind these 5 key principles. Consideration of these principles addresses many of the current uncertainties regarding the AOP framework and its application and is intended to foster greater consistency in AOP development. PMID:25466378

  1. Sequential ozone advanced oxidation and biological oxidation processes to remove selected pharmaceutical contaminants from an urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Espejo, Azahara; Aguinaco, Almudena; García-Araya, J F; Beltrán, Fernando J

    2014-01-01

    Sequential treatments consisting in a chemical process followed by a conventional biological treatment, have been applied to remove mixtures of nine contaminants of pharmaceutical type spiked in a primary sedimentation effluent of a municipal wastewater. Combinations of ozone, UVA black light (BL) and Fe(III) or Fe₃O₄ catalysts constituted the chemical systems. Regardless of the Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP), the removal of pharmaceutical compounds was achieved in 1 h of reaction, while total organic carbon (TOC) only diminished between 3.4 and 6%. Among selected ozonation systems to be implemented before the biological treatment, the application of ozone alone in the pre-treatment stage is recommended due to the increase of the biodegradability observed. The application of ozone followed by the conventional biological treatment leads high TOC and COD removal rates, 60 and 61%, respectively, and allows the subsequent biological treatment works with shorter hydraulic residence time (HRT). Moreover, the influence of the application of AOPs before and after a conventional biological process was compared, concluding that the decision to take depends on the characterization of the initial wastewater with pharmaceutical compounds.

  2. Electrochemical advanced oxidation and biological processes for wastewater treatment: a review of the combined approaches.

    PubMed

    Ganzenko, Oleksandra; Huguenot, David; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    As pollution becomes one of the biggest environmental challenges of the twenty-first century, pollution of water threatens the very existence of humanity, making immediate action a priority. The most persistent and hazardous pollutants come from industrial and agricultural activities; therefore, effective treatment of this wastewater prior to discharge into the natural environment is the solution. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have caused increased interest due to their ability to degrade hazardous substances in contrast to other methods, which mainly only transfer pollution from wastewater to sludge, a membrane filter, or an adsorbent. Among a great variety of different AOPs, a group of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), including electro-Fenton, is emerging as an environmental-friendly and effective treatment process for the destruction of persistent hazardous contaminants. The only concern that slows down a large-scale implementation is energy consumption and related investment and operational costs. A combination of EAOPs with biological treatment is an interesting solution. In such a synergetic way, removal efficiency is maximized, while minimizing operational costs. The goal of this review is to present cutting-edge research for treatment of three common and problematic pollutants and effluents: dyes and textile wastewater, olive processing wastewater, and pharmaceuticals and hospital wastewater. Each of these types is regarded in terms of recent scientific research on individual electrochemical, individual biological and a combined synergetic treatment.

  3. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  4. Reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in municipal wastewater effluent by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingying; Zhuang, Yao; Geng, Jinju; Ren, Hongqiang; Xu, Ke; Ding, Lili

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the reduction of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs), intI1 and 16S rRNA genes, by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely Fenton oxidation (Fe(2+)/H2O2) and UV/H2O2 process. The ARGs include sul1, tetX, and tetG from municipal wastewater effluent. The results indicated that the Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process could reduce selected ARGs effectively. Oxidation by the Fenton process was slightly better than that of the UV/H2O2 method. Particularly, for the Fenton oxidation, under the optimal condition wherein Fe(2+)/H2O2 had a molar ratio of 0.1 and a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) with a pH of 3.0 and reaction time of 2h, 2.58-3.79 logs of target genes were removed. Under the initial effluent pH condition (pH=7.0), the removal was 2.26-3.35 logs. For the UV/H2O2 process, when the pH was 3.5 with a H2O2 concentration of 0.01molL(-1) accompanied by 30min of UV irradiation, all ARGs could achieve a reduction of 2.8-3.5 logs, and 1.55-2.32 logs at a pH of 7.0. The Fenton oxidation and UV/H2O2 process followed the first-order reaction kinetic model. The removal of target genes was affected by many parameters, including initial Fe(2+)/H2O2 molar ratios, H2O2 concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. Among these factors, reagent concentrations and pH values are the most important factors during AOPs.

  5. Degradation of estrone in water and wastewater by various advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Shubhajit; Ali, Sura; Rehmann, Lars; Nakhla, George; Ray, Madhumita B

    2014-08-15

    A comprehensive study was conducted to determine the relative efficacy of various advanced oxidation processes such as O3, H2O2, UV, and combinations of UV/O3, UV/H2O2 for the removal of estrone (E1) from pure water and secondary effluent. In addition to the parent compound (E1) removal, performance of the advanced oxidation processes was characterized using removal of total organic carbon (TOC), and estrogenicity of the effluent. Although E1 removal was high for all the AOPs, intermediates formed were more difficult to degrade leading to slow TOC removal. Energy calculations and cost analysis indicated that, although UV processes have low electricity cost, ozonation is the least cost option ($ 0.34/1000 gallons) when both capital and operating costs were taken into account. Ozonation also is superior to the other tested AOPs due to higher removal of TOC and estrogenicity. The rate of E1 removal decreased linearly with the background TOC in water, however, E1 degradation in the secondary effluent from a local wastewater treatment plant was not affected significantly due to the low COD values in the effluent.

  6. Inhibitory effect of natural organic matter or other background constituents on photocatalytic advanced oxidation processes: Mechanistic model development and validation.

    PubMed

    Brame, Jonathon; Long, Mingce; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro

    2015-11-01

    The ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to interact with priority pollutants is crucial for efficient water treatment by photocatalytic advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). However, background compounds in water such as natural organic matter (NOM) can significantly hinder targeted reactions and removal efficiency. This inhibition can be complex, interfering with degradation in solution and at the photocatalyst surface as well as hindering illumination efficiency and ROS production. We developed an analytical model to account for various inhibition mechanisms in catalytic AOPs, including competitive adsorption of inhibitors, scavenging of produced ROS at the surface and in solution, and the inner filtering of the excitation illumination, which combine to decrease ROS-mediated degradation. This model was validated with batch experiments using a variety of ROS producing systems (OH-generating TiO2 photocatalyst and H2O2-UV; (1)O2-generating photosensitive functionalized fullerenes and rose bengal) and inhibitory compounds (NOM, tert-butyl alcohol). Competitive adsorption by NOM and ROS scavenging were the most influential inhibitory mechanisms. Overall, this model enables accurate simulation of photocatalytic AOP performance when one or more inhibitory mechanisms are at work in a wide variety of application scenarios, and underscores the need to consider the effects of background constituents on degradation efficiency.

  7. Microwaves and their coupling to advanced oxidation processes: enhanced performance in pollutants degradation.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Ulisses M; Azevedo, Eduardo B

    2013-01-01

    This review assesses microwaves (MW) coupled to advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for pollutants degradation, as well as the basic theory and mechanisms of MW dielectric heating. We addressed the following couplings: MW/H2O2, MW/UV/H2O2, MW/Fenton, MW/US, and MW/UV/TiO2, as well as few studies that tested alternative oxidants and catalysts. Microwave Discharge Electrodeless Lamps (MDELs) are being extensively used with great advantages over ballasts. In their degradation studies, researchers generally employed domestic ovens with minor adaptations. Non-thermal effects and synergies between UV and MW radiation play an important role in the processes. Published papers so far report degradation enhancements between 30 and 1,300%. Unfortunately, how microwaves enhance pollutants is still obscure and real wastewaters scarcely studied. Based on the results surveyed in the literature, MW/AOPs are promising alternatives for treating/remediating environmental pollutants, whenever one considers high degradation yields, short reaction times, and small costs.

  8. Transformation of polyfluorinated compounds in natural waters by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Dagnino, Sonia; Vandervort, Darcy R; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-02-01

    The presence of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in source and finished drinking waters is a concern with studies showing bioaccumulation and adverse toxicological effects in wildlife and potentially humans. Per/Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as fluorotelomer alcohols have been identified as precursors for PFCAs in biological pathways. In this study, we investigated the fate of 6:2 and 8:2 homologues of the fluorotelomer unsaturated carboxylic acids (FTUCAs) during advanced oxidation process (AOPs). Results showed 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA transformed into 6-C PFCA (PFHxA) and 8-C PFCA (PFOA) respectively with very little other PFCA formation for all AOPs. The degradation of 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA was greater in the GW compared to SW for the ozone processes but similar for UV/H2O2. The formation of n-C PFCA followed O3>O3/H2O2 at same dose and UV/H2O2 had much lower formation at the doses tested. Non-targeted analysis with the LC-MS-qTOF indicated the production of other PFCAs which contribute to the total mass balance, although no intermediate product was discovered indicating a rapid and direct transformation from the FTUCAs to the PFCAs and/or significant volatilization of intermediates. With the use of AOPs essential to water reuse treatment schemes, this work raises concerns over the risk of potential formation of PFCAs in the treatment and their adverse health effects in finished drinking water. PMID:26524147

  9. Transformation of polyfluorinated compounds in natural waters by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Anumol, Tarun; Dagnino, Sonia; Vandervort, Darcy R; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-02-01

    The presence of perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) in source and finished drinking waters is a concern with studies showing bioaccumulation and adverse toxicological effects in wildlife and potentially humans. Per/Polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) such as fluorotelomer alcohols have been identified as precursors for PFCAs in biological pathways. In this study, we investigated the fate of 6:2 and 8:2 homologues of the fluorotelomer unsaturated carboxylic acids (FTUCAs) during advanced oxidation process (AOPs). Results showed 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA transformed into 6-C PFCA (PFHxA) and 8-C PFCA (PFOA) respectively with very little other PFCA formation for all AOPs. The degradation of 6:2 FTUCA and 8:2 FTUCA was greater in the GW compared to SW for the ozone processes but similar for UV/H2O2. The formation of n-C PFCA followed O3>O3/H2O2 at same dose and UV/H2O2 had much lower formation at the doses tested. Non-targeted analysis with the LC-MS-qTOF indicated the production of other PFCAs which contribute to the total mass balance, although no intermediate product was discovered indicating a rapid and direct transformation from the FTUCAs to the PFCAs and/or significant volatilization of intermediates. With the use of AOPs essential to water reuse treatment schemes, this work raises concerns over the risk of potential formation of PFCAs in the treatment and their adverse health effects in finished drinking water.

  10. Exposure and Dosimetry Considerations for Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) (NIH-AOP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk is a function of both of hazard and exposure. Toxicokinetic (TK) models can determine whether chemical exposures produce potentially hazardous tissue concentrations. Whether or not the initial molecular event (MIE) in an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) occurs depends on both e...

  11. Removal of pharmaceutical and personal care products from reverse osmosis retentate using advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Abdelmelek, Sihem Ben; Greaves, John; Ishida, Kenneth P; Cooper, William J; Song, Weihua

    2011-04-15

    The application of reverse osmosis (RO) in water intended for reuse is promising for assuring high water quality. However, one significant disadvantage is the need to dispose of the RO retentate (or reject water). Studies focusing on Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products (PPCPs) have raised questions concerning their concentrations in the RO retentate. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives for destroying these compounds in retentate that contains high concentration of effluent organic matter (EfOM) and other inorganic constituents. Twenty-seven PPCPs were screened in a RO retentate using solid phase extraction (SPE) and UPLC-MS/MS, and detailed degradation studies for 14 of the compounds were obtained. Based on the absolute hydroxyl radical (HO•) reaction rate constants for individual pharmaceutical compounds, and that of the RO retentate (EfOM and inorganic constituents), it was possible to model their destruction. Using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy, the HO• oxidation of the EfOM could be observed through decreases in the retentate fluorescence. The decrease in the peak normally associated with proteins correlated well with the removal of the pharmaceutical compounds. These results suggest that fluorescence may be a suitable parameter for monitoring the degradation of PPCPs by AOPs in RO retentates. PMID:21384915

  12. Demonstrating sucralose as a monitor of full-scale UV/AOP treatment of trace organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Lester, Yaal; Ferrer, Imma; Thurman, E Michael; Linden, Karl G

    2014-09-15

    Due to the large number of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) in water and wastewater, their degradation during UV-based advanced oxidation (UV/AOP) is best monitored using a conservative indicator compound. The present study demonstrates the in situ use of sucralose, a widely consumed artificial sweetener, as a conservative probe for UV/AOP degradation of TOrCs. The main qualities of sucralose in this regard are its high concentration in wastewater effluent and surface water (enabling its direct detection), its resistance to direct UV photolysis, and its relatively slow reaction with hydroxyl radical. Degradation of sucralose was compared to the degradation of commonly detected TOrCs, across two AOPs (i.e. UV/H2O2 and UV/NO3), in both lab-scale and pilot-scale systems. In all cases, UV/AOP degradation of sucralose was slower than the degradation of the examined TOrCs, and is expected to be slower than the degradation of the majority of other environmentally relevant TOrCs. These results demonstrate the potential of sucralose as a conservative probe, to monitor the transformation of TOrCs during UV/AOP treatment. Furthermore, degradation of sucralose was slower than the degradation of many transformation products (generated during oxidation of TOrCs), implying that sucralose is also a valuable indicator for the decay of primary transformation products. PMID:25146095

  13. PROCESS OF OXIDIZING PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Coryell, C.D.

    1959-08-25

    The oxidation of plutonium to the plus six valence state is described. The oxidation is accomplished by treating the plutonium in aqueous solution with a solution above 0.01 molar in argentic ion, above 1.1 molar in nitric acid, and above 0.02 molar in argentous ion.

  14. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  15. Removal of natural organic matter from drinking water by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, Anu; Sillanpää, Mika

    2010-06-01

    Over the past 10-20years the amount of the natural organic matter (NOM) has been increased in raw water supplies on several areas. The presence of NOM causes many problems in drinking water treatment processes, including: (i) negative effect on water quality by colour, taste and odor problems, (ii) increased coagulant and disinfectant dose requirements (which in turn results increased sludge and potential harmful disinfection by-product formation), (iii) promoted biological growth in distribution system, and (iv) increased levels of complexed heavy metals and adsorbed organic pollutants. Thus, more efficient methods for the removal of NOM have emerged. Among these are advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). These include O(3)/H(2)O(2), O(3)/UV, UV/H(2)O(2), TiO(2)/UV, H(2)O(2)/catalyst, Fenton and photo-Fenton prosesses as well as ultrasound. In the present work, an overview of the recent research studies dealing with AOP methods for the removal of NOM and related compounds from drinking water is presented.

  16. Integration of advanced oxidation technologies and biological processes: recent developments, trends, and advances.

    PubMed

    Tabrizi, Gelareh Bankian; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2004-01-01

    The greatest challenge of today's wastewater treatment technology is to optimize the use of biological and chemical wastewater treatment processes. The choice of the process and/or integration of the processes depend strongly on the wastewater characteristics, concentrations, and the desired efficiencies. It has been observed by many investigators that the coupling of a bioreactor and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) could reduce the final concentrations of the effluent to the desired values. However, optimizing the total cost of the treatment is a challenge, as AOPs are much more expensive than biological processes alone. Therefore, an appropriate design should not only consider the ability of this coupling to reduce the concentration of organic pollutants, but also try to obtain the desired results in a cost effective process. To consider the total cost of the treatment, the residence time in biological and photochemical reactors, the kinetic rates, and the capital and operating costs of the reactors play significant roles. In this study, recent developments and trends (1996-2003) on the integration of photochemical and biological processes for the degradation of problematic pollutants in wastewater have been reviewed. The conditions to get the optimum results from this integration have also been considered. In most of the studies, it has been shown that the integrated processes were more efficient than individual processes. However, slight changes in the configuration of the reactors, temperature, pH, treatment time, concentration of the oxidants, and microorganism's colonies could lead to a great deviation in results. It has also been demonstrated that the treatment cost in both reactors is a function of time, which changes by the flow rate. The minimum cost in the coupling of the processes cannot be achieved unless considering the best treatment time in chemical and biological reactors individually.

  17. Comparison of various advanced oxidation processes for the degradation of phenylurea herbicides.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Krisztina; Farkas, János; Veréb, Gábor; Arany, Eszter; Simon, Gergő; Schrantz, Krisztina; Dombi, András; Hernádi, Klára; Alapi, Tünde

    2016-01-01

    Various types of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as UV photolysis, ozonation, heterogeneous photocatalysis and their combinations were comparatively examined at the same energy input in a home-made reactor. The oxidative transformations of the phenylurea herbicides fenuron, monuron and diuron were investigated. The initial rates of transformation demonstrated that UV photolysis was highly efficient in the cases of diuron and monuron. Ozonation proved to be much more effective in the transformation of fenuron than in those of the chlorine containing monuron and diuron. In heterogeneous photocatalysis, the rate of decomposition decreased with increase of the number of chlorine atoms in the target molecule. Addition of ozone to UV-irradiated solutions and/or TiO2-containing suspensions markedly increased the initial rates of degradation. Dehalogenation of monuron and diuron showed that each of these procedures is suitable for the simultaneous removal of chlorinated pesticides and their chlorinated intermediates. Heterogeneous photocatalysis was found to be effective in the mineralization.

  18. A novel liquid plasma AOP device integrating microwaves and ultrasounds and its evaluation in defluorinating perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Satoshi; Sato, Susumu; Abe, Masahiko; Serpone, Nick

    2011-09-01

    A simplified and energy-saving integrated device consisting of a microwave applicator and an ultrasonic homogenizer has been fabricated to generate liquid plasma in a medium possessing high dielectric factors, for example water. The microwave waveguide and the ultrasonic transducer were interconnected through a tungsten/titanium alloy stick acting both as the microwave antenna and as the horn of the ultrasonic homogenizer. Both microwaves and ultrasonic waves are simultaneously transmitted to the aqueous media through the tungsten tip of the antenna. The microwave discharge liquid plasma was easily generated in solution during ultrasonic cavitation. The simple device was evaluated by carrying out the degradation of the perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), a system highly recalcitrant to degradation by conventional advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). PFOA is 59% degraded in an aqueous medium after only 90 s of irradiation by the plasma. Intermediates were identified by electrospray mass spectral techniques in the negative ion mode.

  19. Advanced oxidation processes coupled with electrocoagulation for the exhaustive abatement of Cr-EDTA.

    PubMed

    Durante, Christian; Cuscov, Marco; Isse, Abdirisak Ahmed; Sandonà, Giancarlo; Gennaro, Armando

    2011-02-01

    Using Cr-EDTA as a model system, a two-step method has been investigated for the abatement of persistent chromium complexes in water. The treatment consists of an oxidative decomposition of the organic ligands by means of ozonization or electrochemical oxidation at a boron doped diamond (BDD) electrode, followed by removal of the metal via electrochemical coagulation. In the designed synthetic waste, EDTA has been used both as a chelating agent and as a mimic of the organic content of a typical wastewater provided by a purification leather plant. A crucial point evaluated is the influence of the oxidative pretreatment on the chemical modification of the synthetic waste and hence on the electrocoagulation efficacy. Because of the great stability of Cr complexes, such as Cr-EDTA, the classical coagulation methods, based on ligand exchange between Cr(III) and Fe(II) or Fe(III), are ineffective toward Cr abatement in the presence of organic substances. On the contrary, when advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as ozonization or electrooxidation at a BDD anode are applied in series with electrocoagulation (EC), complete abatement of the recalcitrant Cr fraction can be achieved. ECs have been carried out by using Fe sacrificial anodes, with alternating polarization and complete Cr abatement (over 99%) has been obtained with modest charge consumption. It has been found that Cr(III) is first oxidized to Cr(VI) in the AOP preceding EC. Then, during EC, Cr(VI) is mainly reduced back to Cr(III) by electrogenerated Fe(II). Thus, Cr is mainly eliminated as Cr(III). However, a small fraction of Cr(VI) goes with the precipitate as confirmed by XPS analysis of the sludge. PMID:21255817

  20. Microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process for treating dairy manure at low pH.

    PubMed

    Lo, Kwang V; Chan, Winnie W I; Yawson, Selina K; Liao, Ping H

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the treatment of dairy manure using the microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW-AOP) at pH 2. An experimental design was developed based on a statistical program using response surface methodology to explore the effects of temperature, hydrogen peroxide dosage and heating time on sugar production, nutrient release and solids destruction. Temperature, hydrogen peroxide dosage and acid concentration were key factors affecting reducing sugar production. The highest reducing sugar yield of 7.4% was obtained at 160°C, 0 mL, 15 min heating time, and no H(2)O(2) addition. Temperature was a dominant factor for an increase of soluble chemical oxygen demand (SCOD) in the treated dairy manure. The important factors for volatile fatty acids (VFA) production were microwave temperature and hydrogen peroxide dosage. Temperature was the most important parameter, and heating time, to a lesser extent affecting orthophosphate release. Heating time, hydrogen peroxide dosage and temperature were significant factors for ammonia release. There was a maximum of 96% and 196% increase in orthophosphate and ammonia concentration, respectively at 160°C, 0.5 mL H(2)O(2) and 15 min heating time. The MW-AOP is an effective method in dairy manure treatment for sugar production, nutrient solubilisation, and solids disintegration.

  1. Treating solid dairy manure using microwave-enhanced advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Kenge, Anju A; Liao, Ping H; Lo, Kwang V

    2009-08-01

    The microwave enhanced advanced oxidation process (MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP) was used to treat separated solid dairy manure for nutrient release and solids reduction. The MW/H(2)O(2)-AOP was conducted at a microwave temperature of 120 degrees C for 10 minutes, and at three pH conditions of 3.5, 7.3 and 12. The hydrogen peroxide dosage at approximately 2 mL per 1% TS for a 30 mL sample was used in this study, reflecting a range of 0.53-0.75 g H(2)O(2)/g dry sludge. The results indicated that substantial quantities of nutrients could be released into the solution at pH of 3.5. However, at neutral and basic conditions only volatile fatty acids and soluble chemical oxygen demand could be released. The analyses on orthophosphate, soluble chemical oxygen demands and volatile fatty acids were re-examined for dairy manure. It was found that the orthophosphate concentration for untreated samples at a higher % total solids (TS) was suppressed and lesser than actual. To overcome this difficulty, the initial orthophosphate concentration had to be measured at 0.5% TS.

  2. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    SciTech Connect

    Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio; Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation

  3. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation.

  4. Decontamination of soil washing wastewater using solar driven advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Velasco, Yuridia; Torres, Luis G

    2008-12-30

    Decontamination of soil washing wastewater was performed using two different solar driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): the photo-Fenton reaction and the cobalt/peroxymonosulfate/ultraviolet (Co/PMS/UV) process. Complete sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), the surfactant agent used to enhance soil washing process, degradation was achieved when the Co/PMS/UV process was used. In the case of photo-Fenton reaction, almost complete SDS degradation was achieved after the use of almost four times the actual energy amount required by the Co/PMS/UV process. Initial reaction rate in the first 15min (IR15) was determined for each process in order to compare them. Highest IR15 value was determined for the Co/PMS/UV process (0.011mmol/min) followed by the photo-Fenton reaction (0.0072mmol/min) and the dark Co/PMS and Fenton processes (IR15=0.002mmol/min in both cases). Organic matter depletion in the wastewater, as the sum of surfactant and total petroleum hydrocarbons present (measured as chemical oxygen demand, COD), was also determined for both solar driven processes. It was found that, for the case of COD, the highest removal (69%) was achieved when photo-Fenton reaction was used whereas Co/PMS/UV process yielded a slightly lower removal (51%). In both cases, organic matter removal achieved was over 50%, which can be consider proper for the coupling of the tested AOPs with conventional wastewater treatment processes such as biodegradation. PMID:18423856

  5. Treatment of rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysates with advanced oxidative processes: a new and promising detoxification method to improve the bioconversion process

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The use of lignocellulosic constituents in biotechnological processes requires a selective separation of the main fractions (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin). During diluted acid hydrolysis for hemicellulose extraction, several toxic compounds are formed by the degradation of sugars and lignin, which have ability to inhibit microbial metabolism. Thus, the use of a detoxification step represents an important aspect to be considered for the improvement of fermentation processes from hydrolysates. In this paper, we evaluated the application of Advanced Oxidative Processes (AOPs) for the detoxification of rice straw hemicellulosic hydrolysate with the goal of improving ethanol bioproduction by Pichia stipitis yeast. Aiming to reduce the toxicity of the hemicellulosic hydrolysate, different treatment conditions were analyzed. The treatments were carried out according to a Taguchi L16 orthogonal array to evaluate the influence of Fe+2, H2O2, UV, O3 and pH on the concentration of aromatic compounds and the fermentative process. Results The results showed that the AOPs were able to remove aromatic compounds (furan and phenolic compounds derived from lignin) without affecting the sugar concentration in the hydrolysate. Ozonation in alkaline medium (pH 8) in the presence of H2O2 (treatment A3) or UV radiation (treatment A5) were the most effective for hydrolysate detoxification and had a positive effect on increasing the yeast fermentability of rice straw hemicellulose hydrolysate. Under these conditions, the higher removal of total phenols (above 40%), low molecular weight phenolic compounds (above 95%) and furans (above 52%) were observed. In addition, the ethanol volumetric productivity by P. stipitis was increased in approximately twice in relation the untreated hydrolysate. Conclusion These results demonstrate that AOPs are a promising methods to reduce toxicity and improve the fermentability of lignocellulosic hydrolysates. PMID:23414668

  6. Studies on degradation of glyphosate by several oxidative chemical processes: ozonation, photolysis and heterogeneous photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Assalin, Marcia R; De Moraes, Sandra G; Queiroz, Sonia C N; Ferracini, Vera L; Duran, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    Several different Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) including ozonation at pH 6.5 and 10, photolysis and heterogeneous photocatalysis using TiO(2) as semiconductor and dissolved oxygen as electron acceptor were applied to study the degradation of glyphosate (N-phosphonomethyl glycine) in water. The degree of glyphosate degradation, the reactions kinetic and the formation of the major metabolite, aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA), were evaluated. Ozonation at pH 10 resulted in the maximum mineralization of glyphosate. It was observed that under the experimental conditions used in this study the degradation of glyphosate followed the first-order kinetics. The half-life obtained for glyphosate degradation in the O(3)/pH 10 process was 1.8 minutes.

  7. The use of artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction and simulation of oil degradation in wastewater by AOP.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Yasmen A; Jaid, Ghydaa M; Alwared, Abeer I; Ebrahim, Mothana

    2014-06-01

    The application of advanced oxidation process (AOP) in the treatment of wastewater contaminated with oil was investigated in this study. The AOP investigated is the homogeneous photo-Fenton (UV/H2O2/Fe(+2)) process. The reaction is influenced by the input concentration of hydrogen peroxide H2O2, amount of the iron catalyst Fe(+2), pH, temperature, irradiation time, and concentration of oil in the wastewater. The removal efficiency for the used system at the optimal operational parameters (H2O2 = 400 mg/L, Fe(+2) = 40 mg/L, pH = 3, irradiation time = 150 min, and temperature = 30 °C) for 1,000 mg/L oil load was found to be 72%. The study examined the implementation of artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction and simulation of oil degradation in aqueous solution by photo-Fenton process. The multilayered feed-forward networks were trained by using a backpropagation algorithm; a three-layer network with 22 neurons in the hidden layer gave optimal results. The results show that the ANN model can predict the experimental results with high correlation coefficient (R (2) = 0.9949). The sensitivity analysis showed that all studied variables (H2O2, Fe(+2), pH, irradiation time, temperature, and oil concentration) have strong effect on the oil degradation. The pH was found to be the most influential parameter with relative importance of 20.6%. PMID:24595749

  8. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development II: Best practices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organization of existing and emerging toxicological knowledge into adverse outcome pathway (AOP) descriptions can facilitate greater application of mechanistic data, including high throughput in vitro, high content omics and imaging, and biomarkers, in risk-based decision-making....

  9. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development I: Strategies and principles

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework that organizes existing knowledge concerning biologically plausible, and empirically-supported, links between molecular-level perturbation of a biological system and an adverse outcome at a level of biological organizatio...

  10. Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development: Guiding principles and best practices

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) represent a conceptual framework that can support greater application of mechanistic data in regulatory decision-making. However, in order for the scientific community to collectively address the daunting challenge of describing relevant toxicologi...

  11. Transformation of Contaminant Candidate List (CCL3) compounds during ozonation and advanced oxidation processes in drinking water: Assessment of biological effects.

    PubMed

    Mestankova, Hana; Parker, Austa M; Bramaz, Nadine; Canonica, Silvio; Schirmer, Kristin; von Gunten, Urs; Linden, Karl G

    2016-04-15

    The removal of emerging contaminants during water treatment is a current issue and various technologies are being explored. These include UV- and ozone-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this study, AOPs were explored for their degradation capabilities of 25 chemical contaminants on the US Environmental Protection Agency's Contaminant Candidate List 3 (CCL3) in drinking water. Twenty-three of these were found to be amenable to hydroxyl radical-based treatment, with second-order rate constants for their reactions with hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the range of 3-8 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The development of biological activity of the contaminants, focusing on mutagenicity and estrogenicity, was followed in parallel with their degradation using the Ames and YES bioassays to detect potential changes in biological effects during oxidative treatment. The majority of treatment cases resulted in a loss of biological activity upon oxidation of the parent compounds without generation of any form of estrogenicity or mutagenicity. However, an increase in mutagenic activity was detected by oxidative transformation of the following CCL3 parent compounds: nitrobenzene (OH, UV photolysis), quinoline (OH, ozone), methamidophos (OH), N-nitrosopyrolidine (OH), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (OH), aniline (UV photolysis), and N-nitrosodiphenylamine (UV photolysis). Only one case of formation of estrogenic activity was observed, namely, for the oxidation of quinoline by OH. Overall, this study provides fundamental and practical information on AOP-based treatment of specific compounds of concern and represents a framework for evaluating the performance of transformation-based treatment processes. PMID:26900972

  12. Are combined AOPs effective for toxicity reduction in receiving marine environment? Suitability of battery of bioassays for wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent as an ecotoxicological assessment.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Garduño, B; Rueda-Márquez, J J; Manzano, M A; Garrido-Pérez, C; Martín-Díaz, M L

    2016-03-01

    Ecotoxicological assessment of three different wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents D1, D2 and D3 was performed before and after tertiary treatment using combination of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). A multibarrier treatment (MBT) consisting of microfiltration (MF), hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) was applied for all effluents. Sparus aurata, Paracentrotus lividus, Isochrysis galbana and Vibrio fischeri, representing different trophic levels, constituted the battery of bioassays. Different acute toxicity effects were observed in each WWTP effluents tested. The percentage of sea urchin larval development and mortality fish larvae were the most sensitive endpoints. Significant reduction (p < 0.05) of effluent's toxicity was observed using a classification pT-method after MBT process. Base on obtained results, tested battery of bioassays in pT-method framework can be recommended for acute toxicity preliminary evaluation of WWTP effluents for the marine environment. PMID:26741736

  13. Catalytic oxidative dehydrogenation process

    DOEpatents

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Huff, Marylin

    2002-01-01

    A process for the production of a mono-olefin from a gaseous paraffinic hydrocarbon having at least two carbon atoms or mixtures thereof comprising reacting said hydrocarbons and molecular oxygen in the presence of a platinum catalyst. The catalyst consist essentially of platinum supported on alumina or zirconia monolith, preferably zirconia and more preferably in the absence of palladium, rhodium and gold.

  14. Review of iron-free Fenton-like systems for activating H2O2 in advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Bokare, Alok D; Choi, Wonyong

    2014-06-30

    Iron-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide decomposition for in situ generation of hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)) has been extensively developed as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for environmental applications. A variety of catalytic iron species constituting metal salts (in Fe(2+) or Fe(3+) form), metal oxides (e.g., Fe2O3, Fe3O4), and zero-valent metal (Fe(0)) have been exploited for chemical (classical Fenton), photochemical (photo-Fenton) and electrochemical (electro-Fenton) degradation pathways. However, the requirement of strict acidic conditions to prevent iron precipitation still remains the bottleneck for iron-based AOPs. In this article, we present a thorough review of alternative non-iron Fenton catalysts and their reactivity towards hydrogen peroxide activation. Elements with multiple redox states (like chromium, cerium, copper, cobalt, manganese and ruthenium) all directly decompose H2O2 into HO(•) through conventional Fenton-like pathways. The in situ formation of H2O2 and decomposition into HO(•) can be also achieved using electron transfer mechanism in zero-valent aluminum/O2 system. Although these Fenton systems (except aluminum) work efficiently even at neutral pH, the H2O2 activation mechanism is very specific to the nature of the catalyst and critically depends on its composition. This review describes in detail the complex mechanisms and emphasizes on practical limitations influencing their environmental applications.

  15. Incorporating biodegradation and advanced oxidation processes in the treatment of spent metalworking fluids.

    PubMed

    MacAdam, Jitka; Ozgencil, Haci; Autin, Olivier; Pidou, Marc; Temple, Clive; Parsons, Simon; Jefferson, Bruce

    2012-12-01

    The treatment of spent metalworking fluids (MWFs) is difficult due to their complex and variable composition. Small businesses often struggle to meet increasingly stringent legislation and rising costs as they need to treat this wastewater on site annually over a short period. Larger businesses that treat their wastewater continuously can benefit from the use of biological processes, although new MWFs designed to resist biological activity represent a challenge. A three-stage treatment is generally applied, with the oil phase being removed first, followed by a reduction in COD loading and then polishing of the effluent's quality in the final stage. The performance of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), which could be of benefit to both types of businesses was studied. After assessing the biodegradability of spent MFW, different AOPs were used (UV/H2O2, photo-Fenton and UV/TiO2) to establish the treatability of this wastewater by hydroxyl radicals (*OH). The interactions of both the chemical and biological treatments were also investigated. The wastewater was found to be readily biodegradable in the Zahn-Wellens test with 69% COD and 74% DOC removal. The UV/TiO2 reactor was found to be the cheapest option achieving a very good COD removal (82% at 20 min retention time and 10 L min(-1) aeration rate). The photo-Fenton process was found to be efficient in terms of degradation rate, achieving 84% COD removal (1 M Fe2+, 40 M H2O2, 20.7 J cm(-2), pH 3) and also improving the wastewater's biodegradability. The UV/H202 process was the most effective in removing recalcitrant COD in the post-biological treatment stage. PMID:23437675

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of cylindrospermopsin destruction by sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; de la Cruz, Armah A; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2014-10-15

    Cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is a potent cyanobacterial toxin frequently found in water bodies worldwide raising concerns over the safety of drinking and recreational waters. A number of technologies have been investigated to remove and/or degrade cyanotoxins with advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) being among the most promising and effective for water detoxification. In this study, the degradation of CYN by sulfate radical-based UV-254 nm-AOPs was evaluated. The UV/S2O8(2-) (UV/peroxydisulfate) was more efficient than UV/HSO5(-) (UV/peroxysulfate) and UV/H2O2 (UV/hydrogen peroxide) processes when natural water samples were used as reaction matrices. The observed UV fluence based pseudo-first-order rate constants followed the expected order of radical quantum yields. The presence of 200 μM natural organic matter (NOM) as carbon slightly inhibited the destruction of CYN; 1.24 mg L(-1)NO3(-) (nitrate) had no significant influence on the removal efficiency and 50 μg L(-1) Fe(2+) [iron (2+)] or Cu(2+) [copper (2+)] improved the performance of UV/S2O8(2-). The addition of tert-butyl alcohol (t-BuOH; hydroxyl radical scavenger) in the reaction yielded byproducts that indicated specific sites in CYN preferentially attacked by sulfate radicals (SRs). The predominant CYN degradation byproduct was P448 consistent with fragmentation of the C5C6 bond of the uracil ring. The subsequent formation of P420 and P392 through a stepwise loss of carbonyl group(s) further supported the fragmentation pathway at C5C6. The byproduct P432 was identified exclusively as mono-hydroxylation of CYN at tricyclic guanidine ring, whereas P414 was detected as dehydrogenation at the tricyclic ring. The elimination of sulfate group and the opening of tricyclic ring were also observed. The possible degradation pathways of CYN by SR-AOP were presented. PMID:25000199

  17. Post-treatment of refinery wastewater effluent using a combination of AOPs (H2O2 photolysis and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation) for possible water reuse. Comparison of low and medium pressure lamp performance.

    PubMed

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Levchuk, I; Salcedo, I; Acevedo-Merino, A; Manzano, M A

    2016-03-15

    The main aim of this work was to study the feasibility of multi-barrier treatment (MBT) consisting of filtration, hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) for post-treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Also the possibility of water reuse or safe discharge was considered. The performance of MBT using medium (MP) and low (LP) pressure lamps was compared as well as operation and maintenance (O&M) cost. Decomposition of organic compounds was followed by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis. After filtration step (25 μm) turbidity and concentration of suspended solids decreased by 92% and 80%, respectively. During H2O2/UVC process with LP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 8 and UVC dose received by water 5.28 WUVC s cm(-2)) removal of phenolic compounds, TOC and COD was 100%, 52.3% and 84.3%, respectively. Complete elimination of phenolic compounds, 47.6% of TOC and 91% of COD was achieved during H2O2/UVC process with MP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 5, UVC dose received by water 6.57 WUVC s cm(-2)). In order to compare performance of H2O2/UVC treatment with different experimental set up, the UVC dose required for removal of mg L(-1) of COD was suggested as a parameter and successfully applied. The hydrophilicity of H2O2/UVC effluent significantly increased which in turn enhanced the oxidation of organic compounds during CWPO step. After H2O2/UVC treatment with LP and MP lamps residual H2O2 concentration was 160 mg L(-1) and 96.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Remaining H2O2 was fully consumed during subsequent CWPO step (6 and 3.5 min of contact time for LP and MP, respectively). Total TOC and COD removal after MBT was 94.7% and 92.2% (using LP lamp) and 89.6% and 95%, (using MP lamp), respectively. The O&M cost for MBT with LP lamp was estimated to be 0.44 € m(-3) while with MP lamp it was nearly five

  18. Pilot-scale UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process for surface water treatment and downstream biological treatment: effects on natural organic matter characteristics and DBP formation potential.

    PubMed

    Sarathya, Siva R; Stefan, Mihaela I; Royce, Alan; Mohseni, M

    2011-12-01

    The effects of the advanced oxidation process (AOP) of ultraviolet radiation in combination with hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) on the structure and biodegradability of dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) and on the formation of disinfection by-products (DBPs) through the post-UV/H2O2 chlorination were investigated using UV reactors equipped with either low-pressure amalgam lamps or medium-pressure mercury vapour lamps. With electrical energy doses and H2O2 concentrations typically applied in full-scale UV systems for water remediation, the UV/H2O2 AOP partially oxidized NOM, reducing its degree of aromaticity and leading to an increase in the level of biodegradable species. Also, when combined with a downstream biological activated carbon (BAC) filter, UV/H2O2 AOP reduced the formation of DBPs by up to 60% for trihalomethanes and 75% for haloacetic acids. Biological activated carbon was also shown to effectively remove biodegradable by-products and residual H2O2.

  19. Application of advanced oxidation processes for cleaning of industrial water generated in wet dedusting of shaft furnace gases.

    PubMed

    Czaplicka, Marianna; Kurowski, Ryszard; Jaworek, Katarzyna; Bratek, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents results of studies into advanced oxidation processes in 03 and 03/UV systems. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) was conducted to reduce the load of impurities in circulating waters from wet de-dusting of shaft furnace gases. Besides inorganic impurities, i.e. mainly arsenic compounds (16 g As L(-1) on average), lead, zinc, chlorides and sulphates, the waters also contain some organic material. The organic material is composed of a complex mixture that contains, amongst others, aliphatic compounds, phenol and its derivatives, pyridine bases, including pyridine, and its derivatives. The test results show degradation of organic and inorganic compounds during ozonation and photo-oxidation processes. Analysis of the solutions from the processes demonstrated that the complex organic material in the industrial water was oxidized in ozonation and in photo-oxidation, which resulted in formation of aldehydes and carboxylic acids. Kinetic degradation of selected pollutants is presented. Obtained results indicated that the O3/UV process is more effective in degradation of organic matter than ozonation. Depending on the process type, precipitation of the solid phase was observed. The efficiency of solid-phase formation was higher in photo-oxidation with ozone. It was found that the precipitated solid phase is composed mainly of arsenic, iron and oxygen. PMID:24191479

  20. Virus removal and inactivation by iron (hydr)oxide-mediated Fenton-like processes under sunlight and in the dark.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Juarez, Jessica I; Kohn, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have emerged as a promising alternative to conventional disinfection methods to control microbial water quality, yet little is known about the fate of viruses in AOPs. In this study, we investigated the fate of MS2 coliphage in AOPs that rely on heterogeneous Fenton-like processes catalyzed by iron (hydr)oxide particles. Both physical removal of viruses from solution via adsorption onto particles as well as true inactivation were considered. Virus fate was studied in batch reactors at circumneutral pH, containing 200 mg L(-1) of four different commercial iron (hydr)oxide particles of similar mesh sizes: hematite (α-Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4) and amorphous iron(iii) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3). The effect of adsorption and sunlight exposure on the survival of MS2 was considered. On a mass basis, all particles exhibited a similar virus adsorption capacity, whereas the rate of adsorption followed the order FeOOH > Fe2O3 > Fe3O4 ≈ Fe(OH)3. This adsorption behavior could not be explained by electrostatic considerations; instead, adsorption must be governed by other factors, such as hydrophobic interactions or van der Waals forces. Adsorption to three of the particles investigated (α-FeOOH, Fe3O4, Fe(OH)3) caused virus inactivation of 7%, 22%, and 14%, respectively. Exposure of particle-adsorbed viruses to sunlight and H2O2 resulted in efficient additional inactivation, whereas inactivation was negligible for suspended viruses. The observed first-order inactivation rate constants were 6.6 × 10(-2), 8.7 × 10(-2), 0.55 and 1.5 min(-1) for α-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe(OH)3 respectively. In the absence of sunlight or H2O2, no inactivation was observed beyond that caused by adsorption alone, except for Fe3O4, which caused virus inactivation via a dark Fenton-like process. Overall our results demonstrate that heterogeneous Fenton-like processes can both physically remove viruses from water as well as inactivate them via

  1. Virus removal and inactivation by iron (hydr)oxide-mediated Fenton-like processes under sunlight and in the dark.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Juarez, Jessica I; Kohn, Tamar

    2013-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have emerged as a promising alternative to conventional disinfection methods to control microbial water quality, yet little is known about the fate of viruses in AOPs. In this study, we investigated the fate of MS2 coliphage in AOPs that rely on heterogeneous Fenton-like processes catalyzed by iron (hydr)oxide particles. Both physical removal of viruses from solution via adsorption onto particles as well as true inactivation were considered. Virus fate was studied in batch reactors at circumneutral pH, containing 200 mg L(-1) of four different commercial iron (hydr)oxide particles of similar mesh sizes: hematite (α-Fe2O3), goethite (α-FeOOH), magnetite (Fe3O4) and amorphous iron(iii) hydroxide (Fe(OH)3). The effect of adsorption and sunlight exposure on the survival of MS2 was considered. On a mass basis, all particles exhibited a similar virus adsorption capacity, whereas the rate of adsorption followed the order FeOOH > Fe2O3 > Fe3O4 ≈ Fe(OH)3. This adsorption behavior could not be explained by electrostatic considerations; instead, adsorption must be governed by other factors, such as hydrophobic interactions or van der Waals forces. Adsorption to three of the particles investigated (α-FeOOH, Fe3O4, Fe(OH)3) caused virus inactivation of 7%, 22%, and 14%, respectively. Exposure of particle-adsorbed viruses to sunlight and H2O2 resulted in efficient additional inactivation, whereas inactivation was negligible for suspended viruses. The observed first-order inactivation rate constants were 6.6 × 10(-2), 8.7 × 10(-2), 0.55 and 1.5 min(-1) for α-FeOOH, α-Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe(OH)3 respectively. In the absence of sunlight or H2O2, no inactivation was observed beyond that caused by adsorption alone, except for Fe3O4, which caused virus inactivation via a dark Fenton-like process. Overall our results demonstrate that heterogeneous Fenton-like processes can both physically remove viruses from water as well as inactivate them via

  2. Chemical oxygen demand reduction in coffee wastewater through chemical flocculation and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Zayas Pérez, Teresa; Geissler, Gunther; Hernandez, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The removal of the natural organic matter present in coffee processing wastewater through chemical coagulation-flocculation and advanced oxidation processes (AOP) had been studied. The effectiveness of the removal of natural organic matter using commercial flocculants and UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3 processes was determined under acidic conditions. For each of these processes, different operational conditions were explored to optimize the treatment efficiency of the coffee wastewater. Coffee wastewater is characterized by a high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and low total suspended solids. The outcomes of coffee wastewater treatment using coagulation-flocculation and photodegradation processes were assessed in terms of reduction of COD, color, and turbidity. It was found that a reduction in COD of 67% could be realized when the coffee wastewater was treated by chemical coagulation-flocculation with lime and coagulant T-1. When coffee wastewater was treated by coagulation-flocculation in combination with UV/H2O2, a COD reduction of 86% was achieved, although only after prolonged UV irradiation. Of the three advanced oxidation processes considered, UV/H2O2, UV/O3 and UV/H2O2/O3, we found that the treatment with UV/H2O2/O3 was the most effective, with an efficiency of color, turbidity and further COD removal of 87%, when applied to the flocculated coffee wastewater.

  3. On-the-Fly Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulation of Aqueous Phase Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Crittenden, John

    2015-08-01

    We have developed an on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model to predict the degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts that are produced during aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). The on-the-fly KMC model is composed of a reaction pathway generator, a reaction rate constant estimator, a mechanistic reduction module, and a KMC solver. The novelty of this work is that we develop the pathway as we march forward in time rather than developing the pathway before we use the KMC method to solve the equations. As a result, we have fewer reactions to consider, and we have greater computational efficiency. We have verified this on-the-fly KMC model for the degradation of polyacrylamide (PAM) using UV light and titanium dioxide (i.e., UV/TiO2). Using the on-the-fly KMC model, we were able to predict the time-dependent profiles of the average molecular weight for PAM. The model provided detailed and quantitative insights into the time evolution of the molecular weight distribution and reaction mechanism. We also verified our on-the-fly KMC model for the destruction of (1) acetone, (2) trichloroethylene (TCE), and (3) polyethylene glycol (PEG) for the ultraviolet light and hydrogen peroxide AOP. We demonstrated that the on-the-fly KMC model can achieve the same accuracy as the computer-based first-principles KMC (CF-KMC) model, which has already been validated in our earlier work. The on-the-fly KMC is particularly suitable for molecules with large molecular weights (e.g., polymers) because the degradation mechanisms for large molecules can result in hundreds of thousands to even millions of reactions. The ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describe the degradation pathways cannot be solved using traditional numerical methods, but the KMC can solve these equations.

  4. Significant role of UV and carbonate radical on the degradation of oxytetracycline in UV-AOPs: Kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; He, Xuexiang; Duan, Xiaodi; Fu, Yongsheng; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-05-15

    Carbonate radical (CO3(•-)), a selective oxidant, reacts readily with electron-rich compounds through electron transfer and/or hydrogen abstraction. In this study, the role of CO3(•-) in degrading oxytetracycline (OTC) by UV only, UV/H2O2 and UV/persulfate (UV/PS) advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in the presence of HCO3(-) or CO3(2-) was investigated. For UV only process, the presence of photosensitizers, i.e., nitrate (NO3(-)) and natural organic matter (NOM), had different impacts on OTC degradation, i.e., an enhancing effect by NO3(-) due to the generation of HO(•) and a slight inhibiting effect by NOM possibly due to a light scattering effect. Differently for UV/H2O2 and UV/PS processes, the presence of NO3(-) hardly influenced the destruction of OTC. Generation of CO3(•-) presented a positive role on OTC degradation by UV/NO3(-)/HCO3(-). Such influence was also observed in the two studied AOPs in the presence of both bicarbonate and other natural water constituents. When various natural water samples from different sources were used as reaction matrices, UV only and UV/H2O2 showed an inhibiting effect while UV/PS demonstrated a comparable or even promoting effect in OTC decomposition. After elucidating the potential contribution of UV direct photolysis via excited state OTC* at an elevated reaction pH condition, putative OTC transformation byproducts via CO3(•-) reaction were identified by ultra-high definition accurate-mass quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (QTOF/MS). Five different reaction pathways were subsequently proposed, including hydroxylation (+16 Da), quinonization (+14 Da), demethylation (-14 Da), decarbonylation (-28 Da) and dehydration (-18 Da). The significant role of UV at high pH and CO3(•-) on OTC removal from contaminated water was therefore demonstrated both kinetically and mechanistically.

  5. Significant role of UV and carbonate radical on the degradation of oxytetracycline in UV-AOPs: Kinetics and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiqing; He, Xuexiang; Duan, Xiaodi; Fu, Yongsheng; Fatta-Kassinos, Despo; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-05-15

    Carbonate radical (CO3(•-)), a selective oxidant, reacts readily with electron-rich compounds through electron transfer and/or hydrogen abstraction. In this study, the role of CO3(•-) in degrading oxytetracycline (OTC) by UV only, UV/H2O2 and UV/persulfate (UV/PS) advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) in the presence of HCO3(-) or CO3(2-) was investigated. For UV only process, the presence of photosensitizers, i.e., nitrate (NO3(-)) and natural organic matter (NOM), had different impacts on OTC degradation, i.e., an enhancing effect by NO3(-) due to the generation of HO(•) and a slight inhibiting effect by NOM possibly due to a light scattering effect. Differently for UV/H2O2 and UV/PS processes, the presence of NO3(-) hardly influenced the destruction of OTC. Generation of CO3(•-) presented a positive role on OTC degradation by UV/NO3(-)/HCO3(-). Such influence was also observed in the two studied AOPs in the presence of both bicarbonate and other natural water constituents. When various natural water samples from different sources were used as reaction matrices, UV only and UV/H2O2 showed an inhibiting effect while UV/PS demonstrated a comparable or even promoting effect in OTC decomposition. After elucidating the potential contribution of UV direct photolysis via excited state OTC* at an elevated reaction pH condition, putative OTC transformation byproducts via CO3(•-) reaction were identified by ultra-high definition accurate-mass quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (QTOF/MS). Five different reaction pathways were subsequently proposed, including hydroxylation (+16 Da), quinonization (+14 Da), demethylation (-14 Da), decarbonylation (-28 Da) and dehydration (-18 Da). The significant role of UV at high pH and CO3(•-) on OTC removal from contaminated water was therefore demonstrated both kinetically and mechanistically. PMID:27131094

  6. Developing putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content dataDeveloping putative AOPs from high content data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Developing putative AOPs from high content data Shannon M. Bell1,2, Stephen W. Edwards2 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2 Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development,...

  7. SULFATE RADICAL-BASED FERROUS-PEROXYMONOSULFATE OXIDATIVE SYSTEM FOR PCBs DEGRADATION IN AQUEOUS AND SEDIMENT SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the environment pose long-term risk to public health because of their persistent and toxic nature. This study investigates the degradation of PCBs using sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation processes (SR-AOPs). These processes are based o...

  8. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olive, James R.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus

    1999-01-01

    Considerable effort has been concentrated on the synthesis and characterization of high T(sub c) oxide superconducting materials. The YBaCuO system has received the most intense study, as this material has shown promise for the application of both thin film and bulk materials. There are many problems with the application of bulk materials- weak links, poor connectivity, small coherence length, oxygen content and control, environmental reactivity, phase stability, incongruent melting behavior, grain boundary contamination, brittle mechanical behavior, and flux creep. The extent to which these problems are intrinsic or associated with processing is the subject of controversy. This study seeks to understand solidification processing of these materials, and to use this knowledge for alternative processing strategies, which, at the very least, will improve the understanding of bulk material properties and deficiencies. In general, the phase diagram studies of the YBaCuO system have concentrated on solid state reactions and on the Y2BaCuO(x) + liquid yields YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) peritectic reaction. Little information is available on the complete melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of these materials. In addition, rare earth substitutions such as Nd and Gd affect the liquidus and phase relations. These materials have promising applications, but lack of information on the high temperature phase relations has hampered research. In general, the understanding of undercooling and solidification of high temperature oxide systems lags behind the science of these phenomena in metallic systems. Therefore, this research investigates the fundamental melting relations, undercooling, and solidification behavior of oxide superconductors with an emphasis on improving ground based synthesis of these materials.

  9. Microgravity Processing of Oxide Superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.; Vlasse, Marcus; McCallum, William; Peters, Palmer (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal is to understand the microstructures which develop under the nonequilibrium solidification conditions achieved by melt processing in copper oxide superconductor systems. More specifically, to define the liquidus at the Y- 1:2:3 composition, the Nd-1:2:3 composition, and several intermediate partial substitution points between pure Y-1:2:3 and Nd-1:2:3. A secondary goal has been to understand resultant solidification morphologies and pathways under a variety of experimental conditions and to use this knowledge to better characterize solidification phenomena in these systems.

  10. Melatonin involvement in oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ianăş, O; Olinescu, R; Bădescu, I

    1991-01-01

    The fact that the pineal gland, by its melatonin (MT) production, responds to environmental light variations (the day-night cycle), being also a modulator of the body adaptation to these conditions, may lead to the assumption of its involvement in the body oxidative processes. The redox capacity of melatonin was followed-up in vitro by the chemiluminescence phenomenon. The system generating chemiluminescence as well as free radicals was made up of luminol and H2O2. Incubation of melatonin in doses of 0.08-0.5 microM/ml with the generating system showed that in doses under 0.25 microM/ml melatonin has a pro-oxidative effect while in doses above this value it has an antioxidative effect. The diagram of the results shows the answer specific to a modulator. The study of the correlation between the dose of melatonin with highest pro-oxidative properties and the various peroxide concentrations in the generating system showed that melatonin gets antioxidative properties with the increase in peroxide concentrations (less than 8 mM/ml). In the presence of a hypothalamic homogenate, which is a stimulant of the chemiluminescence-generating system (PXI = 16), melatonin has a dose-dependent antioxidative effect. Similar results were also obtained by adding tryptophan--a free radicals acceptor (PXI = 0.1) and the substrate in melatonin synthesis to the reaction medium. Melatonin in low concentrations (greater than 0.1 microM/ml) has an antioxidative effect while in higher doses it has a dose-dependent pro-oxidative effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1821072

  11. An overview on the advanced oxidation processes applied for the treatment of water pollutants defined in the recently launched Directive 2013/39/EU.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Nunes, Olga C; Pereira, Manuel F R; Silva, Adrián M T

    2015-02-01

    Environmental pollution is a recognized issue of major concern since a wide range of contaminants has been found in aquatic environment at ngL(-1) to μgL(-1) levels. In the year 2000, a strategy was defined to identify the priority substances concerning aquatic ecosystems, followed by the definition of environmental quality standards (EQS) in 2008. Recently it was launched the Directive 2013/39/EU that updates the water framework policy highlighting the need to develop new water treatment technologies to deal with such problem. This review summarizes the data published in the last decade regarding the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to treat priority compounds and certain other pollutants defined in this Directive, excluding the inorganic species (cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel and their derivatives). The Directive 2013/39/EU includes several pesticides (aldrin, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, dicofol, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan, isodrin, heptachlor, lindane, pentachlorophenol, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinphos, dichlorvos, atrazine, simazine, terbutryn, diuron, isoproturon, trifluralin, cypermethrin, alachlor), solvents (dichloromethane, dichloroethane, trichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and its derivatives (PFOS), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenol and octylphenol, as well as the three compounds included in the recommendation for the first watch list of substances (diclofenac, 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and 17-beta-estradiol (E2)). Some particular pesticides (aclonifen, bifenox, cybutryne, quinoxyfen), organotin compounds (tributyltin), dioxins and dioxin-like compounds, brominated diphenylethers, hexabromocyclododecanes and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate are also defined in this Directive, but studies dealing with AOPs are missing. AOPs are recognized tools to destroy recalcitrant compounds or, at least, to transform them into biodegradable species

  12. An overview on the advanced oxidation processes applied for the treatment of water pollutants defined in the recently launched Directive 2013/39/EU.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ana R; Nunes, Olga C; Pereira, Manuel F R; Silva, Adrián M T

    2015-02-01

    Environmental pollution is a recognized issue of major concern since a wide range of contaminants has been found in aquatic environment at ngL(-1) to μgL(-1) levels. In the year 2000, a strategy was defined to identify the priority substances concerning aquatic ecosystems, followed by the definition of environmental quality standards (EQS) in 2008. Recently it was launched the Directive 2013/39/EU that updates the water framework policy highlighting the need to develop new water treatment technologies to deal with such problem. This review summarizes the data published in the last decade regarding the application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to treat priority compounds and certain other pollutants defined in this Directive, excluding the inorganic species (cadmium, lead, mercury, nickel and their derivatives). The Directive 2013/39/EU includes several pesticides (aldrin, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, dicofol, dieldrin, endrin, endosulfan, isodrin, heptachlor, lindane, pentachlorophenol, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinphos, dichlorvos, atrazine, simazine, terbutryn, diuron, isoproturon, trifluralin, cypermethrin, alachlor), solvents (dichloromethane, dichloroethane, trichloromethane and carbon tetrachloride), perfluorooctane sulfonic acid and its derivatives (PFOS), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nonylphenol and octylphenol, as well as the three compounds included in the recommendation for the first watch list of substances (diclofenac, 17-alpha-ethinylestradiol (EE2) and 17-beta-estradiol (E2)). Some particular pesticides (aclonifen, bifenox, cybutryne, quinoxyfen), organotin compounds (tributyltin), dioxins and dioxin-like compounds, brominated diphenylethers, hexabromocyclododecanes and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate are also defined in this Directive, but studies dealing with AOPs are missing. AOPs are recognized tools to destroy recalcitrant compounds or, at least, to transform them into biodegradable species

  13. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process. PMID:17438808

  14. Decolorization of kraft bleaching effluent by advanced oxidation processes using copper (II) as electron acceptor.

    PubMed

    Yeber, María C; Oñate, Katherine P; Vidal, Gladys

    2007-04-01

    Two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), TiO2/UV/O2 and TiO2/UV/Cu (II), were used to remove color from a Kraft bleaching effluent. The optimal decoloration rate was determined by multivariate analysis, obtaining a mathematical model to evaluate the effect among variables. TiO2 and Cu (II) concentrations and the reaction times were optimized. The experimental design resulted in a quadratic matrix of 30 experiments. Additionally, the pH influence on the color removal was determined by multivariate analysis. Results indicate that color removal was 94% at acidic pH (3.0) in the presence of Cu (11) as an electron acceptor. Under this condition, the biodegradation of the effluent increased from 0.3 to 0.6. Moreover, 70% of COD (chemical oxygen demand) was removed, and the ecotoxicity, measured by Daphnia magna, was reduced. Photocatalytic oxidation to remove the color contained in the Kraft mill bleaching effluent was effective under the following conditions: short reaction time, acidic pH values, and without the addition of oxygen due to the presence of Cu (II) in the effluent. Moreover, residual Cu (II) was a minimum (0.05.mg L(-1)) and was not toxic to the next biological stage. The experimental design methodology indicated that a quadratic polynomial model may be used to representthe efficiencyfor degradation of the Kraft bleach pulp effluent by a photocatalytic process.

  15. Mechanisms of lung fibrosis induced by carbon nanotubes: towards an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP).

    PubMed

    Vietti, Giulia; Lison, Dominique; van den Brule, Sybille

    2016-02-29

    Several experimental studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNT) can induce respiratory effects, including lung fibrosis. The cellular and molecular events through which these effects develop are, however, not clearly elucidated. The purpose of the present review was to analyze the key events involved in the lung fibrotic reaction induced by CNT and to assess their relationships. We thus address current knowledge and gaps with a view to draft an Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) concerning the fibrotic potential of CNT.As for many inhaled particles, CNT can indirectly activate fibroblasts through the release of pro-inflammatory (IL-1β) and pro-fibrotic (PDGF and TGF-β) mediators by inflammatory cells (macrophages and epithelial cells) via the induction of oxidative stress, inflammasome or NF-kB. We also highlight here direct effects of CNT on fibroblasts, which appear as a new mode of toxicity relatively specific for CNT. Direct effects of CNT on fibroblasts include the induction of fibroblast proliferation, differentiation and collagen production via ERK 1/2 or Smad signaling. We also point out the physico-chemical properties of CNT important for their toxicity and the relationship between in vitro and in vivo effects. This knowledge provides evidence to draft an AOP for the fibrogenic activity of CNT, which allows developing simple in vitro models contributing to predict the CNT effects in lung fibrosis, and risk assessment tools for regulatory decision.

  16. An evaluation of the use of an advanced oxidation process to remove chlorinated hydrocarbons from groundwater at the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II; Peyton, G.R.

    1990-10-01

    The Allied-Signal Aerospace Company currently operates a production facility in Kansas City, Missouri, under contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Over the years the operation of the DOE Kansas City Plant has resulted in the contamination of groundwater with chlorinated hydrocarbons, including trichloroethene (TCE). One of the plumes of contaminated groundwater, the underground tank farm (UTF) plume, was selected for remediation with an advanced oxidation process (AOP) consisting of simultaneous treatment by ozone (O{sub 3}), ultraviolet (UV) radiation, and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Since the use of AOPs is relatively new for the removal of organics from groundwater, information on design criteria, costs, performance, and operating experience is not well documented in the literature. Therefore, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was requested to evaluate the treatment process. This report documents the work performed through FY 1989. The results of the initial year of the evaluations, FY 1988, have been published previously, and the evaluation will continue at least through FY 1990. This report first briefly describes the treatment plant and the mechanisms of the treatment process. Next, the methodology and the results from the evaluation are discussed. Finally, conclusions and recommendations are presented. 8 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Surface water disinfection by chlorination and advanced oxidation processes: Inactivation of an antibiotic resistant E. coli strain and cytotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Andreza Costa; Lepretti, Marilena; Rizzo, Luigi; Caputo, Ivana; Vaiano, Vincenzo; Sacco, Olga; Lopes, Wilton Silva; Sannino, Diana

    2016-06-01

    The release of antibiotics into the environment can result in antibiotic resistance (AR) spread, which in turn can seriously affect human health. Antibiotic resistant bacteria have been detected in different aquatic environments used as drinking water source. Water disinfection may be a possible solution to minimize AR spread but conventional processes, such as chlorination, result in the formation of dangerous disinfection by-products. In this study advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), namely H2O2/UV, TiO2/UV and N-TiO2/UV, have been compared with chlorination in the inactivation of an AR Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain in surface water. TiO2 P25 and nitrogen doped TiO2 (N-TiO2), prepared by sol-gel method at two different synthesis temperatures (0 and -20°C), were investigated in heterogeneous photocatalysis experiments. Under the investigated conditions, chlorination (1.0 mg L(-1)) was the faster process (2.5 min) to achieve total inactivation (6 Log). Among AOPs, H2O2/UV resulted in the best inactivation rate: total inactivation (6 Log) was achieved in 45 min treatment. Total inactivation was not observed (4.5 Log), also after 120 min treatment, only for N-doped TiO2 synthesized at 0°C. Moreover, H2O2/UV and chlorination processes were evaluated in terms of cytotoxicity potential by means of 3-(4,5-dime-thylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenylte-trazolium colorimetric test on a human-derived cell line and they similarly affected HepG2 cells viability.

  18. Comparison of UV/hydrogen peroxide and UV/peroxydisulfate processes for the degradation of humic acid in the presence of halide ions.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Dongxue; Fang, Changling; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe; Guo, Yaoguang; Lu, Shuyu

    2016-03-01

    This study compared the behaviors of two classic advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), hydroxyl radical-based AOPs ((•)OH-based AOPs) and sulfate radical-based AOPs (SO4 (•-)-based AOPs), represented by UV/ hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and UV/peroxydisulfate (PDS) systems, respectively, to degrade humic acid (HA) in the presence of halide ions (Cl(-) and Br(-)). The effects of different operational parameters, such as oxidant dosages, halide ions concentration, and pH on HA degradation were investigated in UV/H2O2/Cl(-), UV/PDS/Cl(-), UV/H2O2/Br(-), and UV/PDS/Br(-) processes. It was found that the oxidation capacity of H2O2 and PDS to HA degradation in the presence of halides was nearly in the same order. High dosage of peroxides would lead to an increase in HA removal while excess dosage would slightly inhibit the efficiency. Both Cl(-) and Br(-) would have depressing impact on the two AOPs, but the inhibiting effect of Br(-) was more obvious than that of Cl(-), even the concentration of Cl(-) was far above that of Br(-). The increasing pH would have an adverse effect on HA decomposition in UV/H2O2 system, whereas there was no significant impact of pH in UV/PDS process. Furthermore, infrared spectrometer was used to provide the information of degraded HA in UV/H2O2/Cl(-), UV/PDS/Cl(-), UV/H2O2/Br(-), and UV/PDS/Br(-) processes, and halogenated byproducts were identified in using GC-MS analysis in the four processes. The present research might have significant technical implications on water treatment using advanced oxidation technologies.

  19. Treatment of trichlorophenol by catalytic oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chu, W; Law, C K

    2003-05-01

    The oxidation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP) by ferrous-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide was quantified and modeled in the study. TCP was effectively degraded by hydroxyl radicals that were generated by Fe(II)/H(2)O(2) in the oxidation process. The oxidation capacity (OC) of the process depends on the concentrations of oxidant (hydrogen peroxide) and oxidative catalyst (ferrous ion). Up to 99.6% of TCP removal can be achieved in the process, provided the doses of Fe(II) and H(2)O(2) are selected correctly. The OC of the process was successfully predicted through a kinetic approach in a two-stage model with some simple and measurable parameters, which makes the model useful for predicting, controlling and optimizing the catalyzed oxidation process in the degradation of TCP. PMID:12727243

  20. Insights into real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater treatment using solar advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Manenti, Diego R; Souza, Selene M A G U; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2014-01-01

    Different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) were applied to the treatment of a real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater as a pre-oxidation step to enhance the biodegradability of the recalcitrant compounds, which can be further oxidized using a biological process. Tests were conducted on a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation and at pilot scale with compound parabolic collectors using natural solar radiation. The cotton-textile dyeing wastewater presents a lilac color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (pH = 8.2), moderate organic content (DOC = 152 mg C L(-1), COD = 684 mg O2 L(-1)) and low-moderate biodegradability (40 % after 28 days in Zahn-Wellens test). All the tested processes contributed to an effective decolorization and mineralization, but the most efficient process was the solar-photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 98.5% decolorization and 85.5% mineralization after less than 0.1 and 5.8 kJUV L(-1), respectively. In order to achieve a final wastewater with a COD below 250 mg O2 L(-1) (discharge limit into water bodies imposed by the Portuguese Legislation-Portaria no. 423/97 of 25 June 1997), considering the combination of a solar-photo-Fenton reaction with a biological process, the phototreatment energy required is 0.5 kJUV L(-1), consuming 7.5 mM hydrogen peroxide, resulting in 58.4% of mineralization [Formula: see text].

  1. Insights into real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater treatment using solar advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Manenti, Diego R; Souza, Selene M A G U; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2014-01-01

    Different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) were applied to the treatment of a real cotton-textile dyeing wastewater as a pre-oxidation step to enhance the biodegradability of the recalcitrant compounds, which can be further oxidized using a biological process. Tests were conducted on a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation and at pilot scale with compound parabolic collectors using natural solar radiation. The cotton-textile dyeing wastewater presents a lilac color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (pH = 8.2), moderate organic content (DOC = 152 mg C L(-1), COD = 684 mg O2 L(-1)) and low-moderate biodegradability (40 % after 28 days in Zahn-Wellens test). All the tested processes contributed to an effective decolorization and mineralization, but the most efficient process was the solar-photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 98.5% decolorization and 85.5% mineralization after less than 0.1 and 5.8 kJUV L(-1), respectively. In order to achieve a final wastewater with a COD below 250 mg O2 L(-1) (discharge limit into water bodies imposed by the Portuguese Legislation-Portaria no. 423/97 of 25 June 1997), considering the combination of a solar-photo-Fenton reaction with a biological process, the phototreatment energy required is 0.5 kJUV L(-1), consuming 7.5 mM hydrogen peroxide, resulting in 58.4% of mineralization [Formula: see text]. PMID:23832802

  2. Effects of chloride ion on degradation of Acid Orange 7 by sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process: implications for formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ruixia; Ramjaun, Sadiqua N; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2011-11-30

    Sodium chloride is a common salt used during textile wet processes. Here a dual effect of chloride (i.e. inhibitory and accelerating effect) on azo dye (Acid Orange 7, AO7) degradation in an emerging cobalt/peroxymonosulfate (Co/PMS) advanced oxidation process (AOP) was reported. Compared to OH-based AOPs, high concentrations of chloride (>5mM) can significantly enhance dye decoloration independent of the presence of the Co(2+) catalyst, but did greatly inhibit dye mineralization to an extent which was closely dependent upon the chloride content. Both UV-vis absorbance spectra and AOX determination indicated the formation of some refractory byproducts. Some chlorinated aromatic compounds, including 3-chloroisocoumain, 2-chloro-7-hydroxynaphthalene, 1,3,5-trichloro-2-nitrobenzene and tetrachlorohydroquione, were identified by GC-MS measurement in both Co/PMS/Cl(-) and PMS/Cl(-) reaction systems. Based on those experimental results, two possible branched (SO(4)(-)radical-based and non-radical) reaction pathways are proposed. This is one of the very few studies dealing with chlorinated organic intermediates formed via chlorine radical/active chlorine species (HOCl/Cl(2)) attack on dye compounds. Therefore, this finding may have significant technical implications for utilizing Co/PMS regent to detoxify chloride-rich azo dyes wastewater.

  3. Computer-based first-principles kinetic modeling of degradation pathways and byproduct fates in aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Minakata, Daisuke; Niu, Junfeng; Crittenden, John

    2014-05-20

    In this study, a computer-based first-principles kinetic model is developed to predict the degradation mechanisms and fates of intermediates and byproducts produced during aqueous-phase advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for various organic compounds. The model contains a rule-based pathway generator to generate the reaction pathways, a reaction rate constant estimator to estimate the reaction rate constant for each reaction generated, a mechanistic reduction module to reduce the generated mechanisms, an ordinary differential equations generator and solver to solve the generated mechanisms and calculate the concentration profiles for all species, and a toxicity estimator to estimate the toxicity of major species and calculate time-dependent profiles of relative toxicity (i.e., concentration of species divided by toxicity value). We predict concentration profiles of acetone and trichloroethylene and their intermediates and byproducts in photolysis with hydrogen peroxide (i.e., UV/H2O2) and validate with experimental observations. The predicted concentration profiles for both parent compounds are consistent with experimental data. The calculated profiles of 96-h green algae chronic toxicity show that the overall toxicity decreases during the degradation process. These generated mechanisms also provide detailed and quantitative insights into the pathways for the formation and consumption of important intermediates and byproducts produced during AOPs. Our approach is sufficiently general to be applied to a wide range of contaminants.

  4. Effect of matrix components on UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) advanced oxidation processes for trace organic degradation in reverse osmosis brines from municipal wastewater reuse facilities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Pignatello, Joseph J; Ma, Jun; Mitch, William A

    2016-02-01

    When reverse osmosis brines from potable wastewater reuse plants are discharged to poorly-flushed estuaries, the concentrated organic contaminants are a concern for receiving water ecosystems. UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) and UV/persulfate (UV/S2O8(2-)) advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) may reduce contaminant burdens prior to discharge, but the effects of the high levels of halide, carbonate and effluent organic matter (EfOM) normally present in these brines are unclear. On the one hand, these substances may reduce process efficiency by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl (OH) and sulfate (SO4(-) radicals. On the other, the daughter radicals generated by halide and carbonate scavenging may themselves degrade organics, offsetting the effect of ROS scavenging. UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) AOPs were compared for degradation of five pharmaceuticals spiked into brines obtained from two reuse facilities and the RO influent from one of them. For UV/H2O2, EfOM scavenged ∼75% of the OH, reducing the degradation efficiency of the target contaminants to a similar extent; halide and carbonate scavenging and the reactivities of associated daughter radicals were less important. For UV/S2O8(2-), anions (mostly Cl(-)) scavenged ∼93% of the SO4(-). Because daughter radicals of Cl(-) contributed to contaminant degradation, the reduction in contaminant degradation efficiency was only ∼75-80%, with the reduction driven by daughter radical scavenging by EfOM. Conversion of SO4(-) to more selective halogen and carbonate radicals resulted in a wider range of degradation efficiencies among the contaminants. For both AOPs, 250 mJ/cm(2) average fluence achieved significant removal of four pharmaceuticals, with significantly better performance by UV/S2O8(2-) treatment for some constituents. Accounting for the lower brine flowrates, the energy output to achieve this fluence in brines is comparable to that often applied to RO permeates. However, much higher fluence was

  5. Effect of matrix components on UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) advanced oxidation processes for trace organic degradation in reverse osmosis brines from municipal wastewater reuse facilities.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Pignatello, Joseph J; Ma, Jun; Mitch, William A

    2016-02-01

    When reverse osmosis brines from potable wastewater reuse plants are discharged to poorly-flushed estuaries, the concentrated organic contaminants are a concern for receiving water ecosystems. UV/hydrogen peroxide (UV/H2O2) and UV/persulfate (UV/S2O8(2-)) advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) may reduce contaminant burdens prior to discharge, but the effects of the high levels of halide, carbonate and effluent organic matter (EfOM) normally present in these brines are unclear. On the one hand, these substances may reduce process efficiency by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydroxyl (OH) and sulfate (SO4(-) radicals. On the other, the daughter radicals generated by halide and carbonate scavenging may themselves degrade organics, offsetting the effect of ROS scavenging. UV/H2O2 and UV/S2O8(2-) AOPs were compared for degradation of five pharmaceuticals spiked into brines obtained from two reuse facilities and the RO influent from one of them. For UV/H2O2, EfOM scavenged ∼75% of the OH, reducing the degradation efficiency of the target contaminants to a similar extent; halide and carbonate scavenging and the reactivities of associated daughter radicals were less important. For UV/S2O8(2-), anions (mostly Cl(-)) scavenged ∼93% of the SO4(-). Because daughter radicals of Cl(-) contributed to contaminant degradation, the reduction in contaminant degradation efficiency was only ∼75-80%, with the reduction driven by daughter radical scavenging by EfOM. Conversion of SO4(-) to more selective halogen and carbonate radicals resulted in a wider range of degradation efficiencies among the contaminants. For both AOPs, 250 mJ/cm(2) average fluence achieved significant removal of four pharmaceuticals, with significantly better performance by UV/S2O8(2-) treatment for some constituents. Accounting for the lower brine flowrates, the energy output to achieve this fluence in brines is comparable to that often applied to RO permeates. However, much higher fluence was

  6. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  7. Accelerated oxidation processes is biodiesel

    SciTech Connect

    Canakci, M.; Monyem, A.; Van Gerpen, J.

    1999-12-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for diesel engines that can be produced from renewable feedstocks such as vegetable oil and animal fats. These feedstocks are reacted with an alcohol to produce alkyl monoesters that can be used in conventional diesel engines with little or no modification. Biodiesel, especially if produced from highly unsaturated oils, oxidizes more rapidly than diesel fuel. This article reports the results of experiments to track the chemical and physical changes that occur in biodiesel as it oxidizes. These results show the impact of time, oxygen flow rate, temperature, metals, and feedstock type on the rate of oxidation. Blending with diesel fuel and the addition of antioxidants are explored also. The data indicate that without antioxidants, biodiesel will oxidize very quickly at temperatures typical of diesel engines. This oxidation results in increases in peroxide value, acid value, and viscosity. While the peroxide value generally reaches a plateau of about 350 meq/kg ester, the acid value and viscosity increase monotonically as oxidation proceeds.

  8. Plutonium Oxide Process Capability Work Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.

    2014-02-28

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked to develop a Pilot-scale Plutonium-oxide Processing Unit (P3U) providing a flexible capability to produce 200g (Pu basis) samples of plutonium oxide using different chemical processes for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. Materials produced can also be used as exercise and reference materials.

  9. Conventional and advanced oxidation processes used in disinfection of treated urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Chueca, J; Ormad, M P; Mosteo, R; Sarasa, J; Ovelleiro, J L

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the current study is to compare the inactivation of Escherichia coli in wastewater effluents using conventional treatments (chlorination) and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV irradiation, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)/solar irradiation, and photo-Fenton processes. In addition, an analysis of the operational costs of each treatment is carried out taking into account the optimal dosages of chemicals used. Total inactivation of bacteria (7.5 log) was achieved by means of chlorination and UV irradiation. However, bacterial regrowth was observed 6 hours after the completion of UV treatment, obtaining a disinfection value around 3 to 4 log. On the other hand, the combination H2O2/solar irradiation achieved a maximum inactivation of E. coli of 3.30 ± 0.35 log. The photo-Fenton reaction achieved a level of inactivation of 4.87 ± 0.10 log. The order of disinfection, taking into account the reagent/cost ratio of each treatment, is as follows: chlorination > UV irradiation > photo-Fenton > H2O2/sunlight irradiation.

  10. Degradation Mechanism of Cyanobacterial Toxin Cylindrospermopsin by Hydroxyl Radicals in Homogeneous UV/H2O2 Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    The degradation of cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a widely distributed and highly toxic cyanobacterial toxin (cyanotoxin), remains poorly elucidated. In this study, the mechanism of CYN destruction by UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated by mass spectrometr...

  11. A KINETIC MODEL FOR H2O2/UV PROCESS IN A COMPLETELY MIXED BATCH REACTOR. (R825370C076)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A dynamic kinetic model for the advanced oxidation process (AOP) using hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet irradiation (H2O2/UV) in a completely mixed batch reactor (CMBR) is developed. The model includes the known elementary chemical and photochemical reac...

  12. The application of advanced oxidation technologies to the treatment of effluents from the pulp and paper industry: a review.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Daphne; Merayo, Noemí; Gascó, Antonio; Blanco, Ángeles

    2015-01-01

    The paper industry is adopting zero liquid effluent technologies to reduce freshwater use and meet environmental regulations, which implies closure of water circuits and the progressive accumulation of pollutants that must be removed before water reuse and final wastewater discharge. The traditional water treatment technologies that are used in paper mills (such as dissolved air flotation or biological treatment) are not able to remove recalcitrant contaminants. Therefore, advanced water treatment technologies, such as advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), are being included in industrial wastewater treatment chains aiming to either improve water biodegradability or its final quality. A comprehensive review of the current state of the art regarding the use of AOPs for the treatment of the organic load of effluents from the paper industry is herein addressed considering mature and emerging treatments for a sustainable water use in this sector. Wastewater composition, which is highly dependent on the raw materials being used in the mills, the selected AOP itself, and its combination with other technologies, will determine the viability of the treatment. In general, all AOPs have been reported to achieve good organic removal efficiencies (COD removal >40%, and about an extra 20% if AOPs are combined with biological stages). Particularly, ozonation has been the most extensively reported and successfully implemented AOP at an industrial scale for effluent treatment or reuse within pulp and paper mills, although Fenton processes (photo-Fenton particularly) have actually addressed better oxidative results (COD removal ≈ 65-75%) at a lab scale, but still need further development at a large scale.

  13. Response surface method for the optimisation of micropollutant removal in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluent with the UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Hennings, U; Pinnekamp, J

    2013-01-01

    Experiments with the ultraviolet (UV)/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) were conducted to investigate the abatement of micropollutants in wastewater treatment plant effluent. The fluence and the starting concentration of H2O2 in a bench-scale batch reactor were varied according to response surface method (RSM) to examine their influence on the treatment efficiency. It was shown that the investigated AOP is very effective for the abatement of micropollutants with conversion rates typically higher than 90%. Empirical relationships between fluence, H2O2 dosage and the resulting concentration of micropollutants were established by RSM. By this means it was shown that X-ray-contrast media had been degraded only by UV light. Nevertheless, most substances were degraded by the combination of UV irradiation and H2O2. Based on RSM an optimisation of multiple responses was conducted to find the minimal fluence and H2O2 dosage that are needed to reach an efficient abatement of micropollutants. PMID:23656952

  14. Energy efficient--advanced oxidation process for treatment of cyanide containing automobile industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mudliar, R; Umare, S S; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2009-05-30

    Destruction of cyanide (CN) from an automobile industry wastewater by advance oxidation process (AOP) has been evaluated. The operating conditions (in an indigenously designed photoreactor) for three different treatment strategies have been optimized. The treatment strategies involved use of, ultra violet light (UV), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and ozone (O(3)) in various combinations. Treatment of automobile industry wastewater (250 mg/L CN) showed fastest CN destruction, which was significantly (P<0.05) faster than that observed with synthetic wastewater (with similar CN concentration). A combined application of H(2)O(2)/O(3) was found to be the best option for maximum CN destruction. This treatment allows CN to reach the regional/international limit (of 0.02 mg/L) for safe industrial wastewater discharges to the receiving water bodies. The specific energy consumption by the photoreactor following this treatment was comparable to that obtained by conventional treatments, which use photocatalyst. Since the present treatment does not use catalyst, it provides an excellent energy efficient and economical option for treatment and safe disposal of CN containing industrial wastewater.

  15. Effect of halide ions and carbonates on organic contaminant degradation by hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes in saline waters.

    PubMed

    Grebel, Janel E; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2010-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) generating nonselective hydroxyl radicals (HO*) provide a broad-spectrum contaminant destruction option for the decontamination of waters. Halide ions are scavengers of HO* during AOP treatment, such that treatment of saline waters would be anticipated to be ineffective. However, HO* scavenging by halides converts HO* to radical reactive halogen species (RHS) that participate in contaminant destruction but react more selectively with electron-rich organic compounds. The effects of Cl-, Br-, and carbonates (H2CO3+HCO3-+CO3(2-)) on the UV/H2O2 treatment of model compounds in saline waters were evaluated. For single target organic contaminants, the impact of these constituents on contaminant destruction rate suppression at circumneutral pH followed the order Br->carbonates>Cl-. Traces of Br- in the NaCl stock had a greater effect than Cl- itself. Kinetic modeling of phenol destruction demonstrated that RHS contributed significantly to phenol destruction, mitigating the impact of HO* scavenging. The extent of treatment efficiency reduction in the presence of halides varied dramatically among different target organic compounds. Destruction of contaminants containing electron-poor reaction centers in seawater was nearly halted, while 17beta-estradiol removal declined by only 3%. Treatment of mixtures of contaminants with each other and with natural organic matter (NOM) was evaluated. Although NOM served as an oxidant scavenger, conversion of nonselective HO* to selective radicals due to the presence of anions enhanced the efficiency of electron-rich contaminant removal in saline waters by focusing the oxidizing power of the system away from the NOM toward the target contaminant. Despite the importance of contaminant oxidation by halogen radicals, the formation of halogenated byproducts was minimal. PMID:20681567

  16. Process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexene

    DOEpatents

    Mizuno, Noritaka; Lyon, David K.; Finke, Richard G.

    1993-01-01

    This invention is a process for catalytically oxidizing cycloolefins, particularly cyclohexenes, to form a variety of oxygenates. The catalyst used in the process is a covalently bonded iridium-heteropolyanion species. The process uses the catalyst in conjunction with a gaseous oxygen containing gas to form 2-cyclohexen-1-ol and also 2-cyclohexen-1-one.

  17. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D.

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  18. Advanced oxidation degradation kinetics as a function of ultraviolet LED duty cycle.

    PubMed

    Duckworth, Kelsey; Spencer, Michael; Bates, Christopher; Miller, Michael E; Almquist, Catherine; Grimaila, Michael; Magnuson, Matthew; Willison, Stuart; Phillips, Rebecca; Racz, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light emitting diodes (LEDs) may be a viable option as a UV light source for advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) utilizing photocatalysts or oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide. The effect of UV-LED duty cycle, expressed as the percentage of time the LED is powered, was investigated in an AOP with hydrogen peroxide, using methylene blue (MB) to assess contaminant degradation. The UV-LED AOP degraded the MB at all duty cycles. However, adsorption of MB onto the LED emitting surface caused a linear decline in reactor performance over time. With regard to the effect of duty cycle, the observed rate constant of MB degradation, after being adjusted to account for the duty cycle, was greater for 5 and 10% duty cycles than higher duty cycles, providing a value approximately 160% higher at 5% duty cycle than continuous operation. This increase in adjusted rate constant at low duty cycles, as well as contaminant fouling of the LED surface, may impact design and operational considerations for pulsed UV-LED AOP systems. PMID:25945855

  19. Biodegradability of iopromide products after UV/H₂O₂ advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Love, Nancy G; Aga, Diana S; Linden, Karl G

    2016-02-01

    Iopromide is an X-ray and MRI contrast agent that is virtually non-biodegradable and persistent through typical wastewater treatment processes. This study determined whether molecular transformation of iopromide in a UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) can result in biodegradable products. The experiments used iopromide labeled with carbon-14 on the aromatic ring to trace degradation of iopromide through UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation and subsequent biodegradation. The biotransformation assay tracked the formation of radiolabeled (14)CO2 which indicated full mineralization of the molecule. The results indicated that AOP formed biodegradable iopromide products. There was no (14)C released from the pre-AOP samples, but up to 20% of all radiolabeled carbon transformed into (14)CO2 over the course of 42 days of biodegradation after iopromide was exposed to advanced oxidation (compared to 10% transformation in inactivated post-AOP controls). In addition, the quantum yield of photolysis of iopromide was determined using low pressure (LP) and medium pressure (MP) mercury lamps as 0.069 ± 0.005 and 0.080 ± 0.007 respectively. The difference in the quantum yields for the two UV sources was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.08), which indicates the equivalency of using LP or MP UV sources for iopromide treatment. The reaction rate between iopromide and hydroxyl radicals was measured to be (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). These results indicate that direct photolysis is a dominant degradation pathway in UV/H2O2 AOP treatment of iopromide. Other iodinated contrast media may also become biodegradable after exposure to UV or UV/H2O2.

  20. Biodegradability of iopromide products after UV/H₂O₂ advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Keen, Olya S; Love, Nancy G; Aga, Diana S; Linden, Karl G

    2016-02-01

    Iopromide is an X-ray and MRI contrast agent that is virtually non-biodegradable and persistent through typical wastewater treatment processes. This study determined whether molecular transformation of iopromide in a UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) can result in biodegradable products. The experiments used iopromide labeled with carbon-14 on the aromatic ring to trace degradation of iopromide through UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation and subsequent biodegradation. The biotransformation assay tracked the formation of radiolabeled (14)CO2 which indicated full mineralization of the molecule. The results indicated that AOP formed biodegradable iopromide products. There was no (14)C released from the pre-AOP samples, but up to 20% of all radiolabeled carbon transformed into (14)CO2 over the course of 42 days of biodegradation after iopromide was exposed to advanced oxidation (compared to 10% transformation in inactivated post-AOP controls). In addition, the quantum yield of photolysis of iopromide was determined using low pressure (LP) and medium pressure (MP) mercury lamps as 0.069 ± 0.005 and 0.080 ± 0.007 respectively. The difference in the quantum yields for the two UV sources was not statistically significant at the 95% confidence interval (p = 0.08), which indicates the equivalency of using LP or MP UV sources for iopromide treatment. The reaction rate between iopromide and hydroxyl radicals was measured to be (2.5 ± 0.2) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). These results indicate that direct photolysis is a dominant degradation pathway in UV/H2O2 AOP treatment of iopromide. Other iodinated contrast media may also become biodegradable after exposure to UV or UV/H2O2. PMID:26433937

  1. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission.

  2. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils.

    PubMed

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  3. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    PubMed Central

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources of NO in the atmosphere are anthropogenic emissions (from combustion of fossil fuels) and biogenic emission from soils. NO is both produced and consumed in soils as a result of biotic and abiotic processes. The main processes involved are microbial nitrification and denitrification, and chemodenitrification. Thus, the net result is complex and dependent on several factors such as nitrogen availability, organic matter content, oxygen status, soil moisture, pH and temperature. This paper reviews recent knowledge on processes forming NO in soils and the factors controlling its emission to the atmosphere. Schemes for simulating these processes are described, and the results are discussed with the purpose of scaling up to global emission. PMID:23713124

  4. MTBE oxidation by conventional ozonation and the combination ozone/hydrogen peroxide: efficiency of the processes and bromate formation.

    PubMed

    Acero, J L; Haderlein, S B; Schmidt, T C; Suter, M J; von Gunten, U

    2001-11-01

    The present study investigates the oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by conventional ozonation and the advanced oxidation process (AOP) ozone/hydrogen peroxide under drinking water treatment conditions. The major degradation products identified were tert-butyl formate (TBF), tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), 2-methoxy-2-methyl propionaldehyde (MMP), acetone (AC), methyl acetate (MA), hydroxyisobutyraldehyde (HiBA), and formaldehyde (FA). The rate constants of the reaction of ozone and OH radicals with MTBE were found to be 0.14 and 1.9 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The rate constants for the same oxidation processes were also measured for the degradation products TBF, MMP, MA, and HiBA (k(O3-TBF) = 0.78 M(-1) s(-1); k(OH-TBF) = 7.0 x 10(8) M(-1) s(-1); k(O3-MMP) = 5 M(-1) s(-1); k(OH-MMP) = 3 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), k(O3-MA) = 0.09 M(-1) s(-1), k(O3-HiBA) = 5 M(-1) s(-1); k(OH-HiBA) = 3 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). Since all compounds reacted slowly with molecular ozone, only the degradation pathway of MTBE with OH radicals has been determined, including the formation of primary degradation products. In experiments performed with several natural waters, the efficiency of MTBE elimination and the formation of bromate as disinfection byproduct have been measured. With a bromide level of 50 microg/L, only 35-50% of MTBE could be eliminated by the AOP O3/H2O2 without exceeding the current drinking water standard of bromate (10 microg/L). The transient concentrations of MTBE and its primary degradation products were modeled using a combination of kinetic parameters (degradation product distribution and rate constants) together with the ozone and OH radical concentration and were in good agreement with the experimental results.

  5. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Ginley, D.S.

    1994-10-18

    An etching process is described using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstrom range may be achieved by this method. 1 fig.

  6. Process for etching mixed metal oxides

    DOEpatents

    Ashby, Carol I. H.; Ginley, David S.

    1994-01-01

    An etching process using dicarboxylic and tricarboxylic acids as chelating etchants for mixed metal oxide films such as high temperature superconductors and ferroelectric materials. Undesirable differential etching rates between different metal oxides are avoided by selection of the proper acid or combination of acids. Feature sizes below one micron, excellent quality vertical edges, and film thicknesses in the 100 Angstom range may be achieved by this method.

  7. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Senkov, Oleg N.

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  8. Comparison among the methods for hydrogen peroxide measurements to evaluate advanced oxidation processes: Application of a spectrophotometric method using copper(II) ion and 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline

    SciTech Connect

    Kosaka, Koji; Yamada, Harumi; Matsui, Saburo; Echigo, Shinya; Shishida, Kenichi

    1998-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in the range of several tens to several hundreds of micromoles per liter is usually added to the process water in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). In this study, a spectrophotometric method using copper(II) ion and 2,9-dimethyl-1, 10-phenanthroline (DMP) for measuring H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration was compared with other methods [i.e., spectrophotometric methods using titanium oxalate and N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) and a fluorometric method using p-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid (POHPAA)]. Particular attention was paid to sensitivities and effects of coexisting substances. The most sensitive method was the fluorometric method, followed in order by DPD, DMP, and the titanium oxalate colorimetric method; their detection limits in 1-cm cells were 0.16, 0.77, 0.80, and 29 {micro}M, respectively. Therefore, the DMP method was found to be reasonably sensitive when applied to AOPs. In the DMP method, copper(II)-DMP complexes react with humic acid, and colored chemicals are produced. However, the slopes of the calibration curves of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} containing up to 10 mg of C L{sup {minus}1} from humic acid did not change significantly as compared to that in ultrapure water. The effect of chlorine on the DMP method was not observed up to at least 23 {micro}M (0.8 mg of Cl L{sup {minus}1}) of free chlorine, although the DPD and fluorometric methods are known to be interfered by chlorine. From this study, it was concluded that the DMP method is suitable to be used in AOPs.

  9. On-line sensor monitoring for chemical contaminant attenuation during UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Weon; Anumol, Tarun; Park, Minkyu; Pepper, Ian; Scheideler, Jens; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-15

    A combination of surrogate parameters and indicator compounds were measured to predict the removal efficiency of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) using low pressure (LP)-UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), engaged with online sensor-based monitoring system. Thirty-nine TOrCs were evaluated in two distinct secondary wastewater effluents in terms of estimated photochemical reactivity, as a function of the rate constants of UV direct photolysis (kUV) and hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation (kOH). The selected eighteen TOrCs were classified into three groups that served as indicator compounds: Group 1 for photo-susceptible TOrCs but with minor degradation by OH oxidation (diclofenac, fluoxetine, iohexol, iopamidol, iopromide, simazine and sulfamethoxazole); Group 2 for TOrCs susceptible to both direct photolysis and OH oxidation (benzotriazole, diphenhydramine, ibuprofen, naproxen and sucralose); and Group 3 for photo-resistant TOrCs showing dominant degradation by OH oxidation (atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, gemfibrozil, primidone and trimethoprim). The results indicate that TOC (optical-based measurement), UVA254 or UVT254 (UV absorbance or transmittance at 254 nm), and total fluorescence can all be used as suitable on-line organic surrogate parameters to predict the attenuation of TOrCs. Furthermore, the automated real-time monitoring via on-line surrogate sensors and equipped with the developed degradation profiles between sensor response and a group of TOrCs removal can provide a diagnostic tool for process control during advanced treatment of reclaimed waters.

  10. On-line sensor monitoring for chemical contaminant attenuation during UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hye-Weon; Anumol, Tarun; Park, Minkyu; Pepper, Ian; Scheideler, Jens; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-15

    A combination of surrogate parameters and indicator compounds were measured to predict the removal efficiency of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) using low pressure (LP)-UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), engaged with online sensor-based monitoring system. Thirty-nine TOrCs were evaluated in two distinct secondary wastewater effluents in terms of estimated photochemical reactivity, as a function of the rate constants of UV direct photolysis (kUV) and hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation (kOH). The selected eighteen TOrCs were classified into three groups that served as indicator compounds: Group 1 for photo-susceptible TOrCs but with minor degradation by OH oxidation (diclofenac, fluoxetine, iohexol, iopamidol, iopromide, simazine and sulfamethoxazole); Group 2 for TOrCs susceptible to both direct photolysis and OH oxidation (benzotriazole, diphenhydramine, ibuprofen, naproxen and sucralose); and Group 3 for photo-resistant TOrCs showing dominant degradation by OH oxidation (atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, gemfibrozil, primidone and trimethoprim). The results indicate that TOC (optical-based measurement), UVA254 or UVT254 (UV absorbance or transmittance at 254 nm), and total fluorescence can all be used as suitable on-line organic surrogate parameters to predict the attenuation of TOrCs. Furthermore, the automated real-time monitoring via on-line surrogate sensors and equipped with the developed degradation profiles between sensor response and a group of TOrCs removal can provide a diagnostic tool for process control during advanced treatment of reclaimed waters. PMID:26074188

  11. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This handbook summarizes commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced photochemical oxidation (APO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and solids. Similar information from pilot- and bench-scale evaluations of APO processes is also included to supplement the...

  12. HANDBOOK ON ADVANCED NONPHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this handbook is to summarize commercial-scale system performance and cost data for advanced nonphotochemical oxidation (ANPO) treatment of contaminated water, air, and soil. Similar information from pilot-and bench-scale evaluations of ANPO processes is also inclu...

  13. The Effect of AOP on Software Engineering, with Particular Attention to OIF and Event Quantification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Filman, Robert; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    We consider the impact of Aspect-Oriented Programming on Software Engineering, and, in particular, analyze two AOP systems, one of which does component wrapping and the other, quantification over events, for their software engineering effects.

  14. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L. . Kroll Inst. for Extractive Metallurgy); Averill, W.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  15. Processing of effluent salt from the direct oxide reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1992-05-01

    The production of reactive metals by Direct Oxide Reduction (DOR) process using calcium in a molten calcium salt system generates significant amount of contaminated waste as calcium oxide saturated calcium chloride salt mix with calcium oxide content of up to 15 wt. pct. Fused salt electrolysis of a simulated salt mix has been carried out to electrowin calcium, which can be recycled to the DOR reactor along with the calcium chloride salt or may be used in-situ in a combined DOR and electrowinning process. Many reactive metal oxides could thus be reduced in a one-step process without generating a significant amount of waste. The process has been optimized in terms of the calcium solubility, cell temperature, current density and the cell design to maximize the current efficiency. Based on the information available regarding the solubility of calcium in calcium chloride salt in the presence of calcium oxide, and the back reactions occurring in-situ between the electrowon calcium and other components present in the cell, e.g. carbon, oxygen, carbon dioxide and calcium oxide, it is difficult to recover elemental calcium within the system. However, a liquid cathode or a rising cathode has been used in the past to recover calcium. The solubility has also been found to depend on the use of graphite as the anode material as evidenced by the presence of calcium carbonate in the final salt. The rate of recovery for metallic calcium has to be enhanced to levels that overcome the back reactions in a system where quick removal of anodic gases is achieved. Calcium has been detected by the hydrogen evolution technique and the amount of calcia has been determined by titration. A porous ceramic sheath has been used in the cell to prevent the chemical reaction of electrowon calcium to produce oxide or carbonate and to prevent the contamination of salt by the anodic carbon.

  16. UV-based advanced oxidation processes for the treatment of odour compounds: efficiency and by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Zoschke, Kristin; Dietrich, Norman; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2012-10-15

    The occurrence of the taste and odour compounds geosmin and 2-methyl isoborneol (2-MIB) affects the organoleptic quality of raw waters from drinking water reservoirs worldwide. UV-based oxidation processes for the removal of these substances are an alternative to adsorption and biological processes, since they additionally provide disinfection of the raw water. We could show that the concentration of geosmin and 2-MIB could be reduced by VUV irradiation and the combination of UV irradiation with ozone and hydrogen peroxide in pure water and water from a drinking water reservoir. The figure of merit EE/O is an appropriate tool to compare the AOPs and showed that VUV and UV/O(3) yielded the lowest treatment costs for the odour compounds in pure and raw water, respectively. Additionally, VUV irradiation with addition of ozone, generated by the VUV lamp, was evaluated. The generation of ozone and the irradiation were performed in a single reactor system using the same low-pressure mercury lamp, thereby reducing the energy consumption of the treatment process. The formation of the undesired by-products nitrite and bromate was investigated. The combination of VUV irradiation with ozone produced by a VUV lamp avoided the formation of relevant concentrations of the by-products. The internal generation of ozone is capable to produce ozone concentrations sufficient to reduce EE/O below 1 kWh m(-3) and without the risk of the formation of nitrite or bromate above the maximum contaminant level.

  17. Process for preparing active oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Berard, Michael F.; Hunter, Jr., Orville; Shiers, Loren E.; Dole, Stephen L.; Scheidecker, Ralph W.

    1979-02-20

    An improved process for preparing active oxide powders in which cation hydroxide gels, prepared in the conventional manner are chemically dried by alternately washing the gels with a liquid organic compound having polar characteristics and a liquid organic compound having nonpolar characteristics until the mechanical water is removed from the gel. The water-free cation hydroxide is then contacted with a final liquid organic wash to remove the previous organic wash and speed drying. The dried hydroxide treated in the conventional manner will form a highly sinterable active oxide powder.

  18. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) for chemical binding to tubulin in oocytes leading to aneuploid offspring.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Francesco; Massarotti, Alberto; Yauk, Carole L; Pacchierotti, Francesca; Russo, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has launched the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) Programme to advance knowledge of pathways of toxicity and improve the use of mechanistic information in risk assessment. An AOP links a molecular initiating event (MIE) to an adverse outcome (AO) through intermediate key events (KE). Here, we present the scientific evidence in support of an AOP whereby chemicals that bind to tubulin cause microtubule depolymerization resulting in spindle disorganization followed by altered chromosome alignment and segregation and the generation of aneuploidy in female germ cells, ultimately leading to aneuploidy in the offspring. Aneuploidy, an abnormal number of chromosomes that is not an exact multiple of the haploid number, is a well-known cause of human disease and represents a major cause of infertility, pregnancy failure, and serious genetic disorders in the offspring. Among chemicals that induce aneuploidy in female germ cells, a large majority impairs microtubule dynamics and spindle function. Colchicine, a prototypical chemical that binds to tubulin and causes microtubule depolymerization, is used here to illustrate the AOP. This AOP is specific to female germ cells exposed during the periovulation period. Although the majority of the data come from rodent studies, the available evidence suggests that the MIE and KEs are conserved across species and would occur in human oocytes. The development of AOPs related to mutagenicity in germ cells is expected to aid the identification of potential hazards to germ cell genomic integrity and support regulatory efforts to protect population health.

  19. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  20. Organic waste processing using molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, M. G., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal means of oxidizing (destroying) the organic constituents of mixed wastes, hazardous wastes, and energetic materials while retaining inorganic and radioactive constituents in the salt. For this reason, MSO is considered a promising alternative to incineration for the treatment of a variety of organic wastes. The U. S. Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) is currently funding research that will identify alternatives to incineration for the treatment of organic-based mixed wastes. (Mixed wastes are defined as waste streams which have both hazardous and radioactive properties.) One such project is Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Expedited Technology Demonstration of Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO). The goal of this project is to conduct an integrated demonstration of MSO, including off-gas and spent salt treatment, and the preparation of robust solid final forms. Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has constructed an integrated pilot-scale MSO treatment system in which tests and demonstrations are presently being performed under carefully controlled (experimental) conditions. The system consists of a MSO process vessel with dedicated off-gas treatment, a salt recycle system, feed preparation equipment, and equipment for preparing ceramic final waste forms. In this paper we describe the integrated system and discuss its capabilities as well as preliminary process demonstration data. A primary purpose of these demonstrations is to identify the most suitable waste streams and waste types for MSO treatment.

  1. Selective-oxidation catalyst improves Claus process

    SciTech Connect

    Lagas, J.A.; Borsboom, J. ); Berben, P.H. )

    1988-10-10

    Increased SO/sub 2/ emissions. On a worldwide scale, the exploitation and processing of crude oil and natural gas have increased significantly during the past 30 years. This expansion has caused severe pollution problems, especially from sulfur dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. A new development for the well-known Claus process improves production of elemental sulfur from H/sub 2/S. The ''SuperClaus'' process involves a modification of the process-control system and the use of a newly developed selective-oxidation catalyst in the third reactor with the objective of achieving a 99% or 99.5% overall sulfur recovery (two versions) without further tail-gas cleanup. The catalyst for the new process was developed and tested on laboratory bench scale for more than 3 years. Based on the results, it was decided to test the process directly in a commercial unit. A three-stage, 100-t/d Claus plant in a natural-gas plant in the Federal Republic of Germany has been retrofitted to SuperClause. Since Jan. 21, the process has been successfully operated.

  2. Increased formation of halomethanes during chlorination of chloramphenicol in drinking water by UV irradiation, persulfate oxidation, and combined UV/persulfate pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Wenhai, Chu; Tengfei, Chu; Erdeng, Du; Deng, Yang; Yingqing, Guo; Naiyun, Gao

    2016-02-01

    Ultraviolet/persulfate (UV/PS) has been widely used to generate sulfate radicals for degradation of water organic pollutants in previous studies. However, its impacts on disinfection byproduct formation during post-chlorination of degraded compounds is unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and the combined UV/PS advanced oxidation process (AOP) pre-treatments on halomethane formation during the following chlorination of chloramphenicol (CAP), a model antibiotic commonly found in wastewater-impacted water. Results showed that CAP could be transformed to more trichloromethane (TCM) than monochloromethane (MCM) and dichloromethane (DCM) in the presence of excess chlorine. UV photolysis, PS oxidation and UV/PS AOP all directly decomposed CAP to produce halomethanes (HMs) before post-chlorination. Moreover, UV and UV/PS pre-treatments both enhanced the formation of all the HMs in the subsequent chlorination. PS pre-oxidation decreased the TCM formation during post-chlorination, but increased the yields of MCM, DCM and total HMs. UV pre-irradiation significantly increased the bromide utilization of HMs, whereas UV/PS pre-oxidation decreased the bromine incorporation and utilization of HMs from the chlorination of CAP in a low-bromide water. UV irradiation, PS oxidation, and UV/PS AOP can inactivate pathogens and degrade organic pollutants, but this benefit should be weighed against a potential risk of the increased halomethane formation from degraded organic pollutants with and without post-chlorination.

  3. Process for fabrication of metal oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, C.E.; Benson, D.; Svensson, S.

    1990-07-17

    This invention is comprised of a method of fabricating metal oxide films from a plurality of reactants by inducing a reaction by plasma deposition among the reactants. The plasma reaction is effective for consolidating the reactants and producing thin films of metal oxides, e.g. electro-optically active transition metal oxides, at a high deposition rate. The presence of hydrogen during the plasma reaction enhances the deposition rate of the metal oxide. Various types of metal oxide films can be produced.

  4. Investigation of the multifunctional gene AOP3 expands the regulatory network fine-tuning glucosinolate production in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Lea M.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Burow, Meike

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies enable identification of loci that are part of regulatory networks controlling various phenotypes. Detailed investigations of genes within these loci are required to ultimately understand the function of individual genes and how they interact with other players in the network. In this study, we use transgenic plants in combination with natural variation to investigate the regulatory role of the AOP3 gene found in GS-AOP locus previously suggested to contribute to the regulation of glucosinolate defense compounds. Phenotypic analysis and QTL mapping in F2 populations with different AOP3 transgenes support that the enzymatic function and the AOP3 RNA both play a significant role in controlling glucosinolate accumulation. Furthermore, we find different loci interacting with either the enzymatic activity or the RNA of AOP3 and thereby extend the regulatory network controlling glucosinolate accumulation. PMID:26442075

  5. Partial oxidation process with extractant purification

    SciTech Connect

    Stellaccio, R.J.

    1983-09-06

    A partial oxidation process is disclosed with an extractant purifier for removing the particulate carbon entrained in a vaporized stream of normally liquid organic extractant-carbon-water dispersion from a decanter and producing a clean vaporized mixture of liquid organic extractant and water and a separate liquid stream of liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel-carbon dispersion. The extractant purifier comprises a closed, vertical, cylindrical, thermally insulated vessel with an unobstructed central passage. Supported in the upper section of the vessel is a gas-solids separator for separating the particulate carbon from the vaporized dispersion flowing up the vessel and discharging the particulate carbon into atomized liquid hydrocarbon fuel located within the lower section of the purifier.

  6. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.

    1993-01-01

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x.

  7. Inactivation of adenovirus using low-dose UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bounty, Sarah; Rodriguez, Roberto A; Linden, Karl G

    2012-12-01

    Adenovirus has consistently been observed to be the most resistant known pathogen to disinfection by ultraviolet light. This has had an impact on regulations set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency regarding the use of UV disinfection for virus inactivation in groundwater and surface water. In this study, enhancement of UV inactivation of adenovirus was evaluated when hydrogen peroxide was added to create an advanced oxidation process (AOP). While 4 log reduction of adenovirus was determined to require a UV dose (UV fluence) of about 200 mJ/cm(2) from a low pressure (LP) UV source (emitting at 253.7 nm), addition of 10 mg/L H(2)O(2) achieved 4 log inactivation at a dose of 120 mJ/cm(2). DNA damage was assessed using a novel nested PCR approach, and similar levels of DNA damage between the two different treatments were noted, suggesting the AOP enhancement in inactivation was not due to additional DNA damage. Hydroxyl radicals produced in the advanced oxidation process are likely able to damage parts of the virus not targeted by LPUV, such as attachment proteins, enhancing the UV-induced inactivation. The AOP-enhanced inactivation potential was modeled in three natural waters. This research sheds light on the inactivation mechanisms of viruses with ultraviolet light and in the presence of hydroxyl radicals and provides a practical means to enhance inactivation of this UV-resistant virus.

  8. Comparison of Infectious Agents Susceptibility to Photocatalytic Effects of Nanosized Titanium and Zinc Oxides: A Practical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdan, Janusz; Zarzyńska, Joanna; Pławińska-Czarnak, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    Nanotechnology contributes towards a more effective eradication of pathogens that have emerged in hospitals, veterinary clinics, and food processing plants and that are resistant to traditional drugs or disinfectants. Since new methods of pathogens eradication must be invented and implemented, nanotechnology seems to have become the response to that acute need. A remarkable achievement in this field of science was the creation of self-disinfecting surfaces that base on advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Thus, the phenomenon of photocatalysis was practically applied. Among the AOPs that have been most studied in respect of their ability to eradicate viruses, prions, bacteria, yeasts, and molds, there are the processes of TiO2/UV and ZnO/UV. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) act as photocatalysts, after they have been powdered to nanoparticles. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is an agent that determines their excitation. Methods using photocatalytic properties of nanosized TiO2 and ZnO prove to be highly efficient in inactivation of infectious agents. Therefore, they are being applied on a growing scale. AOP-based disinfection is regarded as a very promising tool that might help overcome problems in food hygiene and public health protection. The susceptibility of infectious agents to photocatalylic processes can be generally arranged in the following order: viruses > prions > Gram-negative bacteria > Gram-positive bacteria > yeasts > molds.

  9. PROCESS OF PRODUCING REFRACTORY URANIUM OXIDE ARTICLES

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, N.E.

    1957-12-01

    A method is presented for fabricating uranium oxide into a shaped refractory article by introducing a uranium halide fluxing reagent into the uranium oxide, and then mixing and compressing the materials into a shaped composite mass. The shaped mass of uranium oxide and uranium halide is then fired at an elevated temperature so as to form a refractory sintered article. It was found in the present invention that the introduction of a uraninm halide fluxing agent afforded a fluxing action with the uranium oxide particles and that excellent cohesion between these oxide particles was obtained. Approximately 90% of uranium dioxide and 10% of uranium tetrafluoride represent a preferred composition.

  10. The potential of AOP networks for reproductive and developmental toxicity assay development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Historically, the prediction of reproductive and early developmental toxicity has largely relied on the use of animals. The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework forms a basis for the development of new non-animal test methods. It also provides biological context for mechanisti...

  11. AOP Wiki: A new tool for developing and documenting adverse outcome pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    An initial version of an IT system to support OECD AOP activities recently was completed through collaborative efforts and contributions of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (EU JRC), the Office of Research and Development (ORD) of the United States Environmental Pr...

  12. Quantitative AOP linking aromatase inhibition to impaired reproduction: A case study in predictive ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) framework is intended to help support greater use of mechanistic toxicology data as a basis for risk assessment and/or regulatory decision-making. While there have been clear advances in the ability to rapidly generate mechanistically-oriented da...

  13. Fish early life stage: Developing AOPs to support targeted reduction and replacement

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is an interest in developing alternatives to the fish early-life stage (FELS) test (OECD test guideline 210), for predicting adverse chronic toxicity outcomes (e.g., impacts on growth and survival). Development and characterization of adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) related...

  14. Thick film oxidation of copper in an electroplated MEMS process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.; Bedair, S. S.; Song, X.; Boteler, L. M.; Kierzewski, I. M.

    2013-06-01

    Copper forms a porous oxide, allowing the formation of oxide layers up to tens of microns thick to be created at modest processing temperatures. In this work, the controlled oxidation of copper is employed within an all-metal electroplating process to create electrically insulating, structural posts and beams. This capability could eliminate the additional dielectric deposition and patterning steps that are often needed during the construction of sensors, waveguides, and other microfabricated devices. In this paper, copper oxidation rates for thermal and plasma-assisted growth methods are characterized. Time control of the oxide growth enables larger copper structures to remain conductive while smaller copper posts are fully oxidized. The concept is demonstrated using the controlled oxidation of a copper layer between two nickel layers to fabricate nickel inductors having both copper electrical vias and copper oxide support pillars. Nickel was utilized in this demonstration for its resistance against low temperature oxidation and interdiffusion with copper.

  15. Performance evaluation of different solar advanced oxidation processes applied to the treatment of a real textile dyeing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Manenti, Diego R; Soares, Petrick A; Silva, Tânia F C V; Módenes, Aparecido N; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; Bergamasco, Rosângela; Boaventura, Rui A R; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-01-01

    The performance of different solar-driven advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), such as TiO2/UV, TiO2/H2O2/UV, and Fe(2+)/H2O2/UV-visible in the treatment of a real textile effluent using a pilot plant with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs), was investigated. The influence of the main photo-Fenton reaction variables such as iron concentration (20-100 mg Fe(2+) L(-1)), pH (2.4-4.5), temperature (10-50 °C), and irradiance (22-68 WUV m(-2)) was evaluated in a lab-scale prototype using artificial solar radiation. The real textile wastewater presented a beige color, with a maximum absorbance peak at 641 nm, alkaline pH (8.1), moderate organic content (dissolved organic carbon (DOC) = 129 mg C L(-1) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) = 496 mg O2 L(-1)), and high conductivity mainly associated to the high concentration of chloride (1.1 g Cl(-) L(-1)), sulfate (0.4 g SO 4 (2 -) L(- 1)), and sodium (1.2 g Na(+) L(-1)) ions. Although all the processes tested contributed to complete decolorization and effective mineralization, the most efficient process was the solar photo-Fenton with an optimum catalyst concentration of 60 mg Fe(2+) L(-1), leading to 70 % mineralization (DOCfinal = 41 mg C L(-1); CODfinal < 150 mg O2 L(-1)) at pH 3.6, requiring a UV energy dose of 3.5 kJUV L(-1) (t 30 W = 22.4 min; [Formula: see text]; [Formula: see text]) and consuming 18.5 mM of H2O2.

  16. Oxidation Ditches. Student Manual. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, David

    The textual material for a two-lesson unit on oxidation ditches is presented in this student manual. Topics discussed in the first lesson (introduction, theory, and components) include: history of the oxidation ditch process; various designs of the oxidation ditch; multi-trench systems; carrousel system; advantages and disadvantages of the…

  17. Assessing the application of advanced oxidation processes, and their combination with biological treatment, to effluents from pulp and paper industry.

    PubMed

    Merayo, Noemí; Hermosilla, Daphne; Blanco, Laura; Cortijo, Luis; Blanco, Angeles

    2013-11-15

    The closure of water circuits within pulp and paper mills has resulted in a higher contamination load of the final mill effluent, which must consequently be further treated in many cases to meet the standards imposed by the legislation in force. Different treatment strategies based on advanced oxidation processes (ozonation and TiO2-photocatalysis), and their combination with biological treatment (MBR), are herein assessed for effluents of a recycled paper mill and a kraft pulp mill. Ozone treatment achieved the highest efficiency of all. The consumption of 2.4 g O3 L(-1) resulted in about a 60% COD reduction treating the effluent from the kraft pulp mill at an initial pH=7; although it only reached about a 35% COD removal for the effluent of the recycled paper mill. Otherwise, photocatalysis achieved about a 20-30% reduction of the COD for both type of effluents. In addition, the effluent from the recycled paper mill showed a higher biodegradability, so combinations of these AOPs with biological treatment were tested. As a result, photocatalysis did not report any significant COD reduction improvement whether being performed as pre- or post-treatment of the biological process; whereas the use of ozonation as post-biological treatment enhanced COD removal a further 10%, summing up a total 90% reduction of the COD for the combined treatment, as well as it also supposed an increase of the presence of volatile fatty acids, which might ultimately enable the resultant wastewater to be recirculated back to further biological treatment.

  18. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, E.A.; Fegley, M.B. Jr.; Bowen, H.K.

    1985-09-24

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 microns can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed. 6 figs.

  19. Synthesis and processing of monosized oxide powders

    DOEpatents

    Barringer, Eric A.; Fegley, Jr., M. Bruce; Bowen, H. Kent

    1985-01-01

    Uniform-size, high-purity, spherical oxide powders are formed by hydrolysis of alkoxide precursors in dilute alcoholic solutions. Under controlled conditions (concentrations of 0.03 to 0.2 M alkoxide and 0.2 to 1.5 M water, for example) oxide particles on the order of about 0.05 to 0.7 micron can be produced. Methods of doping such powders and forming sinterable compacts are also disclosed.

  20. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A.; Nayak, Pradipta K.; Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M. N.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2015-01-01

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field. PMID:25892711

  1. Low temperature processed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) device by oxidation effect from capping layer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenwei; Al-Jawhari, Hala A; Nayak, Pradipta K; Caraveo-Frescas, J A; Wei, Nini; Hedhili, M N; Alshareef, H N

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190 °C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  2. Process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Derosset, A.J.; Ginger, E.A.

    1980-12-23

    An improved process for the separation of sulfur oxides from a gaseous mixture containing sulfur oxides and oxygen is disclosed. The gaseous mixture is contacted with a solid sulfur oxide acceptor comprising copper, copper oxide, or a mixture thereof dispersed on a carrier material in combination with a platinum group metal component and a component selected from the group consisting of rhenium, germanium and tin.

  3. Analysis and advanced oxidation treatment of a persistent pharmaceutical compound in wastewater and wastewater sludge-carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-02-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) are considered as emerging environmental problem due to their continuous input and persistence to the aquatic ecosystem even at low concentrations. Among them, carbamazepine (CBZ) has been detected at the highest frequency, which ends up in aquatic systems via wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) among other sources. The identification and quantification of CBZ in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) is of major interest to assess the toxicity of treated effluent discharged into the environment. Furthermore, WWS has been subjected for re-use either in agricultural application or for the production of value-added products through the route of bioconversion. However, this field application is disputable due to the presence of these organic compounds and in order to protect the ecosystem or end users, data concerning the concentration, fate, behavior as well as the perspective of simultaneous degradation of these compounds is urgently necessary. Many treatment technologies, including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed in order to degrade CBZ in WW and WWS. AOPs are technologies based on the intermediacy of hydroxyl and other radicals to oxidize recalcitrant, toxic and non-biodegradable compounds to various by-products and eventually to inert end products. The purpose of this review is to provide information on persistent pharmaceutical compound, carbamazepine, its ecological effects and removal during various AOPs of WW and WWS. This review also reports the different analytical methods available for quantification of CBZ in different contaminated media including WW and WWS.

  4. Analysis and advanced oxidation treatment of a persistent pharmaceutical compound in wastewater and wastewater sludge-carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, D P; Brar, S K; Tyagi, R D; Picard, P; Surampalli, R Y

    2014-02-01

    Pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) are considered as emerging environmental problem due to their continuous input and persistence to the aquatic ecosystem even at low concentrations. Among them, carbamazepine (CBZ) has been detected at the highest frequency, which ends up in aquatic systems via wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) among other sources. The identification and quantification of CBZ in wastewater (WW) and wastewater sludge (WWS) is of major interest to assess the toxicity of treated effluent discharged into the environment. Furthermore, WWS has been subjected for re-use either in agricultural application or for the production of value-added products through the route of bioconversion. However, this field application is disputable due to the presence of these organic compounds and in order to protect the ecosystem or end users, data concerning the concentration, fate, behavior as well as the perspective of simultaneous degradation of these compounds is urgently necessary. Many treatment technologies, including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been developed in order to degrade CBZ in WW and WWS. AOPs are technologies based on the intermediacy of hydroxyl and other radicals to oxidize recalcitrant, toxic and non-biodegradable compounds to various by-products and eventually to inert end products. The purpose of this review is to provide information on persistent pharmaceutical compound, carbamazepine, its ecological effects and removal during various AOPs of WW and WWS. This review also reports the different analytical methods available for quantification of CBZ in different contaminated media including WW and WWS. PMID:24140682

  5. Applying Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) to support Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA).

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Scholz, Stefan; Cronin, Mark T; Edwards, Stephen W; de Knecht, Joop; Crofton, Kevin; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Hartung, Thomas; Worth, Andrew; Patlewicz, Grace

    2014-12-01

    Chemical regulation is challenged by the large number of chemicals requiring assessment for potential human health and environmental impacts. Current approaches are too resource intensive in terms of time, money and animal use to evaluate all chemicals under development or already on the market. The need for timely and robust decision making demands that regulatory toxicity testing becomes more cost-effective and efficient. One way to realize this goal is by being more strategic in directing testing resources; focusing on chemicals of highest concern, limiting testing to the most probable hazards, or targeting the most vulnerable species. Hypothesis driven Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA) have been proposed as practical solutions to such strategic testing. In parallel, the development of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, which provides information on the causal links between a molecular initiating event (MIE), intermediate key events (KEs) and an adverse outcome (AO) of regulatory concern, offers the biological context to facilitate development of IATA for regulatory decision making. This manuscript summarizes discussions at the Workshop entitled "Advancing AOPs for Integrated Toxicology and Regulatory Applications" with particular focus on the role AOPs play in informing the development of IATA for different regulatory purposes. PMID:25261300

  6. Applying Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) to support Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA).

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut Erik; Scholz, Stefan; Cronin, Mark T; Edwards, Stephen W; de Knecht, Joop; Crofton, Kevin; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia; Hartung, Thomas; Worth, Andrew; Patlewicz, Grace

    2014-12-01

    Chemical regulation is challenged by the large number of chemicals requiring assessment for potential human health and environmental impacts. Current approaches are too resource intensive in terms of time, money and animal use to evaluate all chemicals under development or already on the market. The need for timely and robust decision making demands that regulatory toxicity testing becomes more cost-effective and efficient. One way to realize this goal is by being more strategic in directing testing resources; focusing on chemicals of highest concern, limiting testing to the most probable hazards, or targeting the most vulnerable species. Hypothesis driven Integrated Approaches to Testing and Assessment (IATA) have been proposed as practical solutions to such strategic testing. In parallel, the development of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework, which provides information on the causal links between a molecular initiating event (MIE), intermediate key events (KEs) and an adverse outcome (AO) of regulatory concern, offers the biological context to facilitate development of IATA for regulatory decision making. This manuscript summarizes discussions at the Workshop entitled "Advancing AOPs for Integrated Toxicology and Regulatory Applications" with particular focus on the role AOPs play in informing the development of IATA for different regulatory purposes.

  7. Oxidation of artificial sweetener sucralose by advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet; Kim, Hyunook

    2014-01-01

    Sucralose, a chlorinated carbohydrate, has shown its increased use as an artificial sweetener and persistently exists in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment. This paper aims to review possible degradation of sucralose and related carbohydrates by biological, electrochemical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes. Biodegradation of sucralose in waterworks did not occur significantly. Electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates may be applied to seek degradation of sucralose. The kinetics of the oxidation of sucralose and the related carbohydrates by different oxidative species is compared. Free chlorine, ozone, and ferrate did not show any potential to degrade sucralose in water. Advanced oxidation processes, generating highly strong oxidizing agent hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), have demonstrated effectiveness in transforming sucralose in water. The mechanism of oxidation of sucralose by (•)OH is briefly discussed. PMID:24687789

  8. Oxidation of artificial sweetener sucralose by advanced oxidation processes: a review.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Virender K; Oturan, Mehmet; Kim, Hyunook

    2014-01-01

    Sucralose, a chlorinated carbohydrate, has shown its increased use as an artificial sweetener and persistently exists in wastewater treatment plant effluents and aquatic environment. This paper aims to review possible degradation of sucralose and related carbohydrates by biological, electrochemical, chemical, and advanced oxidation processes. Biodegradation of sucralose in waterworks did not occur significantly. Electrochemical oxidation of carbohydrates may be applied to seek degradation of sucralose. The kinetics of the oxidation of sucralose and the related carbohydrates by different oxidative species is compared. Free chlorine, ozone, and ferrate did not show any potential to degrade sucralose in water. Advanced oxidation processes, generating highly strong oxidizing agent hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), have demonstrated effectiveness in transforming sucralose in water. The mechanism of oxidation of sucralose by (•)OH is briefly discussed.

  9. Effect of advanced oxidation processes on the micropollutants and the effluent organic matter contained in municipal wastewater previously treated by three different secondary methods.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Gamarra Vives, Franco Alejandro; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2015-11-01

    In this study, wastewater from the output of three different secondary treatment facilities (Activated Sludge, Moving Bed Bioreactor and Coagulation-Flocculation) present in the municipal wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland), was further treated with various oxidation processes (UV, UV/H2O2, solar irradiation, Fenton, solar photo-Fenton), at laboratory scale. For this assessment, 6 organic micropollutants in agreement with the new environmental legislation requirements in Switzerland were selected (Carbamazepine, Clarithromycin, Diclofenac, Metoprolol, Benzotriazole, Mecoprop) and monitored throughout the treatment. Also, the overall removal of the organic load was assessed. After each secondary treatment, the efficiency of the AOPs increased in the following order: Coagulation-Flocculation < Activated Sludge < Moving Bed Bioreactor, in almost all cases. From the different combinations tested, municipal wastewater subjected to biological treatment followed by UV/H2O2 resulted in the highest elimination levels. Wastewater previously treated by physicochemical treatment demonstrated considerably inhibited micropollutant degradation rates. The degradation kinetics were determined, yielding: k (UV) < k (UV/H2O2) and k (Fenton) < k (solar irradiation) < k (photo-Fenton). Finally, the evolution of global pollution parameters (COD & TOC elimination) was followed and the degradation pathways for the effluent organic matter are discussed.

  10. The fate of H2O2 during managed aquifer recharge: A residual from advanced oxidation processes for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; van Halem, D; van der Hoek, J P

    2016-04-01

    The fate of H2O2 residual from advanced oxidation process (AOP) preceding managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is of concern because H2O2 could lead to undesired effects on organisms in the MAR aquatic and soil ecosystem. The objective of this study was to distinguish between factors affecting H2O2 decomposition in MAR systems, simulated in batch reactors with synthetic MAR water and slow sand filter sand. The results showed that pure sand and soil organic matter had no considerable effect on H2O2 decomposition, whereas naturally occurring inorganic substances on the surface of sand grains and microbial biomass are the two main factors accelerating H2O2 decomposition in MAR systems. Additionally, the results showed that the H2O2 decompositions with different initial concentrations fitted first-order kinetics in 2-6 h in a mixture of slow sand filter sand (as a substitute for sand from a MAR system) and synthetic MAR water with high bacterial population. An estimation indicated that low concentrations of H2O2 (<3 mg/L) could decompose to the provisional standard of 0.25 mg/L in the first centimeters of MAR systems with the influent water containing high microbial biomass 38 ng ATP/mL.

  11. Effect of advanced oxidation processes on the micropollutants and the effluent organic matter contained in municipal wastewater previously treated by three different secondary methods.

    PubMed

    Giannakis, Stefanos; Gamarra Vives, Franco Alejandro; Grandjean, Dominique; Magnet, Anoys; De Alencastro, Luiz Felippe; Pulgarin, César

    2015-11-01

    In this study, wastewater from the output of three different secondary treatment facilities (Activated Sludge, Moving Bed Bioreactor and Coagulation-Flocculation) present in the municipal wastewater treatment plant of Vidy, Lausanne (Switzerland), was further treated with various oxidation processes (UV, UV/H2O2, solar irradiation, Fenton, solar photo-Fenton), at laboratory scale. For this assessment, 6 organic micropollutants in agreement with the new environmental legislation requirements in Switzerland were selected (Carbamazepine, Clarithromycin, Diclofenac, Metoprolol, Benzotriazole, Mecoprop) and monitored throughout the treatment. Also, the overall removal of the organic load was assessed. After each secondary treatment, the efficiency of the AOPs increased in the following order: Coagulation-Flocculation < Activated Sludge < Moving Bed Bioreactor, in almost all cases. From the different combinations tested, municipal wastewater subjected to biological treatment followed by UV/H2O2 resulted in the highest elimination levels. Wastewater previously treated by physicochemical treatment demonstrated considerably inhibited micropollutant degradation rates. The degradation kinetics were determined, yielding: k (UV) < k (UV/H2O2) and k (Fenton) < k (solar irradiation) < k (photo-Fenton). Finally, the evolution of global pollution parameters (COD & TOC elimination) was followed and the degradation pathways for the effluent organic matter are discussed. PMID:26255127

  12. The fate of H2O2 during managed aquifer recharge: A residual from advanced oxidation processes for drinking water production.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; van Halem, D; van der Hoek, J P

    2016-04-01

    The fate of H2O2 residual from advanced oxidation process (AOP) preceding managed aquifer recharge (MAR) is of concern because H2O2 could lead to undesired effects on organisms in the MAR aquatic and soil ecosystem. The objective of this study was to distinguish between factors affecting H2O2 decomposition in MAR systems, simulated in batch reactors with synthetic MAR water and slow sand filter sand. The results showed that pure sand and soil organic matter had no considerable effect on H2O2 decomposition, whereas naturally occurring inorganic substances on the surface of sand grains and microbial biomass are the two main factors accelerating H2O2 decomposition in MAR systems. Additionally, the results showed that the H2O2 decompositions with different initial concentrations fitted first-order kinetics in 2-6 h in a mixture of slow sand filter sand (as a substitute for sand from a MAR system) and synthetic MAR water with high bacterial population. An estimation indicated that low concentrations of H2O2 (<3 mg/L) could decompose to the provisional standard of 0.25 mg/L in the first centimeters of MAR systems with the influent water containing high microbial biomass 38 ng ATP/mL. PMID:26812369

  13. Nitrous oxide emissions from wastewater treatment processes

    PubMed Central

    Law, Yingyu; Ye, Liu; Pan, Yuting; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from wastewater treatment plants vary substantially between plants, ranging from negligible to substantial (a few per cent of the total nitrogen load), probably because of different designs and operational conditions. In general, plants that achieve high levels of nitrogen removal emit less N2O, indicating that no compromise is required between high water quality and lower N2O emissions. N2O emissions primarily occur in aerated zones/compartments/periods owing to active stripping, and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, rather than heterotrophic denitrifiers, are the main contributors. However, the detailed mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated, despite strong evidence suggesting that both nitrifier denitrification and the chemical breakdown of intermediates of hydroxylamine oxidation are probably involved. With increased understanding of the fundamental reactions responsible for N2O production in wastewater treatment systems and the conditions that stimulate their occurrence, reduction of N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems through improved plant design and operation will be achieved in the near future. PMID:22451112

  14. Process for Producing Metal Compounds From Graphite Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be fiber processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  15. Process for producing metal compounds from graphite oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  16. Process for Producing Metal Compounds from Graphite Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon. metal. chloride. and oxygen This intermediary product can be flier processed by direct exposure to carbonate solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon. metal carbonate. and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide: b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate: c) in a reducing environment. to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  17. Higher diversity of ammonia/ammonium-oxidizing prokaryotes in constructed freshwater wetland than natural coastal marine wetland.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Feng; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2013-08-01

    Anaerobic ammonium-oxidizing (anammox) bacteria, aerobic ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are three groups of ammonium/ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes (AOPs) that are involved in the nitrogen cycle. This research compared the AOP communities in a constructed freshwater wetland with a natural coastal marine wetland in the subtropical Hong Kong. Both vegetated/rhizosphere and nonvegetated sediments were investigated to identify the effects of different macrophytes on the AOP communities. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified gene fragments of 16S rRNA and archaeal and bacterial amoA (encoding the ammonia monooxygenase alpha subunit) were applied as molecular biomarkers to analyze the AOPs' phylogeny and diversity. Quantitative PCR was used to determine the abundances of AOPs in the sediments. The results showed that the relatively more heterogeneous freshwater wetland contained a broader range of phylotypes, higher diversity, more complex community structures, and more unevenly distributed abundances of AOPs than the coastal wetland. The effects of vegetation on the community structures of AOPs were plant-specific. The exotic Typha angustifolia affected the community structures of all AOPs and enhanced their abundances in the rhizosphere region. Both Phragmites australis and Cyperus malaccensis showed some effects on the community structures of AOB, but minimal effects on those of anammox bacteria or AOA. Kandelia obovata had almost no detectable effect on all AOPs due to their smaller size. This study suggested that the freshwater and coastal marine wetlands may have different contributions to the inorganic N removal due to the variations in AOP communities and plant types. PMID:23053083

  18. Process for selected gas oxide removal by radiofrequency catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Cha, C.Y.

    1993-09-21

    This process to remove gas oxides from flue gas utilizes adsorption on a char bed subsequently followed by radiofrequency catalysis enhancing such removal through selected reactions. Common gas oxides include SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. 1 figure.

  19. Uranium Metal to Oxide Conversion by Air Oxidation –Process Development

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, A

    2001-12-31

    Published technical information for the process of metal-to-oxide conversion of uranium components has been reviewed and summarized for the purpose of supporting critical decisions for new processes and facilities for the Y-12 National Security Complex. The science of uranium oxidation under low, intermediate, and high temperature conditions is reviewed. A process and system concept is outlined and process parameters identified for uranium oxide production rates. Recommendations for additional investigations to support a conceptual design of a new facility are outlined.

  20. Solid oxide electrochemical cell fabrication process

    DOEpatents

    Dollard, Walter J.; Folser, George R.; Pal, Uday B.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    1992-01-01

    A method to form an electrochemical cell (12) is characterized by the steps of thermal spraying stabilized zirconia over a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube (14) to provide an electrolyte layer (15), coating conductive particles over the electrolyte, pressurizing the outside of the electrolyte layer, feeding halide vapors of yttrium and zirconium to the outside of the electrolyte layer and feeding a source of oxygen to the inside of the electrolyte layer, heating to cause oxygen reaction with the halide vapors to close electrolyte pores if there are any and to form a metal oxide coating on and between the particles and provide a fuel electrode (16).

  1. Online monitoring of Escherichia coli and Bacillus thuringiensis spore inactivation after advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Sherchan, Samendra P; Snyder, Shane A; Gerba, Charles P; Pepper, Ian L

    2014-01-01

    Various studies have shown that advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) such as UV light in combination with hydrogen peroxide is an efficient process for the removal of a large variety of emerging contaminants including microorganisms. The mechanism of destruction in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the enhanced formation of hydroxyl (·OH) radicals, which have a high oxidation potential. The goal of this study was to utilize in-line advanced oxidation to inactivate microbes, and document the inactivation via an in-line, real-time sensor. Escherichia coli cells and Bacillus thuringiensis spores were exposed to UV/H2O2 treatment in DI water, and the online sensor BioSentry(®) was evaluated for its potential to monitor inactivation in real-time. B. thuringiensis was selected as a non-pathogenic surrogate for B. anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax and a proven biological weapon. UV radiation and UV/H2O2 exposure resulted in a >6 log10 reduction of the viable culturable counts of E. coli vegetative cells, and a 3 log10 reduction of B. thuringiensis spores. Scanning electron microscopy of the treated samples revealed severe damage on the surface of most E. coli cells, yet there was no significant change observed in the morphology of the B. thuringiensis spores. Following AOP exposure, the BioSentry sensor showed an increase in the categories of unknown, rod and spores counts, but overall, did not correspond well with viable count assays. Data from this study show that advanced oxidation processes effectively inactivate E. coli vegetative cells, but not B. thuringiensis spores, which were more resistant to AOP. Further, the BioSentry in-line sensor was not successful in documenting destruction of the microbial cells in real-time.

  2. Removal of trichloroethylene from waste gases via the peroxone process.

    PubMed

    Van Craeynest, K; Dewulf, J; Vandeburie, S; Van Langenhove, H

    2003-01-01

    In dealing with chlorinated organic compounds in waste gases, traditional treatment techniques show some severe shortcomings. Thermal oxidation may lead to the formation of dioxins, active carbon adsorption does not degrade the pollutants and biotechnological treatment is difficult since microorganisms do not always possess efficient degradation pathways for these compounds. These drawbacks explain the growing interest of the waste gas treatment sector for Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs) which were initially developed as water treatment techniques. AOPs generate highly reactive hydroxyl radicals that efficiently oxidise organic pollutants. In the peroxone process, this is done by a combination of ozone and hydrogen peroxide. In this work, the peroxone process is applied in an oxidative scrubber for the removal of trichloroethylene (TCE). Rapid oxidation of absorbed TCE in the liquid phase enhances TCE absorption Practically, a gas stream contaminated with TCE is mixed with an ozone loaded gas stream. The mixture is led through a bubble column that is fed with a buffered hydrogen peroxide solution. The effect of different process parameters (flow rates, buffer concentration, pH, hydrogen peroxide/ozone dosage ratio, TCE dosage) on TCE removal was investigated. Depending on the operating conditions, removal efficiencies up to 98% could be attained.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, Matthew Ellis; Bayless, David J.; Trembly, Jason P.

    2011-11-15

    Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

  4. Study of the formation process of titanium oxides containing micro arc oxidation film on Mg alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yingwei; Dong, Kaihui; Shan, Dayong; Han, En-Hou

    2014-09-01

    A novel micro arc oxidation (MAO) film is developed to protect Mg alloys from corrosion. This film contains plenty of titanium oxides, which exhibits higher chemical stability than traditional MAO films. Especially, the micropores on the surface of the film are in situ sealed during the film formation process instead of the sealing pores post treatment. The film formation process is investigated by the observation of surface and cross-section morphologies and analysis of chemical composition. It is found that the sizes of micropores increase but the quantities decrease with increasing oxidation voltages. The micropores are open in the initial stage of oxidation and then they are sealed gradually. The growth direction of the film takes place change at different oxidation voltages. The elements of F and Ti play a significant role in the film growth process.

  5. The role of oxidative processes in emphysema

    SciTech Connect

    Janoff, A.; Carp, H.; Laurent, P.; Raju, L.

    1983-02-01

    Elastase/elastase inhibitor imbalance in the lung has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. In light of this, it may be significant that the activity of two major elastase inhibitors, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1Pi) and bronchial mucous proteinase inhibitor, can be decreased by oxidizing agents. The effect can be observed with ozone, substances present in cigarette smoke, and oxygen metabolites generated by lung macrophages as well as peroxidative systems released by other phagocytic cells. Thus alpha 1Pi recovered from lung washings of cigarette smokers has only half the predicted normal activity per mg inhibitor and contains 4 moles of methionine sulfoxide (oxidized methionine) per mole of inactive inhibitor. By contrast, alpha 1Pi purified from nonsmokers' lung washings is fully active and contains only native methionine. At the same time, lung washes from some smokers show significantly greater hydrolytic activity against a specific synthetic elastase substrate than do lung washes of nonsmokers. These findings suggest that some smokers may develop an acquired imbalance between elastase and elastase inhibitor in their lungs, favoring activity of the enzyme. In addition to the potential effect of cigarette smoking on lung elastase/elastase inhibitor balance, smoking also may interfere with elastin repair mechanisms. Specifically, acidic water-soluble gas phase components of cigarette smoke prevent synthesis of desmosine cross-links during elastinogenesis in vitro. This report will attempt to correlate the foregoing information on biochemical changes in the lung induced by cigarette smoking with the development of emphysema in the smoker.

  6. Literature review for oxalate oxidation processes and plutonium oxalate solubility

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. A.

    2015-10-01

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign.

  7. Landfill leachate treatment by solar-driven AOPs

    SciTech Connect

    Rocha, Elisangela M.R.; Vilar, Vitor J.P.; Boaventura, Rui A.R.; Fonseca, Amelia; Saraiva, Isabel

    2011-01-15

    Sanitary landfill leachate resulting from the rainwater percolation through the landfill layers and waste material decomposition is a complex mixture of high-strength organic and inorganic compounds which constitutes serious environmental problems. In this study, different heterogeneous (TiO{sub 2}/UV, TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) and homogenous (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV, Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) photocatalytic processes were investigated as an alternative for the treatment of a mature landfill leachate. The addition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to TiO{sub 2}/UV system increased the reduction of the aromatic compounds from 15% to 61%, although mineralization was almost the same. The DOC and aromatic content abatement is similar for the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV and TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV processes, although the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} consumption is three times higher in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV system. The low efficiency of TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV system is presumably due to the alkaline leachate solution, for which the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} becomes highly unstable and self-decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} occurs. The efficiency of the TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV system increased 10 times after a preliminary pH correction to 4. The photo-Fenton process is much more efficient than heterogeneous (TiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) or homogeneous (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV) photocatalysis, showing an initial reaction rate more than 20 times higher, and leading to almost complete mineralization of the wastewater. However, when compared with TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV with acidification, the photo-Fenton reaction is only two times faster. The optimal initial iron dose for the photo-Fenton treatment of the leachate is 60 mg Fe{sup 2+} L{sup -1}, which is in agreement with path length of 5 cm in the photoreactor. The kinetic behaviour of the process (60 mg Fe{sup 2+} L{sup -1}) comprises a slow initial reaction, followed by a first-order kinetics (k = 0.020 LkJ{sub UV

  8. Mobilization Protocols for Hybrid Sensors for Environmental AOP Sampling (HySEAS) Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B.

    2014-01-01

    The protocols presented here enable the proper mobilization of the latest-generation instruments for measuring the apparent optical properties (AOPs) of aquatic ecosystems. The protocols are designed for the Hybrid Sensors for Environmental AOP Sampling (HySEAS) class of instruments, but are applicable to the community of practice for AOP measurements. The protocols are organized into eleven sections beyond an introductory overview: a) cables and connectors, b) HySEAS instruments, c) platform preparation, d) instrument installation, e) cable installation, f) test deployment, g) test recovery, h) maintenance, i) shipping, j) storage, and k) smallboat operations. Each section concentrates on documenting how to prevent the most likely faults, remedy them should they occur, and accomplishing both with the proper application of a modest set of useful tools. Within the twelve sections, there are Socratic exercises to stimulate thought, and the answers to these exercises appear in Appendix A. Frequently asked questions (FAQs) are summarized in a separate section after the answers to the exercises in Appendix B. For practitioners unfamiliar with the nautical terms used throughout this document plus others likely encountered at sea, an abbreviated dictionary of nautical terms appears in Appendix C. An abbreviated dictionary of radiotelephone terms is presented in Appendix D. To ensure familiarity with many of the tools that are presented, Appendix E provides a description of the tools alongside a thumbnail picture. Abbreviated deployment checklists and cable diagrams are provided in Appendix F. The document concludes with an acknowledgments section, a glossary of acronyms, a definition of symbols, and a list of references.

  9. Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasad

    2011-06-07

    The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  10. [Mitochondria and oxidative stress participation in renal inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis and renal fibrosis are processes inherent to the chronic kidney disease, and consequently a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with chronic renal disease associated to an increase of the oxidative stress. The injured tubular cells linked to the interstitial macrophages and myofibroblasts produce cytokines and growth factors that encourage an inflammatory condition, inducing the apoptosis of the tubular cells and enabling the accumulation of the extracellular matrix. The angiotensin II has a central role in the renal fibrogenesis leading to a rapid progression of the chronic kidney disease. The growing levels of the angiotensin II induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of NF-kB, adhesion molecules,chemokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress. The current evidence suggests that the angiotensin II increases the mitochondrial oxidative stress, regulates the induction of the apoptosis and conditions the inflammatory process. Therefore the mitochondria and the oxidative stress would play a determinant role in the renal inflammatory process. Finally, this review summarizes our present knowledge regarding the possible mechanisms that would contribute to the apoptosis conditioned by inflammation and/or oxidative stress during the chronic renal disease. Additionally, a new concept of the anti-inflammatory tools is proposed to regulate the mitochondrial oxidative stress that would directly affect the inflammatory process and apoptosis. This concept could have positive consequences on the treatment of renal inflammatory pathologies and related diseases.

  11. Application of metabolite profiling tools and time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the identification of transformation products of iopromide and iopamidol during advanced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Randolph R; Lester, Yaal; Linden, Karl G; Love, Nancy G; Atilla-Gokcumen, G Ekin; Aga, Diana S

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of wastewater treatment systems in removing pharmaceuticals is often assessed on the basis of the decrease in the concentration of the parent compound. However, what is perceived as "removal" during treatment may not necessarily mean mineralization of the pharmaceutical compound but simply conversion into different transformation products (TPs). Using liquid chromatography coupled to a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (LC-QToF-MS), we demonstrated conversion of iopromide in wastewater to at least 14 TPs after an advanced oxidation process (AOP) using UV (fluence = 1500 mJ/cm(2)) and H2O2 (10 mg/L). Due to the complexity of the wastewater matrix, the initial experiments were performed using a high concentration (10 mg/L) of iopromide in order to facilitate the identification of TPs. Despite the high concentration of iopromide used, cursory inspection of UV and mass spectra only revealed four TPs in the chromatograms of the post-AOP samples. However, the use of METLIN database and statistics-based profiling tools commonly used in metabolomics proved effective in discriminating between background signals and TPs derived from iopromide. High-resolution mass data allowed one to predict molecular formulas of putative TPs with errors below 5 ppm relative to the observed m/z. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data and isotope pattern comparisons provided necessary information that allowed one to elucidate the structure of iopromide TPs. The presence of the proposed iopromide TPs was determined in unspiked wastewater from a municipal wastewater treatment plant, but no iopromide and TPs were detected. Using analogous structural modifications and oxidation that results from the AOP treatment of iopromide, the potential TPs of iopamidol (a structurally similar compound to iopromide) were predicted. The same mass fragmentation pattern observed in iopromide TPs was applied to the predicted iopamidol TPs. LC-QToF-MS revealed the presence of two iopamidol

  12. Optimization of conventional Fenton and ultraviolet-assisted oxidation processes for the treatment of reverse osmosis retentate from a paper mill.

    PubMed

    Hermosilla, Daphne; Merayo, Noemí; Ordóñez, Ruth; Blanco, Angeles

    2012-06-01

    According to current environmental legislation concerned with water scarcity, paper industry is being forced to adopt a zero liquid effluent policy. In consequence, reverse osmosis (RO) systems are being assessed as the final step of effluent treatment trains aiming to recover final wastewater and reuse it as process water. One of the most important drawbacks of these treatments is the production of a retentated stream, which is usually highly loaded with biorecalcitrant organic matter and inorganics; and this effluent must meet current legislation stringent constraints before being ultimately disposed. The treatment of biorefractory RO retentate from a paper mill by several promising advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) - conventional Fenton, photo-Fenton and photocatalysis - was optimized considering the effect and interaction of reaction parameters; particularly using response surface methodology (RSM) when appropriate (Fenton processes). The economical cost of these treatments was also comparatively assessed. Photo-Fenton process was able to totally remove the COD of the retentate, and resulted even operatively cheaper at high COD removal levels than conventional Fenton, which achieved an 80% reduction of the COD at best. In addition, although these optimal results were produced at pH=2.8, it was also tested that Fenton processes are able to achieve good COD reduction efficiencies (>60%) without adjusting the initial pH value, provided the natural pH of this wastewater was close to neutral. Finally, although TiO(2)-photocatalysis showed the least efficient and most expensive figures, it improved the biodegradability of the retentate, so its combination with a final biological step almost achieved the total removal of the COD. PMID:22244652

  13. High-temperature processing of cuprate oxide superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, M. K.; Ashburn, J. R.; Higgins, C. A.; Fellows, C. W.; Loo, B. H.; Burns, D. H.; Ibrahim, A.; Rolin, T. D.; Peters, P. N.; Sisk, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Superconducting Y1Ba2Cu3O7 ('123') films were fabricated on the Y2BaCuO5 ('211') phase substrate. The superconducting characteristics of these films, in terms of superconducting transition temperature (Tc) and width, are better than those using other oxide compounds as substrates. In addition, using high-temperature processing, the bulk 211 phase was converted into the 123 phase. A new high Tc copper oxide material with non-rare-earth elements (Bi-Sr-Cu-O) was prepared using similar high-temperature processing. High-temperature processing presents an alternative synthetic route in the search of new high Tc superconductors.

  14. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M.

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  15. Oxidation processes in magneto-optic and related materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Paul A.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Danzinger, James L.; England, Craig D.

    1992-01-01

    The surface oxidation processes of thin films of magneto-optic materials, such as the rare-earth transition metal alloys have been studied, starting in ultrahigh vacuum environments, using surface analysis techniques, as a way of modeling the oxidation processes which occur at the base of a defect in an overcoated material, at the instant of exposure to ambient environments. Materials examined have included FeTbCo alloys, as well as those same materials with low percentages of added elements, such a Ta, and their reactivities to both O2 and H2O compared with materials such as thin Fe films coated with ultrathin adlayers of Ti. The surface oxidation pathways for these materials is reviewed, and XPS data presented which indicates the type of oxides formed, and a critical region of Ta concentration which provides optimum protection.

  16. Scientists set to destroy VOCs with thermal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, K.A

    1989-12-01

    This paper reports on a thermal oxidation process that boasts a 99.99 percent destruction removal efficiency (DRE) and minimal formation of products of incomplete combustion (PICs). Together with a high reliability, corrosion resistant,non-catalytic design, these attributes make the technology ideal for processing chlorinated compounds, say company officials.

  17. Advanced oxidation processes with coke plant wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Krzywicka, A; Kwarciak-Kozłowska, A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the most efficient method of coke wastewater treatment. This research examined two processes - advanced oxidation with Fenton and photo-Fenton reaction. It was observed that the use of ultraviolet radiation with Fenton process had a better result in removal of impurities.

  18. Development of techniques for processing metal-metal oxide systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    Techniques for producing model metal-metal oxide systems for the purpose of evaluating the results of processing such systems in the low-gravity environment afforded by a drop tower facility are described. Because of the lack of success in producing suitable materials samples and techniques for processing in the 3.5 seconds available, the program was discontinued.

  19. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  20. COLUMBIC OXIDE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR SEPARATING URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM IONS

    DOEpatents

    Beaton, R.H.

    1959-07-14

    A process is described for separating plutonium ions from a solution of neutron irradiated uranium in which columbic oxide is used as an adsorbert. According to the invention the plutonium ion is selectively adsorbed by Passing a solution containing the plutonium in a valence state not higher than 4 through a porous bed or column of granules of hydrated columbic oxide. The adsorbed plutonium is then desorbed by elution with 3 N nitric acid.

  1. [Oxidative stress, antioxydants and the ageing process].

    PubMed

    Pincemail, J; Ricour, C; Defraigne, J O; Petermans, J

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant supplementation in the form of pills is thought to slow down the aging process through the "free radical" scavenger activity of these compounds. The idea arose from the "Free Radical Theory of Ageing" (FRTA), initially developed by Harman in 1956. In the present paper, we present some arguments against this theory. One of the most pertinent is that "free radicals", more properly renamed as reactive oxygen species (ROS), play important biological roles in defense mechanisms of the organism as illustrated, in particular, by the hormesis phenomenon. Surprisingly, a moderate production of ROS has been shown to extend the life span in animals. PMID:25065231

  2. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments. Annual report, FY1997

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.

    1998-12-31

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company. Continuous ceramic filaments are a principal component in many advanced high temperature materials like continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) and woven ceramic textiles. The use of continuous ceramic filaments in CFCC radiant burners, gas turbines, waste incineration, and hot gas filters in U.S. industry and power generation is estimated to save at least 2.16 quad/yr by year 2010 with energy cost savings of at least $8.1 billion. By year 2010, continuous ceramic filaments and CFCC`s have the potential to abate pollution emissions by 917,000 tons annually of nitrous oxide and 118 million tons annually of carbon dioxide (DOE Report OR-2002, February, 1994).

  3. Advances in Measuring the Apparent Optical Properties (AOPs) of Optically Complex Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, John H.; Hooker, Stanford B.; Booth, Charles R.; Bernhard, Germar; Lind, Randall N.; Brown, James W.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents new technology used to measure the apparent optical properties (AOPs) of optically complex waters. The principal objective is to be prepared for the launch of next-generation ocean color satellites with the most capable commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) instrumentation. An enhanced COTS radiometer was the starting point for designing and testing the new sensors. The follow-on steps were to apply the lessons learned towards a new in-water profiler based on a kite-shaped backplane for mounting the light sensors. The next level of sophistication involved evaluating new radiometers emerging from a development activity based on so-called microradiometers. The exploitation of microradiometers resulted in an in-water profiling system, which includes a sensor networking capability to control ancillary sensors like a shadowband or global positioning system (GPS) device. A principal advantage of microradiometers is their flexibility in producing, interconnecting, and maintaining instruments. The full problem set for collecting sea-truth data--whether in coastal waters or the open ocean-- involves other aspects of data collection that were improved for instruments measuring both AOPs and inherent optical properties (IOPs), if the uncertainty budget is to be minimized. New capabilities associated with deploying solar references were developed as well as a compact solution for recovering in-water instrument systems from small boats.

  4. Taxonomic applicability of inflammatory cytokines in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development.

    PubMed

    Angrish, Michelle M; Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Madden, Michael C; Moser, Virginia C; Herr, David W

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines, low-molecular-weight messenger proteins that act as intercellular immunomodulatory signals, have become a mainstream preclinical marker for assessing the systemic inflammatory response to external stressors. The challenge is to quantitate from healthy subjects cytokine levels that are below or at baseline and relate those dynamic and complex cytokine signatures of exposures with the inflammatory and repair pathways. Thus, highly sensitive, specific, and precise analytical and statistical methods are critically important. Investigators at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have implemented advanced technologies and developed statistics for evaluating panels of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate, urine samples, and murine biological media. Advanced multiplex, bead-based, and automated analytical platforms provided sufficient sensitivity, precision, and accuracy over the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thus, baseline cytokine levels can be quantified from healthy human subjects and animals and compared to an in vivo exposure response from an environmental chemical. Specifically, patterns of cytokine responses in humans exposed to environmental levels of ozone and diesel exhaust, and in rodents exposed to selected pesticides (such as fipronil and carbaryl), were used as case studies to generally assess the taxonomic applicability of cytokine responses. The findings in this study may aid in the application of measureable cytokine markers in future adverse outcome pathway (AOP)-based toxicity testing. Data from human and animal studies were coalesced and the possibility of using cytokines as key events (KE) to bridge species responses to external stressors in an AOP-based framework was explored.

  5. Adapting biomarker technologies to adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) research: current thoughts on using in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) research is a relatively new concept in human systems biology for assessing the molecular level linkage from an initiating (chemical) event that could lead to a disease state. Although most implementations of AOPs are based on liquids analyses, the...

  6. LITERATURE REVIEW FOR OXALATE OXIDATION PROCESSES AND PLUTONIUM OXALATE SOLUBILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C.

    2012-02-03

    A literature review of oxalate oxidation processes finds that manganese(II)-catalyzed nitric acid oxidation of oxalate in precipitate filtrate is a viable and well-documented process. The process has been operated on the large scale at Savannah River in the past, including oxidation of 20 tons of oxalic acid in F-Canyon. Research data under a variety of conditions show the process to be robust. This process is recommended for oxalate destruction in H-Canyon in the upcoming program to produce feed for the MOX facility. Prevention of plutonium oxalate precipitation in filtrate can be achieved by concentrated nitric acid/ferric nitrate sequestration of oxalate. Organic complexants do not appear practical to sequester plutonium. Testing is proposed to confirm the literature and calculation findings of this review at projected operating conditions for the upcoming campaign. H Canyon plans to commence conversion of plutonium metal to low-fired plutonium oxide in 2012 for eventual use in the Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX) Facility. The flowsheet includes sequential operations of metal dissolution, ion exchange, elution, oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination. All processes beyond dissolution will occur in HB-Line. The filtration step produces an aqueous filtrate that may have as much as 4 M nitric acid and 0.15 M oxalate. The oxalate needs to be removed from the stream to prevent possible downstream precipitation of residual plutonium when the solution is processed in H Canyon. In addition, sending the oxalate to the waste tank farm is undesirable. This report addresses the processing options for destroying the oxalate in existing H Canyon equipment.

  7. Process for combined control of mercury and nitric oxide.

    SciTech Connect

    Livengood, C. D.; Mendelsohn, M. H.

    1999-11-03

    Continuing concern about the effects of mercury in the environment may lead to requirements for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. If such controls are mandated, the use of existing flue-gas cleanup systems, such as wet scrubbers currently employed for flue-gas desulfurization, would be desirable, Such scrubbers have been shown to be effective for capturing oxidized forms of mercury, but cannot capture the very insoluble elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) that can form a significant fraction of the total emissions. At Argonne National Laboratory, we have proposed and tested a concept for enhancing removal of Hg{sup 0}, as well as nitric oxide, through introduction of an oxidizing agent into the flue gas upstream of a scrubber, which readily absorbs the soluble reaction products. Recently, we developed a new method for introducing the oxidizing agent into the flue-gas stream that dramatically improved reactant utilization. The oxidizing agent employed was NOXSORB{trademark}, which is a commercial product containing chloric acid and sodium chlorate. When a dilute solution of this agent was introduced into a gas stream containing Hg{sup 0} and other typical flue-gas species at 300 F, we found that about 100% of the mercury was removed from the gas phase and recovered in process liquids. At the same time, approximately 80% of the nitric oxide was removed. The effect of sulfur dioxide on this process was also investigated and the results showed that it slightly decreased the amount of Hg{sup 0} oxidized while appearing to increase the removal of nitric oxide from the gas phase. We are currently testing the effects of variations in NOXSORB{trademark} concentration, sulfur dioxide concentration, nitric oxide concentration, and reaction time (residence time). Preliminary economic projections based on the results to date indicate that the chemical cost for nitric oxide oxidation could be less than $5,000/ton removed, while for Hg{sup 0} oxidation it

  8. Oxidation of Black Carbon by Biotic and Abiotic Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chih-hsin; Lehmann, Johannes C.; Thies, Janice E.; Burton, Sarah D.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantify the relative importance of either biotic or abiotic oxidation of biomass-derived black carbon (BC) and to characterize the surface properties and charge characteristics of oxidized particulate BC. We incubated BC and BC-soil mixtures at two different temperatures (30 C and 70 C) with and without microbial inoculation, nutrient additions, or manure amendments for four months. Abiotic processes were more important for oxidation of BC than biotic processes during this short-term incubation, as inoculation with microorganisms did not change any of the measured parameters. Black C incubated at both 30 C and 70 C without microbial activity showed dramatic decreases in pH (in water) from 5.4 to 5.2 and 3.4, as well as increases in cation exchange capacity (CEC at pH 7) by 53% and 538% and in oxygen (O) contents by 4% and 38%, respectively. Boehm titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy suggested that the formation of carboxylic functional groups was the reason for the enhanced CEC during oxidation. The analyses of BC surface properties by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the oxidation of BC particles initiated on the surface. Incubation at 30 C only enhanced oxidation on particle surfaces, while oxidation during incubation at 70 C penetrated into the interior of particles. Such short-term oxidation of BC has great significance for the stability of BC in soils as well as for its effects on soil fertility and biogeochemistry.

  9. Hybridization of natural systems with advanced treatment processes for organic micropollutant removals: new concepts in multi-barrier treatment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Sairam; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Amy, Gary

    2013-07-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) represent a major constraint in drinking water supply. In the past, emphasis has been on individual treatment processes comprising conventional treatment (coagulation, sedimentation, and filtration) followed by advanced treatment processes (adsorption, ion-exchange, oxidation, and membrane separation). With the depletion of water resources and high demand for power and chemical usage, efforts need to be made to judiciously use advanced treatment processes. There is a new interest in multiple barriers with synergies in which two coupled processes can function as a hybrid process. Within the context of this paper, the hybrid processes include a natural treatment process coupled with an advanced process. Pilot/full-scale studies have shown efficient removal of OMPs by these hybrid processes. With this hybridization, the usage of resources such as power and chemicals can be reduced. In this study, coupling/hybridization of aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) with oxidation (O3), advanced oxidation process which involves OH radicals (AOP), nanofiltration (NF), reverse osmosis (RO) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption for OMP removal was studied. O3 or AOP as a pre-treatment and GAC, NF, RO, or UV/chlorination as a post-treatment to ARR was studied. NF can be replaced by RO for removal of OMPs since studies have shown similar performance of NF to RO for removal of many OMPs, thereby reducing costs and providing a more sustainable approach. PMID:23664475

  10. Hybridization of natural systems with advanced treatment processes for organic micropollutant removals: new concepts in multi-barrier treatment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Sairam; Maeng, Sung Kyu; Amy, Gary

    2013-07-01

    Organic micropollutants (OMPs) represent a major constraint in drinking water supply. In the past, emphasis has been on individual treatment processes comprising conventional treatment (coagulation, sedimentation, and filtration) followed by advanced treatment processes (adsorption, ion-exchange, oxidation, and membrane separation). With the depletion of water resources and high demand for power and chemical usage, efforts need to be made to judiciously use advanced treatment processes. There is a new interest in multiple barriers with synergies in which two coupled processes can function as a hybrid process. Within the context of this paper, the hybrid processes include a natural treatment process coupled with an advanced process. Pilot/full-scale studies have shown efficient removal of OMPs by these hybrid processes. With this hybridization, the usage of resources such as power and chemicals can be reduced. In this study, coupling/hybridization of aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) with oxidation (O3), advanced oxidation process which involves OH radicals (AOP), nanofiltration (NF), reverse osmosis (RO) and granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption for OMP removal was studied. O3 or AOP as a pre-treatment and GAC, NF, RO, or UV/chlorination as a post-treatment to ARR was studied. NF can be replaced by RO for removal of OMPs since studies have shown similar performance of NF to RO for removal of many OMPs, thereby reducing costs and providing a more sustainable approach.

  11. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification.

    PubMed

    Sudhakaran, Sairam; Amy, Gary L

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (k(OH) and k(O3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O(3) and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, k(OH) and [Formula: see text] , were predicted based on target compound properties. The k(O3) and k(OH) values ranged from 5 * 10(-4) to 10(5) M(-1)s(-1) and 0.04 to 18 * (10(9)) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O(3) and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r(2) (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. PMID:23260175

  12. Study on the process of Fe (III) oxide fluorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sophronov, V. L.; Kalaev, M. E.; Makaseev, Yu N.; Sachkov, V. I.; Verkhoturova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    The article deals with a fundamentally new fluoride technology for obtaining fluoride materials, provides data on the kinetics of the process of fluorination of Fe oxide with fluorine, fluoride and ammonium bifluoride. The physical and chemical properties of obtained fluorides are shown: a study of the elemental composition, grain-size composition using the method of scanning electron microscopy and laser diffraction.

  13. Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes: today and tomorrow. A review.

    PubMed

    Sirés, Ignasi; Brillas, Enric; Oturan, Mehmet A; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Panizza, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, new advanced oxidation processes based on the electrochemical technology, the so-called electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), have been developed for the prevention and remediation of environmental pollution, especially focusing on water streams. These methods are based on the electrochemical generation of a very powerful oxidizing agent, such as the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) in solution, which is then able to destroy organics up to their mineralization. EAOPs include heterogeneous processes like anodic oxidation and photoelectrocatalysis methods, in which (•)OH are generated at the anode surface either electrochemically or photochemically, and homogeneous processes like electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton, and sonoelectrolysis, in which (•)OH are produced in the bulk solution. This paper presents a general overview of the application of EAOPs on the removal of aqueous organic pollutants, first reviewing the most recent works and then looking to the future. A global perspective on the fundamentals and experimental setups is offered, and laboratory-scale and pilot-scale experiments are examined and discussed.

  14. GREENING OF OXIDATION CATALYSIS THROUGH IMPROVED CATALYST AND PROCESS DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory


    Greening of Oxidation Catalysis Through Improved Catalysts and Process Design
    Michael A. Gonzalez*, Thomas Becker, and Raymond Smith

    United State Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W...

  15. Better End-Cap Processing for Oxidation-Resistant Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Mary Ann B.; Frimer, Aryeh A.

    2004-01-01

    A class of end-cap compounds that increase the thermo-oxidative stab ility of polyimides of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PM R) type has been extended. In addition, an improved processing proto col for this class of end-cap compounds has been invented.

  16. Process and Equipment for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: (1) directing a vapor stream containing at least nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; (2) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen- containing oxidizing agent; (3) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; (4) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrite form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; (5) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; (6) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level on hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1% by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; (7) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and (8) removing sais solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  17. Thermal imaging of solid oxide fuel cell anode processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomfret, Michael B.; Steinhurst, Daniel A.; Kidwell, David A.; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    A Si-charge-coupled device (CCD), camera-based, near-infrared imaging system is demonstrated on Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) fragments and the anodes of working solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). NiO reduction to Ni by H 2 and carbon deposition lead to the fragment cooling by 5 ± 2 °C and 16 ± 1 °C, respectively. When air is flowed over the fragments, the temperature rises 24 ± 1 °C as carbon and Ni are oxidized. In an operational SOFC, the decrease in temperature with carbon deposition is only 4.0 ± 0.1 °C as the process is moderated by the presence of oxides and water. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon deposits results in a Δ T of +2.2 ± 0.2 °C, demonstrating that electrochemical oxidation is less vigorous than atmospheric oxidation. While the high temperatures of SOFCs are challenging in many respects, they facilitate thermal imaging because their emission overlaps the spectral response of inexpensive Si-CCD cameras. Using Si-CCD cameras has advantages in terms of cost, resolution, and convenience compared to mid-infrared thermal cameras. High spatial (∼0.1 mm) and temperature (∼0.1 °C) resolutions are achieved in this system. This approach provides a convenient and effective analytical technique for investigating the effects of anode chemistry in operating SOFCs.

  18. Evaluation of advanced oxidation process for the treatment of groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, S.B. II ); Peyton, G.R. ); Rice, L.E. . Kansas City Div.)

    1990-01-01

    An advanced oxidation process utilizing ozone, ultraviolet radiation, and hydrogen peroxide was selected for the removal of chlorinated hydrocarbons, particularly trichlorethene and 1,2-dichlorethene, from groundwater underlying the US Department of Energy Kansas City Plant. Since the performance of this process for the removal of organics from groundwater is not well-documented, an evaluation was initiated to determine the performance of the treatment plant, document the operation and maintenance costs experience, and evaluate contaminant removal mechanisms. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Treatment of oxide spent fuel using the lithium reduction process

    SciTech Connect

    Karell, E.J.; Pierce, R.D.; Mulcahey, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The wide variety in the composition of DOE spent nuclear fuel complicates its long-term disposition because of the potential requirement to individually qualify each type of fuel for repository disposal. Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has developed the electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert all of these spent fuel types into a single set of disposal forms, simplifying the qualification process. While metallic fuels can be directly processed using the electrometallurgical treatment technique, oxide fuels must first be reduced to the metallic form. The lithium reduction process accomplishes this pretreatment. In the lithium process the oxide components of the fuel are reduced using lithium at 650 C in the presence of molten LiCl, yielding the corresponding metals and Li{sub 2}O. The reduced metal components are then separated from the LiCl salt phase and become the feed material for electrometallurgical treatment. A demonstration test of the lithium reduction process was successfully conducted using a 10-kg batch of simulated oxide spent fuel and engineering-scale equipment specifically constructed for that purpose. This paper describes the lithium process, the equipment used in the demonstration test, and the results of the demonstration test.

  20. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  1. Benzene/nitrous oxide flammability in the precipitate hydrolysis process

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R A

    1989-09-18

    The HAN (hydroxylamine nitrate) process for destruction of nitrite in precipitate hydrolysis produces nitrous oxide (N2O) gas as one of the products. N2O can form flammable mixtures with benzene which is also present due to radiolysis and hydrolysis of tetraphenylborate. Extensive flame modeling and explosion testing was undertaken to define the minimum oxidant for combustion of N2O/benzene using both nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents. The attached memorandum interprets and documents the results of the studies.

  2. Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) for a Mutagenic Mode of Action for Cancer: AFB1 and Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    AOPs provide a framework to describe a sequence of measureable key events (KEs), beginning with a molecular initiating event (MIE), followed by a series of identified KEs linked to one another by KE Relationships (KERs), all anchored by a specific adverse outcome (AO). Each KE/KE...

  3. Enzymatic oxidation of phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juliana Arriel; Batista Chagas, Pricila Maria; Silva, Maria Cristina; dos Santos, Custódio Donizete; Duarte Corrêa, Angelita

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases can be used in the treatment of wastewater containing phenolic compounds. The effluent from the wet processing of coffee fruits contains high content of these pollutants and although some studies propose treatments for this wastewater, none targets specifically the removal of these recalcitrant compounds. This study evaluates the potential use of different peroxidase sources in the oxidation of caffeic acid and of total phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater (CPW). The identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in CPW was performed and caffeic acid was found to be the major phenolic compound. Some factors, such as reaction time, pH, amount of H2O2 and enzyme were evaluated, in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance for maximum oxidation of caffeic acid. The turnip peroxidase (TPE) proved efficient in the removal of caffeic acid, reaching an oxidation of 51.05% in just 15 minutes of reaction. However, in the bioremediation of the CPW, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was more efficient with 32.70%±0.16 of oxidation, followed by TPE with 18.25%±0.11. The treatment proposed in this work has potential as a complementary technology, since the efficiency of the existing process is intimately conditioned to the presence of these pollutants.

  4. Enzymatic oxidation of phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juliana Arriel; Batista Chagas, Pricila Maria; Silva, Maria Cristina; dos Santos, Custódio Donizete; Duarte Corrêa, Angelita

    2016-01-01

    Peroxidases can be used in the treatment of wastewater containing phenolic compounds. The effluent from the wet processing of coffee fruits contains high content of these pollutants and although some studies propose treatments for this wastewater, none targets specifically the removal of these recalcitrant compounds. This study evaluates the potential use of different peroxidase sources in the oxidation of caffeic acid and of total phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater (CPW). The identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in CPW was performed and caffeic acid was found to be the major phenolic compound. Some factors, such as reaction time, pH, amount of H2O2 and enzyme were evaluated, in order to determine the optimum conditions for the enzyme performance for maximum oxidation of caffeic acid. The turnip peroxidase (TPE) proved efficient in the removal of caffeic acid, reaching an oxidation of 51.05% in just 15 minutes of reaction. However, in the bioremediation of the CPW, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was more efficient with 32.70%±0.16 of oxidation, followed by TPE with 18.25%±0.11. The treatment proposed in this work has potential as a complementary technology, since the efficiency of the existing process is intimately conditioned to the presence of these pollutants. PMID:26744933

  5. Advanced oxidation of iodinated X-ray contrast media in reverse osmosis brines: the influence of quenching.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Gur-Reznik, Shirra; Heller-Grossman, Lilly; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2014-10-01

    Among the main restrictions for the implementation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for removal of micropollutants present in reverse osmosis (RO) brines of secondary effluents account the quenching performed by background organic and inorganic constituents. Natural organic matter (NOM) and soluble microbial products (SMP) are the main effluent organic matter constituents. The inorganic fraction is largely constituted by chlorides and bicarbonate alkalinity with sodium and calcium as main counterions. The quenching influence of these components, separately and their mixture, in the transformation of model compounds by UVA/TiO2 was studied applying synthetic brines solutions mimicking 2-fold concentrated RO secondary effluents brines. The results were validated using fresh RO brines. Diatrizoate (DTZ) and iopromide (IOPr) were used as model compound. They have been found to exhibit relative high resistance to oxidation process and therefore represent good markers for AOPs techniques. Under the conditions applied, oxidization of DTZ in the background of RO brines was strongly affected by quenching effects. The major contribution to quenching resulted from organic matter (≈70%) followed by bicarbonate alkalinity (≈30%). NOM displayed higher quenching than SMP in spite of its relative lower concentration. Multivalent cations, i.e., Ca(+2), were found to decrease effectiveness of the technique due to agglomeration of the catalyst. However this influence was lowered in presence of NOM. Different patterns of transformation were found for each model compound in which a delayed deiodination was observed for iopromide whereas diatrizoate oxidation paralleled deiodination. PMID:24945978

  6. Advanced oxidation of iodinated X-ray contrast media in reverse osmosis brines: the influence of quenching.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Gur-Reznik, Shirra; Heller-Grossman, Lilly; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2014-10-01

    Among the main restrictions for the implementation of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for removal of micropollutants present in reverse osmosis (RO) brines of secondary effluents account the quenching performed by background organic and inorganic constituents. Natural organic matter (NOM) and soluble microbial products (SMP) are the main effluent organic matter constituents. The inorganic fraction is largely constituted by chlorides and bicarbonate alkalinity with sodium and calcium as main counterions. The quenching influence of these components, separately and their mixture, in the transformation of model compounds by UVA/TiO2 was studied applying synthetic brines solutions mimicking 2-fold concentrated RO secondary effluents brines. The results were validated using fresh RO brines. Diatrizoate (DTZ) and iopromide (IOPr) were used as model compound. They have been found to exhibit relative high resistance to oxidation process and therefore represent good markers for AOPs techniques. Under the conditions applied, oxidization of DTZ in the background of RO brines was strongly affected by quenching effects. The major contribution to quenching resulted from organic matter (≈70%) followed by bicarbonate alkalinity (≈30%). NOM displayed higher quenching than SMP in spite of its relative lower concentration. Multivalent cations, i.e., Ca(+2), were found to decrease effectiveness of the technique due to agglomeration of the catalyst. However this influence was lowered in presence of NOM. Different patterns of transformation were found for each model compound in which a delayed deiodination was observed for iopromide whereas diatrizoate oxidation paralleled deiodination.

  7. Integration between chemical oxidation and membrane thermophilic biological process.

    PubMed

    Bertanza, G; Collivignarelli, M C; Crotti, B M; Pedrazzani, R

    2010-01-01

    Full scale applications of activated sludge thermophilic aerobic process for treatment of liquid wastes are rare. This experimental work was carried out at a facility, where a thermophilic reactor (1,000 m(3) volume) is operated. In order to improve the global performance of the plant, it was decided to upgrade it, by means of two membrane filtration units (ultrafiltration -UF-, in place of the final sedimentation, and nanofiltration -NF-). Subsequently, the integration with chemical oxidation (O(3) and H(2)O(2)/UV processes) was taken into consideration. Studied solutions dealt with oxidation of both the NF effluents (permeate and concentrate). Based on experimental results and economic evaluation, an algorithm was proposed for defining limits of convenience of this process.

  8. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  9. Taxonomic applicability of inflammatory cytokines in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) development.

    PubMed

    Angrish, Michelle M; Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Madden, Michael C; Moser, Virginia C; Herr, David W

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines, low-molecular-weight messenger proteins that act as intercellular immunomodulatory signals, have become a mainstream preclinical marker for assessing the systemic inflammatory response to external stressors. The challenge is to quantitate from healthy subjects cytokine levels that are below or at baseline and relate those dynamic and complex cytokine signatures of exposures with the inflammatory and repair pathways. Thus, highly sensitive, specific, and precise analytical and statistical methods are critically important. Investigators at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have implemented advanced technologies and developed statistics for evaluating panels of inflammatory cytokines in human blood, exhaled breath condensate, urine samples, and murine biological media. Advanced multiplex, bead-based, and automated analytical platforms provided sufficient sensitivity, precision, and accuracy over the traditional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thus, baseline cytokine levels can be quantified from healthy human subjects and animals and compared to an in vivo exposure response from an environmental chemical. Specifically, patterns of cytokine responses in humans exposed to environmental levels of ozone and diesel exhaust, and in rodents exposed to selected pesticides (such as fipronil and carbaryl), were used as case studies to generally assess the taxonomic applicability of cytokine responses. The findings in this study may aid in the application of measureable cytokine markers in future adverse outcome pathway (AOP)-based toxicity testing. Data from human and animal studies were coalesced and the possibility of using cytokines as key events (KE) to bridge species responses to external stressors in an AOP-based framework was explored. PMID:26914248

  10. Impact of boron penetration on gate oxide reliability and device performance in a dual-gate oxide process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yunqiang; Gan, Chock H.; Li, Xi; Lee, James; Vigar, David; Sundaresan, Ravi

    2000-10-01

    The effect of boron penetration on device performance and gate oxide reliability of P+ polysilicon gate MOSFET of a dual oxide process with salicide block module was investigated. To get stable non-salicided poly sheet resistance, a capping oxide is required before source/drain RTA anneal. It is found that the transistor performance and gate oxide reliability were degraded with the capping oxide. The optimization scheme by replacing BF2 with Boron for P+ implant is demonstrated.

  11. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  12. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  13. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  14. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  15. ER Protein Processing Under Oxidative Stress: Implications and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mahmoud F; Valenzuela, Carlos; Sisniega, Daniella; Skouta, Rachid; Narayan, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of mitochondrial nitrosative stress have been associated with the pathogenesis of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The mechanism involves catalytic poisoning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident oxidoreductase chaperone, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the subsequent accumulation of ER-processed substrate proteins. Using a model system to mimic mitochondrial oxidative and nitrosative stress, we demonstrate a PDI-independent mechanism whereby reactive oxygen species (ROS) compromise regeneration rates of disulfide bond-containing ER-processed proteins. Under ROS-duress, the secretion-destined traffic adopts disulfide-exposed structures making the protein flux retrotranslocation biased. We also demonstrate that ROS-compromised protein maturation rates can be rescued by the polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). Our results are significant in that they reveal an additional mechanism which could promote neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, our data reveal that EA possesses therapeutic potential as a lead prophylactic agent against oxidative/nitrosative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26983927

  16. Reduction of COD in wastewater from an organized tannery industrial region by Electro-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Ugur; Apaydin, Omer; Gonullu, M Talha

    2007-05-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have led the way in the treatment of aqueous waste and are rapidly becoming the chosen technology for many applications. In this paper, COD reduction potential of leather tanning industry wastewaters by Electro-Fenton (EF) oxidation, as one of the AOPs, was experimentally evaluated. The wastewater sample was taken from an outlet of an equalization basin in a common treatment plant of an organized tannery industrial region in Istanbul, Turkey. Treatment of the wastewater was carried out by an electrochemical batch reactor equipped with two iron electrodes, which were connected parallel to each other. The oxidation process was studied for optimization of H(2)O(2) and the electricity consumptions were observed at different contact times under different pH conditions (3.0, 5.0 and 7.2). In each case, electricity consumption for decreased COD mass was estimated. In this process, COD was reduced by 60-70% within 10 min. By taking into consideration the local sewerage discharge limit, applicability of EF process for the tannery wastewaters was evaluated.

  17. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  18. Laccase oxidation and removal of toxicants released during combustion processes.

    PubMed

    Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Semlitsch, Stefan; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Lemmouchi, Yahia; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-02-01

    This study reports for the first time the ability of laccases adsorbed on cellulose acetate to eliminate toxicants released during combustion processes. Laccases directly oxidized and eliminated more than 40% w/v of 14 mM of 1,4-dihydroxybenzene (hydroquinone); 2-methyl-1,4-benzenediol (methylhydroquinone); 1,4-dihydroxy-2,3,5-trimethylbenzene (trimethylhydroquinone); 3-methylphenol (m-cresol); 4-methylphenol (p-cresol); 2-methylphenol (o-cresol); 1,3-benzenediol (resorcinol); 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (catechol); 3,4-dihydroxytoluene (4-methylcatechol) and 2-naphthylamine. Further, laccase oxidized 2-naphthylamine, hydroquinone, catechol, methylhydroquinone and methylcatechol were also able to in turn mediate the elimination of >90% w/v of toxicants which are per-se non-laccase substrates such as 3-aminobiphenyl; 4-aminobiphenyl; benz[a]anthracene; 3-(1-nitrosopyrrolidin-2-yl) pyridine (NNN); formaldehyde; 4-(methyl-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK); 2-butenal (crotonaldehyde); nitric oxide and vinyl cyanide (acrylonitrile). These studies demonstrate the potential of laccase immobilized on solid supports to remove many structurally different toxicants released during combustion processes. This system has great potential application for in situ removal of toxicants in the manufacturing, food processing and food service industries. PMID:26408262

  19. Multiphase Processing of Isoprene Oxidation Products - Kinetic and Product Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, D.; Schoene, L.; Schindelka, J.; Herrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Isoprene represents a significant fraction of NMHC in the troposphere with recently estimated emission rates of 500-750 TgC yr-1 (1). Due to its enormous source strength, the fate of isoprene and its degradation products is important in atmospheric processes. Possible ascendancies of such oxidation processes are the regional ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Some aspects of SOA formation from isoprene and its degradation products have already been studied by chamber studies (2,3). Aqueous phase oxidation processes which may occur after phase transfer of ‘early’ oxidation products are often neglected. But these processes provide a potentially important source for organic particle mass constituents such as carboxylic acids. The majority of existing aqueous phase modelling studies focus only on ‘later’ products such as methylglyoxal and oxalic acid. Yet, a recent field study reports much higher aqueous phase concentrations of some ‘earlier’ isoprene oxidation products including methacrolein (MACR) and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) than expected (4). This indicates a possibly underestimated importance of multiphase chemical processes in the course of the isoprene oxidation as a source for the production of organic particle mass together with known ‘heterogeneous processes’ such as the direct condensation of low-volatility products from gas phase processes onto existing particle surfaces. In order to implement the isoprene multiphase chemistry in atmospheric models detailed kinetic and mechanistic studies are needed. Hence, the temperature dependence of MACR, MVK, methacrylic acid and acrylic acid exposed to NO3, SO4- and OH radicals in the aqueous phase was investigated. The measurements were performed using a laser-photolysis laser long path absorption technique. The analysis confirmed in all cases the much higher reactivity of the OH radical in comparison to SO4- and NO3 radicals. The temperature dependence is most distinct for NO3

  20. Thermal Behavior Study of the MoVTeNb Oxide Catalyst for Selective Oxidation Process

    SciTech Connect

    Idris, R.; Hamid, S. B. Abd.

    2009-06-01

    Several parameters involved in preparing the multi metal oxide (MMO) catalysts (Mo{sub 1}V{sub 0.3}Te{sub 0.23}Nb{sub 0.12}O{sub x}) for selective oxidation of propane to acrylic acid (AA) were investigated. These included the proper pre-calcined and calcinations atmosphere effect on the performance of the catalysts. It was found that each metal element plays a critical role to the performance of an effective catalyst and also the calcinations under a non-flow inert atmosphere. The characterization results from XRD, SEM, TG and DSC show the important differences depending on the activation procedures of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst. The XRD analysis is used to identify the phase inventory of the MoVTeNb oxide catalysts. The structure of orthorhombic M1, M2, TeMo{sub 5}O{sub 16}, V{sub 0.95}Mo{sub 0.97}O{sub 5} and Mo{sub 5}O{sub 14} phase was investigated. The orthorhombic M1 phase is the most active and selective phase and is responsible for the major of the efficiently of the best catalyst for selective oxidation process. TGA and DTG allow the identification of the number and types, of reactions involving evaporation of small molecules from removal of ligands and water to condensation or drying processes. From all these analyses it was proven that the activation procedures would affect the performance of the MoVTeNb oxide catalyst.

  1. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  2. Solid oxide membrane (SOM) process for ytterbium and silicon production from their oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yihong

    The Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis is an innovative green technology that produces technologically important metals directly from their respective oxides. A yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) tube, closed at one end is employed to separate the molten salt containing dissolved metal oxides from the anode inside the YSZ tube. When the applied electric potential between the cathode in the molten salt and the anode exceeds the dissociation potential of the desired metal oxides, oxygen ions in the molten salt migrate through the YSZ membrane and are oxidized at the anode while the dissolved metal cations in the flux are reduced to the desired metal at the cathode. Compared with existing metal production processes, the SOM process has many advantages such as one unit operation, less energy consumption, lower capital costs and zero carbon emission. Successful implementation of the SOM electrolysis process would provide a way to mitigate the negative environmental impact of the metal industry. Successful demonstration of producing ytterbium (Yb) and silicon (Si) directly from their respective oxides utilizing the SOM electrolysis process is presented in this dissertation. During the SOM electrolysis process, Yb2O3 was reduced to Yb metal on an inert cathode. The melting point of the supporting electrolyte (LiF-YbF3-Yb2O3) was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA). Static stability testing confirmed that the YSZ tube was stable with the flux at operating temperature. Yb metal deposit on the cathode was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). During the SOM electrolysis process for silicon production, a fluoride based flux based on BaF2, MgF2, and YF3 was engineered to serve as the liquid electrolyte for dissolving silicon dioxide. YSZ tube was used to separate the molten salt from an anode current collector in the liquid silver. Liquid tin was chosen as cathode to dissolve the reduced silicon during

  3. The first commercial supercritical water oxidation sludge processing plant.

    PubMed

    Griffith, James W; Raymond, Dennis H

    2002-01-01

    Final disposal of sludge continues to be one of the more pressing problems for the wastewater treatment industry. Present regulations for municipal sludge have favored beneficial use, primarily in land application. However, several agencies and entities have warned of potential health risks associated with these methods. Hydrothermal oxidation provides an alternative method that addresses the health concerns associated with sludge disposal by completely converting all organic matter in the sludge to carbon dioxide, water, and other innocuous materials. A hydrothermal oxidation system using HydroProcessing, L.L.C.'s HydroSolids process has been installed at Harlingen, Texas to process up to 9.8 dry tons per day of sludge. Based on a literature review, this system is the largest hydrothermal oxidation system in the world, and the only one built specifically to process a sludge. Start up of Unit 1 of two units of the HTO system began in April 2001. Early results have indicated COD conversion rates in excess of 99.9%. Harlingen Waterworks System estimates that the HydroSolids system will cost less than other alternatives such as autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion and more traditional forms of digestion that still require dewatering and final disposal. The Waterworks intends to generate income from the sale of energy in the form of hot water and the use of carbon dioxide from the HydroSolids process for neutralization of high pH industrial effluent. The Waterworks also expects to generate income from the treatment of septage and grease trap wastes.

  4. Solution-Processed Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wangying

    Oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) have attracted considerable attention over the past decade due to their high carrier mobility and excellent uniformity. However, most of these oxide TFTs are usually fabricated using costly vacuum-based techniques. Recently, the solution processes have been developed due to the possibility of low-cost and large-area fabrication. In this thesis, we have carried out a detailed and systematic study of solution-processed oxide thin films and TFTs. At first, we demonstrated a passivation method to overcome the water susceptibility of solution-processed InZnO TFTs by utilizing octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The unpassivated InZnO TFTs exhibited large hysteresis in their electrical characteristics due to the adsorbed water at the semiconductor surface. Formation of a SAM of ODPA on the top of InZnO removed water molecules weakly absorbed at the back channel and prevented water diffusion from the surroundings. Therefore the passivated devices exhibited significantly reduced hysteretic characteristics. Secondly, we developed a simple spin-coating approach for high- k dielectrics (Al2O3, ZrO2, Y 2O3 and TiO2). These materials were used as gate dielectrics for solution-processed In2O3 or InZnO TFTs. Among the high-k dielectrics, the Al2O3-based devices showed the best performance, which is attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and the low interface trap density besides its good insulating property. Thirdly, the formation and properties of Al2O3 thin films under various annealing temperatures were intensively studied, revealing that the sol-gel-derived Al2O3 thin film undergoes the decomposition of organic residuals and nitrate groups, as well as conversion of aluminum hydroxides to form aluminum oxide. Besides, the Al2O 3 film was used as gate dielectric for solution-processed oxide TFTs, resulting in high mobility and low operating voltage. Finally, we proposed a green route for

  5. Processing, Microstructure, and Oxidation Behavior of Iron Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyeji; Noh, Yoonsook; Choi, Hyelim; Hong, Kicheol; Kwon, Kyungjung; Choe, Heeman

    2016-09-01

    With its historically long popularity in major structural applications, the use of iron (Fe) has also recently begun to be explored as an advanced functional material. For this purpose, it is more advantageous to use Fe as a porous structure, simply because it can provide a greater surface area and a higher reaction rate. This study uses a freeze-casting method, which consists of simple and low-cost processing steps, to produce Fe foam with a mean pore size of 10 μm. We examine the influences of various parameters ( i.e., mold bottom temperature, powder content, and sintering time) on the processing of Fe foam, along with its oxidation kinetics at 823 K (550 °C) with various heat-treatment times. We confirm that Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 oxide layers are successfully formed on the surface of Fe foam. With the Fe oxide layers as an active anode material, the Fe foam can potentially be used as a three-dimensional anode current collector for an advanced lithium-ion battery.

  6. PROCESS FOR PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FROM ITS OXIDES

    DOEpatents

    Weissman, S.I.; Perlman, M.L.; Lipkin, D.

    1959-10-13

    A method is described for obtaining a carbide of plutonium and two methods for obtaining plutonium metal from its oxides. One of the latter involves heating the oxide, in particular PuO/sub 2/, to a temperature of 1200 to 1500 deg C with the stoichiometrical amount of carbon to fornn CO in a hard vacuum (3 to 10 microns Hg), the reduced and vaporized plutonium being collected on a condensing surface above the reaction crucible. When an excess of carbon is used with the PuO/sub 2/, a carbide of plutonium is formed at a crucible temperature of 1400 to 1500 deg C. The process may be halted and the carbide removed, or the reaction temperature can be increased to 1900 to 2100 deg C at the same low pressure to dissociate the carbide, in which case the plutonium is distilled out and collected on the same condensing surface.

  7. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.W.; Dooge, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this study is to develop a novel catalytic chemical oxidation process that can be used to effectively treat multi-component wastes with a minimum of pretreatment characterization, thus providing a versatile, non-combustion method which will destroy hazardous organic compounds while simultaneously containing and concentrating toxic and radioactive metals for recovery or disposal in a readily stabilized matrix. Although the DETOX{sup SM} process had been tested to a limited extent for potential application to mixed wastes, there had not been sufficient experience with the process to determine its range of application to multicomponent waste forms. The potential applications of the process needed to be better identified. Then, the process needed to be demonstrated on wastes and remediate types on a practical scale in order that data could be obtained on application range, equipment size, capital and operating costs, effectiveness, safety, reliability, permittability, and potential commercial applications of the process. The approach for the project was, therefore, to identify the potential range of applications of the process (Phase I), to choose demonstration sites and design a demonstration prototype (Phase II), to fabricate and shakedown the demonstration unit (Phase III), then finally to demonstrate the process on surrogate hazardous and mixed wastes, and on actual mixed wastes (Phase IV).

  8. Combined oxidative and biological treatment of separated streams of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Vidal, G; Nieto, J; Mansilla, H D; Bornhardt, C

    2004-01-01

    Leather tanning effluents are a source of severe environmental impacts. In particular, the unhairing stage, belonging to the beamhouse processes, generates an alkaline wastewater with high concentrations of organic matter, sulphides, suspended solids, and salts, which shows significant toxicity. The objective of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of this industrial wastewater by combined oxidative and biological treatments. An advanced oxidation process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent was used as batch pretreatment. The relationships of H2O2/Fe2+ and H2O2/COD were 9 and 4, respectively, reaching an organic matter removal of about 90%. Subsequently, the oxidised beamhouse effluent was fed to an activated sludge system, at increasing organic load rates (OLR), in the range of 0.4 to 1.6 g COD/L x day. The biological organic matter removal of the pre-treated wastewater ranged between 35% and 60% for COD, and from 60% to 70% for BOD. Therefore, sequential AOP pretreatment and biological aerobic treatment increased the overall COD removal up to 96%, compared to 60% without pretreatment. Bioassays with D. magna and D. pulex showed that this kind of treatment achieves only a partial toxicity removal of the tannery effluent.

  9. Development of computationally predicted Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) networks through data mining and integration of publicly available in vivo, in vitro, phenotype, and biological pathway data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. Ho...

  10. Thermal Processing and Microwave Processing of Mixed-Oxide Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gadre, Mandar

    2011-12-01

    Amorphous oxide semiconductors are promising new materials for various optoelectronic applications. In this study, improved electrical and optical properties upon thermal and microwave processing of mixed-oxide semiconductors are reported. First, arsenic-doped silicon was used as a model system to understand susceptor-assisted microwave annealing. Mixed oxide semiconductor films of indium zinc oxide (IZO) and indium gallium zinc oxide (IGZO) were deposited by room-temperature RF sputtering on flexible polymer substrates. Thermal annealing in different environments---air, vacuum and oxygen was done. Electrical and optical characterization was carried out before and after annealing. The degree of reversal in the degradation in electrical properties of the thin films upon annealing in oxygen was assessed by subjecting samples to subsequent vacuum anneals. To further increase the conductivity of the IGZO films, Ag layers of various thicknesses were embedded between two IGZO layers. Optical performance of the multilayer structures was improved by susceptor-assisted microwave annealing and furnace-annealing in oxygen environment without compromising on their electrical conductivity. The post-processing of the films in different environments was used to develop an understanding of mechanisms of carrier generation, transport and optical absorption. This study establishes IGZO as a viable transparent conductor, which can be deposited at room-temperature and processed by thermal and microwave annealing to improve electrical and optical performance for applications in flexible electronics and optoelectronics.

  11. Microstructure Sensitive Design and Processing in Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Hamid Garmestani; Dr. Stephen Herring

    2009-06-12

    The aim of this study was to develop and inexpensive manufacturing process for deposition of functionally graded thin films of LSM oxides with porosity graded microstructures for use as IT-SOFCs cathode. The spray pyrolysis method was chosen as a low-temperature processing technique for deposition of porous LSM films onto dense YXZ substrates. The effort was directed toward the optimization of the processing conditions for deposition of high quality LSM films with variety of morphologies in the range of dense to porous microstructures. Results of optimization studies of spray parameters revealed that the substrate surface temperature is the most critical parameter influencing the roughness and morphology, porosity, cracking and crystallinity of the film.

  12. Developing a Scalable Remote Sampling Design for the NEON Airborne Observation Platform (AOP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musinsky, J.; Wasser, L. A.; Kampe, T. U.; Leisso, N.; Krause, K.; Petroy, S. B.; Cawse-Nicholson, K.; van Aardt, J. A.; Serbin, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) airborne observation platform (AOP) will collect co-registered high-resolution hyperspectral imagery, discrete and waveform LiDAR, and high-resolution digital photography for more than 60 terrestrial and 23 aquatic sites spread across the continental United States, Puerto Rico, Alaska and Hawaii on an annual basis over the next 30 years. These data, to be made freely available to the public, will facilitate the scaling of field-based biological, physical and chemical measurements to regional and continental scales, enabling a better understanding of the relationships between climate variability and change, land use change and invasive species, and their ecological consequences in areas not directly sampled by the NEON facilities. However, successful up-scaling of in situ measurements requires a flight sampling design that captures environmental heterogeneity and diversity (i.e., ecological and topographic gradients), is sensitive to temporal system variation (e.g., phenology), and can respond to major disturbance events. Alignment of airborne campaigns - composed of two payloads for nominal science acquisitions and one payload for PI-driven rapid-response campaigns -- with other ground, airborne (e.g., AVIRIS) and satellite (e.g., Landsat, MODIS) collections will further facilitate scaling between sensors and data sources of varying spatial and spectral resolution and extent. This presentation will discuss the approach, challenges and future goals associated with the development of NEON AOP's sampling design, using examples from the 2013 nominal flight campaigns in the Central Plains (NEON Domain 10) and the Pacific Southwest (Domain 17), and the rapid response flight campaign of the High Park Fire site outside of Fort Collins, CO. Determination of the specific flight coverage areas for each campaign involved analysis of the landscape scale ecological, geophysical and bioclimatic attributes and trends most closely

  13. Processing of Non-PFP Plutonium Oxide in Hanford Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Susan A.; Delegard, Calvin H.

    2011-03-10

    Processing of non-irradiated plutonium oxide, PuO2, scrap for recovery of plutonium values occurred routinely at Hanford’s Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) in glovebox line operations. Plutonium oxide is difficult to dissolve, particularly if it has been high-fired; i.e., calcined to temperatures above about 400°C and much of it was. Dissolution of the PuO2 in the scrap typically was performed in PFP’s Miscellaneous Treatment line using nitric acid (HNO3) containing some source of fluoride ion, F-, such as hydrofluoric acid (HF), sodium fluoride (NaF), or calcium fluoride (CaF2). The HNO3 concentration generally was 6 M or higher whereas the fluoride concentration was ~0.5 M or lower. At higher fluoride concentrations, plutonium fluoride (PuF4) would precipitate, thus limiting the plutonium dissolution. Some plutonium-bearing scrap also contained PuF4 and thus required no added fluoride. Once the plutonium scrap was dissolved, the excess fluoride was complexed with aluminum ion, Al3+, added as aluminum nitrate, Al(NO3)3•9H2O, to limit collateral damage to the process equipment by the corrosive fluoride. Aluminum nitrate also was added in low quantities in processing PuF4.

  14. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300° as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency) for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter. PMID:23369258

  15. Processing and Oxidation Behavior of Nb-Si-B Intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Y.LIU; A.J. Thom; M.J. Kramer; M. Akinc

    2004-09-30

    Single phase materials of {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, Nb{sub 5}(Si,B){sub 3} (T2) and Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}B{sub x} (D8{sub 8}) in the Nb-Si-B system were prepared by powder metallurgy processing. T2 was almost fully dense, while {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and D8{sub 8} were porous after sintering at 1900 C for 2 hours. The lattice parameters of T2 decreased linearly with the substitution of B for Si. Isothermal oxidation testing at 1000 C in flowing air indicated that the oxidation resistances of T2 and D8{sub 8} are much better than {alpha}-Nb{sub 5}Si{sub 3}, but still extremely poor compared to the boron-modified Mo{sub 5}Si{sub 3}. Extensive cracking in the oxide scale and matrix were observed and arose from the volume expansion associated with the formation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} and boron-containing silica glass.

  16. Removal of Hazardous Pollutants from Wastewaters: Applications of TiO 2 -SiO 2 Mixed Oxide Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Rasalingam, Shivatharsiny; Peng, Rui; Koodali, Ranjit T.

    2014-01-01

    The direct release of untreated wastewaters from various industries and households results in the release of toxic pollutants to the aquatic environment. Advanced oxidation processes (AOP) have gained wide attention owing to the prospect of complete mineralization of nonbiodegradable organic substances to environmentally innocuous products by chemical oxidation. In particular, heterogeneous photocatalysis has been demonstrated to have tremendous promise in water purification and treatment of several pollutant materials that include naturally occurring toxins, pesticides, and other deleterious contaminants. In this work, we have reviewed the different removal techniques that have been employed for water purification. In particular, the applicationmore » of TiO 2 -SiO 2 binary mixed oxide materials for wastewater treatment is explained herein, and it is evident from the literature survey that these mixed oxide materials have enhanced abilities to remove a wide variety of pollutants.« less

  17. Process for depositing epitaxial alkaline earth oxide onto a substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1996-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilize molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and/or electron beam evaporation methods and an ultra-high vacuum facility to grow a layup of epitaxial alkaline earth oxide films upon the substrate surface. By selecting metal constituents for the oxides and in the appropriate proportions so that the lattice parameter of each oxide grown closely approximates that of the substrate or base layer upon which oxide is grown, lattice strain at the film/film or film/substrate interface of adjacent films is appreciably reduced or relieved. Moreover, by selecting constituents for the oxides so that the lattice parameters of the materials of adjacent oxide films either increase or decrease in size from one parameter to another parameter, a graded layup of films can be grown (with reduced strain levels therebetween) so that the outer film has a lattice parameter which closely approximates that of, and thus accomodates the epitaxial growth of, a pervoskite chosen to be grown upon the outer film.

  18. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  19. Remediation of a winery wastewater combining aerobic biological oxidation and electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-05-15

    Apart from a high biodegradable fraction consisting of organic acids, sugars and alcohols, winery wastewaters exhibit a recalcitrant fraction containing high-molecular-weight compounds as polyphenols, tannins and lignins. In this context, a winery wastewater was firstly subjected to a biological oxidation to mineralize the biodegradable fraction and afterwards an electrochemical advanced oxidation process (EAOP) was applied in order to mineralize the refractory molecules or transform them into simpler ones that can be further biodegraded. The biological oxidation led to above 97% removals of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5), but was inefficient on the degradation of a bioresistant fraction corresponding to 130 mg L(-1) of DOC, 380 mg O2 L(-1) of COD and 8.2 mg caffeic acid equivalent L(-1) of total dissolved polyphenols. Various EAOPs such as anodic oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (AO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF), UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) and solar PEF (SPEF) were then applied to the recalcitrant effluent fraction using a 2.2 L lab-scale flow plant containing an electrochemical cell equipped with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon-PTFE air-diffusion cathode and coupled to a photoreactor with compound parabolic collectors (CPCs). The influence of initial Fe(2+) concentration and current density on the PEF process was evaluated. The relative oxidative ability of EAOPs increased in the order AO-H2O2 < EF < PEF ≤ SPEF. The SPEF process using an initial Fe(2+) concentration of 35 mg L(-1), current density of 25 mA cm(-2), pH of 2.8 and 25 °C reached removals of 86% on DOC and 68% on COD after 240 min, regarding the biologically treated effluent, along with energy consumptions of 45 kWh (kg DOC)(-1) and 5.1 kWh m(-3). After this coupled treatment, color, odor, COD, BOD5, NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) parameters complied with the legislation targets and, in addition, a total

  20. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells.

  1. Improved thermal oxidation stability of solution-processable silver nanowire transparent electrode by reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yumi; Jeong, Youngjun; Lee, Youngu

    2012-12-01

    Solution-processable silver nanowire-reduced graphene oxide (AgNW-rGO) hybrid transparent electrode was prepared in order to replace conventional ITO transparent electrode. AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited high optical transmittance and low sheet resistance, which is comparable to ITO transparent electrode. In addition, it was found that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode exhibited highly enhanced thermal oxidation and chemical stabilities due to excellent gas-barrier property of rGO passivation layer onto AgNW film. Furthermore, the organic solar cells with AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode showed good photovoltaic behavior as much as solar cells with AgNW transparent electrode. It is expected that AgNW-rGO hybrid transparent electrode can be used as a key component in various optoelectronic application such as display panels, touch screen panels, and solar cells. PMID:23206541

  2. Impact of leachate composition on the advanced oxidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Laca, Adriana; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are gaining importance as an alternative to the biological or physicochemical treatments for the management of leachates. In this work, it has been studied the effect of the characteristics of the leachate (content in humic acids, landfill age and degree of stabilization) on the wet oxidation process and final quality of the treated effluent. A high concentration of humic acids in the leachate had a positive effect on the COD removal because this fraction is more easily oxidizable. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of humic acid and the intermediates generated during the oxidation process improved the degradation of this acid, since such intermediates are stronger initiators of free radicals than the humic acid itself. Similar values of COD removals (49% and 51%) and biodegradability indices (0.30 and 0.35) were observed, after 8 h of wet oxidation, for the stabilised leachate (biologically pretreated) and the raw one, respectively. Nevertheless, final colour removal was much higher for the stabilised leachate, achieving values up to 91%, whereas for the raw one only 56% removal was attained for the same reaction time. Besides, wet oxidation treatment was more efficient for the young leachate than for the old one, with final COD conversions of 60% and 37%, respectively. Eventually, a triangular "three-lump" kinetic model, which considered direct oxidation to CO2 and partial oxidation through intermediate compounds, was here proposed.

  3. Treatment of plutonium process residues by molten salt oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Stimmel, J.; Wishau, R.; Ramsey, K.B.; Montoya, A.; Brock, J.; Heslop, M.; Wernly, K.

    1999-04-01

    Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) is a thermal process that can remove more than 99.999% of the organic matrix from combustible {sup 238}Pu material. Plutonium processing residues are injected into a molten salt bed with an excess of air. The salt (sodium carbonate) functions as a catalyst for the conversion of the organic material to carbon dioxide and water. Reactive species such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine, sulfur, phosphorous and arsenic in the organic waste react with the molten salt to form the corresponding neutralized salts, NaF, NaCl, NaBr, NaI, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and NaAsO{sub 2} or Na{sub 3}AsO4. Plutonium and other metals react with the molten salt and air to form metal salts or oxides. Saturated salt will be recycled and aqueous chemical separation will be used to recover the {sup 238}Pu. The Los Alamos National Laboratory system, which is currently in the conceptual design stage, will be scaled down from current systems for use inside a glovebox.

  4. Process for depositing an oxide epitaxially onto a silicon substrate and structures prepared with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1993-01-01

    A process and structure involving a silicon substrate utilizes an ultra high vacuum and molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) methods to grow an epitaxial oxide film upon a surface of the substrate. As the film is grown, the lattice of the compound formed at the silicon interface becomes stabilized, and a base layer comprised of an oxide having a sodium chloride-type lattice structure grows epitaxially upon the compound so as to cover the substrate surface. A perovskite may then be grown epitaxially upon the base layer to render a product which incorporates silicon, with its electronic capabilities, with a perovskite having technologically-significant properties of its own.

  5. Treatment of petroleum refinery sourwater by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Alessandra; Castro, Antonio V; Dezotti, Márcia; Sant'Anna, G L

    2006-09-01

    The performance of several oxidation processes to remove organic pollutants from sourwater was investigated. Sourwater is a specific stream of petroleum refineries, which contains slowly biodegradable compounds and toxic substances that impair the industrial biological wastewater treatment system. Preliminary experiments were conducted, using the following processes: H2O2, H2O2/UV, UV, photocatalysis, ozonation, Fenton and photo-Fenton. All processes, except Fenton and photo-Fenton, did not lead to satisfactory results, reducing at most 35% of the sourwater dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Thus, further experiments were performed with these two techniques to evaluate process conditions and organic matter removal kinetics. Batch experiments revealed that the Fenton reaction is very fast and reaches, in a few minutes, an ultimate DOC removal of 13-27%, due to the formation of iron complexes. Radiation for an additional period of 60 min can increase DOC removal up to 87%. Experiments were also conducted in a continuous mode, operating one 0.4L Fenton stirred reactor and one 1.6L photo-Fenton reactor in series. DOC removals above 75% were reached, when the reaction system was operated with hydraulic retention times (HRT) higher than 85 min. An empirical mathematical model was proposed to represent the DOC removal kinetics, allowing predicting process performance quite satisfactorily.

  6. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    1994-07-01

    DETOX{sup SM} is a catalyzed wet oxidation process which destroys organic materials in an acidic water solution of iron at 373 to 473 K. The solution can be used repeatedly to destroy great amounts of organic materials. Since the process is conducted in a contained vessel, air emissions from the process can be well controlled. The solution is also capable of dissolving and concentrating many heavy and radioactive metals for eventual stabilization and disposal. The Phase 2 effort for this project is site selection and engineering design for a DETOX demonstration unit. Site selection was made using a set of site selection criteria and evaluation factors. A survey of mixed wastes at DOE sites was conducted using the Interim Mixed Waste Inventory Report. Sites with likely suitable waste types were identified. Potential demonstration sites were ranked based on waste types, interest, regulatory needs, scheduling, ability to provide support, and available facilities. Engineering design for the demonstration unit is in progress and is being performed by Jacobs Applied Technology. The engineering design proceeded through preliminary process flow diagrams (PFDs), calculation of mass and energy balances for representative waste types, process and instrumentation diagrams (P and IDs), preparation of component specifications, and a firm cost estimate for fabrication of the demonstration unit.

  7. Simultaneous constraint and phase conversion processing of oxide superconductors

    DOEpatents

    Li, Qi; Thompson, Elliott D.; Riley, Jr., Gilbert N.; Hellstrom, Eric E.; Larbalestier, David C.; DeMoranville, Kenneth L.; Parrell, Jeffrey A.; Reeves, Jodi L.

    2003-04-29

    A method of making an oxide superconductor article includes subjecting an oxide superconductor precursor to a texturing operation to orient grains of the oxide superconductor precursor to obtain a highly textured precursor; and converting the textured oxide superconducting precursor into an oxide superconductor, while simultaneously applying a force to the precursor which at least matches the expansion force experienced by the precursor during phase conversion to the oxide superconductor. The density and the degree of texture of the oxide superconductor precursor are retained during phase conversion. The constraining force may be applied isostatically.

  8. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  9. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  10. Process for making surfactant capped metal oxide nanocrystals, and products produced by the process

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Rockenberger, Joerg

    2006-01-10

    Disclosed is a process for making surfactant capped nanocrystals of metal oxides which are dispersable in organic solvents. The process comprises decomposing a metal cupferron complex of the formula MXCupX, wherein M is a metal, and Cup is a N-substituted N-Nitroso hydroxylamine, in the presence of a coordinating surfactant, the reaction being conducted at a temperature ranging from about 150 to about 400.degree. C., for a period of time sufficient to complete the reaction. Also disclosed are compounds made by the process.

  11. Microwave cavity spectrometer for process monitoring of ethylene oxide sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Gibson, C.; Samuel, A. H.; Matthews, I. P.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports a novel and simple cavity spectrometer for process monitoring of ethylene oxide sterilization, in which the source frequency, cavity resonant frequency, and gas absorption center frequency are asynchronous with respect to each other, thus, enabling sophisticated signal enhancement techniques to be employed without the need to engage the Stark effect. The operation of the device is such that the source frequency sweeps across a given range (F1 to F2) which contains one of the absorption peaks of the analyte gas (gases) of interest while the cavity resonant frequency Fr is oscillated within the profile of the absorption peak. Signal enhancement is achieved by adding a relatively small magnitude/high-frequency ``dither'' signal to the source frequency sweep pattern. The salient information of the gas absorption due to the oscillation of the resonant frequency of the cavity is carried by the ``dither'' signal and amplified and extracted by a series of tuned amplifiers and demodulators. Although the device is still at the initial design stage, a working prototype has been constructed in order to test the feasibility of the novel asynchronous modulation technique. This was achieved by successfully demonstrating that the device operates in an expected manner to within a standard error of 8.3%. It is believed that this error largely results from mechanical components. The significance of this error is greatly reduced when the spectrometer is operated in a large signal scanning mode as is the case when we apply the ``power saturation'' technique to measure the concentration of ethylene oxide in the resonant cavity. This measurement showed that there is a good linear correlation between the output signal and the concentration of ethylene oxide gas (to within a standard error of 4%).

  12. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaofei Guan; Peter A. Zink; Uday B. Pal; Adam C. Powell

    2012-01-01

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.% Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the magnesium content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapor. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium.

  13. Magnesium Recycling of Partially Oxidized, Mixed Magnesium-Aluminum Scrap Through Combined Refining and Solid Oxide Membrane (SOM) Electrolysis Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaofei; Zink, Peter; Pal, Uday

    2012-03-11

    Pure magnesium (Mg) is recycled from 19g of partially oxidized 50.5wt.%Mg-Aluminum (Al) alloy. During the refining process, potentiodynamic scans (PDS) were performed to determine the electrorefining potential for magnesium. The PDS show that the electrorefining potential increases over time as the Mg content inside the Mg-Al scrap decreases. Up to 100% percent of magnesium is refined from the Mg-Al scrap by a novel refining process of dissolving magnesium and its oxide into a flux followed by vapor phase removal of dissolved magnesium and subsequently condensing the magnesium vapors in a separate condenser. The solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis process is employed in the refining system to enable additional recycling of magnesium from magnesium oxide (MgO) in the partially oxidized Mg-Al scrap. The combination of the refining and SOM processes yields 7.4g of pure magnesium; could not collect and weigh all of the magnesium recovered.

  14. Cosmetic wastewater treatment using the Fenton, Photo-Fenton and H2O2/UV processes.

    PubMed

    Marcinowski, Piotr P; Bogacki, Jan P; Naumczyk, Jeremi H

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs), such as the Fenton, photo-Fenton and H2O2/UV processes, have been investigated for the treatment of cosmetic wastewaters that were previously coagulated by FeCl3. The Photo-Fenton process at pH 3.0 with 1000/100 mg L(-1) H2O2/Fe(2+) was the most effective (74.0% Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal). The Fenton process with 1200/500 mg L(-1) H2O2/Fe(2+) achieved a COD removal of 72.0%, and the H2O2/UV process achieved a COD removal of 47.0%. Spreading the H2O2 doses over time to obtain optimal conditions did not improve COD removal. The kinetics of the Fenton and photo-Fenton processes may be described by the following equation: d[COD]/dt = -a[COD] t(m) (t represents time and a and m are constants). The rate of COD removal by the H2O2/UV process may be described by a second-order reaction equation. Head Space, Solid-Phase MicroExtraction, Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS) were used to identify 48 substances in precoagulated wastewater. Among these substances, 26 were fragrances. Under optimal AOP conditions, over 99% of the identified substances were removed in 120 min.

  15. Single-Step Process toward Achieving Superhydrophobic Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Tang, Xiu-Zhi; Zhu, Wenyu; Thompson, Brianna C; Huang, Mingyue; Yang, Jinglei; Hu, Xiao; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2016-05-01

    We report the first use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) as a single-step process to achieve superhydrophobic reduced graphene oxide (rGO). It was found that SPS was capable of converting smooth and electrically insulating graphene oxide (GO) sheets into highly electrically conductive rGO with minimum residual oxygen and hierarchical roughness which could be well retained after prolonged ultrasonication. At a temperature of 500 °C, which is lower than the conventional critical temperature for GO exfoliation, GO was successfully exfoliated, reduced, and hierarchically roughened. rGO fabricated by only 1 min of treatment at 1050 °C was superhydrophobic with a surface roughness (Ra) 10 times as large as that of GO as well as an extraordinarily high C:O ratio of 83.03 (atom %) and water contact angle of 153°. This demonstrates that SPS is a superior GO reduction technique, which enabled superhydrophobic rGO to be quickly and effectively achieved in one single step. Moreover, the superhydrophobic rGO fabricated by SPS showed an impressive bacterial antifouling and inactivation effect against Escherichia coli in both aqueous solution and the solid state. It is envisioned that the superhydrophobic rGO obtained in this study can be potentially used for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications, such as the fabrication of self-cleaning and antibacterial surfaces.

  16. Stabilized leachates: sequential coagulation-flocculation + chemical oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Rivas, F Javier; Beltrán, Fernando; Carvalho, Fátima; Acedo, Benito; Gimeno, Olga

    2004-12-10

    The combined sedimentation-chemical oxidation treatment of medium-stabilized landfill leachates has been investigated. The sequence of stages implemented was: (a) coagulation-flocculation by pH decrease (pH 2) to acidic conditions (COD removal approximately 25% related to COD0 approximately 7500 ppm); (b) coagulation-flocculation by Fe(III) addition (0.01 M) at pH 3.5 (COD removal approximately 40% related to COD of supernatant after step (a); (c) Fenton (Fe(III) = 0.01 M; H2O2 = 1.0 M) oxidation (COD removal approximately 80% related to COD of supernatant after step (a); and (d) coagulation-flocculation of Fenton's effluent at pH 3.5 (COD removal approximately 90% related to COD of supernatant after step (a). The use of Kynch theory allows for the design of clarifiers based on the amount of solids fed. For a general example of 1000 m3 day(-1) of a feeding stream, clarifier area values of 286,111 and 231 m2 were calculated for compacting indices of 3.7, 2.67 and 2.83 corresponding to the first, second and third consecutive sedimentation processes, respectively, (steps (a), (b) and (d)).

  17. Single-Step Process toward Achieving Superhydrophobic Reduced Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong; Tang, Xiu-Zhi; Zhu, Wenyu; Thompson, Brianna C; Huang, Mingyue; Yang, Jinglei; Hu, Xiao; Khor, Khiam Aik

    2016-05-01

    We report the first use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) as a single-step process to achieve superhydrophobic reduced graphene oxide (rGO). It was found that SPS was capable of converting smooth and electrically insulating graphene oxide (GO) sheets into highly electrically conductive rGO with minimum residual oxygen and hierarchical roughness which could be well retained after prolonged ultrasonication. At a temperature of 500 °C, which is lower than the conventional critical temperature for GO exfoliation, GO was successfully exfoliated, reduced, and hierarchically roughened. rGO fabricated by only 1 min of treatment at 1050 °C was superhydrophobic with a surface roughness (Ra) 10 times as large as that of GO as well as an extraordinarily high C:O ratio of 83.03 (atom %) and water contact angle of 153°. This demonstrates that SPS is a superior GO reduction technique, which enabled superhydrophobic rGO to be quickly and effectively achieved in one single step. Moreover, the superhydrophobic rGO fabricated by SPS showed an impressive bacterial antifouling and inactivation effect against Escherichia coli in both aqueous solution and the solid state. It is envisioned that the superhydrophobic rGO obtained in this study can be potentially used for a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications, such as the fabrication of self-cleaning and antibacterial surfaces. PMID:27064825

  18. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an "active" microbial process.

    PubMed

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-02-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. AOM was first found to be coupled with sulfate reduction and mediated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME, often forming consortia with SRB, are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. ANME-1 is even able to produce methane. Subsequently, it has been found that AOM can also be coupled with denitrification. The known microbes responsible for this process are Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (M. oxyfera) and Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens (M. nitroreducens). Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera belongs to the NC10 bacteria, can catalyze nitrite reduction through an "intra-aerobic" pathway, and may catalyze AOM through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. However, M. nitroreducens, which is affiliated with ANME-2d archaea, may be able to catalyze AOM through the reverse methanogenesis pathway. Moreover, manganese (Mn(4+) ) and iron (Fe(3+) ) can also be used as electron acceptors of AOM. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM. It also discusses recent progress in some unclear key issues about AOM, including ANME-1 in hypersaline environments, the effect of oxygen on M. oxyfera, and the relationship of M. nitroreducens with ANME. PMID:25530008

  19. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: an “active” microbial process

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Mengmeng; Ma, Anzhou; Qi, Hongyan; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) is an important sink of methane that plays a significant role in global warming. AOM was first found to be coupled with sulfate reduction and mediated by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME, often forming consortia with SRB, are phylogenetically related to methanogenic archaea. ANME-1 is even able to produce methane. Subsequently, it has been found that AOM can also be coupled with denitrification. The known microbes responsible for this process are Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera (M. oxyfera) and Candidatus Methanoperedens nitroreducens (M. nitroreducens). Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera belongs to the NC10 bacteria, can catalyze nitrite reduction through an “intra-aerobic” pathway, and may catalyze AOM through an aerobic methane oxidation pathway. However, M. nitroreducens, which is affiliated with ANME-2d archaea, may be able to catalyze AOM through the reverse methanogenesis pathway. Moreover, manganese (Mn4+) and iron (Fe3+) can also be used as electron acceptors of AOM. This review summarizes the mechanisms and associated microbes of AOM. It also discusses recent progress in some unclear key issues about AOM, including ANME-1 in hypersaline environments, the effect of oxygen on M. oxyfera, and the relationship of M. nitroreducens with ANME. PMID:25530008

  20. Oxidation enhancement of submicron organic aerosols by fog processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Ge, X.; Collier, S.; Setyan, A.; Xu, J.; Sun, Y.

    2011-12-01

    During 2010 wintertime, a measurement study was carried out at Fresno, California, using an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) combined with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Four fog events occurred during the first week of the campaign. While ambient aerosol was sampled into the HR-ToF-AMS, fog water samples were collected, and were later aerosolized and analyzed via HR-TOF-AMS in the laboratory. We performed Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) on the AMS ambient organic mass spectra, and identified four OA factors: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) likely from vehicle emissions, cooking influenced OA (COA), biomass burning OA (BBOA) representing residential wood combustion, and an oxygenated OA (OOA) that has an average O/C ratio of 0.42. The time series of the OOA factor correlates best with that of sulfate (R2 =0.54 ) during fog events, suggesting that aqueous phase processing may have strongly affected OOA production during wintertime in Fresno. We further investigate the OOA compositions and elemental ratios before, during, and after the fog events, as well as those of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fog waters to study the influence of aqueous phase processing on OA compositions. Results of fog sample analysis shows an enhancement of oxidation of DOM in 11 separate fog samples. Further factor analysis of the fog DOM data will elucidate the possible mechanisms by which fog processing enhances oxidation of aerosol. In addition, in order to investigate the influence of aqueous processing on OA, we used the Extended Aerosol Inorganic Model (E-AIM) (http://www.aim.env.uea.ac.uk/aim/aim.php) to estimate aerosol phase water contents based on the AMS measured aerosol composition. The predicted water content has a good correlation with sulfate and OOA . We will further explore the correlations between particle phase water with organic aerosol characteristics to discuss the influence of aqueous phase processing on

  1. Pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Canesi, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Most aquatic organisms behave as conformers with respect to environmental variables, including changes in O2 availability. Aquatic species that show tolerance to hypoxia/anoxia or hyperoxia can be excellent models for investigating physiological and biochemical adaptations that deal with changing O2 and consequent changes in metabolic rate and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, I summarize selected data on ROS production and antioxidant defenses in a model marine invertebrate, the bivalve Mytilus, under different environmental and physiological conditions. An example of other bivalves adapted to particular environments (the Antarctic Sea) is also reported. These studies contributed to the knowledge on pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes in aquatic invertebrates from comparative and environmental perspectives. A common role for metallothioneins in antioxidant protection in mammals and aquatic invertebrates is underlined in different conditions, from human disease to responses to environmental exposure to heavy metals.

  2. Secondary hospital wastewater detoxification and disinfection by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Machado, E L; Kist, L T; Schmidt, R; Hoeltz, J M; Dalberto, D; Alcayaga, E L A

    2007-10-01

    Secondary hospital wastewater treatment was investigated as an alternative to detoxification and disinfection after anaerobic digestion in a hospital located in southern Brazil. Tertiary and secondary effluents were assessed by general parameters. The use of advanced oxidation processes (UV/O3 and UV/TiO2/O3) showed potential capacity for disinfection and detoxification of wastewater effluents. The UV/TiO2/O3 method yielded the best results, decreasing toxicity of EC50 = 65 to nontoxic levels, also reducing MPN/100ml of 1.1 x 10(6) to values less than 2 and increasing wastewater biodegradability. The low energetic consumption of the proposed UV/TiO2/O3 method can be considered operationally advantageous.

  3. Cobalt-based nanocatalysts for green oxidation and hydrogenation processes.

    PubMed

    Jagadeesh, Rajenahally V; Stemmler, Tobias; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Bauer, Matthias; Pohl, Marga-Martina; Radnik, Jörg; Junge, Kathrin; Junge, Henrik; Brückner, Angelika; Beller, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    This protocol describes the preparation of cobalt-based nanocatalysts and their applications in environmentally benign redox processes for fine chemical synthesis. The catalytically active material consists of nanoscale Co3O4 particles surrounded by nitrogen-doped graphene layers (NGrs), which have been prepared by pyrolysis of phenanthroline-ligated cobalt acetate on carbon. The resulting materials have been found to be excellent catalysts for the activation of both molecular oxygen and hydrogen; in all tested reactions, water was the only by-product. By applying these catalysts, green oxidations of alcohols and hydrogenation of nitroarenes for the synthesis of nitriles, esters and amines are demonstrated. The overall time required for catalyst preparation and for redox reactions is 35 h and 10-30 h, respectively.

  4. The Active Molybdenum Oxide Phase in the Methanol Oxidation to Formaldehyde (Formox Process): A DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Rellán-Piñeiro, Marcos; López, Núria

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is oxidised to formaldehyde by the Formox process, in which molybdenum oxides, usually doped with iron, are the catalyst. The active phase of the catalysts and the reasons for the selectivity observed are still unknown. We present a density functional theory based study that indicates the unique character of Mo(VI)¢Mo(IV) pairs as the most active and selective sites and indicates the active sites on the surface, the controlling factors of selectivity, and the role of the dopant. Iron reduces the energy requirements of the redox Mo(VI)¢Mo(IV) pair by acting as an electron reservoir that sets in if required. Our present study paves the way towards a better understanding of the process.

  5. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  6. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  7. Fabrication and characterization of oxide-based thin film transistors, and process development for oxide heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wantae

    2009-12-01

    This dissertation is focused on the development of thin film transistors (TFTs) using oxide materials composed of post-transitional cations with (n-1)d 10ns0 (n≥4). The goal is to achieve high performance oxide-based TFTs fabricated at low processing temperature on either glass or flexible substrates for next generation display applications. In addition, etching mechanism and Ohmic contact formation for oxide heterostructure (ZnO/CuCrO 2) system is demonstrated. The deposition and characterization of oxide semiconductors (In 2O3-ZnO, and InGaZnO4) using a RF-magnetron sputtering system are studied. The main influence on the resistivity of the films is found to be the oxygen partial pressure in the sputtering ambient. The films remained amorphous and transparent (> 70%) at all process conditions. These films showed good transmittance at suitable conductivity for transistor fabrication. The electrical characteristics of both top- and bottom-gate type Indium Zinc Oxide (InZnO) and Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide (InGaZnO4)-based TFTs are reported. The InZnO films were favorable for depletion-mode TFTs due to their tendency to form oxygen vacancies, while enhancement-mode devices were realized with InGaZnO4 films. The InGaZnO4-based TFTs fabricated on either glass or plastic substrates at low temperature (<100°C) exhibit good electrical properties: the saturation mobility of 5--12 cm2.V-1.s-1 and threshold voltage of 0.5--2.5V. The devices are also examined as a function of aging time in order to verify long-term stability in air. The effect of gate dielectric materials on electrical properties of InGaZnO 4-based TFTs was investigated. The use of SiNx film as a gate dielectric reduces the trap density and the roughness at the channel/gate dielectric interface compared to SiO2 gate dielectric, resulting in an improvement of device parameters by reducing scattering of trapped charges at the interface. The quality of interface is shown to have large effect on TFT performance

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF SULFATE RADICAL-BASED CHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESSES FOR GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study investigates the development of novel sulfate radical-based chemical oxidation processes for treatment of groundwater contaminants. Environmentally friendly transition metal (Fe (II), Fe (III)) has been evaluated for the activation of common oxidants (peroxymonosulfat...

  9. Test of TDA's Direct Oxidation Process for Sulfur Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Girish Srinivas; Steven C. Gebhard; Eugene Peeples; Sandra Huzyk; Randy Welch

    2005-01-01

    This project was a Phase III pilot plant test of TDA's gas sweetening process done under realistic conditions. TDA Research Inc successfully completed the test at Whiting Petroleum's Sable San Andreas Gas Plant. The feed was approximately 228,000 standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of gas that contained approximately 60 vol% CO{sub 2}, 20 vol% CH{sub 4} and 10 vol% C{sub 3}+ and higher hydrocarbons. The feed was associated gas from CO{sub 2} flooding operations carried out on Whiting's oil wells. The gas is collected and piped to the Sable gas plant where it is normally flared. We sited our pilot plant in line with the flare so that we could remove the hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) prior to flaring. The average H{sub 2}S concentration in the gas during the field test was 7341 ppm. The selectivity of our process for converting H{sub 2}S into elemental sulfur was essentially 100% and the catalyst converted 90% of the H{sub 2}S into sulfur and water (the remaining 10% of the H{sub 2}S passed through unconverted). Importantly, no catalyst deactivation was observed for over the course of the 1000+ hour test. Minimal (ca. 10-15 ppm) of SO{sub 2} was formed during the test. Approximately 3.6 tons of elemental sulfur was recovered from a total inlet of 3.9 tons of sulfur (as H{sub 2}S). The total amount of SO{sub 2} released from the plant (taking into account flaring of the unconverted 10% H2S) was 0.86 tons. This amount of SO{sub 2} is much lower than the normal 8 tons that would have been emitted if all of the H{sub 2}S were flared over the time of the pilot plant test. The pilot plant was simple to operate and required much less operator intervention than is typical for a new unit being commissioned. Our operator (Mr. Eugene Peeples) has more than 30 years of experience operating commercial scale liquid redox sulfur recovery processes and in his opinion, TDA's Direct Oxidation pilot plant is easier to operate than liquid systems. The ease of use and low capital and

  10. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  11. Removal of emerging contaminants in sewage water subjected to advanced oxidation with ozone.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, M; Gracia-Lor, E; Bijlsma, L; Morales, E; Pastor, L; Hernández, F

    2013-09-15

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOP) based on ozone treatments, assisted by ultrasounds, have been investigated at a pilot-plant scale in order to evaluate the removal of emerging contaminants in sewage water. Around 60 emerging contaminants, mainly pharmaceuticals from different therapeutically classes and drugs of abuse, have been determined in urban wastewater samples (treated and untreated) by LC-MS/MS. In a first step, the removal efficiency of these contaminants in conventional sewage water treatment plants was evaluated. Our results indicate that most of the compounds were totally or partially removed during the treatment process of influent wastewater. Up to 30 contaminants were quantified in the influent and effluent samples analysed, being antibiotics, anti-inflammatories, cholesterol lowering statin drugs and angiotensin II receptor antagonists the most frequently detected. Regarding drugs of abuse, cocaine and its metabolite benzoylecgonine were the most frequent. In a second step, the effectiveness of AOP in the removal of emerging contaminants remaining in the effluent was evaluated. Ozone treatments have been proven to be highly efficient in the removal, notably decreasing the concentrations for most of the emerging contaminants present in the water samples. The use of ultrasounds, alone or assisting ozone treatments, has been shown less effective, being practically unnecessary.

  12. Anaerobic oxidation of methane: progress with an unknown process.

    PubMed

    Knittel, Katrin; Boetius, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere, and it is an important greenhouse gas, which has so far contributed an estimated 20% of postindustrial global warming. A great deal of biogeochemical research has focused on the causes and effects of the variation in global fluxes of methane throughout earth's history, but the underlying microbial processes and their key agents remain poorly understood. This is a disturbing knowledge gap because 85% of the annual global methane production and about 60% of its consumption are based on microbial processes. Only three key functional groups of microorganisms of limited diversity regulate the fluxes of methane on earth, namely the aerobic methanotrophic bacteria, the methanogenic archaea, and their close relatives, the anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME). The ANME represent special lines of descent within the Euryarchaeota and appear to gain energy exclusively from the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), with sulfate as the final electron acceptor according to the net reaction: CH(4) + SO(42-) ---> HCO(3-) + HS(-) + H(2)O. This review summarizes what is known and unknown about AOM on earth and its key catalysts, the ANME clades and their bacterial partners.

  13. Investigation of solution-processed bismuth-niobium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Satoshi; Ariga, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Shin; Onoue, Masatoshi; Miyasako, Takaaki; Tokumitsu, Eisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya; Chinone, Norimichi; Cho, Yasuo

    2014-10-21

    The characteristics of bismuth-niobium-oxide (BNO) films prepared using a solution process were investigated. The BNO film annealed at 550°C involving three phases: an amorphous phase, Bi₃NbO₇ fluorite microcrystals, and Nb-rich cubic pyrochlore microcrystals. The cubic pyrochlore structure, which was the main phase in this film, has not previously been reported in BNO films. The relative dielectric constant of the BNO film was approximately 140, which is much higher than that of a corresponding film prepared using a conventional vacuum sputtering process. Notably, the cubic pyrochlore microcrystals disappeared with increasing annealing temperature and were replaced with triclinic β-BiNbO₄ crystals at 590°C. The relative dielectric constant also decreased with increasing annealing temperature. Therefore, the high relative dielectric constant of the BNO film annealed at 550°C is thought to result from the BNO cubic pyrochlore structure. In addition, the BNO films annealed at 500°C contained approximately 6.5 atm.% carbon, which was lost at approximately 550°C. This result suggests that the carbon in the BNO film played an important role in the formation of the cubic pyrochlore structure.

  14. Nitrogen oxide removal dynamic process through 15 Ns DBD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Lianshui; Lai, Weidong; Liu, Fengliang

    2015-05-01

    Nitrogen oxides exhaust gas assumes the important responsibility on air pollution by forming acid rain. This paper discusses the NO removal mechanism in 15 ns pulse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma through experimental and simulating method. Emission spectra collected from plasma are evaluated as sourced from N+ and O(3P). The corresponding zero-dimensional model is established and verified through comparing the simulated concentration evolution and the experimental time-resolved spectra of N+. The electron impact ionization plays major role on NO removal and the produced NO+ are further decomposed into N+ and O(3P) through electron impact dissociative excitation rather than the usual reported dissociative recombination process. Simulation also indicates that the removal process can be accelerated by NO inputted at lower initial concentration or electrons streamed at higher concentration, due to the heightened electron impact probability on NO molecules. The repetitive pulse discharge is a benefit for improving the NO removal efficiency by effectively utilizing the radicals generated from the previous pulse under the condition that the pulse period should be shorter enough to ignore the spatial diffusion of radicals. Finally, slight attenuation on NO removal has been experimentally and simulatively observed after N2 mixed, due to the competitive consumption of electrons.

  15. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S M; Hefting, Mariet M; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0-975.9 μmol N m(-2) h(-1), n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr(-1), which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China's inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale. PMID:26610807

  16. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0–975.9 μmol N m−2 h−1, n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr−1, which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China’s inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale. PMID:26610807

  17. Ubiquitous anaerobic ammonium oxidation in inland waters of China: an overlooked nitrous oxide mitigation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guibing; Wang, Shanyun; Zhou, Leiliu; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Siyan; Xia, Chao; Wang, Weidong; Zhou, Rong; Wang, Chaoxu; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Hefting, Mariet M.; Yin, Chengqing; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-11-01

    Denitrification has long been regarded as the only pathway for terrestrial nitrogen (N) loss to the atmosphere. Here we demonstrate that large-scale anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), an overlooked N loss process alternative to denitrification which bypasses nitrous oxide (N2O), is ubiquitous in inland waters of China and contributes significantly to N loss. Anammox rates in aquatic systems show different levels (1.0-975.9 μmol N m-2 h-1, n = 256) with hotspots occurring at oxic-anoxic interfaces and harboring distinct biogeochemical and biogeographical features. Extrapolation of these results to the China-national level shows that anammox could contribute about 2.0 Tg N yr-1, which equals averagely 11.4% of the total N loss from China’s inland waters. Our results indicate that a significant amount of the nitrogen lost from inland waters bypasses denitrification, which is important for constructing more accurate climate models and may significantly reduce potential N2O emission risk at a large scale.

  18. Basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by scanning probe microscope tip-induced nano-oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshitaka; Iuchi, Yoshimasa; Kawabe, Mitsuo; Harris, James S.

    2000-07-01

    The basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-induced nano-oxidation process have been investigated. The chemical analysis of the AFM tip-generated GaAs oxide was performed by using scanning microprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the main constituents of GaAs anodic oxide were determined to be Ga2O3 and As2O3. The electrical characterization showed that the electron transport across a GaAs oxide nanodot of ˜5.7 nm thickness, from a doped n+-Si tip into the n+-GaAs substrate follows the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism over a range of applied bias. Further, the tip-generated GaAs oxide nanodots were found to withstand moderate thermal treatments, but some volume reduction was observed.

  19. Effects of Gravity on Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hegde, Uday; Hicks, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The effects of gravity on the fluid mechanics of supercritical water jets are being studied at NASA to develop a better understanding of flow behaviors for purposes of advancing supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technologies for applications in reduced gravity environments. These studies provide guidance for the development of future SCWO experiments in new experimental platforms that will extend the current operational range of the DECLIC (Device for the Study of Critical Liquids and Crystallization) Facility on board the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrodynamics of supercritical fluid jets is one of the basic unit processes of a SCWO reactor. These hydrodynamics are often complicated by significant changes in the thermo-physical properties that govern flow behavior (e.g., viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressibility, etc), particularly when fluids transition from sub-critical to supercritical conditions. Experiments were conducted in a 150 ml reactor cell under constant pressure with water injections at various flow rates. Flow configurations included supercritical jets injected into either sub-critical or supercritical water. Profound gravitational influences were observed, particularly in the transition to turbulence, for the flow conditions under study. These results will be presented and the parameters of the flow that control jet behavior will be examined and discussed.

  20. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  1. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3770 Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids. Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen...

  2. Nanocrystalline-oxide ceramics: Synthesis, diagnostics, and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi-Jia

    A flat-flame combustion process is employed to synthesize oxide-ceramic powder with nanoparticle size. An extensive study is made of the influence of processing parameters on final particle size. The parameters include precursor feed rate, burner-to-chill distance, chamber pressure, and location in the reaction chamber. Laser induced fluorescence is used as an in-situ diagnostic tool to obtain information on precursor concentration, the extent of precursor decomposition, particle formation, and temperature profiles. It is found that the precursor feed rate affects the precursor decomposition rate, and that most of the precursor decomposition is complete at one third of the burner-to-chill distance. Evidence for nanoparticle formation, which immediately follows precursor decomposition, is obtained from visible light emission. The effect of the chill is to establish a fixed aspect ratio (burner diameter to burner-to-chill distance) and to ensure one-dimensional flow. Decomposition of the precursor is complete within the stand-off distance, while particle coalescence is the main feature outside the burner region. A non-agglomerated nanopowder with particle size ranging from several to tens of nanometers is easily obtained using the flat-flame combustion process. After the optimum powder processing conditions are established, the as-synthesized powder is collected and used as starting material for a sintering study. A torroidal type of high pressure apparatus is used to sinter the green compacts, using a wide range of sintering conditions up to 8GPa and 2000°C. To sinter the nanopowder into single-phase material, while maintaining nano-sized grains, pressures in the GPa range are required to close the pores, because of the small pore size and associated high curvature. In the sintering of nanoparticles involving a phase transformation, accompanied by a reduced molar volume, pressure acts as a nucleation promoter. By applying high pressure, the sintering temperature is

  3. Fabrication of Glassy and Crystalline Ferroelectric Oxide by Containerless Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoda, Shinichi

    1. Instruction Much effort has been devoted to forming bulk glass from the melt of ferroelectric crystalline materials without adding any network-forming oxides such as SiO2 due to the potential for producing transparent glass ceramics with high dielectric constant and enhanced piezoelectric, pyroelectric and electro-optic effects. However, they require a higher cooling rate than glass formed by conventional techniques. Therefore, only amorphous thin-films have been formed, using rapid quenching with a cooling rate >105 K/s. The containerless processing is an attractive synthesis technique as it can prevent melt contamination, minimize heterogeneous nucleation, and allow melt to achieve deep undercooling for forming metastable phase and glassy material. Recently a new ferroelectric materiel, monoclinic BaTi2 O5 , with Currie temperature as 747 K was reported. In this study, we fabricated a bulk BaTi2 O5 glass from melt using containerless processing to study the phase relations and ferroelectric properties of BaTi2 O5 . To our knowledge, this was the first time that a bulk glass of ferroelectric material was fabricated from melt without adding any network-forming oxide. 2. Experiments BaTi2 O5 sphere glass with 2mm diameter was fabricated using containerless processing in an Aerodynamic Levitation Furnace (ALF). The containerless processing allowed the melt to achieve deep undercooling for glass forming. High purity commercial BaTiO3 and TiO2 powders were mixed with a mole ratio of 1:1 and compressed into rods and then sintered at 1427 K for 10 h. Bulk samples with a mass of about 20 mg were cut from the rod, levitated with the ALF, and then melted by a CO2 laser beam. After quenching with a cooling rate of about 1000 K/s, 2 mm diameter sphere glass could be obtained. To analyze the glass structure, a high-energy x-ray diffraction experiment was performed using an incident photon energy of 113.5 keV at the high-energy x-ray diffraction beamline BL04B2 of SPring-8

  4. Oxidation of DNA bases by tumor promoter-activated processes.

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, K

    1989-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated showing that active oxygen species participate in at least one stage of tumor promotion. Tumor promoters can induce various types of cells to undergo processes that result in formation of active oxygen species. They stimulate polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to undergo an oxidative burst that is characterized by rapid formation of .O2- and H2O2. We find that in vitro formation of H2O2 by tumor promoter-activated PMNs correlates with their in vivo first-stage promoting activity. Moreover, two thymidine derivatives are formed in DNA coincubated with tumor promoter-stimulated PMNs: 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxyuridine (HMdU) and thymidine glycol (dTG). The amounts of HMdU and dTG formed correlate with the first-stage tumor-promoting potencies of the agents used for PMN stimulation and with the amount of H2O2 generated. We find that HMdU is also formed in the DNA of HeLa cells coincubated with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-activated PMNs, with the amount of HMdU being proportional to that of TPA used. Even in the absence of PMNs, HMdU is increasingly formed in cellular DNA with increased TPA concentration, although at much lower levels than in the presence of PMNs. When rat liver microsomes are incubated with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a complete carcinogen, H2O2 is also generated. Production of H2O2 increases linearly with increasing concentrations of BaP. Furthermore, HMdU is formed in DNA exposed to BaP-treated microsomes, and its formation is inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that carcinogen-induced processes generating H2O2 are associated with the first-stage promoting activity of complete carcinogens. PMID:2667984

  5. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Orton, Robert D.; Rapko, Brian M.; Smart, John E.

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  6. A review of greywater characteristics and treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Boyjoo, Yash; Pareek, Vishnu K; Ang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive literature review of different characteristics of greywater (GW) and current treatment methods. GW is domestic wastewater excluding toilet waste and can be classified as either low-load GW (excluding kitchen and laundry GW) or high-load GW (including kitchen and/or laundry). This review provides information on the quantity of GW produced, its constituents (macro and micro), existing guidelines for wastewater reuse, current treatment methods (from storage to disinfection) as well as related costs and environmental impacts. Moreover some successful examples from various countries around the world are examined. The current preferred treatments for GW use physical and biological/natural systems. Recently, chemical systems like coagulation, adsorption and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been considered and have been successful for low to moderate strength GW. The presence of xenobiotic organic compounds (XOC), which are hazardous micropollutants in GW, is emphasised. Since conventional treatments are not efficient at removing XOC, it is recommended that future studies look at chemical treatment, especially AOPs that have been found to be successful at mineralising recalcitrant organic compounds in wastewater. PMID:23552228

  7. A review of greywater characteristics and treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Boyjoo, Yash; Pareek, Vishnu K; Ang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive literature review of different characteristics of greywater (GW) and current treatment methods. GW is domestic wastewater excluding toilet waste and can be classified as either low-load GW (excluding kitchen and laundry GW) or high-load GW (including kitchen and/or laundry). This review provides information on the quantity of GW produced, its constituents (macro and micro), existing guidelines for wastewater reuse, current treatment methods (from storage to disinfection) as well as related costs and environmental impacts. Moreover some successful examples from various countries around the world are examined. The current preferred treatments for GW use physical and biological/natural systems. Recently, chemical systems like coagulation, adsorption and advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) have been considered and have been successful for low to moderate strength GW. The presence of xenobiotic organic compounds (XOC), which are hazardous micropollutants in GW, is emphasised. Since conventional treatments are not efficient at removing XOC, it is recommended that future studies look at chemical treatment, especially AOPs that have been found to be successful at mineralising recalcitrant organic compounds in wastewater.

  8. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, Richard B.; Warren, Barbara K.

    1991-01-01

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  9. High ethylene to ethane processes for oxidative coupling

    DOEpatents

    Chafin, R.B.; Warren, B.K.

    1991-12-17

    Oxidative coupling of lower alkane to higher hydrocarbon is conducted using a catalyst comprising barium and/or strontium component and a metal oxide combustion promoter in the presence of vapor phase halogen component. High ethylene to ethane mole ratios in the product can be obtained over extended operating periods.

  10. Removal of the anti-cancer drug methotrexate from water by advanced oxidation processes: Aerobic biodegradation and toxicity studies after treatment.

    PubMed

    Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre; Baginska, Ewelina; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Anti-cancer drugs are discussed as high risk substances in regard to human health and considered as problematic for the environment. They are of potential environmental relevance due to their poor biodegradability and toxicological properties. Methotrexate (MTX) is an antimetabolite that was introduced in the pharmaceutical market in the 40's and still today is one of the most consumed cytotoxic compounds around the world. In the present study MTX was only partially biodegraded in the closed bottle test (CBT). Therefore, it was submitted to three different advanced oxidation processes (AOPs): UV/H2O2, UV/Fe(2+)/H2O2 and UV/TiO2. The irradiation was carried out with a Hg medium-pressure lamp during 256min whereas the analytical monitoring was done through LC-UV-MS/MS and DOC analysis. MTX was easily removed in all the irradiation experiments, while the highest mineralization values and rates were achieved by the UV/Fe(2+)/H2O2 treatment. The lowest resulted from the UV/H2O2 reactions. The UV/H2O2 treatment resulted in little biodegradable transformation products (TPs). However, the same treatment resulted in a reduction of the toxicity of MTX by forming less toxic TPs. Analysis by LC-UV-MS/MS revealed the existence of nine TPs formed during the photo-catalytic treatments. The pH of the solutions decreased from 6.4 (t 0min) to 5.15 in the UV/H2O2 and from 6.4 (t 0min) to 5.9 in the UV/TiO2 at the end of the experiments. The initial pH of the UV/Fe(2+)/H2O2 experiments was adjusted to 5 and after the addition of H2O2 the pH decreased to around 3 and remained in this range until the end of the treatments.

  11. Degradation mechanism of cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin by hydroxyl radicals in homogeneous UV/H₂O₂ process.

    PubMed

    He, Xuexiang; Zhang, Geshan; de la Cruz, Armah A; O'Shea, Kevin E; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2014-04-15

    The degradation of cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a widely distributed and highly toxic cyanobacterial toxin (cyanotoxin), remains poorly elucidated. In this study, the mechanism of CYN destruction by UV-254 nm/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP) was investigated by mass spectrometry. Various byproducts identified indicated three common reaction pathways: hydroxyl addition (+16 Da), alcoholic oxidation or dehydrogenation (-2 Da), and elimination of sulfate (-80 Da). The initiation of the degradation was observed at the hydroxymethyl uracil and tricyclic guanidine groups; uracil moiety cleavage/fragmentation and further ring-opening of the alkaloid were also noted at an extended reaction time or higher UV fluence. The degradation rates of CYN decreased and less byproducts (species) were detected using natural water matrices; however, CYN was effectively eliminated under extended UV irradiation. This study demonstrates the efficiency of CYN degradation and provides a better understanding of the mechanism of CYN degradation by hydroxyl radical, a reactive oxygen species that can be generated by most AOPs and is present in natural water environment.

  12. Powder processing of oxides. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and applications of metal oxide ceramics and refractories. Citations consider cold isostatic pressing, compacting, densification, firing, grinding, hot isostatic pressing, laser beam processing, and sintering. Aluminum oxide, berylium oxide, hafnium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are covered. Uses in insulation, propulsion systems, electric devices, and cylinder heads are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Powder processing of oxides. (Latest citations from Engineered Materials Abstracts). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the properties and applications of metal oxide ceramics and refractories. Citations consider cold isostatic pressing, compacting, densification, firing, grinding, hot isostatic pressing, laser beam processing, and sintering. Aluminum oxide, berylium oxide, hafnium oxide, silicon dioxide, and titanium dioxide are covered. Uses in insulation, propulsion systems, electric devices, and cylinder heads are included. (Contains a minimum of 225 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  14. Slaughterhouse wastewater characteristics, treatment, and management in the meat processing industry: A review on trends and advances.

    PubMed

    Bustillo-Lecompte, Ciro Fernando; Mehrvar, Mehrab

    2015-09-15

    A thorough review of advancement in slaughterhouse wastewater (SWW) characteristics, treatment, and management in the meat processing industry is presented. This study also provides a general review of the environmental impacts, health effects, and regulatory frameworks relevant to the SWW management. A significant progress in high-rate anaerobic treatment, nutrient removal, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), and the combination of biological treatment and AOPs for SWW treatment is highlighted. The treatment processes are described and few examples of their applications are given. Conversely, few advances are accounted in terms of waste minimization and water use reduction, reuse, and recycle in slaughterhouses, which may offer new alternatives for cost-effective waste management. An overview of the most frequently applied technologies and combined processes for organic and nutrient removal during the last decade is also summarized. Several types of individual and combined processes have been used for the SWW treatment. Nevertheless, the selection of a particular technology depends on the characteristics of the wastewater, the available technology, and the compliance with regulations. This review facilitates a better understanding of current difficulties that can be found during production and management of the SWW, including treatment and characteristics of the final effluent.

  15. Thermally grown oxide and diffusions for automatic processing of integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, B. W.

    1979-01-01

    A totally automated facility for semiconductor oxidation and diffusion was developed using a state-of-the-art diffusion furnace and high temperature grown oxides. Major innovations include: (1) a process controller specifically for semiconductor processing; (2) an automatic loading system to accept wafers from an air track, insert them into a quartz carrier and then place the carrier on a paddle for insertion into the furnace; (3) automatic unloading of the wafers back onto the air track, and (4) boron diffusion using diborane with plus or minus 5 percent uniformity. Processes demonstrated include Wet and dry oxidation for general use and for gate oxide, boron diffusion, phosphorous diffusion, and sintering.

  16. The role of oxidation in the fretting wear process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bill, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    Fretting experiments were conducted on titanium, a series of Ni-Cr-Al alloys and on some high temperature turbine alloys at room temperature and at elevated temperatures in air and in various inert environments. It was found that, depending on temperature and environment, the fretting behavior of the materials examined could be classified according to four general types of behavior. Briefly, these types of behavior were: (1) the complete absence of oxidation, as in inert environments, generally leading to low rates of fretting wear but high fretting friction; (2) gradual attrition of surface oxide with each fretting stroke, found in these experiments to operate in concert with other dominating mechanisms; (3) rapid oxidation at surface fatigue damage sites, resulting in undermining and rapid disintegration of the load bearing surface; and (4) the formation of coherent, protective oxide film, resulting in low rates of fretting wear. An analytical model predicting conditions favorable to the fourth type of behavior was outlined.

  17. SULFATE RADICAL-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES- ACS MEETING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper will present an overview of sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation technologies for the destruction of environmentally toxic chemicals in wastewater, industrial water, groundwater and sources of water supply. The paper will include fundamental aspects of the generati...

  18. Process for making a noble metal on tin oxide catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Davis, Patricia (Inventor); Miller, Irvin M. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A quantity of reagent grade tin metal or compound, chloride-free, and high-surface-area silica spheres are placed in deionized water, followed by deaerating the mixture by boiling and adding an oxidizing agent, such as nitric acid. The nitric acid oxidizes the tin to metastannic acid which coats the spheres because the acid is absorbed on the substrate. The metastannic acid becomes tin oxide upon drying and calcining. The tin-oxide coated silica spheres are then placed in water and boiled. A chloride-free precious metal compound in aqueous solution is then added to the mixture containing the spheres, and the precious metal compound is reduced to a precious metal by use of a suitable reducing agent such as formic acid. Very beneficial results were obtained using the precious metal compound tetraammine platinum(II) hydroxide.

  19. ALCOHOL OXIDATION - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alco...

  20. SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS - COMPARING DIFFERENT CATALYTIC PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids is one of the most desirable chemical transformations in organic synthesis as these products are important precursors and intermediates for many drugs, vitamins and fragrances. Numerous methods are available for alc...

  1. Process for light-driven hydrocarbon oxidation at ambient temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.

    1990-01-01

    A photochemical reaction for the oxidation of hydrocarbons uses molecular oxygen as the oxidant. A reductive photoredox cycle that uses a tin(IV)- or antimony(V)-porphyrin photosensitizer generates the reducing equivalents required to activate oxygen. This artificial photosynthesis system drives a catalytic cycle, which mimics the cytochrome P.sub.450 reaction, to oxidize hydrocarbons. An iron(III)- or manganese(III)-porphyrin is used as the hydrocarbon-oxidation catalyst. Methylviologen can be used as a redox relay molecule to provide for electron-transfer from the reduced photosensitizer to the Fe or Mn porphyrin. The system is long-lived and may be used in photo-initiated spectroscopic studies of the reaction to determine reaction rates and intermediates.

  2. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, C.M.; Shapiro, C.

    1997-11-25

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor. 6 figs.

  3. Process for treating effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Charles M.; Shapiro, Carolyn

    1997-01-01

    A method for treating a gaseous effluent from a supercritical water oxidation reactor containing entrained solids is provided comprising the steps of expanding the gas/solids effluent from a first to a second lower pressure at a temperature at which no liquid condenses; separating the solids from the gas effluent; neutralizing the effluent to remove any acid gases; condensing the effluent; and retaining the purified effluent to the supercritical water oxidation reactor.

  4. Mussel-inspired approach to constructing robust cobalt-embedded N-doped carbon nanosheet toward enhanced sulphate radical-based oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Haiyan; He, Zhiqiao; Chen, Jianmeng; Song, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous sulphate radical based advanced oxidation processes (SR-AOPs) have lately been raised as a promising candidate for water treatment. Despite the progress made, either the stability or the performance of the current catalysts is still far from satisfactory for practical applications. Herein, using polydopamine-cobalt ion complex that inspired by mussel proteins as medium, we facilely fabricate a robust SR-AOPs catalyst with cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide matrix (NRGO@Co). The NRGO scaffold with high porosity and surface area not only stabilizes the NPs but also greatly facilitates the accessibility and adsorption of substrates to the active sites. With the synergistic effect arising from the NRGO and Co NPs, the NRGO@Co hybrid catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity for activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) to degrade organic pollutants in water. Furthermore, taking advantage of the favorable magnetic properties, the catalyst can be easily recycled and reused for at least 4 runs with negligible loss of activity. Coupled with systematic investigation in terms of influential factors, mineralization, and radicals identification, make the catalyst hold significant potential for application in remediation of organic pollutants in water. PMID:27616643

  5. Mussel-inspired approach to constructing robust cobalt-embedded N-doped carbon nanosheet toward enhanced sulphate radical-based oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Haiyan; He, Zhiqiao; Chen, Jianmeng; Song, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Heterogeneous sulphate radical based advanced oxidation processes (SR-AOPs) have lately been raised as a promising candidate for water treatment. Despite the progress made, either the stability or the performance of the current catalysts is still far from satisfactory for practical applications. Herein, using polydopamine-cobalt ion complex that inspired by mussel proteins as medium, we facilely fabricate a robust SR-AOPs catalyst with cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide matrix (NRGO@Co). The NRGO scaffold with high porosity and surface area not only stabilizes the NPs but also greatly facilitates the accessibility and adsorption of substrates to the active sites. With the synergistic effect arising from the NRGO and Co NPs, the NRGO@Co hybrid catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity for activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) to degrade organic pollutants in water. Furthermore, taking advantage of the favorable magnetic properties, the catalyst can be easily recycled and reused for at least 4 runs with negligible loss of activity. Coupled with systematic investigation in terms of influential factors, mineralization, and radicals identification, make the catalyst hold significant potential for application in remediation of organic pollutants in water.

  6. Mussel-inspired approach to constructing robust cobalt-embedded N-doped carbon nanosheet toward enhanced sulphate radical-based oxidation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Haiyan; He, Zhiqiao; Chen, Jianmeng; Song, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous sulphate radical based advanced oxidation processes (SR-AOPs) have lately been raised as a promising candidate for water treatment. Despite the progress made, either the stability or the performance of the current catalysts is still far from satisfactory for practical applications. Herein, using polydopamine-cobalt ion complex that inspired by mussel proteins as medium, we facilely fabricate a robust SR-AOPs catalyst with cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide matrix (NRGO@Co). The NRGO scaffold with high porosity and surface area not only stabilizes the NPs but also greatly facilitates the accessibility and adsorption of substrates to the active sites. With the synergistic effect arising from the NRGO and Co NPs, the NRGO@Co hybrid catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity for activation of peroxymonosulfate (PMS) to degrade organic pollutants in water. Furthermore, taking advantage of the favorable magnetic properties, the catalyst can be easily recycled and reused for at least 4 runs with negligible loss of activity. Coupled with systematic investigation in terms of influential factors, mineralization, and radicals identification, make the catalyst hold significant potential for application in remediation of organic pollutants in water. PMID:27616643

  7. Preparation of silicate tungsten bronzes on aluminum by plasma electrolytic oxidation process in 12-tungstosilicic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, M.; Stojadinović, S.; Vasilić, R.; Belča, I.; Nedić, Z.; Kasalica, B.; Mioč, U. B.

    2011-09-01

    The growth of silicate tungsten bronzes on aluminum by plasma electrolytic oxidation in 12-tungstosilicic acid is experimentally investigated and discussed. Real time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy characterization of plasma electrolytic oxidation show that spatial density of microdischarges is the highest in the early stage of the process, while the percentage of oxide coating area covered by active discharge sites decreases slowly with time. Emission spectrum of microdischarges has several intensive band peaks originating either from aluminum electrode or from the electrolyte. Surface roughness of obtained oxide coatings increases with prolonged time of plasma electrolytic oxidation, as their microhardness decreases. Raman spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are employed to confirm that the outer layer of oxide coatings formed during the plasma electrolytic oxidation process is silicate tungsten bronze

  8. Process for Making a Noble Metal on Tin Oxide Catalyst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Patricia; Miller, Irvin; Upchurch, Billy

    2010-01-01

    To produce a noble metal-on-metal oxide catalyst on an inert, high-surface-area support material (that functions as a catalyst at approximately room temperature using chloride-free reagents), for use in a carbon dioxide laser, requires two steps: First, a commercially available, inert, high-surface-area support material (silica spheres) is coated with a thin layer of metal oxide, a monolayer equivalent. Very beneficial results have been obtained using nitric acid as an oxidizing agent because it leaves no residue. It is also helpful if the spheres are first deaerated by boiling in water to allow the entire surface to be coated. A metal, such as tin, is then dissolved in the oxidizing agent/support material mixture to yield, in the case of tin, metastannic acid. Although tin has proven especially beneficial for use in a closed-cycle CO2 laser, in general any metal with two valence states, such as most transition metals and antimony, may be used. The metastannic acid will be adsorbed onto the high-surface-area spheres, coating them. Any excess oxidizing agent is then evaporated, and the resulting metastannic acid-coated spheres are dried and calcined, whereby the metastannic acid becomes tin(IV) oxide. The second step is accomplished by preparing an aqueous mixture of the tin(IV) oxide-coated spheres, and a soluble, chloride-free salt of at least one catalyst metal. The catalyst metal may be selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, ruthenium, gold, and rhodium, or other platinum group metals. Extremely beneficial results have been obtained using chloride-free salts of platinum, palladium, or a combination thereof, such as tetraammineplatinum (II) hydroxide ([Pt(NH3)4] (OH)2), or tetraammine palladium nitrate ([Pd(NH3)4](NO3)2).

  9. Applicability of nano zero valent iron (nZVI) in sono - Fenton process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taha, M. R.; Ibrahim, A. H.; Amat, R. C.; Azhari, A. W.

    2014-04-01

    Fenton process is one of the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) used to remove complex organic pollutants in wastewater. In this study, instead of iron sulfate (FeSO4), nano zero valent iron (nZVI) was used as a major source of ferrous iron (Fe2+). In order to enhance the process, ultrasound was utilized in this study. Results show that, with the aid of ultrasound, nZVI produced more Fe2+ compared to FeSO4 at pH 2. Furthermore, combination of higher intensity and longer sonication time in Fenton process acceleratde the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from palm oil mill effluent (POME). Through the process, 80% of COD content was removed within 2 hours instead of 24 hours of silent degradation.

  10. Trimethoprim: kinetic and mechanistic considerations in photochemical environmental fate and AOP treatment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng; Greaves, John; Cooper, William J; Song, Weihua

    2012-03-15

    Trimethoprim (TMP), a bacteriostatic antibiotic, has recently been detected in wastewater and surface waters. In this study the sunlight mediated photochemical fate, and treatment using advanced oxidation and reduction (free radical) processes, have been investigated with respect to their effect on TMP. Photochemical fate, in the presence of humic acid, and advanced oxidation treatment both involve the hydroxyl radical (OH) as one of the reactive species of interest. Another reactive oxygen species, singlet oxygen (1O2), may also be important in the photochemical fate of TMP. The bimolecular reaction rate constants of TMP with 1O2 and OH were evaluated to be (3.2±0.2)×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and 8.66×10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The reaction kinetics for the sub-structural moieties of TMP, 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene (TMBz) and 2,4-diaminoprimidine (DAP), was evaluated to facilitate an understanding of the loss mechanisms. For TMBz and DAP the reaction rate constants with 1O2 were <1.0×10(4) and (3.0±0.1)×10(6) M(-1) s(-1), while with OH they were 8.12×10(9) and 1.64×10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The data suggests that the 1O2 attacks the DAP and the OH radical attacks the TMBz moiety. However, for TMP, 1O2 and OH reactions accounted for only ∼19% and ∼6%, of its total photodegradation, respectively. Therefore, the reaction of TMP with excited state natural organic matter is postulated as a significant degradation pathway for the loss of TMP in sunlit waters containing natural organic matter. There was no effect of pH on the direct or indirect photolysis of TMP. To complete the study for reductive treatment processes, the solvated electron reaction rates for the destruction of TMP, TMBz and DAP were also evaluated. The absolute bimolecular reaction rates obtained were, (13.6±0.01)×10(9), (6.36±0.11)×10(7) and (10.1±0.01)×10(9) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. PMID:22244271

  11. Electrospinning of nickel oxide nanofibers: Process parameters and morphology control

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, Abdullah Hashaikeh, Raed

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology (diameter and roughness) were fabricated via electrospinning technique using a precursor composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. It was found that the diameter and surface roughness of individual nickel oxide nanofibers are strongly dependent upon nickel acetate concentration in the precursor. With increasing nickel acetate concentration, the diameter of nanofibers increased and the roughness decreased. An optimum concentration of nickel acetate in the precursor resulted in the formation of smooth and continuous nickel oxide nanofibers whose diameter can be further controlled via electrospinning voltage. Beyond an optimum concentration of nickel acetate, the resulting nanofibers were found to be ‘flattened’ and ‘wavy’ with occasional cracking across their length. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the obtained nanofibers are polycrystalline in nature. These nickel oxide nanofibers with varying morphology have potential applications in various engineering domains. - Highlights: • Nickel oxide nanofibers were synthesized via electrospinning. • Fiber diameter and roughness depend on nickel acetate concentration used. • With increasing nickel acetate concentration the roughness of nanofibers decreased. • XRD and TEM revealed a polycrystalline structure of the nanofibers.

  12. CHEMISTRY OF SO2 AND DESOX PROCESSES ON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES.

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2006-06-30

    On bulk stoichiometric oxides, SO{sub 2} mainly reacts with the O centers to form SO{sub 3} or SO{sub 4} species that decompose at elevated temperatures. Adsorption on the metal cations occurs below 300 K and does not lead to cleavage of the S-O bonds. In bulk oxides, the occupied cation bands are too stable for effective bonding interactions with the LUMO of SO{sub 2}. The effects of quantum confinement on the electronic properties of oxide nanoparticles and the structural defects that usually accompany these systems in general favor the bonding and dissociation of SO{sub 2}. Thus, nanoparticles of MgO, CaO, SrO, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} are all more efficient for sequestering SO{sub 2} than the corresponding bulk oxides. Structural imperfections in pure or metal-doped ceria nanoparticles accelerate the reduction of SO{sub 2} by CO by facilitating the formation and migration of O vacancies in the oxide surface.

  13. Pilot-scale UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process for municipal reuse water: Assessing micropollutant degradation and estrogenic impacts on goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Singh, Arvinder; Klamerth, Nikolaus; McPhedran, Kerry; Bolton, James R; Belosevic, Miodrag; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-09-15

    Low concentrations (ng/L-μg/L) of emerging micropollutant contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents affect the possibility to reuse these waters. Many of those micropollutants elicit endocrine disrupting effects in aquatic organisms resulting in an alteration of the endocrine system. A potential candidate for tertiary municipal wastewater treatment of these micropollutants is ultraviolet (UV)/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) which was currently applied to treat the secondary effluent of the Gold Bar Wastewater Treatment Plant (GBWWTP) in Edmonton, AB, Canada. A new approach is presented to predict the fluence-based degradation rate constants (kf') of environmentally occurring micropollutants including carbamazepine [(0.87-1.39) × 10(-3) cm(2)/mJ] and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) [(0.60-0.91) × 10(-3) cm(2)/mJ for 2,4-D] in a medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 system based on a previous bench-scale investigation. Rather than using removal rates, this approach can be used to estimate the performance of the MP UV/H2O2 process for degrading trace contaminants of concern found in municipal wastewater. In addition to the ability to track contaminant removal/degradation, evaluation of the MP UV/H2O2 process was also accomplished by identifying critical ecotoxicological endpoints (i.e., estrogenicity) of the treated wastewater. Using quantitative PCR, mRNA levels of estrogen-responsive (ER) genes ERα1, ERα2, ERβ1, ERβ2 and NPR as well as two aromatase encoding genes (CYP19a and CYP19b) in goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) were measured during exposure to the GBWWTP effluent before and after MP UV/H2O2 treatment (a fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 20 mg/L of H2O2) in spring, summer and fall. Elevated expression of estrogen-responsive genes in goldfish exposed to UV/H2O2 treated effluent (a 7-day exposure) suggested that the UV/H2O2 process may induce acute estrogenic disruption to goldfish principally because

  14. Pilot-scale UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process for municipal reuse water: Assessing micropollutant degradation and estrogenic impacts on goldfish (Carassius auratus L.).

    PubMed

    Shu, Zengquan; Singh, Arvinder; Klamerth, Nikolaus; McPhedran, Kerry; Bolton, James R; Belosevic, Miodrag; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-09-15

    Low concentrations (ng/L-μg/L) of emerging micropollutant contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment plant effluents affect the possibility to reuse these waters. Many of those micropollutants elicit endocrine disrupting effects in aquatic organisms resulting in an alteration of the endocrine system. A potential candidate for tertiary municipal wastewater treatment of these micropollutants is ultraviolet (UV)/hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as an advanced oxidation process (AOP) which was currently applied to treat the secondary effluent of the Gold Bar Wastewater Treatment Plant (GBWWTP) in Edmonton, AB, Canada. A new approach is presented to predict the fluence-based degradation rate constants (kf') of environmentally occurring micropollutants including carbamazepine [(0.87-1.39) × 10(-3) cm(2)/mJ] and 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) [(0.60-0.91) × 10(-3) cm(2)/mJ for 2,4-D] in a medium pressure (MP) UV/H2O2 system based on a previous bench-scale investigation. Rather than using removal rates, this approach can be used to estimate the performance of the MP UV/H2O2 process for degrading trace contaminants of concern found in municipal wastewater. In addition to the ability to track contaminant removal/degradation, evaluation of the MP UV/H2O2 process was also accomplished by identifying critical ecotoxicological endpoints (i.e., estrogenicity) of the treated wastewater. Using quantitative PCR, mRNA levels of estrogen-responsive (ER) genes ERα1, ERα2, ERβ1, ERβ2 and NPR as well as two aromatase encoding genes (CYP19a and CYP19b) in goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) were measured during exposure to the GBWWTP effluent before and after MP UV/H2O2 treatment (a fluence of 1000 mJ/cm(2) and 20 mg/L of H2O2) in spring, summer and fall. Elevated expression of estrogen-responsive genes in goldfish exposed to UV/H2O2 treated effluent (a 7-day exposure) suggested that the UV/H2O2 process may induce acute estrogenic disruption to goldfish principally because

  15. Solution processed nickel oxide anodes for organic photovoltaic devices

    SciTech Connect

    Mustafa, Bestoon; Griffin, Jonathan; Alsulami, Abdullah S.; Lidzey, David G.; Buckley, Alastair R.

    2014-02-10

    Nickel oxide thin films have been prepared from a nickel acetylacetonate (Ni(acac)) precursor for use in bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices. The conversion of Ni(acac) to NiO{sub x} has been investigated. Oxygen plasma treatment of the NiO layer after annealing at 400 °C affords solar cell efficiencies of 5.2%. Photoelectron spectroscopy shows that high temperature annealing converts the Ni(acac) to a reduced form of nickel oxide. Additional oxygen plasma treatment further oxidizes the surface layers and deepens the NiO work function from 4.7 eV for the annealed film, to 5.0 eV allowing for efficient hole extraction at the organic interface.

  16. Probe molecules (PrM) approach in adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high throughput screening (HTS): in vivo discovery for developing in vitro target methods

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efficient and accurate adverse outcome pathway (AOP) based high-throughput screening (HTS) methods use a systems biology based approach to computationally model in vitro cellular and molecular data for rapid chemical prioritization; however, not all HTS assays are grounded by rel...

  17. Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Utilizing ToxCast Data and Lifestage Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models to Drive Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs)-Based Margin of Exposures (ABME) to Chemicals. Hisham A. El-Masri1, Nicole C. Klienstreur2, Linda Adams1, Tamara Tal1, Stephanie Padilla1, Kristin I...

  18. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  19. Process for fabricating doped zinc oxide microsphere gel

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, W.D. Jr.; Bond, W.D.; Lauf, R.J.

    1991-11-05

    Disclosed are a new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel. 4 figures.

  20. Oxidation Ditches. Instructor's Guide. Biological Treatment Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelsen, David

    This instructor's guide contains materials needed for teaching a two-lesson unit on oxidation ditches. These materials include: (1) an overview of the two lessons; (2) lesson plans; (3) lecture outlines; (4) student worksheet (with answers); and (5) two copies of a final quiz (with and without answers). The first lesson: reviews the theory,…

  1. LABORATORY MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS OF OXIDATION PROCESSES AFTER STEAM INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aggressive thermal methods such as steam injection or resistive heating are known to be effective for the recovery of many types of volatile and semivolatile compounds. It has been suggested that oxidation or other chemical reactions that occur at remediation temperatures can ai...

  2. Evaluation of pretreatment processes for supercritical water oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.M.

    1994-01-01

    This report evaluates processes to chemically treat US Department of Energy wastes to remove organic halogens, phosphorus, and sulfur. Chemical equilibrium calculations, process simulations, and responses from developers and licensors form the basis for comparisons. Gas-phase catalytic hydrogenation processes, strong base and base catalyzed processes, high pressure hydrolysis, and other emerging or commercial dehalogenation processes (both liquid and mixed phase) were considered. Cost estimates for full-scale processes and demonstration testing are given. Based on the evaluation, testing of a hydrogenation process and a strong base process are recommended.

  3. Advanced oxidation of alkylphenol ethoxylates in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Nagarnaik, Pranav M; Boulanger, Bryan

    2011-10-01

    Alkylphenols and alkylphenol ethoxylates are ubiquitous wastewater contaminants. In this study the oxidation of nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPEO) and octylphenol ethoxylates (OPEO) by oxidant systems generating hydroxide radicals was evaluated. The reaction of each oxidant with a technical mixture of NPEO (Tergitol™) and OPEO (Triton X-100™) in ultrapure laboratory water and four aqueous environmental matrices was carried out in order to develop an understanding of reaction kinetics. The oxidation of APEOs was evaluated by hydroxyl radical generated by (1) hydrogen peroxide in the presence of ultraviolet light, (2) Fenton's reagent, and (3) a photo-Fenton's process. The second order kinetic rate constant for both NPEO and OPEO with hydroxyl radical was calculated to be 1.1×10¹⁰ M⁻¹ s⁻¹. The efficacy of the AOPs within an aqueous environmental matrix was dependent on the rate of formation of hydroxyl radical and the scavenging capacity of the matrix. A model based on the hydroxyl radical formation, scavenging capacity and the kinetic rate constant of target APEO was developed from the existing literature and applied to predict the concentration of APEOs in solution during advanced oxidation in different aqueous environmental matrices. PMID:21784502

  4. Application of ozonation process in industrial wastewaters: textile, kraft E1 and whey effluents.

    PubMed

    Assalin, M R; Almeida, E S; Rosa, M A; Moraes, S G; Duran, N

    2004-08-01

    A large variety of organic and inorganic compounds can be found in wastewater from industrial processes. In this work, Advanced Oxidative Processes (AOPs) have been applied for the control of water pollution and the ozonation of different effluents was investigated. Wastewater from textile, kraft E1 and cheese manufacturing processes were chosen as examples of industrial effluents. The efficiency of substrate mineralization has been comparatively analyzed by the decrease in total organic carbon (TOC), color, and toxicity. The results revealed that the ozonation process can be a method for decolorization of effluent, but it is not effective for TOC reduction. The whey effluent was the most recalcitrant wastewater for ozone treatment which produced no TOC removal.

  5. Treatment of aqueous wastes contaminated with Congo Red dye by electrochemical oxidation and ozonation processes.

    PubMed

    Faouzi Elahmadi, Mohammed; Bensalah, Nasr; Gadri, Abdellatif

    2009-09-15

    Synthetic aqueous wastes polluted with Congo Red (CR) have been treated by two advanced oxidation processes: electrochemical oxidation on boron doped diamond anodes (BDD-EO) and ozonation under alkaline conditions. For same concentrations, galvanostatic electrolyses have led to total COD and TOC removals but ozonation process can reach only 85% and 81% of COD and TOC removals, respectively. UV-vis qualitative analyses have shown different behaviors of CR molecules towards ozonation and electrochemical oxidation. Rapid discoloration has been observed during ozonation, whereas color persistence till the end of galvanostatic electrolyses has been seen during BDD-EO process. It seems that the oxidation mechanisms involved in the two processes are different: simultaneous destruction of azoic groups is suggested during ozonation process but consecutive destruction of these groups is proposed during BDD-EO. However, energetic study has evidenced that BDD-EO appears more efficient and more economic than ozonation in terms of TOC removals. These results have been explained by the fact that during BDD-EO, other strong oxidants electrogenerated from the electrolyte oxidation such as persulfates and direct-oxidation of CR and its byproducts on BDD anodes complement the hydroxyl radicals mediated oxidation to accomplish the total mineralization of organics.

  6. Integrated fab process for metal oxide EUV photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenville, Andrew; Anderson, Jeremy T.; Clark, Benjamin L.; De Schepper, Peter; Edson, Joseph; Greer, Michael; Jiang, Kai; Kocsis, Michael; Meyers, Stephen T.; Stowers, Jason K.; Telecky, Alan J.; De Simone, Danilo; Vandenberghe, Geert

    2015-03-01

    Inpria is developing directly patternable, metal oxide hardmasks as robust, high-resolution photoresists for EUV lithography. Targeted formulations have achieved 13nm half-pitch at 35 mJ/cm2 on an ASML's NXE:3300B scanner. Inpria's second-generation materials have an absorbance of 20/μm, thereby enabling an equivalent photon shot noise compared to conventional resists at a dose lower by a factor of 4X. These photoresists have ~40:1 etch selectivity into a typical carbon underlayer, so ultrathin 20nm films are possible, mitigating pattern collapse. In addition to lithographic performance, we review progress in parallel advances required to enable the transition from lab to fab for such a metal oxide photoresist. This includes considerations and data related to: solvent compatibility, metals cross-contamination, coat uniformity, stability, outgassing, and rework.

  7. Hierarchical zeolites and their catalytic performance in selective oxidative processes.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Manuel; Grau-Atienza, Aida; Campos, Rafael; Romero, Antonio A; Serrano, Elena; Maria Marinas, Jose; García Martínez, Javier; Luque, Rafael

    2015-04-24

    Hierarchical ZSM-5 zeolites prepared using a simple alkali treatment and subsequent HCl washing are found to exhibit unprecedented catalytic activities in selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol under microwave irradiation. The metal-free zeolites promote the microwave-assisted oxidation of benzyl alcohol with hydrogen peroxide in yields ranging from 45-35 % after 5 min of reaction under mild reaction conditions as well as the epoxidation of cyclohexene to valuable products (40-60 % conversion). The hierarchically porous systems also exhibited an interesting catalytic activity in the dehydration of N,N-dimethylformamide (25-30 % conversion), representing the first example of transition-metal free catalysts in this reaction.

  8. Catalytic oxidation process cleans volatile organics from exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1994-06-27

    Unsteady-state catalytic oxidation is the basis of a technology now becoming available in the US for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial exhaust streams. The technology originated in Russia and is being developed for the US market by Monsanto Enviro-Chem Systems, St. Louis. At least 149 of the 189 pollutants identified by EPA are VOCs. EPA estimates that the initial cost to industry for equipment to remove the hazardous materials will be about $350 million. The expected annual maintenance bill to treat the major pollution sources is about $182 million. Catalytic oxidizers are applicable to most, but not all, VOC removal applications. The advantages in most cases are VOC removal efficiencies of at least 99%, half the energy requirement of other systems, low operating temperatures, stable operation with variable flow rates and VOC concentrations, and low capital and operating costs.

  9. Stability of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide as a spin-trap for quantification of hydroxyl radicals in processes based on Fenton reaction.

    PubMed

    Fontmorin, J M; Burgos Castillo, R C; Tang, W Z; Sillanpää, M

    2016-08-01

    Fenton reaction was used to produce hydroxyl radicals under conditions similar to AOPs with 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap agent in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. A theoretical kinetics model was developed to determine conditions under which the spin-adduct DMPO-OH is not further oxidized by Fe(3+) and excessive radicals, so that hydroxyl radicals concentration could be accurately inferred. Experiments were designed based upon the model and H2O2 and Fe(2+) concentrations were varied from 1 to 100 mM and from 0.1 to 10 mM, respectively, with a constant H2O2: Fe(2+) ratio of 10:1. Results confirmed that DMPO concentration should be at least 20 times higher than the concentration of H2O2 and 200 times higher than iron concentration to produce stable DMPO-OH EPR signal. When DMPO: H2O2 ratio varied from 1 to 10, DMPO-OH could generate intermediates and be further oxidized leading to the apparition of an additional triplet. This signal was attributed to a paramagnetic dimer: its structure and a formation mechanism were proposed. Finally, the utilization of sodium sulfite and catalase to terminate Fenton reaction was discussed. Catalase appeared to be compatible with DMPO. However, sodium sulfite should be avoided since it reacted with DMPO-OH to form DMPO-SO3. PMID:27132196

  10. Oxidative treatment characteristics of biotreated textile-dyeing wastewater and chemical agents used in a textile-dyeing process by advanced oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Lim, B R; Hu, H Y; Ahn, K H; Fujie, K

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative treatment characteristics of biotreated textile-dyeing wastewater and typical chemicals such as desizing, scouring, dispersing and swelling agents used in the textile-dyeing process by advanced oxidation process were experimentally studied. The refractory organic matters remained in the effluent of biological treatment process without degradation may be suitable for the improvement of biodegradability and mineralized to CO2 by combined ozonation with and without hydrogen peroxide. On the other hand, the refractory chemicals contained in the scouring agent A and swelling agent may not be mineralized and their biodegradability may not be improved by ozonation. However, the BOD/DOC ratio of scouring agent B increased from 0.3 to 0.45 after ozonation. Based on the results described above, advanced treatment process involving the ozonation without and with the addition of hydrogen peroxide, followed by biological treatment was proposed for the treatment of refractory wastewater discharged from the textile-dyeing process.

  11. TiO2-sludge carbon enhanced catalytic oxidative reaction in environmental wastewaters applications.

    PubMed

    Athalathil, Sunil; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Stüber, Frank; Bengoa, Christophe; Font, Josep; Fortuny, Agusti; Pintar, Albin; Fabregat, Azael

    2015-12-30

    The enhanced oxidative potential of sludge carbon/TiO2 nano composites (SNCs), applied as heterogeneous catalysts in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), was studied. Fabrification of efficient SNCs using different methods and successful evaluation of their catalytic oxidative activity is reported for the first time. Surface modification processes of hydrothermal deposition, chemical treatment and sol-gel solution resulted in improved catalytic activity and good surface chemistry of the SNCs. The solids obtained after chemical treatment and hydrothermal deposition processes exhibit excellent crystallinity and photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic rate was obtained for the material prepared using hydrothermal deposition technique, compared to other nanocomposites. Further, improved removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous phase by means of catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet air oxidation processes is achieved over the solid synthesized using chemical treatment method. The present results demonstrate that the addition of TiO2 on the surface of sludge carbon (SC) increases catalytic oxidative activity of SNCs. The latter produced from harmful sludge materials can be therefore used as cost-effective and efficient sludge derived catalysts for the removal of hazardous pollutants.

  12. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined... Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids. Polyhydric alcohol... following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyhydric alcohol esters identified in this paragraph may be...

  13. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined... Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids. Polyhydric alcohol... following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyhydric alcohol esters identified in this paragraph may be...

  14. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined... Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids. Polyhydric alcohol... following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyhydric alcohol esters identified in this paragraph may be...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3770 - Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined... Polyhydric alcohol esters of oxidatively refined (Gersthofen process) montan wax acids. Polyhydric alcohol... following prescribed conditions: (a) The polyhydric alcohol esters identified in this paragraph may be...

  16. Participation of oxygen, having diffused through a silver membrane catalyst, in heterogeneous oxidation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Gryaznov, V.M.; Gul'yanova, S.G.; Vedernikov, V.I.

    1986-08-01

    On the basis of an investigation of the characteristics of oxidation of hydrocarbons, alcohols and ammonia on a silver membrane catalyst, and also changes of its oxygen permeability proposals have been made in relation to participation of various forms of adsorbed oxygen in the limiting stage of its transfer through silver membranes in heterogeneous oxidation processes.

  17. Effect of Process Parameters on the Size and Shape of Nano- and Micrometric Zinc Oxide.

    PubMed

    Pulit-Prociak, Jolanta; Banach, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents a method of obtaining zinc oxide nano- and microparticles. In these studies microwave reactor and laboratory pressure reactor were used. Since microwave radiation accelerates proceeding of reactions, this way was found to be an effective method in the process of obtaining nanocrystallines of zinc oxide. The size of prepared particles rarely exceeded 500 nm. PMID:27333554

  18. Structural Evolution of Silicon Oxide Nanowires via Head-Growth Solid-Liquid-Solid Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Cheng-Hang; Chan, Shih-Yu; Chen, Chia-Fu

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a growth mechanism for silicon oxide nanowires (SiONWs) as a unique solid-liquid-solid process. SiONWs were synthesized in a furnace at 1000 °C and cooled at a high rate. Nickel and gold were introduced as catalysts to dissolve and precipitate the silicon oxide originally prepared by wet oxidation. The ratio of nickel to gold determined the precipitation rate and different “octopus-like” structures were formed. At a specific cooling rate, composition and amount of a catalyst, aligned silicon oxide nanowires with unattached ends were obtained.

  19. High-Quality Solution-Processed Silicon Oxide Gate Dielectric Applied on Indium Oxide Based Thin-Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Jaehnike, Felix; Pham, Duy Vu; Anselmann, Ralf; Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    A silicon oxide gate dielectric was synthesized by a facile sol-gel reaction and applied to solution-processed indium oxide based thin-film transistors (TFTs). The SiOx sol-gel was spin-coated on highly doped silicon substrates and converted to a dense dielectric film with a smooth surface at a maximum processing temperature of T = 350 °C. The synthesis was systematically improved, so that the solution-processed silicon oxide finally achieved comparable break downfield strength (7 MV/cm) and leakage current densities (<10 nA/cm(2) at 1 MV/cm) to thermally grown silicon dioxide (SiO2). The good quality of the dielectric layer was successfully proven in bottom-gate, bottom-contact metal oxide TFTs and compared to reference TFTs with thermally grown SiO2. Both transistor types have field-effect mobility values as high as 28 cm(2)/(Vs) with an on/off current ratio of 10(8), subthreshold swings of 0.30 and 0.37 V/dec, respectively, and a threshold voltage close to zero. The good device performance could be attributed to the smooth dielectric/semiconductor interface and low interface trap density. Thus, the sol-gel-derived SiO2 is a promising candidate for a high-quality dielectric layer on many substrates and high-performance large-area applications. PMID:26039187

  20. Photochemical oxidation of oxalate in Pu-238 process streams

    SciTech Connect

    Long, K. M.; Ford, D. K.; Trujillo, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    For over forty years, NASA has relied on plutonium-238 in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) units and Radioisotope Heater Units ( W s ) to provide power and heat for many space missions including Transit, Pioneer, Viking, Voyager, Galileo, Ulysses and Cassini. RHUs provide heat to keep key components warm in extremely cold environments found on planets, moons, or in deep space. RTGs convert heat generated from the radioactive decay of plutonium-238 into electricity using a themocouple, Plutonium-238 has proven to be an excellent heat source far deep space missions because of its high thermal power density, useful lifetime, minimal shielding requirements, and oxide stability.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: CAV-OX ULTRAVIOLET OXIDATION PROCESS MAGNUM WATER TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The CAV-OX® technology (see Fig- ure 1) destroys organic contaminants, including chlorinated hy- drocarbons, in water. The process uses hydrogen peroxide, hy- drodynamic cavitation, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation to photolyze and oxidize organic compounds present in water at ...

  2. TREATMENT OF PAHS AND PCBS USING SULFATE RADICAL-BASED OXIDATION PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in aquatic systems pose serious threat to public health due to their toxicity and potential carcinogenicity [1]. Sulfate radical-based oxidation processes can be effectively used for degradation of these...

  3. Hydrothermal treatment of Hanford waste constituents. [Wet Oxidation Processes

    SciTech Connect

    Dell'Orco, P C; Foy, B R; Robinson, J M; Buelow, S J

    1992-01-01

    The destruction of nitrates, organics, and ferrocyanides contained in underground storage tanks at the Department of Energy Hanford site in Washington state would significantly reduce the volume, hazard, and toxicity of the waste, while meeting pretreatment requirements for vitrification and grouting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability of supercritical water oxidation for the destruction of nitrates organics, and ferrocyanides. Laboratory studies were performed studying oxidation/reduction reactions of nitrate with a simple organic compound, methanol, and with ammonia. Additional studies examined the reaction of nitrate with ferrocyanide. When reacted with methanol above 500{degrees}C, greater than 99% of the nitrate was destroyed at the shortest residence times (< 6 seconds). At the same conditions, greater than 80% of the methanol was converted to bicarbonate and carbon dioxide. Studies involving the reaction of nitrate and nitrite with ammonia indicated that the reaction proceeds to completion in short residence times at temperatures above the critical point of water (374.2{degrees}C). Ferrocyanide to also reacted rapidly with nitrate above the critical point, to produce carbon dioxide and ammonia.

  4. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  5. Regulatory Control or Oxidative Damage? Proteomic Approaches to Interrogate the Role of Cysteine Oxidation Status in Biological Processes*

    PubMed Central

    Held, Jason M.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation is a double-edged sword for cellular processes and its role in normal physiology, cancer and aging remains only partially understood. Although oxidative stress may disrupt biological function, oxidation-reduction (redox) reactions in a cell are often tightly regulated and play essential physiological roles. Cysteines lie at the interface between these extremes since the chemical properties that make specific thiols exquisitely redox-sensitive also predispose them to oxidative damage by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species during stress. Thus, these modifications can be either under reversible redox regulatory control or, alternatively, a result of reversible or irreversible oxidative damage. In either case, it has become increasingly important to assess the redox status of protein thiols since these modifications often impact such processes as catalytic activity, conformational alterations, or metal binding. To better understand the redox changes that accompany protein cysteine residues in complex biological systems, new experimental approaches have been developed to identify and characterize specific thiol modifications and/or changes in their overall redox status. In this review, we describe the recent technologies in redox proteomics that have pushed the boundaries for detecting and quantifying redox cysteine modifications in a cellular context. While there is no one-size-fits-all analytical solution, we highlight the rationale, strengths, and limitations of each technology in order to effectively apply them to specific biological questions. Several technological limitations still remain unsolved, however these approaches and future developments play an important role toward understanding the interplay between oxidative stress and redox signaling in health and disease. PMID:22159599

  6. STEP wastewater treatment: a solar thermal electrochemical process for pollutant oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baohui; Wu, Hongjun; Zhang, Guoxue; Licht, Stuart

    2012-10-01

    A solar thermal electrochemical production (STEP) pathway was established to utilize solar energy to drive useful chemical processes. In this paper, we use experimental chemistry for efficient STEP wastewater treatment, and suggest a theory based on the decreasing stability of organic pollutants (hydrocarbon oxidation potentials) with increasing temperature. Exemplified by the solar thermal electrochemical oxidation of phenol, the fundamental model and experimental system components of this process outline a general method for the oxidation of environmentally stable organic pollutants into carbon dioxide, which is easily removed. Using thermodynamic calculations we show a sharply decreasing phenol oxidation potential with increasing temperature. The experimental results demonstrate that this increased temperature can be supplied by solar thermal heating. In combination this drives electrochemical phenol removal with enhanced oxidation efficiency through (i) a thermodynamically driven decrease in the energy needed to fuel the process and (ii) improved kinetics to sustain high rates of phenol oxidation at low electrochemical overpotential. The STEP wastewater treatment process is synergistic in that it is performed with higher efficiency than either electrochemical or photovoltaic conversion process acting alone. STEP is a green, efficient, safe, and sustainable process for organic wastewater treatment driven solely by solar energy.

  7. The sulfide ore looping oxidation process: An alternative to current roasting and smelting practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, Larry F.; Balliett, Robert; Mozolic, Jean A.

    2008-07-01

    This novel method utilizes the reactions of metal sulfides and metal oxides. It is applicable to single-metal systems such as Mo, Cu, Co, Ni, Fe, and Zn individual sulfides and to mixed sulfides such as chalcopyrite and Mo/Fe. In addition to primary ores, waste stream products such as spent catalysts can be effectively processed. The benchmark work done on MoS2/MoO3 resulted in an MoO2 product with less than 0.095 wt.% sulfur. Other sulfide concentrate materials showed similar results. In the first stage of the looping process, a highly concentrated SO2 off-gas stream is produced that could be directed to an acid plant or converted to liquid. The products from the first process step can be directed down line for further processing or can be used as is. In the second step of looping oxidation, the product is oxidized back to its fully oxidized state and is mainly looped back to drive the oxidation process in the first reaction. There are also several opportunities for energy recovery and conversion, making looping oxidation an energy-efficient process.

  8. A general route toward complete room temperature processing of printed and high performance oxide electronics.

    PubMed

    Baby, Tessy T; Garlapati, Suresh K; Dehm, Simone; Häming, Marc; Kruk, Robert; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2015-03-24

    Critical prerequisites for solution-processed/printed field-effect transistors (FETs) and logics are excellent electrical performance including high charge carrier mobility, reliability, high environmental stability and low/preferably room temperature processing. Oxide semiconductors can often fulfill all the above criteria, sometimes even with better promise than their organic counterparts, except for their high process temperature requirement. The need for high annealing/curing temperatures renders oxide FETs rather incompatible to inexpensive, flexible substrates, which are commonly used for high-throughput and roll-to-roll additive manufacturing techniques, such as printing. To overcome this serious limitation, here we demonstrate an alternative approach that enables completely room-temperature processing of printed oxide FETs with device mobility as large as 12.5 cm(2)/(V s). The key aspect of the present concept is a chemically controlled curing process of the printed nanoparticle ink that provides surprisingly dense thin films and excellent interparticle electrical contacts. In order to demonstrate the versatility of this approach, both n-type (In2O3) and p-type (Cu2O) oxide semiconductor nanoparticle dispersions are prepared to fabricate, inkjet printed and completely room temperature processed, all-oxide complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) invertors that can display significant signal gain (∼18) at a supply voltage of only 1.5 V. PMID:25693653

  9. Dissolution of Neptunium and Plutonium Oxides Using a Catalyzed Electrolytic Process

    SciTech Connect

    Hylton, TD

    2004-10-25

    This report discusses the scoping study performed to evaluate the use of a catalyzed electrolytic process for dissolving {sup 237}Np oxide targets that had been irradiated to produce {sup 238}Pu oxide. Historically, these compounds have been difficult to dissolve, and complete dissolution was obtained only by adding hydrofluoric acid to the nitric acid solvent. The presence of fluoride in the mixture is undesired because the fluoride ions are corrosive to tank and piping systems and the fluoride ions cause interferences in the spectrophotometric analyses. The goal is to find a dissolution method that will eliminate these issues and that can be incorporated into a processing system to support the domestic production and purification of {sup 238}Pu. This study evaluated the potential of cerium(IV) ions, a strong oxidant, to attack and dissolve the oxide compounds. In the dissolution process, the cerium(IV) ions are reduced to cerium(III) ions, which are not oxidants. Therefore, an electrolytic process was incorporated to continuously convert cerium(III) ions back to cerium(IV) ions so that they can dissolve more of the oxide compounds. This study showed that the neptunium and plutonium oxides were successfully dissolved and that more development work should be performed to optimize the procedure.

  10. Photocatalytic Iron Oxide Coatings Produced by Thermal Spraying Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navidpour, A. H.; Salehi, M.; Amirnasr, M.; Salimijazi, H. R.; Azarpour Siahkali, M.; Kalantari, Y.; Mohammadnezhad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, hematite coatings with semiconductor properties have received attention for photocatalytic applications. In this study, plasma and flame spraying techniques were used for hematite deposition on 316 stainless steel plates. X-ray diffraction was used for phase composition analysis, and methylene blue was used as an organic pollutant to evaluate the photocatalytic activity of thermally sprayed coatings. The results showed that all these coatings could act under visible-light irradiation but the one deposited by flame spraying at 20 cm stand-off distance showed the highest photocatalytic activity. The results showed that wavelength of the light source and pH of the solution affected the photocatalytic activity significantly. It was also shown that thermally sprayed iron oxide coatings could have a high photo-absorption ability, which could positively affect the photocatalytic activity.

  11. Processing, Compatibility and Oxidation of Diboride - Oxide Matrix Composites for Ultrahigh-Temperature Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abada, Ahmed

    1990-01-01

    Promising results for the development of a ceramic/ceramic composite to be used for structural applications in the ultra high temperature range (1650-1850^ circC) have been obtained for alumina reinforced with titanium or zirconium diboribe coated with molybdenum disilicide. Prior to this achievement, several theoretical and experimental studies of particulate composites with (TiB_2 or ZrB_2) imbedded in (ZrO_2, Y_2 O_3 or Al_2 O_3) were conducted. Calculations of the compatibility and stability of oxide matrices with the diborides in vacuum showed positive energies of formation, indicating suitability of reinforcement of alumina under vacuum conditions. Also, since the sublimation of vapor species at ultra high temperatures is very critical to the stability of substances still existing in their condensed states, a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the metal -oxygen systems, was carried out using elemental data of the TiB_2, ZrB_2 , ZrO_2, Y_2 O_3, Al_2 O_3, MoSi_2 and their combinations (TiB_2 or ZrB_2)/(ZrO_2 , Y_2O_3 or Al_2O_3) for comparison, at 1650, 1850 and 2050^ circC. A comparison of the combination TiB _2 and ZrB_2 in MoSi_2/(Al_2O _3 or ZrO_2) at 1650^circC was also made. A stability analysis using equilibrium oxygen partial pressures for the TiB_2 and ZrB_2 decomposition at 1650, 1850 and 2050^ circC was carried out. A detailed characterization of the powders used for the oxide matrices, the diborides and the molybdenum disilicide are presented. The effects of the powder characteristics and the vacuum hot pressing parameters on the densification of the composites are discussed. Stability and chemical compatibility of the particulate and ternary composites in their as hot pressed states and following their vacuum and air oxidation treatments were characterized. Interdiffusion of elemental species across diboride/disilicide and oxide/disilicide interfaces was studies by EDS dot mapping. It is proposed that the growth of the Mo _5Si_3 is interface

  12. Purification of 238Pu Oxide using the Pu Oxalate Process

    SciTech Connect

    Mew, D A; Krikorian, O H; Dodson, K E; Schmitz, J A

    2001-11-28

    The Pu oxalate process is used to remove {sup 234}U from aged {sup 238}Pu-enriched PuO{sub 2} ({sup 234}U grows into the PuO{sub 2} material with time from a-decay of {sup 238}Pu). The Pu oxalate process was first used on a mixture of weapons grade PuO{sub 2} with UO{sub 2} to work out the processing parameters. It was then applied to aged {sup 238}Pu-enriched PuO{sub 2} ({sup 238}PuO{sub 2}). The {sup 234}U content of the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} was reduced from 13.2 wt% to 0.0254 wt%, and the Pu recovery yield was 78.5%. The process is complex and is complicated by radiolysis problems when working with {sup 238}Pu. Details of the experiments are described.

  13. Chemical oxidation of sulfadiazine by the Fenton process: kinetics, pathways, toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Feng; Zhou, Shi-Biao; Xiao, An-Guo; Li, Wen-Jun; Ying, Guang-Guo

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigated sulfadiazine oxidation by the Fenton process under various reaction conditions. The reaction conditions tested in the experiments included the initial pH value of reaction solutions, and the dosages of ferrous ions and hydrogen peroxide. Under the reaction conditions with pH 3, 0.25 mM of ferrous ion and 2 mM of hydrogen peroxide, a removal efficiency of nearly 100% was achieved for sulfadiazine. A series of intermediate products including 4-OH-sulfadiazine/or 5-OH-sulfadiazine, 2-aminopyrimidine, sulfanilamide, formic acid, and oxalic acid were identified. Based on these products, the possible oxidation pathway of sulfadiazine by Fenton's reagent was proposed. The toxicity evaluation of reaction solutions showed increased antimicrobial effects following the Fenton oxidation process. The results from this study suggest that the Fenton oxidation process could remove sulfadiazine, but also increase solution toxicity due to the presence of more toxic products. PMID:25310806

  14. Phases Transition and Consolidation Mechanism of High Chromium Vanadium-Titanium Magnetite Pellet by Oxidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jue; Chu, Man-sheng; Feng, Cong; Li, Feng; Liu, Zheng-gen

    2016-08-01

    Based on the fundamental characteristics of high chromium vanadium-titanium magnetite (HCVTM), the effects of roasting temperature and roasting time on the phase transition and oxidation consolidation during the oxidation were investigated systematically. It was shown that the oxidation of HCVTM pellet was not a simple process but complex. With increasing roasting temperature and time, the compressive strength of oxidized pellet was improved. The phase transition during oxidation was hypothesized to proceed as follows: (1) Fe3O4 → Fe2O3; (2) Fe2.75Ti0.25O4 → Fe9TiO15 + FeTiO3 → Fe9TiO15 + Fe2Ti3O9; (3) Fe2VO4 → V2O3 → (Cr0.15V0.85)2O3; (4) FeCr2O4 → Cr2O3 → Cr1.3Fe0.7O3 + (Cr0.15V0.85)2O3. The oxidation consolidation process was divided into three stages: (1)oxidation below 1,173 K; (2) recrystallization consolidation at 1,173 - 1,373 K; (3) particle refining recrystallization-consolidation by the participation of liquid phase at 1,373 - 1,573 K. To obtain the HCVTM oxidized pellet with good quality, the rational roasting parameters included a roasting temperature of 1,573 K and a roasting time of 20 min.

  15. Efficient removal of insecticide "imidacloprid" from water by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Turabik, Meral; Oturan, Nihal; Gözmen, Belgin; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of imidacloprid (ICP) has been carried out by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), anodic oxidation, and electro-Fenton, in which hydroxyl radicals are generated electrocatalytically. Carbon-felt cathode and platinum or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes were used in electrolysis cell. To determine optimum operating conditions, the effects of applied current and catalyst concentration were investigated. The decay of ICP during the oxidative degradation was well fitted to pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and absolute rate constant of the oxidation of ICP by hydroxyl radicals was found to be k abs(ICP) = 1.23 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1). The results showed that both anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton process with BDD anode exhibited high mineralization efficiency reaching 91 and 94% total organic carbon (TOC) removal at 2 h, respectively. For Pt-EF process, mineralization efficiency was also obtained as 71%. The degradation products of ICP were identified and a plausible general oxidation mechanism was proposed. Some of the main reaction intermediates such as 6-chloronicotinic acid, 6-chloronicotinaldehyde, and 6-hydroxynicotinic acid were determined by GC-MS analysis. Before complete mineralization, formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxylic acids were identified as end-products. The initial chlorine and organic nitrogen present in ICP were found to be converted to inorganic anions Cl(-), NO₃(-), and NH₄(+).

  16. Efficient removal of insecticide "imidacloprid" from water by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Turabik, Meral; Oturan, Nihal; Gözmen, Belgin; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative degradation of imidacloprid (ICP) has been carried out by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs), anodic oxidation, and electro-Fenton, in which hydroxyl radicals are generated electrocatalytically. Carbon-felt cathode and platinum or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes were used in electrolysis cell. To determine optimum operating conditions, the effects of applied current and catalyst concentration were investigated. The decay of ICP during the oxidative degradation was well fitted to pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics and absolute rate constant of the oxidation of ICP by hydroxyl radicals was found to be k abs(ICP) = 1.23 × 10(9) L mol(-1) s(-1). The results showed that both anodic oxidation and electro-Fenton process with BDD anode exhibited high mineralization efficiency reaching 91 and 94% total organic carbon (TOC) removal at 2 h, respectively. For Pt-EF process, mineralization efficiency was also obtained as 71%. The degradation products of ICP were identified and a plausible general oxidation mechanism was proposed. Some of the main reaction intermediates such as 6-chloronicotinic acid, 6-chloronicotinaldehyde, and 6-hydroxynicotinic acid were determined by GC-MS analysis. Before complete mineralization, formic, acetic, oxalic, and glyoxylic acids were identified as end-products. The initial chlorine and organic nitrogen present in ICP were found to be converted to inorganic anions Cl(-), NO₃(-), and NH₄(+). PMID:24671401

  17. Ceruloplasmin copper induces oxidant damage by a redox process utilizing cell-derived superoxide as reductant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Fox, P. L.

    1998-01-01

    Oxidative damage by transition metals bound to proteins may be an important pathogenic mechanism. Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a Cu-containing plasma protein thought to be involved in oxidative modification of lipoproteins. We have previously shown that Cp increased cell-mediated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by a process requiring cell-derived superoxide, but the underlying chemical mechanism(s) is (are) unknown. We now show that superoxide reduction of Cp Cu is a critical reaction in cellular LDL oxidation. By bathocuproine disulfonate (BCS) binding and by superoxide utilization, we showed that exogenous superoxide reduces a single Cp Cu atom, the same Cu required for LDL oxidation. The Cu atom remained bound to Cp during the redox cycle. Three avenues of evidence showed that vascular cells reduce Cp Cu by a superoxide-dependent process. The 2-fold higher rate of Cp Cu reduction by smooth muscle cells (SMC) compared to endothelial cells (EC) was consistent with their relative rates of superoxide release. Furthermore, Cp Cu reduction by cells was blocked by Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1). Finally, the level of superoxide produced by EC and SMC was sufficient to cause the amount of Cu reduction observed. An important role of Cp Cu reduction in LDL oxidation was suggested by results showing that SOD1 inhibited Cp Cu reduction and LDL oxidation by SMC with equal potency, while tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated both processes. In summary, these results show that superoxide is a critical cellular reductant of divalent transition metals involved in oxidation, and that protein-bound Cu is a substrate for this reaction. The role of these mechanisms in oxidative processes in vivo has yet to be defined.

  18. Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes

    PubMed Central

    Charbon, E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the basics of single-photon counting in complementary metal oxide semiconductors, through single-photon avalanche diodes (SPADs), and the making of miniaturized pixels with photon-counting capability based on SPADs. Some applications, which may take advantage of SPAD image sensors, are outlined, such as fluorescence-based microscopy, three-dimensional time-of-flight imaging and biomedical imaging, to name just a few. The paper focuses on architectures that are best suited to those applications and the trade-offs they generate. In this context, architectures are described that efficiently collect the output of single pixels when designed in large arrays. Off-chip readout circuit requirements are described for a variety of applications in physics, medicine and the life sciences. Owing to the dynamic nature of SPADs, designs featuring a large number of SPADs require careful analysis of the target application for an optimal use of silicon real estate and of limited readout bandwidth. The paper also describes the main trade-offs involved in architecting such chips and the solutions adopted with focus on scalability and miniaturization. PMID:24567470

  19. Chemical processes for the extreme enrichment of tellurium into marine ferromanganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiwabara, Teruhiko; Oishi, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Aya; Sugiyama, Toshiki; Usui, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshio

    2014-04-01

    Tellurium, an element of growing economic importance, is extremely enriched in marine ferromanganese oxides. We investigated the mechanism of this enrichment using a combination of spectroscopic analysis and adsorption/coprecipitation experiments. X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) analysis showed that in adsorption/coprecipitation systems, Te(IV) was oxidized on δ-MnO2 and not oxidized on ferrihydrite. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) analysis showed that both Te(IV) and Te(VI) were adsorbed on the surface of δ-MnO2 and ferrihydrite via formation of inner-sphere complexes. In addition, Te(VI) can be structurally incorporated into the linkage of Fe octahedra through a coprecipitation process because of its molecular geometry that is similar to the Fe octahedron. The largest distribution coefficient obtained in the adsorption/coprecipitation experiments was for the Te(VI)/ferrihydrite coprecipitation system, and it was comparable to those calculated from the distribution between natural ferromanganese oxides and seawater. Our XAFS and micro-focused X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping of natural ferromanganese oxides showed that Te was structurally incorporated as Te(VI) in Fe (oxyhydr)oxide phases. We conclude that the main process for the enrichment of Te in ferromanganese oxides is structural incorporation of Te(VI) into Fe (oxyhydr)oxide phases through coprecipitation. This mechanism can explain the unique degree of enrichment of Te compared with other oxyanions, which are mainly enriched via adsorption on the surface of the solid structures. In particular, the great contrast in the distributions of Te and Se is caused by their oxidized species: (i) the similar geometry of the Te(VI) molecule to Fe octahedron, and (ii) quite soluble nature of Se(VI). Coexisting Mn oxide phases may promote structural incorporation of Te(VI) by oxidation of Te(IV), although the surface oxidation itself may not work as the critical enrichment process as

  20. Novel two stage bio-oxidation and chlorination process for high strength hazardous coal carbonization effluent.

    PubMed

    Manekar, Pravin; Biswas, Rima; Karthik, Manikavasagam; Nandy, Tapas

    2011-05-15

    Effluent generated from coal carbonization to coke was characterized with high organic content, phenols, ammonium nitrogen, and cyanides. A full scale effluent treatment plant (ETP) working on the principle of single stage carbon-nitrogen bio-oxidation process (SSCNBP) revealed competition between heterotrophic and autotrophic bacteria in the bio-degradation and nitrification process. The effluent was pretreated in a stripper and further combined with other streams to treat in the SSCNBP. Laboratory studies were carried on process and stripped effluents in a bench scale model of ammonia stripper and a two stage bio-oxidation process. The free ammonia removal efficiency of stripper was in the range 70-89%. Bench scale studies of the two stage bio-oxidation process achieved a carbon-nitrogen reduction at 6 days hydraulic retention time (HRT) operating in an extended aeration mode. This paper addresses the studies on selection of a treatment process for removal of organic matter, phenols, cyanide and ammonia nitrogen. The treatment scheme comprising ammonia stripping (pretreatment) followed by the two stage bio-oxidation and chlorination process met the Indian Standards for discharge into Inland Surface Waters. This treatment process package offers a techno-economically viable treatment scheme to neuter hazardous effluent generated from coal carbonization process. PMID:21371822

  1. The chemistry of O in reduction processes of the GaAs native oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuberes, M. T.; Sacedon, J. L.

    1992-05-01

    We present an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the interfacial chemical reactions during the total reduction of a 5 Å thick GaAs native oxide layer accomplished in two separate stages. First, the As2O3 has been selectively reduced by annealing the oxidized surface at increasing temperatures. In the second stage, the reduction of the Ga oxides has been completed at room temperature by Si deposition. The total amount of O at the GaAs interface remains constant during both processes. During the As2O3 thermal reduction, the analysis of the Ga2p{3}/{2} and Ga LMM spectra shows that, depending on the annealing temperature, GaOx (x < {3}/{2}) or Ga2O3 growth occurs. The Si promoted of the Ga oxides results in the formation of Si oxides of different stoichiometry at the GaAs surface.

  2. Zinc-oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasael

    2010-03-23

    Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  3. Zinc oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same

    DOEpatents

    Gangwal, Santosh Kumar; Turk, Brian Scott; Gupta, Raghubir Prasad

    2005-10-04

    Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided, wherein the sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents contain an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2 O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, containing a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

  4. Post-growth process-induced degradation in thin gate oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Rajesh; Bhattacharyya, A. B.; Singh, D. N.

    1991-06-01

    The mechanism of degradation in thin gate oxides due to postoxidation processing steps has been investigated using charge to breakdown QBD as a diagnostic tool. The QBD degradation is also correlated with trap generation rate in thin gate oxide. Controlled annealing experiments show that the gate oxide degradation is not related to the diffusion of phosphorous or other mobile ion impurities from the polysilicon film into the gate oxide. The degradation is caused by stress build up in silicon dioxide film with high-temperature annealing, due to viscous shear flow of the gate oxide at polysilicon/silicon dioxide and silicon dioxide/silicon interfaces. In another experiment, where the thickness of polysilicon was taken as a parameter, it is shown that degradation has a direct correlation with the polysilicon thickness which may be related to the mechanical stress.

  5. Occurrence of cyclophosphamide and ifosfamide in aqueous environment and their removal by biological and abiotic wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Česen, Marjeta; Kosjek, Tina; Laimou-Geraniou, Maria; Kompare, Boris; Širok, Brane; Lambropolou, Dimitra; Heath, Ester

    2015-09-15

    Cytostatic drug residues in the aqueous environment are of concern due to their possible adverse effects on non-target organisms. Here we report the occurrence and removal efficiency of cyclophosphamide (CP) and ifosfamide (IF) by biological and abiotic treatments including advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Cyclophosphamide was detected in hospital wastewaters (14-22,000 ng L(-1)), wastewater treatment plant influents (19-27 ng L(-1)) and effluent (17 ng L(-1)), whereas IF was detected only in hospital wastewaters (48-6800 ng L(-1)). The highest removal efficiency during biological treatment (attached growth biomass in a flow through bioreactor) was 59 ± 15% and 35 ± 9.3% for CP and IF, respectively. Also reported are the removal efficiencies of both compounds from wastewater using hydrodynamic cavitation (HC), ozonation (O3) and/or UV, either individually or in combination with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Hydrodynamic cavitation did not remove CP and IF to any significant degree. The highest removal efficiencies: 99 ± 0.71% for CP and 94 ± 2.4% for IF, were achieved using UV/O3/H2O2 at 5 g L(-1) for 120 min. When combined with biological treatment, removal efficiencies were >99% for both compounds. This is the first report of combined biological and AOP treatment of CP and IF from wastewater with a removal efficiency >99%.

  6. Mineralization of paracetamol in aqueous solution with advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Torun, Murat; Gültekin, Özge; Şolpan, Dilek; Güven, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Paracetamol is a common analgesic drug widely used in all regions of the world more than hundred tonnes per year and it poses a great problem for the aquatic environment. Its phenolic intermediates are classified as persistent organic pollutants and toxic for the environment as well as human beings. In the present study, the irradiation of aqueous solutions of paracetamol with 60Co gamma-rays was examined on a laboratory scale and its degradation path was suggested with detected radiolysis products. The synergic effect of ozone on gamma-irradiation was investigated by preliminary ozonation before irradiation which reduced the irradiation dose from 5 to 3 kGy to completely remove paracetamol and its toxic intermediate hydroquinone from 6 to 4 kGy as well as increasing the radiation chemical yield (Gi values 1.36 and 1.66 in the absence and presence of ozone, respectively). The observed amount of formed hydroquinone was also decreased in the presence of ozone. There is a decrease in pH from 6.4 to 5.2 and dissolved oxygen consumed, which is up to 0.8 mg l(-1), to form some peroxyl radicals used for oxidation. Analytical measurements were carried out with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC) both qualitatively and quantitatively. Amounts of paracetamol and hydroquinone were measured with gas chromatography after trimethylsilane derivatization. Small aliphatic acids, such as acetic acid, formic acid and oxalic acid, were measured quantitatively with IC as well as inorganic ions (nitrite and nitrate) in which their yields increase with irradiation.

  7. Mineralization of paracetamol in aqueous solution with advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Torun, Murat; Gültekin, Özge; Şolpan, Dilek; Güven, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Paracetamol is a common analgesic drug widely used in all regions of the world more than hundred tonnes per year and it poses a great problem for the aquatic environment. Its phenolic intermediates are classified as persistent organic pollutants and toxic for the environment as well as human beings. In the present study, the irradiation of aqueous solutions of paracetamol with 60Co gamma-rays was examined on a laboratory scale and its degradation path was suggested with detected radiolysis products. The synergic effect of ozone on gamma-irradiation was investigated by preliminary ozonation before irradiation which reduced the irradiation dose from 5 to 3 kGy to completely remove paracetamol and its toxic intermediate hydroquinone from 6 to 4 kGy as well as increasing the radiation chemical yield (Gi values 1.36 and 1.66 in the absence and presence of ozone, respectively). The observed amount of formed hydroquinone was also decreased in the presence of ozone. There is a decrease in pH from 6.4 to 5.2 and dissolved oxygen consumed, which is up to 0.8 mg l(-1), to form some peroxyl radicals used for oxidation. Analytical measurements were carried out with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC) both qualitatively and quantitatively. Amounts of paracetamol and hydroquinone were measured with gas chromatography after trimethylsilane derivatization. Small aliphatic acids, such as acetic acid, formic acid and oxalic acid, were measured quantitatively with IC as well as inorganic ions (nitrite and nitrate) in which their yields increase with irradiation. PMID:25263253

  8. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate. PMID:27434736

  9. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, Gholamreza; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N2 selectivity achieved at HRT of 80min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  10. Acid catalyzed hydrocarbon conversion processes utilizing a catalyst comprising a group ivb, vb or vib metal oxide on an inorganic refractory oxide support

    SciTech Connect

    Grenoble, D.C.; Kim, C.J.; Murrell, L.L.

    1980-11-11

    It has been discovered and forms the basis of the disclosure that various acid catalyzed hydrocarbon conversion processes such as catalytic cracking of gas oil; xylene isomerization; toluene disproportionation; dealkylation of aromatics; ethylene, butylene , isobutylene, propylene polymerization; olefin isomerization; alcohol dehydration; olefin hydration; alkylation; heavy ends cat cracking, etc. are dramatically improved insofar as percent conversion, and selectivity are concerned by the use of a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of tungsten, niobium and mixtures thereof, and tungsten or niobium oxides in combination with one or more additional metal oxides selected from the group consisting of tantalum oxide, hafnium oxide, chromium oxide, titanium oxide and zirconium oxide, supported on an inorganic refractory oxide support. These catalysts may be prepared by the methods known in the art, I.E., incipient wetness, impregnation, coprecipitation, etc. Of the metal oxide precursor onto or with the supports followed by conversion into the oxide form. Before use, the metal oxide/support combination is preferably subjected to steaming at elevated temperatures either before introduction into the reactor or in situ in the process reactor. Conventional catalytic cracking catalysts are unstable at the elevated temperatures where the metal oxide/support combinations of the present invention are uniquely stable.

  11. Free suspension processing of oxides to form amorphous oxide materials, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wouch, G.

    1973-01-01

    The processing of yttria, zirconia, and alumina under weightless conditions is discussed. The process consists of levitation or position control, heating and melting, superheating, and supercooling. The use of arc imaging furnaces, lasers, induction heating, microwave, and electron beam methods are analyzed to show the advantages and disadvantages of each.

  12. Cavitational Hydrothermal Oxidation: A New Remediation Process - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Suslick, K. S.

    2001-07-05

    During the past year, we have continued to make substantial scientific progress on our understanding of cavitation phenomena in aqueous media and applications of cavitation to remediation processes. Our efforts have focused on three separate areas: sonoluminescence as a probe of conditions created during cavitational collapse in aqueous media, the use of cavitation for remediation of contaminated water, and an addition of the use of ultrasound in the synthesis of novel heterogeneous catalysts for hydrodehalogenation of halocarbons under mild conditions.

  13. Impact of some herbicides on the biomass activity in biological treatment plants and biodegradability enhancement by a photo-Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Benzaquén, T B; Benzzo, M T; Isla, M A; Alfano, O M

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of agrochemicals has increased because they are essential for profitable agricultural production. Herbicides are heavily demanded compounds and among these, the most marketed are 2,4-D, atrazine and acetochlor. They have characteristics that can cause problems to humans and the environment. Therefore, it is necessary to design systems that can reduce these compounds to harmless molecules. This work aims at evaluating the possibility of incorporating these herbicides into degradable effluents in a biological treatment system, without reducing its efficiency. For this purpose, studies of organic matter degradability in the presence of these agrochemicals were performed. A synthetic effluent based on glucose and mineral salts was inoculated with microorganisms. Glucose consumption and biomass concentration were assessed. Subsequently, preliminary studies were performed to test the viability of degradation of the most harmful compound with an advanced oxidation process (AOP). The results showed that the incorporation of these herbicides into degradable effluents in a biological treatment system has a negative impact on microorganisms. Therefore, the application of an AOP, such as the Fenton or photo-Fenton processes, prior to a biological treatment was found to degrade these substances to simpler and less toxic molecules.

  14. Development and testing of a wet oxidation waste processing system. [for waste treatment aboard manned spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weitzmann, A. L.

    1977-01-01

    The wet oxidation process is considered as a potential treatment method for wastes aboard manned spacecraft for these reasons: (1) Fecal and urine wastes are processed to sterile water and CO2 gas. However, the water requires post-treatment to remove salts and odor; (2) the residual ash is negligible in quantity, sterile and easily collected; and (3) the product CO2 gas can be processed through a reduction step to aid in material balance if needed. Reaction of waste materials with oxygen at elevated temperature and pressure also produces some nitrous oxide, as well as trace amounts of a few other gases.

  15. Redox processes at surfaces of manganese oxide and their effects on aqueous metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Mn oxides precipitated from aerated solutions of Mn2+ by raising the pH are reported in various publications to have the approximate composition Mn3O4 or MnOOH. These oxyhydroxides in turn can disproportionate to Mn2+ and MnO2 resulting in a substantial decrease in equilibrium Mn solubility. The disproportionation can catalyze the oxidation of Mn2+ and other metals by facilitating electron-transfer processes. Diversion of some electron transfers from Mn species to other metal ions can greatly decrease the equilibrium solubility of Co, Pb, Ni and some other elements in the presence of mixed-valence Mn oxides. Some scavenging and coprecipitation effects involving Mn oxides may be attributable to redox processes. Equilibrium solubilities for Mn, Co and Pb are summarized in four graphs. ?? 1978.

  16. [Characteristics of the process of oxidation of fats of diverse character during storage].

    PubMed

    Rzhavskaia, F M; Klimova, T G; Dubrovskaia, T A

    1977-01-01

    The process of various commercial fats, such as cod oil, edible whale and sperm oil, as well as sunflower seed oil oxidation occurring under the effect of atmospheric oxygen was investigated. The susceptibility of fats to oxidation was found to be determined by the degree of their unsaturation, conditioned by the composition of fatty acids. During oxidation of cod and edible whale oil under test conditions there takes place decomposition of biologically active acids with 5 and 6 double bonds, which is most strongly pronounced in unsaturated cod oil and thus bears witness to a materially diminished nutritional value of these oils. The data obtained proves the advisability of storing different fats under dissimilar conditions and confirm the need for using highly effective means for inhibiting the processes of the cod oil oxidation, this oil being used for medical purposes.

  17. Potential for in situ chemical oxidation of acid extractable organics in oil sands process affected groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, V; Ross, M S; Martin, J W; Barker, J F

    2013-11-01

    The process of bitumen extraction from oil sands in Alberta, Canada leads to an accumulation of toxic acid-extractable organics (AEOs) in oil sands process water (OSPW). Infiltration of OSPW from tailings ponds and from their retaining sand dykes and subsequent transport towards surface water has occurred. Given the apparent lack of significant natural attenuation of AEOs in groundwater, remediation may be required. This laboratory study evaluates the potential use of unactivated persulfate and permanganate as in situ oxidation agents for remediation of AEOs in groundwater. Naphthenic acids (NAs; CnH2n+zO2), which are a component of the acutely toxic AEOs, were degraded by both oxidants in OSPW samples. Permanganate oxidation yielded some residual dissolved organic carbon (DOC) whereas persulfate mineralized the AEO compounds with less residual DOC. Acid-extractable organics from oxidized OSPW had essentially no Microtox toxicity.

  18. The impact of beef steak thermal processing on lipid oxidation and postprandial inflammation related responses.

    PubMed

    Nuora, Anu; Chiang, Vic Shao-Chih; Milan, Amber M; Tarvainen, Marko; Pundir, Shikha; Quek, Siew-Young; Smith, Greg C; Markworth, James F; Ahotupa, Markku; Cameron-Smith, David; Linderborg, Kaisa M

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised lipid species, their bioavailability and impact on inflammatory responses from cooked beef steak are poorly characterised. Oxidised lipid species from pan-fried (PF) and sous-vide (SV) thermally processed beef were determined with UHPLC-ESI/MS. Twenty-three lipid oxidation products increased with thermal processing and differences between the PF and SV steaks were measured. Fifteen oxidised lipids were measured in post-meal plasma after a cross-over randomised clinical study. Postprandial plasma inflammatory markers tended to remain lower following the SV meal than the PF meal. High levels of conjugated dienes were measured in the HDL fraction, suggesting that the protective effect of HDL may extend to the reverse-transport of oxidised lipid species. Oxidised lipids in a single meal may influence postprandial oxidative stress and inflammation. Further studies are required to examine the lipid oxidative responses to increased dietary oxidative lipid load, including the reverse transport activity of HDL. PMID:25872426

  19. Identification of iron oxide impurities in earliest industrial-scale processed platinum

    SciTech Connect

    Weerd, Jaap van der; Rehren, Thilo . E-mail: th.rehren@ucl.ac.uk; Firth, Steven; Clark, Robin J.H. . E-mail: r.j.h.clark@ucl.ac.uk

    2004-09-15

    A detailed investigation of iron oxide inclusions in a 19th century Russian platinum coin is presented. Such coins represent the products of the first industrial-scale purification of platinum metal. The processed metal is far from pure, however, and two types of iron oxide inclusions are identified by electron microprobe and Raman microscopy. The results show that the inclusions mainly consist of magnetite and haematite. The Raman band of magnetite at 668 cm{sup -1} was found to shift to about 680 cm{sup -1} with an increase in the average oxidation state of the iron. It is concluded that the iron oxides are formed during the heating of the platinum metal powder in the manufacturing process.

  20. The impact of beef steak thermal processing on lipid oxidation and postprandial inflammation related responses.

    PubMed

    Nuora, Anu; Chiang, Vic Shao-Chih; Milan, Amber M; Tarvainen, Marko; Pundir, Shikha; Quek, Siew-Young; Smith, Greg C; Markworth, James F; Ahotupa, Markku; Cameron-Smith, David; Linderborg, Kaisa M

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised lipid species, their bioavailability and impact on inflammatory responses from cooked beef steak are poorly characterised. Oxidised lipid species from pan-fried (PF) and sous-vide (SV) thermally processed beef were determined with UHPLC-ESI/MS. Twenty-three lipid oxidation products increased with thermal processing and differences between the PF and SV steaks were measured. Fifteen oxidised lipids were measured in post-meal plasma after a cross-over randomised clinical study. Postprandial plasma inflammatory markers tended to remain lower following the SV meal than the PF meal. High levels of conjugated dienes were measured in the HDL fraction, suggesting that the protective effect of HDL may extend to the reverse-transport of oxidised lipid species. Oxidised lipids in a single meal may influence postprandial oxidative stress and inflammation. Further studies are required to examine the lipid oxidative responses to increased dietary oxidative lipid load, including the reverse transport activity of HDL.

  1. Comparative study of the effect of pharmaceutical additives on the elimination of antibiotic activity during the treatment of oxacillin in water by the photo-Fenton, TiO2-photocatalysis and electrochemical processes.

    PubMed

    Serna-Galvis, Efraim A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo, Ana L; Flórez-Acosta, Oscar A; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2016-01-15

    Synthetic pharmaceutical effluents loaded with the β-lactam antibiotic oxacillin were treated using advanced oxidation processes (the photo-Fenton system and TiO2 photocatalysis) and chloride mediated electrochemical oxidation (with Ti/IrO2 anodes). Combinations of the antibiotic with excipients (mannitol or tartaric acid), an active ingredient (calcium carbonate, i.e. bicarbonate ions due to the pH) and a cleaning agent (sodium lauryl ether sulfate) were considered. Additionally, urban wastewater that had undergone biological treatment was doped with oxacillin and treated with the tested systems. The evolution of antimicrobial activity was monitored as a parameter of processes efficiency. Although the two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) differ only in the way they produce OH, marked differences were observed between them. There were also differences between the AOPs and the electrochemical system. Interestingly, each additive had a different effect on each treatment. For water loaded with mannitol, electrochemical treatment was the most suitable option because the additive did not significantly affect the efficiency of the system. Due to the formation of a complex with Fe(3+), tartaric acid accelerated the elimination of antibiotic activity during the photo-Fenton process. For TiO2 photocatalysis, the presence of bicarbonate ions contributed to antibiotic activity elimination through the possible formation of carbonate and bicarbonate radicals. Sodium lauryl ether sulfate negatively affected all of the processes. However, due to the higher selectivity of HOCl compared with OH, electrochemical oxidation showed the least inhibited efficiency. For the urban wastewater doped with oxacillin, TiO2 photocatalysis was the most efficient process. These results will help select the most suitable technology for the treatment of water polluted with β-lactam antibiotics.

  2. Catalyst for oxidation of carbon monoxide and process for preparing the catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Kolts, J.H.

    1989-04-04

    A process is described for preparing a composition or matter, which is useful and effective as catalyst composition for CO oxidation and consists essentially of (i) at least one metal oxide selected from the group consisting of alumina and magnesia, (ii) at least one noble metal selected from the group consisting of platinum and palladium and (iii) iron oxide, the process comprising the steps of (a) contacting a support material consisting essentially of at least one metal oxide selected from the group consisting of alumina and magnesia with a solution comprising at least one dissolved compounds of at least one noble metal selected from the group consisting of platinum and palladium and at least one dissolved iron compound, (b) heating the material obtained in step (a) under such conditions as to substantially dry the material obtained in step (a), to substantially convert at least one compound of at least one noble metal to at least one of oxides of Pt, oxides of Pd, Pt metal and Pd metal and to substantially convert at least one iron compound to iron oxide; and (c) heating the material obtained in step (b) in a reducing gas atmosphere at a temperature in the range of from about 550/sup 0/ to about 700/sup 0/C, under such conditions as to activate the material obtained in step (b) and to form the composition of matter.

  3. [Oxidation Process of Dissolvable Sulfide by Manganite and Its Influencing Factors].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yao; Li, Shan; Tan, Wen-feng; Liu, Fan; Cai, Chong-fa; Qiu, Guo-hong

    2016-04-15

    As one of the manganese oxides, which are easily generated and widely distributed in supergene environment, manganite participates in the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide (S²⁻), and affects the migration, transformation, and the fate of sulfides. In the present work, the redox mechanism was studied by determining the intermediates, and the influence of initial pH and oxygen atmosphere on the processes were studied. The chemical composition, crystal structures and micromorphologies were characterized by XRD, FTIR and TEM. The concentration of S²⁻ and its oxidation products were analyzed using spectrophotometer, high performance liquid chromatograph and ion chromatograph. The results indicated that elemental sulfur was formed as the major oxidation product of S²⁻ oxidation, and decreased pH could accelerate the oxidation rate of S²⁻ in the initial stage, however, there was no significant influence on final products. Elemental S could be further oxidized to S₂O₃²⁻ when the reaction system was bubbled with oxygen, and manganite exhibited excellent catalytic performance and chemical stability during the oxidation of dissolvable sulfide by oxygen. After reaction of more than 10 h, the crystal structure of manganite remained stable. PMID:27548980

  4. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przewlocka, H.; Siedlecka, J.

    1982-01-01

    The oxidation process of two-component Fe-Al alloys containing up to 7.2% Al and from 18 to 30% Al was studied. Kinetic measurements were conducted using the isothermal gravimetric method in the range of 1073-1223 K and 1073-1373 K for 50 hours. The methods used in studies of the mechanism of oxidation included: X-ray microanalysis, X-ray structural analysis, metallographic analysis and marker tests.

  5. Effect of nitrogen doping on wetting and photoactive properties of laser processed zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers

    SciTech Connect

    György, E.; Pérez del Pino, A.; Logofatu, C.; Duta, A.; Isac, L.

    2014-07-14

    Zinc oxide-graphene oxide nanocomposite layers were submitted to laser irradiation in air or controlled nitrogen atmosphere using a frequency quadrupled Nd:YAG (λ = 266 nm, τ{sub FWHM} ≅ 3 ns, ν = 10 Hz) laser source. The experiments were performed in air at atmospheric pressure or in nitrogen at a pressure of 2 × 10{sup 4} Pa. The effect of the irradiation conditions, incident laser fluence value, and number of subsequent laser pulses on the surface morphology of the composite material was systematically investigated. The obtained results reveal that nitrogen incorporation improves significantly the wetting and photoactive properties of the laser processed layers. The kinetics of water contact angle variation when the samples are submitted to laser irradiation in nitrogen are faster than that of the samples irradiated in air, the surfaces becoming super-hydrophilic under UV light irradiation.

  6. Occurrence and Removal of Organic Micropollutants in Landfill Leachates Treated by Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Oturan, Nihal; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Zhang, Hui; Mazeas, Laurent; Budzinski, Hélène; Le Menach, Karyn; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-10-20

    In recent years, electrochemical advanced oxidation processes have been shown to be an effective alternative for the removal of refractory organic compounds from water. This study is focused on the effective removal of recalcitrant organic matter (micropollutants, humic substances, etc.) present in municipal solid waste landfill leachates. A mixture of eight landfill leachates has been studied by the electro-Fenton process using a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon felt cathode or by the anodic oxidation process with a BDD anode. These processes exhibit great oxidation ability due to the in situ production of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), a highly powerful oxidizing species. Both electrochemical processes were shown to be efficient in the removal of dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) from landfill leachates. Regarding the electro-Fenton process, the replacement of the classical anode Pt by the anode BDD allows better performance in terms of dissolved TOC removal. The occurrence and removal yield of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 15 volatile organic compounds, 7 alkylphenols, 7 polychlorobiphenyls, 5 organochlorine pesticides, and 2 polybrominated diphenyl ethers in landfill leachate were also investigated. Both electrochemical processes allow one to reach a quasicomplete removal (about 98%) of these organic micropollutants.

  7. Occurrence and Removal of Organic Micropollutants in Landfill Leachates Treated by Electrochemical Advanced Oxidation Processes.

    PubMed

    Oturan, Nihal; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Zhang, Hui; Mazeas, Laurent; Budzinski, Hélène; Le Menach, Karyn; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2015-10-20

    In recent years, electrochemical advanced oxidation processes have been shown to be an effective alternative for the removal of refractory organic compounds from water. This study is focused on the effective removal of recalcitrant organic matter (micropollutants, humic substances, etc.) present in municipal solid waste landfill leachates. A mixture of eight landfill leachates has been studied by the electro-Fenton process using a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and a carbon felt cathode or by the anodic oxidation process with a BDD anode. These processes exhibit great oxidation ability due to the in situ production of hydroxyl radicals ((•)OH), a highly powerful oxidizing species. Both electrochemical processes were shown to be efficient in the removal of dissolved total organic carbon (TOC) from landfill leachates. Regarding the electro-Fenton process, the replacement of the classical anode Pt by the anode BDD allows better performance in terms of dissolved TOC removal. The occurrence and removal yield of 19 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, 15 volatile organic compounds, 7 alkylphenols, 7 polychlorobiphenyls, 5 organochlorine pesticides, and 2 polybrominated diphenyl ethers in landfill leachate were also investigated. Both electrochemical processes allow one to reach a quasicomplete removal (about 98%) of these organic micropollutants. PMID:26378656

  8. AOPs with ozone and UV radiation in drinking water: contaminants removal and effects on disinfection byproducts formation.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, C; Sorlini, S

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the advanced oxidation with ozone and UV radiation (with two low pressure UV lamps, at 254 and 185 nm wavelength) were experimented on a surface water in order to study the removal of two odorous compounds (geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol) and a pesticide (metolachlor), the influence on organic compounds (UV absorbance and THM precursors) and bromate formation. Different batch tests were performed with ozone concentration up to 10 mg/L, UV dose up to 14,000 J/m2 and a maximum contact time of 10 minutes. The main results show that metolachlor can be efficiently removed with ozone alone while for geosmin and MIB a complete removal can be obtained with the advanced oxidation of ozone (with concentration of 1.5-3 mg/L and contact time of 2-3 minutes) with UV radiation (with doses of 5,000-6,000 J/m2). As concerns the influence on the organic precursors, all the experimented processes show a medium removal of about 20-40% for UV absorbance and 15-30% for THMFP (trihalomethanes formation potential). As concerns bromate formation, the advanced oxidation of ozone/UV 254 nm shows a bromate formation that is about 40% lower with respect to conventional oxidation with ozone.

  9. ADVANCED OXIDATION: OXALATE DECOMPOSITION TESTING WITH OZONE

    SciTech Connect

    Ketusky, E.; Subramanian, K.

    2012-02-29

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), oxalic acid is currently considered the preferred agent for chemically cleaning the large underground Liquid Radioactive Waste Tanks. It is applied only in the final stages of emptying a tank when generally less than 5,000 kg of waste solids remain, and slurrying based removal methods are no-longer effective. The use of oxalic acid is preferred because of its combined dissolution and chelating properties, as well as the fact that corrosion to the carbon steel tank walls can be controlled. Although oxalic acid is the preferred agent, there are significant potential downstream impacts. Impacts include: (1) Degraded evaporator operation; (2) Resultant oxalate precipitates taking away critically needed operating volume; and (3) Eventual creation of significant volumes of additional feed to salt processing. As an alternative to dealing with the downstream impacts, oxalate decomposition using variations of ozone based Advanced Oxidation Process (AOP) were investigated. In general AOPs use ozone or peroxide and a catalyst to create hydroxyl radicals. Hydroxyl radicals have among the highest oxidation potentials, and are commonly used to decompose organics. Although oxalate is considered among the most difficult organic to decompose, the ability of hydroxyl radicals to decompose oxalate is considered to be well demonstrated. In addition, as AOPs are considered to be 'green' their use enables any net chemical additions to the waste to be minimized. In order to test the ability to decompose the oxalate and determine the decomposition rates, a test rig was designed, where 10 vol% ozone would be educted into a spent oxalic acid decomposition loop, with the loop maintained at 70 C and recirculated at 40L/min. Each of the spent oxalic acid streams would be created from three oxalic acid strikes of an F-area simulant (i.e., Purex = high Fe/Al concentration) and H-area simulant (i.e., H area modified Purex = high Al/Fe concentration) after nearing

  10. Processing and mechanical behavior of aluminium oxide microstructure composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlacka, Robert J.

    concluded that densification was impeded by the dopant at lower temperatures but enhanced significantly above 1450°C. Texture is highly developed in samples with no dopant and 0.14 wt% dopant by 1550°C and in samples with 2 wt% dopant by 1350°C. We proposed a new class of composites (called microstructure composites) that accesses different component properties not through the use of distinct materials, but rather through the exploitation of the microstructure-property relationship within a single material. Microstructure composites, therefore, are single phase ceramics that combine components with distinct microstructures within a single composite to obtain unique property combinations. Spatial control and composite connectivity of the individual microstructural 'components' of a microstructure composite are ultimately the key to developing and controlling useful and unique properties. Microstructural components are developed by controlling the starting location and transport of dopants during processing and sintering. This work focuses on alpha-Al2O3 microstructure composites that combine textured components, developed in situ using templated grain growth (TGG), and fine-grained equiaxed components. To control microstructure development locally during composite fabrication, it is important to use relatively low levels of dopant to mitigate the effects of dopant interdiffusion. Therefore, the development of texture in alpha-Al 2O3 using low liquid-phase dopant concentrations was explored, with a focus on the effect of template constraint on texture plane shrinkage. High quality texture was obtained with just 0.14 wt% (SiO2 + CaO) dopant. Textured Al2O3 exhibited transgranular fracture, as well as lower strength and fracture toughness than the fine-grained equiaxed Al2O3. A processing strategy using tape casting was developed for the fabrication of textured-equiaxed Al2O3 microstructure composites with 2-2 connectivity. Dopants used to promote TGG (SiO2 + CaO) were

  11. Development of nanomaterial-enabled advanced oxidation techniques for treatment of organic micropollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oulton, Rebekah Lynn

    Increasing demand for limited fresh water resources necessitates that alternative water sources be developed. Nonpotable reuse of treated wastewater represents one such alternative. However, the ubiquitous presence of organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in wastewater effluents limits use of this resource. Numerous investigations have examined PPCP fate during wastewater treatment, focusing on their removal during conventional and advanced treatment processes. Analysis of influent and effluent data from published studies reveals that at best 1-log10 concentration unit of PPCP removal can generally be achieved with conventional treatment. In contrast, plants employing advanced treatment methods, particularly ozonation and/or membranes, remove most PPCPs often to levels below analytical detection limits. However, membrane treatment is cost prohibitive for many facilities, and ozone treatment can be very selective. Ozone-recalcitrant compounds require the use of Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs), which utilize highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (*OH) to target resistant pollutants. Due to cost and energy use concerns associated with current AOPs, alternatives such as catalytic ozonation are under investigation. Catalytic ozonation uses substrates such as activated carbon to promote *OH formation during ozonation. Here, we show that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) represent another viable substrate, promoting *OH formation during ozonation to levels exceeding activated carbon and equivalent to conventional ozone-based AOPs. Via a series of batch reactions, we observ a strong correlation between *OH formation and MWCNT surface oxygen concentrations. Results suggest that deprotonated carboxyl groups on the CNT surface are integral to their reactivity toward ozone and corresponding *OH formation. From a practical standpoint, we show that industrial grade MWCNTs exhibit similar *OH production as their research

  12. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, MM; Stehle, RC; Hahn, DW

    2012-10-23

    A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  13. Reverse osmosis concentrate treatment by chemical oxidation and moving bed biofilm processes.

    PubMed

    Vendramel, S M R; Justo, A; González, O; Sans, C; Esplugas, S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, four oxidation techniques were investigated (O3, O3/UV, H2O2/O3, O3/H2O2/UV) to pre-treat reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate before treatment in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system. Without previous oxidation, the MBBR was able to remove a small fraction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (5-20%) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (2-15%). When the concentrate was previously submitted to oxidation, DOC removal efficiencies in the MBBR increased to 40-55%. All the tested oxidation techniques improved concentrate biodegradability. The concentrate treated by the combined process (oxidation and MBBR) presented residual DOC and COD in the ranges of 6-12 and 25-41 mg L(-1), respectively. Nitrification of the RO concentrate, pre-treated by oxidation, was observed in the MBBR. Ammonium removal was comprised between 54 and 79%. The results indicate that the MBBR was effective for the treatment of the RO concentrate, previously submitted to oxidation, generating water with an improved quality. PMID:24334891

  14. Reverse osmosis concentrate treatment by chemical oxidation and moving bed biofilm processes.

    PubMed

    Vendramel, S M R; Justo, A; González, O; Sans, C; Esplugas, S

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, four oxidation techniques were investigated (O3, O3/UV, H2O2/O3, O3/H2O2/UV) to pre-treat reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate before treatment in a moving-bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) system. Without previous oxidation, the MBBR was able to remove a small fraction of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (5-20%) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (2-15%). When the concentrate was previously submitted to oxidation, DOC removal efficiencies in the MBBR increased to 40-55%. All the tested oxidation techniques improved concentrate biodegradability. The concentrate treated by the combined process (oxidation and MBBR) presented residual DOC and COD in the ranges of 6-12 and 25-41 mg L(-1), respectively. Nitrification of the RO concentrate, pre-treated by oxidation, was observed in the MBBR. Ammonium removal was comprised between 54 and 79%. The results indicate that the MBBR was effective for the treatment of the RO concentrate, previously submitted to oxidation, generating water with an improved quality.

  15. Process for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase of catalytically active material

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Dale L.; Russo, Richard E.; Mao, Xianglei

    1995-01-01

    A process is disclosed for forming a homogeneous oxide solid phase reaction product of catalytically active material comprising one or more alkali metals, one or more alkaline earth metals, and one or more Group VIII transition metals. The process comprises reacting together one or more alkali metal oxides and/or salts, one or more alkaline earth metal oxides and/or salts, one or more Group VIII transition metal oxides and/or salts, capable of forming a catalytically active reaction product, in the optional presence of an additional source of oxygen, using a laser beam to ablate from a target such metal compound reactants in the form of a vapor in a deposition chamber, resulting in the deposition, on a heated substrate in the chamber, of the desired oxide phase reaction product. The resulting product may be formed in variable, but reproducible, stoichiometric ratios. The homogeneous oxide solid phase product is useful as a catalyst, and can be produced in many physical forms, including thin films, particulate forms, coatings on catalyst support structures, and coatings on structures used in reaction apparatus in which the reaction product of the invention will serve as a catalyst.

  16. Fingerprinting DNA oxidation processes: IR characterization of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Dominik B; Pilles, Bert M; Pfaffeneder, Toni; Carell, Thomas; Zinth, Wolfgang

    2014-02-24

    Methylated cytidine plays an important role as an epigenetic signal in gene regulation. Its oxidation products are assumed to be involved in active demethylation processes but also in damaging DNA. Here, we report the photochemical production of the 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine radical cation via a two-photon ionization process. The radical cation is detected by time-resolved IR spectroscopy and identified by band assignment using density functional theory calculations. Two final oxidation products are characterized with liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry.

  17. Role of Y-Al Oxides During Extended Recovery Process of a Ferritic ODS Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-08-01

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Finally, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  18. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  19. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  20. Processing, Structure and High Temperature Oxidation Properties of Polymer-Derived and Hafnium Oxide Based Ceramic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terauds, Kalvis

    Demands for hypersonic aircraft are driving the development of ultra-high temperature structural materials. These aircraft, envisioned to sustain Mach 5+, are expected to experience continuous temperatures of 1200--1800°C on the aircraft surface and temperatures as high as 2800°C in combustion zones. Breakthroughs in the development of fiber based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are opening the door to a new class of high-tech UHT structures for aerospace applications. One limitation with current carbon fiber or silicon carbide fiber based CMC technology is the inherent problem of material oxidation, requiring new approaches for protective environmental barrier coatings (EBC) in extreme environments. This thesis focuses on the development and characterization of SiCN-HfO2 based ceramic composite EBC systems to be used as a protective layer for silicon carbide fiber based CMCs. The presented work covers three main architectures for protection (i) multilayer films, (ii) polymer-derived HfSiCNO, and (iii) composite SiCN-HfO 2 infiltration. The scope of this thesis covers processing development, material characterization, and high temperature oxidation behavior of these three SiCN-HfO2 based systems. This work shows that the SiCN-HfO 2 composite materials react upon oxidation to form HfSiO4, offering a stable EBC in streaming air and water vapor at 1600°C.

  1. Degradation of anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen by electro-oxidation: comparison of electro-Fenton and anodic oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ling; Oturan, Nihal; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical degradation of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ketoprofen in tap water has been studied using electro-Fenton (EF) and anodic oxidation (AO) processes with platinium (Pt) and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anodes and carbon felt cathode. Fast degradation of the parent drug molecule and its degradation intermediates leading to complete mineralization was achieved by BDD/carbon felt, Pt/carbon felt, and AO with BDD anode. The obtained results showed that oxidative degradation rate of ketoprofen and mineralization of its aqueous solution increased by increasing applied current. Degradation kinetics fitted well to a pseudo-first-order reaction. Absolute rate constant of the oxidation of ketoprofen by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals was determined to be (2.8 ± 0.1) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) by using competition kinetic method. Several reaction intermediates such as 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, pyrogallol, catechol, benzophenone, benzoic acid, and hydroquinone were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses. The formation, identification, and evolution of short-chain aliphatic carboxylic acids like formic, acetic, oxalic, glycolic, and glyoxylic acids were monitored with ion exclusion chromatography. Based on the identified aromatic/cyclic intermediates and carboxylic acids as end products before mineralization, a plausible mineralization pathway was proposed. The evolution of the toxicity during treatments was also monitored using Microtox method, showing a faster detoxification with higher applied current values.

  2. Demonstration of an N7 integrated fab process for metal oxide EUV photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Danilo; Mao, Ming; Kocsis, Michael; De Schepper, Peter; Lazzarino, Frederic; Vandenberghe, Geert; Stowers, Jason; Meyers, Stephen; Clark, Benjamin L.; Grenville, Andrew; Luong, Vinh; Yamashita, Fumiko; Parnell, Doni

    2016-03-01

    Inpria has developed a directly patternable metal oxide hard-mask as a robust, high-resolution photoresist for EUV lithography. In this paper we demonstrate the full integration of a baseline Inpria resist into an imec N7 BEOL block mask process module. We examine in detail both the lithography and etch patterning results. By leveraging the high differential etch resistance of metal oxide photoresists, we explore opportunities for process simplification and cost reduction. We review the imaging results from the imec N7 block mask patterns and its process windows as well as routes to maximize the process latitude, underlayer integration, etch transfer, cross sections, etch equipment integration from cross metal contamination standpoint and selective resist strip process. Finally, initial results from a higher sensitivity Inpria resist are also reported. A dose to size of 19 mJ/cm2 was achieved to print pillars as small as 21nm.

  3. Evaluation of silicon oxide cleaning using F2/Ar remote plasma processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S. C.; Hwang, J. Y.; Lee, N.-E.; Joo, K. S.; Bae, G. H.

    2005-07-01

    In this study, chamber cleaning experiments using a F2/Ar remote plasma generated from a toroidal-type remote plasma source were carried out in a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system. The cleaning processes for the various silicon oxide layers, including PE-oxide (deposited by PECVD using SiH4 and N2O), O3-TEOS oxide (deposited by thermal CVD using ozone and TEOS precursor), and BPSG (borophosphosilicate glass), were investigated by varying the various process parameters, such as the F2 gas flow rate, the F2/(F2+Ar) flow ratio, and the cleaning temperature. The species emitted during cleaning were monitored by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and residual gas analysis. Under the current experimental conditions, the cleaning rate of the BPSG was 4.1-5.0 and 3.9-7.3 times higher than that those of the PE-oxide and O3-TEOS oxide layers, respectively, at room temperature and an F2/(F2+Ar) flow ratio of 28.5%-83%. As the cleaning temperature increased from 100 to 350 °C, the cleaning rates of the PE-oxide, O3-TEOS oxide, and BPSG layers were increased by factors of 2.0-3.0, 1.5-2.2, and 3.0-3.4, respectively, at an F2/(F2+Ar) flow ratio of 28%-68%. The F2/(F2+Ar) flow ratio and cleaning temperature were found to be the most critical parameters involved in determining the cleaning rate of the various oxide layers.

  4. Flue gas cleanup using the Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process

    SciTech Connect

    Pennline, Henry W; Hoffman, James S

    2013-10-01

    The use of copper oxide on a support had been envisioned as a gas cleanup technique to remove sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxides (NO{sub x}) from flue gas produced by the combustion of coal for electric power generation. In general, dry, regenerable flue gas cleanup techniques that use a sorbent can have various advantages, such as simultaneous removal of pollutants, production of a salable by-product, and low costs when compared to commercially available wet scrubbing technology. Due to the temperature of reaction, the placement of the process into an advanced power system could actually increase the thermal efficiency of the plant. The Moving-Bed Copper Oxide Process is capable of simultaneously removing sulfur oxides and nitric oxides within the reactor system. In this regenerable sorbent technique, the use of the copper oxide sorbent was originally in a fluidized bed, but the more recent effort developed the use of the sorbent in a moving-bed reactor design. A pilot facility or life-cycle test system was constructed so that an integrated testing of the sorbent over absorption/regeneration cycles could be conducted. A parametric study of the total process was then performed where all process steps, including absorption and regeneration, were continuously operated and experimentally evaluated. The parametric effects, including absorption temperature, sorbent and gas residence times, inlet SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} concentration, and flyash loadings, on removal efficiencies and overall operational performance were determined. Although some of the research results have not been previously published because of previous collaborative restrictions, a summary of these past findings is presented in this communication. Additionally, the potential use of the process for criteria pollutant removal in oxy-firing of fossil fuel for carbon sequestration purposes is discussed.

  5. Solution-Processed Metal Oxides as Efficient Carrier Transport Layers for Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Choy, Wallace C H; Zhang, Di

    2016-01-27

    Carrier (electron and hole) transport layers (CTLs) are essential components for boosting the performance of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic solar cells and organic light-emitting diodes. Considering the drawbacks of conventional CTLs (easily oxidized/unstable, demanding/costly fabrication, etc.), transition metal oxides with good carrier transport/extraction and superior stability have drawn extensive research interest as CTLs for next-generation devices. In recent years, many research efforts have been made toward the development of solution-based metal oxide CTLs with the focus on low- or even room-temperature processes, which can potentially be compatible with the deposition processes of organic materials and can significantly contribute to the low-cost and scale-up of organic devices. Here, the recent progress of different types of solution-processed metal oxide CTLs are systematically reviewed in the context of organic photovoltaics, from synthesis approaches to device performance. Different approaches for further enhancing the performance of solution-based metal oxide CTLs are also discussed, which may push the future development of this exciting field.

  6. Insights into dynamic processes of cations in pyrochlores and other complex oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Perriot, Romain

    2015-08-26

    Complex oxides are critical components of many key technologies, from solid oxide fuel cells and superionics to inert matrix fuels and nuclear waste forms. In many cases, understanding mass transport is important for predicting performance and, thus, extensive effort has been devoted to understanding mass transport in these materials. However, most work has focused on the behavior of oxygen while cation transport has received relatively little attention, even though cation diffusion is responsible for many phenomena, including sintering, radiation damage evolution, and deformation processes. Here, we use accelerated molecular dynamics simulations to examine the kinetics of cation defects in one class of complex oxides, A₂B₂O₇ pyrochlore. In some pyrochlore chemistries, B cation defects are kinetically unstable, transforming to A cation defects and antisites at rates faster than they can diffuse. When this occurs, transport of B cations occurs through defect processes on the A sublattice. Further, these A cation defects, either interstitials or vacancies, can interact with antisite disorder, reordering the material locally, though this process is much more efficient for interstitials than vacancies. Whether this behavior occurs in a given pyrochlore depends on the A and B chemistry. Pyrochlores with a smaller ratio of cation radii exhibit this complex behavior, while those with larger ratios exhibit direct migration of B interstitials. Similar behavior has been reported in other complex oxides such as spinels and perovskites, suggesting that this coupling of transport between the A and B cation sublattices, while not universal, occurs in many complex oxide.

  7. IMPACTS OF ANTIFOAM ADDITIONS AND ARGON BUBBLING ON DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY REDUCTION/OXIDATION

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.; Johnson, F.

    2012-06-05

    During melting of HLW glass, the REDOX of the melt pool cannot be measured. Therefore, the Fe{sup +2}/{Sigma}Fe ratio in the glass poured from the melter must be related to melter feed organic and oxidant concentrations to ensure production of a high quality glass without impacting production rate (e.g., foaming) or melter life (e.g., metal formation and accumulation). A production facility such as the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) cannot wait until the melt or waste glass has been made to assess its acceptability, since by then no further changes to the glass composition and acceptability are possible. therefore, the acceptability decision is made on the upstream process, rather than on the downstream melt or glass product. That is, it is based on 'feed foward' statistical process control (SPC) rather than statistical quality control (SQC). In SPC, the feed composition to the melter is controlled prior to vitrification. Use of the DWPF REDOX model has controlled the balanjce of feed reductants and oxidants in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT). Once the alkali/alkaline earth salts (both reduced and oxidized) are formed during reflux in the SRAT, the REDOX can only change if (1) additional reductants or oxidants are added to the SRAT, the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), or the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) or (2) if the melt pool is bubble dwith an oxidizing gas or sparging gas that imposes a different REDOX target than the chemical balance set during reflux in the SRAT.

  8. Molecular-Level Processes Governing the Interaction of Contaminants with Iron and Manganese Oxides - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown Jr., G. E.; Chambers, S. A.

    1999-10-31

    Many of the inorganic and organic contaminants present in sediments at DOE sites can be altered or destroyed by reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions occurring at mineral surfaces. A fundamental understanding of such redox processes provided by molecular-level studies on structurally and compositionally well-defined mineral surfaces will lead to: (i) improved models of contaminant fate and transport in geochemical systems, and (ii) optimized manipulation of these processes for remediation purposes. To contribute to this understanding, we will study, both experimentally and theoretically, redox processes involving three important contaminants - chromate ion, carbon tetrachloride, and trichloroethene TCE, on the following iron and manganese oxides - hematite, magnetite, maghemite, and pyrolusite. These oxides and their hydroxylated analogs commonly occur as coatings on minerals or as interfaces in the subsurface environment. Single-crystal surfaces of these oxides will be synthesized in carefully controlled fashion by molecular beam epitaxy. These surfaces, as well as high surface are powdered samples of these oxides, will be used in spectroscopic and kinetic experiments in both aqueous and gas phases. Our goal is to identify products and to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of surface-catalyzed redox reaction of Cr(VI) and CR(III), and the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride and TCE. The combination of theory and experiment will provide the base information needed to scale from the molecular level to the microscopic grain level minerals.

  9. Optimization of oxidation processes to improve crystalline silicon solar cell emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, L.; Liang, Z. C. Liu, C. F.; Long, T. J.; Wang, D. L.

    2014-02-15

    Control of the oxidation process is one key issue in producing high-quality emitters for crystalline silicon solar cells. In this paper, the oxidation parameters of pre-oxidation time, oxygen concentration during pre-oxidation and pre-deposition and drive-in time were optimized by using orthogonal experiments. By analyzing experimental measurements of short-circuit current, open circuit voltage, series resistance and solar cell efficiency in solar cells with different sheet resistances which were produced by using different diffusion processes, we inferred that an emitter with a sheet resistance of approximately 70 Ω/□ performed best under the existing standard solar cell process. Further investigations were conducted on emitters with sheet resistances of approximately 70 Ω/□ that were obtained from different preparation processes. The results indicate that emitters with surface phosphorus concentrations between 4.96 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} and 7.78 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3} and with junction depths between 0.46 μm and 0.55 μm possessed the best quality. With no extra processing, the final preparation of the crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency can reach 18.41%, which is an increase of 0.4%{sub abs} compared to conventional emitters with 50 Ω/□ sheet resistance.

  10. Removal of arsenite by simultaneous electro-oxidation and electro-coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Baofeng; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2010-12-15

    An electrochemical reactor was built and used to remove arsenite from water. In this reactor, arsenite can be oxidized into arsenate, which was removed by electro-coagulation process simultaneously. The reactor mainly included dimension stable anode (DSA) and iron plate electrode. Oxidation of arsenite will occur at the DSA electrode in the electrochemical process. Meantime, the iron ions can be generated by the electro-induced process and iron oxides will form. Thus, the arsenic was removed by coagulation process. Influencing factors on the removal of arsenite were investigated. It is found that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions promoted the removal of arsenite. However, Cl(-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(3)(2-), and PO(4)(3-) ions inhibited the arsenic removal. And, it is observed that the inhibition effect was the largest in the presence of PO(4)(3-). Furthermore, it is observed that the removal efficiency of arsenate is the largest in the pH value of 8. Increase or decrease of pH value did not benefit to the arsenite removal. Fourier transform infrared spectra were used to analyze the floc particles, it is suggested that the removal mechanism of As(III) in this system seems to be oxidative of As(III) to As(V) and to be removed by adsorption/complexation with metal hydroxides generated in the process. PMID:20863616

  11. Removal of arsenite by simultaneous electro-oxidation and electro-coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Baofeng; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2010-12-15

    An electrochemical reactor was built and used to remove arsenite from water. In this reactor, arsenite can be oxidized into arsenate, which was removed by electro-coagulation process simultaneously. The reactor mainly included dimension stable anode (DSA) and iron plate electrode. Oxidation of arsenite will occur at the DSA electrode in the electrochemical process. Meantime, the iron ions can be generated by the electro-induced process and iron oxides will form. Thus, the arsenic was removed by coagulation process. Influencing factors on the removal of arsenite were investigated. It is found that Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions promoted the removal of arsenite. However, Cl(-), CO(3)(2-), SiO(3)(2-), and PO(4)(3-) ions inhibited the arsenic removal. And, it is observed that the inhibition effect was the largest in the presence of PO(4)(3-). Furthermore, it is observed that the removal efficiency of arsenate is the largest in the pH value of 8. Increase or decrease of pH value did not benefit to the arsenite removal. Fourier transform infrared spectra were used to analyze the floc particles, it is suggested that the removal mechanism of As(III) in this system seems to be oxidative of As(III) to As(V) and to be removed by adsorption/complexation with metal hydroxides generated in the process.

  12. Influence of HCl on oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury by dielectric barrier discharge process.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyung Bo; Byun, Youngchul; Cho, Moohyun; Namkung, Won; Shin, Dong Nam; Koh, Dong Jun; Kim, Kyoung Tae

    2008-04-01

    The influence of HCl on the oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg0) has been investigated using a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process, where the temperature of the plasma reactor and the composition of gas mixtures of HCl, H2O, NO, and O2 in N2 balance have been varied. We observe that Cl atoms and Cl2 molecules, created by the DBD process, play important roles in the oxidation of Hg0 to HgCl2. The addition of H2O to the gas mixture of HCl in N2 accelerates the oxidation of Hg0, although no appreciable effect of H2O alone on the oxidation of Hg0 has been observed. The increase of the reaction temperature in the presence of HCl results in the reduction of Hg0 oxidation efficiency probably due to the deterioration of the heterogeneous chemical reaction of Hg0 with chlorinated species on the reactor wall. The presence of NO shows an inhibitory effect on the oxidation of Hg0 under DBD of 16% O2 in N2, indicating that NO acts as an O and O3 scavenger. At the composition of Hg0 (280 microg m(-3)), HCl (25 ppm), NO (204 ppm), O2 (16%) and N2 (balance) and temperature 90 degrees C, we obtain the nearly complete oxidation of Hg0 at a specific energy density of 8 J l(-1). These results lead us to suggest that the DBD process can be viable for the treatment of mercury released from coal-fired power plants. PMID:18313101

  13. Process for improving phosphorus-vanadium oxide and phosphorus-vanadium-co-metal oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, R.C.

    1987-10-20

    A process is described for the improvement of a vanadium-phosphorus-oxygen catalyst having a phosphorus to vanadium atomic ratio of about 2:1 to about 0.8:1 which catalyst is present on a catalyst bed having a portion therof containing an initial exotherm of reaction. The catalyst is suitable for use in the manufacture of maleic anhydride from a feed gas stream comprising C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons, benzene, or butane which process comprises: applying to the catalyst bed, simultaneously with introduction of the feed gas stream thereon, water and a phosphorus compound in an amount sufficient to initiate (a) deactivation of the portion of the catalyst containing the initial exotherm, and (b) formation of a new exotherm downstream in the catalyst bed from the initial exotherm, and thereafter reducing or discontinuing application of the phosphorus compound at a point in time when the initial exotherm portion of the catalyst bed is still undergoing deactivation, thereby allowing the partially deactivated exotherm portion to reactivate by producing a more isothermal catalyst bed.

  14. Effect of diesel oxidation catalysts on the diesel particulate filter regeneration process.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, Leonardo; Souentie, Stamatios; Boreave, Antoinette; George, Christian; D'Anna, Barbara; Vernoux, Philippe

    2011-12-15

    A Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) regeneration process was investigated during aftertreatment exhaust of a simulated diesel engine under the influence of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC). Aerosol mass spectrometry analysis showed that the presence of the DOC decreases the Organic Carbon (OC) fraction adsorbed to soot particles. The activation energy values determined for soot nanoparticles oxidation were 97 ± 5 and 101 ± 8 kJ mol(-1) with and without the DOC, respectively; suggesting that the DOC does not facilitate elementary carbon oxidation. The minimum temperature necessary for DPF regeneration was strongly affected by the presence of the DOC in the aftertreatment. The conversion of NO to NO(2) inside the DOC induced the DPF regeneration process at a lower temperature than O(2) (ΔT = 30 K). Also, it was verified that the OC fraction, which decreases in the presence of the DOC, plays an important role to ignite soot combustion.

  15. Study of the processes of carbonization and oxidation of porous silicon by Raman and IR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Vasin, A. V.; Okholin, P. N.; Verovsky, I. N.; Nazarov, A. N.; Lysenko, V. S.; Kholostov, K. I. Bondarenko, V. P.; Ishikawa, Y.

    2011-03-15

    Porous silicon layers were produced by electrochemical etching of single-crystal silicon wafers with the resistivity 10 {Omega} cm in the aqueous-alcohol solution of hydrofluoric acid. Raman spectroscopy and infrared absorption spectroscopy are used to study the processes of interaction of porous silicon with undiluted acetylene at low temperatures and the processes of oxidation of carbonized porous silicon by water vapors. It is established that, even at the temperature 550 Degree-Sign C, the silicon-carbon bonds are formed at the pore surface and the graphite-like carbon condensate emerges. It is shown that the carbon condensate inhibits oxidation of porous silicon by water vapors and contributes to quenching of white photoluminescence in the oxidized carbonized porous silicon nanocomposite layer.

  16. Sonochemistry in environmental remediation. 2. Heterogeneous sonophotocatalytic oxidation processes for the treatment of pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Adewuyi, Yusuf G

    2005-11-15

    Recent advances in advanced oxidation technologies for applications in environmental remediation involve the use of acoustic cavitation. Cavitation is the formation, growth, and implosive collapse of gas- or vapor-filled microbubbles formed from acoustical wave-induced compression/ rarefaction in a body of liquid. Cavitation is effective in treating most liquid-phase pollutants but it is highly energy intensive and not economical or practically feasible when used alone. One of the most interesting topics in the recent advances in environmental sonochemistry is the intensification of the ultrasonic degradation process by coupling ultrasound with other types of energy, chemical oxidants, or photocataysts. In Part II of this series, a critical review of the applications of ultrasound in environmental remediation focusing on the simultaneous or hybrid use of ultrasonic irradiation and photocatalysis in aqueous solutions, namely, sonophotocatalytic oxidation processes, is presented. PMID:16323748

  17. Reactive nitrogen oxides in the southeast United States national parks: source identification, origin, and process budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Daniel Quansong; Kang, Daiwen; Aneja, Viney P.; Ray, John D.

    2005-01-01

    We present in this study both measurement-based and modeling analyses for elucidation of source attribution, influence areas, and process budget of reactive nitrogen oxides at two rural southeast United States sites (Great Smoky Mountains national park (GRSM) and Mammoth Cave national park (MACA)). Availability of nitrogen oxides is considered as the limiting factor to ozone production in these areas and the relative source contribution of reactive nitrogen oxides from point or mobile sources is important in understanding why these areas have high ozone. Using two independent observation-based techniques, multiple linear regression analysis and emission inventory analysis, we demonstrate that point sources contribute a minimum of 23% of total NOy at GRSM and 27% at MACA. The influence areas for these two sites, or origins of nitrogen oxides, are investigated using trajectory-cluster analysis. The result shows that air masses from the West and Southwest sweep over GRSM most frequently, while pollutants transported from the eastern half (i.e., East, Northeast, and Southeast) have limited influence (<10% out of all air masses) on air quality at GRSM. The processes responsible for formation and removal of reactive nitrogen oxides are investigated using a comprehensive 3-D air quality model (Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP)). The NOy contribution associated with chemical transformations to NOz and O3, based on process budget analysis, is as follows: 32% and 84% for NOz, and 26% and 80% for O3 at GRSM and MACA, respectively. The similarity between NOz and O3 process budgets suggests a close association between nitrogen oxides and effective O3 production at these rural locations.

  18. Key factors, Soil N Processes, and nitrite accumulation affecting nitrous oxide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A better understanding of the key factors affecting nitrous oxide (N2O) emission and potential mitigation strategies is essential for sustainable agriculture. The objective of this study was to examine the important factors affecting N2O emissions, soil processes involved, and potential mitigation s...

  19. XPERT DESIGN AND DIAGNOSTICS' (XDD) IN-SITU CHEMICAL OXIDATION PROCESS USING POTASSIUM PERMANGANATE (KMNO4)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Xpert Design and Diagnostic's (XDD)potassium permanganate in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) process was evaluated under the EPA Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program at the former MEC Building site located in Hudson, New Hampshire. At this site, both soil and ...

  20. Treatment of textile dyeing wastewater using UV/solar photofenton oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Sarayu, G; Kanmani, S

    2003-04-01

    Colour removal of effluent from textile dyeing and finishing industry is becoming important because of aesthetic as well as environmental concerns. Conventional treatment methods have several limitations. Hence emerging technologies like advanced oxidation processes which were based on generation of hydroxyl free radicals (OH) were investigated. In the present work, photofenton oxidation process was used to treat textile dyeing wastewater and the study was carried out at different Fenton molar ratio's (H2O2/Fe2+) like 25:1, 50:1, 75:1, 100:1. It was found that maximum decolourisation occurred at a fenton molar ration of 50:1 and pH 3. A maximum colour removal of 97% was achieved after a contact time of 30 minutes and 70% COD reduction was observed after a contact time of 60 minutes in UV photofenton oxidation process. Whereas 80% colour removal and 50-55% COD reduction was observed after a contact time of 2 hrs in solar photofenton oxidation process.

  1. Post-treatment of reclaimed waste water based on an electrochemical advanced oxidation process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verostko, Charles E.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Hitchens, G. D.; Salinas, Carlos E.; Rogers, Tom D.

    1992-01-01

    The purification of reclaimed water is essential to water reclamation technology life-support systems in lunar/Mars habitats. An electrochemical UV reactor is being developed which generates oxidants, operates at low temperatures, and requires no chemical expendables. The reactor is the basis for an advanced oxidation process in which electrochemically generated ozone and hydrogen peroxide are used in combination with ultraviolet light irradiation to produce hydroxyl radicals. Results from this process are presented which demonstrate concept feasibility for removal of organic impurities and disinfection of water for potable and hygiene reuse. Power, size requirements, Faradaic efficiency, and process reaction kinetics are discussed. At the completion of this development effort the reactor system will be installed in JSC's regenerative water recovery test facility for evaluation to compare this technique with other candidate processes.

  2. Oxidation of Oil Sands Process-Affected Water by Potassium Ferrate(VI).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengjin; Klamerth, Nikolaus; Huang, Rongfu; Elnakar, Haitham; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-04-19

    This paper investigates the oxidation of oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) by potassium ferrate(VI). Due to the selectivity of ferrate(VI) oxidation, two-ring and three-ring fluorescing aromatics were preferentially removed at doses <100 mg/L Fe(VI), and one-ring aromatics were removed only at doses ≥100 mg/L Fe(VI). Ferrate(VI) oxidation achieved 64.0% and 78.4% removal of naphthenic acids (NAs) at the dose of 200 mg/L and 400 mg/L Fe(VI) respectively, and NAs with high carbon number and ring number were removed preferentially. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectra indicated that the oxidation of fluorescing aromatics resulted in the opening of some aromatic rings. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis detected signals of organic radical intermediates, indicating that one-electron transfer is one of the probable mechanisms in the oxidation of NAs. The inhibition effect of OSPW on Vibrio fischeri and the toxicity effect on goldfish primary kidney macrophages (PKMs) were both reduced after ferrate(VI) oxidation. The fluorescing aromatics in OSPW were proposed to be an important contributor to this acute toxicity. Degradation of model compounds with ferrate(VI) was also investigated and the results confirmed our findings in OSPW study. PMID:27008571

  3. Treatment of oilfield fracturing wastewater by a sequential combination of flocculation, Fenton oxidation and SBR process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Hong, Liang; Liu, Yan-Hong; Guo, Jian-Wei; Lin, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined process was developed that included flocculation, Fenton oxidation and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) to treat oilfield fracturing wastewater (FW). Flocculation and Fenton oxidation were applied to reduce chemical oxygen demand (COD) organic load and to enhance biodegradability, respectively. For flocculation, the optimum conditions were: polymeric aluminium chloride dosage, 40 mg/L; polyacrylamide dosage, 4 mg/L; dilution ratio, 1:2 and stirring time, 30 min. For Fenton oxidation, a total reaction time of 60 min, a H₂O₂dosage of 2 m mol/L, with a [H₂O₂]/[FeSO₄] ratio of 2 were selected to achieve optimum oxidation. Under these optimum flocculation and Fenton oxidation conditions, the COD removal efficiency was found to be 76.6%. Following pretreatment with flocculation and Fenton oxidation, the FW was further remediated using a SBR. Results show that COD was reduced to 92 mg/L, and the overall water quality of the final effluent could meet the class I national wastewater discharge standard of petrochemical industry of China.

  4. First Principles Calculation of Intial Oxidation Processes of Si(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyoshi, Uda; Koichi, Kato; Kiyoyuki, Terakura

    1997-08-01

    Oxidation of the Si(001) surface, one of the most important processes in the modern Si technology, was studied using the first-principles calculation technique with spin-polarized gradient approximation. The spontaneous dissociative chemisorption occurs only in the exceptional case, where incident O2 molecule attacks the center between the two surface dimers with its molecular axis parallel to a dimer row. In other cases, rather large activation energy is needed for dissociative chemisorption of an O2 molecule. It increases as the chemisorption site becomes deeper from the surface. This is in accordance qualitatively with the recent finding by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) that the oxidation occurs in a layer-by-layer reaction mode. The calculated activation energies, however, are considerably larger than the observed ones. In particular, the calculated barrier energy for backbond oxidation is more than 0.8 eV, while the first sub-surface, including backbonds, is observed to be oxidized with almost no activation energy. We have found that the barrierless backbond oxidation can be realized along a reaction path via the spontaneously chemisorbed meta-stable states on the Si top-layer mentioned earlier. Since this channel is very narrow, our model also explains why the initial sticking coefficient of O2 molecule is small despite of the fact that the barrierless oxidation takes place along this path. This work was partly supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

  5. Plasma Spray and Pack Cementation Process Optimization and Oxidation Behaviour of Novel Multilayered Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng

    The hot section components in gas turbines are subjected to a harsh environment with the temperature being increased continuously. The higher temperature has directly resulted in severe oxidation of these components. Monolithic coatings such as MCrAIY and aluminide have been traditionally used to protect the components from oxidation; however, increased operating temperature quickly deteriorates the coatings due to accelerated diffusion of aluminum in the coatings. To improve the oxidation resistance a group of multilayered coatings are developed in this study. The multilayered coatings consist of a Cr-Si co-deposited layer as the diffusion barrier, a plasma sprayed NiCrA1Y coating as the middle layer and an aluminized top layer. The Cr-Si and aluminized layers are fabricated using pack cementation processes and the NiCrA1Y coatings are produced using the Mettech Axial III(TM) System. All of the coating processes are optimized using the methodology of Design of Experiments (DOE) and the results are analyzed using statistical method. The optimal processes are adopted to fabricate the multilayered coatings for oxidation tests. The coatings are exposed in air at 1050°C and 1150°C for 1000 hr. The results indicate that a Cr layer and a silicon-rich barrier layer have formed on the interface between the Cr-Si coating and the NiCrA1Y coating. This barrier layer not only prevents aluminum and chromium from diffusing into the substrate, but also impedes the diffusion of other elements from the substrate into the coating. The results also reveal that, for optimal oxidation resistance at 1050°C, the top layer in a multilayered coating should have at least Al/Ni ratio of one; whereas the multilayered coating with the All Ni ratio of two in the top layer exhibits the best oxidation resistance at 1150°C. The DOE methodology provides an excellent means for process optimization and the selection of oxidation test matrix, and also offers a more thorough understanding of the

  6. Low-temperature solution-processed p-type vanadium oxide for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haocheng; Hou, Xiaomeng; Wei, Qiulong; Liu, Huawei; Yang, Kecheng; Wang, Wei; An, Qinyou; Rong, Yaoguang

    2016-06-21

    A low-temperature solution-processed inorganic p-type contact material of vanadium oxide (VOx) was developed to fabricate planar-heterojunction perovskite solar cells. Using a solvent-assisted process, high-quality uniform and compact perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) films were deposited on VOx coated substrates. Due to the high transmittance and quenching efficiency of VOx layers, a power conversion efficiency of over 14% was achieved.

  7. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation. PMID:26334187

  8. Reaction Mechanism for m-Xylene Oxidation in the Claus Process by Sulfur Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sourab; Raj, Abhijeet; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed S; Chung, Suk Ho

    2015-09-24

    In the Claus process, the presence of aromatic contaminants such benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX), in the H2S feed stream has a detrimental effect on catalytic reactors, where BTX form soot particles and clog and deactivate the catalysts. Among BTX, xylenes are proven to be most damaging contaminant for catalysts. BTX oxidation in the Claus furnace, before they enter catalyst beds, provides a solution to this problem. A reaction kinetics study on m-xylene oxidation by SO2, an oxidant present in Claus furnace, is presented. The density functional theory is used to study the formation of m-xylene radicals (3-methylbenzyl, 2,6-dimethylphenyl, 2,4-dimethylphenyl, and 3,5-dimethylphenyl) through H-abstraction and their oxidation by SO2. The mechanism begins with SO2 addition on the radicals through an O-atom rather than the S-atom with the release of 180.0-183.1 kJ/mol of reaction energies. This exothermic reaction involves energy barriers in the range 3.9-5.2 kJ/mol for several m-xylene radicals. Thereafter, O-S bond scission takes place to release SO, and the O-atom remaining on aromatics leads to CO formation. Among four m-xylene radicals, the resonantly stabilized 3-methylbenzyl exhibited the lowest SO2 addition and SO elimination rates. The reaction rate constants are provided to facilitate Claus process simulations to find conditions suitable for BTX oxidation.

  9. In situ analysis of repair processes for oxidative DNA damage in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Li; Nakajima, Satoshi; Oohata, Yoshitsugu; Takao, Masashi; Okano, Satoshi; Masutani, Mitsuko; Wilson, Samuel H.; Yasui, Akira

    2004-09-01

    Oxidative DNA damage causes blocks and errors in transcription and replication, leading to cell death and genomic instability. Although repair mechanisms of the damage have been extensively analyzed in vitro, the actual in vivo repair processes remain largely unknown. Here, by irradiation with an UVA laser through a microscope lens, we have conditionally produced single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage at restricted nuclear regions of mammalian cells. We showed, in real time after irradiation by using antibodies and GFP-tagged proteins, rapid and ordered DNA repair processes of oxidative DNA damage in human cells. Furthermore, we characterized repair pathways by using repair-defective mammalian cells and found that DNA polymerase accumulated at single-strand breaks and oxidative base damage by means of its 31- and 8-kDa domains, respectively, and that XRCC1 is essential for both polymerase -dependent and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-dependent repair pathways of single-strand breaks. Thus, the repair of oxidative DNA damage is based on temporal and functional interactions among various proteins operating at the site of DNA damage in living cells.

  10. Synthesis, analysis and processing of novel materials in the yttrium oxide-aluminum oxide system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, Julien Claudius

    In the current work, liquid feed flame spray pyrolysis (LF-FSP) was used to create three novel nanopowders in the Y2O3-Al 2O3 system: alpha-Al2O3, YAG (garnet Y3Al5O12) and hexagonal Y3Al 5O12. For example, LF-FSP combustion of metalloorganic yttrium and aluminum precursors in a 3/5 ratio forms hexagonal Y3Al5O 12, a newly discovered crystalline phase detailed in this work. The resulting 15-35 nm average particle size, single crystal nanopowders were characterized by TGA-DTA, XRD, HR-TEM, electron diffraction and FTIR. The data was used to establish a model for the crystal structure of this new phase (hexagonal, with crystal parameter of a = 0.736 nm, c = 1.052) consisting of a superlattice of substituted hexagonal YAlO3. YAG has been extensively investigated for its applications as scintillators, phosphors and as a laser host. Fully dispersible, unaggregated single crystal YAG nanopowders with average particle sizes of 35-50 nm were obtained from hexagonal Y3Al5O12 after annealing at 850°C-1200°C (for 2h-8d). The resulting YAG nanopowder was processed into green bodies using cold isostatic pressing after adding binders. 99%+ dense monoliths were obtained after sintering at 1400°C in vacuum (6-8 h), while maintaining grain sizes < 500 nm. The ability to sinter while keeping sub-micron grains differs from present techniques (where translucency is obtained through exaggerated grain growth to 5-10 microns) reported in the literature for sintering polycrystalline YAG, and is the first step for improving polycrystalline YAG laser host optical properties. LF-FSP processing of transition Al2O3 nanopowders converts them to single crystal alpha-Al2O3 nanopowders, previously thought impossible to obtain. The alpha-Al2O 3 nanopowders thus obtained, consist of unaggregated 30-40 nm single particles. These nanopowders were characterized by XRD, HR-TEM, SEM, DLS, FTIR. Green bodies of alpha-Al2O3 nanopowders were sintered to 99% density without sintering aids at 1400°C (6

  11. [Degradation of aniline by a dual-electrode electrochemical oxidation process].

    PubMed

    Cen, Shi-Hong; Song, Xiao-Yan; Chu, Yan-Yang

    2011-08-01

    The efficiency and the mechanism of aniline degradation by an electrochemical oxidation process using a Ti/SnO2-Sb2O5 electrode as the anode and a graphite electrode as the cathode, were studied in two aqueous electrolytes with/without Fe2+. The results showed that the reasonable anodic potential was about 2.0 V +/- 0.1 V for Ti/SnO2-Sb2O5 electrode to oxidize organic compounds, while the optimum cathodic potential was -0.65 V for graphite electrode to reduce O2 generating H2O2. The oxidation degradation of aniline could not take place only by the single action of H2O2. Anodic oxidation was accounted for the degradation of aniline in the absence of Fe2+, while in the presence of Fe2+ both electro-Fenton oxidation and anodic oxidation (dual-electrode electrochemical oxidation) could degradate aniline effectively, and in this case the former was the main mechanism. Under the conditions of -0.65 V cathodic potential, pH 3.0 and 0.5 mmol x L(-1) Fe2+, the removal rate of COD was 77.5% after 10 h treatment and a current efficiency of 97.8% for COD removal could be obtained. This work indicates that the dual-electrode electrochemical oxidation is feasible for the degradation of organic compounds with a high current efficiency by using Ti/SnO2-Sb2O5 as anode as well as the reasonable anodic and cathodic potentials.

  12. Rapid deposition process for zinc oxide film applications in pyroelectric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Yu, Shih-Yuan

    2012-10-01

    Aerosol deposition (AD) is a rapid process for the deposition of films. Zinc oxide is a low toxicity and environmentally friendly material, and it possesses properties such as semiconductivity, pyroelectricity and piezoelectricity without the poling process. Therefore, AD is used to accelerate the manufacturing process for applications of ZnO films in pyroelectric devices. Increasing the temperature variation rate in pyroelectric films is a useful method for enhancing the responsivity of pyroelectric devices. In the present study, a porous ZnO film possessing the properties of large heat absorption and high temperature variation rate is successfully produced by the AD rapid process and laser annealing for application in pyroelectric devices.

  13. UV optical properties of thin film oxide layers deposited by different processes.

    PubMed

    Pellicori, Samuel F; Martinez, Carol L

    2011-10-01

    UV optical properties of thin film layers of compound and mixed oxide materials deposited by different processes are presented. Japan Electron Optics Laboratory plasma ion assisted deposition (JEOL PIAD), electron beam with and without IAD, and pulsed DC magnetron sputtering were used. Comparisons are made with published deposition process data. Refractive indices and absorption values to as short as 145 nm were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Electronic interband defect states are detected that are deposition-process dependent. SE might be effective in identifying UV optical film quality, especially in defining processes and material composition beneficial for high-energy excimer laser applications and environments requiring stable optical properties.

  14. Elemental Metals or Oxides Distributed on a Carbon Substrate or Self-Supported and the Manufacturing Process Using Graphite Oxide as Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A process for providing elemental metals or metal oxides distributed on a carbon substrate or self-supported utilizing graphite oxide as a precursor. The graphite oxide is exposed to one or more metal chlorides to form an intermediary product comprising carbon, metal, chloride, and oxygen. This intermediary product can be further processed by direct exposure to carbonate-solutions to form a second intermediary product comprising carbon, metal carbonate, and oxygen. Either intermediary product may be further processed: a) in air to produce metal oxide; b) in an inert environment to produce metal oxide on carbon substrate; c) in a reducing environment to produce elemental metal distributed on carbon substrate. The product generally takes the shape of the carbon precursor.

  15. Processing and mechanical behavior of Nicalon{reg_sign}/SiC composites with sol-gel derived oxide interfacial coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-10-01

    Recent analytical and finite element modeling studies have indicated that low modulus interface materials are desirable for obtaining Nicalon/SiC composites with good toughness. Two oxides, Al titanate and mullite, were chosen on this basis as interface materials. The oxide and C coatings were deposited by sol-gel and CVD, respectively. Nicalon/SiC composites with oxide/C and C/oxide/C interfaces were fabricated and evaluated for flexure strength in the as-processed and oxidized conditions. Composites with C/oxide/C interfaces retained considerable strength and damage-tolerant behavior even after 500 h oxidation at 1000 C in air. The C/oxide/C interface shows promise as a viable oxidation-resistant interface alternative to C or BN interfaces.

  16. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young

    2012-11-15

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  17. Coupled interactions between volatile activity and Fe oxidation state during arc crustal processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humphreys, Madeleine C.S.; Brooker, R; Fraser, D.C.; Burgisser, A; Mangan, Margaret T.; McCammon, C

    2015-01-01

    Arc magmas erupted at the Earth’s surface are commonly more oxidized than those produced at mid-ocean ridges. Possible explanations for this high oxidation state are that the transfer of fluids during the subduction process results in direct oxidation of the sub-arc mantle wedge, or that oxidation is caused by the effect of later crustal processes, including protracted fractionation and degassing of volatile-rich magmas. This study sets out to investigate the effect of disequilibrium crustal processes that may involve coupled changes in H2O content and Fe oxidation state, by examining the degassing and hydration of sulphur-free rhyolites. We show that experimentally hydrated melts record strong increases in Fe3+/∑Fe with increasing H2O concentration as a result of changes in water activity. This is relevant for the passage of H2O-undersaturated melts from the deep crust towards shallow crustal storage regions, and raises the possibility that vertical variations in fO2 might develop within arc crust. Conversely, degassing experiments produce an increase in Fe3+/∑Fe with decreasing H2O concentration. In this case the oxidation is explained by loss of H2 as well as H2O into bubbles during decompression, consistent with thermodynamic modelling, and is relevant for magmas undergoing shallow degassing en route to the surface. We discuss these results in the context of the possible controls on fO2 during the generation, storage and ascent of magmas in arc settings, in particular considering the timescales of equilibration relative to observation as this affects the quality of the petrological record of magmatic fO2.

  18. Oxidized Docosahexaenoic Acid Species and Lipid Peroxidation Products Increase Amyloidogenic Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Marcus O W; Haupenthal, Viola J; Mett, Janine; Stahlmann, Christoph P; Blümel, Tamara; Mylonas, Nadine T; Endres, Kristina; Grimm, Heike S; Hartmann, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    One of the main characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) generated by β- and γ-secretase processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Previously it has been demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), especially docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are associated with a reduced risk of AD caused by decreased Aβ production. However, in epidemiological studies and nutritional approaches, the outcomes of DHA-dependent treatment were partially controversial. PUFAs are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which are increased during disease pathology. In line with published results, lipid peroxidation was elevated in human postmortem AD brains; especially 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE) was increased. To investigate whether lipid peroxidation is only a consequence or might also influence the processes leading to AD, we analyzed 7 different oxidized lipid species including 5 oxidized DHA derivatives and the lipid peroxidation products of ω-3 and ω-6 PUFAs, HNE and 4-hydroxy-hexenal, in human neuroblastoma cells and mouse mixed cortical neurons. In the presence of oxidized lipids Aβ and soluble β-secreted APP levels were elevated, whereas soluble α-secreted APP was decreased, suggesting a shift from the nonamyloidogenic to the amyloidogenic pathway of APP processing. Furthermore, β- and γ-secretase activity was increased by oxidized lipids via increased gene expression and additionally by a direct effect on β-secretase activity. Importantly, only 1% oxidized DHA was sufficient to revert the protective effect of DHA and to significantly increase Aβ production. Therefore, our results emphasize the need to prevent DHA from oxidation in nutritional approaches and might help explain the divergent results of clinical DHA studies. PMID:26642316

  19. Generation and characterization of nano tungsten oxide particles by wire explosion process

    SciTech Connect

    Aravinth, S.; Sankar, Binu; Chakravarthi, S.R.; Sarathi, R.

    2011-02-15

    Nano tungsten oxide particles are produced by wire explosion process. It is realized that by exploding tungsten conductor in lower pressure of oxygen, unreacted phase of tungsten was present and it could be reduced by increasing the operating pressure and increasing the amount of energy deposited to the exploding conductor. It is realized that the nucleation rate of the particle could be high only at the point of maximum saturation ratio, irrespective of the pressure of the oxygen. The size of the critical nucleus formed is low when the saturation ratio and the nucleation rate are at maximum. The nano metal oxide particle formation by wire explosion process allows one to conclude that the second stage annealing process has a major impact on the final grain size formed. The high speed camera photographs of wire explosion process were used to understand the dynamics of particle formation by wire explosion process. The Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) analysis indicates that the nano tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) particles are of spherical shape and the analysis of particle size indicates that it follows log normal distribution. - Graphical Abstract: Nano tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) particles are produced by wire explosion process. Theoretical analysis indicates that the size of the critical nucleus formed is low when the saturation ratio and the nucleation rate are at maximum. High speed camera photographs of wire explosion process were used to understand the dynamics of particles formed. Research Highlights: {yields}Lower particle size is possible with lower pressure. {yields}Particle size is increased with reduced energy ratio. {yields}Unreacted tungsten content reduces when oxygen pressure increases.

  20. Incorporation of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes in a multistage treatment system for sanitary landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Soler, J; Fonseca, Amélia; Saraiva, Isabel; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-09-15

    The current study has proved the technical feasibility of including electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) in a multistage strategy for the remediation of a sanitary landfill leachate that embraced: (i) first biological treatment to remove the biodegradable organic fraction, oxidize ammonium and reduce alkalinity, (ii) coagulation of the bio-treated leachate to precipitate humic acids and particles, followed by separation of the clarified effluent, and (iii) oxidation of the resulting effluent by an EAOP to degrade the recalcitrant organic matter and increase its biodegradability so that a second biological process for removal of biodegradable organics and nitrogen content could be applied. The influence of current density on an UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) process was firstly assessed. The oxidation ability of various EAOPs such as electro-Fenton (EF) with two distinct initial total dissolved iron concentrations ([TDI]0), PEF and solar PEF (SPEF) was further evaluated and these processes were compared with their analogous chemical ones. A detailed assessment of the two first treatment stages was made and the biodegradability enhancement during the SPEF process was determined by a Zahn-Wellens test to define the ideal organics oxidation state to stop the EAOP and apply the second biological treatment. The best current density was 200 mA cm(-2) for a PEF process using a BDD anode, [TDI]0 of 60 mg L(-1), pH 2.8 and 20 °C. The relative oxidation ability of EAOPs increased in the order EF with 12 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < EF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < PEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) ≤ SPEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1), using the abovementioned conditions. While EF process was much superior to the Fenton one, the superiority of PEF over photo-Fenton was less evident and SPEF attained similar degradation to solar photo-Fenton. To provide a final dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 163 mg L(-1) to fulfill the discharge limits into the environment after

  1. Incorporation of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes in a multistage treatment system for sanitary landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Francisca C; Soler, J; Fonseca, Amélia; Saraiva, Isabel; Boaventura, Rui A R; Brillas, Enric; Vilar, Vítor J P

    2015-09-15

    The current study has proved the technical feasibility of including electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) in a multistage strategy for the remediation of a sanitary landfill leachate that embraced: (i) first biological treatment to remove the biodegradable organic fraction, oxidize ammonium and reduce alkalinity, (ii) coagulation of the bio-treated leachate to precipitate humic acids and particles, followed by separation of the clarified effluent, and (iii) oxidation of the resulting effluent by an EAOP to degrade the recalcitrant organic matter and increase its biodegradability so that a second biological process for removal of biodegradable organics and nitrogen content could be applied. The influence of current density on an UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) process was firstly assessed. The oxidation ability of various EAOPs such as electro-Fenton (EF) with two distinct initial total dissolved iron concentrations ([TDI]0), PEF and solar PEF (SPEF) was further evaluated and these processes were compared with their analogous chemical ones. A detailed assessment of the two first treatment stages was made and the biodegradability enhancement during the SPEF process was determined by a Zahn-Wellens test to define the ideal organics oxidation state to stop the EAOP and apply the second biological treatment. The best current density was 200 mA cm(-2) for a PEF process using a BDD anode, [TDI]0 of 60 mg L(-1), pH 2.8 and 20 °C. The relative oxidation ability of EAOPs increased in the order EF with 12 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < EF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) < PEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1) ≤ SPEF with 60 mg [TDI]0 L(-1), using the abovementioned conditions. While EF process was much superior to the Fenton one, the superiority of PEF over photo-Fenton was less evident and SPEF attained similar degradation to solar photo-Fenton. To provide a final dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of 163 mg L(-1) to fulfill the discharge limits into the environment after

  2. Process for the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in gaseous mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ginger, E.A.

    1981-05-19

    A process for the reductive removal of a nitrogen oxide from a gaseous stream, particularly a stream containing oxygen, water, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and nitrogen, by contacting the stream with ammonia in the presence of a mixture of two catalysts. The first catalyst comprises copper or a copper compound, preferably copper sulfate supported on a porous carrier material. The second catalyst is a combination of metals or compounds thereof, preferably sulfates of vanadium and iron or tungsten and iron, also dispersed on a porous carrier material.

  3. Oxidative processes in red blood cells from normal and diabetic individuals.

    PubMed

    Bryszewska, M; Zavodnik, I B; Niekurzak, A; Szosland, K

    1995-10-01

    The oxidation processes in normal and diabetic erythrocytes after cell exposure to H2O2 and t-butyl hydroperoxide, as well as the effect of malondialdehyde (a stable end product of lipid peroxidation) on erythrocyte membrane structure and stability were studied. The malondialdehyde level began to increase only after oxidation of most of the red blood cell glutathione by peroxides. The activation energy of malondialdehyde was 53 +/- 7 kj/mol. Sodium azide inhibited the oxidation processes induced by t-butyl hydroperoxide. The modification of erythrocytes by malondialdehyde decreased the fluidity of the membrane lipid bilayer measured by fluorescence anisotropy and increased the osmotic stability of the cells. The level of endogenous thiobarbituric acid-reactive species was higher and antioxidative activity was lower in diabetic cells. It seems likely that oxidation processes and accumulation of malondialdehyde can contribute directly to changes in the properties of ¿diabetic¿ red blood cells and may cause the development of long-term complications. PMID:8673018

  4. Modeling for calculation of vanadium oxide film composition in reactive-sputtering process

    SciTech Connect

    Yu He; Jiang Yadong; Wang Tao; Wu Zhiming; Yu Junsheng; Wei Xiongbang

    2010-05-15

    A modified model describing the changing ratio of vanadium to oxide on the target and substrate as a function of oxygen flow is described. Actually, this ratio is extremely sensitive to the deposition conditions during the vanadium oxide (VO{sub x}) reactive magnetron-sputtering process. The method in this article is an extension of a previously presented Berg's model, where only a single stoichiometry compound layer was taken into consideration. This work deals with reactive magnetron sputtering of vanadium oxide films with different oxygen contents from vanadium metal target. The presence of vanadium mixed oxides at both target and substrate surface produced during reactive-sputtering process are included. It shows that the model can be used for the optimization of film composition with respect to oxygen flow in a stable hysteresis-free reactive-sputtering process. A systematic experimental study of deposition rate of VO{sub x} with respect to target ion current was also made. Compared to experimental results, it was verified that the theoretical calculation from modeling is in good agreement with the experimental counterpart.

  5. Energy and exergy analysis of an ethanol reforming process for solid oxide fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Tippawan, Phanicha; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2014-04-01

    The fuel processor in which hydrogen is produced from fuels is an important unit in a fuel cell system. The aim of this study is to apply a thermodynamic concept to identify a suitable reforming process for an ethanol-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Three different reforming technologies, i.e., steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming, are considered. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are employed to determine an energy demand and to describe how efficiently the energy is supplied to the reforming process. Effect of key operating parameters on the distribution of reforming products, such as H2, CO, CO2 and CH4, and the possibility of carbon formation in different ethanol reformings are examined as a function of steam-to-ethanol ratio, oxygen-to-ethanol ratio and temperatures at atmospheric pressure. Energy and exergy analysis are performed to identify the best ethanol reforming process for SOFC applications.

  6. Energy Harvesting Thermoelectric Generators Manufactured Using the Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Process

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 μW at a temperature difference of 15 K. PMID:23396193

  7. Importance of oxide capping on the suppression of dopant outdiffusion for salicide block process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong; Siah, Soh Yun; Vigar, David

    2000-10-01

    In this paper, the effect of dopant out diffusion on unsalicided polysilicon resistance has been intensively investigated. It has been found that excessive dopant out diffusion as a result of non-optimized oxide capping could cause a large variation in sheet resistance of the unsalicided polysilicon resistor. For this salicide block process, great attention needs to be paid for the suppression of dopant out diffusion. Based on understanding of the cause of the inconsistent, unsalicided polysilicon resistance, we demonstrate an implementation of salicide blocking for 0.25 micrometers CMOS technology with a well controlled unsalicided polysilicon resistance by exploring the various process trade-offs in the choice of oxide for the salicide blocking and optimizing the subsequent thermal annealing process.

  8. Energy and exergy analysis of an ethanol reforming process for solid oxide fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Tippawan, Phanicha; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai

    2014-04-01

    The fuel processor in which hydrogen is produced from fuels is an important unit in a fuel cell system. The aim of this study is to apply a thermodynamic concept to identify a suitable reforming process for an ethanol-fueled solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Three different reforming technologies, i.e., steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming, are considered. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are employed to determine an energy demand and to describe how efficiently the energy is supplied to the reforming process. Effect of key operating parameters on the distribution of reforming products, such as H2, CO, CO2 and CH4, and the possibility of carbon formation in different ethanol reformings are examined as a function of steam-to-ethanol ratio, oxygen-to-ethanol ratio and temperatures at atmospheric pressure. Energy and exergy analysis are performed to identify the best ethanol reforming process for SOFC applications. PMID:24561628

  9. Studies in treatment of disperse dye waste: Membrane-wet oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Dhale, A.D.; Mahajani, V.V.

    2000-07-01

    An integrated process, membrane-wet oxidation (MEMWO) has been demonstrated to treat the disperse dye bath waste. The dye bath waste stream containing azo class disperse dye CL 79, was studied to demonstrate the process. A nanofiltration membrane (MPT 30) showed > 99% color and 97% chemical oxygen demand (COD) rejection of dye compound. The concentrate was then treated by wet oxidation (WO) process. WO of dye was studied in the range of 160--225 C and oxygen partial pressure 0.69--1.38 MPa. A homogeneous copper sulfate was found to be a suitable catalyst to effectively destroy the dye as well as the real waste. While non catalytic WO of dye achieved 75% reduction in COD during 120 min with 99% color destruction, the catalytic WO showed about 90% reduction in COD. The performance of WO of actual waste stream was comparable with that of pure dye molecule.

  10. Energy harvesting thermoelectric generators manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-02-08

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 mW at a temperature difference of 15 K.

  11. Energy harvesting thermoelectric generators manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor process.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Dai, Ching-Liang; Tsai, Wen-Jung

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of energy harvesting thermoelectric micro generators using the commercial complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The micro generator consists of 33 thermocouples in series. Thermocouple materials are p-type and n-type polysilicon since they have a large Seebeck coefficient difference. The output power of the micro generator depends on the temperature difference in the hot and cold parts of the thermocouples. In order to increase this temperature difference, the hot part of the thermocouples is suspended to reduce heat-sinking. The micro generator needs a post-CMOS process to release the suspended structures of hot part, which the post-process includes an anisotropic dry etching to etch the sacrificial oxide layer and an isotropic dry etching to remove the silicon substrate. Experiments show that the output power of the micro generator is 9.4 mW at a temperature difference of 15 K. PMID:23396193

  12. High Performance, Low Temperature Solution-Processed Barium and Strontium Doped Oxide Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Banger, Kulbinder K; Peterson, Rebecca L; Mori, Kiyotaka; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Leedham, Timothy; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-01-28

    Amorphous mixed metal oxides are emerging as high performance semiconductors for thin film transistor (TFT) applications, with indium gallium zinc oxide, InGaZnO (IGZO), being one of the most widely studied and best performing systems. Here, we investigate alkaline earth (barium or strontium) doped InBa(Sr)ZnO as alternative, semiconducting channel layers and compare their performance of the electrical stress stability with IGZO. In films fabricated by solution-processing from metal alkoxide precursors and annealed to 450 °C we achieve high field-effect electron mobility up to 26 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). We show that it is possible to solution-process these materials at low process temperature (225-200 °C yielding mobilities up to 4.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) and demonstrate a facile "ink-on-demand" process for these materials which utilizes the alcoholysis reaction of alkyl metal precursors to negate the need for complex synthesis and purification protocols. Electrical bias stress measurements which can serve as a figure of merit for performance stability for a TFT device reveal Sr- and Ba-doped semiconductors to exhibit enhanced electrical stability and reduced threshold voltage shift compared to IGZO irrespective of the process temperature and preparation method. This enhancement in stability can be attributed to the higher Gibbs energy of oxidation of barium and strontium compared to gallium. PMID:24511184

  13. Regeneration of siloxane-exhausted activated carbon by advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Codony, Alba; Gonzalez-Olmos, Rafael; Martín, Maria J

    2015-03-21

    In the context of the biogas upgrading, siloxane exhausted activated carbons need to be regenerated in order to avoid them becoming a residue. In this work, two commercial activate carbons which were proved to be efficient in the removal of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) from biogas, have been regenerated through advanced oxidation processes using both O3 and H2O2. After the treatment with O3, the activated carbon recovered up to 40% of the original adsorption capacity while by the oxidation with H2O2 the regeneration efficiency achieved was up to 45%. In order to enhance the H2O2 oxidation, activated carbon was amended with iron. In this case, the regeneration efficiency increased up to 92%.

  14. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications. PMID:27668803

  15. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, C; Joseph, B; Orpe, P B; Saini, N L; Mukherjee, S; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K; Stanek, J; Di Gioacchino, D; Marcelli, A

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  16. Effects of process parameters on sheet resistance uniformity of fluorine-doped tin oxide thin films

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    An alternative indium-free material for transparent conducting oxides of fluorine-doped tin oxide [FTO] thin films deposited on polyethylene terephthalate [PET] was prepared by electron cyclotron resonance - metal organic chemical vapor deposition [ECR-MOCVD]. One of the essential issues regarding metal oxide film deposition is the sheet resistance uniformity of the film. Variations in process parameters, in this case, working and bubbler pressures of ECR-MOCVD, can lead to a change in resistance uniformity. Both the optical transmittance and electrical resistance uniformity of FTO film-coated PET were investigated. The result shows that sheet resistance uniformity and the transmittance of the film are affected significantly by the changes in bubbler pressure but are less influenced by the working pressure of the ECR-MOCVD system. PMID:22221518

  17. Combined effects of organic aerosol loading and fog processing on organic aerosols oxidation and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Abhishek; Tripathi, Sachchida; Gupta, Tarun

    2016-04-01

    Fog is a natural meteorological phenomenon that occurs throughout the world, it contains substantial quantity of liquid water and generally seen as a natural cleansing agent but it also has the potential to form highly oxidized secondary organic aerosols (SOA) via aqueous processing of ambient aerosols. On the other hand higher organic aerosols (OA) loading tend to decrease the overall oxidation level (O/C) of the particle phase organics, due to enhanced partitioning of less oxidized organics from gas to particle phase. However, combined impact of these two parameters; aqueous oxidation and OA loading, on the overall oxidation ratio (O/C) of ambient OA has never been studied. To assess this, real time ambient sampling using HR-ToF-AMS was carried out at Kanpur, India from 15 December 2014 - 10 February 2015. In first 3 weeks of this campaign, very high OA loading is (134 ± 42 μg/m3) observed (termed as high loading or HL period) while loading is substantially reduced from 2nd January, 2016 (56 ± 20 μg/m3, termed as low loading or LL period) . However, both the loading period was affected by several fog episodes (10 in HL and 7 in LL), thus providing the opportunity of studying the combined effects of fog and OA loading on OA oxidation. It is found that O/C ratio is very strongly anti-correlated with OA loading in both the loading period, however, slope of this ant-correlation is much steep during HL period than in LL period. Source apportionment of OA revealed that there is drastic change in the types of OA from HL to LL period, clearly indicating difference in OA composition from HL to LL period. During foggy night continuous oxidation of OA is observed from early evening to early morning with 15-20% enhancement in O/C ratio, while the same is absent during non-foggy period, clearly indicating the efficient fog processing of ambient OA. It is also found that night time fog aqueous oxidation can be as effective as daytime photo chemistry in oxidation of OA. Fog

  18. Immobilized soybean hull peroxidase for the oxidation of phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Pricila Maria Batista; Torres, Juliana Arriel; Silva, Maria Cristina; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan beads were prepared, using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent for the immobilization of soybean hull peroxidase (SBP). The activity of free and immobilized SBP was studied. The optimum pH was 6.0 for both the free and immobilized enzyme; however, enzyme activity became more dependent on the temperature after immobilization. This study evaluated the potential use of immobilized and free enzyme in the oxidation of caffeic acid, of synthetic phenolic solution (SPS) and of total phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater (CPW). Some factors, such as reaction time, amount of H2O2 and caffeic acid were evaluated, in order to determine the optimum conditions for enzyme performance. Both enzymes showed a potential in the removal of caffeic acid, SPS and CPW, and immobilized SBP had the highest oxidation performance. The immobilized enzyme showed a potential of 50% in the oxidation of caffeic acid after 4 consecutive cycles.

  19. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Orpe, PB; Saini, NL; Mukherjee, S.; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K.; Stanek, J.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  20. Laboratory Demonstration of the Pretreatment Process with Caustic and Oxidative Leaching Using Actual Hanford Tank Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Snow, Lanee A.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the bench-scale pretreatment processing of actual tank waste materials through the entire baseline WTP pretreatment flowsheet in an effort to demonstrate the efficacy of the defined leaching processes on actual Hanford tank waste sludge and the potential impacts on downstream pretreatment processing. The test material was a combination of reduction oxidation (REDOX) tank waste composited materials containing aluminum primarily in the form of boehmite and dissolved S saltcake containing Cr(III)-rich entrained solids. The pretreatment processing steps tested included • caustic leaching for Al removal • solids crossflow filtration through the cell unit filter (CUF) • stepwise solids washing using decreasing concentrations of sodium hydroxide with filtration through the CUF • oxidative leaching using sodium permanganate for removing Cr • solids filtration with the CUF • follow-on solids washing and filtration through the CUF • ion exchange processing for Cs removal • evaporation processing of waste stream recycle for volume reduction • combination of the evaporated product with dissolved saltcake. The effectiveness of each process step was evaluated by following the mass balance of key components (such as Al, B, Cd, Cr, Pu, Ni, Mn, and Fe), demonstrating component (Al, Cr, Cs) removal, demonstrating filterability by evaluating filter flux rates under various processing conditions (transmembrane pressure, crossflow velocities, wt% undissolved solids, and PSD) and filter fouling, and identifying potential issues for WTP. The filterability was reported separately (Shimskey et al. 2008) and is not repeated herein.