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Sample records for oxidative defence regulation

  1. Nitric oxide-activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the abscisic acid-induced antioxidant defence in maize.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fangfang; Lu, Rui; Liu, Huiying; Shi, Ben; Zhang, Jianhua; Tan, Mingpu; Zhang, Aying; Jiang, Mingyi

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) are all required for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defence. Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a strong candidate for the decoder of Ca2+ signals. However, whether CCaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defence is unknown. The results of the present study show that exogenous and endogenous ABA induced increases in the activity of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK in leaves of maize. Subcellular localization analysis showed that ZmCCaMK is located in the nucleus, the cytoplasm, and the plasma membrane. The transient expression of ZmCCaMK and the RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of ZmCCaMK analysis in maize protoplasts revealed that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence. Moreover, treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced the activation of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK. Pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor blocked the ABA-induced increases in the activity and the transcript level of ZmCCaMK. Conversely, RNAi silencing of ZmCCaMK in maize protoplasts did not affect the ABA-induced NO production, which was further confirmed using a mutant of OsCCaMK, the homologous gene of ZmCCaMK in rice. Moreover, H2O2 was also required for the ABA activation of ZmCCaMK, and pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor inhibited the H2O2-induced increase in the activity of ZmCCaMK. Taken together, the data clearly suggest that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence, and H2O2-dependent NO production plays an important role in the ABA-induced activation of ZmCCaMK.

  2. Nitric oxide-activated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase regulates the abscisic acid-induced antioxidant defence in maize

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aying; Jiang, Mingyi

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and calcium (Ca2+)/calmodulin (CaM) are all required for abscisic acid (ABA)-induced antioxidant defence. Ca2+/CaM-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is a strong candidate for the decoder of Ca2+ signals. However, whether CCaMK is involved in ABA-induced antioxidant defence is unknown. The results of the present study show that exogenous and endogenous ABA induced increases in the activity of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK in leaves of maize. Subcellular localization analysis showed that ZmCCaMK is located in the nucleus, the cytoplasm, and the plasma membrane. The transient expression of ZmCCaMK and the RNA interference (RNAi) silencing of ZmCCaMK analysis in maize protoplasts revealed that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence. Moreover, treatment with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced the activation of ZmCCaMK and the expression of ZmCCaMK. Pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor blocked the ABA-induced increases in the activity and the transcript level of ZmCCaMK. Conversely, RNAi silencing of ZmCCaMK in maize protoplasts did not affect the ABA-induced NO production, which was further confirmed using a mutant of OsCCaMK, the homologous gene of ZmCCaMK in rice. Moreover, H2O2 was also required for the ABA activation of ZmCCaMK, and pre-treatments with an NO scavenger and inhibitor inhibited the H2O2-induced increase in the activity of ZmCCaMK. Taken together, the data clearly suggest that ZmCCaMK is required for ABA-induced antioxidant defence, and H2O2-dependent NO production plays an important role in the ABA-induced activation of ZmCCaMK. PMID:22865912

  3. Sensory neuron regulation of gastrointestinal inflammation and bacterial host defence.

    PubMed

    Lai, N Y; Mills, K; Chiu, I M

    2017-02-02

    Sensory neurons in the gastrointestinal tract have multifaceted roles in maintaining homeostasis, detecting danger and initiating protective responses. The gastrointestinal tract is innervated by three types of sensory neurons: dorsal root ganglia, nodose/jugular ganglia and intrinsic primary afferent neurons. Here, we examine how these distinct sensory neurons and their signal transducers participate in regulating gastrointestinal inflammation and host defence. Sensory neurons are equipped with molecular sensors that enable neuronal detection of diverse environmental signals including thermal and mechanical stimuli, inflammatory mediators and tissue damage. Emerging evidence shows that sensory neurons participate in host-microbe interactions. Sensory neurons are able to detect pathogenic and commensal bacteria through specific metabolites, cell-wall components, and toxins. Here, we review recent work on the mechanisms of bacterial detection by distinct subtypes of gut-innervating sensory neurons. Upon activation, sensory neurons communicate to the immune system to modulate tissue inflammation through antidromic signalling and efferent neural circuits. We discuss how this neuro-immune regulation is orchestrated through transient receptor potential ion channels and sensory neuropeptides including substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Recent studies also highlight a role for sensory neurons in regulating host defence against enteric bacterial pathogens including Salmonella typhimurium, Citrobacter rodentium and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli. Understanding how sensory neurons respond to gastrointestinal flora and communicate with immune cells to regulate host defence enhances our knowledge of host physiology and may form the basis for new approaches to treat gastrointestinal diseases.

  4. Upstream and downstream signals of nitric oxide in pathogen defence.

    PubMed

    Gaupels, Frank; Kuruthukulangarakoola, Gitto Thomas; Durner, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is now recognised as a crucial player in plant defence against pathogens. Considerable progress has been made in defining upstream and downstream signals of NO. Recently, MAP kinases, cyclic nucleotide phosphates, calcium and phosphatidic acid were demonstrated to be involved in pathogen-induced NO-production. However, the search for inducers of NO synthesis is difficult because of the still ambiguous enzymatic source of NO. Accumulation of NO triggers signal transduction by other second messengers. Here we depict NON-EXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED 1 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as central redox switches translating NO redox signalling into cellular responses. Although the exact position of NO in defence signal networks is unresolved at last some NO-related signal cascades are emerging.

  5. Carbon monoxide enhances salt tolerance by nitric oxide-mediated maintenance of ion homeostasis and up-regulation of antioxidant defence in wheat seedling roots.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yanjie; Ling, Tengfang; Han, Yi; Liu, Kaili; Zheng, Qingsong; Huang, Liqin; Yuan, Xingxing; He, Ziyi; Hu, Bing; Fang, Lei; Shen, Zhenguo; Yang, Qing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2008-12-01

    Salt stress induced an increase in endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) production and the activity of the CO synthetic enzyme haem oxygenase (HO) in wheat seedling roots. In addition, a 50% CO aqueous solution, applied daily, not only resulted in the enhancement of CO release, but led to a significant reversal in dry weight (DW) and water loss caused by 150 mm NaCl treatment, which was mimicked by the application of two nitric oxide (NO) donors sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and diethylenetriamine NO adduct (DETA/NO). Further analyses showed that CO, as well as SNP, apparently up-regulated H(+)-pump and antioxidant enzyme activities or related transcripts, thus resulting in the increase of K/Na ratio and the alleviation of oxidative damage. Whereas, the CO/NO scavenger haemoglobin (Hb), NO scavenger or synthetic inhibitor methylene blue (MB) or N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) differentially blocked these effects. Furthermore, CO was able to mimic the effect of SNP by strongly increasing NO release in the root tips, whereas the CO-induced NO signal was quenched by the addition of l-NAME or cPTIO, the specific scavenger of NO. The results suggested that CO might confer an increased tolerance to salinity stress by maintaining ion homeostasis and enhancing antioxidant system parameters in wheat seedling roots, both of which were partially mediated by NO signal.

  6. Cold defence responses: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Dusko P; Grubor-Lajsic, Gordana N; Spasic, Mihajlo B

    2011-01-01

    Low temperatures provoke increased production of heat accompanied by increased respiration, oxygen consumption and the production of partially reduced oxygen species called ROS. ROS induce different forms of cellular oxidative damage, disturb the redox state and can change the activity of several metabolic enzymes. Organisms have developed a functionally connected set of anti-oxidant enzymes and low molecular mass compounds (together termed the ADS) that metabolise primary ROS. If ROS production within cells overwhelms the ADS, oxidative damage arises and oxidative stress can occur. Short-term cold exposure in endotherms leads to oxidative stress. As cold exposure persists organisms develop adaptive changes toward reducing ROS production and increasing the ADS. In contrast, heterotherms and ectotherms as a normal part of their over-wintering strategy slow down metabolism, oxygen consumption and subsequently cause ROS production. Increased baseline activity of key anti-oxidant enzymes as well as 'secondary' enzymatic defence and/or glutathione levels in preparation for a putative oxidative stressful situation arising from tissue re-oxygenation seems to be the preferred evolutionary adaptation of such animals exposed to low environmental temperatures.

  7. Identification of plant defence regulators through transcriptional profiling of Arabidopsis thaliana cdd1 mutant.

    PubMed

    Swain, Swadhin; Singh, Nidhi; Nandi, Ashis Kumar

    2015-03-01

    A sustainable balance between defence and growth is essential for optimal fitness under pathogen stress. Plants activate immune response at the cost of normal metabolic requirements. Thus, plants that constitutively activate defence are deprived of growth. Arabidopsis thaliana mutant constitutive defence without defect in growth and development1 (cdd1) is an exception. The cdd1 mutant is constitutive for salicylic acid accumulation, signalling, and defence against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens, without having much impact on growth. Thus, cdd1 offers an ideal genetic background to identify novel regulators of plant defence. Here we report the differential gene expression profile between cdd1 and wild-type plants as obtained by microarray hybridization. Expression of several defence-related genes also supports constitutive activation of defence in cdd1. We screened T-DNA insertion mutant lines of selected genes, for resistance against virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000). Through bacterial resistance, callose deposition and pathogenesis-associated expression analyses, we identified four novel regulators of plant defence. Resistance levels in the mutants suggest that At2g19810 and [rom] At5g05790 are positive regulators, whereas At1g61370 and At3g42790 are negative regulators of plant defence against bacterial pathogens.

  8. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species.

    PubMed

    Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Paital, Biswaranjan; Dandapat, Jagneswar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons.

  9. An Overview of Seasonal Changes in Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defence Parameters in Some Invertebrate and Vertebrate Species

    PubMed Central

    Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda; Paital, Biswaranjan; Dandapat, Jagneswar

    2016-01-01

    Antioxidant defence system, a highly conserved biochemical mechanism, protects organisms from harmful effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a by-product of metabolism. Both invertebrates and vertebrates are unable to modify environmental physical factors such as photoperiod, temperature, salinity, humidity, oxygen content, and food availability as per their requirement. Therefore, they have evolved mechanisms to modulate their metabolic pathways to cope their physiology with changing environmental challenges for survival. Antioxidant defences are one of such biochemical mechanisms. At low concentration, ROS regulates several physiological processes, whereas at higher concentration they are toxic to organisms because they impair cellular functions by oxidizing biomolecules. Seasonal changes in antioxidant defences make species able to maintain their correct ROS titre to take various physiological functions such as hibernation, aestivation, migration, and reproduction against changing environmental physical parameters. In this paper, we have compiled information available in the literature on seasonal variation in antioxidant defence system in various species of invertebrates and vertebrates. The primary objective was to understand the relationship between varied biological phenomena seen in different animal species and conserved antioxidant defence system with respect to seasons. PMID:27127682

  10. Nitric oxide, antioxidants and prooxidants in plant defence responses

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Felicitas; Durner, Jörg; Gaupels, Frank

    2013-01-01

    In plant cells the free radical nitric oxide (NO) interacts both with anti- as well as prooxidants. This review provides a short survey of the central roles of ascorbate and glutathione—the latter alone or in conjunction with S-nitrosoglutathione reductase—in controlling NO bioavailability. Other major topics include the regulation of antioxidant enzymes by NO and the interplay between NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Under stress conditions NO regulates antioxidant enzymes at the level of activity and gene expression, which can cause either enhancement or reduction of the cellular redox status. For instance chronic NO production during salt stress induced the antioxidant system thereby increasing salt tolerance in various plants. In contrast, rapid NO accumulation in response to strong stress stimuli was occasionally linked to inhibition of antioxidant enzymes and a subsequent rise in hydrogen peroxide levels. Moreover, during incompatible Arabidopsis thaliana-Pseudomonas syringae interactions ROS burst and cell death progression were shown to be terminated by S-nitrosylation-triggered inhibition of NADPH oxidases, further highlighting the multiple roles of NO during redox-signaling. In chemical reactions between NO and ROS reactive nitrogen species (RNS) arise with characteristics different from their precursors. Recently, peroxynitrite formed by the reaction of NO with superoxide has attracted much attention. We will describe putative functions of this molecule and other NO derivatives in plant cells. Non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHb) were proposed to act in NO degradation. Additionally, like other oxidases nsHb is also capable of catalyzing protein nitration through a nitrite- and hydrogen peroxide-dependent process. The physiological significance of the described findings under abiotic and biotic stress conditions will be discussed with a special emphasis on pathogen-induced programmed cell death (PCD). PMID:24198820

  11. Osmotic stress-induced polyamine oxidation mediates defence responses and reduces stress-enhanced grapevine susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Hatmi, Saloua; Trotel-Aziz, Patricia; Villaume, Sandra; Couderchet, Michel; Clément, Christophe; Aziz, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic factors inducing osmotic stress can influence the plant immune response and resistance to pathogen infections. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol (PEG)- and sucrose-induced osmotic stress on polyamine (PA) homeostasis and the basal immune response in grapevine plantlets before and after Botrytis cinerea infection was determined. Pharmacological approaches were also addressed to assess the contribution of osmotic stress-induced PA oxidation to the regulation of defence responses and the susceptibility of grapevine to B. cinerea. Following osmotic stress or pathogen infection, PA homeostasis was linked to enhanced activity of diamine oxidases (CuAO) and PA oxidases (PAO) and the production of 1,3-diaminopropane. These responses paralleled the accumulation of the main stilbenic phytoalexins, resveratrol and ε-viniferin and upregulation of gene transcripts including STS (a stilbene synthase), PR-2 (a β-1,3-glucanase), PR3-4c (acidic chitinase IV), and PR-5 (a thaumatin-like protein), as well as NCED2 involved in abscisic acid biosynthesis. It was also demonstrated that leaves pre-exposed to osmotic stress and later inoculated with B. cinerea showed enhanced PA accumulation and attenuation of CuAO and PAO activities. This was consistent with the impaired production of phytoalexins and transcript levels of defence- and stress-related genes following infection, and the enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea. Pharmacological experiments revealed that, under osmotic stress conditions, CuAO and PAO were involved in PA homeostasis and in the regulation of defence responses. Specific inhibition of CuAO and PAO in osmotically stressed leaves strongly attenuated the induction of defence responses triggered by B. cinerea infection and enhanced susceptibility to the pathogen. Taken together, this study reveals a contribution of PA catabolism to the resistance state through modulation of immune response in grapevine following osmotic stress and/or after B

  12. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Linda C; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-10-07

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity.

  13. Dopamine is a key regulator in the signalling pathway underlying predator-induced defences in Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Linda C.; Leese, Florian; Laforsch, Christian; Tollrian, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The waterflea Daphnia is a model to investigate the genetic basis of phenotypic plasticity resulting from one differentially expressed genome. Daphnia develops adaptive phenotypes (e.g. morphological defences) thwarting predators, based on chemical predator cue perception. To understand the genomic basis of phenotypic plasticity, the description of the precedent cellular and neuronal mechanisms is fundamental. However, key regulators remain unknown. All neuronal and endocrine stimulants were able to modulate but not induce defences, indicating a pathway of interlinked steps. A candidate able to link neuronal with endocrine responses is the multi-functional amine dopamine. We here tested its involvement in trait formation in Daphnia pulex and Daphnia longicephala using an induction assay composed of predator cues combined with dopaminergic and cholinergic stimulants. The mere application of both stimulants was sufficient to induce morphological defences. We determined dopamine localization in cells found in close association with the defensive trait. These cells serve as centres controlling divergent morphologies. As a mitogen and sclerotization agent, we anticipate that dopamine is involved in proliferation and structural formation of morphological defences. Furthermore, dopamine pathways appear to be interconnected with endocrine pathways, and control juvenile hormone and ecdysone levels. In conclusion, dopamine is suggested as a key regulator of phenotypic plasticity. PMID:26423840

  14. [Research of antioxidant defence system under alimentary induced oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Iu V; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Vasil'ev, A V

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary induced oxidative stress and its corrections in children and adults with homocysteine metabolism disorder are urgent problems for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease prophylactics. For determination antioxidant status GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities were detected. Effectiveness of Se-contained antioxidant complex "Selenec" was determined in experimental model with pubertal male Wistar rats. Including high value of methionine to semipurified diet with pyridoxine and folate deficiency induced oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation substances were increased in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aortal endothelium and myocardium. GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities decreased significant compared to control. "Selenec" supplementation caused a decrease of thiobarbituric-reactive substances level, increasing SOD and catalase activity and decreasing GSH-Px and GSH-reductase activity in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aorta and myocardium.

  15. Respiratory nitrogen metabolism and nitrosative stress defence in ϵ-proteobacteria: the role of NssR-type transcription regulators.

    PubMed

    Kern, Melanie; Winkler, Christine; Simon, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    ϵ-Proteobacteria form a globally ubiquitous group of ecologically significant organisms and comprise a diverse range of host-associated and free-living species. To grow by anaerobic respiration, many ϵ-proteobacteria reduce nitrate to nitrite followed by either nitrite ammonification or denitrification. Using the ammonifying model organisms Wolinella succinogenes and Campylobacter jejuni, the electron transport chains of nitrate respiration, respiratory nitrite ammonification and even N2O (nitrous oxide) respiration have been characterized in recent years, but knowledge on nitrosative stress defence, nitrogen compound-sensing and corresponding signal transduction pathways is limited. The potentially dominant role of NssR (nitrosative stress-sensing regulator)-type transcription regulators in ϵ-proteobacterial nitrogen metabolism is discussed.

  16. Enterococcus faecalis zinc-responsive proteins mediate bacterial defence against zinc overload, lysozyme and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Abrantes, Marta C; Kok, Jan; Silva Lopes, Maria de Fátima

    2014-12-01

    Two Enterococcus faecalis genes encoding the P-type ATPase EF1400 and the putative SapB protein EF0759 were previously shown to be strongly upregulated in the presence of high concentrations of zinc. In the present work, we showed that a Zn(2+)-responsive DNA-binding motif (zim) is present in the promoter regions of these genes. Both proteins were further studied with respect to their involvement in zinc homeostasis and invasion of the host. EF0759 contributed to intramacrophage survival by an as-yet unknown mechanism(s). EF1400, here renamed ZntAEf, is an ATPase with specificity for zinc and plays a role in dealing with several host defences, i.e. zinc overload, oxidative stress and lysozyme; it provides E. faecalis cells with the ability to survive inside macrophages. As these three host defence mechanisms are important at several sites in the host, i.e. inside macrophages and in saliva, this work suggested that ZntAEf constitutes a crucial E. faecalis defence mechanism that is likely to contribute to the ability of this bacterium to endure life inside its host.

  17. The ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, TaU4 regulates wheat defence against the phytopathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

    PubMed Central

    Millyard, Linda; Lee, Jack; Zhang, Cunjin; Yates, Gary; Sadanandom, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Mycosphaerella graminicola (Zymoseptoria tritici commonly known as Septoria), the causal agent of Septoria Leaf Blotch (STB), is considered one of the major threats to European wheat production. Previous studies have shown the importance of ubiquitination in plant defence against a multitude of pathogens. However the ubiquitination machinery in wheat is under studied, particularly E2 enzymes that have the ability to control the ubiquitination and thereby the fate of many different target proteins. In this study we identify an E2 enzyme, Triticum aestivum Ubiquitin conjugating enzyme 4 (TaU4) that functions in wheat defence against Septoria. We demonstrate TaU4 to be a bona fide E2 enzyme through an E2 charging assay. TaU4 localises in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore potentially interacting with E3 ligases and substrate proteins in multiple compartments. Virus Induced Gene Silencing of TaU4 in wheat leaves resulted in delayed development of disease symptoms, reduced Septoria growth and reproduction. We conclude that TaU4 is a novel negative regulator of defence against Septoria. PMID:27759089

  18. Polyphenol Stilbenes: Molecular Mechanisms of Defence against Oxidative Stress and Aging-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Reinisalo, Mika; Kårlund, Anna; Koskela, Ali; Kaarniranta, Kai; Karjalainen, Reijo O.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted the key roles of oxidative stress and inflammation in aging-related diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In aging cells, the natural antioxidant capacity decreases and the overall efficiency of reparative systems against cell damage becomes impaired. There is convincing data that stilbene compounds, a diverse group of natural defence phenolics, abundant in grapes, berries, and conifer bark waste, may confer a protective effect against aging-related diseases. This review highlights recent data helping to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the stilbene-mediated protection against oxidative stress. The impact of stilbenes on the nuclear factor-erythroid-2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) mediated cellular defence against oxidative stress as well as the potential roles of SQSTM1/p62 protein in Nrf2/Keap1 signaling and autophagy will be summarized. The therapeutic potential of stilbene compounds against the most common aging-related diseases is discussed. PMID:26180583

  19. Prioritizing plant defence over growth through WRKY regulation facilitates infestation by non-target herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ran; Zhang, Jin; Li, Jiancai; Zhou, Guoxin; Wang, Qi; Bian, Wenbo; Erb, Matthias; Lou, Yonggen

    2015-01-01

    Plants generally respond to herbivore attack by increasing resistance and decreasing growth. This prioritization is achieved through the regulation of phytohormonal signaling networks. However, it remains unknown how this prioritization affects resistance against non-target herbivores. In this study, we identify WRKY70 as a specific herbivore-induced, mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated rice transcription factor that physically interacts with W-box motifs and prioritizes defence over growth by positively regulating jasmonic acid (JA) and negatively regulating gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis upon attack by the chewing herbivore Chilo suppressalis. WRKY70-dependent JA biosynthesis is required for proteinase inhibitor activation and resistance against C. suppressalis. In contrast, WRKY70 induction increases plant susceptibility against the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. Experiments with GA-deficient rice lines identify WRKY70-dependent GA signaling as the causal factor in N. lugens susceptibility. Our study shows that prioritizing defence over growth leads to a significant resistance trade-off with important implications for the evolution and agricultural exploitation of plant immunity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04805.001 PMID:26083713

  20. Molecular modifications by regulating cAMP signaling and oxidant-antioxidant defence mechanisms, produce antidepressant-like effect: A possible mechanism of etazolate aftermaths of impact accelerated traumatic brain injury in rat model.

    PubMed

    Jindal, Ankur; Mahesh, Radhakrishnan; Bhatt, Shvetank; Pandey, Dilip

    2016-12-14

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading cause of psychiatric conditions in patients, amongst which, depression and anxiety are more frequent. Despite the preclinical antidepressant-like effects, clinical development of Phospodiesterase-4 (PDE4) enzyme inhibitors has been hampered due to serious side effect profiles, such as nausea and vomiting. Etazolate (ETZ) is a new generation PDE4 inhibitor with encouraging safety and tolerance profiles. In our previous studies we have addressed that ETZ produces antidepressant-like effects in animal models of depression, however, the underlying mechanism(s) following TBI have not been completely explored. Impact accelerated TBI by weight drop method causes depression-like behavioral deficits in modified open field exploration, hyper-emotionality and sucrose consumption paradigms. TBI not only causes immediate mechanical damage to the brain, but also induces biochemical changes that lead to delayed neural cell loss leading to a secondary injury. The present study examines the antidepressant effects of ETZ on the TBI-induced depression-like behavior deficits and attempts to explore the underlying mechanism. In order to understand the underlying pathology of TBI and mechanism(s) of ETZ in TBI molecular markers namely, brain cAMP, cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) were estimated. Additionally, the level of oxidative (lipid peroxidation) & nitrosative (nitrite) stress markers, along with antioxidant enzymes markers, such as, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were measured. Furthermore, the involvement of hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis activity in underlying mechanism was also investigated by measuring serum corticosterone (CORT) level. The results revealed that TBI significantly altered cAMP, pCREB and BDNF levels. Moreover, a significant increase in oxidative-nitrosative stress markers levels, while, significant

  1. Antioxidant defences and oxidative damage in salt-treated olive plants under contrasting sunlight irradiance.

    PubMed

    Melgar, Juan Carlos; Guidi, Lucia; Remorini, Damiano; Agati, Giovanni; Degl'innocenti, Elena; Castelli, Silvana; Camilla Baratto, Maria; Faraloni, Cecilia; Tattini, Massimiliano

    2009-09-01

    The interactive effects of root-zone salinity and sunlight on leaf biochemistry, with special emphasis on antioxidant defences, were analysed in Olea europaea L. cv. Allora, during the summer period. Plants were grown outside under 15% (shade plants) or 100% sunlight (sun plants) and supplied with 0 or 125 mM NaCl. The following measurements were performed: (1) the contribution of ions and soluble carbohydrates to osmotic potentials; (2) the photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry and the photosynthetic pigment concentration; (3) the concentration and the tissue-specific distribution of leaf flavonoids; (4) the activity of antioxidant enzymes; and (5) the leaf oxidative damage. The concentrations of Na(+) and Cl(-) were significantly greater in sun than in shade leaves, as also observed for the concentration of the 'antioxidant' sugar-alcohol mannitol. The de-epoxidation state of violaxanthin-cycle pigments increased in response to salinity stress in sun leaves. This finding agrees with a greater maximal PSII photochemistry (F(v)/F(m)) at midday, detected in salt-treated than in control plants, growing in full sunshine. By contrast, salt-treated plants in the shade suffered from midday depression in F(v)/F(m) to a greater degree than that observed in control plants. The high concentration of violaxanthin-cycle pigments in sun leaves suggests that zeaxanthin may protect the chloroplast from photo-oxidative damage, rather than dissipating excess excitation energy via non-photochemical quenching mechanisms. Dihydroxy B-ring-substituted flavonoid glycosides accumulate greatly in the mesophyll, not only in the epidermal cells, in response to high sunlight. The activity of antioxidant enzymes varied little because of sunlight irradiance, but declined sharply in response to high salinity in shade leaves. Interestingly, control and particularly salt-treated plants in the shade underwent greater oxidative damage than their sunny counterparts. These findings, which conform to

  2. Cyclo(His-Pro) promotes cytoprotection by activating Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of antioxidant defence

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, Alba; Conte, Carmela; Grottelli, Silvia; Bellezza, Maria; Cacciatore, Ivana; Bolaños, Juan P

    2009-01-01

    Hystidyl-proline [cyclo(His-Pro)] is an endogenous cyclic dipeptide produced by the cleavage of thyrotropin releasing hormone. Previous studies have shown that cyclo(His-Pro) protects against oxidative stress, although the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we addressed this issue and found that cyclo(His-Pro) triggered nuclear accumulation of NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor that up-regulates antioxidant-/electrophile-responsive element (ARE-EpRE)-related genes, in PC12 cells. Cyclo(His-Pro) attenuated reactive oxygen species production, and prevented glutathione depletion caused by glutamate, rotenone, paraquat and β-amyloid treatment. Moreover, real-time PCR analyses revealed that cyclo(His-Pro) induced the expression of a number of ARE-related genes and protected cells against hydrogen peroxide-mediated apoptotic death. Furthermore, these effects were abolished by RNA interference-mediated Nrf2 knockdown. Finally, pharmacological inhibition of p-38 MAPK partially prevented both cyclo(His-Pro)-mediated Nrf2 activation and cellular protection. These results suggest that the signalling mechanism responsible for the cytoprotective actions of cyclo(His-Pro) would involve p-38 MAPK activation leading to Nrf2-mediated up-regulation of antioxidant cellular defence. PMID:18373731

  3. Negative regulation of defence and stress genes by EAR-motif-containing repressors.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2006-03-01

    Although positive control or activation mechanism(s) involved in plant defence- and stress-related gene expression is relatively well studied, little is known about what keeps defensive armoury under control when not needed. Recent reports suggest that transcriptional repression of gene expression by EAR-motif-containing repressor proteins plays a key role in modulating plant defence and stress responses.

  4. Defence Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana to Infection by Pseudomonas syringae Are Regulated by the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Vaibhav; Meier, Stuart; Petersen, Lindsay N.; Ingle, Robert A.; Roden, Laura C.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock allows plants to anticipate predictable daily changes in abiotic stimuli, such as light; however, whether the clock similarly allows plants to anticipate interactions with other organisms is unknown. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) has circadian clock-mediated variation in resistance to the virulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000), with plants being least susceptible to infection in the subjective morning. We suggest that the increased resistance to Pst DC3000 observed in the morning in Col-0 plants results from clock-mediated modulation of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-triggered immunity. Analysis of publicly available microarray data revealed that a large number of Arabidopsis defence-related genes showed both diurnal- and circadian-regulation, including genes involved in the perception of the PAMP flagellin which exhibit a peak in expression in the morning. Accordingly, we observed that PAMP-triggered callose deposition was significantly higher in wild-type plants inoculated with Pst DC3000 hrpA in the subjective morning than in the evening, while no such temporal difference was evident in arrhythmic plants. Our results suggest that PAMP-triggered immune responses are modulated by the circadian clock and that temporal regulation allows plants to anticipate and respond more effectively to pathogen challenges in the daytime. PMID:22066021

  5. Effects of depleted uranium on oxidative stress, detoxification, and defence parameters of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Gagnaire, Beatrice; Cavalie, Isabelle; Camilleri, Virginie; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of depleted uranium (DU), the by-product of nuclear enrichment of uranium, on several parameters related to oxidative stress, detoxification, and the defence system in the zebrafish Danio rerio. Several parameters were recorded: phenoloxidase-like (PO) activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and 7-ethoxyresrufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity. Experiments were performed on adult and larvae D. rerio. Adult fish were exposed for 28 days at 20 μg U/L followed by a 27-day depuration period. Eggs of D. rerio were exposed for 4 days at 0, 20, 100, 250, 500, and 1,000 μg U/L. Results showed that DU increased ROS production both in adult and in larvae even at the low concentrations tested and even during the depuration period for adult D. rerio. DU also modified PO-like activity, both in the D. rerio adult and larvae experiments, but in a more transient manner. EROD activity was not modified by DU, but sex effects were shown. Results are discussed by way of comparison with other known effects of uranium in fish. Overall, these results show that the mechanisms of action of DU in fish tend to be similar to the ones existing for mammals. These results encourage the development and use of innate immune biomarkers to understand the effects of uranium and, more generally, radionuclides on the fish immune system.

  6. Cortical microtubule as a sensor and target of nitric oxide signal during the defence responses to Verticillium dahliae toxins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Fu-Mei; Yao, Lin-Lin; Pei, Bao-Lei; Zhou, Qun; Li, Xiu-Li; Li, Yun; Li, Ying-Zhang

    2009-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms of signal transduction of plants in response to Verticillium dahliae (VD) are not known. Here, we show that Arabidopsis reacts to VD-toxins with a rapid burst of nitric oxide (NO) and cortical microtubule destabilization. VD-toxins treatment triggered a disruption of cortical microtubules network. This disruption can be influenced by NO production. However, cortical microtubule disruptions were not involved in regulating the NO production. The results indicated that NO may act as an upstream signalling molecule to trigger the depolymerization of cortical microtubule. Cortical microtubules may act as a target of NO signal and as a sensor to mediate the activation of PR-1 gene expression. These results suggested that NO production and cortical microtubule dynamics appeared to be parts of the important signalling system and are involved in the defence mechanisms to VD-toxins in Arabidopsis.

  7. Antioxidant defence system during exponential and stationary growth phases of Phycomyces blakesleeanus: response to oxidative stress by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Cristina; del Valle, Pilar; Rúa, Javier; García-Armesto, María Rosario; Gutiérrez-Larraínzar, Marta; Busto, Félix; de Arriaga, Dolores

    2013-04-01

    An analysis of the components of the antioxidant defence system in exponential and stationary growth phases of filamentous fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus and the response to the oxidative stress hydrogen peroxide were performed. There is a strong positive correlation between mycelial antioxidant capacity and the contents of gallic acid, d-erythroascorbate (d-EAA) or d-erythroascorbate monoglucoside (d-EAAG). These secondary metabolites are specifically synthesized by this fungus and reach maximal values in the stationary growth phase, suggesting that they can play some role in the antioxidant defence system of this fungus. There is a differential expression of the two more notable antioxidant activities, catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), depending of the growth stage of P. blakesleeanus, CAT being expressed in the exponential and SOD in the stationary phase. Phycomyces blakesleeanus showed a high resistance to the oxidative stress caused by H2O2 (50 and 200 mM) which was higher in exponential phase. This higher resistance can be explained by the presence of CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the probable contribution of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and high levels of reduced form of glutathione (GSH). The transition to stationary phase was accompanied with a higher physiological oxidative damage illustrated by the higher protein carbonylation. In this growth stage the resistance of the fungus to the oxidative stress caused by H2O2 could be explained by the presence of SOD, GPx, and the probable contribution of GST as well as of secondary metabolites, mainly d-EAA and d-EAAG. These results highlight a specific response to oxidative stress by H2O2 depending on the growth phase of P. blakesleeanus.

  8. Functional analysis of Arabidopsis immune-related MAPKs uncovers a role for MPK3 as negative regulator of inducible defences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key regulators of immune responses in animals and plants. In Arabidopsis, perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) activates the MAPKs MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6. Increasing information depicts the molecular events activated by MAMPs in plants, but the specific and cooperative contributions of the MAPKs in these signalling events are largely unclear. Results In this work, we analyse the behaviour of MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 mutants in early and late immune responses triggered by the MAMP flg22 from bacterial flagellin. A genome-wide transcriptome analysis reveals that 36% of the flg22-upregulated genes and 68% of the flg22-downregulated genes are affected in at least one MAPK mutant. So far MPK4 was considered as a negative regulator of immunity, whereas MPK3 and MPK6 were believed to play partially redundant positive functions in defence. Our work reveals that MPK4 is required for the regulation of approximately 50% of flg22-induced genes and we identify a negative role for MPK3 in regulating defence gene expression, flg22-induced salicylic acid accumulation and disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae. Among the MAPK-dependent genes, 27% of flg22-upregulated genes and 76% of flg22-downregulated genes require two or three MAPKs for their regulation. The flg22-induced MAPK activities are differentially regulated in MPK3 and MPK6 mutants, both in amplitude and duration, revealing a highly interdependent network. Conclusions These data reveal a new set of distinct functions for MPK3, MPK4 and MPK6 and indicate that the plant immune signalling network is choreographed through the interplay of these three interwoven MAPK pathways. PMID:24980080

  9. Defence against oxidative stress in two species of land snails (Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa) subjected to estivation.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Anna; Caputa, Michał; Rogalska, Justyna

    2011-12-01

    During summer, land snails are exposed to estivation/arousal cycles that imposes oxidative stress, but they exhibit different patterns of antioxidant defence. To test the ability of two related species, Helix pomatia and Helix aspersa, to modulate their antioxidant defence mechanism during estivation/arousal cycles, we examined activities of catalase and glutathione-related enzymes and concentrations of glutathione and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS; as products of lipid peroxidation). In both species, estivation evoked changes in activity of total and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx), but did not affect activity of catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione transferase, and had no effect on concentration of glutathione. Activity of catalase in estivating snails, instead of the expected increase, showed a tendency to diminish. Extremely low activities of catalase in the foot were usually associated with extremely high activities of both forms of GPx. In conclusion, maintenance of relatively high activities of the antioxidant enzymes and accumulation of glutathione, resulting in a low and stable concentration of TBARS, plays an important role in scavenging oxygen free radicals from the organism of both species.

  10. Gene coevolution and regulation lock cyclic plant defence peptides to their targets.

    PubMed

    Gilding, Edward K; Jackson, Mark A; Poth, Aaron G; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Prentis, Peter J; Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Craik, David J

    2016-04-01

    Plants have evolved many strategies to protect themselves from attack, including peptide toxins that are ribosomally synthesized and thus adaptable directly by genetic polymorphisms. Certain toxins in Clitoria ternatea (butterfly pea) are cyclic cystine-knot peptides of c. 30 residues, called cyclotides, which have co-opted the plant's albumin-1 gene family for their production. How butterfly pea albumin-1 genes were commandeered and how these cyclotides are utilized in defence remain unclear. The role of cyclotides in host plant ecology and biotechnological applications requires exploration. We characterized the sequence diversity and expression dynamics of precursor and processing proteins implicated in butterfly pea cyclotide biosynthesis by expression profiling through RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). Peptide-enriched extracts from various organs were tested for activity against insect-like membranes and the model nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that the evolution and deployment of cyclotides involved their diversification to exhibit different chemical properties and expression between organs facing different defensive challenges. Cyclotide-enriched fractions from soil-contacting organs were effective at killing nematodes, whereas similar enriched fractions from aerial organs contained cyclotides that exhibited stronger interactions with insect-like membrane lipids. Cyclotides are employed as versatile and combinatorial mediators of defence in C. ternatea and have specialized to affect different classes of attacking organisms.

  11. CYP94-mediated jasmonoyl-isoleucine hormone oxidation shapes jasmonate profiles and attenuates defence responses to Botrytis cinerea infection

    PubMed Central

    Aubert, Yann; Widemann, Emilie; Miesch, Laurence; Pinot, Franck; Heitz, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Induced resistance to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea depends on jasmonate metabolism and signalling in Arabidopsis. We have presented here extensive jasmonate profiling in this pathosystem and investigated the impact of the recently reported jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile) catabolic pathway mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP94) enzymes. Using a series of mutant and overexpressing (OE) plant lines, we showed that CYP94B3 and CYP94C1 are integral components of the fungus-induced jasmonate metabolic pathway and control the abundance of oxidized conjugated but also some unconjugated derivatives, such as sulfated 12-HSO4-JA. Despite causing JA-Ile overaccumulation due to impaired oxidation, CYP94 deficiency had negligible impacts on resistance, associated with enhanced JAZ repressor transcript levels. In contrast, plants overexpressing (OE) CYP94B3 or CYP94C1 were enriched in 12-OH-JA-Ile or 12-COOH-JA-Ile respectively. This shift towards oxidized JA-Ile derivatives was concomitant with strongly impaired defence gene induction and reduced disease resistance. CYP94B3-OE, but unexpectedly not CYP94C1-OE, plants displayed reduced JA-Ile levels compared with the wild type, suggesting that increased susceptibility in CYP94C1-OE plants may result from changes in the hormone oxidation ratio rather than absolute changes in JA-Ile levels. Consistently, while feeding JA-Ile to seedlings triggered strong induction of JA pathway genes, induction was largely reduced or abolished after feeding with the CYP94 products 12-OH-JA-Ile and 12-COOH-JA-Ile, respectively. This trend paralleled in vitro pull-down assays where 12-COOH-JA-Ile was unable to promote COI1–JAZ9 co-receptor assembly. Our results highlight the dual function of CYP94B3/C1 in antimicrobial defence: by controlling hormone oxidation status for signal attenuation, these enzymes also define JA-Ile as a metabolic hub directing jasmonate profile complexity. PMID:25903915

  12. Crucial Roles of Systemic and Tissue Lipid Peroxidation Levels and Anti-Oxidant Defences Following Contrast Agent Application

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Gungor; Kucuk, Mehmet; Erinc Sitar, Mustafa; Yasar, Ozgur; Aydin, Seval; Yanar, Karolin; Cakatay, Ufuk; Buyukpınarbasili, Nur

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most important side effects of contrast pharmaceutical agents, which are used very common in routine radiology practice, is contrast induced nephropathy. Even ischemia, oxidative stress and osmolality related cytotoxic effects are considered, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology have not been identified completely yet. Objectives The aim of the current study was to reveal the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymatic defence mechanisms in the aetiopathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy. We also studied possible alleviating effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, to obtain extra information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Materials and Methods This is an clinical-experimental study, This study was conducted of Istanbul/Turkey between September 15, 2012 and April 15, 2013. Three groups of male rats were randomly set up as a control group (C), a 100 mg/kg intraperitoneal NAC + 7 mL/kg contrast agent group (N + CIN) and a 7 mL/kg intraperitoneal contrast agent group (CIN). They were placed in individual metabolic cages 48 hours after agent administration to obtain 24-hour urine samples. Renal function tests (albumin, urea, creatinine, total protein) were conducted, oxidative stress parameters (Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase activity - Cu, Zn-SOD; advanced oxidation protein products - AOPP; protein carbonyls - PCO; total thiol groups - T-SH; and lipid hydroperoxides -LHP) were measured and tissues were analysed histopathologically. Results Compared with the control group, groups CIN and N + CIN had significantly higher urea and LHP levels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) and significantly lower Cu, Zn-SOD activity and creatinine clearance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in PCO or AOPP levels despite differences in descriptive statistics. Conclusions Contrast-agent-induced nephropathic changes are more closely related to

  13. First line of defence: the role of sloughing in the regulation of cutaneous microbes in frogs

    PubMed Central

    Cramp, Rebecca L.; McPhee, Rebecca K.; Meyer, Edward A.; Ohmer, Michel E.; Franklin, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphibian populations worldwide are currently experiencing unprecedented declines due to the combined effects of emerging infectious disease and climate change. The skin is the first line of defence in preventing establishment of pathogens and associated infections. Although amphibians undergo regular sloughing of the outer layer of the skin, the potential for regular sloughing to play a role in influencing cutaneous microbial populations and pathogens has been largely overlooked. In the present study, we assessed the effect of skin sloughing on cultivable cutaneous bacterial abundance in the green tree frog (Litoria caerulea). We also examined the effects of temperature and hydric environment on sloughing frequency and microbial re-establishment rates. Our data showed that cultivable cutaneous bacterial abundance was significantly reduced by sloughing events, and frogs kept at ‘summer’ temperatures (23–33°C) sloughed almost twice as frequently as those maintained at ‘winter’ temperatures (13–23°C). No effect of hydric environment on sloughing frequency was observed, but we did find that sloughing in L. caerulea appeared to be linked to ambient light cycles. Examination of the effect of sloughing on microbial recolonization indicated that at cool temperatures, an extended intermoult interval allowed microbial abundance to reach higher levels than at warmer ‘summer’ temperatures (when the intermoult interval was significantly reduced). Our data suggest that sloughing may significantly influence the establishment and/or maintenance of cutaneous bacterial populations (pathogenic, mutualistic and/or commensal) and this, in turn, may be affected by environmental factors, such as ambient light and temperature. These findings are likely to be important for our understanding of the ecology of skin-based pathogens, such as the amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis. PMID:27293633

  14. Comparative analyses of genotoxicity, oxidative stress and antioxidative defence system under exposure of methyl parathion and hexaconazole in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.).

    PubMed

    Dubey, Pragyan; Mishra, Amit Kumar; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-12-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the comparative effects of methyl parathion and hexaconazole on genotoxicity, oxidative stress, antioxidative defence system and photosynthetic pigments in barley (Hordeum vulgare L. variety karan-16). The seeds were exposed with three different concentrations, i.e. 0.05, 0.1 and 0.5 % for 6 h after three pre-soaking durations 7, 17 and 27 h which represents G1, S and G2 phases of the cell cycle, respectively. Ethyl methane sulphonate, a well-known mutagenic agent and double distilled water, was used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The results indicate significant decrease in mitotic index with increasing concentrations of pesticides, and the extent was higher in methyl parathion. Chromosomal aberrations were found more frequent in methyl parathion than hexaconazole as compared to their respective controls. Treatment with the pesticides induced oxidative stress which was evident with higher contents of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation, and the increase was more prominent in methyl parathion. Contents of total phenolics were increased; however, soluble protein content showed a reverse trend. Among the enzymatic antioxidants, activities of superoxide dismutase and peroxidase were significantly up-regulated, and more increase was noticed in hexaconazole. Increments in total chlorophyll and carotenoid contents were observed up to 0.1 % but decreased at higher concentration (0.5 %), and the reductions were more prominent in methyl parathion than hexaconazole as compared to their respective controls. Methyl parathion treatment caused more damage in the plant cells of barley as compared to hexaconazole, which may be closely related to higher genotoxicity and oxidative stress.

  15. Reactive oxygen species and anti-oxidant defences in swine follicular fluids.

    PubMed

    Basini, Giuseppina; Simona, Bussolati; Santini, Sujen Eleonora; Grasselli, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the pro-oxidant/anti-oxidant balance inside the ovarian follicle plays an important role in folliculogenesis. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the redox status of follicular fluids collected from different-sized swine follicles. We quantified the most important reactive oxygen species (ROS), namely superoxide anion (O(2)(-)), hydrogen peroxide and hydroperoxides (ROOH); in addition, we examined the activity of the detoxifying enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase and the total non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity as determined by the ferric-reducing anti-oxidant power assay. Our data demonstrate that oxidative stress does not affect follicle growth because O(2)(-) levels do not change during follicle development, whereas concentrations of H2O2 and ROOH are reduced (P < 0.05). Surprisingly, all non-enzymatic and enzymatic scavengers examined in the present study, except for CAT, demonstrated reduced activity during follicle development (P < 0.05). Taken together, these results suggest that other factors could be involved in ROS detoxification during follicle development.

  16. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  17. Detrimental role of endogenous nitric oxide in host defence against Sporothrix schenckii

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Karla Simone S; Neto, Edward Helal; Brito, Marcelly M S; Silva, João S; Cunha, Fernando Q; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2008-01-01

    We earlier demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) is a fungicidal molecule against Sporothrix schenckii in vitro. In the present study we used mice deficient in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS–/–) and C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice treated with Nω-nitro-arginine (Nitro-Arg-treated mice), an NOS inhibitor, both defective in the production of reactive nitrogen intermediates, to investigate the role of endogenous NO during systemic sporotrichosis. When inoculated with yeast cells of S. schenckii, WT mice presented T-cell suppression and high tissue fungal dissemination, succumbing to infection. Furthermore, susceptibility of mice seems to be related to apoptosis and high interleukin-10 and tumour necrosis factor-α production by spleen cells. In addition, fungicidal activity and NO production by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophages from WT mice were abolished after fungal infection. Strikingly, iNOS–/– and Nitro-Arg-treated mice presented fungal resistance, controlling fungal load in tissues and restoring T-cell activity, as well as producing high amounts of IFN-γ Interestingly, macrophages from these groups of mice presented fungicidal activity after in vitro stimulation with higher doses of IFN-γ. Herein, these results suggest that although NO was an essential mediator to the in vitro killing of S. schenckii by macrophages, the activation of NO system in vivo contributes to the immunosuppression and cytokine balance during early phases of infection with S. schenckii. PMID:18194265

  18. A single blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) portion does not affect markers of antioxidant defence and oxidative stress in healthy volunteers following cigarette smoking.

    PubMed

    Del Bo', Cristian; Porrini, Marisa; Campolo, Jonica; Parolini, Marina; Lanti, Claudia; Klimis-Zacas, Dorothy; Riso, Patrizia

    2016-03-01

    We previously reported that a portion of blueberries reversed endothelial dysfunction induced by acute cigarette smoking. Since smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction is associated with a condition of oxidative stress, we evaluated whether the observed effect was mediated by modulation of markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defence. Fourteen out of 16 male healthy smokers previously enrolled, participated in a three-armed randomized controlled study with the following experimental conditions: smoking treatment (one cigarette); blueberry treatment (300g of blueberries) + smoking (one cigarette); control treatment (300ml of water with sugar) + smoking (one cigarette). The cigarette was smoked 100min after blueberry/control/water consumption. Each treatment was separated by 1 week of washout period. Plasma vitamin (C, B12 and folate) and aminothiol concentrations, endogenous [formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG)-sensitive sites] and oxidatively induced DNA damage (resistance to H2O2-induced DNA damage) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were measured at baseline and 20, 60, 90, 120min and 24h after smoking. On the whole, analysis of variance did not show a significant effect of treatment on the modulation of markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defence but revealed an effect of time for plasma concentrations of vitamin C (P = 0.003), B12 (P < 0.001), folate (P < 0.001), total cysteine (P = 0.007) and cysteine-glycine (P = 0.010) that increased following the three treatments after smoking. No significant effect of treatment was observed for the levels of FPG-sensitive sites (P > 0.05) and H2O2-induced DNA damage (P > 0.05) in PBMCs. In conclusion, the consumption of a single blueberry portion failed to modulate markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defence investigated in our experimental conditions. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this finding and help clarifying the mechanisms of protection of blueberries against

  19. Molecular regulation of sucrose catabolism and sugar transport for development, defence and phloem function.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Wu, Limin; Foster, Ryan; Ruan, Yong-Ling

    2017-03-17

    Sucrose (Suc) is the major end product of photosynthesis in mesophyll cells of most vascular plants. It is loaded into phloem of mature leaves for long-distance translocation to non-photosynthetic organs where it is unloaded for diverse uses. Clearly, Suc transport and metabolism is central to plant growth and development and the functionality of the entire vascular system. Despite of vast information in the literature about the physiological roles of individual sugar metabolic enzymes and transporters, there is a lack of systematic evaluation about their molecular regulation from transcriptional to post-translational levels. Knowledge on this topic is essential for understanding and improving plant development, optimising resource distribution and increasing crop productivity. We therefore focused our analyses on molecular control of key players in Suc metabolism and transport, including (i) the identification of promoter elements responsive to sugars and hormones or targeted by transcription factors and microRNAs degrading transcripts of target genes and (ii) modulation of enzyme and transporter activities through protein-protein interactions and other post-translational modifications. We highlighted major remaining questions and discussed opportunities to exploit current understanding to gain new insights into molecular control of carbon partitioning for improving plant performance.

  20. Role of antioxidant enzymatic defences against oxidative stress H(2)O(2) and the acquisition of oxidative tolerance in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    González-Párraga, Pilar; Hernández, José A; Argüelles, Juan Carlos

    2003-10-30

    In Candida albicans, trehalose plays an essential role as a protector of cell integrity against oxidative challenge. A double homozygous mutant, tps1/tps1, deficient in trehalose synthesis, displayed severe cell mortality when exposed to high H(2)O(2) concentrations, compared with its congenic parental (CAI-4) strain (Alvarez-Peral et al., 2002). We have examined the putative role of a set of well-known antioxidant enzymes as components of the defence mechanism against oxidative challenges. When exposed to mild non-lethal oxidative treatment (0.5 mM H(2)O(2)), a significant induction of catalase, glutathione reductase (GR), and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) was recorded in tps1/tps1 exponential cultures. However, in CAI-4 cells, subjected to the same conditions, there was only a clear activation of catalase, Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD activities. The degree of activation was always much more pronounced in the trehalose-deficient mutant than in its wild-type counterpart, except for Mn-SOD activity. After exposure to severe oxidative stress (50 mM H(2)O(2)) only GR and catalase activities increased in tps1/tps1 cultures, whereas in CAI-4 cells GR but not catalase was induced. In both cell strains, 50 mM H(2)O(2) caused inhibition of the Mn- and Cu,Zn-SOD isozymes, this inhibition being more pronounced in tps1/tps1 cells. C. albicans is able to acquire adaptive oxidative tolerance by pretreatment with a low non-stressing concentration of H(2)O(2) before exposure to a drastic oxidative challenge. When these antioxidant activities were measured during the adaptive response, a greater degree of enzymatic antioxidant induction was consistently observed in the tps1/tps1 mutant with respect to the CAI-4 strain. Together with a higher intrinsic sensitivity of tps1/tps1 cells, we suggest that this unexpected increase might be explained in terms of a compensatory mechanism to overcome the lack of endogenous trehalose upon drastic oxidative exposure, although this induction was

  1. A newly discovered oxidant defence system and its involvement in the development of Aurelia aurita (Scyphozoa, Cnidaria): reactive oxygen species and elemental iodine control medusa formation.

    PubMed

    Berking, Stefan; Czech, Nicole; Gerharz, Melanie; Herrmann, Klaus; Hoffmann, Uwe; Raifer, Hartmann; Sekul, Guy; Siefker, Barbara; Sommerei, Andrea; Vedder, Fritz

    2005-01-01

    In Aurelia aurita, applied iodine induces medusa formation (strobilation). This process also occurs when the temperature is lowered. This was found to increase oxidative stress resulting in an increased production of iodine from iodide. One polyp produces several medusae (initially termed ephyrae) starting at the polyp's oral end. The spreading of strobilation down the body column is controlled by a feedback loop: ephyra anlagen decrease the tyrosine content in adjacent polyp tissue by producing melanin from tyrosine. Endogenous tyrosine is able to remove iodine by forming iodiferous tyrosine compounds. The reduced level of tyrosine causes the ephyra-polyp-border to move towards the basal end of the former polyp. We argue that an oxidant defence system may exist which makes use of iodide and tyrosine. Like other marine invertebrates, polyps of Aurelia contain iodide ions. Inevitably produced peroxides oxidise iodide into iodine. The danger to be harmed by iodine is strongly decreased by endogenous tyrosine which reacts with iodine to form iodiferous tyrosine compounds including thyroxin. Both substances together, iodide and tyrosine, form an efficient oxidant defence system which shields the tissue against damage by reactive oxygen species. In the course of evolution (from a species at the basis of the animal kingdom like Aurelia to a highly evolved species like man) the waste product thyroxin (indicating a high metabolic rate) has developed into a hormone which controls the metabolic rate.

  2. MAP65-1a positively regulates H2O2 amplification and enhances brassinosteroid-induced antioxidant defence in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan; Zuo, Mingxing; Liang, Yali; Jiang, Mingyi; Zhang, Jianhua; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Tan, Mingpu; Zhang, Aying

    2013-09-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR)-induced antioxidant defence has been shown to enhance stress tolerance. In this study, the role of the maize 65 kDa microtubule-associated protein (MAP65), ZmMAP65-1a, in BR-induced antioxidant defence was investigated. Treatment with BR increased the expression of ZmMAP65-1a in maize (Zea mays) leaves and mesophyll protoplasts. Transient expression and RNA interference silencing of ZmMAP65-1a in mesophyll protoplasts further revealed that ZmMAP65-1a is required for the BR-induced increase in expression and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). Both exogenous and BR-induced endogenous H2O2 increased the expression of ZmMAP65-1a. Conversely, transient expression of ZmMAP65-1a in maize mesophyll protoplasts enhanced BR-induced H2O2 accumulation, while transient silencing of ZmMAP65-1a blocked the BR-induced expression of NADPH oxidase genes and inhibited BR-induced H2O2 accumulation. Inhibiting the activity and gene expression of ZmMPK5 significantly prevented the BR-induced expression of ZmMAP65-1a. Likewise, transient expression of ZmMPK5 enhanced BR-induced activities of the antioxidant defence enzymes SOD and APX in a ZmMAP65- 1a-dependent manner. ZmMPK5 directly interacted with ZmMAP65-1a in vivo and phosphorylated ZmMAP65-1a in vitro. These results suggest that BR-induced antioxidant defence in maize operates through the interaction of ZmMPK5 with ZmMAP65-1a. Furthermore, ZmMAP65-1a functions in H2O2 self-propagation via regulation of the expression of NADPH oxidase genes in BR signalling.

  3. Oxidative Stress: A Master Regulator of Plant Trade-Offs?

    PubMed

    Morales, Melanie; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2016-12-01

    Trade-offs between growth, reproduction, and defence have been documented. Oxidative stress is one of the physiological mechanisms that underlie trade-offs at the cellular and organ levels. The diversity of plant life forms and the complexity of scaling up limit our knowledge of oxidative stress as a universal mediator of life-history trade-offs at the organism level. Joint efforts by plant physiologists and ecologists will undoubtedly provide novel insights into this topic in the near future.

  4. Physiological adaptations to reproduction. I. Experimentally increasing litter size enhances aspects of antioxidant defence but does not cause oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Michael; Pichaud, Nicolas; King, Edith D Aloise; Brooks, Robert C

    2013-08-01

    Life history theory suggests that investment in reproduction can trade off against growth, longevity and both reproduction and performance later in life. One possible reason for this trade-off is that reproduction directly causes somatic damage. Oxidative stress, an overproduction of reactive oxygen species in relation to cellular defences, can correlate with reproductive investment and has been implicated as a pathway leading to senescence. This has led to the suggestion that this aspect of physiology could be an important mechanism underlying the trade-off between reproduction and lifespan. We manipulated female reproductive investment to test whether oxidative stress increases with reproduction in mice. Each female's pups were cross-fostered to produce litters of either two or eight, representing low and high levels of reproductive investment for wild mice. No differences were observed between reproductive groups at peak lactation for several markers of oxidative stress in the heart and gastrocnemius muscle. Surprisingly, oxidative damage to proteins was lower in the livers of females with a litter size of eight than in females with two pups or non-reproductive control females. While protein oxidation decreased, activity levels of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase increased in the liver, suggesting this may be one pathway used to protect against oxidative stress. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting correlative relationships and suggest that oxidative stress does not increase with enhanced reproductive effort during lactation.

  5. Rapid evolution of antioxidant defence in a natural population of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Oexle, S; Jansen, M; Pauwels, K; Sommaruga, R; De Meester, L; Stoks, R

    2016-07-01

    Natural populations can cope with rapid changes in stressors by relying on sets of physiological defence mechanisms. Little is known onto what extent these physiological responses reflect plasticity and/or genetic adaptation, evolve in the same direction and result in an increased defence ability. Using resurrection ecology, we studied how a natural Daphnia magna population adjusted its antioxidant defence to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) during a period with increasing incident UVR reaching the water surface. We demonstrate a rapid evolution of the induction patterns of key antioxidant enzymes under UVR exposure in the laboratory. Notably, evolutionary changes strongly differed among enzymes and mainly involved the evolution of UV-induced plasticity. Whereas D. magna evolved a strong plastic up-regulation of glutathione peroxidase under UVR, it evolved a lower plastic up-regulation of glutathione S-transferase and superoxide dismutase and a plastic down-regulation of catalase. The differentially evolved antioxidant strategies were collectively equally effective in dealing with oxidative stress because they resulted in the same high levels of oxidative damage (to lipids, proteins and DNA) and lowered fitness (intrinsic growth rate) under UVR exposure. The lack of better protection against UVR may suggest that the UVR exposure did not increase between both periods. Predator-induced evolution to migrate to lower depths that occurred during the same period may have contributed to the evolved defence strategy. Our results highlight the need for a multiple trait approach when focusing on the evolution of defence mechanisms.

  6. Transcriptional control of plant defence responses.

    PubMed

    Buscaill, Pierre; Rivas, Susana

    2014-08-01

    Mounting of efficient plant defence responses depends on the ability to trigger a rapid defence reaction after recognition of the invading microbe. Activation of plant resistance is achieved by modulation of the activity of multiple transcriptional regulators, both DNA-binding transcription factors and their regulatory proteins, that are able to reprogram transcription in the plant cell towards the activation of defence signalling. Here we provide an overview of recent developments on the transcriptional control of plant defence responses and discuss defence-related hormone signalling, the role of WRKY transcription factors during the regulation of plant responses to pathogens, nuclear functions of plant immune receptor proteins, as well as varied ways by which microbial effectors subvert plant transcriptional reprogramming to promote disease.

  7. Manganese regulation of virulence factors and oxidative stress resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsing-Ju; Seib, Kate L.; Srikhanta, Yogitha N.; Edwards, Jennifer; Kidd, Stephen P.; Maguire, Tina L .; Hamilton, Amanda; Pan, Kuan-Tin; Hsiao, He-Hsuan; Yao, Chen-Wen; Grimmond, Sean M.; Apicella, Michael A.; McEwan, Alastair G.; Wang, Andrew H-J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae has evolved a complex and novel network of oxidative stress responses, including defense mechanisms that are dependent on manganese (Mn). We performed systematic analyses at the transcriptomic and proteomic (1D SDS-PAGE and Isotope-Coded Affinity Tag [ICAT]) levels to investigate the global expression changes that take place in a high Mn environment, which results in a Mn-dependent oxidative stress resistance phenotype. These studies revealed that 97 proteins are regulated at the post-transcriptional level under conditions of increased Mn concentration, including proteins involved in virulence (eg. Pilin, a key adhesin), oxidative stress defence (eg. superoxide dismutase), cellular metabolism, protein synthesis, RNA processing and cell division. Mn regulation of inorganic pyrophosphatase (Ppa) indicated the potential involvement of phosphate metabolism in the Mn-dependent oxidative stress defense. A detailed analysis of the role of Ppa and polyphosphate kinase (Ppk) in the gonococcal oxidative stress response revealed that ppk and ppa mutant strains showed increased resistance to oxidative stress. Investigation of these mutants grown with high Mn suggests that phosphate and pyrophosphate are involved in Mn-dependent oxidative stress resistance. PMID:20004262

  8. Regulation of basal and oxidative stress-triggered jasmonic acid-related gene expression by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi; Mhamdi, Amna; Chaouch, Sejir; Noctor, Graham

    2013-06-01

    Glutathione is a determinant of cellular redox state with roles in defence and detoxification. Emerging concepts suggest that this compound also has functions in cellular signalling. Here, we report evidence that glutathione plays potentially important roles in setting signalling strength through the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway. Firstly, we show that basal expression of JA-related genes is correlated with leaf glutathione content when the latter is manipulated either genetically or pharmacologically. Secondly, analyses of an oxidative stress signalling mutant, cat2, reveal that up-regulation of the JA pathway triggered by intracellular oxidation requires accompanying glutathione accumulation. Genetically blocking this accumulation in a cat2 cad2 line largely annuls H2 O2 -induced expression of JA-linked genes, and this effect can be rescued by exogenously supplying glutathione. While most attention on glutathione functions in biotic stress responses has been focused on the thiol-regulated protein NPR1, a comparison of JA-linked gene expression in cat2 cad2 and cat2 npr1 double mutants provides evidence that glutathione acts through other components to regulate the response of this pathway to oxidative stress. Our study provides new information implicating glutathione as a factor determining basal JA gene expression and suggests novel glutathione-dependent control points that regulate JA signalling in response to intracellular oxidation.

  9. Host defences against Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Romero, G; Quintero, J; Astiazarán-García, H; Velazquez, C

    2015-08-01

    Giardia spp. is a protozoan parasite that inhabits the upper small intestine of mammals and other species and is the aetiological agent of giardiasis. It has been demonstrated that nitric oxide, mast cells and dendritic cells are the first line of defence against Giardia. IL-6 and IL-17 play an important role during infection. Several cytokines possess overlapping functions in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. IgA and CD4(+) T cells are fundamental to the process of Giardia clearance. It has been suggested that CD4(+) T cells play a double role during the anti-Giardia immune response. First, they activate and stimulate the differentiation of B cells to generate Giardia-specific antibodies. Second, they act through a B-cell-independent mechanism that is probably mediated by Th17 cells. Several Giardia proteins that stimulate humoral and cellular immune responses have been described. Variant surface proteins, α-1 giardin, and cyst wall protein 2 can induce host protective responses to future Giardia challenges. The characterization and evaluation of the protective potential of the immunogenic proteins that are associated with Giardia will offer new insights into host-parasite interactions and may aid in the development of an effective vaccine against the parasite.

  10. Functional and toxicological consequences of metabolic bioactivation of methapyrilene via thiophene S-oxidation: Induction of cell defence, apoptosis and hepatic necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, Amy E.; Regan, Sophie L.; Hirst, Charlotte M.; Graham, Emma E.; Antoine, Daniel J.; Benson, Craig A.; Williams, Dominic P. Foster, John; Kenna, J. Gerry; Park, B. Kevin

    2009-09-15

    Methapyrilene, [N,N-dimethyl-N'-pyridyl-N'(2-thienylmethyl)-1,2-ethanediamine] (MP) was withdrawn from, clinical use due to reported periportal hepatic necrosis and hepatocarcinogenicity in the rat, via S-oxidation of the thiophene group. In this study MP is used as a model hepatotoxin to further characterise the functional consequences of S-oxidation of the thiophene group in vivo, in rat models and in vitro, in freshly isolated rat hepatocyte suspensions. In vivo histological studies revealed the early depletion of glutathione (GSH), which was confined to the damaged periportal area, in contrast to an increase in GSH levels in the centrilobular region. Additionally, the induction of cell defence was demonstrated by an increase in the protein levels of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutamate cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC) in vivo. Histological examination demonstrated that cytotoxicity progresses initially via apoptosis before an increase in necrosis over the 3-day administration. An apoptotic-like mechanism was observed in vitro via the measurement of cytochrome c release and caspase activation. Conclusion: This study provides evidence for a complex pathway of MP-induced hepatotoxicity which progresses through early adaptation, apoptosis, necrosis and inflammation, all underpinned by the zonal induction and depletion of GSH within the liver.

  11. AtMYB44 regulates resistance to the green peach aphid and diamondback moth by activating EIN2-affected defences in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Lü, B-B; Li, X-J; Sun, W-W; Li, L; Gao, R; Zhu, Q; Tian, S-M; Fu, M-Q; Yu, H-L; Tang, X-M; Zhang, C-L; Dong, H-S

    2013-09-01

    Recently we showed that the transcription activator AtMYB44 regulates expression of EIN2, a gene essential for ethylene signalling and insect resistance, in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). To link the transactivation with insect resistance, we investigated the wild-type and atmyb44 mutant plants, genetically Complemented atmyb44 (Catmyb44) and AtMYB44-Overexpression Transgenic Arabidopsis (MYB44OTA). We found that AtMYB44 played a critical role in Arabidopsis resistance to the phloem-feeding generalist green peach aphid (Myzus persicae Sulzer) and leaf-chewing specialist caterpillar diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella L.). AtMYB44 was required not only for the development of constitutive resistance but also for the induction of resistance by both herbivorous insects. Levels of constitutive and herbivore-induced resistance were consistent with corresponding amounts of the AtMYB44 protein constitutively produced in MYB44OTA and induced by herbivory in Catmyb44. In both cases, AtMYB44 promoted EIN2 expression to a greater extent in MYB44OTA than in Catmyb44. However, AtMYB44-promoted EIN2 expression was arrested with reduced resistance levels in the EIN2-deficient Arabidopsis mutant ein2-1 and the MYB44OTA ein2-1 hybrid. In the different plant genotypes, only MYB44OTA constitutively displayed phloem-based defences, which are specific to phloem-feeding insects, and robust expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of glucosinolates, which are the secondary plant metabolites known as deterrents to generalist herbivores. Phloem-based defences and glucosinolate-related gene expression were not detected in ein2-1 and MYB44OTA ein2-1. These results establish a genetic connection between the regulatory role of AtMYB44 in EIN2 expression and the development of Arabidopsis resistance to insects.

  12. The regulation of methane oxidation in soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancinelli, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane, a greenhouse gas, has more than doubled during the past 200 years. Consequently, identifying the factors influencing the flux of methane into the atmosphere is becoming increasingly important. Methanotrophs, microaerophilic organisms widespread in aerobic soils and sediments, oxidize methane to derive energy and carbon for biomass. In so doing, they play an important role in mitigating the flux of methane into the atmosphere. Several physico-chemical factors influence rates of methane oxidation in soil, including soil diffusivity; water potential; and levels of oxygen, methane, ammonium, nitrate, nitrite, and copper. Most of these factors exert their influence through interactions with methane monooxygenase (MMO), the enzyme that catalyzes the reaction converting methane to methanol, the first step in methane oxidation. Although biological factors such as competition and predation undoubtedly play a role in regulating the methanotroph population in soils, and thereby limit the amount of methane consumed by methanotrophs, the significance of these factors is unknown. Obtaining a better understanding of the ecology of methanotrophs will help elucidate the mechanisms that regulate soil methane oxidation.

  13. Effect of acetaminophen exposure in Oncorhynchus mykiss gills and liver: detoxification mechanisms, oxidative defence system and peroxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A S; Correia, A T; Antunes, S C; Gonçalves, F; Nunes, B

    2014-05-01

    The increasing presence of pharmaceutical drugs in nature is cause of concern due to the occurrence of oxidative stress in non-target species. Acetaminophen is widely used in human medicine as an analgesic and antipyretic drug, and it is one of the most sold non-prescription drugs. The present study aimed to assess the toxic effects of acetaminophen (APAP) in Oncorhynchus mykiss following acute and chronic exposures in realistic levels. In order to evaluate the APAP effects in the rainbow trout, gills and liver were analyzed with biochemical biomarkers, such as catalase (CAT), total and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GRed) and glutathione-S-transferases (GSTs) activity and also lipid peroxidation levels (TBARS). The results obtained in all tests indicate that a significant response of oxidative stress was established, along with the increase of APAP concentrations. The establishment of an oxidative stress scenario occurred with the involvement of all tested biomarkers, sustaining a generalized set of pro-oxidative effects elicited by APAP. Additionally, the occurrence of oxidative damage strongly suggests the impairment of the antioxidant defense mechanism of O. mykiss. It is important to note that the occurrence of oxidative deleterious effects and peroxidative damages occurred for concentrations similar to those already reported for several freshwater ecosystems. The importance of these assumptions is further discussed under the scope of ecological relevance of the assessment of effects caused by pharmaceuticals in non-target organisms.

  14. Virus-induced gene silencing of Withania somnifera squalene synthase negatively regulates sterol and defence-related genes resulting in reduced withanolides and biotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anup Kumar; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Pal, Shaifali; Reddy, Sajjalavarahalli Gangireddy Eswara; Rao, Dodaghatta Krishnarao Venkata; Shasany, Ajit Kumar; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is an important Indian medicinal plant that produces withanolides, which are triterpenoid steroidal lactones having diverse biological activities. To enable fast and efficient functional characterization of genes in this slow-growing and difficult-to-transform plant, a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was established by silencing phytoene desaturase (PDS) and squalene synthase (SQS). VIGS of the gene encoding SQS, which provides precursors for triterpenoids, resulted in significant reduction of squalene and withanolides, demonstrating its application in studying withanolides biosynthesis in W. somnifera leaves. A comprehensive analysis of gene expression and sterol pathway intermediates in WsSQS-vigs plants revealed transcriptional modulation with positive feedback regulation of mevalonate pathway genes, and negative feed-forward regulation of downstream sterol pathway genes including DWF1 (delta-24-sterol reductase) and CYP710A1 (C-22-sterol desaturase), resulting in significant reduction of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. However, there was little effect of SQS silencing on cholesterol, indicating the contribution of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol, but not of cholesterol, towards withanolides formation. Branch-point oxidosqualene synthases in WsSQS-vigs plants exhibited differential regulation with reduced CAS (cycloartenol synthase) and cycloartenol, and induced BAS (β-amyrin synthase) and β-amyrin. Moreover, SQS silencing also led to the down-regulation of brassinosteroid-6-oxidase-2 (BR6OX2), pathogenesis-related (PR) and nonexpressor of PR (NPR) genes, resulting in reduced tolerance to bacterial and fungal infection as well as to insect feeding. Taken together, SQS silencing negatively regulated sterol and defence-related genes leading to reduced phytosterols, withanolides and biotic stress tolerance, thus implicating the application of VIGS for functional analysis of genes related to withanolides

  15. Nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide: two players in the defence response of tomato plants to root-knot nematodes.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, P; Melillo, M T; Bleve-Zacheo, T

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been postulated to be required, together with reactive oxygen species (ROS) for activation of disease resistance reaction of plants to pathogen infection. Here, we investigated NO, superoxide (O(*-)2), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in tomato-root-knot nematode interactions to answer the question of whether they are produced during the early stages of nematode infection. NO detection was carried out using diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) by means of confocal laser microscopy and spectrophotometric analyses, and production of NO was estimated by monitoring the conversion of L-[U14C]arginine into L-[U14C]citrulline. O(*-)2 production was determined by using the tetrazolium salt, sodium,3'-{1-[phenylamino-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium}-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) and H2O2 was measured by using the Amplex Red H2O2/peroxidase assay. Results showed i) the highest NO production in tissues challenged by avr pathotype, 12h after nematode inoculation, ii) NO production by nitric oxide synthase (NOS-like activity), iii) ROSbalance dependent control of NO. Our data evidenced, for the first time, that NO-generated signal, its spatiotemporal expression, and its cross-communication with other pro-oxidants or anti-oxidants critically influence compatible and incompatible tomato-Meloidogyne incognito interactions.

  16. Defence response of tomato seedlings to oxidative stress induced by phenolic compounds from dry olive mill residue.

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Garrido, Inmaculada; Casimiro, Ilda de Jesús; Casero, Pedro Joaquín; Espinosa, Francisco; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Aranda, Elisabet

    2012-10-01

    ADOR is an aqueous extract obtained from the dry olive mill residue (DOR) which contains the majority of its soluble phenolic compounds, which are responsible for its phytotoxic properties. Some studies have shown that ADOR negatively affects seed germination. However, to date, few studies have been carried out on the effect of ADOR on the oxidative stress of the plant. It is well known that saprobe fungi can detoxify these phenolic compounds and reduce the potential negative effects of ADOR on plants. To gain a better understanding of the phytotoxic effects and oxidative stress caused by this residue, tomato seeds were germinated in the presence of ADOR, treated and untreated with Coriolopsis rigida, Trametes versicolor, Pycnoporus cinnabarinus and Penicillium chrysogenum-10 saprobe fungi. ADOR sharply reduced tomato seed germination and also generated high levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2). However, bioremediated ADOR did not negatively affect germination and reduced MDA, O(2)(-) and H(2)O(2) content in different ways depending on the fungus used. In addition, the induced defense response was studied by analyzing the activity of both antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ascorbate peroxidasa, glutathione reductase (GR), peroxidases and coniferil alcohol peroxidasa) and detoxification enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase (GST)). Our findings suggest that, because ADOR is capable of inducing oxidative stress, tomato seedlings trigger a defense response through SOD, GR, and GST activity and through antioxidant and lignification processes. On the other hand, the bioremediation of ADOR plays an important role in counteracting the oxidative stress induced by the untreated residue.

  17. The transcriptional coregulator PGC-1β controls mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant defence in skeletal muscles

    PubMed Central

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Laverny, Gilles; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Messaddeq, Nadia; Bornert, Jean-Marc; Panza, Salvatore; Ferry, Arnaud; Geny, Bernard; Metzger, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coregulators PGC-1α and PGC-1β modulate the expression of numerous partially overlapping genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and energetic metabolism. The physiological role of PGC-1β is poorly understood in skeletal muscle, a tissue of high mitochondrial content to produce ATP levels required for sustained contractions. Here we determine the physiological role of PGC-1β in skeletal muscle using mice, in which PGC-1β is selectively ablated in skeletal myofibres at adulthood (PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice). We show that myofibre myosin heavy chain composition and mitochondrial number, muscle strength and glucose homeostasis are unaffected in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− mice. However, decreased expression of genes controlling mitochondrial protein import, translational machinery and energy metabolism in PGC-1β(i)skm−/− muscles leads to mitochondrial structural and functional abnormalities, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and reduced exercise performance. Moreover, enhanced free-radical leak and reduced expression of the mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme Sod2 increase muscle oxidative stress. PGC-1β is therefore instrumental for skeletal muscles to cope with high energetic demands. PMID:26674215

  18. The transcriptional coregulator PGC-1β controls mitochondrial function and anti-oxidant defence in skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Laverny, Gilles; Schlagowski, Anna-Isabel; Zoll, Joffrey; Messaddeq, Nadia; Bornert, Jean-Marc; Panza, Salvatore; Ferry, Arnaud; Geny, Bernard; Metzger, Daniel

    2015-12-17

    The transcriptional coregulators PGC-1α and PGC-1β modulate the expression of numerous partially overlapping genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and energetic metabolism. The physiological role of PGC-1β is poorly understood in skeletal muscle, a tissue of high mitochondrial content to produce ATP levels required for sustained contractions. Here we determine the physiological role of PGC-1β in skeletal muscle using mice, in which PGC-1β is selectively ablated in skeletal myofibres at adulthood (PGC-1β((i)skm-/-) mice). We show that myofibre myosin heavy chain composition and mitochondrial number, muscle strength and glucose homeostasis are unaffected in PGC-1β((i)skm-/-) mice. However, decreased expression of genes controlling mitochondrial protein import, translational machinery and energy metabolism in PGC-1β((i)skm-/-) muscles leads to mitochondrial structural and functional abnormalities, impaired muscle oxidative capacity and reduced exercise performance. Moreover, enhanced free-radical leak and reduced expression of the mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme Sod2 increase muscle oxidative stress. PGC-1β is therefore instrumental for skeletal muscles to cope with high energetic demands.

  19. Abscisic acid-regulated responses of aba2-1 under osmotic stress: the abscisic acid-inducible antioxidant defence system and reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Ozfidan, C; Turkan, I; Sekmen, A H; Seckin, B

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the interaction among abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant defence system in the transduction of osmotic stress signalling using Arabidopsis thaliana WT (Columbia ecotype, WT) and an ABA-deficient mutant (aba2-1). For this, 50 μm ABA and osmotic stress, induced with 40% (w/v) polyethylene glycol (PEG8000; -0.7 MPa), were applied to WT and aba2-1 for 6, 12 or 24 h. Time course analysis was undertaken for determination of total/isoenzyme activity of the antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6), ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), NADPH oxidase (NOX; EC 1.6.3.1) activity; scavenging activity of the hydroxyl radical (OH˙), hydrogen peroxide (H(2) O(2) ); endogenous ABA and malondialdehyde (MDA). The highest H(2) O(2) and MDA content was found in PEG-treated groups of both genotypes, but with more in aba2-1. ABA treatment under stress reduced the accumulation of H(2) O(2) and MDA, while it promoted activity of SOD, CAT and APX. APX activity was higher than CAT activity in ABA-treated WT and aba2-1, indicating a protective role of APX rather than CAT during osmotic stress-induced oxidative damage. Treatment with ABA also significantly induced increased NOX activity. Oxidative damage was lower in ABA-treated seedlings of both genotypes, which was associated with greater activity of SOD (Mn-SOD1 and 2 and Fe-SOD isoenzymes), CAT and APX in these seedlings after 24 h of stress. These results suggest that osmotic stress effects were overcome by ABA treatment because of increased SOD, CAT, APX and NOX.

  20. Ability of innate defence regulator peptides IDR-1002, IDR-HH2 and IDR-1018 to protect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections in animal models.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; Rivas Santiago, Cesar E; Waldbrook, Matt; González-Curiel, Irma; León-Contreras, Juan C; Enciso-Moreno, Jose Antonio; del Villar, Victor; Mendez-Ramos, Jazmin; Hancock, Robert E W; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is an ongoing threat to global health, especially with the emergence of multi drug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant strains that are motivating the search for new treatment strategies. One potential strategy is immunotherapy using Innate Defence Regulator (IDR) peptides that selectively modulate innate immunity, enhancing chemokine induction and cell recruitment while suppressing potentially harmful inflammatory responses. IDR peptides possess only modest antimicrobial activity but have profound immunomodulatory functions that appear to be influential in resolving animal model infections. The IDR peptides HH2, 1018 and 1002 were tested for their activity against two M. tuberculosis strains, one drug-sensitive and the other MDR in both in vitro and in vivo models. All peptides showed no cytotoxic activity and only modest direct antimicrobial activity versus M. tuberculosis (MIC of 15-30 µg/ml). Nevertheless peptides HH2 and 1018 reduced bacillary loads in animal models with both the virulent drug susceptible H37Rv strain and an MDR isolate and, especially 1018 led to a considerable reduction in lung inflammation as revealed by decreased pneumonia. These results indicate that IDR peptides have potential as a novel immunotherapy against TB.

  1. Obesity and oxidative stress: potential roles of melatonin as antioxidant and metabolic regulator.

    PubMed

    Bonnefont-Rousselot, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an oxidative stress status, defined as an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) compared to the level of antioxidants acting in the natural defence systems. Several sources of ROS can be identified in obesity (e.g., mitochondrial respiratory chain, or NADPH oxidase) and could contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity. Indeed, these conditions favour the development of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome through deregulation of adipokines and pro-inflammatory cytokines, so that it could be of interest to associate antioxidant therapeutic strategies with strategies of weight loss. Among antioxidants, melatonin holds a special place, on the one hand for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, and on the other hand for its role as a metabolic regulator. As melatonin modulates several processes involved in obesity and its related metabolic alterations, it could have a therapeutic interest in the treatment of obesity.

  2. The effects of temperature and dissolved oxygen on antioxidant defences and oxidative damage in the fathead minnow Pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, E D; Lapidus, S J H; Brown, A C

    2013-03-01

    Fathead minnows Pimephales promelas maintained at 25° C for 6 h had significantly higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than fish maintained at 7 or 32° C, but hypoxic conditions (3 mg l(-1) O2 ) over the same time period did not affect SOD activity. Fish in better body condition (length-adjusted mass) had higher SOD activity. In a separate experiment, P. promelas maintained at three water temperatures (7, 23 and 32° C) for 31 days did not differ in liver acrolein, a biomarker of oxidative stress.

  3. 40 CFR 52.231 - Regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Regulations: Sulfur oxides. 52.231... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.231 Regulations: Sulfur oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standard for Sulfur Oxides. (1) Lake County Intrastate Region. (i) Lake County,...

  4. 40 CFR 52.231 - Regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulations: Sulfur oxides. 52.231... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.231 Regulations: Sulfur oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standard for Sulfur Oxides. (1) Lake County Intrastate Region. (i) Lake County,...

  5. 40 CFR 52.231 - Regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Regulations: Sulfur oxides. 52.231... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.231 Regulations: Sulfur oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standard for Sulfur Oxides. (1) Lake County Intrastate Region. (i) Lake County,...

  6. 40 CFR 52.231 - Regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulations: Sulfur oxides. 52.231... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.231 Regulations: Sulfur oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standard for Sulfur Oxides. (1) Lake County Intrastate Region. (i) Lake County,...

  7. 40 CFR 52.231 - Regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulations: Sulfur oxides. 52.231... (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF IMPLEMENTATION PLANS California § 52.231 Regulations: Sulfur oxides... Ambient Air Quality Standard for Sulfur Oxides. (1) Lake County Intrastate Region. (i) Lake County,...

  8. RNA silencing suppression by plant pathogens: defence, counter-defence and counter-counter-defence.

    PubMed

    Pumplin, Nathan; Voinnet, Olivier

    2013-11-01

    RNA silencing is a central regulator of gene expression in most eukaryotes and acts both at the transcriptional level through DNA methylation and at the post-transcriptional level through direct mRNA interference mediated by small RNAs. In plants and invertebrates, the same pathways also function directly in host defence against viruses by targeting viral RNA for degradation. Successful viruses have consequently evolved diverse mechanisms to avoid silencing, most notably through the expression of viral suppressors of RNA silencing. RNA silencing suppressors have also been recently identified in plant pathogenic bacteria and oomycetes, suggesting that disruption of host silencing is a general virulence strategy across several kingdoms of plant pathogens. There is also increasing evidence that plants have evolved specific defences against RNA-silencing suppression by pathogens, providing yet another illustration of the never-ending molecular arms race between plant pathogens and their hosts.

  9. Membrane-bound oxygen reductases of the anaerobic sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: roles in oxygen defence and electron link with periplasmic hydrogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ramel, F; Amrani, A; Pieulle, L; Lamrabet, O; Voordouw, G; Seddiki, N; Brèthes, D; Company, M; Dolla, A; Brasseur, G

    2013-12-01

    Cytoplasmic membranes of the strictly anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough contain two terminal oxygen reductases, a bd quinol oxidase and a cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase (Cox). Viability assays pointed out that single Δbd, Δcox and double ΔbdΔcox deletion mutant strains were more sensitive to oxygen exposure than the WT strain, showing the involvement of these oxygen reductases in the detoxification of oxygen. The Δcox strain was slightly more sensitive than the Δbd strain, pointing to the importance of the cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase in oxygen protection. Decreased O2 reduction rates were measured in mutant cells and membranes using lactate, NADH, ubiquinol and menadiol as substrates. The affinity for oxygen measured with the bd quinol oxidase (Km, 300 nM) was higher than that of the cc(b/o)o3 cytochrome oxidase (Km, 620 nM). The total membrane activity of the bd quinol oxidase was higher than that of the cytochrome oxidase activity in line with the higher expression of the bd oxidase genes. In addition, analysis of the ΔbdΔcox mutant strain indicated the presence of at least one O2-scavenging membrane-bound system able to reduce O2 with menaquinol as electron donor with an O2 affinity that was two orders of magnitude lower than that of the bd quinol oxidase. The lower O2 reductase activity in mutant cells with hydrogen as electron donor and the use of specific inhibitors indicated an electron transfer link between periplasmic H2 oxidation and membrane-bound oxygen reduction via the menaquinol pool. This linkage is crucial in defence of the strictly anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio against oxygen stress.

  10. Diverse opportunities in defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gareth

    2016-08-01

    Working at the UK's defence laboratory gives Gareth Brown the ability to apply his physics and mathematics knowledge to real-world applications - and not necessarily in the ways you might expect. This article is Crown copyright

  11. Defence Reporter. Spring 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    of a series of services and products produced by ATHENA to keep readers up -to- date with the latest developments in key areas of defence science...the MOD’s ATHENA Collection. Defence Reporter is available by subscription. To sign up for this free service, please send an e-mail with your full...for the oral route. This study was set up lo enable some confirmation of published LD50 information of orally dosed ricin but also to enable some

  12. Nitric oxide negatively regulates mammalian adult neurogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packer, Michael A.; Stasiv, Yuri; Benraiss, Abdellatif; Chmielnicki, Eva; Grinberg, Alexander; Westphal, Heiner; Goldman, Steven A.; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2003-08-01

    Neural progenitor cells are widespread throughout the adult central nervous system but only give rise to neurons in specific loci. Negative regulators of neurogenesis have therefore been postulated, but none have yet been identified as subserving a significant role in the adult brain. Here we report that nitric oxide (NO) acts as an important negative regulator of cell proliferation in the adult mammalian brain. We used two independent approaches to examine the function of NO in adult neurogenesis. In a pharmacological approach, we suppressed NO production in the rat brain by intraventricular infusion of an NO synthase inhibitor. In a genetic approach, we generated a null mutant neuronal NO synthase knockout mouse line by targeting the exon encoding active center of the enzyme. In both models, the number of new cells generated in neurogenic areas of the adult brain, the olfactory subependyma and the dentate gyrus, was strongly augmented, which indicates that division of neural stem cells in the adult brain is controlled by NO and suggests a strategy for enhancing neurogenesis in the adult central nervous system.

  13. Do strigolactones contribute to plant defence?

    PubMed

    Torres-Vera, Rocío; García, Juan M; Pozo, María J; López-Ráez, Juan A

    2014-02-01

    Strigolactones are multifunctional molecules involved in several processes outside and within the plant. As signalling molecules in the rhizosphere, they favour the establishment of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, but they also act as host detection cues for root parasitic plants. As phytohormones, they are involved in the regulation of plant architecture, adventitious rooting, secondary growth and reproductive development, and novel roles are emerging continuously. In the present study, the possible involvement of strigolactones in plant defence responses was investigated. For this purpose, the resistance/susceptibility of the strigolactone-deficient tomato mutant Slccd8 against the foliar fungal pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria alternata was assessed. Slccd8 was more susceptible to both pathogens, pointing to a new role for strigolactones in plant defence. A reduction in the content of the defence-related hormones jasmonic acid, salicylic acid and abscisic acid was detected by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry in the Slccd8 mutant, suggesting that hormone homeostasis is altered in the mutant. Moreover, the expression level of the jasmonate-dependent gene PinII, involved in the resistance of tomato to B. cinerea, was lower than in the corresponding wild-type. We propose here that strigolactones play a role in the regulation of plant defences through their interaction with other defence-related hormones, especially with the jasmonic acid signalling pathway.

  14. Lack of Clinical Manifestations in Asymptomatic Dengue Infection Is Attributed to Broad Down-Regulation and Selective Up-Regulation of Host Defence Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Adeline S. L.; Azhar, Nur Atiqah; Yeow, Wanyi; Talbot, C. Conover; Khan, Mohammad Asif; Shankar, Esaki M.; Rathakrishnan, Anusyah; Azizan, Azliyati; Wang, Seok Mui; Lee, Siew Kim; Fong, Mun Yik; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dengue represents one of the most serious life-threatening vector-borne infectious diseases that afflicts approximately 50 million people across the globe annually. Whilst symptomatic infections are frequently reported, asymptomatic dengue remains largely unnoticed. Therefore, we sought to investigate the immune correlates conferring protection to individuals that remain clinically asymptomatic. Methods We determined the levels of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) and gene expression profiles of host immune factors in individuals with asymptomatic infections, and whose cognate household members showed symptoms consistent to clinical dengue infection. Results We observed broad down-regulation of host defense response (innate, adaptive and matrix metalloprotease) genes in asymptomatic individuals as against symptomatic patients, with selective up-regulation of distinct genes that have been associated with protection. Selected down-regulated genes include: TNF α (TNF), IL8, C1S, factor B (CFB), IL2, IL3, IL4, IL5, IL8, IL9, IL10 and IL13, CD80, CD28, and IL18, MMP8, MMP10, MMP12, MMP15, MMP16, and MMP24. Selected up-regulated genes include: RANTES (CCL5), MIP-1α (CCL3L1/CCL3L3), MIP-1β (CCL4L1), TGFβ (TGFB), and TIMP1. Conclusion Our findings highlight the potential association of certain host genes conferring protection against clinical dengue. These data are valuable to better explore the mysteries behind the hitherto poorly understood immunopathogenesis of subclinical dengue infection. PMID:24727912

  15. The response of L5178Y lymphoma sublines to oxidative stress: antioxidant defence, iron content and nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Bouzyk, E; Gradzka, I; Iwaneńko, T; Kruszewski, M; Sochanowicz, B; Szumiel, I

    2000-01-01

    We examined the response to hydrogen peroxide of two L5178Y (LY) sublines which are inversely cross-sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and X-rays: LY-R cells are radio-resistant and hydrogen peroxide-sensitive, whereas LY-S cells are radiosensitive and hydrogen peroxide-resistant. Higher initial DNA breaks and higher iron content (potentially active in the Fenton reaction) were found in the hydrogen peroxide sensitive LY-R cells than in the hydrogen peroxide resistant LY-S cells, whereas the antioxidant defence of LY-R cells was weaker. In particular, catalase activity is twofold higher in LY-S than in LY-R cells. The content of monobromobimane-reactive thiols is 54% higher in LY-S than in LY-R cells. In contrast, the activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) is about two times higher in LY-R than in LY-S cells; however, upon induction with selenium the activity increases 15.6-fold in LY-R cells and 50.3-fold in LY-S cells. Altogether, the sensitivity difference is related to the iron content, the amount of the initial DNA damage, as well as to the efficiency of the antioxidant defence system. Differential nuclear translocation of p65-NF-kappaB in LY sublines is due to the more efficient antioxidant defence in LY-S than in LY-R cells.

  16. Functional analysis reveals effects of tobacco alternative oxidase gene (NtAOX1a) on regulation of defence responses against abiotic and biotic stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Xi, Dongmei; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dongfang; Guo, Xingqi

    2009-07-22

    Mitochondrial AOX (alternative oxidase) is the terminal oxidase of the CN (cyanide)-resistant alternative respiratory pathway in plants. To investigate the role of the tobacco AOX gene (NtAOX1a) (where Nt is Nicotiana tabacum) under deleterious conditions which could induce ROS (reactive oxygen species) accumulation, we generated and characterized a number of independent transgenic tobacco (N. tabacum) lines with altered NtAOX1a gene expression and AP (alternative pathway) capacity. AOX efficiently inhibited the production of low-temperature-induced H2O2 and might be a major enzyme for scavenging H2O2 at low temperature. Furthermore, NtAOX1a may act as a regulator of KCN-induced resistance to TMV (tobacco mosaic virus) through the regulation of H2O2. Notably, a moderate accumulation of H2O2 under the control of NtAOX1a was crucial in viral resistance. Analysis of seed germination indicated an important role for NtAOX1a in germination under H2O2-induced oxidative stress when the CP (cytochrome pathway) was inhibited. These results demonstrate that NtAOX1a is necessary for plants to survive low temperature, pathogen attack and oxidative stress by scavenging ROS under these adverse conditions when the CP is restricted.

  17. The regulation of superoxide generation and nitric oxide synthesis by C-reactive protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ratnam, S; Mookerjea, S

    1998-01-01

    Activated macrophages utilize both reactive oxygen intermediates and reactive oxynitrogen intermediates for defence against microbes. However, simultaneous generation of superoxide (O- 2;) and nitric oxide (NO) could be harmful to host cells due to the production of peroxynitrite, nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radicals. Therefore, the regulation of the production of these molecules is critical to host survival. During periods of inflammation or infection, the level of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) increases in many species. Human and rat CRP have been shown to bind and interact with phagocytic cells. Since many of the interactions of CRP involve the binding to the phosphocholine ligand, we studied the role of CRP in O- 2; and NO generation through the modulation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) metabolism in macrophages. This study has shown that, while rat CRP inhibited phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA) induced release of O- 2; by rat macrophages, CRP-treated macrophages released NO in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CRP increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme as well as iNOS mRNA levels in rat macrophages. Tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate (D609), an inhibitor to PC phospholipase C (PC-PLC), suppressed iNOS induction but enhanced PMA-induced release of O- 2;. These data indicate that an increased level of CRP during periods of inflammation may result in differential regulation of macrophage NADPH oxidase and iNOS activity. Increased hepatic synthesis of CRP may contribute to the mechanism by which phagocytic cells avoid simultaneous O- 2; and NO synthesis, and this could possibly be mediated through the regulation of PC-PLC. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9767445

  18. Alternative defence policy

    SciTech Connect

    Burt, G.

    1987-01-01

    This book considers key questions connected with the present crisis, questions such as Would conventional deterrence really be effective. Just what is the Labour Party's policy. How precisely might Britain be transformed into a non-aligned, non-military state. The future of British defence policy is an issue of major concern not just in Britain but throughout the world, especially in the United States where there are major anxieties in the Pentagon about what will happen if the Labour Party wins an election outright. British defence policy is currently in a state of crisis. The former position where a reasonably united establishment on one hand confronted nuclear disarmers on the other has been replaced by a position where a wide spectrum of different opinions is held not just by the peace movement and the opposition parties but by many people in the Conservative party and the military also.

  19. Regulation of alkane oxidation in Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Grund, A; Shapiro, J; Fennewald, M; Bacha, P; Leahy, J; Markbreiter, K; Nieder, M; Toepfer, M

    1975-01-01

    We have studied the appearance of whole-cell oxidizing activity for n-alkanes and their oxidation products in strains of Pseudomonas putida carrying the OCT plasmid. Our results indicate that the OCT plasmid codes for inducible alkane-hydroxylating and primary alcohol-dehydrogenating activities and that the chromosome codes for constitutive oxidizing activities for primary alcohols, aliphatic aldehydes, and fatty acids. Mutant isolation confirms the presence of an alcohol dehydrogenase locus on the OCT plasmid and indicated the presence of multiple alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenase loci on the P. putida chromosome. Induction tests with various compounds indicate that inducer recognition has specificity for chain length and can be affected by the degree of oxidation of the carbon chain. Some inducers are neither growth nor respiration substrates. Growth tests with and without a gratuitous inducer indicate that undecane is not a growth substrate because it does not induce alkane hydroxylase activity. Using a growth test for determining induction of the plasmid alcohol dehydrogenase it is possible to show that heptane induces this activity in hydroxylase-negative mutants. This suggests that unoxidized alkane molecules are the physiological inducers of both plasmid activities. PMID:1150626

  20. The role of thionins in rice defence against root pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hongli; Gheysen, Godelieve; Ullah, Chhana; Verbeek, Ruben; Shang, Chenjing; De Vleesschauwer, David; Höfte, Monica; Kyndt, Tina

    2015-10-01

    Thionins are antimicrobial peptides that are involved in plant defence. Here, we present an in-depth analysis of the role of rice thionin genes in defence responses against two root pathogens: the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne graminicola and the oomycete Pythium graminicola. The expression of rice thionin genes was observed to be differentially regulated by defence-related hormones, whereas all analysed genes were consistently down-regulated in M. graminicola-induced galls, at least until 7 days post-inoculation (dpi). Transgenic lines of Oryza sativa cv. Nipponbare overproducing OsTHI7 revealed decreased susceptibility to M. graminicola infection and P. graminicola colonization. Taken together, these results demonstrate the role of rice thionin genes in defence against two of the most damaging root pathogens attacking rice.

  1. Oxidative Regulation of Large Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiang D.; Daggett, Heather; Hanner, Markus; Garcia, Maria L.; McManus, Owen B.; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2001-01-01

    Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are readily generated in vivo, playing roles in many physiological and pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, by oxidatively modifying various proteins. Previous studies indicate that large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (BKCa or Slo) are subject to redox regulation. However, conflicting results exist whether oxidation increases or decreases the channel activity. We used chloramine-T, which preferentially oxidizes methionine, to examine the functional consequences of methionine oxidation in the cloned human Slo (hSlo) channel expressed in mammalian cells. In the virtual absence of Ca2+, the oxidant shifted the steady-state macroscopic conductance to a more negative direction and slowed deactivation. The results obtained suggest that oxidation enhances specific voltage-dependent opening transitions and slows the rate-limiting closing transition. Enhancement of the hSlo activity was partially reversed by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, suggesting that the upregulation is mediated by methionine oxidation. In contrast, hydrogen peroxide and cysteine-specific reagents, DTNB, MTSEA, and PCMB, decreased the channel activity. Chloramine-T was much less effective when concurrently applied with the K+ channel blocker TEA, which is consistent with the possibility that the target methionine lies within the channel pore. Regulation of the Slo channel by methionine oxidation may represent an important link between cellular electrical excitability and metabolism. PMID:11222629

  2. Defence Reporter. Winter 2012

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Reporter is one part of a series of services and products produced by ATHENA to keep readers up -to- date with the latest developments in key areas...have been added to the MOD’s ATHENA Collection. Defence Reporter is available by subscription. To sign up for this free service, please send an e...study identified a number of critical REEs in addition to several non-REE materials. A ‘bottom- up ’ study assessed market data and information on

  3. Defence Reporter. Autumn 2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Reporter is one part of a series of services and products produced by ATHENA to keep readers up -to- date with the latest developments in key areas...ATHENA Collection. Defence Reporter is available by subscription. To sign up for this free service, please send an e-mail with your full name and...here is that in a joined- up coalition environment our allies will not be able to discover UK data and if they do have it, they may not treat it

  4. Anti-carcinogenic action of curcumin by activation of antioxidant defence system and inhibition of NF-κB signalling in lymphoma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Laxmidhar; Vinayak, Manjula

    2012-04-01

    NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) plays a significant role in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, apoptosis and malignancy. ROS (reactive oxygen species) are among the most important regulating factors of NF-κB. Intracellular ROS are mainly regulated by an endogenous antioxidant defence system. Any disruption of redox balance leads to oxidative stress, which causes a number of pathological conditions including inflammation and malignancy. Increased metabolic activity in cancerous cells leads to oxidative stress, which is further enhanced due to depletion of the endogenous antioxidant defence system. However, the activation and signalling of NF-κB are reported to be inhibited by overexpression and induced activity of antioxidant enzymes. Therefore the present study focuses on the correlation between the endogenous antioxidant defence system, ROS and NF-κB activation during lymphoma growth in mice. The study highlights the anti-carcinogenic role of curcumin by modulation of NF-κB activation and oxidative stress via the endogenous antioxidant defence system. Oxidative stress was monitored by lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and antioxidant enzyme activity. NF-κB-mediated signalling was tested by DNA-binding activity. The results reflect that intracellular production of H2O2 in oxidative tumour micro-environment regulates NF-κB activation. Curcumin inhibits oxidative state in the liver of lymphoma-bearing mice by enhancing the transcription and activities of antioxidant enzymes, which in turn modulate activation of NF-κB, leading to a decrease in lymphoma growth. Morphological changes as well as cell proliferation and cell survival assays confirmed reduced lymphoma growth. Thus curcumin contributes to cancer prevention by disrupting the vicious cycle of constant ROS production, responsible for a high oxidative micro-environment for tumour growth.

  5. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  6. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Sean X; Stevens, Jeff W; Lentz, Steven R

    2015-06-18

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis.

  7. [The changes of processes of free radical oxidation of lipids and proteins, antioxidant defence in rats with hypofunction of the thyroid gland in conditions of iodine and copper deficiency].

    PubMed

    Voronych-Semchenko, N M; Huranych, T V

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid status, copper balance, correlation of processes of peroxide oxidation of lipids (POL), proteins (POP), antioxidant defence (AOD) were examined in experiments on rats with hypofunction of thyroid gland under iodine monodeficit (HTGI) and combined iodine and copper deficit (HTGI+Cu). It was determined that a combined deficit of microelements is accompanied by a distribution of copper content between different tissues (increase in red blood cell mass and cerebrum, decrease in myocardium), essential changes of indexes of hypotalamo-hypophysis-thyroid axis, oxygen-dependent metabolism, antiradical defense, exacerbating the effects of negative influence of each of them on organism. It was established that HTGI+Cu causes a suppression of oxygen-dependent processes. In thyroid gland, it is shown a decrease of content of dyenic conjugates (DC) by 69,70% , of TBA-reacting products (TBA-RP) by 47,72% in diencephalon, the volume of modified proteins (VMP) - by 37,10-98,98% in the tissues of diencephalons. The results obtained let us to suggest a pivotal role ofmicroelement dysbalance and metabolic mechanisms in pathogenesis of cardiological pathology under thyroid dysfunction. The development of HTGI +Cu exhausts the resources of AOD: decreases the activity of catalase (on 47,05%), superoxide dismutase (on 33,13%), ceruloplasmine (on 33,93%) and saturation of transferrin with iron (on 56,76%) against the background of selective rise in the activity of glu-tationreductase (in 2,8 time) in comparison with the control data. The long-term disturbances ofantyoxidative defence can be the reason of manifestation of oxygendependent processes and the development of pathological changes in separate physiological systems of organism.

  8. Argininosuccinate lyase is an essential regulator of nictric oxide homeostatis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The regulation of nitric oxide synthesis is a complex mechanism, depending on the availability of substrates and the activity of the enzymes involved. Here we describe in a mouse model the channeling of urea cycle intermediates for the recycling of citrulline and the transport of extracellular argin...

  9. Iron homeostasis in host defence and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Tomas; Nemeth, Elizabeta

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential trace element for multicellular organisms and nearly all microorganisms. Although iron is abundant in the environment, common forms of iron are minimally soluble and therefore poorly accessible to biological organisms. Microorganisms entering a mammalian host face multiple mechanisms that further restrict their ability to obtain iron and thereby limit their pathogenicity. Iron levels also modulate host defence, as iron content in macrophages regulates their cytokine production. Here, we review recent advances that highlight the role of systemic and cellular iron-regulating mechanisms in protecting hosts from infection, emphasizing aspects that are applicable to human health and disease. PMID:26160612

  10. Antioxidant defences in hydrated and desiccated states of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Angela M; Negroni, Manuela; Altiero, Tiziana; Montorfano, Gigliola; Corsetto, Paola; Berselli, Patrizia; Berra, Bruno; Guidetti, Roberto; Rebecchi, Lorena

    2010-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed in all aerobic organisms, potentially leading to oxidative damage of all biological molecules. A number of defence mechanisms have developed to protect the organism from attack by ROS. Desiccation tolerance is correlated with an increase in the antioxidant potential in several organisms, but the regulation of the antioxidant defence system is complex and its role in desiccation-tolerant organisms is not yet firmly established. To determine if anhydrobiotic tardigrades have an antioxidant defence system, capable of counteracting ROS, we compared the activity of several antioxidant enzymes, the fatty acid composition and Heat shock protein expression in two physiological states (desiccated vs. hydrated) of the tardigrade Paramacrobiotus richtersi. In hydrated tardigrades, superoxide dismutase and catalase show comparable activities, while in desiccated specimens the activity of superoxide dismutase increases. Both glutathione peroxidase and glutathione were induced by desiccation. The percentage of fatty acid composition of polyunsaturated fatty acids and the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances are higher in desiccated animals than in hydrated ones. Lastly, desiccated tardigrades did not differ significantly from the hydrated ones in the relative levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90. These results indicate that the possession of antioxidant metabolism could represent a crucial strategy to avoid damages during desiccation in anhydrobiotic tardigrades.

  11. Epigenetic Regulation of Oxidative Stress in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiping; Han, Ziping; Ji, Xunming; Luo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of stroke rises with life expectancy. However, except for the use of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator, the translation of new therapies for acute stroke from animal models into humans has been relatively unsuccessful. Oxidative DNA and protein damage following stroke is typically associated with cell death. Cause-effect relationships between reactive oxygen species and epigenetic modifications have been established in aging, cancer, acute pancreatitis, and fatty liver disease. In addition, epigenetic regulatory mechanisms during stroke recovery have been reviewed, with focuses mainly on neural apoptosis, necrosis, and neuroplasticity. However, oxidative stress-induced epigenetic regulation in vascular neural networks following stroke has not been sufficiently explored. Improved understanding of the epigenetic regulatory network upon oxidative stress may provide effective antioxidant approaches for treating stroke. In this review, we summarize the epigenetic events, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNAs, that result from oxidative stress following experimental stroke in animal and cell models, and the ways in which epigenetic changes and their crosstalk influence the redox state in neurons, glia, and vascular endothelial cells, helping us to understand the foregone and vicious epigenetic regulation of oxidative stress in the vascular neural network following stroke. PMID:27330844

  12. Nitrogen oxide cycle regulates nitric oxide levels and bacterial cell signaling

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yasuyuki; Oguchi, Haruka; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kusama, Shinichiro; Sugiura, Ryo; Moriya, Kenta; Hirata, Takuya; Yukioka, Yuriya; Takaya, Naoki; Yajima, Shunsuke; Ito, Shinsaku; Okada, Kiyoshi; Ohsawa, Kanju; Ikeda, Haruo; Takano, Hideaki; Ueda, Kenji; Shoun, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling controls various metabolic pathways in bacteria and higher eukaryotes. Cellular enzymes synthesize and detoxify NO; however, a mechanism that controls its cellular homeostasis has not been identified. Here, we found a nitrogen oxide cycle involving nitrate reductase (Nar) and the NO dioxygenase flavohemoglobin (Fhb), that facilitate inter-conversion of nitrate, nitrite, and NO in the actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor. This cycle regulates cellular NO levels, bacterial antibiotic production, and morphological differentiation. NO down-regulates Nar and up-regulates Fhb gene expression via the NO-dependent transcriptional factors DevSR and NsrR, respectively, which are involved in the auto-regulation mechanism of intracellular NO levels. Nitrite generated by the NO cycles induces gene expression in neighboring cells, indicating an additional role of the cycle as a producer of a transmittable inter-cellular communication molecule. PMID:26912114

  13. H2S regulation of nitric oxide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kolluru, Gopi K.; Yuan, Shuai; Shen, Xinggui; Kevil, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) are two major gaseous signaling molecules that regulate diverse physiological functions. Recent publications indicate the regulatory role of H2S on NO metabolism. In this chapter, we discuss the latest findings on H2S-NO interactions through formation of novel chemical derivatives, and experimental approaches to study these adducts. This chapter also addresses potential H2S interference on various NO detection techniques, along with precautions for analyzing biological samples from various sources. This information will facilitate critical evaluation and clearer insight into H2S regulation of NO signaling and its influence on various physiological functions. PMID:25725527

  14. The Oxidation Status of Mic19 Regulates MICOS Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sakowska, Paulina; Jans, Daniel C.; Mohanraj, Karthik; Riedel, Dietmar; Jakobs, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The function of mitochondria depends on the proper organization of mitochondrial membranes. The morphology of the inner membrane is regulated by the recently identified mitochondrial contact site and crista organizing system (MICOS) complex. MICOS mutants exhibit alterations in crista formation, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanisms that underlie MICOS regulation remain poorly understood. MIC19, a peripheral protein of the inner membrane and component of the MICOS complex, was previously reported to be required for the proper function of MICOS in maintaining the architecture of the inner membrane. Here, we show that human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae MIC19 proteins undergo oxidation in mitochondria and require the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly (MIA) pathway, which couples the oxidation and import of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins for mitochondrial localization. Detailed analyses identified yeast Mic19 in two different redox forms. The form that contains an intramolecular disulfide bond is bound to Mic60 of the MICOS complex. Mic19 oxidation is not essential for its integration into the MICOS complex but plays a role in MICOS assembly and the maintenance of the proper inner membrane morphology. These findings suggest that Mic19 is a redox-dependent regulator of MICOS function. PMID:26416881

  15. The Oxidation Status of Mic19 Regulates MICOS Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sakowska, Paulina; Jans, Daniel C; Mohanraj, Karthik; Riedel, Dietmar; Jakobs, Stefan; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    The function of mitochondria depends on the proper organization of mitochondrial membranes. The morphology of the inner membrane is regulated by the recently identified mitochondrial contact site and crista organizing system (MICOS) complex. MICOS mutants exhibit alterations in crista formation, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the mechanisms that underlie MICOS regulation remain poorly understood. MIC19, a peripheral protein of the inner membrane and component of the MICOS complex, was previously reported to be required for the proper function of MICOS in maintaining the architecture of the inner membrane. Here, we show that human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae MIC19 proteins undergo oxidation in mitochondria and require the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly (MIA) pathway, which couples the oxidation and import of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins for mitochondrial localization. Detailed analyses identified yeast Mic19 in two different redox forms. The form that contains an intramolecular disulfide bond is bound to Mic60 of the MICOS complex. Mic19 oxidation is not essential for its integration into the MICOS complex but plays a role in MICOS assembly and the maintenance of the proper inner membrane morphology. These findings suggest that Mic19 is a redox-dependent regulator of MICOS function.

  16. Oxidative stress in aspic vipers facing pregnancy and water constraints.

    PubMed

    Stier, Antoine; Dupoué, Andréaz; Picard, Damien; Angelier, Frédéric; Brischoux, François; Lourdais, Olivier

    2017-03-14

    The physiological mechanisms underlying the 'cost of reproduction' remain under debate, though oxidative stress has emerged as a potential candidate. The 'oxidative cost of reproduction' has received considerable attention with regards to food and antioxidant availability, however the limitation of water availability has thus far been neglected. In this study we experimentally examined the combined effect of pregnancy and water-deprivation on oxidative status in a viviparous snake (Vipera aspis), a species naturally exposed to periods of water and food deprivation. We predicted a cumulative effect of pregnancy and dehydration on oxidative stress levels. Our results support the occurrence of an oxidative cost of reproduction since we found higher oxidative damage levels in pregnant females than in non-reproductive individuals, despite an up-regulation of antioxidant defences. Surprisingly, water-deprivation was associated with an up-regulation of antioxidant defences, and did not increase oxidative damage, either alone or in combination with reproduction.

  17. Cold-stress-induced modulation of antioxidant defence: role of stressed conditions in tissue injury followed by protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, E.; Gümüşlü, S.

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of cold stress on antioxidant enzyme activities and examine protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in various tissues (brain, liver, kidney, heart and stomach). Twenty male Wistar rats (3 months old) weighing 220 +/- 20 g were used. The rats were randomly divided into two groups of ten: the control group and the cold stress group. Cold stress was applied to the animals by maintaining them in a cold room (5 °C) for 15 min/day for 15 days. Blood samples were taken for measuring plasma corticosterone levels. Tissues were obtained from each rat for measuring the antioxidant enzyme activities, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Corticosterone levels were increased in the cold stress group. Copper, zinc superoxide dismutase activities were increased in the brains, livers and kidneys, whereas they decreased in the hearts and stomachs of rats in the cold stress group. Catalase activities were increased in the brains, livers, kidneys and hearts, whereas they decreased in the stomachs of rats in the cold stress group. Selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase activities were increased in the brain, liver, heart and stomach. Reduced glutathione levels were decreased, while levels of protein carbonyl, conjugated diene and thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances were increased in all tissues of the cold stress group. These results lead us to conclude that cold stress can disrupt the balance in an oxidant/antioxidant system and cause oxidative damage to several tissues by altering the enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation.

  18. 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 enhances cellular defences against UV-induced oxidative and other forms of DNA damage in skin.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Thomson, Clare; Gupta, Ritu; Tongkao-on, Wannit; Ryan, Anthony; Halliday, Gary M; Mason, Rebecca S

    2012-12-01

    DNA damage induced by ultraviolet radiation is the key initiator for skin carcinogenesis since mutations may arise from the photoproducts and it also contributes to photoimmune suppression. The active vitamin D hormone, 1α,25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) reduces thymine dimers, the major photoproduct found in human skin after UV exposure, and suppresses the accumulation of nitric oxide derivatives that lead to more toxic reactive nitrogen species (RNS). We examined whether other forms of DNA damage are reduced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), and hypothesized that photoprotection by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is, in part, due to the suppression of various forms of promutagenic DNA damage, including thymine dimers, through a reduction of genotoxic RNS. Different forms of UV-induced DNA damage were investigated in irradiated skin cells treated with or without 1,25(OH)(2)D(3), or inhibitors of metabolism and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Keratinocytes were also treated with nitric oxide donors in the absence of UV light. DNA damage was assessed by comet assay incorporating site specific DNA repair endonucleases, and by immunohistochemistry using antibodies to thymine dimers or 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, and quantified by image analysis. Strand breaks in T4 endonuclease V, endonuclease IV and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase digests increased more than 2-fold in UV irradiated human keratinocytes, and were reduced by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) treatment after UV exposure, and also by low temperature, sodium azide and an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Conversely, nitric oxide donors induced all three types of DNA damage in the absence of UV. We present data to show that 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) protects skin cells from at least three forms of UV-induced DNA damage, and provide further evidence to support the proposal that a reduction in RNS by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is a likely mechanism for its photoprotective effect against oxidative and nitrative DNA damage, as well as

  19. Redox regulation of Rac1 by thiol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. Aaron; Mitchell, Lauren E.; Arrington, Megan E.; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; DeCristo, Molly J.; Loeser, Richard F.; Chen, Xian; Cox, Adrienne D.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is an essential and ubiquitous protein that signals through numerous pathways to control critical cellular processes, including cell growth, morphology, and motility. Rac1 deletion is embryonic lethal, and its dysregulation or mutation can promote cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Rac1 activity is highly regulated by modulatory proteins and posttranslational modifications. Whereas much attention has been devoted to guanine nucleotide exchange factors that act on Rac1 to promote GTP loading and Rac1 activation, cellular oxidants may also regulate Rac1 activation by promoting guanine nucleotide exchange. Herein, we show that Rac1 contains a redox-sensitive cysteine (Cys18) that can be selectively oxidized at physiological pH because of its lowered pKa. Consistent with these observations, we show that Rac1 is glutathiolated in primary chondrocytes. Oxidation of Cys18 by glutathione greatly perturbs Rac1 guanine nucleotide binding and promotes nucleotide exchange. As aspartate substitutions have been previously used to mimic cysteine oxidation, we characterized the biochemical properties of Rac1C18D. We also evaluated Rac1C18S as a redox-insensitive variant and found that it retains structural and biochemical properties similar to those of Rac1WT but is resistant to thiol oxidation. In addition, Rac1C18D, but not Rac1C18S, shows greatly enhanced nucleotide exchange, similar to that observed for Rac1 oxidation by glutathione. We employed Rac1C18D in cell-based studies to assess whether this fast-cycling variant, which mimics Rac1 oxidation by glutathione, affects Rac1 activity and function. Expression of Rac1C18D in Swiss 3T3 cells showed greatly enhanced GTP-bound Rac1 relative to Rac1WT and the redox-insensitive Rac1C18S variant. Moreover, expression of Rac1C18D in HEK-293T cells greatly promoted lamellipodia formation. Our results suggest that Rac1 oxidation at Cys18 is a novel posttranslational modification that

  20. Relationships between isotopic values and oxidative status: insights from populations of gentoo penguins.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Michaël; González-Acuña, Daniel; Thierry, Anne-Mathilde; Polito, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Feeding strategies can affect the balance between the production of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defences (i.e. oxidative status). This is ecologically relevant, as variation in oxidative status can in turn strongly affect fitness. However, how animals regulate their oxidative status through their feeding behaviour under natural conditions remains poorly understood. Thus, relating the isotopic values of free-ranging animals to their oxidative status may prove useful. Here, we considered three colonies of gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) in which we measured (1) δ(13)C and δ(15)N values, and (2) antioxidant defences and oxidative damage. We found that colonies with the highest δ(13)C and δ(15)N values also had the highest levels of antioxidant defences and oxidative damage, resulting in positive relationships between isotopic values and markers of oxidative status. As a result, colony segregation in terms of isotopic values was reflected by segregation in terms of oxidative markers (although more markedly for oxidative damage than for antioxidant defences). Interestingly, variation in the estimated contribution of krill in the diet of penguins followed an opposite pattern to that observed for markers of oxidative status, providing evidence that inter-population differences in terms of foraging strategies can result in inter-population differences in terms of oxidative status. More studies examining simultaneously oxidative status, isotopic signature, foraging behaviour and food allocation between parents and young are, however, needed to understand better the interplay between the foraging strategies adopted by animals in their natural habitat and their oxidative status.

  1. Mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase regulates mitochondrial matrix pH.

    PubMed

    Ghafourifar, P; Richter, C

    1999-01-01

    Nitric oxide (nitrogen monoxide, NO) exerts a wide profile of its biological activities via regulation of respiration and respiration-dependent functions. The presence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in mitochondria (mtNOS) was recently reported by us (Ghafourifar and Richter, FEBS Lett. 418, 291-296, 1997) and others (Giulivi et al., J. Biol. Chem. 273, 11038-11043, 1998). Here we report that NO, provided by an NO donor as well as by mtNOS stimulation, regulates mitochondrial matrix pH, transmembrane potential and Ca2+ buffering capacity. Exogenously-added NO causes a dose-dependent matrix acidification. Also mtNOS stimulation, induced by loading mitochondria with Ca2+, causes mitochondrial matrix acidification and a drop in mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Inhibition of mtNOS's basal activity causes mitochondrial matrix alkalinization and provides a resistance to the sudden drop of mitochondrial transmembrane potential induced by mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. We conclude that mtNOS plays a critical role in regulating mitochondrial delta(pH).

  2. Exogenous N-acyl-homoserine lactones enhance the expression of flagella of Pseudomonas syringae and activate defence responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feifei; Ma, Anzhou; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Fray, Rupert G

    2016-10-18

    In order to cope with pathogens, plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to sense pathogenic attacks and to induce defence responses. The N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in bacteria regulates diverse physiological processes, including those involved in pathogenicity. In this work, we study the interactions between AHL-producing transgenic tobacco plants and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 11528 (P. syringae 11528). Both a reduced incidence of disease and decrease in the growth of P. syringae 11528 were observed in AHL-producing plants compared with wild-type plants. The present data indicate that plant-produced AHLs enhance disease resistance against this pathogen. Subsequent RNA-sequencing analysis showed that the exogenous addition of AHLs up-regulated the expression of P. syringae 11528 genes for flagella production. Expression levels of plant defence genes in AHL-producing and wild-type plants were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. These data showed that plant-produced AHLs activated a wide spectrum of defence responses in plants following inoculation, including the oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, cell wall strengthening, and the production of certain metabolites. These results demonstrate that exogenous AHLs alter the gene expression patterns of pathogens, and plant-produced AHLs either directly or indirectly enhance plant local immunity during the early stage of plant infection.

  3. REGULATION OF OBESITY AND INSULIN RESISTANCE BY NITRIC OXIDE

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease and has quickly become a world-wide pandemic with few tangible and safe treatment options. While it is generally accepted that the primary cause of obesity is energy imbalance, i.e., the calories consumed are greater than are utilized, understanding how caloric balance is regulated has proven a challenge. Many “distal” causes of obesity, such as the structural environment, occupation, and social influences, are exceedingly difficult to change or manipulate. Hence, molecular processes and pathways more proximal to the origins of obesity—those that directly regulate energy metabolism or caloric intake—appear to be more feasible targets for therapy. In particular, nitric oxide (NO) is emerging as a central regulator of energy metabolism and body composition. NO bioavailability is decreased in animal models of diet-induced obesity and in obese and insulin resistant patients, and increasing NO output has remarkable effects on obesity and insulin resistance. This review discusses the role of NO in regulating adiposity and insulin sensitivity and places its modes of action into context with the known causes and consequences of metabolic disease. PMID:24878261

  4. Salmonella Rapidly Regulates Membrane Permeability To Survive Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Joris; Reynolds, Lisa A.; Deng, Wanyin; Mills, Allan; Scholz, Roland; Imami, Koshi; Foster, Leonard J.; Duong, Franck

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria provides protection against toxic molecules, including reactive oxygen species (ROS). Decreased OM permeability can promote bacterial survival under harsh circumstances and protects against antibiotics. To better understand the regulation of OM permeability, we studied the real-time influx of hydrogen peroxide in Salmonella bacteria and discovered two novel mechanisms by which they rapidly control OM permeability. We found that pores in two major OM proteins, OmpA and OmpC, could be rapidly opened or closed when oxidative stress is encountered and that the underlying mechanisms rely on the formation of disulfide bonds in the periplasmic domain of OmpA and TrxA, respectively. Additionally, we found that a Salmonella mutant showing increased OM permeability was killed more effectively by treatment with antibiotics. Together, these results demonstrate that Gram-negative bacteria regulate the influx of ROS for defense against oxidative stress and reveal novel targets that can be therapeutically targeted to increase bacterial killing by conventional antibiotics. PMID:27507830

  5. Nitric oxide as a regulator of B. anthracis pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Taissia G.; Teunis, Allison; Vaseghi, Haley; Zhou, Weidong; Espina, Virginia; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key physiological regulator in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. It can cause a variety of biological effects by reacting with its targets or/and indirectly inducing oxidative stress. NO can also be produced by bacteria including the pathogenic Bacillus anthracis; however, its role in the infectious process only begins to emerge. NO incapacitates macrophages by S-nitrosylating the intracellular proteins and protects B. anthracis from oxidative stress. It is also implicated in the formation of toxic peroxynitrite. In this study we further assessed the effects of B. anthracis NO produced by the NO synthase (bNOS) on bacterial metabolism and host cells in experiments with the bNOS knockout Sterne strain. The mutation abrogated accumulation of nitrite and nitrate as tracer products of NO in the culture medium and markedly attenuated growth in both aerobic and microaerobic conditions. The regulatory role of NO was also suggested by the abnormally high rate of nitrate denitrification by the mutant in the presence of oxygen. Anaerobic regulation mediated by NO was reflected in reduced fermentation of glucose by the mutant correlating with the reduced toxicity of bacteria toward host cells in culture. The toxic effect of NO required permeabilization of the target cells as well as the activity of fermentation-derived metabolite in the conditions of reduced pH. The host cells demonstrated increased phosphorylation of major survivor protein kinase AKT correlating with reduced toxicity of the mutant in comparison with Sterne. Our global proteomic analysis of lymph from the lymph nodes of infected mice harboring bacteria revealed numerous changes in the pattern and levels of proteins associated with the activity of bNOS influencing key cell physiological processes relevant to energy metabolism, growth, signal transduction, stress response, septic shock, and homeostasis. This is the first in vivo observation of the bacterial NO effect on the lymphatic

  6. The cysteine desulfurase IscS of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and oxidative stress defence.

    PubMed

    Rybniker, Jan; Pojer, Florence; Marienhagen, Jan; Kolly, Gaëlle S; Chen, Jeffrey M; van Gumpel, Edeltraud; Hartmann, Pia; Cole, Stewart T

    2014-05-01

    The complex multiprotein systems for the assembly of protein-bound iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are well defined in Gram-negative model organisms. However, little is known about Fe-S cluster biogenesis in other bacterial species. The ISC (iron-sulfur cluster) operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis lacks several genes known to be essential for the function of this system in other organisms. However, the cysteine desulfurase IscSMtb (Rv number Rv3025c; Mtb denotes M. tuberculosis) is conserved in this important pathogen. The present study demonstrates that deleting iscSMtb renders the cells microaerophilic and hypersensitive to oxidative stress. Moreover, the ∆iscSMtb mutant shows impaired Fe-S cluster-dependent enzyme activity, clearly indicating that IscSMtb is associated with Fe-S cluster assembly. An extensive interaction network of IscSMtb with Fe-S proteins was identified, suggesting a novel mechanism of sulfur transfer by direct interaction with apoproteins. Interestingly, the highly homologous IscS of Escherichia coli failed to complement the ∆iscSMtb mutant and showed a less diverse protein-interaction profile. To identify a structural basis for these observations we determined the crystal structure of IscSMtb, which mirrors adaptations made in response to an ISC operon devoid of IscU-like Fe-S cluster scaffold proteins. We conclude that in M. tuberculosis IscS has been redesigned during evolution to compensate for the deletion of large parts of the ISC operon.

  7. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  8. An IFIH1 gene polymorphism associated with risk for autoimmunity regulates canonical antiviral defence pathways in Coxsackievirus infected human pancreatic islets

    PubMed Central

    Domsgen, Erna; Lind, Katharina; Kong, Lingjia; Hühn, Michael H.; Rasool, Omid; van Kuppeveld, Frank; Korsgren, Olle; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Flodström-Tullberg, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The IFIH1 gene encodes the pattern recognition receptor MDA5. A common polymorphism in IFIH1 (rs1990760, A946T) confers increased risk for autoimmune disease, including type 1-diabetes (T1D). Coxsackievirus infections are linked to T1D and cause beta-cell damage in vitro. Here we demonstrate that the rs1990760 polymorphism regulates the interferon (IFN) signature expressed by human pancreatic islets following Coxsackievirus infection. A strong IFN signature was associated with high expression of IFNλ1 and IFNλ2, linking rs1990760 to the expression of type III IFNs. In the high-responding genotype, IRF-1 expression correlated with that of type III IFN, suggesting a positive-feedback on type III IFN transcription. In summary, our study uncovers an influence of rs1990760 on the canonical effector function of MDA5 in response to an acute infection of primary human parenchymal cells with a clinically relevant virus linked to human T1D. It also highlights a previously unrecognized connection between the rs1990760 polymorphism and the expression level of type III IFNs. PMID:28000722

  9. Arsenite oxidation regulator AioR regulates bacterial chemotaxis towards arsenite in Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Kaixiang; Fan, Xia; Qiao, Zixu; Han, Yushan; McDermott, Timothy R.; Wang, Qian; Wang, Gejiao

    2017-01-01

    Some arsenite [As(III)]-oxidizing bacteria exhibit positive chemotaxis towards As(III), however, the related As(III) chemoreceptor and regulatory mechanism remain unknown. The As(III)-oxidizing bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens GW4 displays positive chemotaxis towards 0.5–2 mM As(III). Genomic analyses revealed a putative chemoreceptor-encoding gene, mcp, located in the arsenic gene island and having a predicted promoter binding site for the As(III) oxidation regulator AioR. Expression of mcp and other chemotaxis related genes (cheA, cheY2 and fliG) was inducible by As(III), but not in the aioR mutant. Using capillary assays and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence spectra analysis, Mcp was confirmed to be responsible for chemotaxis towards As(III) and to bind As(III) (but not As(V) nor phosphate) as part of the sensing mechanism. A bacterial one-hybrid system technique and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that AioR interacts with the mcp regulatory region in vivo and in vitro, and the precise AioR binding site was confirmed using DNase I foot-printing. Taken together, these results indicate that this Mcp is responsible for the chemotactic response towards As(III) and is regulated by AioR. Additionally, disrupting the mcp gene affected bacterial As(III) oxidation and growth, inferring that Mcp may exert some sort of functional connection between As(III) oxidation and As(III) chemotaxis. PMID:28256605

  10. Limiting immunopathology: Interaction between carotenoids and enzymatic antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Babin, A; Saciat, C; Teixeira, M; Troussard, J-P; Motreuil, S; Moreau, J; Moret, Y

    2015-04-01

    The release of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) during the inflammatory response generates damages to host tissues, referred to as immunopathology, and is an important factor in ecological immunology. The integrated antioxidant system, comprising endogenous antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase SOD, and catalase CAT) and dietary antioxidants (e.g. carotenoids), helps to cope with immune-mediated oxidative stress. Crustaceans store large amounts of dietary carotenoids for yet unclear reasons. While being immunostimulants and antioxidants, the interaction of these pigments with antioxidant enzymes remains unclear. Here, we tested the interaction between dietary supplementation with carotenoids and immune challenge on immune defences and the activity of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT, in the amphipod crustacean Gammarus pulex. Dietary supplementation increased the concentrations of circulating carotenoids and haemocytes in the haemolymph, while the immune response induced the consumption of circulating carotenoids and a drop of haemocyte density. Interestingly, supplemented gammarids exhibited down-regulated SOD activity but high CAT activity compared to control ones. Our study reveals specific interactions of dietary carotenoids with endogenous antioxidant enzymes, and further underlines the potential importance of carotenoids in the evolution of immunity and/or of antioxidant mechanisms in crustaceans.

  11. Microglial self-defence mediated through GLT-1 and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Persson, Mikael; Rönnbäck, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is stored in synaptic vesicles in presynaptic neurons. It is released into the synaptic cleft to provide signalling to postsynaptic neurons. Normally, the astroglial glutamate transporters GLT-1 and GLAST take up glutamate to mediate a high signal-to-noise ratio in the synaptic signalling, and also to prevent excitotoxic effects by glutamate. In astrocytes, glutamate is transformed into glutamine, which is safely transported back to neurons. However, in pathological conditions, such as an ischemia or virus infection, astroglial transporters are down-regulated which could lead to excitotoxicity. Lately, it was shown that even microglia can express glutamate transporters during pathological events. Microglia have two systems for glutamate transport: GLT-1 for transport into the cells and the x (c) (-) system for transport out of the cells. We here review results from our work and others, which demonstrate that microglia in culture express GLT-1, but not GLAST, and transport glutamate from the extracellular space. We also show that TNF-α can induce increased microglial GLT-1 expression, possibly associating the expression with inflammatory systems. Furthermore, glutamate taken up through GLT-1 may be used for direct incorporation into glutathione and to fuel the intracellular glutamate pool to allow cystine uptake through the x (c) (-) system. This can lead to a defence against oxidative stress and have an antiviral function.

  12. Regulation of Injury-Induced Neurogenesis by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Bruno P.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2012-01-01

    The finding that neural stem cells (NSCs) are able to divide, migrate, and differentiate into several cellular types in the adult brain raised a new hope for restorative neurology. Nitric oxide (NO), a pleiotropic signaling molecule in the central nervous system (CNS), has been described to be able to modulate neurogenesis, acting as a pro- or antineurogenic agent. Some authors suggest that NO is a physiological inhibitor of neurogenesis, while others described NO to favor neurogenesis, particularly under inflammatory conditions. Thus, targeting the NO system may be a powerful strategy to control the formation of new neurons. However, the exact mechanisms by which NO regulates neural proliferation and differentiation are not yet completely clarified. In this paper we will discuss the potential interest of the modulation of the NO system for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or other pathological conditions that may affect the CNS. PMID:22997523

  13. Pregnane X receptor regulates drug metabolism and transport in the vasculature and protects from oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swales, Karen E.; Moore, Rick; Truss, Nicola J.; Tucker, Arthur; Warner, Timothy D.; Negishi, Masahiko; Bishop-Bailey, David

    2012-01-01

    Aims Circulating endogenous, dietary, and foreign chemicals can contribute to vascular dysfunction. The mechanism by which the vasculature protects itself from these chemicals is unknown. This study investigates whether the pregnane X receptor (PXR), the major transcriptional regulator of hepatic drug metabolism and transport that responds to such xenobiotics, mediates vascular protection by co-ordinating a defence gene programme in the vasculature. Methods and results PXR was detected in primary human and rat aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cells (SMC) and blood vessels including the human and rat aorta. Metabolic PXR target genes cytochrome P450 3A, 2B, 2C, and glutathione S-transferase mRNA and activity were induced by PXR ligands in rodent and human vascular cells and absent in the aortas from PXR-null mice stimulated in vivo or in rat aortic SMC expressing dominant-negative PXR. Activation of aortic PXR by classical agonists had several protective effects: increased xenobiotic metabolism demonstrated by bioactivation of the pro-drug clopidogrel, which reduced adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation; increased expression of multidrug resistance protein 1, mediating chemical efflux from the vasculature; and protection from reactive oxygen species-mediated cell death. Conclusion PXR co-ordinately up-regulates drug metabolism, transport, and antioxidant genes to protect the vasculature from endogenous and exogenous insults, thus representing a novel gatekeeper for vascular defence. PMID:22166712

  14. Molecular regulation of tumour angiogenesis by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2009-12-01

    As tumors grow, their original vasculature can be insufficient to supply the growing tissue mass, and consequently local hypoxia develops. Thus neovascularisation is a key feature determining growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. This is, at least in part, mediated by humoral factors known to stimulate angiogenesis, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2). Among the multiple angiogenic modulators released by tumor and stromal cells, a key role is played by nitric oxide (NO). Beside its capacity to regulate permeability and blood flow, NO has been reported to exert angiogenic properties in various tumor models. The focus of this review will be the proangiogenic role of NO in the tumor microenvironment and its multiple mechanism of action on vascular endothelium. Particular attention will be devoted to the role of NO in regulating metalloproteinase activity on cultured microvascular endothelium and in the in vivo rabbit cornea assay. Finally, the potential clinical outcomes and expectations related to this topic will be discussed.

  15. Nitric oxide regulates neutrophil migration through microparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Sarah; Dixon, Rachel; Norman, Keith; Hellewell, Paul; Ridger, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in regulating neutrophil migration has been investigated. Human neutrophil migration to interleukin (IL)-8 (1 nmol/L) was measured after a 1-hour incubation using a 96-well chemotaxis plate assay. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) significantly (P < 0.001) enhanced IL-8-induced migration by up to 45%. Anti-CD18 significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited both IL-8-induced and L-NAME enhanced migration. Antibodies to L-selectin or PSGL-1 had no effect on IL-8-induced migration but prevented the increased migration to IL-8 induced by L-NAME. L-NAME induced generation of neutrophil-derived microparticles that was significantly (P < 0.01) greater than untreated neutrophils or D-NAME. This microparticle formation was dependent on calpain activity and superoxide production. Only microparticles from L-NAME and not untreated or D-NAME-treated neutrophils induced a significant (P < 0.01) increase in IL-8-induced migration and transendothelial migration. Pretreatment of microparticles with antibodies to L-selectin (DREG-200) or PSGL-1 (PL-1) significantly (P < 0.001) inhibited this effect. The ability of L-NAME-induced microparticles to enhance migration was found to be dependent on the number of microparticles produced and not an increase in microparticle surface L-selectin or PSGL-1 expression. These data show that NO can modulate neutrophil migration by regulating microparticle formation.

  16. Genetic dissection of basal defence responsiveness in accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shakoor; Van Hulten, Marieke; Martin, Janet; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M; Ton, Jurriaan

    2011-07-01

    Basal resistance involves a multitude of pathogen- and herbivore-inducible defence mechanisms, ranging from localized callose deposition to systemic defence gene induction by salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA). In this study, we have explored and dissected genetic variation in the responsiveness of basal defence mechanisms within a selection of Arabidopsis accessions. Responsiveness of JA-induced PDF1.2 gene expression was associated with enhanced basal resistance against the necrotrophic fungus Plectosphaerella cucumerina and the herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. Conversely, accessions showing augmented PR-1 induction upon SA treatment were more resistant to the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, and constitutively expressed defence-related transcription factor (TF) genes. Unexpectedly, accessions with primed responsiveness to SA deposited comparatively little callose after treatment with microbe-associated molecular patterns. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis identified two loci regulating flagellin-induced callose and one locus regulating SA-induced PR-1 expression. The latter QTL was found to contribute to basal resistance against P. syringae. None of the defence regulatory QTLs influenced plant growth, suggesting that the constitutive defence priming conferred by these loci is not associated with major costs on plant growth. Our study demonstrates that natural variation in basal resistance can be exploited to identify genetic loci that prime the plant's basal defence arsenal.

  17. α-Tocopherol prevents lymphoma by improving antioxidant defence system of mice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Renu; Vinayak, Manjula

    2013-02-01

    Increased level of ROS causes oxidative stress and leads to various pathological conditions including cancer. Therefore antioxidants should contribute to cancer prevention by improving antioxidant defense system and thereby protecting the cell from oxidative damage. In the present study we have validated the hypothesis by evaluating the antioxidant action of α-tocopherol. The effect of α-tocopherol is analyzed on oxidative stress as well as its regulation on antioxidant defense system. Oxidative stress is measured in terms of reduced glutathione and protein carbonylation. To evaluate the role of α-tocopherol on antioxidant defense system, the activities and expressions of antioxidant enzymes like glutathione peroxidase, catalase and superoxide dismutase are analyzed by activity gel assay and by RT-PCR respectively. These enzyme activities and/or expressions are found to be improved by α-tocopherol in lymphoma bearing mice which brings down the oxidative stress as reflected by increased level of reduced glutathione as well as decreased protein carbonylation. The effect of α-tocopherol is further analyzed on general characteristics of lymphoma growth like body weight, longevity, accumulation of ascites fluid, angiogenesis in peritoneum, morphology of liver and abundance of lymphocytes. The antioxidant α-tocopherol is found to check lymphoma growth. The results suggest that α-tocopherol contributes to lymphoma prevention by improving antioxidant defence system of mice.

  18. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  19. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  20. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  1. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  2. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  3. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  4. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  6. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  8. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  9. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1475 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1475 Section 52.1475 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1475 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of this... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for sulfur oxides in the Nevada Intrastate Region. (b) Article...

  12. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.2731 Section 52.2731 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Rico § 52.2731 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The requirements of subpart G of... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo...

  13. Defence Capability Plan 2006-2016

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-14

    Version Points of Contact Phase 8B Capability Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Squadron Leader Greg Trott Ms Katrina Burzynski (02) 6265...Capability Plan 2006 – 2016 Public Version 0 Points of Contact Phase 7 Capability Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Major Paul Randall Mr Ross...Staff: Defence Materiel Organisation: Major Paul Randall Lieutenant Colonel Duncan Roach (02) 6265 4441 (03) 9282 5380 LAND 58 Phase 3 Weapon

  14. Australian Defence Force Demographic Data and Challenges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE DEMOGRAPHIC DATA AND CHALLENGES Directorate of Strategic Personnel Planning and Research DSPPR Technical Note 10/2001...DATE 00 OCT 2001 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Australian Defence Force Demographic Data and Challenges 5a...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 AUSTRALIAN DEFENCE FORCE DEMOGRAPHIC DATA AND CHALLENGES The findings and views expressed in this report are the results

  15. Defence Reporter. Summer/Autumn 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    defence science and technology literature. Defence Reporter is one part of a series of services and products produced by ATHENA to keep readers up ...To sign up for this free service, please send an e-mail with your full name and address details to: DefenceReporter@dstl.gov.uk. © Crown Copyright...methodological limitations. An alternative approach based on ‘bottom up ’ comparisons with existing platforms of similar capabilities is also described. In

  16. Metabolomic Assessment of Induced and Activated Chemical Defence in the Invasive Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla

    PubMed Central

    Nylund, Göran M.; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  17. Metabolomic assessment of induced and activated chemical defence in the invasive red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla.

    PubMed

    Nylund, Göran M; Weinberger, Florian; Rempt, Martin; Pohnert, Georg

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with terrestrial plants the mechanistic knowledge of chemical defences is poor for marine macroalgae. This restricts our understanding in the chemically mediated interactions that take place between algae and other organisms. Technical advances such as metabolomics, however, enable new approaches towards the characterisation of the chemically mediated interactions of organisms with their environment. We address defence responses in the red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla using mass spectrometry based metabolomics in combination with bioassays. Being invasive in the north Atlantic this alga is likely to possess chemical defences according to the prediction that well-defended exotics are most likely to become successful invaders in systems dominated by generalist grazers, such as marine macroalgal communities. We investigated the effect of intense herbivore feeding and simulated herbivory by mechanical wounding of the algae. Both processes led to similar changes in the metabolic profile. Feeding experiments with the generalist isopod grazer Idotea baltica showed that mechanical wounding caused a significant increase in grazer resistance. Structure elucidation of the metabolites of which some were up-regulated more than 100 times in the wounded tissue, revealed known and novel eicosanoids as major components. Among these were prostaglandins, hydroxylated fatty acids and arachidonic acid derived conjugated lactones. Bioassays with pure metabolites showed that these eicosanoids are part of the innate defence system of macroalgae, similarly to animal systems. In accordance with an induced defence mechanism application of extracts from wounded tissue caused a significant increase in grazer resistance and the up-regulation of other pathways than in the activated defence. Thus, this study suggests that G. vermiculophylla chemically deters herbivory by two lines of defence, a rapid wound-activated process followed by a slower inducible defence. By unravelling

  18. Involvement of protein kinases and calcium in the NO-signalling cascade for defence-gene induction in ozonated tobacco plants.

    PubMed

    Pasqualini, S; Reale, L; Calderini, O; Pagiotti, R; Ederli, L

    2012-07-01

    This study analyses the signalling pathways triggered by nitric oxide (NO) in response to ozone (O(3)) fumigation of tobacco plants, with particular attention to protein kinase cascades and free cytosolic Ca(2+) in defence-gene activation. NO was visualized with the NO probe DAF-FM. Using a pharmacological approach, the effects of different inhibitors on the expression profiles of NO-dependent defence genes were monitored using RT-PCR. The assay of the kinase activity of the immunoprecipitates complexes shows that O(3) stimulates a 48 kDa salicylic acid (SA)-induced protein kinase (SIPK) in an NO-dependent manner. The O(3)-induced alternative oxidase 1a (AOX1a) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase a (PALa) genes are modulated by phosphorylation by protein kinases, and SIPK might have a role in this up-regulation. By contrast, protein dephosphorylation mediates pathogenesis-related protein 1a (PR1a) expression in O(3)-treated tobacco plants. Ca(2+) is essential, but not sufficient, to promote NO accumulation in ozonated tobacco plants. Intracellular Ca(2+) transients are also essential for PALa up-regulation and cGMP-induced PR1a expression. Partial dependence on intracellular Ca(2+) suggests two different pathways of SA accumulation and PR1a induction. A model summarizing the signalling networks involving NO, SA, and the cellular messengers in this O(3)-induced defence gene activation is proposed.

  19. HIF and reactive oxygen species regulate oxidative phosphorylation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, Eric; Cízková, Alena; Demont, Jocelyne; Vojtísková, Alena; Pecina, Petr; Franssen-van Hal, Nicole L W; Keijer, Jaap; Simonnet, Hélène; Ivánek, Robert; Kmoch, Stanislav; Godinot, Catherine; Houstek, Josef

    2008-08-01

    A decrease in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is characteristic of many cancer types and, in particular, of clear cell renal carcinoma (CCRC) deficient in von Hippel-Lindau (vhl) gene. In the absence of functional pVHL, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1-alpha and HIF2-alpha subunits are stabilized, which induces the transcription of many genes including those involved in glycolysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism. Transfection of these cells with vhl is known to restore HIF-alpha subunit degradation and to reduce glycolytic genes transcription. We show that such transfection with vhl of 786-0 CCRC (which are devoid of HIF1-alpha) also increased the content of respiratory chain subunits. However, the levels of most transcripts encoding OXPHOS subunits were not modified. Inhibition of HIF2-alpha synthesis by RNA interference in pVHL-deficient 786-0 CCRC also restored respiratory chain subunit content and clearly demonstrated a key role of HIF in OXPHOS regulation. In agreement with these observations, stabilization of HIF-alpha subunit by CoCl(2) decreased respiratory chain subunit levels in CCRC cells expressing pVHL. In addition, HIF stimulated ROS production and mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase content. OXPHOS subunit content was also decreased by added H(2)O(2.) Interestingly, desferrioxamine (DFO) that also stabilized HIF did not decrease respiratory chain subunit level. While CoCl(2) significantly stimulates ROS production, DFO is known to prevent hydroxyl radical production by inhibiting Fenton reactions. This indicates that the HIF-induced decrease in OXPHOS is at least in part mediated by hydroxyl radical production.

  20. Sex-based differential regulation of oxidative stress in the vasculature by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rommel C.; Bahnson, Edward S.M.; Havelka, George E.; Cantu-Medellin, Nadiezhda; Kelley, Eric E.; Kibbe, Melina R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (•NO) is more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia following arterial injury in male versus female rodents, though the etiology is unclear. Given that superoxide (O2•−) regulates cellular proliferation, and •NO regulates superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) in the vasculature, we hypothesized that •NO differentially regulates SOD-1 based on sex. Materials and methods Male and female vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) were harvested from the aortae of Sprague-Dawley rats. O2•− levels were quantified by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and HPLC. sod-1 gene expression was assayed by qPCR. SOD-1, SOD-2, and catalase protein levels were detected by Western blot. SOD-1 activity was measured via colorimetric assay. The rat carotid artery injury model was performed on Sprague-Dawley rats ±•NO treatment and SOD-1 protein levels were examined by Western blot. Results In vitro, male VSMC have higher O2•− levels and lower SOD − 1 activity at baseline compared to female VSMC (P < 0.05). •NO decreased O2•− levels and increased SOD − 1 activity in male (P<0.05) but not female VSMC. •NO also increased sod− 1 gene expression and SOD − 1 protein levels in male (P<0.05) but not female VSMC. In vivo, SOD-1 levels were 3.7-fold higher in female versus male carotid arteries at baseline. After injury, SOD-1 levels decreased in both sexes, but •NO increased SOD-1 levels 3-fold above controls in males, but returned to baseline in females. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that regulation of the redox environment at baseline and following exposure to •NO is sex-dependent in the vasculature. These data suggest that sex-based differential redox regulation may be one mechanism by which •NO is more effective at inhibiting neointimal hyperplasia in male versus female rodents. PMID:25617803

  1. Plant defences against herbivore and insect attack

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plants deploy a number of defences against attack by insects and other herbivores. Direct defence is conferred by plant products and structures that deter or kill the herbivores. Chemical toxins and deterrents vary widely among plant species, and some typical toxins include alkaloids, terpenoids, st...

  2. Evolutionarily stable defence and signalling of that defence.

    PubMed

    Broom, M; Speed, M P; Ruxton, G D

    2006-09-07

    We examine the evolution and maintenance of defence and conspicuousness in prey species using a game theoretic model. In contrast to previous works, predators can raise as well as lower their attack probabilities as a consequence of encountering moderately defended prey. Our model predicts four distinct possibilities for evolutionarily stable strategies (ESSs) featuring maximum crypsis. Namely that such a solution can exist with (1) zero toxicity, (2) a non-zero but non-aversive level of toxicity, (3) a high, aversive level of toxicity or (4) that no such maximally cryptic solution exists. Maximally cryptic prey may still invest in toxins, because of the increased chance of surviving an attack (should they be discovered) that comes from having toxins. The toxin load of maximally cryptic prey may be sufficiently strong that the predators will find them aversive, and seek to avoid similar looking prey in future. However, this aversiveness does not always necessarily trigger aposematic signalling, and highly toxic prey can still be maximally cryptic, because the increased initial rate of attack from becoming more conspicuous is not necessarily always compensated for by increased avoidance of aversive prey by predators. In other circumstances, the optimal toxin load may be insufficient to generate aversion but still be non-zero (because it increases survival), and in yet other circumstances, it is optimal to make no investment in toxins at all. The model also predicts ESSs where the prey are highly defended and aversive and where this defence is advertised at a cost of increased conspicuousness to predators. In many circumstances there is an infinite array of these aposematic ESSs, where the precise appearance is unimportant as long as it is highly visible and shared by all members of the population. Yet another class of solutions is possible where there is strong between-individual variation in appearance between conspicuous, poorly defended prey.

  3. RNA silencing is required for Arabidopsis defence against Verticillium wilt disease

    PubMed Central

    Ellendorff, Ursula; Fradin, Emilie F.; de Jonge, Ronnie; Thomma, Bart P. H. J.

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is a conserved mechanism in eukaryotes that plays an important role in various biological processes including regulation of gene expression. RNA silencing also plays a role in genome stability and protects plants against invading nucleic acids such as transgenes and viruses. Recently, RNA silencing has been found to play a role in defence against bacterial plant pathogens in Arabidopsis through modulating host defence responses. In this study, it is shown that gene silencing plays a role in plant defence against multicellular microbial pathogens; vascular fungi belonging to the Verticillium genus. Several components of RNA silencing pathways were tested, of which many were found to affect Verticillium defence. Remarkably, no altered defence towards other fungal pathogens that include Alternaria brassicicola, Botrytis cinerea, and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, but also the vascular pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, was recorded. Since the observed differences in Verticillium susceptibility cannot be explained by notable differences in root architecture, it is speculated that the gene silencing mechanisms affect regulation of Verticillium-specific defence responses. PMID:19098131

  4. RNA silencing is required for Arabidopsis defence against Verticillium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Ellendorff, Ursula; Fradin, Emilie F; de Jonge, Ronnie; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2009-01-01

    RNA silencing is a conserved mechanism in eukaryotes that plays an important role in various biological processes including regulation of gene expression. RNA silencing also plays a role in genome stability and protects plants against invading nucleic acids such as transgenes and viruses. Recently, RNA silencing has been found to play a role in defence against bacterial plant pathogens in Arabidopsis through modulating host defence responses. In this study, it is shown that gene silencing plays a role in plant defence against multicellular microbial pathogens; vascular fungi belonging to the Verticillium genus. Several components of RNA silencing pathways were tested, of which many were found to affect Verticillium defence. Remarkably, no altered defence towards other fungal pathogens that include Alternaria brassicicola, Botrytis cinerea, and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, but also the vascular pathogen Fusarium oxysporum, was recorded. Since the observed differences in Verticillium susceptibility cannot be explained by notable differences in root architecture, it is speculated that the gene silencing mechanisms affect regulation of Verticillium-specific defence responses.

  5. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Izbiańska, Karolina; Deckert, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation. PMID:26082792

  6. Emerging importance of oxidative stress in regulating striated muscle elasticity.

    PubMed

    Beckendorf, Lisa; Linke, Wolfgang A

    2015-02-01

    The contractile function of striated muscle cells is altered by oxidative/nitrosative stress, which can be observed under physiological conditions but also in diseases like heart failure or muscular dystrophy. Oxidative stress causes oxidative modifications of myofilament proteins and can impair myocyte contractility. Recent evidence also suggests an important effect of oxidative stress on muscle elasticity and passive stiffness via modifications of the giant protein titin. In this review we provide a short overview of known oxidative modifications in thin and thick filament proteins and then discuss in more detail those oxidative stress-related modifications altering titin stiffness directly or indirectly. Direct modifications of titin include reversible disulfide bonding within the cardiac-specific N2-Bus domain, which increases titin stiffness, and reversible S-glutathionylation of cryptic cysteines in immunoglobulin-like domains, which only takes place after the domains have unfolded and which reduces titin stiffness in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Indirect effects of oxidative stress on titin can occur via reversible modifications of protein kinase signalling pathways (especially the NO-cGMP-PKG axis), which alter the phosphorylation level of certain disordered titin domains and thereby modulate titin stiffness. Oxidative stress also activates proteases such as matrix-metalloproteinase-2 and (indirectly via increasing the intracellular calcium level) calpain-1, both of which cleave titin to irreversibly reduce titin-based stiffness. Although some of these mechanisms require confirmation in the in vivo setting, there is evidence that oxidative stress-related modifications of titin are relevant in the context of biomarker design and represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in some forms of muscle and heart disease.

  7. Uncoupling of reactive oxygen species accumulation and defence signalling in the metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, Helen N; Eyles, Chris J; Bennett, Mark H; Smith, J Andrew C; Preston, Gail M

    2013-09-01

    The metal hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens is protected from disease by the accumulation of high concentrations of metals in its aerial tissues, which are toxic to many pathogens. As these metals can lead to the production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS), metal hyperaccumulator plants have developed highly effective ROS tolerance mechanisms, which might quench ROS-based signals. We therefore investigated whether metal accumulation alters defence signalling via ROS in this plant. We studied the effect of zinc (Zn) accumulation by N. caerulescens on pathogen-induced ROS production, salicylic acid accumulation and downstream defence responses, such as callose deposition and pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression, to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. The accumulation of Zn caused increased superoxide production in N. caerulescens, but inoculation with P. syringae did not elicit the defensive oxidative burst typical of most plants. Defences dependent on signalling through ROS (callose and PR gene expression) were also modified or absent in N. caerulescens, whereas salicylic acid production in response to infection was retained. These observations suggest that metal hyperaccumulation is incompatible with defence signalling through ROS and that, as metal hyperaccumulation became effective as a form of elemental defence, normal defence responses became progressively uncoupled from ROS signalling in N. caerulescens.

  8. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  9. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  10. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  11. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  12. 40 CFR 52.1601 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...: Sulfur oxides. 52.1601 Section 52.1601 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... § 52.1601 Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides. (a) The applicable limitation on the sulfur... permit applied for that would authorize a relaxation in the sulfur-in-coal limitation at any...

  13. Oxidative stress and DNA methylation regulation in the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yara, Sabrina; Lavoie, Jean-Claude; Levy, Emile

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is implicated in tissue-specific gene expression and genomic imprinting. It is modulated by environmental factors, especially nutrition. Modified DNA methylation patterns may contribute to health problems and susceptibility to complex diseases. Current advances have suggested that the metabolic syndrome (MS) is a programmable disease, which is characterized by epigenetic modifications of vital genes when exposed to oxidative stress. Therefore, the main objective of this paper is to critically review the central context of MS while presenting the most recent knowledge related to epigenetic alterations that are promoted by oxidative stress. Potential pro-oxidant mechanisms that orchestrate changes in methylation profiling and are related to obesity, diabetes and hypertension are discussed. It is anticipated that the identification and understanding of the role of DNA methylation marks could be used to uncover early predictors and define drugs or diet-related treatments able to delay or reverse epigenetic changes, thereby combating MS burden.

  14. Two thiadiazole compounds promote rice defence against Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae by suppressing the bacterium's production of extracellular polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Xiaoyue; Dong, Wenxia; Guo, Shijian; Xu, Shu; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-10-01

    Thiazole, isothiazole, thiadiazole, and their derivatives are used to control various human, animal and plant diseases. In addition to having direct anti-microbial and anti-fungal properties, these compounds are thought to induce host defences, but the mechanism of defence induction remains poorly understood. This article reports that the thiadiazoles of zinc thiazole and bismerthiazol induce H2 O2 accumulation, up-regulation of defence-related genes, callose deposition and hypersensitive response-like cell death in rice leaves infected with Xanthomonas oryaze pv. oryzae (Xoo) strain ZJ173, but not in non-infected leaves. These defence responses in Xoo-infected leaves were suppressed by the exogenous application of catalase, which reduces H2 O2 accumulation. The application of extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs) extracted from strain ZJ173 significantly compromised rice defence against ZJ173 with or without thiadiazole treatment. The EPS-deficient Xoo mutant ∆gumH triggered a stronger defence than its parent strain ZJ173. The thiadiazole treatments reduced EPS production by strain ZJ173, but not by the thiadiazole-resistant strain 2-1-1, which is thiadiazole resistant in vivo, but not in vitro; moreover, enhanced defence was not detected in thiadiazole-treated rice inoculated with 2-1-1. Based on these data, we infer that zinc thiazole and bismerthiazol promote rice defence against Xoo by inhibiting the production of bacterial EPS.

  15. Anosognosia as motivated unawareness: the 'defence' hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Oliver H; Fotopoulou, Aikaterini; Solms, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Anosognosia for hemiplegia has seen a century of almost continuous research, yet a definitive understanding of its mechanism remains elusive. Essentially, anosognosic patients hold quasi-delusional beliefs about their paralysed limbs, in spite of all the contrary evidence, repeated questioning, and logical argument. We review a range of findings suggesting that emotion and motivation play an important role in anosognosia. We conclude that anosognosia involves (amongst other things) a process of psychological defence. This conclusion stems from a wide variety of clinical and experimental investigations, including data on implicit awareness of deficit, fluctuations in awareness over time, and dramatic effects upon awareness of psychological interventions such as psychotherapy, reframing of the emotional consequences of the paralysis, and first versus third person perspectival manipulations. In addition, we review and refute the (eight) arguments historically raised against the 'defence' hypothesis, including the claim that a defence-based account cannot explain the lateralised nature of the disorder. We argue that damage to a well-established right-lateralised emotion regulation system, with links to psychological processes that appear to underpin allocentric spatial cognition, plays a key role in anosognosia (at least in some patients). We conclude with a discussion of implications for clinical practice.

  16. Creatine-induced activation of antioxidative defence in myotube cultures revealed by explorative NMR-based metabonomics and proteomics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Creatine is a key intermediate in energy metabolism and supplementation of creatine has been used for increasing muscle mass, strength and endurance. Creatine supplementation has also been reported to trigger the skeletal muscle expression of insulin like growth factor I, to increase the fat-free mass and improve cognition in elderly, and more explorative approaches like transcriptomics has revealed additional information. The aim of the present study was to reveal additional insight into the biochemical effects of creatine supplementation at the protein and metabolite level by integrating the explorative techniques, proteomics and NMR metabonomics, in a systems biology approach. Methods Differentiated mouse myotube cultures (C2C12) were exposed to 5 mM creatine monohydrate (CMH) for 24 hours. For proteomics studies, lysed myotubes were analyzed in single 2-DGE gels where the first dimension of protein separation was pI 5-8 and second dimension was a 12.5% Criterion gel. Differentially expressed protein spots of significance were excised from the gel, desalted and identified by peptide mass fingerprinting using MALDI-TOF MS. For NMR metabonomic studies, chloroform/methanol extractions of the myotubes were subjected to one-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy and the intracellular oxidative status of myotubes was assessed by intracellular DCFH2 oxidation after 24 h pre-incubation with CMH. Results The identified differentially expressed proteins included vimentin, malate dehydrogenase, peroxiredoxin, thioredoxin dependent peroxide reductase, and 75 kDa and 78 kDa glucose regulated protein precursors. After CMH exposure, up-regulated proteomic spots correlated positively with the NMR signals from creatine, while down-regulated proteomic spots were negatively correlated with these NMR signals. The identified differentially regulated proteins were related to energy metabolism, glucose regulated stress, cellular structure and the antioxidative defence system. The

  17. Comparing systemic defence-related gene expression changes upon migratory and sedentary nematode attack in rice.

    PubMed

    Kyndt, T; Nahar, K; Haegeman, A; De Vleesschauwer, D; Höfte, M; Gheysen, G

    2012-03-01

    Complex defence signalling pathways, controlled by different hormones, are known to be involved in the reaction of plants to a wide range of biotic and abiotic stress factors. Here, we studied the differential expression of genes involved in stress and defence responses in systemic tissue of rice infected with the root knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne graminicola and the migratory root rot nematode Hirschmanniella oryzae, two agronomically important rice pathogens with very different lifestyles. qRT-PCR revealed that all investigated systemic tissues had significantly lower expression of isochorismate synthase, a key enzyme for salicylic acid production involved in basal defence and systemic acquired resistance. The systemic defence response upon migratory nematode infection was remarkably similar to fungal rice blast infection. Almost all investigated defence-related genes were up-regulated in rice shoots 3 days after root rot nematode attack, including the phenylpropanoid pathway, ethylene pathway and PR genes, but many of which were suppressed at 7 dpi. Systemic shoot tissue of RKN-infected plants showed similar attenuation of expression of almost all studied genes already at 3 dpi, with clear attenuation of the ethylene pathway and methyl jasmonate biosynthesis. These results provide an interesting starting point for further studies to elucidate how nematodes are able to suppress systemic plant defence mechanisms and the effect in multitrophic interactions.

  18. The mechanical defence advantage of small seeds.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Evan C; Wright, S Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Seed size and toughness affect seed predators, and size-dependent investment in mechanical defence could affect relationships between seed size and predation. We tested how seed toughness and mechanical defence traits (tissue density and protective tissue content) are related to seed size among tropical forest species. Absolute toughness increased with seed size. However, smaller seeds had higher specific toughness both within and among species, with the smallest seeds requiring over 2000 times more energy per gram to break than the largest seeds. Investment in mechanical defence traits varied widely but independently of the toughness-mass allometry. Instead, a physical scaling relationship confers a toughness advantage on small seeds independent of selection on defence traits and without a direct cost. This scaling relationship may contribute to seed size diversity by decreasing fitness differences among large and small seeds. Allometric scaling of toughness reconciles predictions and conflicting empirical relationships between seed size and predation.

  19. Iron oxides, dissolved silica, and regulation of marine phosphate concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planavsky, N.; Reinhard, C.; Lyons, T.

    2008-12-01

    Phosphorous concentrations in iron oxide-rich sediments reflect orthophosphate levels in the water column from which iron oxides precipitated. Sediment P/Fe ratios are also strongly influenced by the concentrations of dissolved species that inhibit orthophosphate-to-ferrihydrite sorption, most notably silica. It may, therefore, be possible to use P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments to estimate past dissolved P concentrations, if one considers the evolution of the silica cycle. A compilation of Fe and P data in iron oxide-rich sediments through time reveals an increase in P/Fe ratios after the Jurassic. We propose that this trend indicates evolution of the iron-oxide phosphate removal mechanism caused by decreasing levels of sorption inhibition by dissolved silica. The large difference in P/Fe ratios in Cenozoic versus older iron-oxide rich sediments can be linked with Si drawdown caused by the proliferation of siliceous plankton in the Cretaceous. There is also a late Mesozoic or Cenozoic increase in V/Fe ratios, which provides additional evidence for lower ferrihydrite anion sorption efficiency prior to diatom radiation. P/Fe ratios in iron oxide-rich sediments from the early and middle Phanerozoic are comparable to the ratios in iron formations previously presented as evidence for an early Precambrian phosphate crisis (Bjerrum and Canfield, 2002, Nature, 417:159-162). Given the compelling evidence for higher Si concentrations in the Precambrian compared to the Phanerozoic and dissolved P concentrations comparable to modern levels throughout the Phanerozoic, the presented trend of P/Fe ratios suggests dissolved P concentrations were higher in Precambrian than Phanerozoic oceans. High dissolved P levels in the Precambrian may have been linked to inhibited carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) formation as a result of persistently high levels of carbonate supersaturation. Carbonate ion substitution into CFA scales with the ambient carbonate ion activity and increases

  20. Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence Procurement Jonathan Barnes KPMG Corporate Finance Report Documentation Page Report Date...25SEP2001 Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) 25SEP2001 - 27SEP2001 Title and Subtitle Public Private Partnerships Applicability to Defence...unclassified Classification of Abstract unclassified Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 6 kpmg Aim Provide an appreciation of: n Public Private Partnerships

  1. Calcium in plant defence-signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lecourieux, David; Ranjeva, Raoul; Pugin, Alain

    2006-01-01

    In plant cells, the calcium ion is a ubiquitous intracellular second messenger involved in numerous signalling pathways. Variations in the cytosolic concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt) couple a large array of signals and responses. Here we concentrate on calcium signalling in plant defence responses, particularly on the generation of the calcium signal and downstream calcium-dependent events participating in the establishment of defence responses with special reference to calcium-binding proteins.

  2. The Harbour Defence IKC2 Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    Choon Kiat, Tan Defence Science and Technolgy Agency 1 Depot Road #22-01 DefenceTechnology Tower A Singapore 109679 Phone : +65 63732338 Fax...Command Post (Desktop) Mobile Units (PDA) Radar 1 Web Service Radar 2 Web Service Radar 1 Tracks Msg Radar 2 Tracks Msg Web Service Abstraction...was found to be adequate for the mobile forces, providing a relatively constant throughput of 8 kbps throughout the base, though minor service

  3. Light acclimation, retrograde signalling, cell death and immune defences in plants.

    PubMed

    Karpiński, Stanisław; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Wituszyńska, Weronika; Burdiak, Paweł

    2013-04-01

    This review confronts the classical view of plant immune defence and light acclimation with recently published data. Earlier findings have linked plant immune defences to nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR)-dependent recognition of pathogen effectors and to the role of plasma membrane-localized NADPH-dependent oxidoreductase (AtRbohD), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). However, recent results suggest that plant immune defence also depends on the absorption of excessive light energy and photorespiration. Rapid changes in light intensity and quality often cause the absorption of energy, which is in excess of that required for photosynthesis. Such excessive light energy is considered to be a factor triggering photoinhibition and disturbance in ROS/hormonal homeostasis, which leads to cell death in foliar tissues. We highlight here the tight crosstalk between ROS- and SA-dependent pathways leading to light acclimation, and defence responses leading to pathogen resistance. We also show that LESION SIMULATING DISEASE 1 (LSD1) regulates and integrates these processes. Moreover, we discuss the role of plastid-nucleus signal transduction, photorespiration, photoelectrochemical signalling and 'light memory' in the regulation of acclimation and immune defence responses. All of these results suggest that plants have evolved a genetic system that simultaneously regulates systemic acquired resistance (SAR), cell death and systemic acquired acclimation (SAA).

  4. Hydrogen sulfide induces systemic tolerance to salinity and non-ionic osmotic stress in strawberry plants through modification of reactive species biosynthesis and transcriptional regulation of multiple defence pathways.

    PubMed

    Christou, Anastasis; Manganaris, George A; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been recently found to act as a potent priming agent. This study explored the hypothesis that hydroponic pretreatment of strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa cv. Camarosa) roots with a H2S donor, sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; 100 μM for 48 h), could induce long-lasting priming effects and tolerance to subsequent exposure to 100mM NaCI or 10% (w/v) PEG-6000 for 7 d. Hydrogen sulfide pretreatment of roots resulted in increased leaf chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal conductance and leaf relative water content as well as lower lipid peroxidation levels in comparison with plants directly subjected to salt and non-ionic osmotic stress, thus suggesting a systemic mitigating effect of H2S pretreatment to cellular damage derived from abiotic stress factors. In addition, root pretreatment with NaHS resulted in the minimization of oxidative and nitrosative stress in strawberry plants, manifested via lower levels of synthesis of NO and H(2)O(2) in leaves and the maintenance of high ascorbate and glutathione redox states, following subsequent salt and non-ionic osmotic stresses. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR gene expression analysis of key antioxidant (cAPX, CAT, MnSOD, GR), ascorbate and glutathione biosynthesis (GCS, GDH, GS), transcription factor (DREB), and salt overly sensitive (SOS) pathway (SOS2-like, SOS3-like, SOS4) genes suggests that H2S plays a pivotal role in the coordinated regulation of multiple transcriptional pathways. The ameliorative effects of H2S were more pronounced in strawberry plants subjected to both stress conditions immediately after NaHS root pretreatment, rather than in plants subjected to stress conditions 3 d after root pretreatment. Overall, H2S-pretreated plants managed to overcome the deleterious effects of salt and non-ionic osmotic stress by controlling oxidative and nitrosative cellular damage through increased performance of antioxidant mechanisms and the coordinated regulation of the SOS pathway, thus proposing a

  5. Role of Nitric Oxide in the Regulation of Renin and Vasopressin Secretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Ian A.

    1994-01-01

    Research during recent years has established nitric oxide as a unique signaling molecule that plays important roles in the regulation of the cardiovascular, nervous, immune, and other systems. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the control of the secretion of hormones by the pancreas, hypothalamus, and anterior pituitary gland, and evidence is accumulating that it contributes to the regulation of the secretion of renin and vasopressin, hormones that play key roles in the control of sodium and water balance. Several lines of evidence have implicated nitric oxide in the control of renin secretion. The enzyme nitric oxide synthase is present in vascular and tubular elements of the kidney, particularly in cells of the macula densa, a structure that plays an important role in the control of renin secretion. Guanylyl cyclase, a major target for nitric oxide, is also present in the kidney. Drugs that inhibit nitric oxide synthesis generally suppress renin release in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a stimulatory role for the L-arginine/nitric oxide pathway in the control of renin secretion. Under some conditions, however, blockade of nitric oxide synthesis increases renin secretion. Recent studies indicate that nitric oxide not only contributes to the regulation of basal renin secretion, but also participates in the renin secretory responses to activation of the renal baroreceptor, macula densa, and beta adrenoceptor mechanisms that regulate renin secretion. Histochemical and immunocytochemical studies have revealed the presence of nitric oxide synthase in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus and in the posterior pituitary gland. Colocalization of nitric oxide synthase and vasopressin has been demonstrated in some hypothalamic neurons. Nitric oxide synthase activity in the hypothalamus and pituitary is increased by maneuvers known to stimulate vasopressin secretion, including salt loading and dehydration, Administration of L-arginine and nitric

  6. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  7. Does dissolved organic carbon regulate biological methane oxidation in semiarid soils?

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Benjamin W; Selmants, Paul C; Hart, Stephen C

    2013-07-01

    In humid ecosystems, the rate of methane (CH4 ) oxidation by soil-dwelling methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) is controlled by soil texture and soil water holding capacity, both of which limit the diffusion of atmospheric CH4 into the soil. However, it remains unclear whether these same mechanisms control CH4 oxidation in more arid soils. This study was designed to measure the proximate controls of potential CH4 oxidation in semiarid soils during different seasons. Using a unique and well-constrained 3-million-year-old semiarid substrate age gradient, we were able to hold state factors constant while exploring the relationship between seasonal potential CH4 oxidation rates and soil texture, soil water holding capacity, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). We measured unexpectedly higher rates of potential CH4 oxidation in the wet season than the dry season. Although other studies have attributed low CH4 oxidation rates in dry soils to desiccation of MOB, we present several lines of evidence that this may be inaccurate. We found that soil DOC concentration explained CH4 oxidation rates better than soil physical factors that regulate the diffusion of CH4 from the atmosphere into the soil. We show evidence that MOB facultatively incorporated isotopically labeled glucose into their cells, and MOB utilized glucose in a pattern among our study sites that was similar to wet-season CH4 oxidation rates. This evidence suggests that DOC, which is utilized by MOB in other environments with varying effects on CH4 oxidation rates, may be an important regulator of CH4 oxidation rates in semiarid soils. Our collective understanding of the facultative use of DOC by MOB is still in its infancy, but our results suggest it may be an important factor controlling CH4 oxidation in soils from dry ecosystems.

  8. Oxidation of calmodulin alters activation and regulation of CaMKII.

    PubMed

    Robison, A J; Winder, Danny G; Colbran, Roger J; Bartlett, Ryan K

    2007-04-27

    Increases in reactive oxygen species and mis-regulation of calcium homeostasis are associated with various physiological conditions and disease states including aging, ischemia, exposure to drugs of abuse, and neurodegenerative diseases. In aged animals, this is accompanied by a reduction in oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in increased methionine oxidation of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin in the brain. Here, we show that oxidation of calmodulin results in an inability to: (1) activate CaMKII; (2) support Thr(286) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (3) prevent Thr(305/6) autophosphorylation of CaMKII; (4) support binding of CaMKII to the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor; and (5) compete with alpha-actinin for binding to CaMKII. Moreover, oxidized calmodulin does not efficiently bind calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in rat brain lysates or in vitro. These observations contrast from past experiments performed with oxidized calmodulin and the plasma membrane calcium ATPase, where oxidized calmodulin binds to, and partially activates the PMCA. When taken together, these data suggest that oxidative stress may perturb neuronal and cardiac function via a decreased ability of oxidized calmodulin to bind, activate, and regulate the interactions of CaMKII.

  9. Glucose oxidation positively regulates glucose uptake and improves cardiac function recovery after myocardial reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Xu, Jie; Qin, Xinghua; Hou, Zuoxu; Guo, Yongzheng; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianjiang; Zheng, Hong; Zhang, Xing; Gao, Feng

    2017-03-21

    Myocardial reperfusion decreases glucose oxidation and uncouples glucose oxidation from glycolysis. Therapies that increase glucose oxidation lessen myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the regulation of glucose uptake during reperfusion remains poorly understood. Here we found that glucose uptake was remarkably diminished in myocardium following reperfusion in Sprague-Dawley rats as detected by 18F-labeled and fluorescent-labeled glucose analogs, even though GLUT1 was upregulated by 3 folds and GLUT4 translocation remained unchanged compared with those of sham rats. The decreased glucose uptake was accompanied by suppressed glucose oxidation. Interestingly, stimulating glucose oxidation by inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), a rate-limiting enzyme for glucose oxidation, increased glucose uptake and alleviated ischemia/reperfusion injury. In vitro data in neonatal myocytes showed that PDK4 overexpression decreased glucose uptake, while its knockdown increased glucose uptake, suggesting a role of PDK4 in regulating glucose uptake. Moreover, inhibition of PDK4 increased myocardial glucose uptake with concomitant enhancement of cardiac insulin sensitivity following myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. These results showed that the suppressed glucose oxidation mediated by PDK4 contributes to the reduced glucose uptake in myocardium following reperfusion, and enhancement of glucose uptake exerts cardioprotection. The findings suggest that stimulating glucose oxidation via PDK4 could be an efficient approach to improve recovery from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  10. Growth-defence balance in grass biomass production: the role of jasmonates.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Christine; Brutnell, Thomas P

    2015-07-01

    Growth-defence balance is the selective partitioning of resources between biomass accumulation and defence responses. Although it is generally postulated that reallocation of limited carbon pools drives the antagonism between growth and defence, little is known about the mechanisms underlying this regulation. Jasmonates (JAs) are a group of oxylipins that are required for a broad range of responses from defence against insects to reproductive growth. Application of JAs to seedlings also leads to inhibited growth and repression of photosynthesis, suggesting a role for JAs in regulating growth-defence balance. The majority of JA research uses dicot models such as Arabidopsis and tomato, while understanding of JA biology in monocot grasses, which comprise most bioenergy feedstocks, food for human consumption, and animal feed, is limited. Interestingly, JA mutants of grasses exhibit unique phenotypes compared with well-studied dicot models. Gene expression analyses in bioenergy grasses also suggest roles for JA in rhizome development, which has not been demonstrated in Arabidopsis. In this review we summarize current knowledge of JA biology in panicoid grasses-the group that consists of the world's emerging bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, sugarcane, Miscanthus, and sorghum. We discuss outstanding questions regarding the role of JAs in panicoid grasses, and highlight the importance of utilizing emerging grass models for molecular studies to provide a basis for engineering bioenergy grasses that can maximize biomass accumulation while efficiently defending against stress.

  11. Graphene Oxide Regulated Tin Oxide Nanostructures: Engineering Composition, Morphology, Band Structure, and Photocatalytic Properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2015-12-16

    A facile, one-step hydrothermal method has been developed to fabricate tin oxide-reduced graphene oxide (Sn-RGO) nanocomposites with tunable composition, morphology, and energy band structure by utilizing graphene oxide (GO) as a multifunctional two-dimensional scaffold. By adjusting the GO concentration during synthesis, a variety of tin oxide nanomaterials with diverse composition and morphology are obtained. Simultaneously, the varying of GO concentration can also narrow the bandgap and tune the band edge positions of the Sn-RGO nanocomposites. As a result, the Sn-RGO nanocomposites with controllable composition, morphology, and energy band structure are obtained, which exhibit efficient photoactivities toward methyl orange (MO) degradation under visible-light irradiation. It is expected that our work would point to the new possibility of using GO for directing synthesis of semiconductor nanomaterials with tailored structure and physicochemical properties.

  12. Photosynthesis, photorespiration, and light signalling in defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Neukermans, Jenny; Li, Shengchun; Aro, Eva-Mari; Noctor, Graham

    2012-02-01

    Visible light is the basic energetic driver of plant biomass production through photosynthesis. The constantly fluctuating availability of light and other environmental factors means that the photosynthetic apparatus must be able to operate in a dynamic fashion appropriate to the prevailing conditions. Dynamic regulation is achieved through an array of homeostatic control mechanisms that both respond to and influence cellular energy and reductant status. In addition, light availability and quality are continuously monitored by plants through photoreceptors. Outside the laboratory growth room, it is within the context of complex changes in energy and signalling status that plants must regulate pathways to deal with biotic challenges, and this can be influenced by changes in the highly energetic photosynthetic pathways and in the turnover of the photosynthetic machinery. Because of this, defence responses are neither simple nor easily predictable, but rather conditioned by the nutritional and signalling status of the plant cell. This review discusses recent data and emerging concepts of how recognized defence pathways interact with and are influenced by light-dependent processes. Particular emphasis is placed on the potential roles of the chloroplast, photorespiration, and photoreceptor-associated pathways in regulating the outcome of interactions between plants and pathogenic organisms.

  13. Regulation of Methane Oxidation in a Freshwater Wetland by Water Table Changes and Anoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of water table fluctuations and anoxia on methane emission and methane oxidation were studied in a freshwater marsh. Seasonal aerobic methane oxidation rates varied between 15% and 76% of the potential diffusive methane flux (diffusive flux in the absence of aerobic oxidation). On an annual basis, approximately 43% of the methane diffusing into the oxic zone was oxidized before reaching the atmosphere. The highest methane oxidation was observed when the water table was below the peat surface. This was confirmed in laboratory experiments where short-term decreases in water table levels increased methane oxidation but also net methane emission. Although methane emission was generally not observed during the winter, stems of soft rush (Juncus effusus) emitted methane when the marsh was ice covered. Indigenous methanotrophic bacteria from the wetiand studied were relatively anoxia tolerant. Surface peat incubated under anoxic conditions maintained 30% of the initial methane oxidation capacity after 32 days of anoxia. Methanotrophs from anoxic peat initiated aerobic methane oxidation relatively quickly after oxygen addition (1-7 hours). These results were supported by culture experiments with the methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. This organism maintained a greater capacity for aerobic methane oxidation when starved under anoxic compared to oxic conditions. Anoxic incubation of M. trichosporium OB3b in the presence of sulfide (2 mM) and a low redox potential (-110 mV) did not decrease the capacity for methane oxidation relative to anoxic cultures incubated without sulfide. The results suggest that aerobic methane oxidation was a major regulator of seasonal methane emission front the investigated wetland. The observed water table fluctuations affected net methane oxidation presumably due to associated changes in oxygen gradients. However, changes from oxic to anoxic conditions in situ had relatively little effect on survival of the methanotrophic

  14. Glial β-oxidation regulates Drosophila energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Joachim G; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Dotti, Carlos G

    2015-01-15

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production.

  15. Glial β-Oxidation regulates Drosophila Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Joachim G.; Laranjeira, Antonio; Van Huffel, Leen; Gärtner, Annette; Vilain, Sven; Bastianen, Jarl; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Dotti, Carlos G.

    2015-01-01

    The brain's impotence to utilize long-chain fatty acids as fuel, one of the dogmas in neuroscience, is surprising, since the nervous system is the tissue most energy consuming and most vulnerable to a lack of energy. Challenging this view, we here show in vivo that loss of the Drosophila carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (CPT2), an enzyme required for mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids as substrates for energy production, results in the accumulation of triacylglyceride-filled lipid droplets in adult Drosophila brain but not in obesity. CPT2 rescue in glial cells alone is sufficient to restore triacylglyceride homeostasis, and we suggest that this is mediated by the release of ketone bodies from the rescued glial cells. These results demonstrate that the adult brain is able to catabolize fatty acids for cellular energy production. PMID:25588812

  16. ATM regulation of IL-8 links oxidative stress to cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ta; Ebelt, Nancy D; Stracker, Travis H; Xhemalce, Blerta; Van Den Berg, Carla L; Miller, Kyle M

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase regulates the DNA damage response (DDR) and is associated with cancer suppression. Here we report a cancer-promoting role for ATM. ATM depletion in metastatic cancer cells reduced cell migration and invasion. Transcription analyses identified a gene network, including the chemokine IL-8, regulated by ATM. IL-8 expression required ATM and was regulated by oxidative stress. IL-8 was validated as an ATM target by its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. Finally, ATM-depletion in human breast cancer cells reduced lung tumors in a mouse xenograft model and clinical data validated IL-8 in lung metastasis. These findings provide insights into how ATM activation by oxidative stress regulates IL-8 to sustain cell migration and invasion in cancer cells to promote metastatic potential. Thus, in addition to well-established roles in tumor suppression, these findings identify a role for ATM in tumor progression.

  17. Plant RNA silencing in viral defence.

    PubMed

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio

    2011-01-01

    RNA silencing is described in plants and insects as a defence mechanism against foreign nucleic acids, such as invading viruses. The RNA silencing-based antiviral defence involves the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs and their association to effector proteins, which together drive the sequence specific inactivation of viruses. The entire process of antiviral defence 'borrows' several plant factors involved in other specialized RNA silencing endogenous pathways. Different viruses use variable strategies to infect different host plants, which render the antiviral RNA silencing a complex phenomenon far to be completely clarified. This chapter reports current advances in understanding the main steps of the plant's RNA-silencing response to viral invasion and discusses some of the key questions still to be answered.

  18. Prophage-mediated defence against viral attack and viral counter-defence.

    PubMed

    Dedrick, Rebekah M; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Bustamante, Carlos A Guerrero; Garlena, Rebecca A; Mavrich, Travis N; Pope, Welkin H; Reyes, Juan C Cervantes; Russell, Daniel A; Adair, Tamarah; Alvey, Richard; Bonilla, J Alfred; Bricker, Jerald S; Brown, Bryony R; Byrnes, Deanna; Cresawn, Steven G; Davis, William B; Dickson, Leon A; Edgington, Nicholas P; Findley, Ann M; Golebiewska, Urszula; Grose, Julianne H; Hayes, Cory F; Hughes, Lee E; Hutchison, Keith W; Isern, Sharon; Johnson, Allison A; Kenna, Margaret A; Klyczek, Karen K; Mageeney, Catherine M; Michael, Scott F; Molloy, Sally D; Montgomery, Matthew T; Neitzel, James; Page, Shallee T; Pizzorno, Marie C; Poxleitner, Marianne K; Rinehart, Claire A; Robinson, Courtney J; Rubin, Michael R; Teyim, Joseph N; Vazquez, Edwin; Ware, Vassie C; Washington, Jacqueline; Hatfull, Graham F

    2017-01-09

    Temperate phages are common, and prophages are abundant residents of sequenced bacterial genomes. Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis, encompass substantial genetic diversity and are commonly temperate. Characterization of ten Cluster N temperate mycobacteriophages revealed at least five distinct prophage-expressed viral defence systems that interfere with the infection of lytic and temperate phages that are either closely related (homotypic defence) or unrelated (heterotypic defence) to the prophage. Target specificity is unpredictable, ranging from a single target phage to one-third of those tested. The defence systems include a single-subunit restriction system, a heterotypic exclusion system and a predicted (p)ppGpp synthetase, which blocks lytic phage growth, promotes bacterial survival and enables efficient lysogeny. The predicted (p)ppGpp synthetase coded by the Phrann prophage defends against phage Tweety infection, but Tweety codes for a tetrapeptide repeat protein, gp54, which acts as a highly effective counter-defence system. Prophage-mediated viral defence offers an efficient mechanism for bacterial success in host-virus dynamics, and counter-defence promotes phage co-evolution.

  19. ROS accumulation and antiviral defence control by microRNA528 in rice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianguo; Yang, Rongxin; Yang, Zhirui; Yao, Shengze; Zhao, Shanshan; Wang, Yu; Li, Pingchuan; Song, Xianwei; Jin, Lian; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Xie, Lianhui; Zhou, Xueping; Chu, Chengcai; Qi, Yijun; Cao, Xiaofeng; Li, Yi

    2017-01-06

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of plant-pathogen interactions. Modulating miRNA function has emerged as a new strategy to produce virus resistance traits(1-5). However, the miRNAs involved in antiviral defence and the underlying mechanisms remain largely elusive. We previously demonstrated that sequestration by Argonaute (AGO) proteins plays an important role in regulating miRNA function in antiviral defence pathways(6). Here we reveal that cleavage-defective AGO18 complexes sequester microRNA528 (miR528) upon viral infection. We show that miR528 negatively regulates viral resistance in rice by cleaving L-ascorbate oxidase (AO) messenger RNA, thereby reducing AO-mediated accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Upon viral infection, miR528 becomes preferentially associated with AGO18, leading to elevated AO activity, higher basal reactive oxygen species accumulation and enhanced antiviral defence. Our findings reveal a mechanism in which antiviral defence is boosted through suppression of an miRNA that negatively regulates viral resistance. This mechanism could be manipulated to engineer virus-resistant crop plants.

  20. Regulation of cytochrome c oxidase by adenylic nucleotides. Is oxidative phosphorylation feedback regulated by its end-products?

    PubMed

    Beauvoit, B; Rigoulet, M

    2001-01-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase, which catalyzes an irreversible step of the respiratory chain, is one of the rate-controlling steps of oxidative phosphorylation on isolated mitochondria. The rate of electron transfer through the complex is primarily controlled by the associated thermodynamic forces, i.e., the span in redox potential between oxygen and cytochrome c and the protonmotive force. However, the electron flux also depends on the various kinetic effectors, including adenylic nucleotides. Although the number of binding sites for ATP and ADP on cytochrome oxidase is still a matter of debate, experiments performed on the solubilized and reconstituted enzyme provide strong functional evidence that the mammalian cytochrome c oxidase binds adenylic nucleotides on both sides of the inner membrane. These effects include modification in cytochrome c affinity, allosteric inhibition and changes in proton pumping efficiency. Immunological studies have pointed out the role of subunit IV and that of an ATP-binding protein, subunit VIa, in these kinetic regulations. In yeast, the role of the nuclear-encoded subunits in assembly and regulation of the cytochrome c oxidase has been further substantiated by using gene-disruption analysis. Using a subunit VIa-null mutant, the consequences of the ATP regulation on oxidative phosphorylation have been further investigated on isolated mitochondria. Taken together, the data demonstrate that there are multiple regulating sites for ATP on the yeast cytochrome oxidase with respect to the location (matrix versus cytosolic side), kinetic effect (activation versus inhibition) and consequence on the flow-force relationships. The question is therefore raised as to the physiological meaning of such feedback regulation of the respiratory chain by ATP in the control and regulation of cellular energy metabolism.

  1. Grp94 acts as a mediator of curcumin-induced antioxidant defence in myogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Scapin, Cristina; Vitadello, Maurizio; Florean, Cristina; Gorza, Luisa

    2010-04-01

    Curcumin is a non-toxic polyphenol with pleiotropic activities and limited bioavailability. We investigated whether a brief exposure to low doses of curcumin would induce in the myogenic C2C12 cell line an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response and protect against oxidative stress. A 3-hr curcumin administration (5-10 microM) increased protein levels of the ER chaperone Grp94, without affecting those of Grp78, calreticulin and haeme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Exposure of cells to hydrogen peroxide 24 hrs after the curcumin treatment decreased caspase-12 activation, total protein oxidation and translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, compared with untreated cells. Grp94 overexpression, achieved by means of either stable or transient trasfection, induced comparable cytoprotective effects to hydrogen peroxide. The delayed cytoprotection induced by curcumin acted through Grp94, because the curcumin-induced increase in Grp94 expression was hampered by either stable or transient transfection with antisense cDNA; in these latter cells, the extent of total protein oxidation, as well as the translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus, and the percentage of apoptotic cells were comparable to those observed in both curcumin-untreated wild-type and empty vector transfected cells. Defining the mechanism(s) by which Grp94 exerts its antioxidant defence, the determination of cytosolic calcium levels in C2C12 cells by fura-2 showed a significantly reduced amount of releasable calcium from intracellular stores, both in conditions of Grp94 overexpression and after curcumin pre-treatment. Therefore, a brief exposure to curcumin induces a delayed cytoprotection against oxidative stress in myogenic cells by increasing Grp94 protein level, which acts as a regulator of calcium homeostasis.

  2. New insights into the regulation of plant immunity by amino acid metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Zeier, Jürgen

    2013-12-01

    Besides defence pathways regulated by classical stress hormones, distinct amino acid metabolic pathways constitute integral parts of the plant immune system. Mutations in several genes involved in Asp-derived amino acid biosynthetic pathways can have profound impact on plant resistance to specific pathogen types. For instance, amino acid imbalances associated with homoserine or threonine accumulation elevate plant immunity to oomycete pathogens but not to pathogenic fungi or bacteria. The catabolism of Lys produces the immune signal pipecolic acid (Pip), a cyclic, non-protein amino acid. Pip amplifies plant defence responses and acts as a critical regulator of plant systemic acquired resistance, defence priming and local resistance to bacterial pathogens. Asp-derived pyridine nucleotides influence both pre- and post-invasion immunity, and the catabolism of branched chain amino acids appears to affect plant resistance to distinct pathogen classes by modulating crosstalk of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-regulated defence pathways. It also emerges that, besides polyamine oxidation and NADPH oxidase, Pro metabolism is involved in the oxidative burst and the hypersensitive response associated with avirulent pathogen recognition. Moreover, the acylation of amino acids can control plant resistance to pathogens and pests by the formation of protective plant metabolites or by the modulation of plant hormone activity.

  3. Nitric oxide regulates retinal vascular tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Dorner, Guido T; Garhofer, Gerhard; Kiss, Barbara; Polska, Elzbieta; Polak, Kaija; Riva, Charles E; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the contribution of basal nitric oxide (NO) on retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, we set out to elucidate the role of NO in flicker-induced retinal vasodilation in humans. Twelve healthy young subjects were studied in a three-way crossover design. Subjects received an intravenous infusion of either placebo or NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA; 3 or 6 mg/kg over 5 min), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Thereafter, diffuse luminance flicker was consecutively performed for 16, 32, and 64 s at a frequency of 8 Hz. The effect of L-NMMA on retinal arterial and venous diameter was assessed under resting conditions and during the hyperemic flicker response. Retinal vessel diameter was measured with a Zeiss retinal vessel analyzer. L-NMMA significantly reduced arterial diameter (3 mg/kg: -2%; 6 mg/kg: -4%, P < 0.001) and venous diameter (3 mg/kg: -5%; 6 mg/kg: -8%, P < 0.001). After placebo infusion, flicker induced a significant increase in retinal vessel diameter (P < 0.001). At a flicker duration of 64 s, arterial diameter increased by 4% and venous diameter increased by 3%. L-NMMA did not abolish these hyperemic responses but blunted venous vasodilation (P = 0.017) and arterial vasodilation (P = 0.02) in response to flicker stimulation. Our data indicate that NO contributes to basal retinal vascular tone in humans. In addition, NO appears to play a role in flicker-induced vasodilation of the human retinal vasculature.

  4. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    1999-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to play an important role during neuronal development. Since many of its effects occur during the time of growth cone pathfinding and target interaction, we here test the hypothesis that part of NO's effects might be exerted at the growth cone. We found that low concentrations of the NO-donors DEA/NO, SIN-1, and SNP caused a rapid and transient elongation of filopodia as well as a reduction in filopodial number. These effects resulted from distinct changes in filopodial extension and retraction rates. Our novel findings suggest that NO could play a physiological role by temporarily changing a growth cone's morphology and switching its behavior from a close-range to a long-range exploratory mode. We subsequently dissected the pathway by which NO acted on growth cones. The effect of NO donors on filopodial length could be blocked by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), indicating that NO acted via sGC. Supporting this idea, injection of cyclic GMP (cGMP) mimicked the effect of NO donors on growth cone filopodia. Moreover, application of NO-donors as well as injection of cGMP elicited a rapid and transient rise in intracellular calcium in growth cones, indicating that NO acted via cGMP to elevate calcium. This calcium rise, as well as the morphological effects of SIN-1 on filopodia, were blocked by preventing calcium entry. Given the role of filopodia in axonal guidance, our new data suggest that NO could function at the neuronal growth cone as an intracellular and/or intercellular signaling molecule by affecting steering decisions during neuronal pathfinding.

  5. Future directions in the ontogeny of plant defence: understanding the evolutionary causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Barton, Kasey E; Boege, Karina

    2017-04-01

    Plant defence often varies by orders of magnitude as plants develop from the seedling to juvenile to mature and senescent stages. Ontogenetic trajectories can involve switches among defence traits, leading to complex shifting phenotypes across plant lifetimes. While considerable research has characterised ontogenetic trajectories for now hundreds of plant species, we still lack a clear understanding of the molecular, ecological and evolutionary factors driving these patterns. In this study, we identify several non-mutually exclusive factors that may have led to the evolution of ontogenetic trajectories in plant defence, including developmental constraints, resource allocation costs, multi-functionality of defence traits, and herbivore selection pressure. Evidence from recent physiological studies is highlighted to shed light on the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation and activation of these developmental changes. Overall, our goal is to promote new research avenues that would provide evidence for the factors that have promoted the evolution of this complex lifetime phenotype. Future research focusing on the questions and approaches identified here will advance the field and shed light on why defence traits shift so dramatically across plant ontogeny, a widespread but poorly understood ecological pattern.

  6. Plant defence suppression is mediated by a fungal sirtuin during rice infection by Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Jessie; Marroquin-Guzman, Margarita; Nandakumar, Renu; Shijo, Sara; Cornwell, Kathryn M; Li, Gang; Wilson, Richard A

    2014-10-01

    Crop destruction by the hemibiotrophic rice pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae requires plant defence suppression to facilitate extensive biotrophic growth in host cells before the onset of necrosis. How this is achieved at the genetic level is not well understood. Here, we report that a M. oryzae sirtuin, MoSir2, plays an essential role in rice defence suppression and colonization by controlling superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene expression. Loss of MoSir2 function in Δsir2 strains did not affect appressorial function, but biotrophic growth in rice cells was attenuated. Compared to wild type, Δsir2 strains failed to neutralize plant-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and elicited robust defence responses in rice epidermal cells that included elevated pathogenesis-related gene expression and granular depositions. Deletion of a SOD-encoding gene under MoSir2 control generated Δsod1 deletion strains that mimicked Δsir2 for impaired rice defence suppression, confirming SOD activity as a downstream output of MoSir2. In addition, comparative protein acetylation studies and forward genetic analyses identified a JmjC domain-containing protein as a likely target of MoSir2, and a Δsir2 Δjmjc double mutant was restored for MoSOD1 expression and defence suppression in rice epidermal cells. Together, this work reveals MoSir2 and MoJmjC as novel regulators of early rice cell infection.

  7. The nexus between growth and defence signalling: auxin and cytokinin modulate plant immune response pathways.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Muhammad; Kaltdorf, Martin; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Plants deploy a finely tuned balance between growth and defence responses for better fitness. Crosstalk between defence signalling hormones such as salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonates (JAs) as well as growth regulators plays a significant role in mediating the trade-off between growth and defence in plants. Here, we specifically discuss how the mutual antagonism between the signalling of auxin and SA impacts on plant growth and defence. Furthermore, the synergism between auxin and JA benefits a class of plant pathogens. JA signalling also poses growth cuts through auxin. We discuss how the effect of cytokinins (CKs) is multifaceted and is effective against a broad range of pathogens in mediating immunity. The synergism between CKs and SA promotes defence against biotrophs. Reciprocally, SA inhibits CK-mediated growth responses. Recent reports show that CKs promote JA responses; however, in a feedback loop, JA suppresses CK responses. We also highlight crosstalk between auxin and CKs and discuss their antagonistic effects on plant immunity. Efforts to minimize the negative effects of auxin on immunity and a reduction in SA- and JA-mediated growth losses should lead to better sustainable plant protection strategies.

  8. 50 years of biological research--from oxidative phosphorylation to energy requiring transport regulation.

    PubMed

    Kalckar, H M

    1991-01-01

    In 1930 adenosine triphosphate appeared in the literature from W. A. Engelhardt's work on avian erythrocytes. This was an early example of oxidative phosphorylation in intact cells, and it required methylene blue and oxygen. Both Belitser and I realized that the use of Warburg manometers for aeration was critical in order to generate oxidative phosphorylation of glucose in tissue preparations. Test tube techniques did not work. In 1956 we were able to describe a human type of diabetes called "galactose diabetes," in which consumption of human or cows' milk provokes mental retardation. Replacement of human or cows' milk products with "vegetable milk" formula in early infancy can prevent retardation. We determined that the disease results from a defect of galactose-one-phosphate uridylyl-transferase, a hereditary enzyme. This type of enzyme defect, if discovered and treated in early infancy, is a benign molecular disease. Regulation of transport systems in mammalian cell cultures are frequently complex energized systems. Perhaps my greatest surprise in this regard was the mere fact that an all-cis "odd" hexose-D-allose turned out to be a highly intense down-regulator of the hexose transport system. Additions of inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation (such as oligomycin or di-nitrophenol) arrested the allose-mediated down-regulation. We have reason to suspect that the strong down-regulator is a phosphorylated form of D-allose. Thus ends my story about oxidative energized biological phosphorylation systems.

  9. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates Oxidative Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans through the NHR-49 and MDT-15 Transcriptional Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Arriola, Elizabeth; EL Hafidi, Mohammed; Ortega-Cuéllar, Daniel; Carvajal, Karla

    2016-01-01

    Cellular energy regulation relies on complex signaling pathways that respond to fuel availability and metabolic demands. Dysregulation of these networks is implicated in the development of human metabolic diseases such as obesity and metabolic syndrome. In Caenorhabditis elegans the AMP-activated protein kinase, AAK, has been associated with longevity and stress resistance; nevertheless its precise role in energy metabolism remains elusive. In the present study, we find an evolutionary conserved role of AAK in oxidative metabolism. Similar to mammals, AAK is activated by AICAR and metformin and leads to increased glycolytic and oxidative metabolic fluxes evidenced by an increase in lactate levels and mitochondrial oxygen consumption and a decrease in total fatty acids and lipid storage, whereas augmented glucose availability has the opposite effects. We found that these changes were largely dependent on the catalytic subunit AAK-2, since the aak-2 null strain lost the observed metabolic actions. Further results demonstrate that the effects due to AAK activation are associated to SBP-1 and NHR-49 transcriptional factors and MDT-15 transcriptional co-activator, suggesting a regulatory pathway that controls oxidative metabolism. Our findings establish C. elegans as a tractable model system to dissect the relationship between distinct molecules that play a critical role in the regulation of energy metabolism in human metabolic diseases. PMID:26824904

  10. Cellular bioenergetics is regulated by PARP1 under resting conditions and during oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Módis, Katalin; Gerő, Domokos; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szoleczky, Petra; DeWitt, Douglas; Szabo, Csaba

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The goal of the current studies was to elucidate the role of the principal poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase isoform, PARP1 in the regulation of cellular energetics in endothelial cells under resting conditions and during oxidative stress. Methods We utilized bEnd.3 endothelial cells and A549 human transformed epithelial cells. PARP1 was inhibited either by pharmacological inhibitors or by siRNA silencing. The Seahorse XF24 Extracellular Flux Analyzer was used to measure indices of mitochondrial respiration (oxygen consumption rate) and of glycolysis (extracellular acidification rate). Cell viability, cellular and mitochondrial NAD+ levels and mitochondrial biogenesis were also measured. Results Silencing of PARP1 increased basal cellular parameters of oxidative phosphorylation, providing direct evidence that PARP1 is a regulator of mitochondrial function in resting cells. Pharmacological inhibitors of PARP1 and siRNA silencing of PARP1 protected against the development of mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated the respiratory reserve capacity in endothelial cells exposed to oxidative stress. The observed effects were unrelated to an effect on mitochondrial biogenesis. Isolated mitochondria of A549 human transformed epithelial cells exhibited an improved resting bioenergetic status after stable lentiviral silencing of PARP1; these effects were associated with elevated resting mitochondrial NAD+ levels in PARP1 silenced cells. Conclusions PARP1 is a regulator of basal cellular energetics in resting endothelial and epithelial cells. Furthermore, endothelial cells respond with a decrease in their mitochondrial reserve capacity during low-level oxidative stress, an effect, which is attenuated by PARP1 inhibition. While PARP1 is a regulator of oxidative phosphorylation in resting and oxidatively stressed cells, it only exerts a minor effect on glycolysis. PMID:22198485

  11. Regulation of dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in the purple sulfur bacterium allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Frauke; Franz, Bettina; Dahl, Christiane

    2011-01-01

    In the purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum, thiosulfate oxidation is strictly dependent on the presence of three periplasmic Sox proteins encoded by the soxBXAK and soxYZ genes. It is also well documented that proteins encoded in the dissimilatory sulfite reductase (dsr) operon, dsrABEFHCMKLJOPNRS, are essential for the oxidation of sulfur that is stored intracellularly as an obligatory intermediate during the oxidation of thiosulfate and sulfide. Until recently, detailed knowledge about the regulation of the sox genes was not available. We started to fill this gap and show that these genes are expressed on a low constitutive level in A. vinosum in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds. Thiosulfate and possibly sulfide lead to an induction of sox gene transcription. Additional translational regulation was not apparent. Regulation of soxXAK is probably performed by a two-component system consisting of a multi-sensor histidine kinase and a regulator with proposed di-guanylate cyclase activity. Previous work already provided some information about regulation of the dsr genes encoding the second important sulfur-oxidizing enzyme system in the purple sulfur bacterium. The expression of most dsr genes was found to be at a low basal level in the absence of reduced sulfur compounds and enhanced in the presence of sulfide. In the present work, we focused on the role of DsrS, a protein encoded by the last gene of the dsr locus in A. vinosum. Transcriptional and translational gene fusion experiments suggest a participation of DsrS in the post-transcriptional control of the dsr operon. Characterization of an A. vinosum ΔdsrS mutant showed that the monomeric cytoplasmic 41.1-kDa protein DsrS is important though not essential for the oxidation of sulfur stored in the intracellular sulfur globules.

  12. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  13. Responses of foliar antioxidative and photoprotective defence systems of trees to drought: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wujeska, Agnieszka; Bossinger, Gerd; Tausz, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Current climate change predictions hint to more frequent extreme weather events, including extended droughts, making better understanding of the impacts of water stress on trees even more important. At the individual plant level, stomatal closure as a result of water deficit leads to reduced CO2 availability in the leaf, which can lead to photo-oxidative stress. Photorespiration and the Mehler reaction can maintain electron transport rates under low internal CO2, but result in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). If electron consumption is decreased, upstream photochemical processes can be affected and light energy is absorbed in excess of photochemical requirements. Trees evolved to cope with excess energy and elevated concentration of ROS by activating photoprotective and antioxidative defence systems. The meta-analysis we present here assessed responses of these defence systems reported in 50 studies. We found responses to vary depending on stress intensity, foliage type and habitat, and on whether experiments were done in the field or in controlled environments. In general, drought increased concentrations of antioxidants and photoprotective pigments. However, severe stress caused degradation of antioxidant concentrations and oxidation of antioxidant pools. Evergreen trees seemed to preferentially reinforce membrane-bound protection systems zeaxanthin and tocopherol, whereas deciduous species showed greater responses in water-soluble antioxidants ascorbic acid and glutathione. Trees and shrubs from arid versus humid habitats vary in their antioxidative and photoprotective defence responses. In field experiments, drought had greater effects on some defence compounds than under controlled conditions.

  14. Towards an internet civil defence against bioterrorism.

    PubMed

    LaPorte, R E; Sauer, F; Dearwater, S; Sekikawa, A; Sa, E R; Aaron, D; Shubnikov, E

    2001-09-01

    Approaches towards the public-health prevention of bioterrorism are too little, and too late. New information-based approaches could yield better homeland protection. An internet civil defence is presented where millions of eyes could help to identify suspected cases of bioterrorism, with the internet used to report, confirm, and prevent outbreaks.

  15. In Defence of the Classroom Science Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrory, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Science demonstrations are often criticised for their passive nature, their gratuitous exploitation and their limited ability to develop scientific knowledge and understanding. This article is intended to present a robust defence of the use of demonstrations in the classroom by identifying some of their unique and powerful benefits--practical,…

  16. Malaysian Defence and E-Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhary, Jowati binti

    2005-01-01

    This paper begins with an analysis of the changing security scenario in the Asian region, with special focus on Malaysian defence strategies and foreign policies. Beginning in the mid 1990s, the Malaysian government shifted its attention away from the counter insurgency strategies of the early decades of independence to focus on wider questions of…

  17. Superconductivity: Recent Developments and Defence Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-11

    particular interest to the defence community include: batteries , bearings, electromagnetic guns and launchers, energy storage, free electron lasers...has looked at muon spin rotation measurements of the penetration depth of magnetic fields into the superconductors. Basic research is under way at Chalk...and batteries (3) High density magnetic field transducers (4) Magnetic levitation (5) Magnetic, frictionless be arings (6) Magnetic separation (7

  18. Swedish Defence Acquisition Transformation: A Research Agenda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-13

    presentation • A small country perspective • The swinging pendulum : “From preparedness to deployment to preparedness?” – or “from national defence to PSOs to...history of war The swinging (political) pendulum • A. 200 years of peace – Standing in preparedness • B. Post Cold War – Deployed on PSOs • C

  19. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-04-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1-CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1.

  20. Testing the optimal defence hypothesis for two indirect defences: extrafloral nectar and volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Radhika, Venkatesan; Kost, Christian; Bartram, Stefan; Heil, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Many plants respond to herbivory with an increased production of extrafloral nectar (EFN) and/or volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to attract predatory arthropods as an indirect defensive strategy. In this study, we tested whether these two indirect defences fit the optimal defence hypothesis (ODH), which predicts the within-plant allocation of anti-herbivore defences according to trade-offs between growth and defence. Using jasmonic acid-induced plants of Phaseolus lunatus and Ricinus communis, we tested whether the within-plant distribution pattern of these two indirect defences reflects the fitness value of the respective plant parts. Furthermore, we quantified photosynthetic rates and followed the within-plant transport of assimilates with 13C labelling experiments. EFN secretion and VOC emission were highest in younger leaves. Moreover, the photosynthetic rate increased with leaf age, and pulse-labelling experiments suggested transport of carbon to younger leaves. Our results demonstrate that the ODH can explain the within-plant allocation pattern of both indirect defences studied. PMID:18493790

  1. Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Capacity and Muscle Mass by SIRT3

    PubMed Central

    Khalek, Waed Abdel; Ward, Jack Lee; Yang, Henry; Chabi, Béatrice; Wrutniak-Cabello, Chantal; Tong, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that the expression of mitochondrial deacetylase SIRT3 is high in the slow oxidative muscle and that the expression of muscle SIRT3 level is increased by dietary restriction or exercise training. To explore the function of SIRT3 in skeletal muscle, we report here the establishment of a transgenic mouse model with muscle-specific expression of the murine SIRT3 short isoform (SIRT3M3). Calorimetry study revealed that the transgenic mice had increased energy expenditure and lower respiratory exchange rate (RER), indicating a shift towards lipid oxidation for fuel usage, compared to control mice. The transgenic mice exhibited better exercise performance on treadmills, running 45% further than control animals. Moreover, the transgenic mice displayed higher proportion of slow oxidative muscle fibers, with increased muscle AMPK activation and PPARδ expression, both of which are known regulators promoting type I muscle fiber specification. Surprisingly, transgenic expression of SIRT3M3 reduced muscle mass up to 30%, likely through an up-regulation of FOXO1 transcription factor and its downstream atrophy gene MuRF-1. In summary, these results suggest that SIRT3 regulates the formation of oxidative muscle fiber, improves muscle metabolic function, and reduces muscle mass, changes that mimic the effects of caloric restriction. PMID:24454908

  2. FABP4 reversed the regulation of leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation in mice adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Liu, Zhenjiang; Cao, Weina; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), plays key role in fatty acid transportation and oxidation, and increases with leptin synergistically during adipose inflammation process. However, the regulation mechanism between FABP4 and leptin on mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation remains unclear. In this study, we found that FABP4 reduced the expression of leptin, CPT-1 and AOX1 in mice adipocytes. Conversely, FABP4 was down-regulated in a time-dependent manner by leptin treatment. Additionally, forced expression of FABP4 attenuated the expression of PGC1-α, UCP2, CPT-1, AOX1 and COX2 compared with leptin incubation. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential, fatty acid oxidation enzyme medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD) and Cyt C levels were reduced in response to the overexpression of FABP4. These reductions correspond well with the reduced release of free fatty acid and the inactivation of mitochondrial complexes I and III by FABP4 overexpression. Furthermore, addition of the Akt/mTOR pathway-specific inhibitor (MK2206) blocked the mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and respiration factors, whereas interference of FABP4 overcame these effects. Taken together, FABP4 could reverse the activation of the leptin-induced mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation, and the inhibition of Akt/mTOR signal pathway played a key role in this process. PMID:26310911

  3. Vasomotor Regulation of Coronary Microcirculation by Oxidative Stress: Role of Arginase

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Lih; Hein, Travis W.

    2013-01-01

    Overproduction of reactive oxygen species, i.e., oxidative stress, is associated with the activation of redox signaling pathways linking to inflammatory insults and cardiovascular diseases by impairing endothelial function and consequently blood flow dysregulation due to microvascular dysfunction. This review focuses on the regulation of vasomotor function in the coronary microcirculation by endothelial nitric oxide (NO) during oxidative stress and inflammation related to the activation of L-arginine consuming enzyme arginase. Superoxide produced in the vascular wall compromises vasomotor function by not only scavenging endothelium-derived NO but also inhibiting prostacyclin synthesis due to formation of peroxynitrite. The upregulation of arginase contributes to the deficiency of endothelial NO and microvascular dysfunction in various vascular diseases by initiating or following oxidative stress and inflammation. Hydrogen peroxide, a diffusible and stable oxidizing agent, exerts vasodilator function and plays important roles in the physiological regulation of coronary blood flow. In occlusive coronary ischemia, the release of hydrogen peroxide from the microvasculature helps to restore vasomotor function of coronary collateral microvessels with exercise training. However, excessive production and prolonged exposure of microvessels to hydrogen peroxide impairs NO-mediated endothelial function by reducing L-arginine availability through hydroxyl radical-dependent upregulation of arginase. The redox signaling can be a double-edged sword in the microcirculation, which helps tissue survival in one way by improving vasomotor regulation and elicits oxidative stress and tissue injury in the other way by causing vascular dysfunction. The impact of vascular arginase on the development of vasomotor dysfunction associated with angiotensin II receptor activation, hypertension, ischemia-reperfusion, hypercholesterolemia, and inflammatory insults is discussed. PMID:23966996

  4. Histidine Regulates Seed Oil Deposition through Abscisic Acid Biosynthesis and β-Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Huimin; Wang, Shui

    2016-10-01

    The storage compounds are deposited into plant seeds during maturation. As the model oilseed species, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) has long been studied for seed oil deposition. However, the regulation of this process remains unclear. Through genetic screen with a seed oil body-specific reporter, we isolated low oil1 (loo1) mutant. LOO1 was mapped to HISTIDINE BIOSYNTHESIS NUMBER 1A (HISN1A). HISN1A catalyzes the first step of His biosynthesis. Oil significantly decreased, and conversely proteins markedly increased in hisn1a mutants, indicating that HISN1A regulates both oil accumulation and the oil-protein balance. HISN1A was predominantly expressed in embryos and root tips. Accordingly, the hisn1a mutants exhibited developmental phenotype especially of seeds and roots. Transcriptional profiling displayed that β-oxidation was the major metabolic pathway downstream of HISN1A β-Oxidation was induced in hisn1a mutants, whereas it was reduced in 35S:HISN1A-transgenic plants. In plants, seed storage oil is broken-down by β-oxidation, which is controlled by abscisic acid (ABA). We found that His activated genes of ABA biosynthesis and correspondingly advanced ABA accumulation. Exogenous ABA rescued the defects of hisn1a mutants, whereas mutation of ABA DEFICIENT2, a key enzyme in ABA biosynthesis, blocked the effect of His on β-oxidation, indicating that ABA mediates His regulation in β-oxidation. Intriguingly, structural analysis showed that a potential His-binding domain was present in the general amino acid sensors GENERAL CONTROL NON-DEREPRESSIBLE2 and PII, suggesting that His may serve as a signal molecule. Taken together, our study reveals that His promotes plant seed oil deposition through ABA biosynthesis and β-oxidation.

  5. Chromatin remodeling regulates catalase expression during cancer cells adaptation to chronic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Glorieux, Christophe; Sandoval, Juan Marcelo; Fattaccioli, Antoine; Dejeans, Nicolas; Garbe, James C; Dieu, Marc; Verrax, Julien; Renard, Patricia; Huang, Peng; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2016-10-01

    Regulation of ROS metabolism plays a major role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress in cancer cells, but the molecular mechanism that regulates catalase, a key antioxidant enzyme responsible for conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water and oxygen, remains to be elucidated. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional regulatory mechanism controlling catalase expression in three human mammary cell lines: the normal mammary epithelial 250MK primary cells, the breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and an experimental model of MCF-7 cells resistant against oxidative stress resulting from chronic exposure to H2O2 (Resox), in which catalase was overexpressed. Here we identify a novel promoter region responsible for the regulation of catalase expression at -1518/-1226 locus and the key molecules that interact with this promoter and affect catalase transcription. We show that the AP-1 family member JunB and retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) mediate catalase transcriptional activation and repression, respectively, by controlling chromatin remodeling through a histone deacetylases-dependent mechanism. This regulatory mechanism plays an important role in redox adaptation to chronic exposure to H2O2 in breast cancer cells. Our study suggests that cancer adaptation to oxidative stress may be regulated by transcriptional factors through chromatin remodeling, and reveals a potential new mechanism to target cancer cells.

  6. Rusi/Brassey's defence yearbook 1987 97th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This annual review of defence and strategic affairs provides an up-to-date survey of international strategic affairs, contemporary weapons and developments and future trends. For all those involved in defence studies, university and public libraries and the general public. Contents: The Year Ahead; The Middle East; NATO; The Soviet Union and Eastern Europe; UK defence policy; The Issues: What is SDI.; Will SDI help. A military view; SDI-the industrial implications; Conventional defence, a military view; An alternative view; European armaments cooperation; Terrorism; Sri Lanka: the Tamils; Israel 1986; The Iran/Iraq war; Arab view; South Africa; Chronology of conflict; Defence literature; Arms control; Nuclear weapons; Characteristics.

  7. Arginase regulates red blood cell nitric oxide synthase and export of cardioprotective nitric oxide bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiangning; Gonon, Adrian T; Sjöquist, Per-Ove; Lundberg, Jon O; Pernow, John

    2013-09-10

    The theory that red blood cells (RBCs) generate and release nitric oxide (NO)-like bioactivity has gained considerable interest. However, it remains unclear whether it can be produced by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), which is present in RBCs, and whether NO can escape scavenging by hemoglobin. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that arginase reciprocally controls NO formation in RBCs by competition with eNOS for their common substrate arginine and that RBC-derived NO is functionally active following arginase blockade. We show that rodent and human RBCs contain functional arginase 1 and that pharmacological inhibition of arginase increases export of eNOS-derived nitrogen oxides from RBCs under basal conditions. The functional importance was tested in an ex vivo model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Inhibitors of arginase significantly improved postischemic functional recovery in rat hearts if administered in whole blood or with RBCs in plasma. By contrast, arginase inhibition did not improve postischemic recovery when administered with buffer solution or plasma alone. The protective effect of arginase inhibition was lost in the presence of a NOS inhibitor. Moreover, hearts from eNOS(-/-) mice were protected when the arginase inhibitor was given with blood from wild-type donors. In contrast, when hearts from wild-type mice were given blood from eNOS(-/-) mice, the arginase inhibitor failed to protect against ischemia-reperfusion. These results strongly support the notion that RBCs contain functional eNOS and release NO-like bioactivity. This process is under tight control by arginase 1 and is of functional importance during ischemia-reperfusion.

  8. Monophosphoryl lipid A stimulated up-regulation of nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide release by human monocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saha, D C; Astiz, M E; Lin, R Y; Rackow, E C; Eales, L J

    1997-10-01

    Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) is a derivative of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with reduced toxicity which has been shown to modulate various immune functions in monocytes. We examined whether human monocytes can be stimulated to produce nitric oxide (NO) and its catalytic enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Monocytes were stimulated with LPS or MPL and both NOS and NO (as nitrite) production were measured. MPL at high doses (> 100 micrograms/ml) stimulated monocytes to release NO that was significantly greater than both the control and LPS-treated monocytes (p < 0.05). NO release by control cells and the LPS treated cells was not significantly different. Both arginase and N-monomethyl arginine (NMLA) inhibited the MPL stimulated release of NO (p < 0.01). MPL significantly increased inducible NOS (iNOS) expression as measured by both fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Similarly, both soluble NOS (sNOS) and particulate NOS (pNOS) activity were significantly up-regulated by MPL (p < 0.05). Significant correlations were found between pNOS expression and sNOS release (r = 0.72, p < 0.0001) and between 12 h NO release and sNOS production (r = 0.44, p < 0.005). These experiments confirm that human monocytes can be stimulated with MPL to produce NO in vitro and suggest that up-regulation of pNOS does not preclude NO release.

  9. The Bacterial Response Regulator ArcA Uses a Diverse Binding Site Architecture to Regulate Carbon Oxidation Globally

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dan M.; Akhtar, Md. Sohail; Ansari, Aseem Z.; Landick, Robert; Kiley, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis for cellular viability, how cells control redox balance globally is poorly understood. Here we provide new mechanistic insight into how the balance between reduced and oxidized electron carriers is regulated at the level of gene expression by mapping the regulon of the response regulator ArcA from Escherichia coli, which responds to the quinone/quinol redox couple via its membrane-bound sensor kinase, ArcB. Our genome-wide analysis reveals that ArcA reprograms metabolism under anaerobic conditions such that carbon oxidation pathways that recycle redox carriers via respiration are transcriptionally repressed by ArcA. We propose that this strategy favors use of catabolic pathways that recycle redox carriers via fermentation akin to lactate production in mammalian cells. Unexpectedly, bioinformatic analysis of the sequences bound by ArcA in ChIP-seq revealed that most ArcA binding sites contain additional direct repeat elements beyond the two required for binding an ArcA dimer. DNase I footprinting assays suggest that non-canonical arrangements of cis-regulatory modules dictate both the length and concentration-sensitive occupancy of DNA sites. We propose that this plasticity in ArcA binding site architecture provides both an efficient means of encoding binding sites for ArcA, σ70-RNAP and perhaps other transcription factors within the same narrow sequence space and an effective mechanism for global control of carbon metabolism to maintain redox homeostasis. PMID:24146625

  10. Nitric oxide acts as a positive regulator to induce metamorphosis of the ascidian Herdmania momus.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Nobuo; Degnan, Sandie M

    2013-01-01

    Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation in ascidian

  11. Nitric Oxide Acts as a Positive Regulator to Induce Metamorphosis of the Ascidian Herdmania momus

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Nobuo; Degnan, Sandie M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine invertebrates commonly have a biphasic life cycle in which the metamorphic transition from a pelagic larva to a benthic post-larva is mediated by the nitric oxide signalling pathway. Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesised by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which is a client protein of the molecular chaperon heat shock protein 90 (HSP90). It is notable, then, that both NO and HSP90 have been implicated in regulating metamorphosis in marine invertebrates as diverse as urochordates, echinoderms, molluscs, annelids, and crustaceans. Specifically, the suppression of NOS activity by the application of either NOS- or HSP90-inhibiting pharmacological agents has been shown consistently to induce the initiation of metamorphosis, leading to the hypothesis that a negative regulatory role of NO is widely conserved in biphasic life cycles. Further, the induction of metamorphosis by heat-shock has been demonstrated for multiple species. Here, we investigate the regulatory role of NO in induction of metamorphosis of the solitary tropical ascidian, Herdmania momus. By coupling pharmacological treatments with analysis of HmNOS and HmHSP90 gene expression, we present compelling evidence of a positive regulatory role for NO in metamorphosis of this species, in contrast to all existing ascidian data that supports the hypothesis of NO as a conserved negative regulator of metamorphosis. The exposure of competent H. momus larvae to a NOS inhibitor or an NO donor results in an up-regulation of NOS and HSP90 genes. Heat shock of competent larvae induces metamorphosis in a temperature dependent manner, up to a thermal tolerance that approaches 35°C. Both larval/post-larval survival and the appearance of abnormal morphologies in H. momus post-larvae reflect the magnitude of up-regulation of the HSP90 gene in response to heat-shock. The demonstrated role of NO as a positive metamorphic regulator in H. momus suggests the existence of inter-specific adaptations of NO regulation in ascidian

  12. Staphylococcus aureus CymR Is a New Thiol-based Oxidation-sensing Regulator of Stress Resistance and Oxidative Response

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Quanjiang; Zhang, Liang; Sun, Fei; Deng, Xin; Liang, Haihua; Bae, Taeok; He, Chuan

    2014-10-02

    As a human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus must cope with oxidative stress generated by the human immune system. Here, we report that CymR utilizes its sole Cys-25 to sense oxidative stress. Oxidation followed by thiolation of this cysteine residue leads to dissociation of CymR from its cognate promoter DNA. In contrast, the DNA binding of the CymRC25S mutant was insensitive to oxidation and thiolation, suggesting that CymR senses oxidative stress through oxidation of its sole cysteine to form a mixed disulfide with low molecular weight thiols. The determined crystal structures of the reduced and oxidized forms of CymR revealed that Cys-25 is oxidized to Cys-25-SOH in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Deletion of cymR reduced the resistance of S. aureus to oxidative stresses, and the resistance was restored by expressing a C25S mutant copy of cymR. In a C25S substitution mutant, the expression of two genes, tcyP and mccB, was constitutively repressed and did not respond to hydrogen peroxide stress, whereas the expression of the genes were highly induced under oxidative stress in a wild-type strain, indicating the critical role of Cys-25 in redox signaling in vivo. Thus, CymR is another master regulator that senses oxidative stress and connects stress responses to virulence regulation in S. aureus.

  13. Superoxide dismutase 1 acts as a nuclear transcription factor to regulate oxidative stress resistance

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Chi Kwan; Liu, Yuan; Thomas, Janice; Zhang, Yanjie; Zheng, X. F. Steven

    2015-01-01

    Summary Superoxide dismutase 1 (Sod1) has been known for nearly half a century for catalysis of superoxide to hydrogen peroxide. Here we report a new Sod1 function in oxidative signaling: in response to elevated endogenous and exogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS), Sod1 rapidly relocates into the nucleus, which is important for maintaining genomic stability. Interestingly, H2O2 is sufficient to promote Sod1 nuclear localization, indicating that it is responding to general ROS rather than Sod1 substrate superoxide. ROS signaling is mediated by Mec1/ATM and its effector Dun1/Cds1 kinase, through Dun1 interaction with Sod1 and regulation of Sod1 by phosphorylation at S60, 99. In the nucleus, Sod1 binds to the promoters and regulates the expression of oxidative resistance and repair genes. Altogether, our study unravels an unorthodox function of Sod1 as a transcription factor and elucidates the regulatory mechanism for its localization. PMID:24647101

  14. Post-translational regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase in vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jin; Fulton, David

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous signaling molecule. In blood vessels, it is synthesized in a dynamic fashion by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and influences vascular function via two distinct mechanisms, the activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent signaling and the S-nitrosylation of proteins with reactive thiols (S-nitrosylation). The regulation of eNOS activity and NO bioavailability is critical to maintain blood vessel function. The activity of eNOS and ability to generate NO is regulated at the transcriptional, posttranscriptional, and posttranslational levels. Post-translational modifications acutely impact eNOS activity and dysregulation of these mechanisms compromise eNOS activity and foster the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). This review will intergrate past and current literature on the post-translational modifications of eNOS in both health and disease. PMID:24379783

  15. Regulation of protein function by S-glutathiolation in response to oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    PubMed

    Klatt, P; Lamas, S

    2000-08-01

    Protein S-glutathiolation, the reversible covalent addition of glutathione to cysteine residues on target proteins, is emerging as a candidate mechanism by which both changes in the intracellular redox state and the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species may be transduced into a functional response. This review will provide an introduction to the concepts of oxidative and nitrosative stress and outline the molecular mechanisms of protein regulation by oxidative and nitrosative thiol-group modifications. Special attention will be paid to recently published work supporting a role for S-glutathiolation in stress signalling pathways and in the adaptive cellular response to oxidative and nitrosative stress. Finally, novel insights into the molecular mechanisms of S-glutathiolation as well as methodological problems related to the interpretation of the biological relevance of this post-translational protein modification will be discussed.

  16. Trade-offs between constitutive and induced defences drive geographical and climatic clines in pine chemical defences.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Mooney, Kailen A; Rasmann, Sergio; Petry, William K; Carrillo-Gavilán, Amparo; Zas, Rafael; Sampedro, Luis

    2014-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that geographic and climatic clines drive the patterns of plant defence allocation and defensive strategies. We quantified early growth rate and both constitutive and inducible chemical defences of 18 Pinaceae species in a common greenhouse environment and assessed their defensive allocation with respect to each species' range across climatic gradients spanning 31° latitude and 2300 m elevation. Constitutive defences traded-off with induced defences, and these defensive strategies were associated with growth rate such that slow-growing species invested more in constitutive defence, whereas fast-growing species invested more in inducible defence. The position of each pine species along this trade-off axis was in turn associated with geography; moving poleward and to higher elevations, growth rate and inducible defences decreased, while constitutive defence increased. These geographic patterns in plant defence were most strongly associated with variation in temperature. Climatic and geographical clines thus act as drivers of defence profiles by mediating the constraints imposed by trade-offs, and this dynamic underlays global patterns of defence allocation.

  17. Peptides as triggers of plant defence.

    PubMed

    Albert, Markus

    2013-12-01

    Plants are confronted with several biotic stresses such as microbial pathogens and other herbivores. To defend against such attackers, plants possess an array of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense the danger and consequently initiate a defence programme that prevents further damage and spreading of the pest. Characteristic pathogenic structures, so-called microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs), serve as signals that allow the plant to sense invaders. Additionally, pathogens wound or damage the plant and the resulting release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) serves as a warning signal. This review focuses on peptides that serve as triggers or amplifiers of plant defence and thus follow the definition of a MAMP or a DAMP.

  18. Are natural antibodies involved in tumour defence?

    PubMed

    Bohn, J

    1999-09-01

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are found in the serum of healthy individuals. These antibodies are produced without any apparent specific antigenic stimulation. They are one part of the circulating immunoglobulins and are found in virtually all vertebrate species. NAb react to various self- and non-self antigens. A protective function in different infection models could be demonstrated. Several groups have reported the ability of NAb to bind to tumour cells. Their possible role in tumour defence is documented in mice. The present status of attempts to characterise the role of NAb in tumour defence is discussed, particularly as regards the human immune system. This paper focuses on antibody cell interactions and discusses the genetic background of the Nab-producing B-cells.

  19. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by redox signaling and oxidative stress: implications for neuronal development and trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Carlos; González-Billault, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A proper balance between chemical reduction and oxidation (known as redox balance) is essential for normal cellular physiology. Deregulation in the production of oxidative species leads to DNA damage, lipid peroxidation and aberrant post-translational modification of proteins, which in most cases induces injury, cell death and disease. However, physiological concentrations of oxidative species are necessary to support important cell functions, such as chemotaxis, hormone synthesis, immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, Ca2+ homeostasis and others. Recent evidence suggests that redox balance regulates actin and microtubule dynamics in both physiological and pathological contexts. Microtubules and actin microfilaments contain certain amino acid residues that are susceptible to oxidation, which reduces the ability of microtubules to polymerize and causes severing of actin microfilaments in neuronal and non-neuronal cells. In contrast, inhibited production of reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., due to NOXs) leads to aberrant actin polymerization, decreases neurite outgrowth and affects the normal development and polarization of neurons. In this review, we summarize emerging evidence suggesting that both general and specific enzymatic sources of redox species exert diverse effects on cytoskeletal dynamics. Considering the intimate relationship between cytoskeletal dynamics and trafficking, we also discuss the potential effects of redox balance on intracellular transport via regulation of the components of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton as well as cytoskeleton-associated proteins, which may directly impact localization of proteins and vesicles across the soma, dendrites and axon of neurons. PMID:26483635

  20. Doubts about a classic defence of abortion.

    PubMed

    Difford, Jo

    2011-01-01

    Professor Judith Jarvis Thomson's seminal paper "A defence of abortion" published in 1971 has formed part of higher education syllabi for decades. In the paper Thomson criticizes one of the fundamental arguments against abortion, that is, the right of the foetus to life by denying that the foetus is a person. This article argues that her thought experiments do not compare to the reality of abortion and focuses on the influence of the paper on arguments concerning personhood.

  1. The Man-in-the-Middle Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ross; Bond, Mike

    Eliminating middlemen from security protocols helps less than one would think. EMV electronic payments, for example, can be made fairer by adding an electronic attorney - a middleman which mediates access to a customer’s card. We compare middlemen in crypto protocols and APIs with those in the real world, and show that a man-in-the-middle defence is helpful in many circumstances. We suggest that the middleman has been unfairly demonised.

  2. Oleic acid-dependent modulation of Nitric oxide associated 1 protein levels regulates nitric oxide-mediated defense signaling in Arabidopsis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The conserved cellular metabolites nitric oxide (NO) and oleic acid (18:1) are well-known regulators of disease physiologies in diverse organism. We show that NO production in plants is regulated via 18:1. Reduction in 18:1 levels, via a genetic mutation in the 18:1-synthesizing gene SUPPRESSOR OF S...

  3. Keap1 redox-dependent regulation of doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress response in cardiac myoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Nordgren, Kendra K.S. Wallace, Kendall B.

    2014-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a widely prescribed treatment for a broad scope of cancers, but clinical utility is limited by the cumulative, dose-dependent cardiomyopathy that occurs with repeated administration. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidation of lipids, DNA and proteins. A major cellular defense mechanism against such oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway, which transcriptionally regulates expression of antioxidant genes such as Nqo1 and Gstp1. In the present study, we address the hypothesis that an initial event associated with DOX-induced oxidative stress is activation of the Keap1/Nrf2-dependent expression of antioxidant genes and that this is regulated through drug-induced changes in redox status of the Keap1 protein. Incubation of H9c2 rat cardiac myoblasts with DOX resulted in a time- and dose-dependent decrease in non-protein sulfhydryl groups. Associated with this was a near 2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content and enhanced transcription of several of the Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes, including Gstp1, Ugt1a1, and Nqo1; the expression of Nfe2l2 (Nrf2) itself was unaltered. Furthermore, both the redox status and the total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX, with the loss of Keap1 being due to both inhibited gene expression and increased autophagic, but not proteasomal, degradation. These findings identify the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway as a potentially important initial response to acute DOX-induced oxidative injury, with the primary regulatory events being the oxidation and autophagic degradation of the redox sensor Keap1 protein. - Highlights: • DOX caused a ∼2-fold increase in Nrf2 protein content. • DOX enhanced transcription of several Nrf2-regulated down-stream genes. • Redox status and total amount of Keap1 protein were significantly decreased by DOX. • Loss of Keap1 protein was due to

  4. Regulation of oxidized base damage repair by chromatin assembly factor 1 subunit A

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chunying; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Hegde, Pavana M.; Mitra, Joy; Jiang, Shuai; Holey, Brooke; Sarker, Altaf H.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Mitra, Sankar

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated both endogenously and in response to exogenous stress, induce point mutations by mis-replication of oxidized bases and other lesions in the genome. Repair of these lesions via base excision repair (BER) pathway maintains genomic fidelity. Regulation of the BER pathway for mutagenic oxidized bases, initiated by NEIL1 and other DNA glycosylases at the chromatin level remains unexplored. Whether single nucleotide (SN)-BER of a damaged base requires histone deposition or nucleosome remodeling is unknown, unlike nucleosome reassembly which is shown to be required for other DNA repair processes. Here we show that chromatin assembly factor (CAF)-1 subunit A (CHAF1A), the p150 subunit of the histone H3/H4 chaperone, and its partner anti-silencing function protein 1A (ASF1A), which we identified in human NEIL1 immunoprecipitation complex, transiently dissociate from chromatin bound NEIL1 complex in G1 cells after induction of oxidative base damage. CHAF1A inhibits NEIL1 initiated repair in vitro. Subsequent restoration of the chaperone-BER complex in cell, presumably after completion of repair, suggests that histone chaperones sequester the repair complex for oxidized bases in non-replicating chromatin, and allow repair when oxidized bases are induced in the genome. PMID:27794043

  5. Comparative analysis of defence responses induced by the endophytic plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN and the non-host bacterium Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi in grapevine cell suspensions.

    PubMed

    Bordiec, Sophie; Paquis, Sandra; Lacroix, Hélène; Dhondt, Sandrine; Ait Barka, Essaïd; Kauffmann, Serge; Jeandet, Philippe; Mazeyrat-Gourbeyre, Florence; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan

    2011-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are beneficial microorganisms that colonize the rhizosphere of many plant species and confer beneficial effects, such as an increase in plant growth. PGPR are also well known as inducers of systemic resistance to pathogens in plants. However, the molecular mechanisms involved locally after direct perception of these bacteria by plant cells still remain largely unknown. Burkholderia phytofirmans strain PsJN is an endophytic PGPR that colonizes grapevine and protects the plant against the grey mould disease caused by Botrytis cinerea. This report focuses on local defence events induced by B. phytofirmans PsJN after perception by the grapevine cells. It is demonstrated that, after addition to cell suspension cultures, the bacteria were tightly attaching to plant cells in a way similar to the grapevine non-host bacteria Pseudomonas syringae pv. pisi. B. phytofirmans PsJN perception led to a transient and monophasic extracellular alkalinization but no accumulation of reactive oxygen species or cell death were detected. By contrast, challenge with P. syringae pv. pisi induced a sustained and biphasic extracellular alkalinization, a two phases oxidative burst, and a HR-like response. Perception of the PGPR also led to the production of salicylic acid (SA) and the expression of a battery of defence genes that was, however, weaker in intensity compared with defence gene expression triggered by the non-host bacteria. Some defence genes up-regulated after B. phytofirmans PsJN challenge are specifically induced by exogenous treatment with SA or jasmonic acid, suggesting that both signalling pathways are activated by the PGPR in grapevine.

  6. Regulation of mitochondrial oxidative stress by β-arrestins in cultured human cardiac fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Jennifer L.; Razzaque, Md. Abdur; Han, Mei; Li, Jinju; Theccanat, Tiju; Xu, Xianyao; Akhter, Shahab A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stress in cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) promotes transformation to myofibroblasts and collagen synthesis leading to myocardial fibrosis, a precursor to heart failure (HF). NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) is a major source of cardiac reactive oxygen species (ROS); however, mechanisms of Nox4 regulation are unclear. β-arrestins are scaffold proteins that signal in G-protein-dependent and -independent pathways; for example, in ERK activation. We hypothesize that β-arrestins regulate oxidative stress in a Nox4-dependent manner and increase fibrosis in HF. CFs were isolated from normal and failing adult human left ventricles. Mitochondrial ROS/superoxide production was quantitated using MitoSox. β-arrestin and Nox4 expressions were manipulated using adenoviral overexpression or short interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and Nox4 expression in CFs were significantly increased in HF. Nox4 knockdown resulted in inhibition of mitochondrial superoxide production and decreased basal and TGF-β-stimulated collagen and α-SMA expression. CF β-arrestin expression was upregulated fourfold in HF. β-arrestin knockdown in failing CFs decreased ROS and Nox4 expression by 50%. β-arrestin overexpression in normal CFs increased mitochondrial superoxide production twofold. These effects were prevented by inhibition of either Nox or ERK. Upregulation of Nox4 seemed to be a primary mechanism for increased ROS production in failing CFs, which stimulates collagen deposition. β-arrestin expression was upregulated in HF and plays an important and newly identified role in regulating mitochondrial superoxide production via Nox4. The mechanism for this effect seems to be ERK-mediated. Targeted inhibition of β-arrestins in CFs might decrease oxidative stress as well as pathological cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26449263

  7. Influence of Trichobilharzia regenti (Digenea: Schistosomatidae) on the defence activity of Radix lagotis (Lymnaeidae) Haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Skála, Vladimír; Černíková, Alena; Jindrová, Zuzana; Kašný, Martin; Vostrý, Martin; Walker, Anthony J; Horák, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Radix lagotis is an intermediate snail host of the nasal bird schistosome Trichobilharzia regenti. Changes in defence responses in infected snails that might be related to host-parasite compatibility are not known. This study therefore aimed to characterize R. lagotis haemocyte defence mechanisms and determine the extent to which they are modulated by T. regenti. Histological observations of R. lagotis infected with T. regenti revealed that early phases of infection were accompanied by haemocyte accumulation around the developing larvae 2-36 h post exposure (p.e.) to the parasite. At later time points, 44-92 h p.e., no haemocytes were observed around T. regenti. Additionally, microtubular aggregates likely corresponding to phagocytosed ciliary plates of T. regenti miracidia were observed within haemocytes by use of transmission electron microscopy. When the infection was in the patent phase, haemocyte phagocytic activity and hydrogen peroxide production were significantly reduced in infected R. lagotis when compared to uninfected counterparts, whereas haemocyte abundance increased in infected snails. At a molecular level, protein kinase C (PKC) and extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) were found to play an important role in regulating these defence reactions in R. lagotis. Moreover, haemocytes from snails with patent infection displayed lower PKC and ERK activity in cell adhesion assays when compared to those from uninfected snails, which may therefore be related to the reduced defence activities of these cells. These data provide the first integrated insight into the immunobiology of R. lagotis and demonstrate modulation of haemocyte-mediated responses in patent T. regenti infected snails. Given that immunomodulation occurs during patency, interference of snail-host defence by T. regenti might be important for the sustained production and/or release of infective cercariae.

  8. The Physiological Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Fatty Acid Supply and Oxidation During Moderate-Intensity Exercise.

    PubMed

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2015-11-01

    Energy substrates that are important to the working muscle at moderate intensities are the non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) taken up from the circulation and NEFAs originating from lipolysis of the intramuscular triacylglycerol (IMTAG). Moreover, NEFA from lipolysis via lipoprotein lipase (LPL) in the muscle of the very-low-density lipoproteins and in the (semi) post-prandial state chylomicrons may also contribute. In this review, the NEFA fluxes and oxidation by skeletal muscle during prolonged moderate-intensity exercise are described in terms of the integration of physiological systems. Steps involved in the regulation of the active muscle NEFA uptake include (1) increased energy demand; (2) delivery of NEFA to the muscle; (3) transport of NEFA into the muscle by NEFA transporters; and (4) activation of the NEFAs and either oxidation or re-esterification into IMTAG. The increased metabolic demand of the exercising muscle is the main driving force for all physiological regulatory processes. It elicits functional hyperemia, increasing the recruitment of capillaries and muscle blood flow resulting in increased NEFA delivery and accessibility to NEFA transporters and LPL. It also releases epinephrine that augments adipose tissue NEFA release and thereby NEFA delivery to the active muscle. Moreover, NEFA transporters translocate to the plasma membrane, further increasing the NEFA uptake. The majority of the NEFAs taken up by the active muscle is oxidized and a minor portion is re-esterified to IMTAG. Net IMTAG lipolysis occurs; however, the IMTAG contribution to total fat oxidation is rather limited compared to plasma-derived NEFA oxidation, suggesting a complex role and regulation of IMTAG utilization.

  9. PHLPP2 down regulation influences nuclear Nrf2 stability via Akt-1/Gsk3β/Fyn kinase axis in acetaminophen induced oxidative renal toxicity: Protection accorded by morin.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Alpana; Rizvi, Fatima; Kakkar, Poonam

    2016-03-01

    NF-E2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a cap 'n' collar (CNC) basic region-leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor that imparts cellular defence against xenobiotic and oxidative stress evoked responses by inducing an array of cytoprotective genes. Essential factors that regulate Nrf2 activity and stability during analgesic nephropathy are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrate that acetaminophen (a classic analgesic) posit nephrotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo via PHLPP2 activation. Enhanced PHLPP2 levels down regulate p-Akt by dephosphorylating it at Ser 473 residue leading to Gsk3β activation. APAP subsided Nrf2 nuclear accumulation by activating Gsk3β which phosphorylates Fyn kinase. p-Fyn kinase translocates into the nucleus and phosphorylates Nrf2 (Tyr 568) leading to its nuclear export, ubiquitination and degradation. Therefore, poor prognosis prevails during analgesic nephrotoxicity because of the defects in Akt-1/Gsk3β/Fyn-Nrf2 signaling pathway. Morin, a bioflavonoid given as co- and pre-treatment with acetaminophen significantly prevented the toxicity induced damage by constitutively stabilizing Nrf2 nuclear retention. Diminished Nrf2 levels by APAP overdose imposed severe proximal tubular damage leading to apoptotic cell death. Morin, as a potent Nrf2 inducer accorded protection against acetaminophen induced renal damages by its molecular intervention with Akt-1/Gsk3β/Fyn kinase pathway via PHLPP2 de-activation.

  10. Involvement of putative glutamate receptors in plant defence signaling and NO production.

    PubMed

    Vatsa, Parul; Chiltz, Annick; Bourque, Stéphane; Wendehenne, David; Garcia-Brugger, Angela; Pugin, Alain

    2011-12-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are non-selective cation channels permeable to calcium, present in animals and plants. In mammals, glutamate is a well-known neurotransmitter and recently has been recognized as an immunomodulator. As animals and plants share common mechanisms that govern innate immunity with calcium playing a key role in plant defence activation, we have checked the involvement of putative iGluRs in plant defence signaling. Using tobacco cells, we first provide evidence supporting the activity of iGluRs as calcium channels and their involvement in NO production as reported in animals. Thereafter, iGluRs were shown to be activated in response to cryptogein, a well studied elicitor of defence response, and partly responsible for cryptogein-induced NO production. However, other cryptogein-induced calcium-dependent events including anion efflux, H(2)O(2) production, MAPK activation and hypersensitive response (HR) did not depend on iGluRs indicating that different calcium channels regulate different processes at the cell level. We have also demonstrated that cryptogein induces efflux of glutamate in the apoplast by exocytosis. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time, an involvement of a putative iGluR in plant defence signaling and NO production, by mechanisms that show homology with glutamate mode of action in mammals.

  11. The proteasome and the degradation of oxidized proteins: Part III—Redox regulation of the proteasomal system

    PubMed Central

    Höhn, Tobias Jung Annika; Grune, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review shortly the current knowledge on the regulation of the proteasomal system during and after oxidative stress. After addressing the components of the proteasomal system and the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins in part I and II of this series, we address here which changes in activity undergo the proteasome and the ubiquitin-proteasomal system itself under oxidative conditions. While several components of the proteasomal system undergo direct oxidative modification, a number of redox-regulated events are modulating the proteasomal activity in a way it can address the major tasks in an oxidative stress situation: the removal of oxidized proteins and the adaptation of the cellular metabolism to the stress situation. PMID:24563857

  12. DAPK2 regulates oxidative stress in cancer cells by preserving mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, C R; Georgiou, M L; Misterek, M B; Stöcker, S; Chater, E R; Munro, C E; Pardo, O E; Seckl, M J; Costa-Pereira, A P

    2015-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) 2 is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the DAPK family. Although it shows significant structural differences from DAPK1, the founding member of this protein family, DAPK2 is also thought to be a putative tumour suppressor. Like DAPK1, it has been implicated in programmed cell death, the regulation of autophagy and diverse developmental processes. In contrast to DAPK1, however, few mechanistic studies have been carried out on DAPK2 and the majority of these have made use of tagged DAPK2, which almost invariably leads to overexpression of the protein. As a consequence, physiological roles of this kinase are still poorly understood. Using two genetically distinct cancer cell lines as models, we have identified a new role for DAPK2 in the regulation of mitochondrial integrity. RNA interference-mediated depletion of DAPK2 leads to fundamental metabolic changes, including significantly decreased rate of oxidative phosphorylation in combination with overall destabilised mitochondrial membrane potential. This phenotype is further corroborated by an increase in the production of mitochondrial superoxide anions and increased oxidative stress. This then leads to the activation of classical stress-activated kinases such as ERK, JNK and p38, which is observed on DAPK2 genetic ablation. Interestingly, the generation of oxidative stress is further enhanced on overexpression of a kinase-dead DAPK2 mutant indicating that it is the kinase domain of DAPK2 that is important to maintain mitochondrial integrity and, by inference, for cellular metabolism. PMID:25741596

  13. The oxidative molecular regulation mechanism of NOX in children with phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    He, Ying-Zhong; Gu, Xue-Fan; Lu, Li-Hua; Liang, Li-Li

    2014-11-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is the most frequent inherited disorder of amino acid metabolism. In our previous work, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in a Pahenu2-BTBR PKU mouse model, and an in vitro cell culture model of PKU. In the current study, we evaluated various oxidative stress parameters, namely total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), glutathione (GSH) and maleic dialdehyde (MDA) in the plasma of 40 PKU children, for further investigating the oxidative molecular regulation mechanism of NOX in PKU. It was observed that T-AOC and GSH markedly decreased in PKU as compared with the control group (P<0.01), and seemed to correlate negatively with Phe level. However, there was no statistical difference in MDA level among the three groups. And 8-isoprostane in the blood samples of PKU2 groups was slightly higher than control group (P<0.05). Additionally, mRNA levels of subunits of NOX included p47(phox) and p67(phox) significantly increased in PKU group (P<0.01). These results reflected that NOX is the important source of reactive oxygen species and is involved in the oxidative molecular regulation mechanism in PKU, which shows a new perspective toward understanding the biological underpinnings of PKU.

  14. Nitric oxide production and NO synthase gene expression contribute to vascular regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Zhang, X; Zhao, G; Wolin, M S; Sessa, W; Hintze, T H

    1995-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator produced under normal physiologic conditions primarily by the vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels. The primary stimulus for the production of nitric oxide by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ECNOS, Type II) found in blood vessels is most likely the shear stress, the frictional force, caused by blood flowing through blood vessels. During exercise there is an increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to increase blood flow in skeletal muscle and in the coronary circulation. These adjustments provide increased oxygen delivery to support aerobic energy production and to sustain the exercise response. NO may be involved in the regulation of vascular tone in exercising skeletal and cardiac muscle by promoting, enhancing the metabolic vasodilation. In addition, the production of NO by capillary endothelium may regulate oxygen consumption by mitochondria through chemical interactions between NO and the iron-sulfur center of these enzymes. Finally, brief exercise training may alter the gene expression for the enzyme, the constitutive endothelial NO synthase, which forms NO and may be part of the vascular adaptation seen after aerobic exercise training. Furthermore, if there is a genetic predisposition to produce NO, as in world class athletes or animals bred to race, NO may contribute to spectacular exercise performance. These three potential roles of NO will be discussed and data presented to support each of these in our review.

  15. Potato skin proteome is enriched with plant defence components

    PubMed Central

    Barel, Gilli; Ginzberg, Idit

    2008-01-01

    Periderm is a tissue of secondary origin that replaces damaged epidermis. It can be found in underground plant organs, as an above-ground tissue of woody species (cork), and as a wound-healing tissue. Its outer layers are composed of phellem cells with suberized walls that constitute a protective barrier, preventing pathogen invasion and fluid loss. In potato, a model for periderm studies, periderm tissue replaces the epidermis early in tuber development and the suberized phellems constitute the tuber's skin. To identify factors involved in phellem/skin development and that play a role in its defensive characteristics, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the skin and parenchymatic flesh proteomes of young developing tubers. Proteins exhibiting differentially high signal intensity in the skin were sorted by functional categories. As expected, the differential skin proteome was enriched in proteins whose activity is characteristic of actively dividing tissues such as cell proliferation, C1 metabolism, and the oxidative respiratory chain. Interestingly, the major functional category consisted of proteins (63%) involved in plant defence responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This group included three isozymes of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase and five isozymes of peroxidase that may play a role in suberization processes. The differential expression of these proteins in the skin was further verified by RT-PCR of their corresponding transcripts in skin and tuber flesh samples. The results presented here shed light on the early events in skin development and further expand the concept of the periderm as a protective tissue containing an array of plant defence components. PMID:18653692

  16. Potato skin proteome is enriched with plant defence components.

    PubMed

    Barel, Gilli; Ginzberg, Idit

    2008-01-01

    Periderm is a tissue of secondary origin that replaces damaged epidermis. It can be found in underground plant organs, as an above-ground tissue of woody species (cork), and as a wound-healing tissue. Its outer layers are composed of phellem cells with suberized walls that constitute a protective barrier, preventing pathogen invasion and fluid loss. In potato, a model for periderm studies, periderm tissue replaces the epidermis early in tuber development and the suberized phellems constitute the tuber's skin. To identify factors involved in phellem/skin development and that play a role in its defensive characteristics, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to compare the skin and parenchymatic flesh proteomes of young developing tubers. Proteins exhibiting differentially high signal intensity in the skin were sorted by functional categories. As expected, the differential skin proteome was enriched in proteins whose activity is characteristic of actively dividing tissues such as cell proliferation, C(1) metabolism, and the oxidative respiratory chain. Interestingly, the major functional category consisted of proteins (63%) involved in plant defence responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. This group included three isozymes of caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase and five isozymes of peroxidase that may play a role in suberization processes. The differential expression of these proteins in the skin was further verified by RT-PCR of their corresponding transcripts in skin and tuber flesh samples. The results presented here shed light on the early events in skin development and further expand the concept of the periderm as a protective tissue containing an array of plant defence components.

  17. Up-regulation of cardiac nitric oxide synthase 1-derived nitric oxide after myocardial infarction in senescent rats.

    PubMed

    Damy, Thibaud; Ratajczak, Philippe; Robidel, Estelle; Bendall, Jennifer K; Oliviéro, Patricia; Boczkowski, Jorge; Ebrahimian, Talin; Marotte, Françoise; Samuel, Jane-Lise; Heymes, Christophe

    2003-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been implicated in the development of heart failure, although the source, significance, and functional role of the different NO synthase (NOS) isoforms in this pathology are controversial. The presence of a neuronal-type NOS isoform (NOS1) in the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum has been recently discovered, leading to the hypothesis that NOS1-derived NO may notably alter myocardial inotropy. However, the regulation and role(s) of NOS1 in cardiac diseases remain to be determined. Using an experimental model of myocardial infarction (MI) in senescent rats, we demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac NOS1 expression and activity in MI, coupled with the translocation of this enzyme to the sarcolemma through interactions with caveolin-3. The enhanced NOS1 activity counteracts the decrease in cardiac NOS3 expression and activity observed in heart failure. We demonstrated an increased interaction between NOS1 and its regulatory protein HSP90 in post-MI hearts, a potential mechanism for the higher NOS1 activity in this setting. Finally, preferential in vivo inhibition of NOS1 activity enhanced basal post-MI left ventricular dysfunction in senescent rats. These results provide the first evidence that increased NOS1-derived NO production may play a significant role in the autocrine regulation of myocardial contractility after MI in aging rats.

  18. Comparative genomics tools applied to bioterrorism defence.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Tom; Kuczmarski, Tom; Ott, Linda; Torres, Clinton; Medeiros, Dan; Smith, Jason; Truitt, Brian; Mulakken, Nisha; Lam, Marisa; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Zemla, Adam; Zhou, Carol Ecale; Gardner, Shea

    2003-06-01

    Rapid advances in the genomic sequencing of bacteria and viruses over the past few years have made it possible to consider sequencing the genomes of all pathogens that affect humans and the crops and livestock upon which our lives depend. Recent events make it imperative that full genome sequencing be accomplished as soon as possible for pathogens that could be used as weapons of mass destruction or disruption. This sequence information must be exploited to provide rapid and accurate diagnostics to identify pathogens and distinguish them from harmless near-neighbours and hoaxes. The Chem-Bio Non-Proliferation (CBNP) programme of the US Department of Energy (DOE) began a large-scale effort of pathogen detection in early 2000 when it was announced that the DOE would be providing bio-security at the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. Our team at the Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) was given the task of developing reliable and validated assays for a number of the most likely bioterrorist agents. The short timeline led us to devise a novel system that utilised whole-genome comparison methods to rapidly focus on parts of the pathogen genomes that had a high probability of being unique. Assays developed with this approach have been validated by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). They were used at the 2002 Winter Olympics, have entered the public health system, and have been in continual use for non-publicised aspects of homeland defence since autumn 2001. Assays have been developed for all major threat list agents for which adequate genomic sequence is available, as well as for other pathogens requested by various government agencies. Collaborations with comparative genomics algorithm developers have enabled our LLNL team to make major advances in pathogen detection, since many of the existing tools simply did not scale well enough to be of practical use for this application. It is hoped that a discussion of a real-life practical application of

  19. Heme oxygenase-1: redox regulation and role in the hepatic response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Michael; Bauer, Inge

    2002-10-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) catalyzes the oxidative cleavage of the alpha-mesocarbon of Fe-protoporphyrin-IX yielding equimolar amounts of biliverdin-IXalpha, free divalent iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). Among the three isoenzymes cloned to date, only HO-1 can be induced by a variety of seemingly disparate stimuli, most of which are linked by their ability to provoke oxidative stress. Although constitutive expression of HO-1 in the liver is restricted to Kupffer cells, the gene is inducible in nonparenchymal as well as in parenchymal liver cells. HO-1 induction potentially confers protection against oxidative stress in a variety of experimental models, such as liver ischemia/reperfusion secondary to transplantation or hemorrhage/resuscitation. Induction of HO-1 may protect the cell against oxidative injury by (a) controlling intracellular levels of "free" heme (a prooxidant), (b) producing biliverdin (an antioxidant), (c) improving nutritive perfusion via CO release, and (d) fostering the synthesis of the Fe-binding protein ferritin. Although protective effects of up-regulation of the HO pathway--presumably through production of bile pigments and CO--have been reported for a variety of cells and tissues, including the liver, evidence suggests that the protective action might be restricted to a rather narrow threshold of overexpression. High levels of HO-1 may even sensitize the cell to oxidative stress, e.g., through release of reactive iron. Transcriptional activation of the HO-1 gene is an integral part of the cellular response to oxidative stress, but its induction seems to be neither exclusively cytoprotective nor exclusively cytotoxic.

  20. Histone Deacetylase HDA-2 Regulates Trichoderma atroviride Growth, Conidiation, Blue Light Perception, and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Concepción, Macario; Cristóbal-Mondragón, Gema Rosa; Gutiérrez-Medina, Braulio; Casas-Flores, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Fungal blue-light photoreceptors have been proposed as integrators of light and oxidative stress. However, additional elements participating in the integrative pathway remain to be identified. In Trichoderma atroviride, the blue-light regulator (BLR) proteins BLR-1 and -2 are known to regulate gene transcription, mycelial growth, and asexual development upon illumination, and recent global transcriptional analysis revealed that the histone deacetylase-encoding gene hda-2 is induced by light. Here, by assessing responses to stimuli in wild-type and Δhda-2 backgrounds, we evaluate the role of HDA-2 in the regulation of genes responsive to light and oxidative stress. Δhda-2 strains present reduced growth, misregulation of the con-1 gene, and absence of conidia in response to light and mechanical injury. We found that the expression of hda-2 is BLR-1 dependent and HDA-2 in turn is essential for the transcription of early and late light-responsive genes that include blr-1, indicating a regulatory feedback loop. When subjected to reactive oxygen species (ROS), Δhda-2 mutants display high sensitivity whereas Δblr strains exhibit the opposite phenotype. Consistently, in the presence of ROS, ROS-related genes show high transcription levels in wild-type and Δblr strains but misregulation in Δhda-2 mutants. Finally, chromatin immunoprecipitations of histone H3 acetylated at Lys9/Lys14 on cat-3 and gst-1 promoters display low accumulation of H3K9K14ac in Δblr and Δhda-2 strains, suggesting indirect regulation of ROS-related genes by HDA-2. Our results point to a mutual dependence between HDA-2 and BLR proteins and reveal the role of these proteins in an intricate gene regulation landscape in response to blue light and ROS.

  1. Major vault protein regulates cell growth/survival signaling through oxidative modifications.

    PubMed

    Das, Dividutta; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2016-01-01

    Major vault protein forms a hollow, barrel-like structure in the cell called the vault, whose functions and regulation are not well understood. The present study reports that major vault protein regulates growth/survival signaling in human airway smooth muscle cells through oxidative modifications. The promotion of protein S-glutathionylation by asthma mediators such as interleukin-22 and platelet-derived growth factor or by knocking down glutaredoxin-1 or thioredoxin activated cell growth signaling. Mass spectrometry identified that major vault protein is glutathionylated. Major vault protein knockdown enhanced cell death and inhibited STAT3 and Akt signaling. We identified a protein partner of major vault protein that is regulated by glutaredoxin-1, namely myosin-9, which was found to serve as a cell death factor. Knocking down myosin-9 or promoting protein S-glutathionylation by knocking down glutaredoxin-1 inhibited the death of airway smooth muscle cells by heating to simulate bronchial thermoplasty, a clinically successful procedure for the treatment of severe asthma. These results establish a novel signaling pathway in which ligand/receptor-mediated oxidation promotes the S-glutathionylation of major vault protein, which in turn binds to myosin-9 to suppress the heating-induced death of airway smooth muscle cells.

  2. Metabolic pathways regulated by TAp73 in response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Annicchiarico-Petruzzelli, Margherita; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are involved in both physiological and pathological processes including neurodegeneration and cancer. Therefore, cells have developed scavenging mechanisms to maintain redox homeostasis under control. Tumor suppressor genes play a critical role in the regulation of antioxidant genes. Here, we investigated whether the tumor suppressor gene TAp73 is involved in the regulation of metabolic adaptations triggered in response to oxidative stress. H2O2 treatment resulted in numerous biochemical changes in both control and TAp73 knockout (TAp73−/−) mouse embryonic fibroblasts, however the extent of these changes was more pronounced in TAp73−/− cells when compared to control cells. In particular, loss of TAp73 led to alterations in glucose, nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. In addition, H2O2 treatment resulted in increased pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) activity in null mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Overall, our results suggest that in the absence of TAp73, H2O2 treatment results in an enhanced oxidative environment, and at the same time in an increased pro-anabolic phenotype. In conclusion, the metabolic profile observed reinforces the role of TAp73 as tumor suppressor and indicates that TAp73 exerts this function, at least partially, by regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:27119504

  3. Flow-dependent regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase: role of protein kinases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boo, Yong Chool; Jo, Hanjoong

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are directly and continuously exposed to fluid shear stress generated by blood flow. Shear stress regulates endothelial structure and function by controlling expression of mechanosensitive genes and production of vasoactive factors such as nitric oxide (NO). Though it is well known that shear stress stimulates NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear and controversial. Shear-induced production of NO involves Ca2+/calmodulin-independent mechanisms, including phosphorylation of eNOS at several sites and its interaction with other proteins, including caveolin and heat shock protein-90. There have been conflicting results as to which protein kinases-protein kinase A, protein kinase B (Akt), other Ser/Thr protein kinases, or tyrosine kinases-are responsible for shear-dependent eNOS regulation. The functional significance of each phosphorylation site is still unclear. We have attempted to summarize the current status of understanding in shear-dependent eNOS regulation.

  4. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lehninger, A L; Vercesi, A; Bababunmi, E A

    1978-04-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca(2+) and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca(2+) is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as beta-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca(2+). Successive cycles of Ca(2+) release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca(2+)-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca(2+), mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport.

  5. Anr, the anaerobic global regulator, modulates the redox state and oxidative stress resistance in Pseudomonas extremaustralis.

    PubMed

    Tribelli, Paula M; Nikel, Pablo I; Oppezzo, Oscar J; López, Nancy I

    2013-02-01

    The role of Anr in oxidative stress resistance was investigated in Pseudomonas extremaustralis, a polyhydroxybutyrate-producing Antarctic bacterium. The absence of Anr caused increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide under low oxygen tension. This phenomenon was associated with a decrease in the redox ratio, higher oxygen consumption and higher reactive oxygen species production. Physiological responses of the mutant to the oxidized state included an increase in NADP(H) content, catalase activity and exopolysaccharide production. The wild-type strain showed a sharp decrease in the reduced thiol pool when exposed to hydrogen peroxide, not observed in the mutant strain. In silico analysis of the genome sequence of P. extremaustralis revealed putative Anr binding sites upstream from genes related to oxidative stress. Genes encoding several chaperones and cold shock proteins, a glutathione synthase, a sulfate transporter and a thiol peroxidase were identified as potential targets for Anr regulation. Our results suggest a novel role for Anr in oxidative stress resistance and in redox balance maintenance under conditions of restricted oxygen supply.

  6. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues.

  7. Regulation of Ca2+ release from mitochondria by the oxidation-reduction state of pyridine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lehninger, Albert L.; Vercesi, Anibal; Bababunmi, Enitan A.

    1978-01-01

    Mitochondria from normal rat liver and heart, and also Ehrlich tumor cells, respiring on succinate as energy source in the presence of rotenone (to prevent net electron flow to oxygen from the endogenous pyridine nucleotides), rapidly take up Ca2+ and retain it so long as the pyridine nucleotides are kept in the reduced state. When acetoacetate is added to bring the pyridine nucleotides into a more oxidized state, Ca2+ is released to the medium. A subsequent addition of a reductant of the pyridine nucleotides such as β-hydroxybutyrate, glutamate, or isocitrate causes reuptake of the released Ca2+. Successive cycles of Ca2+ release and uptake can be induced by shifting the redox state of the pyridine nucleotides to more oxidized and more reduced states, respectively. Similar observations were made when succinate oxidation was replaced as energy source by ascorbate oxidation or by the hydrolysis of ATP. These and other observations form the basis of a hypothesis for feedback regulation of Ca2+-dependent substrate- or energy-mobilizing enzymatic reactions by the uptake or release of mitochondrial Ca2+, mediated by the cytosolic phosphate potential and the ATP-dependent reduction of mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides by reversal of electron transport. Images PMID:25436

  8. Regulation of cytochrome C peroxidase activity by nitric oxide and laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Osipov, A N; Stepanov, G O; Vladimirov, Yu A; Kozlov, A V; Kagan, V E

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis can be induced by activation of so-called "death receptors" (extrinsic pathway) or multiple apoptotic factors (intrinsic pathway), which leads to release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. This event is considered to be a point of no return in apoptosis. One of the most important events in the development of apoptosis is the enhancement of cytochrome c peroxidase activity upon its interaction with cardiolipin, which modifies the active center of cytochrome c. In the present work, we have investigated the effects of nitric oxide on the cytochrome c peroxidase activity when cytochrome c is bound to cardiolipin or sodium dodecyl sulfate. We have observed that cytochrome c peroxidase activity, distinctly increased due to the presence of anionic lipids, is completely suppressed by nitric oxide. At the same time, nitrosyl complexes of cytochrome c, produced in the interaction with nitric oxide, demonstrated sensitivity to laser irradiation (441 nm) and were photolyzed during irradiation. This decomposition led to partial restoration of cytochrome c peroxidase activity. Finally, we conclude that nitric oxide and laser irradiation may serve as effective instruments for regulating the peroxidase activity of cytochrome c, and, probably, apoptosis.

  9. RNA splicing in regulation of Nitric Oxide receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Martin, Emil; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key protein in the nitric oxide (NO)/-cGMP signaling pathway. sGC activity is involved in a number of important physiological processes including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmission and platelet aggregation and adhesion. Regulation of sGC expression and activity emerges as a crucial factor in control of sGC function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently accumulated evidence strongly indicates that the regulation of sGC expression is a complex process modulated on several levels including transcription, post-transcriptional regulation, translation and protein stability. Presently our understanding of mechanisms governing regulation of sGC expression remains very limited and awaits systematic investigation. Among other ways, the expression of sGC subunits is modulated at the levels of mRNA abundance and transcript diversity. In this review we summarize available information on different mechanisms (including transcriptional activation, mRNA stability and alternative splicing) involved in the modulation of mRNA levels of sGC subunits in response to various environmental clues. We also summarize and cross-reference the information on human sGC splice forms available in the literature and in genomic databases. This review highlights the fact that the study of the biological role and regulation of sGC splicing will bring new insights to our understanding of NO/cGMP biology. PMID:21867767

  10. Jasmonate in plant defence: sentinel or double agent?

    PubMed

    Yan, Chun; Xie, Daoxin

    2015-12-01

    Plants and their biotic enemies, such as microbial pathogens and herbivorous insects, are engaged in a desperate battle which would determine their survival-death fate. Plants have evolved efficient and sophisticated systems to defend against such attackers. In recent years, significant progress has been made towards a comprehensive understanding of inducible defence system mediated by jasmonate (JA), a vital plant hormone essential for plant defence responses and developmental processes. This review presents an overview of JA action in plant defences and discusses how microbial pathogens evade plant defence system through hijacking the JA pathway.

  11. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  12. A Cytokine Signalling Network for the Regulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Poulami; Panga, Venugopal; Raghunathan, Srivatsan

    2016-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in inflammation, angiogenesis and tissue destruction. The enzyme inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is responsible for the localised over-production of NO in the synovial joints affected by RA. The pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines stimulate the synovial macrophages and the fibroblast-like synoviocytes to express iNOS. Therefore, the cytokine signalling network underlying the regulation of iNOS is essential to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. By using information from the literature, we have constructed, for the first time, the cytokine signalling network involved in the regulation of iNOS expression. Using the differential expression patterns obtained by re-analysing the microarray data on the RA synovium and the synovial macrophages available in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, we aimed to establish the role played by the network genes towards iNOS regulation in the RA synovium. Our analysis reveals that the network genes belonging to interferon (IFN) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) pathways are always up-regulated in the RA synovium whereas the genes which are part of the anti-inflammatory transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signalling pathway are mostly down-regulated. We observed a consistent up-regulation of the transcription factor signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1) in the RA synovium and the macrophages. Interestingly, we found a consistent up-regulation of the iNOS interacting protein ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 2 (RAC2) in the RA synovium as well as the macrophages. Importantly, we have constructed a model to explain the impact of IFN and IL-10 pathways on Rac2-iNOS interaction leading to over-production of NO and thereby causing chronic inflammation in the RA synovium. The interplay between STAT1 and RAC2 in the regulation of NO could have implications for the identification of therapeutic targets for RA. PMID:27626941

  13. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  14. Skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction is regulated by nitric oxide and ROS independently of AMPK.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Steinberg, Gregory R; Lynch, Gordon S; McConell, Glenn K

    2010-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been implicated in the regulation of skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction, and there is evidence that they do so via interaction with AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that ROS and NO regulate skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism. Isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus muscles from mice that expressed a muscle-specific kinase dead AMPKalpha2 isoform (AMPK-KD) and wild-type litter mates (WT) were stimulated to contract, and glucose uptake was measured in the presence or absence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) or the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-l-arginine (l-NMMA). Contraction increased AMPKalpha2 activity in WT but not AMPK-KD EDL muscles. However, contraction increased glucose uptake in the EDL and soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice to a similar extent. In EDL muscles, NAC and l-NMMA prevented contraction-stimulated increases in oxidant levels (dichloroflourescein fluorescence) and NOS activity, respectively, and attenuated contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in both genotypes to a similar extent. In soleus muscles of AMPK-KD and WT mice, NAC prevented contraction-stimulated glucose uptake and l-NMMA had no effect. This is likely attributed to the relative lack of neuronal NOS in the soleus muscles compared with EDL muscles. Contraction increased AMPKalpha Thr(172) phosphorylation in EDL and soleus muscles of WT but not AMPK-KD mice, and this was not affected by NAC or l-NMMA treatment. In conclusion, ROS and NO are involved in regulating skeletal muscle glucose uptake during contraction via an AMPK-independent mechanism.

  15. Herbivory: Caterpillar saliva beats plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musser, Richard O.; Hum-Musser, Sue M.; Eichenseer, Herb; Peiffer, Michelle; Ervin, Gary; Murphy, J. Brad; Felton, Gary W.

    2002-04-01

    Blood-feeding arthropods secrete special salivary proteins that suppress the defensive reaction they induce in their hosts. This is in contrast to herbivores, which are thought to be helpless victims of plant defences elicited by their oral secretions. On the basis of the finding that caterpillar regurgitant can reduce the amount of toxic nicotine released by the tobacco plant Nicotiana tabacum, we investigate here whether specific salivary components from the caterpillar Helicoverpa zea might be responsible for this suppression. We find that the enzyme glucose oxidase counteracts the production of nicotine induced by the caterpillar feeding on the plant.

  16. Clostridium difficile colitis: pathogenesis and host defence.

    PubMed

    Abt, Michael C; McKenney, Peter T; Pamer, Eric G

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of intestinal infection and diarrhoea in individuals following antibiotic treatment. Recent studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms that induce spore formation and germination and have determined the roles of C. difficile toxins in disease pathogenesis. Exciting progress has also been made in defining the role of the microbiome, specific commensal bacterial species and host immunity in defence against infection with C. difficile. This Review will summarize the recent discoveries and developments in our understanding of C. difficile infection and pathogenesis.

  17. In Defence of Multimodal Re-Signification: A Response to Havard Skaar's "In Defence of Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adami, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Responding to "In defence of writing" by Havard Skaar, published in issue 43.1 of this journal (April 2009), the present article argues that (1) compared with text production "from scratch," producing texts through copy-and-paste requires a different type of--rather than less--semiotic work, and that (2) digitally produced writing may involve the…

  18. Regulation of Protein Function by Reversible Methionine Oxidation and the Role of Selenoprotein MsrB1

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Alaattin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein structure and function can be regulated via post-translational modifications by numerous enzymatic and nonenzymatic mechanisms. Regulation involving oxidation of sulfur-containing residues emerged as a key mechanism of redox control. Unraveling the participants and principles of such regulation is necessary for understanding the biological significance of redox control of cellular processes. Recent Advances: Reversible oxidation of methionine residues by monooxygenases of the Mical family and subsequent reduction of methionine sulfoxides by a selenocysteine-containing methionine sulfoxide reductase B1 (MsrB1) was found to control the assembly and disassembly of actin in mammals, and the Mical/MsrB pair similarly regulates actin in fruit flies. This finding has opened up new avenues for understanding the use of stereospecific methionine oxidation in regulating cellular processes and the roles of MsrB1 and Micals in regulation of actin dynamics. Critical Issues: So far, Micals have been the only known partners of MsrB1, and actin is the only target. It is important to identify additional substrates of Micals and characterize other Mical-like enzymes. Future Directions: Oxidation of methionine, reviewed here, is an emerging but not well-established mechanism. Studies suggest that methionine oxidation is a form of oxidative damage of proteins, a modification that alters protein structure or function, a tool in redox signaling, and a mechanism that controls protein function. Understanding the functional impact of reversible oxidation of methionine will require identification of targets, substrates, and regulators of Micals and Msrs. Linking the biological processes, in which these proteins participate, might also lead to insights into disease conditions, which involve regulation of actin by Micals and Msrs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 814–822. PMID:26181576

  19. Actin as Deathly Switch? How Auxin Can Suppress Cell-Death Related Defence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers – a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death. PMID:25933033

  20. Actin as deathly switch? How auxin can suppress cell-death related defence.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Riemann, Michael; Liu, Qiong; Nick, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant innate immunity is composed of two layers--a basal immunity, and a specific effector-triggered immunity, which is often accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Initiation of cell death depends on a complex network of signalling pathways. The phytohormone auxin as central regulator of plant growth and development represents an important component for the modulation of plant defence. In our previous work, we showed that cell death is heralded by detachment of actin from the membrane. Both, actin response and cell death, are triggered by the bacterial elicitor harpin in grapevine cells. In this study we investigated, whether harpin-triggered actin bundling is necessary for harpin-triggered cell death. Since actin organisation is dependent upon auxin, we used different auxins to suppress actin bundling. Extracellular alkalinisation and transcription of defence genes as the basal immunity were examined as well as cell death. Furthermore, organisation of actin was observed in response to pharmacological manipulation of reactive oxygen species and phospholipase D. We find that induction of defence genes is independent of auxin. However, auxin can suppress harpin-induced cell death and also counteract actin bundling. We integrate our findings into a model, where harpin interferes with an auxin dependent pathway that sustains dynamic cortical actin through the activity of phospholipase D. The antagonism between growth and defence is explained by mutual competition for signal molecules such as superoxide and phosphatidic acid. Perturbations of the auxin-actin pathway might be used to detect disturbed integrity of the plasma membrane and channel defence signalling towards programmed cell death.

  1. The histone methylase KMTox interacts with the redox-sensor peroxiredoxin-1 and targets genes involved in Toxoplasma gondii antioxidant defences.

    PubMed

    Sautel, Céline F; Ortet, Philippe; Saksouk, Nehmé; Kieffer, Sylvie; Garin, Jérôme; Bastien, Olivier; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2009-01-01

    The ability of living cells to alter their gene expression patterns in response to environmental changes is essential for viability. Oxidative stress represents a common threat for all aerobic life. In normally growing cells, in which hydrogen peroxide generation is transient or pulsed, the antioxidant systems efficiently control its concentration. Intracellular parasites must also protect themselves against the oxidative burst imposed by the host. In this work, we have investigated the role of KMTox, a new histone lysine methyltransferase, in the obligate intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii. KMTox is a nuclear protein that holds a High Mobility Group domain, which is thought to recognize bent DNA. The enzyme methylates both histones H4 and H2A in vitro with a great preference for the substrate in reduced conditions. Importantly, KMTox interacts specifically with the typical 2-cys peroxiredoxin-1 and the binding is to some extent enhanced upon oxidation. It appears that the cellular functions that are primarily regulated by the KMTox are antioxidant defences and maintenance of cellular homeostasis. KMTox may regulate gene expression in T. gondii by providing the rapid re-arrangement of chromatin domains and by interacting with the redox-sensor TgPrx1 contribute to establish the antioxidant 'firewall' in T. gondii.

  2. Thioredoxin Binding Protein-2 Regulates Autophagy of Human Lens Epithelial Cells under Oxidative Stress via Inhibition of Akt Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ke; Zhang, Yidong; Chen, Guangdi; Lai, Kairan; Yin, Houfa

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an essential role in the development of age-related cataract. Thioredoxin binding protein-2 (TBP-2) is a negative regulator of thioredoxin (Trx), which deteriorates cellular antioxidant system. Our study focused on the autophagy-regulating effect of TBP-2 under oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells (LECs). Human lens epithelial cells were used for cell culture and treatment. Lentiviral-based transfection system was used for overexpression of TBP-2. Cytotoxicity assay, western blot analysis, GFP/mCherry-fused LC3 plasmid, immunofluorescence, and transmission electronic microscopy were performed. The results showed that autophagic response of LECs with increased LC3-II, p62, and GFP/mCherry-LC3 puncta (P < 0.01) was induced by oxidative stress. Overexpression of TBP-2 further strengthens this response and worsens the cell viability (P < 0.01). Knockdown of TBP-2 attenuates the autophagic response and cell viability loss induced by oxidative stress. TBP-2 mainly regulates autophagy in the initiation stage, which is mTOR-independent and probably caused by the dephosphorylation of Akt under oxidative stress. These findings suggest a novel role of TBP-2 in human LECs under oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can cause cell injury and autophagy in LECs, and TBP-2 regulates this response. Hence, this study provides evidence regarding the role of TBP-2 in lens and the possible mechanism of cataract development. PMID:27656263

  3. Seasonal variations in the antioxidant defence systems and lipid peroxidation of the digestive gland of mussels.

    PubMed

    Viarengo, A; Canesi, L; Pertica, M; Livingstone, D R

    1991-01-01

    1. The seasonal variations in the level of antioxidant compounds (glutathione (GSH), vitamin E, carotenoids) and in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), catalase (EC 1.11.1.6), GSH-peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) in the digestive gland of mussels (Mytilus sp.) were evaluated. The lipid peroxidation process was also measured by determining the tissue concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA). 2. The physiological fluctuations of the antioxidant defence systems were inversely related to the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products (MDA) in the tissue. The observed seasonal variations are presumably related to the changing metabolic status of the animals, itself dependent on such factors as gonad ripening and food availability. 3. In particular, the obtained data indicate that a reduction of the antioxidant defence systems, occurring during winter, could be directly responsible for an enhanced susceptibility of mussels tissues to oxidative stress, as indicated by the high MDA concentration observed in this period.

  4. A mir-231-Regulated Protection Mechanism against the Toxicity of Graphene Oxide in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruilong; Ren, Mingxia; Rui, Qi; Wang, Dayong

    2016-08-01

    Recently, several dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in organisms exposed to graphene oxide (GO). However, their biological functions and mechanisms of the action are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of mir-231 in the regulation of GO toxicity using in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that GO exposure inhibited the expression of mir-231::GFP in multiple tissues, in particular in the intestine. mir-231 acted in intestine to regulate the GO toxicity, and overexpression of mir-231 in intestine caused a susceptible property of nematodes to GO toxicity. smk-1 encoding a homologue to mammalian SMEK functioned as a targeted gene for mir-231, and was also involved in the intestinal regulation of GO toxicity. Mutation of smk-1 gene induced a susceptible property to GO toxicity, whereas the intestinal overexpression of smk-1 resulted in a resistant property to GO toxicity. Moreover, mutation of smk-1 gene suppressed the resistant property of mir-231 mutant to GO toxicity. In nematodes, SMK-1 further acted upstream of the transcriptional factor DAF-16/FOXO in insulin signaling pathway to regulate GO toxicity. Therefore, mir-231 may encode a GO-responsive protection mechanism against the GO toxicity by suppressing the function of the SMK-1 - DAF-16 signaling cascade in nematodes.

  5. A Computational Screen for Regulators of Oxidative Phosphorylation Implicates SLIRP in Mitochondrial RNA Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Baughman, Joshua M.; Nilsson, Roland; Gohil, Vishal M.; Arlow, Daniel H.; Gauhar, Zareen; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2009-01-01

    The human oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) system consists of approximately 90 proteins encoded by nuclear and mitochondrial genomes and serves as the primary cellular pathway for ATP biosynthesis. While the core protein machinery for OxPhos is well characterized, many of its assembly, maturation, and regulatory factors remain unknown. We exploited the tight transcriptional control of the genes encoding the core OxPhos machinery to identify novel regulators. We developed a computational procedure, which we call expression screening, which integrates information from thousands of microarray data sets in a principled manner to identify genes that are consistently co-expressed with a target pathway across biological contexts. We applied expression screening to predict dozens of novel regulators of OxPhos. For two candidate genes, CHCHD2 and SLIRP, we show that silencing with RNAi results in destabilization of OxPhos complexes and a marked loss of OxPhos enzymatic activity. Moreover, we show that SLIRP plays an essential role in maintaining mitochondrial-localized mRNA transcripts that encode OxPhos protein subunits. Our findings provide a catalogue of potential novel OxPhos regulators that advance our understanding of the coordination between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes for the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. PMID:19680543

  6. SYK regulates macrophage MHC-II expression via activation of autophagy in response to oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Gonen, Ayelet; Diehl, Cody J; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Witztum, Joseph L; Miller, Yury I

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, which plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis, is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-dependent antigen presentation. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages constitute an important class of antigen-presenting cells that activate adaptive immune responses to oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL). It has been reported that autophagy regulates adaptive immune responses by enhancing antigen presentation to MHC class II (MHC-II). In a previous study, we have demonstrated that SYK (spleen tyrosine kinase) regulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activation of MAPK8/JNK1 in macrophages. Because ROS and MAPK8 are known to regulate autophagy, in this study we investigated the role of SYK in autophagy, MHC-II expression and adaptive immune response to OxLDL. We demonstrate that OxLDL induces autophagosome formation, MHC-II expression, and phosphorylation of SYK in macrophages. Gene knockout and pharmacological inhibitors of NOX2 and MAPK8 reduced OxLDL-induced autophagy. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from wild-type and myeloid-specific SYK knockout mice, we demonstrate that SYK regulates OxLDL-induced ROS generation, MAPK8 activation, BECN1-BCL2 dissociation, autophagosome formation and presentation of OxLDL-derived antigens to CD4+ T cells. ldlr−/− syk−/− mice fed a high-fat diet produced lower levels of IgG to malondialdehyde (MDA)-LDL, malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA)-LDL, and OxLDL compared to ldlr−/− mice. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms by which SYK regulates MHC-II expression via autophagy in macrophages and may contribute to regulation of adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis. PMID:25946330

  7. Structural insight into the oxidation-sensing mechanism of the antibiotic resistance of regulator MexR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hao; Yi, Chengqi; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Wenru; Ge, Zhiyun; Yang, Cai-Guang; He, Chuan

    2010-11-05

    MexR functions as the primary regulator of the mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It has been shown that MexR senses oxidative stress by interprotomer disulphide bond formation between redox-active cysteines. This oxidation induces MexR to dissociate from the promoter DNA, thus activating the transcriptional expression of efflux pump genes. In this study, we present the crystal structure of MexR in its oxidized form at a resolution of 2.1 {angstrom}. This crystal structure reveals the mechanism by which oxidative signal allosterically derepresses the MexR-controlled transcription activation.

  8. Regulation of the sympathetic nervous system by nitric oxide and oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla: 2012 Academic Conference Award from the Japanese Society of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Takuya

    2013-10-01

    Sympathoexcitation has an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Previous studies have demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) and/or oxidative stress in the brain are important for the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. We have investigated the role of NO derived from an overexpression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) or oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), which is known as a vasomotor center in the brainstem, on the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Our results indicated that NO derived from an overexpression of eNOS in the RVLM caused sympathoinhibition via an increase in γ-amino butyric acid and that angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R)-induced oxidative stress in the RVLM caused sympathoexcitation. We also demonstrated that oxidative stress in the RVLM caused sympathoexcitation via interactions with NO, effects on the signal transduction or apoptosis of the astrocytes. Furthermore, several orally administered AT1R blockers have been found to cause sympathoinhibition via a reduction in oxidative stress through the blockade of AT1R in the RVLM of hypertensive rats. In conclusion, our studies suggest that the increase in AT1R-induced oxidative stress and/or the decrease in NO in the RVLM mainly cause sympathoexcitation in hypertension.

  9. Mortalin and DJ-1 coordinately regulate hematopoietic stem cell function through the control of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tai-Nagara, Ikue; Matsuoka, Sahoko; Ariga, Hiroyoshi; Suda, Toshio

    2014-01-02

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) maintain stemness through various mechanisms that protect against stressful conditions. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) preserve cell homeostasis during stress responses through protein quality control, suggesting that HSPs may safeguard HSCs against numerous traumas. Here, we show that mortalin, a mitochondrial HSP, plays an essential role in maintaining HSC properties by regulating oxidative stress. Mortalin is primarily localized in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) compartments. In this study, the inhibition of mortalin function caused abnormal reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevation in HSCs and reduced HSC numbers. Knockdown (KD) of mortalin in HSPCs impaired their ability to repopulate and form colonies. Moreover, mortalin-KD HSCs could not maintain quiescence and showed severe downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor- and antioxidant-related genes. Conversely, HSCs that overexpressed mortalin maintained a high reconstitution capacity and low ROS levels. Furthermore, DJ-1, one of the genes responsible for Parkinson's disease, directly bound to mortalin and acted as a negative ROS regulator. Using DJ-1-deficient mice, we demonstrated that mortalin and DJ-1 coordinately maintain normal ROS levels and HSC numbers. Collectively, these results indicate that the mortalin/DJ-1 complex guards against mitochondrial oxidative stress and is indispensable for the maintenance of HSCs.

  10. Dioscin alleviates dimethylnitrosamine-induced acute liver injury through regulating apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weixin; Yin, Lianhong; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Zheng, Lingli; Han, Xu; Xu, Youwei; Wang, Changyuan; Peng, Jinyong

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the effects of dioscin against alcohol-, carbon tetrachloride- and acetaminophen-induced liver damage have been found. However, the activity of it against dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-induced acute liver injury remained unknown. In the present study, dioscin markedly decreased serum ALT and AST levels, significantly increased the levels of SOD, GSH-Px, GSH, and decreased the levels of MDA, iNOS and NO. Mechanism study showed that dioscin significantly decreased the expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IκBα, p50 and p65 through regulating TLR4/MyD88 pathway to rehabilitate inflammation. In addition, dioscin markedly up-regulated the expression levels of SIRT1, HO-1, NQO1, GST and GCLM through increasing nuclear translocation of Nrf2 against oxidative stress. Furthermore, dioscin significantly decreased the expression levels of FasL, Fas, p53, Bak, Caspase-3/9, and upregulated Bcl-2 level through decreasing IRF9 level against apoptosis. In conclusion, dioscin showed protective effect against DMN-induced acute liver injury via ameliorating apoptosis, oxidative stress and inflammation, which should be developed as a new candidate for the treatment of acute liver injury in the future.

  11. Redox regulation by thioredoxin superfamily; protection against oxidative stress and aging.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Nakamura, H; Nishiyama, A; Hosoi, F; Masutani, H; Wada, H; Yodoi, J

    2000-12-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) is a 12 kD protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site; -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-. We originally cloned human TRX as adult T cell leukemia derived factor (ADF) produced by HTLV-I transformed cells. TRX and related molecules maintain a cellular reducing enviroment, working in concert with the glutathione system. Physiologically, TRX has cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress. TRX promotes DNA binding of transcription factors such as NF-kB, AP-1, p53, and PEBP-2. The TRX superfamily, including thioredoxin-2 (mitochondrial thioredoxin) and glutaredoxin, are involved in biologically important phenomena via the redox-regulating system. Thioredoxin-binding protein-2, which we recently identified by a yeast two-hybrid system, is a type of endogenous modulator of TRX activity. TRX is secreted from the cells and exhibits cytokine-like and chemokine-like activities. Redox regulation by TRX plays a crucial role in biological responses against oxidative stress.

  12. Oxidative stress-mediated down-regulation of bcl-2 promoter in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pugazhenthi, Subbiah; Nesterova, Albina; Jambal, Purevsuren; Audesirk, Gerald; Kern, Marcey; Cabell, Leigh; Eves, Eva; Rosner, Marsha R; Boxer, Linda M; Reusch, Jane E-B

    2003-03-01

    Generation of oxidative stress/reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the causes of neuronal apoptosis. We have examined the effects of ROS at the transcriptional level in an immortalized hippocampal neuronal cell line (H19-7) and in rat primary hippocampal neurons. Treatment of H19-7 cells with hydrogen peroxide (150 micro m) resulted in a 40% decrease in Bcl-2 protein and a parallel decrease in bcl-2 mRNA levels. H19-7 cells overexpressing bcl-2 were found to be resistant to ROS-induced apoptosis. We had previously shown that bcl-2 promoter activity is positively regulated by the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) in neurons. In the present study, we demonstrate that ROS decreases the activity of luciferase reporter gene driven by a cyclic AMP response element site containing bcl-2 promoter. Exposure of neurons to ROS for 6 h resulted in basal and fibroblast growth factor-2-stimulated phosphorylation/activation of CREB. Chronic 24 h treatment with ROS led to a significant (p < 0.01) decrease in CREB protein and CREB mRNA levels. Adenoviral overexpression of wild type CREB in H19-7 cells resulted in significant (p < 0.01) protection against ROS-induced apoptosis through up-regulation of Bcl-2 expression whereas dominant negative CREB exaggerated the injury. These findings demonstrate that loss of CREB function contributes to oxidative stress-induced neuronal dysfunction.

  13. Regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control.

    PubMed

    Chang, Haixin; Sun, Zhenhua; Saito, Mitsuhiro; Yuan, Qinghong; Zhang, Han; Li, Jinhua; Wang, Zhongchang; Fujita, Takeshi; Ding, Feng; Zheng, Zijian; Yan, Feng; Wu, Hongkai; Chen, Mingwei; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2013-07-23

    Defects play significant roles in properties of graphene and related device performances. Most studies of defects in graphene focus on their influences on electronic or luminescent optical properties, while controlling infrared optoelectronic performance of graphene by defect engineering remains a challenge. In the meantime, pristine graphene has very low infrared photoresponses of ~0.01 A/W due to fast photocarrier dynamics. Here we report regulating infrared photoresponses in reduced graphene oxide phototransistors by defect and atomic structure control for the first time. The infrared optoelectronic transport and photocurrent generation are significantly influenced and well controlled by oxygenous defects and structures in reduced graphene oxide. Moreover, remarkable infrared photoresponses are observed in photoconductor devices based on reduced graphene oxide with an external responsivity of ~0.7 A/W, at least over one order of magnitude higher than that from pristine graphene. External quantum efficiencies of infrared devices reach ultrahigh values of ~97%, which to our knowledge is one of the best efficiencies for infrared photoresponses from nonhybrid, pure graphene or graphene-based derivatives. The flexible infrared photoconductor devices demonstrate no photoresponse degradation even after 1000 bending tests. The results open up new routes to control optoelectronic behaviors of graphene for high-performance devices.

  14. L-arginine regulates neuronal nitric oxide synthase production of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei; Weaver, John; Cao, Guan Liang; Pou, Sovitj; Roman, Linda J; Starkov, Anatoly A; Rosen, Gerald M

    2005-03-15

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) in the absence of L-arginine has been shown to be an important factor in promoting the direct formation of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) at the expense of superoxide (O(2)(*-)) by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS1) [Rosen GM, Tsai P, Weaver J, Porasuphatana S, Roman LJ, Starkov AA, et al. Role of tetrahydrobiopterin in the regulation of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-generated superoxide. J Biol Chem 2002;277:40275-80]. Based on these findings, it is hypothesized that L-arginine also shifts the equilibrium between O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Experiments were designed to test this theory. As the concentration of L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine increases, the rate of NADPH consumption for H(4)B-bound NOS1 decreased resulting in lower rates of both O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2) generation, while increasing the rate of nitric oxide (*NO) production. At saturating concentrations of L-arginine or N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine (50microM), NOS1 still produced O(2)(*-) and H(2)O(2). Both L-arginine and N(omega)-hydroxyl-L-arginine have greater impact on the rate of generation of O(2)(*-) than on H(2)O(2).

  15. Urm1: an essential regulator of JNK signaling and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, B; Dacklin, I; Grabbe, C

    2016-05-01

    Ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (Urm1) is a ubiquitin-like molecule (UBL) with the dual capacity to act both as a sulphur carrier and posttranslational protein modifier. Here we characterize the Drosophila melanogaster homologues of Urm1 (CG33276) and its E1 activating enzyme Uba4 (CG13090), and show that they function together to induce protein urmylation in vivo. Urm1 conjugation to target proteins in general, and to the evolutionary conserved substrate Peroxiredoxin 5 (Prx5) specifically, is dependent on Uba4. A complete loss of Urm1 is lethal in flies, although a small number of adult zygotic Urm1 (n123) mutant escapers can be recovered. These escapers display a decreased general fitness and shortened lifespan, but in contrast to their S. cerevisiae counterparts, they are resistant to oxidative stress. Providing a molecular explanation, we demonstrate that cytoprotective JNK signaling is increased in Urm1 deficient animals. In agreement, molecular and genetic evidence suggest that elevated activity of the JNK downstream target genes Jafrac1 and gstD1 strongly contributes to the tolerance against oxidative stress displayed by Urm1 (n123) null mutants. In conclusion, Urm1 is a UBL that is involved in the regulation of JNK signaling and the response against oxidative stress in the fruit fly.

  16. Some Methods for Scenario Analysis in Defence Strategic Planning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Scenarios are an important tool in the strategic planning process, and are increasingly used in both the Defence and business world. This paper...illustrated with small examples. We also demonstrate a single, flexible approach to combining these methods using a typical Defence strategic planning problem

  17. Resolving defence mechanisms: A perspective based on dissipative structure theory.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Guo, Ben-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Theories and classifications of defence mechanisms are not unified. This study addresses the psychological system as a dissipative structure which exchanges information with the external and internal world. When using defence mechanisms, the cognitive-affective schema of an individual could remain stable and ordered by excluding psychological entropy, obtaining psychological negentropy or by dissipating the energy of self-presentation. From this perspective, defences can be classified into three basic types: isolation, compensation and self-dissipation. However, not every kind of defence mechanisms can actually help the individual. Non-adaptive defences are just functioning as an effective strategy in the short run but can be a harmful approach in the long run, while adaptive defences could instead help the individual as a long-term mechanism. Thus, we would like to suggest that it is more useful for the individual to use more adaptive defence mechanisms and seek out social or interpersonal support when undergoing psychic difficulties. As this model of defences is theoretical at present, we therefore aim to support and enrich this viewpoint with empirical evidence.

  18. Comparative analysis of passive defences in spiders (Araneae).

    PubMed

    Pekár, Stano

    2014-07-01

    Being frequent prey of many predators, including especially wasps and birds, spiders have evolved a variety of defence mechanisms. Here I studied patterns of passive defences, namely anachoresis, crypsis, masquerade, aposematism and Batesian mimicry, in spiders. Using published information pertaining more than 1000 spider species, the phylogenetic pattern of different passive defences (i.e. defences that decrease the risk of an encounter with the predator) was investigated. Furthermore, I studied the effect of foraging guild, geographical distribution and diel activity on the frequency of defences as these determine the predators diversity, presence and perception. I found that crypsis (background matching) combined with anachoresis (hiding) was the most frequent defence confined mainly to families/genera at the base of the tree. Aposematism (warning coloration) and Batesian mimicry (imitation of noxious/dangerous model) were found in taxa that branched later in the tree, and masquerade (imitation of inedible objects) was confined to families at intermediate positions of the tree. Aposematism and Batesian mimicry were restricted to a few lineages. Masquerade was used particularly by web-building species with nocturnal activity. Aposematism was rare but mainly used by web-building diurnal species. Batesian mimicry was frequently observed in cursorial species with diurnal activity. Cryptic species were more common in temperate zones, whereas aposematic and mimetic species were more common in the tropics. Here I show that the evolution of passive defences in spiders was influenced by the ecology of species. Then, I discuss the evolutionary significance of the particularly defences.

  19. Costs of Inducible Defence along a Resource Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Nilsson, P. Anders; Ahlgren, Johan; Lennartsdotter, Charlotte; Hollander, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In addition to having constitutive defence traits, many organisms also respond to predation by phenotypic plasticity. In order for plasticity to be adaptive, induced defences should incur a benefit to the organism in, for example, decreased risk of predation. However, the production of defence traits may include costs in fitness components such as growth, time to reproduction, or fecundity. To test the hypothesis that the expression of phenotypic plasticity incurs costs, we performed a common garden experiment with a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, a species known to change morphology in the presence of molluscivorous fish. We measured a number of predator-induced morphological and behavioural defence traits in snails that we reared in the presence or absence of chemical cues from fish. Further, we quantified the costs of plasticity in fitness characters related to fecundity and growth. Since plastic responses may be inhibited under limited resource conditions, we reared snails in different densities and thereby levels of competition. Snails exposed to predator cues grew rounder and thicker shells, traits confirmed to be adaptive in environments with fish. Defence traits were consistently expressed independent of density, suggesting strong selection from predatory molluscivorous fish. However, the expression of defence traits resulted in reduced growth rate and fecundity, particularly with limited resources. Our results suggest full defence in predator related traits regardless of resource availability, and costs of defence consequently paid in traits related to fitness. PMID:22291961

  20. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    SciTech Connect

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-26

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT and E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  1. Costs of inducible defence along a resource gradient.

    PubMed

    Brönmark, Christer; Lakowitz, Thomas; Nilsson, P Anders; Ahlgren, Johan; Lennartsdotter, Charlotte; Hollander, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In addition to having constitutive defence traits, many organisms also respond to predation by phenotypic plasticity. In order for plasticity to be adaptive, induced defences should incur a benefit to the organism in, for example, decreased risk of predation. However, the production of defence traits may include costs in fitness components such as growth, time to reproduction, or fecundity. To test the hypothesis that the expression of phenotypic plasticity incurs costs, we performed a common garden experiment with a freshwater snail, Radix balthica, a species known to change morphology in the presence of molluscivorous fish. We measured a number of predator-induced morphological and behavioural defence traits in snails that we reared in the presence or absence of chemical cues from fish. Further, we quantified the costs of plasticity in fitness characters related to fecundity and growth. Since plastic responses may be inhibited under limited resource conditions, we reared snails in different densities and thereby levels of competition. Snails exposed to predator cues grew rounder and thicker shells, traits confirmed to be adaptive in environments with fish. Defence traits were consistently expressed independent of density, suggesting strong selection from predatory molluscivorous fish. However, the expression of defence traits resulted in reduced growth rate and fecundity, particularly with limited resources. Our results suggest full defence in predator related traits regardless of resource availability, and costs of defence consequently paid in traits related to fitness.

  2. Computed Tomography Technology: Development and Applications for Defence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baheti, G. L.; Saxena, Nisheet; Tripathi, D. K.; Songara, K. C.; Meghwal, L. R.; Meena, V. L.

    2008-09-01

    Computed Tomography(CT) has revolutionized the field of Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation (NDT&E). Tomography for industrial applications warrants design and development of customized solutions catering to specific visualization requirements. Present paper highlights Tomography Technology Solutions implemented at Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur (DLJ). Details on the technological developments carried out and their utilization for various Defence applications has been covered.

  3. Pakistan’s Economic and Security Dilemma: Expanded Defence Expenditures and the Relative Governance Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    higher governance countries, defence expenditures can have a positive impact on economic growth (Table 7). Table 6. Anticipated defence spending in high...predicted expenditures , conditional on governance structures. Low defence spending countries can obtain positive benefits from defence by cutting back...that obtains no positive benefit from their low level of defence. On the other hand, if low defence spending countries can cut back their expenditures

  4. REGULATION OF FMN SUBDOMAIN INTERACTIONS AND FUNCTION IN NEURONAL NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE‡

    PubMed Central

    Ilagan, Robielyn P.; Tejero, Jesús; Aulak, Kulwant S.; Sinha Ray, Sougata; Hemann, Craig; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Gangoda, Mahinda; Zweier, Jay L.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are modular, calmodulin (CaM)-dependent, flavo-heme enzymes that catalyze oxidation of L-arginine to generate nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline. During catalysis, the FMN subdomain cycles between interaction with an NADPH-FAD subdomain to receive electrons, and interaction with an oxygenase domain to deliver electrons to the NOS heme. This process can be described by a three-state, two equilibrium model for the conformation of the FMN subdomain, in which it exists in two distinct bound states (FMN-shielded), and one common unbound state (FMN-deshielded). We studied how each partner subdomain, the FMN redox state, and CaM binding may regulate the conformational equilibria of the FMN module in rat neuronal NOS (nNOS). We utilized four nNOS protein constructs of different subdomain composition, including the isolated FMN subdomain, and determined changes in the conformational state by measuring the degree of FMN shielding by fluorescence, electron paramagnetic resonance, or stopped-flow spectroscopic techniques. Our results suggest: (i) The NADPH-FAD subdomain has a far greater capacity to interact with the FMN subdomain than does the oxygenase domain. (ii) CaM binding has no direct effects on the FMN subdomain. (iii) CaM destabilizes interaction of the FMN subdomain with the NADPH-FAD subdomain but does not measurably increase its interaction with the oxygenase domain. Our results imply that a different set point and CaM regulation exists for either conformational equilibrium of the FMN subdomain. This helps to explain the unique electron transfer and catalytic behaviors of nNOS, relative to other dual-flavin enzymes. PMID:19290671

  5. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Radakovic, Zoran; Regis, Jully M A; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Heterodera schachtii, a plant-parasitic cyst nematode, invades host roots and induces a specific syncytial feeding structure, from which it withdraws all required nutrients, causing severe yield losses. The system H. schachtii-Arabidopsis is an excellent research model for investigating plant defence mechanisms. Such responses are suppressed in well-established syncytia, whereas they are induced during early parasitism. However, the mechanisms by which the defence responses are modulated and the role of phytohormones are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of hormone-based defence responses at the onset of nematode infection. First, concentrations of main phytohormones were quantified and the expression of several hormone-related genes was analysed using quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR or GeneChip. Further, the effects of individual hormones were evaluated via nematode attraction and infection assays using plants with altered endogenous hormone concentrations. Our results suggest a pivotal and positive role for ethylene during nematode attraction, whereas jasmonic acid triggers early defence responses against H. schachtii. Salicylic acid seems to be a negative regulator during later syncytium and female development. We conclude that nematodes are able to impose specific changes in hormone pools, thus modulating hormone-based defence and signal transduction in strict dependence on their parasitism stage.

  6. Functional inactivation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) induces early leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohai; Wang, Ya; Hong, Xiao; Hu, Daoheng; Liu, Caixiang; Yang, Jing; Li, Yang; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Gong, Hanyu; Li, Yang; Fang, Gen; Tang, Huiru; Li, Yangsheng

    2015-02-01

    Plant leaf senescence and defence responses are important biological processes, but the molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. This study identified a new rice mutant, spotted leaf 29 (spl29). The SPL29 gene was identified by map-based cloning, and SPL29 was confirmed as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) by enzymatic analysis. The mutant spl29 lacks UAP activity. The biological phenotypes for which UAP is responsible have not previously been reported in plants. The spl29 mutant displayed early leaf senescence, confirmed by chlorophyll loss and photosystem II decline as physiological indicators, chloroplast degradation as a cellular characteristic, and both upregulation of senescence transcription factors and senescence-associated genes, and downregulation of photosynthesis-related genes, as molecular evidence. Defence responses were induced in the spl29 mutant, shown by enhanced resistance to bacterial blight inoculation and upregulation of defence response genes. Reactive oxygen species, including O2 (-) and H2O2, accumulated in spl29 plants; there was also increased malondialdehyde content. Enhanced superoxide dismutase activity combined with normal catalase activity in spl29 could be responsible for H2O2 accumulation. The plant hormones jasmonic acid and abscisic acid also accumulated in spl29 plants. ROS and plant hormones probably play important roles in early leaf senescence and defence responses in the spl29 mutant. Based on these findings, it is suggested that UAP1 is involved in regulating leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

  7. Functional inactivation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) induces early leaf senescence and defence responses in rice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaohai; Wang, Ya; Hong, Xiao; Hu, Daoheng; Liu, Caixiang; Yang, Jing; Li, Yang; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Gong, Hanyu; Li, Yang; Fang, Gen; Tang, Huiru; Li, Yangsheng

    2015-01-01

    Plant leaf senescence and defence responses are important biological processes, but the molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. This study identified a new rice mutant, spotted leaf 29 (spl29). The SPL29 gene was identified by map-based cloning, and SPL29 was confirmed as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) by enzymatic analysis. The mutant spl29 lacks UAP activity. The biological phenotypes for which UAP is responsible have not previously been reported in plants. The spl29 mutant displayed early leaf senescence, confirmed by chlorophyll loss and photosystem II decline as physiological indicators, chloroplast degradation as a cellular characteristic, and both upregulation of senescence transcription factors and senescence-associated genes, and downregulation of photosynthesis-related genes, as molecular evidence. Defence responses were induced in the spl29 mutant, shown by enhanced resistance to bacterial blight inoculation and upregulation of defence response genes. Reactive oxygen species, including O2 – and H2O2, accumulated in spl29 plants; there was also increased malondialdehyde content. Enhanced superoxide dismutase activity combined with normal catalase activity in spl29 could be responsible for H2O2 accumulation. The plant hormones jasmonic acid and abscisic acid also accumulated in spl29 plants. ROS and plant hormones probably play important roles in early leaf senescence and defence responses in the spl29 mutant. Based on these findings, it is suggested that UAP1 is involved in regulating leaf senescence and defence responses in rice. PMID:25399020

  8. Role of stress-related hormones in plant defence during early infection of the cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kammerhofer, Nina; Radakovic, Zoran; Regis, Jully M A; Dobrev, Petre; Vankova, Radomira; Grundler, Florian M W; Siddique, Shahid; Hofmann, Julia; Wieczorek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    Heterodera schachtii, a plant-parasitic cyst nematode, invades host roots and induces a specific syncytial feeding structure, from which it withdraws all required nutrients, causing severe yield losses. The system H. schachtii–Arabidopsis is an excellent research model for investigating plant defence mechanisms. Such responses are suppressed in well-established syncytia, whereas they are induced during early parasitism. However, the mechanisms by which the defence responses are modulated and the role of phytohormones are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of hormone-based defence responses at the onset of nematode infection. First, concentrations of main phytohormones were quantified and the expression of several hormone-related genes was analysed using quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR or GeneChip. Further, the effects of individual hormones were evaluated via nematode attraction and infection assays using plants with altered endogenous hormone concentrations. Our results suggest a pivotal and positive role for ethylene during nematode attraction, whereas jasmonic acid triggers early defence responses against H. schachtii. Salicylic acid seems to be a negative regulator during later syncytium and female development. We conclude that nematodes are able to impose specific changes in hormone pools, thus modulating hormone-based defence and signal transduction in strict dependence on their parasitism stage. PMID:25825039

  9. [Hi-tech health care: modern status and prospects of development in medical facilities of the Ministry of Defence].

    PubMed

    Fisun, A Ia; Kuvshinov, K É; Makiev, R G; Pastukhov, A G

    2014-02-01

    The article is devoted to the current issues of providing hi-tech medical care in hospitals of the Ministry of Defence. Since the beginning of 2013 the executive body of the Russian Ministry of Defense pays special attention to improvement of the quality and accessibility of health care contingent of the Ministry of Defence. Thus, according to decision of the Minister of Defense of the Russian Federation, General of the Army Sergei Shoigu in 2013 more than 1.1 billion rubles (in 2012, targeted funding of high-tech medical care in the Ministry of Defence did not materialize) was allocated for military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defense of the Russian Federation to provide high-tech medical care. As a result, in 7 months in 2013 the volume of medical care has increased by 32% in comparison with the same period in 2012. Currently the main military medical department of the Ministry of Defense is working to resolve the order of delivery and financing hi-tech medical care in the Armed Forces in the following areas: inclusion of military medical institutions of the Ministry of Defence in the list of health organizations, providing high-tech medical care, approved by Order of the Ministry of Health of the Russian Federation, legal regulation of the provision of high-tech medical care in military medical establishments of the Ministry of defense of the Russian Federation within the budget appropriation allocated to the Ministry of Defence.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide modulates the dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton during the defence responses to Verticillium dahliae toxins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lin-Lin; Zhou, Qun; Pei, Bao-Lei; Li, Ying-Zhang

    2011-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms of signal transduction of plants in response to infection by Verticillium dahliae (VD) are not well understood. We previously showed that NO may act as an upstream signalling molecule to trigger the depolymerization of cortical microtubules in Arabidopsis. In the present study, we used the wild-type, and atrbohD and atrbohF mutants of Arabidopsis to explore the mechanisms of action of H(2)O(2) signals and the dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton in defence responses. We demonstrated that H(2)O(2) may also act as an upstream signalling molecule to regulate cortical microtubule depolymerization. The depolymerization of the cortical microtubules played a functional role in the signalling pathway to mediate the expression of defence genes. The results indicate that H(2)O(2) modulates the dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton to trigger the expression of defence genes against V. dahliae toxins (VD-toxins) in Arabidopsis.

  11. Ecological mechanisms for the coevolution of mating systems and defence.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Stuart A

    2015-02-01

    The diversity of flowering plants is evident in two seemingly unrelated aspects of life history: sexual reproduction, exemplified by the stunning variation in flower form and function, and defence, often in the form of an impressive arsenal of secondary chemistry. Researchers are beginning to appreciate that plant defence and reproduction do not evolve independently, but, instead, may have reciprocal and interactive (coevolutionary) effects on each other. Understanding the mechanisms for mating-defence interactions promises to broaden our understanding of how ecological processes can generate these two rich sources of angiosperm diversity. Here, I review current research on the role of herbivory as a driver of mating system evolution, and the role of mating systems in the evolution of defence strategies. I outline different ecological mechanisms and processes that could generate these coevolutionary patterns, and summarize theoretical and empirical support for each. I provide a conceptual framework for linking plant defence with mating system theory to better integrate these two research fields.

  12. A saponin-detoxifying enzyme mediates suppression of plant defences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouarab, K.; Melton, R.; Peart, J.; Baulcombe, D.; Osbourn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Plant disease resistance can be conferred by constitutive features such as structural barriers or preformed antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Additional defence mechanisms are activated in response to pathogen attack and include localized cell death (the hypersensitive response). Pathogens use different strategies to counter constitutive and induced plant defences, including degradation of preformed antimicrobial compounds and the production of molecules that suppress induced plant defences. Here we present evidence for a two-component process in which a fungal pathogen subverts the preformed antimicrobial compounds of its host and uses them to interfere with induced defence responses. Antimicrobial saponins are first hydrolysed by a fungal saponin-detoxifying enzyme. The degradation product of this hydrolysis then suppresses induced defence responses by interfering with fundamental signal transduction processes leading to disease resistance.

  13. Asymmetric selection and the evolution of extraordinary defences.

    PubMed

    Urban, Mark C; Bürger, Reinhard; Bolnick, Daniel I

    2013-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists typically predict future evolutionary responses to natural selection by analysing evolution on an adaptive landscape. Much theory assumes symmetric fitness surfaces even though many stabilizing selection gradients deviate from symmetry. Here we revisit Lande's adaptive landscape and introduce novel analytical theory that includes asymmetric selection. Asymmetric selection and the resulting skewed trait distributions bias equilibrium mean phenotypes away from fitness peaks, usually toward the flatter shoulder of the individual fitness surface. We apply this theory to explain a longstanding paradox in biology and medicine: the evolution of excessive defences against enemies. These so-called extraordinary defences can evolve in response to asymmetrical selection when marginal risks of insufficient defence exceed marginal costs of excessive defence. Eco-evolutionary feedbacks between population abundances and asymmetric selection further exaggerate these defences. Recognizing the effect of asymmetrical selection on evolutionary trajectories will improve the accuracy of predictions and suggest novel explanations for apparent sub-optimality.

  14. Decreased structural defence of an invasive thistle under warming.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Leshak, A; Shea, K

    2012-01-01

    Plant structural defences play a key role in preventing fitness loss due to herbivory. However, how structural defences are affected by potential climate change is rarely examined. We examined how leaf morphological traits that relate to the structural defence of an invasive thistle, Carduus nutans, change in a warmer climate. We manipulated warming using open-top chambers (OTCs) and examined the morphology of leaves at three different positions (the 5th, 10th and 15th leaves, counted from the top of the plant) in two destructive summer censuses. We found that structural defence traits were different under ambient versus warmed conditions. Prickle densities (both the number of prickles per leaf area and the number of prickles per leaf mass) were significantly lower in plants grown in a warmer climate. Our results suggest that plant structural defences may be reduced under warming, and therefore should be considered when examining species' responses to climate change.

  15. Houttuynia cordata Extract Improves Physical Endurance Performance by Regulating Endothelial Production of Nitric Oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ui-Jeong; Maeng, Hyojin; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2015-09-01

    Vascular function is mediated by various regulatory molecules, including endothelial nitric oxide (NO), which regulates the vasodilation of smooth muscle cells. We investigated whether standardized Houttuynia cordata extract (SHCE) could improve physical endurance performance by regulating the endothelial production of NO. For the standardization of Houttuynia cordata (HC) extract, its bioactive components were identified and quantified using ultraperformance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioaccessibility and biological activity were measured by the in vitro digestion model system and free radical scavenging capacity, respectively. The vascular function in the endothelium was assessed by the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). A preliminary clinical trial was carried out to assess the physical endurance performance. HC extract was standardized to bioactive components, including chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, with the concentration of 5.53, 6.09, and 16.15 mg from 1 g of dry weight, respectively. Bioaccessibility was 33.17%, 31.67%, and 11.18% for chlorogenic acid, rutin, and quercitrin, respectively. Antioxidant activities of SHCE were expressed as vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity in 55.81 and 17.23 mg/g of HC extract using ABTS and DPPH scavenging assay, respectively. In human aortic endothelial cells, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of eNOS was increased by SHCE in the presence of palmitate. However, the expression of blood pressure-regulating genes was not altered. The level of blood lactate concentration and the heart rate of subjects who drank SHCE were lower than those of subjects who drank plain water. Oxygen uptake from subjects drinking SHCE was slightly higher than that from those who drank plain water. This study demonstrated that SHCE decreased heart rate and blood lactate, increased oxygen uptake, and improved physical performance, presumably due to the increased NO production.

  16. Wound repair and anti-oxidative capacity is regulated by ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chi; Liu, Hui-jun; Xiang, Yang; Tan, Yu-rong; Zhu, Xiao-lin; Qin, Xiao-qun

    2010-08-01

    Integrin beta 4 (ITGB4) is a structural adhesion molecule which engages in maintaining the integrity of airway epithelial cells. Its specific cytomembrane structural feature strongly indicates that ITGB4 may engage in many signaling pathways and physiologic processes. However, in addition to adhesion, the specific biologic significance of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells is almost unknown. In this article, we investigated the expression and functional properties of ITGB4 in airway epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Human bronchial epithelial cell line (16HBE14O-cells) and primary rat tracheal epithelial cells (RTE cells) were used to determine ITGB4 expression under ozone tress or mechanical damage, respectively. An ovalbumin (OVA)-challenged asthma model was used to investigate ITGB4 expression after antigen exposure in vivo. In addition, an ITGB4 overexpression vector and ITGB4 silence virus vector were constructed and transfected into RTE cells. Then, wound repair ability and anti-oxidation capacity was evaluated. Our results demonstrated that, on the edge of mechanically wounded cell areas, ITGB4 expression was increased after mechanical injury. After ozone stress, upregulation expression of ITGB4 was also detected. In the OVA-challenged asthma model, ITGB4 expression was decreased on airway epithelial cells accompanying with structural disruption and damage of anti-oxidation capacity. Besides, our study revealed that upregulation of ITGB4 promotes wound repair ability and anti-oxidative ability, while such abilities were blocked when ITGB4 was silenced. Taken together, these results showed that ITGB4 was a new interesting molecule involved in the regulation of wound repair and anti-oxidation processes for airway epithelial cells.

  17. Dioscin Protects ANIT-Induced Intrahepatic Cholestasis Through Regulating Transporters, Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hong; Xu, Youwei; Yin, Lianhong; Tao, Xufeng; Xu, Lina; Qi, Yan; Han, Xu; Sun, Pengyuan; Liu, Kexin; Peng, Jinyong

    2017-01-01

    Intrahepatic cholestasis, a clinical syndrome, is caused by excessive accumulation of bile acids in body and liver. Proper regulation of bile acids in liver cells is critical for liver injury. We previously reported the effects of dioscin against α-naphthylisothio- cyanate (ANIT)-induced cholestasis in rats. However, the pharmacological and mechanism data are limited. In our work, the animals of rats and mice, and Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCHs) were caused by ANIT, and dioscin was used for the treatment. The results showed that dioscin markedly altered relative liver weights, restored ALT, AST, ALP, TBIL, GSH, GSH-Px, MDA, SOD levels, and rehabilitated ROS level and cell apoptosis. In mechanism study, dioscin not only significantly regulated the protein levels of Ntcp, OAT1, OCT1, Bsep and Mrp2 to accelerate bile acids excretion, but also regulated the expression levels of Bak, Bcl-xl, Bcl-2, Bax, Caspase 3 and Caspase 9 in vivo and in vitro to improve apoptosis. In addition, dioscin markedly inhibited PI3K/Akt pathway and up-regulated the levels of Nrf2, GCLc, GCLm, NQO1 and HO-1 against oxidative stress (OS) caused by bile acids. These results were further validated by inhibition of PI3K and Akt using the inhibitors of wortmannin and perifosine in SCHs. Our data showed that dioscin had good action against ANIT-caused intrahepatic cholestasis through regulating transporters, apoptosis and OS. This natural product can be considered as one active compound to treat intrahepatic cholestasis in the future. PMID:28337145

  18. Nitric Oxide Regulates The Lymphatic Reactivity Following Hemorrhagic Shock Through Atp-Sensitive Potassium Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-Min; Qin, Li-Peng; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Zhao, Zi-Gang; Niu, Chun-Yu

    2016-06-01

    Lymphatic reactivity has been shown to exhibit a biphasic change following hemorrhagic shock, and nitric oxide (NO) is involved in this process. However, the precise mechanism responsible for NO regulation of the lymphatic reactivity along with the progression of hemorrhagic shock is unclear. Therefore, the present study was to investigate how NO participates in regulating the shock-induced biphasic changes in lymphatic reactivity and its underlying mechanisms. First, the expressions or contents of inducible NO synthase, nitrite plus nitrate, and elements of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathway in thoracic ducts tissue were assessed. The results revealed that levels of nitrite plus nitrate, cAMP, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), p-PKA, and p-PKG were increased gradually along with the process of shock. Second, the roles of cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP in NO regulating lymphatic response to gradient substance P were evaluated with an isolated lymphatic perfusion system. The results showed that the NOS substrate (L-Arg), PKA donor (8-Br-cAMP) decreased the reactivity of shock 0.5 h-lymphatics, and that the PKA inhibitor (H-89) and KATP inhibitor (glibenclamide) restrained the effects of L-Arg while glibenclamide abolished the effects of 8-Br-cAMP. Meanwhile, NOS antagonist (L-NAME), protein kinase G (PKG) inhibitor (KT-5823), and soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) increased the reactivity of shock 2 h-lymphatics, whereas KATP opener (pinacidil) inhibited these elevated effects induced by either L-NAME, ODQ, or KT-5823. Taken together, these results indicate that NO regulation of lymphatic reactivity during shock involves both cAMP-PKA-KATP and cGMP-PKG-KATP pathways. These findings have potential significance for the treatment of hemorrhagic shock through regulating lymphatic reactivity.

  19. The Iron-Dependent Regulation of the Candida albicans Oxidative Stress Response by the CCAAT-Binding Factor

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ananya; Camp, Kyle; McNabb, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently encountered fungal pathogen in humans, capable of causing mucocutaneous and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. C. albicans virulence is influenced by multiple factors. Importantly, iron acquisition and avoidance of the immune oxidative burst are two critical barriers for survival in the host. Prior studies using whole genome microarray expression data indicated that the CCAAT-binding factor is involved in the regulation of iron uptake/utilization and the oxidative stress response. This study examines directly the role of the CCAAT-binding factor in regulating the expression of oxidative stress genes in response to iron availability. The CCAAT-binding factor is a heterooligomeric transcription factor previously shown to regulate genes involved in respiration and iron uptake/utilization in C. albicans. Since these pathways directly influence the level of free radicals, it seemed plausible the CCAAT-binding factor regulates genes necessary for the oxidative stress response. In this study, we show the CCAAT-binding factor is involved in regulating some oxidative stress genes in response to iron availability, including CAT1, SOD4, GRX5, and TRX1. We also show that CAT1 expression and catalase activity correlate with the survival of C. albicans to oxidative stress, providing a connection between iron obtainability and the oxidative stress response. We further explore the role of the various CCAAT-binding factor subunits in the formation of distinct protein complexes that modulate the transcription of CAT1 in response to iron. We find that Hap31 and Hap32 can compensate for each other in the formation of an active transcriptional complex; however, they play distinct roles in the oxidative stress response during iron limitation. Moreover, Hap43 was found to be solely responsible for the repression observed under iron deprivation. PMID:28122000

  20. Chemical Diversity and Defence Metabolism: How Plants Cope with Pathogens and Ozone Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Iriti, Marcello; Faoro, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Chemical defences represent a main trait of the plant innate immune system. Besides regulating the relationship between plants and their ecosystems, phytochemicals are involved both in resistance against pathogens and in tolerance towards abiotic stresses, such as atmospheric pollution. Plant defence metabolites arise from the main secondary metabolic routes, the phenylpropanoid, the isoprenoid and the alkaloid pathways. In plants, antibiotic compounds can be both preformed (phytoanticipins) and inducible (phytoalexins), the former including saponins, cyanogenic glycosides and glucosinolates. Chronic exposure to tropospheric ozone (O3) stimulates the carbon fluxes from the primary to the secondary metabolic pathways to a great extent, inducing a shift of the available resources in favour of the synthesis of secondary products. In some cases, the plant defence responses against pathogens and environmental pollutants may overlap, leading to the unspecific synthesis of similar molecules, such as phenylpropanoids. Exposure to ozone can also modify the pattern of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), emitted from plant in response to herbivore feeding, thus altering the tritrophic interaction among plant, phytophagy and their natural enemies. Finally, the synthesis of ethylene and polyamines can be regulated by ozone at level of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the biosynthetic precursor of both classes of hormones, which can, therefore, mutually inhibit their own biosynthesis with consequence on plant phenotype. PMID:20111684

  1. GSNOR-mediated de-nitrosylation in the plant defence response.

    PubMed

    Malik, Saad I; Hussain, Adil; Yun, Byung-Wook; Spoel, Steven H; Loake, Gary J

    2011-11-01

    A key feature of the plant defence response is the transient engagement of a nitrosative burst, resulting in the synthesis of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs). Specific, highly reactive cysteine (Cys) residues of low pK(a) are a major site of action for these intermediates. The addition of an NO moiety to a Cys thiol to form an S-nitrosothiol (SNO), is termed S-nitrosylation. This redox-based post-translational modification is emerging as a key regulator of protein function in plant immunity. Here we highlight recent advances in our understanding of de-nitrosylation, the mechanism that depletes protein SNOs, with a focus on S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR). This enzyme controls total cellular S-nitrosylation indirectly during the defence response by turning over S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), a major cache of NO bioactivity.

  2. Effect of 28-homobrassinolide on antioxidant defence system in Raphanus sativus L. under chromium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Indu; Pati, Pratap Kumar; Bhardwaj, Renu

    2011-06-01

    Heavy metals have emerged as major environmental contaminants due to rapid industrialization and urbanization. The genotoxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic effects of heavy metal like chromium (Cr) on man, animals and plants have been documented. In plants, accumulation of heavy metals beyond critical levels generates oxidative stress. This stress is generally overcome by antioxidant defence system and stress shielding phytohormones. Thus, the present study has been focused to analyze the effect of one of imperative group of plant hormones, i.e., brassinosteroids (BRs) which have been reported for its protective properties for wide array of environmental stresses. Raphanus sativus L. (Pusa Chetaki) seeds pre-treated with different concentrations of 28-homobrassinolide (28-HBL) were raised under various concentrations of Cr(VI). It was observed that 28-HBL treatment considerably reduced the impact of Cr-stress on seedlings which was evinced upon analysis of morphological and biochemical parameters of 7-days old radish seedlings. The toxic effects of Cr in terms of reduced growth, lowered contents of chlorophyll (Chl), protein, proline; increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content and elevated metal uptake were ameliorated by applications of 28-HBL. Also, the activities of all the antioxidant enzymes except guaiacol peroxidase (POD), increased significantly when subjected to Cr stress in combination with 28-HBL. Overall, seed pre-soaking treatment of 28-HBL at 10(-7) M was most effective in ameliorating Cr stress. The present work emphasizes the protective role of 28-HBL on regulation of antioxidant enzymes and its possible link in amelioration of stress in plants.

  3. Nickel-regulated heart rate variability: The roles of oxidative stress and inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Hsueh, Tzu-Wei; Chang, Chuen-Chau; Hwang, Jing-Shiang; Chuang, Kai-Jen; Yan, Yuan-Horng; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-01-15

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been reported to be a putative marker of cardiac autonomic imbalance caused by exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM). Our objective in this study was to determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel, an important chemical component of ambient PM that results in oxidative stress and inflammation. HRV data were collected for 72 h before lung exposure (baseline) and 72 h after intratracheal exposure (response) to nickel sulphate (NiSO{sub 4}; 526 μg) in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats. The antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and the anti-inflammatory celecoxib were intraperitoneally injected to examine post-exposure oxidative and inflammatory responses. Self-controlled experiments examined the effects of NiSO{sub 4} exposure on average normal-to-normal intervals (ANN), natural logarithm-transformed standard deviation of the normal-to-normal intervals (LnSDNN) and root mean square of successive differences of adjacent normal-to-normal intervals (LnRMSSD); the resulting data were sequentially analysed using the generalised estimating equation model. HRV effects on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed SH rats were greater than those on NiSO{sub 4}-exposed WKY rats. After adjusted the HRV responses in the WKY rats as control, ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased over 72 h after exposure to NiSO{sub 4}. Both NAC and celecoxib mitigated the NiSO{sub 4}-induced alterations in HRV during the exposure period. The results suggest that concurrent Ni-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory responses play important roles in regulating HRV. These findings help bridge the gap between epidemiological and clinical studies on the plausible mechanisms of the cardiovascular consequences induced by chemical components in ambient PM. -- Highlights: ► To determine the effects on HRV from exposure to nickel. ► ANN and LnRMSSD were found to be quadratically increased after exposure to Ni. ► NAC and

  4. The Transformation from Defence Procurement to Defence Acquisition - Opportunities for New Forms of Analytical Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    to the Nordic Battle Group, NBG. Also, the defence industry in Sweden was domestic during the Cold War Era. With the current globalisation and...voyage to the AOR, or, more specifically, to the Reception Staging and Onwards Movement (RSOM) area. A tactical transport will then transport units...Rules Of Engagement RSOM: Reception Staging and Onwards Movement SAC: Strategic Airlift Capability SALIS: Strategic Airlift Interim Solution SCC

  5. Na⁺/H⁺ exchanger 1 participates in tobacco disease defence against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae by affecting vacuolar pH and priming the antioxidative system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianyang; Bao, Hexigeduleng; Guo, Jie; Jia, Weitao; Tai, Fang; Nie, Lingling; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Lv, Sulian; Li, Yinxin

    2014-11-01

    Despite the importance of NHX1 (Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1) in plant salt tolerance, little is known about its other functions. In this study, intriguingly, it was found that NHX1 participated in plant disease defence against Phytophthora parasitica var. nicotianae (Ppn) in Nicotiana benthamiana. NbNHX1 was originally isolated from N. benthamiana, and characterized. The subcellular localization of NbNHX1 with its C-terminus fused with green fluorescent protein indicated that NbNHX1 localized primarily to the tonoplast. Tobacco rattle virus-induced NbNHX1 silencing led to reduced H(+) efflux from the vacuole to cytoplasts, and decreased Ppn resistance in N. benthamiana. After attack by Ppn, NbNHX1-silenced plants exhibited impaired ability to scavenge reactive oxidative species (ROS) induced by the pathogen. Pea early browning virus-mediated ectopic expression of SeNHX1 (from Salicornia europaea) or AtNHX1 (from Arabidopsis thaliana) both conferred enhanced Ppn resistance to N. benthamiana, with a lower H2O2 concentration after Ppn inoculation. Further investigation of the role of NHX1 demonstrated that transient overexpression of NbNHX1 improved the vacuolar pH and cellular ROS level in N. benthamiana, which was coupled with an enlarged NAD(P) (H) pool and higher expression of ROS-responsive genes. In contrast, NbNHX1 silencing led to a lower pH in the vacuole and a lower cellular ROS level in N. benthamiana, which was coupled with a decreased NAD(P) (H) pool and decreased expression of ROS-responsive genes. These results suggest that NHX1 is involved in plant disease defence; and regulation of vacuolar pH by NHX1, affecting the cellular oxidation state, primes the antioxidative system which is associated with Ppn resistance in tobacco.

  6. Plasticity in cell defence: access to and reactivity of critical protein residues and DNA response elements.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Chris; Kitteringham, Neil; Jenkins, Rosalind; Copple, Ian; Jeannin, Jean-Francois; Park, B Kevin

    2006-06-01

    Cellular and whole organ defence against pathogenic or chemical challenge is manifest as an adaptive response. Where appropriate, this may lead to induction of a cellular defence programme, thereby enhancing cell survival. When the challenge is overwhelming, the defence is breached and a switch is made to yield cell death, either by apoptosis or necrosis. Thus, a cell will defend itself where possible, but in extremis, it may recognise the futility of its resistance and allow itself to die. Transcription factor activation and access to the DNA regulatory elements that control a particular pattern of expression of defence genes is a major issue that may ultimately decide the fate of a cell in a changed environment. It is possible to visualise the access to the nucleus and to the genome, of paradigm gene loci or transcription factors, using a number of molecular techniques such as chromatin immunoprecipitation, in vivo footprinting and live/whole cell imaging. These methods are informative as to the array of transcription factors that may regulate a given gene, as well as the transitory nature of the transcriptional activation. The initial triggering of active transcription factor complexes typically occurs within the cytoplasm of the cell. Protein-protein interactions and signal transduction pathways, elucidated using a classical molecular genetics approach, have long been recognised as pivotal to the initial control of the levels and activity of transcription factors. We can now visualise modifications in critical residues of transcription factors and regulators during cellular response to chemical stress. These modifications may yield enhanced or repressed activity of transcription factors, they may be non-covalent or covalent, and they may occur in response to a variety of classes of chemicals. Such promiscuous signalling can provide plasticity in the cellular response to a wide array of chemical agents.

  7. DELLA proteins modulate Arabidopsis defences induced in response to caterpillar herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Bede, Jacqueline C.

    2014-01-01

    Upon insect herbivory, many plant species change the direction of metabolic flux from growth into defence. Two key pathways modulating these processes are the gibberellin (GA)/DELLA pathway and the jasmonate pathway. In this study, the effect of caterpillar herbivory on plant-induced responses was compared between wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and quad-della mutants that have constitutively elevated GA responses. The labial saliva (LS) of caterpillars of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua, is known to influence induced plant defence responses. To determine the role of this herbivore cue in determining metabolic shifts, plants were subject to herbivory by caterpillars with intact or impaired LS secretions. In both wild-type and quad-della plants, a jasmonate burst is an early response to caterpillar herbivory. Negative growth regulator DELLA proteins are required for the LS-mediated suppression of hormone levels. Jasmonate-dependent marker genes are induced in response to herbivory independently of LS, with the exception of AtPDF1.2 that showed LS-dependent expression in the quad-della mutant. Early expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-marker gene, AtPR1, was not affected by herbivory which also reflected SA hormone levels; however, this gene showed LS-dependent expression in the quad-della mutant. DELLA proteins may positively regulate glucosinolate levels and suppress laccase-like multicopper oxidase activity in response to herbivory. The present results show a link between DELLA proteins and early, induced plant defences in response to insect herbivory; in particular, these proteins are necessary for caterpillar LS-associated attenuation of defence hormones. PMID:24399173

  8. Redox and Nitric Oxide-Mediated Regulation of Sensory Neuron Ion Channel Function

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) can intimately control neuronal excitability and synaptic strength by regulating the function of many ion channels. In peripheral sensory neurons, such regulation contributes towards the control of somatosensory processing; therefore, understanding the mechanisms of such regulation is necessary for the development of new therapeutic strategies and for the treatment of sensory dysfunctions, such as chronic pain. Recent Advances: Tremendous progress in deciphering nitric oxide (NO) and ROS signaling in the nervous system has been made in recent decades. This includes the recognition of these molecules as important second messengers and the elucidation of their metabolic pathways and cellular targets. Mounting evidence suggests that these targets include many ion channels which can be directly or indirectly modulated by ROS and NO. However, the mechanisms specific to sensory neurons are still poorly understood. This review will therefore summarize recent findings that highlight the complex nature of the signaling pathways involved in redox/NO regulation of sensory neuron ion channels and excitability; references to redox mechanisms described in other neuron types will be made where necessary. Critical Issues: The complexity and interplay within the redox, NO, and other gasotransmitter modulation of protein function are still largely unresolved. Issues of specificity and intracellular localization of these signaling cascades will also be addressed. Future Directions: Since our understanding of ROS and RNS signaling in sensory neurons is limited, there is a multitude of future directions; one of the most important issues for further study is the establishment of the exact roles that these signaling pathways play in pain processing and the translation of this understanding into new therapeutics. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 486–504. PMID:24735331

  9. Network Inference Algorithms Elucidate Nrf2 Regulation of Mouse Lung Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Mudita; Malhotra, Deepti; Biswal, Shyam

    2008-01-01

    A variety of cardiovascular, neurological, and neoplastic conditions have been associated with oxidative stress, i.e., conditions under which levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are elevated over significant periods. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) regulates the transcription of several gene products involved in the protective response to oxidative stress. The transcriptional regulatory and signaling relationships linking gene products involved in the response to oxidative stress are, currently, only partially resolved. Microarray data constitute RNA abundance measures representing gene expression patterns. In some cases, these patterns can identify the molecular interactions of gene products. They can be, in effect, proxies for protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions. Traditional techniques used for clustering coregulated genes on high-throughput gene arrays are rarely capable of distinguishing between direct transcriptional regulatory interactions and indirect ones. In this study, newly developed information-theoretic algorithms that employ the concept of mutual information were used: the Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR). These algorithms captured dependencies in the gene expression profiles of the mouse lung, allowing the regulatory effect of Nrf2 in response to oxidative stress to be determined more precisely. In addition, a characterization of promoter sequences of Nrf2 regulatory targets was conducted using a Support Vector Machine classification algorithm to corroborate ARACNE and CLR predictions. Inferred networks were analyzed, compared, and integrated using the Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) plug-in of Cytoscape. Using the two network inference algorithms and one machine learning algorithm, a number of both previously known and novel targets of Nrf2 transcriptional activation were identified. Genes predicted as

  10. Experimentally activated immune defence in female pied flycatchers results in reduced breeding success.

    PubMed

    Ilmonen, P; Taarna, T; Hasselquist, D

    2000-04-07

    Traditional explanations for the negative fitness consequences of parasitism have focused on the direct pathogenic effects of infectious agents. However, because of the high selection pressure by the parasites, immune defences are likely to be costly and trade off with other fitness-related traits, such as reproductive effort. In a field experiment, we immunized breeding female flycatchers with non-pathogenic antigens (diphtheria-tetanus vaccine), which excluded the direct negative effects of parasites, in order to test the consequences of activated immune defence on hosts' investment in reproduction and self-maintenance. Immunized females decreased their feeding effort and investment in self-maintenance (rectrix regrowth) and had lower reproductive output (fledgling quality and number) than control females injected with saline. Our results reveal the phenotypic cost of immune defence by showing that an activated immune system per se can lower the host's breeding success. This may be caused by an energetic or nutritional trade-off between immune function and physical workload when feeding young or be an adaptive response to 'infection' to avoid physiological disorders such as oxidative stress and immunopathology.

  11. Trained immunity: A smart way to enhance innate immune defence.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Jos W M; Joosten, Leo A B; Riksen, Niels; Netea, Mihai G

    2015-11-01

    The innate arm of the immune system is generally viewed as primitive and non-specific and - in contrast to the adaptive immune arm - not to possess memory. However in plants and invertebrate animals that lack adaptive immunity, innate immunity will exhibit a prolonged enhanced functional state after adequate priming. A similar enhancement of function of the innate immunity has occasionally been described in vertebrates, including humans. Over the past few years we have studied this phenomenon in greater detail and we have coined the term 'Trained (innate) immunity' (TI). TI can be induced by a variety of stimuli, of which we have studied BCG and β-glucan in greater detail. The non-specific protective effects of BCG that have been observed in vaccination studies in the literature are probably due to TI. Monocytes and macrophages are among the main cells of the innate immune arm that can be trained. We have discovered that both BCG (via NOD2 signalling) and β-glucan (via dectin-1) induce epigenetic reprogramming, in particular stable changes in histone trimethylation at H3K4. These epigenetic changes lead to cellular activation, enhanced cytokine production and a change in the metabolic state of the cell with a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. TI is not only important for host defence and vaccine responses, but most probably also for diseases like atherosclerosis. Modulation of TI is a promising area for new treatments.

  12. Mechanism of Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulation: Electron Transfer and Interdomain Interactions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS), a flavo-hemoprotein, tightly regulates nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and thereby its dual biological activities as a key signaling molecule for vasodilatation and neurotransmission at low concentrations, and also as a defensive cytotoxin at higher concentrations. Three NOS isoforms, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS (inducible, endothelial, and neuronal NOS), achieve their key biological functions by tight regulation of interdomain electron transfer (IET) process via interdomain interactions. In particular, the FMN–heme IET is essential in coupling electron transfer in the reductase domain with NO synthesis in the heme domain by delivery of electrons required for O2 activation at the catalytic heme site. Compelling evidence indicates that calmodulin (CaM) activates NO synthesis in eNOS and nNOS through a conformational change of the FMN domain from its shielded electron-accepting (input) state to a new electron-donating (output) state, and that CaM is also required for proper alignment of the domains. Another exciting recent development in NOS enzymology is the discovery of importance of the the FMN domain motions in modulating reactivity and structure of the catalytic heme active site (in addition to the primary role of controlling the IET processes). In the absence of a structure of full-length NOS, an integrated approach of spectroscopic (e.g. pulsed EPR, MCD, resonance Raman), rapid kinetics (laser flash photolysis and stopped flow) and mutagenesis methods is critical to unravel the molecular details of the interdomain FMN/heme interactions. This is to investigate the roles of dynamic conformational changes of the FMN domain and the docking between the primary functional FMN and heme domains in regulating NOS activity. The recent developments in understanding of mechanisms of the NOS regulation that are driven by the combined approach are the focuses of this review. An improved understanding of the role of interdomain FMN/heme interaction and Ca

  13. The influence of oxidative stress and autophagy cross regulation on pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Ramos, Bruna Ribeiro; Witkin, Steven S

    2016-09-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a byproduct of aerobic energy metabolism, is maintained at physiological levels by the activity of antioxidant components. Insufficiently opposed ROS results in oxidative stress characterized by altered mitochondrial function, decreased protein activity, damage to nucleic acids, and induction of apoptosis. Elevated levels of inadequately opposed ROS induce autophagy, a major intracellular pathway that sequesters and removes damaged macromolecules and organelles. In early pregnancy, autophagy induction preserves trophoblast function in the low oxygen and nutrient placental environment. Inadequate regulation of the ROS-autophagy axis leads to abnormal autophagy activity and contributes to the development of preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction. ROS-autophagy interactions are altered at the end of gestation and participate in the initiation of parturition at term. The induction of high levels of ROS coupled with a failure to induce a corresponding increase in autophagy results in the triggering of preterm labor and delivery.

  14. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    PubMed

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  15. Nitric Oxide Synthase Regulates Growth Coordination During Drosophila melanogaster Imaginal Disc Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jaszczak, Jacob S; Wolpe, Jacob B; Dao, Anh Q; Halme, Adrian

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that coordinate growth during development are essential for producing animals with proper organ proportion. Here we describe a pathway through which tissues communicate to coordinate growth. During Drosophila melanogaster larval development, damage to imaginal discs activates a regeneration checkpoint through expression of Dilp8. This both produces a delay in developmental timing and slows the growth of undamaged tissues, coordinating regeneration of the damaged tissue with developmental progression and overall growth. Here we demonstrate that Dilp8-dependent growth coordination between regenerating and undamaged tissues, but not developmental delay, requires the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in the prothoracic gland. NOS limits the growth of undamaged tissues by reducing ecdysone biosynthesis, a requirement for imaginal disc growth during both the regenerative checkpoint and normal development. Therefore, NOS activity in the prothoracic gland coordinates tissue growth through regulation of endocrine signals.

  16. Nitric oxide-induced calcium release via ryanodine receptors regulates neuronal function.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Sho; Yamazawa, Toshiko; Chen, Yili; Ito, Akihiro; Murayama, Takashi; Oyamada, Hideto; Kurebayashi, Nagomi; Sato, Osamu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Mori, Nozomu; Oguchi, Katsuji; Sakurai, Takashi; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Iino, Masamitsu

    2012-01-18

    Mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) stores regulates a multitude of cellular functions, but the role of intracellular Ca(2+) release via the ryanodine receptor (RyR) in the brain remains incompletely understood. We found that nitric oxide (NO) directly activates RyRs, which induce Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores of central neurons, and thereby promote prolonged Ca(2+) signalling in the brain. Reversible S-nitrosylation of type 1 RyR (RyR1) triggers this Ca(2+) release. NO-induced Ca(2+) release (NICR) is evoked by type 1 NO synthase-dependent NO production during neural firing, and is essential for cerebellar synaptic plasticity. NO production has also been implicated in pathological conditions including ischaemic brain injury, and our results suggest that NICR is involved in NO-induced neuronal cell death. These findings suggest that NICR via RyR1 plays a regulatory role in the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the brain.

  17. Polarized distribution of inducible nitric oxide synthase regulates activity in intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rumbo, Martin; Courjault-Gautier, Françoise; Sierro, Frédéric; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Felley-Bosco, Emanuela

    2005-01-01

    Summary Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) functions as a homodimer. In cell extracts, iNOS molecules partition both in cytosolic and particulate fractions, indicating that iNOS exist as soluble and membrane associated forms. In this study, iNOS features were investigated in human intestinal epithelial cells stimulated with cytokines and in duodenum from mice exposed to flagellin. Our experiments indicate that iNOS is mainly associated to the particulate fraction of cell extracts. Confocal microscopy showed a preferential localization of iNOS at the apical pole of intestinal epithelial cells. In particulate fractions, iNOS dimers were more abundant than in the cytosolic fraction. Similar observations were done in mouse duodenum samples. These results suggest that, in epithelial cells, iNOS activity is regulated by localization-dependent processes. PMID:15654882

  18. Proanthocyanidin Protects Human Embryo Hepatocytes from Fluoride-Induced Oxidative Stress by Regulating Iron Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiang; Mu, Lati; Li, Shugang; Xu, Shangzhi; Ma, Ruling; Guo, Shuxia

    2016-02-01

    To investigate whether grape seed proanthocyanidin extract (GSPE) antagonizes fluoride-induced oxidative injury by regulating iron metabolism, human embryo hepatic cells (L-02) were incubated with sodium fluoride (NaF, 80 mg/L) and/or GSPE (100 μmol/L) for 24 h. Results showed the glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) content, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) level of the NaF group were significantly lower than that of the control group (P < 0.05), while malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased in the NaF group compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Moreover, the indexes mentioned above showed opposite changes in the NaF + GSPE group. In addition, iron content significantly increased in the NaF group compared to the control group(P < 0.05) and significantly decreased in the NaF + GSPE group compared to the NaF group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, hepcidin (coded by HAMP) messenger RNA (mRNA) expression significantly increased in the NaF group compared to the control group(P < 0.05) and significantly decreased in the NaF + GSPE group compared to the NaF group (P < 0.05). Ferroportin 1 (coded by FPN1) mRNA expression significantly decreased in the NaF group compared to the control group (P < 0.05) and significantly increased in the NaF + GSPE group compared to the NaF group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that GSPE provides significant cellular protection against oxidative stress induced by excessive fluoride via the iron metabolism regulation.

  19. Regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by agmatine after transient global cerebral ischemia in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mun, Chin Hee; Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah; Lee, Jong Eun

    2010-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) plays a protective role in cerebral ischemia by maintaining vascular permeability, whereas NO derived from neuronal and inducible NOS is neurotoxic and can participate in neuronal damage occurring in ischemia. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are up-regulated by ischemic injury and degrade the basement membrane if brain vessels to promote cell death and tissue injury. We previously reported that agmatine, synthesized from L-arginine by arginine decarboxylase (ADC) which is expressed in endothelial cells, has shown a direct increased eNOS expression and decreased MMPs expression in bEnd3 cells. But, there are few reports about the regulation of eNOS by agmatine in ischemic animal model. In the present study, we examined the expression of eNOS and MMPs by agmatine treatment after transient global ischemia in vivo. Global ischemia was induced with four vessel occlusion (4-VO) and agmatine (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion. The animals were euthanized at 6 and 24 hours after global ischemia and prepared for other analysis. Global ischemia led severe neuronal damage in the rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex, but agmatine treatment protected neurons from ischemic injury. Moreover, the level and expression of eNOS was increased by agmatine treatment, whereas inducible NOS (iNOS) and MMP-9 protein expressions were decreased in the brain. These results suggest that agmatine protects microvessels in the brain by activation eNOS as well as reduces extracellular matrix degradation during the early phase of ischemic insult.

  20. Nitric Oxide Mitigates Salt Stress by Regulating Levels of Osmolytes and Antioxidant Enzymes in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A.; Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Gucel, Salih; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    This work was designed to evaluate whether external application of nitric oxide (NO) in the form of its donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) could mitigate the deleterious effects of NaCl stress on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. SNAP (50 μM) was applied to chickpea plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions (50 and 100 mM NaCl). Salt stress inhibited growth and biomass yield, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and chlorophyll content of chickpea plants. High salinity increased electrolyte leakage, carotenoid content and the levels of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, soluble proteins and soluble sugars), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase in chickpea plants. Expression of the representative SOD, CAT and APX genes examined was also up-regulated in chickpea plants by salt stress. On the other hand, exogenous application of NO to salinized plants enhanced the growth parameters, LRWC, photosynthetic pigment production and levels of osmolytes, as well as the activities of examined antioxidant enzymes which is correlated with up-regulation of the examined SOD, CAT and APX genes, in comparison with plants treated with NaCl only. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 and MDA contents showed decline in salt-stressed plants supplemented with NO as compared with those in NaCl-treated plants alone. Thus, the exogenous application of NO protected chickpea plants against salt stress-induced oxidative damage by enhancing the biosyntheses of antioxidant enzymes, thereby improving plant growth under saline stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NO has capability to mitigate the adverse effects of high salinity on chickpea plants by improving LRWC, photosynthetic pigment biosyntheses, osmolyte accumulation and antioxidative defense system. PMID:27066020

  1. Catalytic inactive heme oxygenase-1 protein regulates its own expression in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qing S; Weis, Sebastian; Yang, Guang; Zhuang, Tiangang; Abate, Aida; Dennery, Phyllis A

    2008-03-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the degradation of heme and forms antioxidant bile pigments as well as the signaling molecule carbon monoxide. HO-1 is inducible in response to a variety of chemical and physical stress conditions to function as a cytoprotective molecule. Therefore, it is important to maintain the basal level of HO-1 expression even when substrate availability is limited. We hypothesized that the HO-1 protein itself could regulate its own expression in a positive feedback manner, and that this positive feedback was important in the HO-1 gene induction in response to oxidative stress. In cultured NIH 3T3 cells, transfection of HO-1 cDNA or intracellular delivery of pure HO-1 protein resulted in activation of a 15-kb HO-1 promoter upstream of luciferase as visualized by bioluminescent technology and increased HO-1 mRNA and protein levels. These effects were independent of HO activity because an enzymatically inactive mutant form of HO-1 similarly activated the HO-1 promoter and incubation with HO inhibitor metalloporphyrin SnPP did not affect the promoter activation. In addition, HO-1-specific siRNA significantly reduced hemin and cadmium chloride-mediated HO-1 induction. Furthermore, deletion analyses demonstrated that the E1 and E2 distal enhancers of the HO-1 promoter are required for this HO-1 autoregulation. These experiments document feed-forward autoregulation of HO-1 in oxidative stress and suggest that HO-1 protein has a role in the induction process. We speculate that this mechanism may be useful for maintaining HO-1 expression when substrate is limited and may also serve to up-regulate other genes to promote cytoprotection and to modulate cell proliferation.

  2. Hepatitis B virus X protein regulates hepatic glucose homeostasis via activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Jun; Park, Young-Ho; Kim, Sun-Uk; Moon, Hyung-Bae; Park, Do Sim; Han, Ying-Hao; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, Dong-Seok; Song, In-Sung; Lee, Dae Ho; Kim, Minhye; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Sang-Keun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Su Sung; Choi, Cheol Soo; Kim, Young-Bum; Yu, Dae-Yeul

    2011-08-26

    Dysregulation of liver functions leads to insulin resistance causing type 2 diabetes mellitus and is often found in chronic liver diseases. However, the mechanisms of hepatic dysfunction leading to hepatic metabolic disorder are still poorly understood in chronic liver diseases. The current work investigated the role of hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in regulating glucose metabolism. We studied HBx-overexpressing (HBxTg) mice and HBxTg mice lacking inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Here we show that gene expressions of the key gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly increased in HepG2 cells expressing HBx (HepG2-HBx) and in non-tumor liver tissues of hepatitis B virus patients with high levels of HBx expression. In the liver of HBxTg mice, the expressions of gluconeogenic genes were also elevated, leading to hyperglycemia by increasing hepatic glucose production. However, this effect was insufficient to cause systemic insulin resistance. Importantly, the actions of HBx on hepatic glucose metabolism are thought to be mediated via iNOS signaling, as evidenced by the fact that deficiency of iNOS restored HBx-induced hyperglycemia by suppressing the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes. Treatment of HepG2-HBx cells with nitric oxide (NO) caused a significant increase in the expression of gluconeogenic genes, but JNK1 inhibition was completely normalized. Furthermore, hyperactivation of JNK1 in the liver of HBxTg mice was also suppressed in the absence of iNOS, indicating the critical role for JNK in the mutual regulation of HBx- and iNOS-mediated glucose metabolism. These findings establish a novel mechanism of HBx-driven hepatic metabolic disorder that is modulated by iNOS-mediated activation of JNK.

  3. Differential roles of nitric oxide synthases in regulation of ultraviolet B light-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Wu, Shiyong

    2010-11-01

    Ultraviolet B light (UVB) activates nitric oxide synthase(s) (NOSs) and nitric oxide (NO()) production, which plays a role in regulation of apoptosis. However, the role of NO() in UVB-induced apoptosis remains controversial. In this study, we analyzed expression and activation of constitutive NOSs (cNOSs) and their roles in UV-induced apoptosis of HaCaT keratinocytes. Our data showed that the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was increased while endothelial NOS (eNOS) was uncoupled in the early phase (0-6 h) post-UVB. The expression of both cNOSs peaked at 12h post-UVB and NO() was transiently elevated with 30 min and then steadily rose from 6 to 18 h post-UVB. The expression of iNOS was detected at 6h post-UVB and then sturdily increased. Inhibition of cNOSs with L-NAME reduced the inducibility of NO(*) in the early and late phases of irradiation. Along with the eNOS uncoupling, an increased level of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) was detected in the early phase, but not in the late phase post-UVB. Inhibition of cNOSs reduced the production of ONOO(-) in the early time, but led to an increase of ONOO(-) in the late time after UVB-irradiation. The results indicate that cNOSs regulate NO()/ONOO(-) imbalance after UVB-irradiation. Our data suggested that the activation of cNOSs in the early phase post-UVB leads to NO()/ONOO(-) imbalance and promotes apoptosis via a caspase 3-independent pathway. The elevation of NO() in the late phase of UVB-irradiation is mainly produced by inducible NOS (iNOS). However, cNOSs also contribute to the NO() production and to maintain a higher NO()/ONOO(-) ratio, which reduces caspase 3 activity and protects cells from UVB-induced apoptosis.

  4. Specificity in Mesograzer-Induced Defences in Seagrasses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Crego, Begoña; Arteaga, Pedro; Ueber, Alexandra; Engelen, Aschwin H.; Santos, Rui; Molis, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Grazing-induced plant defences that reduce palatability to herbivores are widespread in terrestrial plants and seaweeds, but they have not yet been reported in seagrasses. We investigated the ability of two seagrass species to induce defences in response to direct grazing by three associated mesograzers. Specifically, we conducted feeding-assayed induction experiments to examine how mesograzer-specific grazing impact affects seagrass induction of defences within the context of the optimal defence theory. We found that the amphipod Gammarus insensibilis and the isopod Idotea chelipes exerted a low-intensity grazing on older blades of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa, which reflects a weak grazing impact that may explain the lack of inducible defences. The isopod Synischia hectica exerted the strongest grazing impact on C. nodosa via high-intensity feeding on young blades with a higher fitness value. This isopod grazing induced defences in C. nodosa as indicated by a consistently lower consumption of blades previously grazed for 5, 12 and 16 days. The lower consumption was maintained when offered tissues with no plant structure (agar-reconstituted food), but showing a reduced size of the previous grazing effect. This indicates that structural traits act in combination with chemical traits to reduce seagrass palatability to the isopod. Increase in total phenolics but not in C:N ratio and total nitrogen of grazed C. nodosa suggests chemical defences rather than a modified nutritional quality as primarily induced chemical traits. We detected no induction of defences in Zostera noltei, which showed the ability to replace moderate losses of young biomass to mesograzers via compensatory growth. Our study provides the first experimental evidence of induction of defences against meso-herbivory that reduce further consumption in seagrasses. It also emphasizes the relevance of grazer identity in determining the level of grazing impact triggering resistance and compensatory

  5. The role of nitric oxide in regulation of the cardiovascular system in reptiles.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Nini; Galli, Gina; Abe, Augusto; Taylor, Edwin W; Wang, Tobias

    2005-10-01

    The roles that nitric oxide (NO) plays in the cardiovascular system of reptiles are reviewed, with particular emphasis on its effects on central vascular blood flows in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. New data is presented that describes the effects on hemodynamic variables in varanid lizards of exogenously administered NO via the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) by l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Furthermore, preliminary data on the effects of SNP on hemodynamic variables in the tegu lizard are presented. The findings are compared with previously published data from our laboratory on three other species of reptiles: pythons (), rattlesnakes () and turtles (). These five species of reptiles possess different combinations of division of the heart and structural complexity of the lungs. Comparison of their responses to NO donors and NOS inhibitors may reveal whether the potential contribution of NO to vascular tone correlates with pulmonary complexity and/or with blood pressure. All existing studies on reptiles have clearly established a potential role for NO in regulating vascular tone in the systemic circulation and NO may be important for maintaining basal systemic vascular tone in varanid lizards, pythons and turtles, through a continuous release of NO. In contrast, the pulmonary circulation is less responsive to NO donors or NOS inhibitors, and it was only in pythons and varanid lizards that the lungs responded to SNP. Both species have a functionally separated heart, so it is possible that NO may exert a larger role in species with low pulmonary blood pressures, irrespective of lung complexity.

  6. UCP2 transports C4 metabolites out of mitochondria, regulating glucose and glutamine oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Vozza, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; De Leonardis, Francesco; Lasorsa, Francesco M.; Castegna, Alessandra; Amorese, Daniela; Marmo, Raffaele; Calcagnile, Valeria M.; Palmieri, Luigi; Ricquier, Daniel; Paradies, Eleonora; Scarcia, Pasquale; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Fiermonte, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is involved in various physiological and pathological processes such as insulin secretion, stem cell differentiation, cancer, and aging. However, its biochemical and physiological function is still under debate. Here we show that UCP2 is a metabolite transporter that regulates substrate oxidation in mitochondria. To shed light on its biochemical role, we first studied the effects of its silencing on the mitochondrial oxidation of glucose and glutamine. Compared with wild-type, UCP2-silenced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, grown in the presence of glucose, showed a higher inner mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP:ADP ratio associated with a lower lactate release. Opposite results were obtained in the presence of glutamine instead of glucose. UCP2 reconstituted in lipid vesicles catalyzed the exchange of malate, oxaloacetate, and aspartate for phosphate plus a proton from opposite sides of the membrane. The higher levels of citric acid cycle intermediates found in the mitochondria of siUCP2-HepG2 cells compared with those found in wild-type cells in addition to the transport data indicate that, by exporting C4 compounds out of mitochondria, UCP2 limits the oxidation of acetyl-CoA–producing substrates such as glucose and enhances glutaminolysis, preventing the mitochondrial accumulation of C4 metabolites derived from glutamine. Our work reveals a unique regulatory mechanism in cell bioenergetics and provokes a substantial reconsideration of the physiological and pathological functions ascribed to UCP2 based on its purported uncoupling properties. PMID:24395786

  7. Zinc oxide nanoparticles cause inhibition of microbial denitrification by affecting transcriptional regulation and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Liu, Kun; Li, Mu; Yin, Daqiang

    2014-12-02

    Over the past few decades, human activities have accelerated the rates and extents of water eutrophication and global warming through increasing delivery of biologically available nitrogen such as nitrate and large emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. In particular, nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, because it has a 300-fold higher global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Microbial denitrification is a major pathway responsible for nitrate removal, and also a dominant source of N2O emissions from terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, whether the release of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) into the environment affects microbial denitrification is largely unknown. Here we show that the presence of ZnO NPs lead to great increases in nitrate delivery (9.8-fold higher) and N2O emissions (350- and 174-fold higher in the gas and liquid phases, respectively). Our data further reveal that ZnO NPs significantly change the transcriptional regulations of glycolysis and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, which causes the decrease in reducing powers available for the reduction of nitrate and N2O. Moreover, ZnO NPs substantially inhibit the gene expressions and catalytic activities of key denitrifying enzymes. These negative effects of ZnO NPs on microbial denitrification finally cause lower nitrate removal and higher N2O emissions, which is likely to exacerbate water eutrophication and global warming.

  8. Role of Carnitine Acetyl Transferase in Regulation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Pulmonary Arterial Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Sun, Xutong; Agarwal, Saurabh; Rafikov, Ruslan; Dasarathy, Sridevi; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart defects with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) result in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction that is dependent, at least in part, on decreases in nitric oxide (NO) signaling. Utilizing a lamb model with left-to-right shunting of blood and increased PBF that mimics the human disease, we have recently shown that a disruption in carnitine homeostasis, due to a decreased carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) activity, correlates with decreased bioavailable NO. Thus, we undertook this study to test the hypothesis that the CrAT enzyme plays a major role in regulating NO signaling through its effect on mitochondrial function. We utilized the siRNA gene knockdown approach to mimic the effect of decreased CrAT activity in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC). Our data indicate that silencing the CrAT gene disrupted cellular carnitine homeostasis, reduced the expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase-and resulted in an increase in oxidative stress within the mitochondrion. CrAT gene silencing also disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics resulting in reduced ATP generation and decreased NO signaling secondary to a reduction in eNOS/Hsp90 interactions. Thus, this study links the disruption of carnitine homeostasis to the loss of NO signaling observed in children with CHD. Preserving carnitine homeostasis may have important clinical implications that warrant further investigation. PMID:23344032

  9. Regulation of AMPK Activation by CD36 Links Fatty Acid Uptake to β-Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingyu; Pietka, Terri; Gross, Richard W.; Eckel, Robert H.; Su, Xiong; Stahl, Philip D.

    2015-01-01

    Increases in muscle energy needs activate AMPK and induce sarcolemmal recruitment of the fatty acid (FA) translocase CD36. The resulting rises in FA uptake and FA oxidation are tightly correlated, suggesting coordinated regulation. We explored the possibility that membrane CD36 signaling might influence AMPK activation. We show, using several cell types, including myocytes, that CD36 expression suppresses AMPK, keeping it quiescent, while it mediates AMPK activation by FA. These dual effects reflect the presence of CD36 in a protein complex with the AMPK kinase LKB1 (liver kinase B1) and the src kinase Fyn. This complex promotes Fyn phosphorylation of LKB1 and its nuclear sequestration, hindering LKB1 activation of AMPK. FA interaction with CD36 dissociates Fyn from the protein complex, allowing LKB1 to remain cytosolic and activate AMPK. Consistent with this, CD36−/− mice have constitutively active muscle and heart AMPK and enhanced FA oxidation of endogenous triglyceride stores. The molecular mechanism described, whereby CD36 suppresses AMPK, with FA binding to CD36 releasing this suppression, couples AMPK activation to FA availability and would be important for the maintenance of cellular FA homeostasis. Its dysfunction might contribute to the reported association of CD36 variants with metabolic complications of obesity in humans. PMID:25157091

  10. Calcium co-regulates oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    De Marchi, Umberto; Thevenet, Jonathan; Hermant, Aurelie; Dioum, Elhadji; Wiederkehr, Andreas

    2014-03-28

    Mitochondrial energy metabolism is essential for glucose-induced calcium signaling and, therefore, insulin granule exocytosis in pancreatic beta cells. Calcium signals are sensed by mitochondria acting in concert with mitochondrial substrates for the full activation of the organelle. Here we have studied glucose-induced calcium signaling and energy metabolism in INS-1E insulinoma cells and human islet beta cells. In insulin secreting cells a surprisingly large fraction of total respiration under resting conditions is ATP synthase-independent. We observe that ATP synthase-dependent respiration is markedly increased after glucose stimulation. Glucose also causes a very rapid elevation of oxidative metabolism as was followed by NAD(P)H autofluorescence. However, neither the rate of the glucose-induced increase nor the new steady-state NAD(P)H levels are significantly affected by calcium. Our findings challenge the current view, which has focused mainly on calcium-sensitive dehydrogenases as the target for the activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. We propose a model of tight calcium-dependent regulation of oxidative metabolism and ATP synthase-dependent respiration in beta cell mitochondria. Coordinated activation of matrix dehydrogenases and respiratory chain activity by calcium allows the respiratory rate to change severalfold with only small or no alterations of the NAD(P)H/NAD(P)(+) ratio.

  11. TET-catalyzed oxidation of intragenic 5-methylcytosine regulates CTCF-dependent alternative splicing.

    PubMed

    Marina, Ryan J; Sturgill, David; Bailly, Marc A; Thenoz, Morgan; Varma, Garima; Prigge, Maria F; Nanan, Kyster K; Shukla, Sanjeev; Haque, Nazmul; Oberdoerffer, Shalini

    2016-02-01

    Intragenic 5-methylcytosine and CTCF mediate opposing effects on pre-mRNA splicing: CTCF promotes inclusion of weak upstream exons through RNA polymerase II pausing, whereas 5-methylcytosine evicts CTCF, leading to exon exclusion. However, the mechanisms governing dynamic DNA methylation at CTCF-binding sites were unclear. Here, we reveal the methylcytosine dioxygenases TET1 and TET2 as active regulators of CTCF-mediated alternative splicing through conversion of 5-methylcytosine to its oxidation derivatives. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-carboxylcytosine are enriched at an intragenic CTCF-binding sites in the CD45 model gene and are associated with alternative exon inclusion. Reduced TET levels culminate in increased 5-methylcytosine, resulting in CTCF eviction and exon exclusion. In vitro analyses establish the oxidation derivatives are not sufficient to stimulate splicing, but efficiently promote CTCF association. We further show genomewide that reciprocal exchange of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine and 5-methylcytosine at downstream CTCF-binding sites is a general feature of alternative splicing in naïve and activated CD4(+) T cells. These findings significantly expand our current concept of the pre-mRNA "splicing code" to include dynamic intragenic DNA methylation catalyzed by the TET proteins.

  12. Circadian and Dopaminergic Regulation of Fatty Acid Oxidation Pathway Genes in Retina and Photoreceptor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vancura, Patrick; Wolloscheck, Tanja; Baba, Kenkichi; Tosini, Gianluca; Iuvone, P. Michael; Spessert, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The energy metabolism of the retina might comply with daily changes in energy demand and is impaired in diabetic retinopathy—one of the most common causes of blindness in Europe and the USA. The aim of this study was to investigate putative adaptation of energy metabolism in healthy and diabetic retina. Hence expression analysis of metabolic pathway genes was performed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, semi-quantitative western blot and immunohistochemistry. Transcriptional profiling of key enzymes of energy metabolism identified transcripts of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation enzymes, i.e. carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (Cpt-1α) and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acadm) to display daily rhythms with peak values during daytime in preparations of the whole retina and microdissected photoreceptors. The cycling of both enzymes persisted in constant darkness, was dampened in mice deficient for dopamine D4 (D4) receptors and was altered in db/db mice—a model of diabetic retinopathy. The data of the present study are consistent with circadian clock-dependent and dopaminergic regulation of fatty acid oxidation in retina and its putative disturbance in diabetic retina. PMID:27727308

  13. Kaempferol Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy via Regulation of ASK1/MAPK Signaling Pathway and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hong; Cao, Jianlei; Zhang, Guangyu; Wang, Yanggan

    2017-02-20

    Kaempferol has been demonstrated to provide benefits for the treatment of atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its role in cardiac hypertrophy remains to be elucidated. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of kaempferol on cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanism. Mice subjected to aorta banding were treated with or without kaempferol (100 mg/kg/d, p. o.) for 6 weeks. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Mice hearts were collected for pathological observation and molecular mechanism investigation. H9c2 cardiomyocytes were stimulated with or without phenylephrine for in vitro study. Kaempferol significantly attenuated cardiac hypertrophy induced by aorta banding as evidenced by decreased cardiomyocyte areas and interstitial fibrosis, accompanied with improved cardiac functions and decreased apoptosis. The ASK1/MAPK signaling pathways (JNK1/2 and p38) were markedly activated in the aorta banding mouse heart but inhibited by kaempferol treatment. In in vitro experiments, kaempferol also inhibited the activity of ASK1/JNK1/2/p38 signaling pathway and the enlargement of H9c2 cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our study revealed that kaempferol could protect the mouse heart and H9c2 cells from pathological oxidative stress. Our investigation indicated that treatment with kaempferol protects against cardiac hypertrophy, and its cardioprotection may be partially explained by the inhibition of the ASK1/MAPK signaling pathway and the regulation of oxidative stress.

  14. Does Dietary Iodine Regulate Oxidative Stress and Adiponectin Levels in Human Breast Milk?

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Repiso, Carolina; Velasco, Inés; Garcia-Escobar, Eva; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Rodríguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Linares, Francisca; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rubio-Martin, Elehazara; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Cobos-Bravo, Juan Francisco; Priego-Puga, Tatiana; Rojo-Martinez, Gemma; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the association between iodine and human milk composition. In this study, we investigated the association between iodine and different markers of oxidative stress and obesity-related hormones in human breast milk. This work is composed of two cross-sectional studies (in lactating women and in the general population), one prospective and one in vitro. In the cross-sectional study in lactating women, the breast milk iodine correlated negatively with superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and with adiponectin levels. An in vitro culture of human adipocytes with 1 μM potassium iodide (KI, dose similar to the human breast milk iodine concentration) produced a significant decrease in adiponectin, GSH-Px, SOD1, and SOD2 mRNA expression. However, after 2 months of treatment with KI in the prospective study, a positive correlation was found between 24-h urinary iodine and serum adiponectin. Our observations lead to the hypothesis that iodine may be a factor directly involved in the regulation of oxidative stress and adiponectin levels in human breast milk. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 847–853. PMID:24001137

  15. Programmed death-1 controls T cell survival by regulating oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tkachev, Victor; Goodell, Stefanie; Opipari, Anthony W; Hao, Ling-Yang; Franchi, Luigi; Glick, Gary D; Ferrara, James L M; Byersdorfer, Craig A

    2015-06-15

    The coinhibitory receptor programmed death-1 (PD-1) maintains immune homeostasis by negatively regulating T cell function and survival. Blockade of PD-1 increases the severity of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), but the interplay between PD-1 inhibition and T cell metabolism is not well studied. We found that both murine and human alloreactive T cells concomitantly upregulated PD-1 expression and increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. This PD-1(Hi)ROS(Hi) phenotype was specific to alloreactive T cells and was not observed in syngeneic T cells during homeostatic proliferation. Blockade of PD-1 signaling decreased both mitochondrial H2O2 and total cellular ROS levels, and PD-1-driven increases in ROS were dependent upon the oxidation of fatty acids, because treatment with etomoxir nullified changes in ROS levels following PD-1 blockade. Downstream of PD-1, elevated ROS levels impaired T cell survival in a process reversed by antioxidants. Furthermore, PD-1-driven changes in ROS were fundamental to establishing a cell's susceptibility to subsequent metabolic inhibition, because blockade of PD-1 decreased the efficacy of later F1F0-ATP synthase modulation. These data indicate that PD-1 facilitates apoptosis in alloreactive T cells by increasing ROS in a process dependent upon the oxidation of fat. In addition, blockade of PD-1 undermines the potential for subsequent metabolic inhibition, an important consideration given the increasing use of anti-PD-1 therapies in the clinic.

  16. Proteomic characterization of the Rph15 barley resistance gene-mediated defence responses to leaf rust

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Leaf rust, caused by the biotrophic fungal pathogen Puccinia hordei, is one of the most important foliar disease of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and represents a serious threat in many production regions of the world. The leaf rust resistance gene Rph15 is of outstanding interest for resistance breeding because it confers resistance to over 350 Puccinia hordei isolates collected from around the world. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms responsible for the Rph15 effectiveness are currently not investigated. The aim of the present work was to study the Rph15-based defence responses using a proteomic approach. Results Protein pattern changes in response to the leaf rust pathogen infection were investigated in two barley near isogenic lines (NILs), Bowman (leaf rust susceptible) and Bowman-Rph15 (leaf rust resistant), differing for the introgression of the leaf rust resistance gene Rph15. Two infection time points, 24 hours and four days post inoculation (dpi), were analysed. No statistically significant differences were identified at the early time point, while at 4 dpi eighteen protein spots were significantly up or down regulated with a fold-change equal or higher than two in response to pathogen infection. Almost all the pathogen-responsive proteins were identified in the Bowman-Rph15 resistant NIL. Protein spots were characterized by LC-MS/MS analysis and found to be involved in photosynthesis and energy metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, protein degradation and defence. Proteomic data were complemented by transcriptional analysis of the respective genes. The identified proteins can be related to modulation of the photosynthetic apparatus components, re-direction of the metabolism to sustain defence responses and deployment of defence proteins. Conclusions The identification of leaf rust infection-modulated defence responses restricted to the resistant NIL support the hypothesis that basal defence responses of Bowman, but not the Rph15 resistance gene

  17. The Defence Medical Library Service and military medicine.

    PubMed

    Walker, S B

    2005-01-01

    The Defence Medical Library Service (DMLS) supports the clinical practice and career development of military health professionals across the world. Clinical governance and the need for medical knowledge to be evidence-based means the DMLS has a central role to play in support of defence medicine. The DMLS is important for enabling health professionals to make sense of the evidence-based pyramid and the hierarchy of medical knowledge. The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine (RCDM) in Birmingham is recognised as an international centre of excellence. The information, knowledge and research requirements of the RCDM will provide opportunities for the DMLS to support and engage with the academic community.

  18. NF-E2-related factor 2 regulates the stress response to UVA-1-oxidized phospholipids in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Florian; Mayer, Herbert; Lengauer, Barbara; Mlitz, Veronika; Sanders, John M; Kadl, Alexandra; Bilban, Martin; de Martin, Rainer; Wagner, Oswald; Kensler, Thomas W; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Leitinger, Norbert; Tschachler, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    Long-wavelength ultraviolet (UVA-1) radiation causes oxidative stress that modifies cellular molecules. To defend themselves against noxious oxidation products, skin cells produce detoxifying enzymes and antioxidants. We have recently shown that UVA-1 oxidized the abundant membrane phospholipid 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine (PAPC), which then induced the stress-response protein heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) in dermal fibroblasts. Here we examined the effects of UVA-1- and UV-oxidized phospholipids on global gene expression in human dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We identified a cluster of genes that were coinduced by UVA-1-oxidized PAPC and UVA-1 radiation. The cluster included HO-1, glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit, aldo-keto reductases-1-C1 and -C2, and IL-8. These genes are members of the cellular stress response system termed "antioxidant response." Accordingly, the regulatory regions of all of these genes contain binding sites for NF-E2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major regulator of the antioxidant response. Both UVA-1 irradiation and treatment with oxidized lipids led to increased nuclear accumulation and DNA binding of NRF2. Silencing and deficiency of NRF2 suppressed the antioxidant response. Taken together, our data show that UVA-1-mediated lipid oxidation induces expression of antioxidant response genes, which is dependent on the redox-regulated transcription factor NRF2. Our findings suggest a different view on UV-generated lipid mediators that were commonly regarded as detrimental

  19. Oxidation of the alarmin IL-33 regulates ST2-dependent inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, E. Suzanne; Scott, Ian C.; Majithiya, Jayesh B.; Rapley, Laura; Kemp, Benjamin P.; England, Elizabeth; Rees, D. Gareth; Overed-Sayer, Catherine L.; Woods, Joanne; Bond, Nicholas J.; Veyssier, Christel Séguy; Embrey, Kevin J.; Sims, Dorothy A.; Snaith, Michael R.; Vousden, Katherine A.; Strain, Martin D.; Chan, Denice T. Y.; Carmen, Sara; Huntington, Catherine E.; Flavell, Liz; Xu, Jianqing; Popovic, Bojana; Brightling, Christopher E.; Vaughan, Tristan J.; Butler, Robin; Lowe, David C.; Higazi, Daniel R.; Corkill, Dominic J.; May, Richard D.; Sleeman, Matthew A.; Mustelin, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    In response to infections and irritants, the respiratory epithelium releases the alarmin interleukin (IL)-33 to elicit a rapid immune response. However, little is known about the regulation of IL-33 following its release. Here we report that the biological activity of IL-33 at its receptor ST2 is rapidly terminated in the extracellular environment by the formation of two disulphide bridges, resulting in an extensive conformational change that disrupts the ST2 binding site. Both reduced (active) and disulphide bonded (inactive) forms of IL-33 can be detected in lung lavage samples from mice challenged with Alternaria extract and in sputum from patients with moderate–severe asthma. We propose that this mechanism for the rapid inactivation of secreted IL-33 constitutes a ‘molecular clock' that limits the range and duration of ST2-dependent immunological responses to airway stimuli. Other IL-1 family members are also susceptible to cysteine oxidation changes that could regulate their activity and systemic exposure through a similar mechanism. PMID:26365875

  20. Nitric Oxide Mediates Bleomycin-Induced Angiogenesis and Pulmonary Fibrosis via Regulation of VEGF

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V.; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A.; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M.; Wright, Clayton A.; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25919965

  1. Regulation of mitochondrial function and endoplasmic reticulum stress by nitric oxide in pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Terron-Bautista, José; Beltrán-Povea, Amparo; Cahuana, Gladys M; Soria, Bernat; Nabil, Hajji; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) are global processes that are interrelated and regulated by several stress factors. Nitric oxide (NO) is a multifunctional biomolecule with many varieties of physiological and pathological functions, such as the regulation of cytochrome c inhibition and activation of the immune response, ERS and DNA damage; these actions are dose-dependent. It has been reported that in embryonic stem cells, NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation, survival and pluripotency, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not yet known. Low levels of NO maintain pluripotency and induce mitochondrial biogenesis. It is well established that NO disrupts the mitochondrial respiratory chain and causes changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ flux that induce ERS. Thus, at high concentrations, NO becomes a potential differentiation agent due to the relationship between ERS and the unfolded protein response in many differentiated cell lines. Nevertheless, many studies have demonstrated the need for physiological levels of NO for a proper ERS response. In this review, we stress the importance of the relationships between NO levels, ERS and mitochondrial dysfunction that control stem cell fate as a new approach to possible cell therapy strategies. PMID:28289506

  2. Wnt Ligands Differentially Regulate Toxicity and Translocation of Graphene Oxide through Different Mechanisms in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Lingtong; Ren, Mingxia; Qu, Man; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of Wnt signals in the control of graphene oxide (GO) toxicity using the in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans. In nematodes, the Wnt ligands, CWN-1, CWN-2, and LIN-44, were found to be involved in the control of GO toxicity. Mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 gene induced a resistant property to GO toxicity and resulted in the decreased accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes, whereas mutation of cwn-2 gene induces a susceptible property to GO toxicity and an enhanced accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes. Genetic interaction assays demonstrated that mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 was able to suppress the susceptibility to GO toxicity shown in the cwn-2 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in all three of these Wnt ligand genes resulted in the resistance of nematodes to GO toxicity. Moreover, the Wnt ligands might differentially regulate the toxicity and translocation of GO through different mechanisms. These findings could be important in understanding the function of Wnt signals in the regulation of toxicity from environmental nanomaterials. PMID:27958363

  3. Endothelial nitric oxide signaling regulates Notch1 in aortic valve disease

    PubMed Central

    Bosse, Authors: Kevin; Hans, Chetan P.; Zhao, Ning; Koenig, Sara N.; Huang, Nianyuan; Guggilam, Anuradha; LaHaye, Stephanie; Tao, Ge; Lucchesi, Pamela A.; Lincoln, Joy; Lilly, Brenda; Garg, Vidu

    2013-01-01

    The mature aortic valve is composed of a structured trilaminar extracellular matrix that is interspersed with aortic valve interstitial cells (AVICs) and covered by endothelium. Dysfunction of the valvular endothelium initiates calcification of neighboring AVICs leading to calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD). The molecular mechanism by which endothelial cells communicate with AVICs and cause disease is not well understood. Using a co-culture assay, we show that endothelial cells secrete a signal to inhibit calcification of AVICs. Gain or loss of nitric oxide (NO) prevents or accelerates calcification of AVICs, respectively, suggesting that the endothelial cell-derived signal is NO. Overexpression of Notch1, which is genetically linked to human CAVD, retards the calcification of AVICs that occurs with NO inhibition. In AVICs, NO regulates the expression of Hey1, a downstream target of Notch1, and alters nuclear localization of Notch1 intracellular domain. Finally, Notch1 and NOS3 (endothelial NO synthase) display an in vivo genetic interaction critical for proper valve morphogenesis and the development of aortic valve disease. Our data suggests that endothelial cell-derived NO is a regulator of Notch1 signaling in AVICs in the development of the aortic valve and adult aortic valve disease. PMID:23583836

  4. Nitric oxide mediates bleomycin-induced angiogenesis and pulmonary fibrosis via regulation of VEGF.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand Krishnan V; Ramesh, Vani; Castro, Carlos A; Kaushik, Vivek; Kulkarni, Yogesh M; Wright, Clayton A; Venkatadri, Rajkumar; Rojanasakul, Yon; Azad, Neelam

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease hallmarked by increased fibroblast proliferation, amplified levels of extracellular matrix deposition and increased angiogenesis. Although dysregulation of angiogenic mediators has been implicated in pulmonary fibrosis, the specific rate-limiting angiogenic markers involved and their role in the progression of pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. We demonstrate that bleomycin treatment induces angiogenesis, and inhibition of the central angiogenic mediator VEGF using anti-VEGF antibody CBO-P11 significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Bleomycin-induced nitric oxide (NO) was observed to be the key upstream regulator of VEGF via the PI3k/Akt pathway. VEGF regulated other important angiogenic proteins including PAI-1 and IL-8 in response to bleomycin exposure. Inhibition of NO and VEGF activity significantly mitigated bleomycin-induced angiogenic and fibrogenic responses. NO and VEGF are key mediators of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and could serve as important targets against this debilitating disease. Overall, our data suggests an important role for angiogenic mediators in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  5. Wnt Ligands Differentially Regulate Toxicity and Translocation of Graphene Oxide through Different Mechanisms in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhi, Lingtong; Ren, Mingxia; Qu, Man; Zhang, Hanyu; Wang, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of Wnt signals in the control of graphene oxide (GO) toxicity using the in vivo assay system of Caenorhabditis elegans. In nematodes, the Wnt ligands, CWN-1, CWN-2, and LIN-44, were found to be involved in the control of GO toxicity. Mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 gene induced a resistant property to GO toxicity and resulted in the decreased accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes, whereas mutation of cwn-2 gene induces a susceptible property to GO toxicity and an enhanced accumulation of GO in the body of nematodes. Genetic interaction assays demonstrated that mutation of cwn-1 or lin-44 was able to suppress the susceptibility to GO toxicity shown in the cwn-2 mutants. Loss-of-function mutations in all three of these Wnt ligand genes resulted in the resistance of nematodes to GO toxicity. Moreover, the Wnt ligands might differentially regulate the toxicity and translocation of GO through different mechanisms. These findings could be important in understanding the function of Wnt signals in the regulation of toxicity from environmental nanomaterials.

  6. cGMP-independent nitric oxide signaling and regulation of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaolin; Zhang, Jianhua; Ma, Penglin; Myers, Daniela E; Goldberg, Ilana G; Sittler, Kelly J; Barb, Jennifer J; Munson, Peter J; Cintron, Ana del Pilar; McCoy, J Philip; Wang, Shuibang; Danner, Robert L

    2005-01-01

    Background Regulatory functions of nitric oxide (NO•) that bypass the second messenger cGMP are incompletely understood. Here, cGMP-independent effects of NO• on gene expression were globally examined in U937 cells, a human monoblastoid line that constitutively lacks soluble guanylate cyclase. Differentiated U937 cells (>80% in G0/G1) were exposed to S-nitrosoglutathione, a NO• donor, or glutathione alone (control) for 6 h without or with dibutyryl-cAMP (Bt2cAMP), and then harvested to extract total RNA for microarray analysis. Bt2cAMP was used to block signaling attributable to NO•-induced decreases in cAMP. Results NO• regulated 110 transcripts that annotated disproportionately to the cell cycle and cell proliferation (47/110, 43%) and more frequently than expected contained AU-rich, post-transcriptional regulatory elements (ARE). Bt2cAMP regulated 106 genes; cell cycle gene enrichment did not reach significance. Like NO•, Bt2cAMP was associated with ARE-containing transcripts. A comparison of NO• and Bt2cAMP effects showed that NO• regulation of cell cycle genes was independent of its ability to interfere with cAMP signaling. Cell cycle genes induced by NO• annotated to G1/S (7/8) and included E2F1 and p21/Waf1/Cip1; 6 of these 7 were E2F target genes involved in G1/S transition. Repressed genes were G2/M associated (24/27); 8 of 27 were known targets of p21. E2F1 mRNA and protein were increased by NO•, as was E2F1 binding to E2F promoter elements. NO• activated p38 MAPK, stabilizing p21 mRNA (an ARE-containing transcript) and increasing p21 protein; this increased protein binding to CDE/CHR promoter sites of p21 target genes, repressing key G2/M phase genes, and increasing the proportion of cells in G2/M. Conclusion NO• coordinates a highly integrated program of cell cycle arrest that regulates a large number of genes, but does not require signaling through cGMP. In humans, antiproliferative effects of NO• may rely substantially on c

  7. Defence signalling triggered by Flg22 and Harpin is integrated into a different stilbene output in Vitis cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Nick, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Plants can activate defence to pathogen attack by two layers of innate immunity: basal immunity triggered by pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) linked with programmed cell death. Flg22 and Harpin are evolutionary distinct bacterial PAMPs. We have previously shown that Harpin triggers hypersensitive cell death mimicking ETI in Vitis rupestris, but not in the Vitis vinifera cultivar 'Pinot Noir'. In contrast, the bacterial PAMP flg22 activating PTI does not trigger cell death. To get insight into the defence signalling triggered by flg22 and Harpin, we compared cellular responses upon flg22 and Harpin treatment in the two Vitis cell lines. We found that extracellular alkalinisation was blocked by inhibition of calcium influx, and modulated by pharmacological manipulation of the cytoskeleton and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity with quantitative differences between cell lines and type of PAMPs. In addition, an oxidative burst was detected that was much stronger and faster in response to Harpin as compared to flg22. In V. rupestris, both flg22 and Harpin induced transcripts of defence-related genes including stilbene synthase, microtubule disintegration and actin bundling in a similar way, whereas they differed in V. vinifera cv. 'Pinot Noir'. In contrast to Harpin, flg22 failed to trigger significant levels of the stilbene trans-resveratrol, and did not induce hypersensitive cell death even in the highly responsive V. rupestris. We discuss these data in a model, where flg22- and Harpin-triggered defence shares a part of early signal components, but differs in perception, oxidative burst, and integration into a qualitatively different stilbene output, such that for flg22 a basal PTI is elicited in both cell lines, while Harpin induces cell death mimicking an ETI-like pattern of defence.

  8. Featured Article: Differential regulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase phosphorylation by protease-activated receptors in adult human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tillery, Lakeisha C; Epperson, Tenille A; Eguchi, Satoru; Motley, Evangeline D

    2016-03-01

    Protease-activated receptors have been shown to regulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase through the phosphorylation of specific sites on the enzyme. It has been established that PAR-2 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Ser-1177 and leads to the production of the potent vasodilator nitric oxide, while PAR-1 activation phosphorylates eNOS-Thr-495 and decreases nitric oxide production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In this study, we hypothesize a differential coupling of protease-activated receptors to the signaling pathways that regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nitric oxide production in primary adult human coronary artery endothelial cells. Using Western Blot analysis, we showed that thrombin and the PAR-1 activating peptide, TFLLR, lead to the phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 in human coronary artery endothelial cells, which was blocked by SCH-79797 (SCH), a PAR-1 inhibitor. Using the nitrate/nitrite assay, we also demonstrated that the thrombin- and TFLLR-induced production of nitric oxide was inhibited by SCH and L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. In addition, we observed that TFLLR, unlike thrombin, significantly phosphorylated eNOS-Thr-495, which may explain the observed delay in nitric oxide production in comparison to that of thrombin. Activation of PAR-2 by SLIGRL, a PAR-2 specific ligand, leads to dual phosphorylation of both catalytic sites but primarily regulated eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation with no change in nitric oxide production in human coronary artery endothelial cells. PAR-3, known as the non-signaling receptor, was activated by TFRGAP, a PAR-3 mimicking peptide, and significantly induced the phosphorylation of eNOS-Thr-495 with minimal phosphorylation of eNOS-Ser-1177 with no change in nitric oxide production. In addition, we confirmed that PAR-mediated eNOS-Ser-1177 phosphorylation was Ca(2+)-dependent using the Ca(2+) chelator, BAPTA, while eNOS-Thr-495 phosphorylation was mediated via Rho kinase using the ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632

  9. Neuronal development is promoted by weakened intrinsic antioxidant defences due to epigenetic repression of Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Karen F.S.; Al-Mubarak, Bashayer; Martel, Marc-André; McKay, Sean; Wheelan, Nicola; Hasel, Philip; Márkus, Nóra M.; Baxter, Paul; Deighton, Ruth F.; Serio, Andrea; Bilican, Bilada; Chowdhry, Sudhir; Meakin, Paul J.; Ashford, Michael L.J.; Wyllie, David J.A.; Scannevin, Robert H.; Chandran, Siddharthan; Hayes, John D.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    Forebrain neurons have weak intrinsic antioxidant defences compared with astrocytes, but the molecular basis and purpose of this is poorly understood. We show that early in mouse cortical neuronal development in vitro and in vivo, expression of the master-regulator of antioxidant genes, transcription factor NF-E2-related-factor-2 (Nrf2), is repressed by epigenetic inactivation of its promoter. Consequently, in contrast to astrocytes or young neurons, maturing neurons possess negligible Nrf2-dependent antioxidant defences, and exhibit no transcriptional responses to Nrf2 activators, or to ablation of Nrf2's inhibitor Keap1. Neuronal Nrf2 inactivation seems to be required for proper development: in maturing neurons, ectopic Nrf2 expression inhibits neurite outgrowth and aborization, and electrophysiological maturation, including synaptogenesis. These defects arise because Nrf2 activity buffers neuronal redox status, inhibiting maturation processes dependent on redox-sensitive JNK and Wnt pathways. Thus, developmental epigenetic Nrf2 repression weakens neuronal antioxidant defences but is necessary to create an environment that supports neuronal development. PMID:25967870

  10. Fatty acid oxidation and the regulation of malonyl-CoA in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Båvenholm, P N; Pigon, J; Saha, A K; Ruderman, N B; Efendic, S

    2000-07-01

    Questions concerning whether malonyl-CoA is regulated in human muscle and whether malonyl-CoA modulates fatty acid oxidation are still unanswered. To address these questions, whole-body fatty acid oxidation and the concentration of malonyl-CoA, citrate, and malate were determined in the vastus lateralis muscle of 16 healthy nonobese Swedish men during a sequential euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Insulin was infused at rates of 0.25 and 1.0 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1), and glucose was infused at rates of 2.0 +/- 0.2 and 8.1 +/- 0.7 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), respectively. During the low-dose insulin infusion, whole-body fatty acid oxidation, as determined by indirect calorimetry, decreased by 22% from a basal rate of 0.94 +/- 0.06 to 0.74 +/- 0.07 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P = 0.005), but no increase in malonyl-CoA was observed. In contrast, during the high-dose insulin infusion, malonyl-CoA increased from 0.20 +/- 0.01 to 0.24 +/- 0.01 nmol/g (P < 0.001), and whole-body fatty acid oxidation decreased by an additional 41% to 0.44 +/- 0.06 mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) (P < 0.001). The increase in malonyl-CoA was associated with 30-50% increases in the concentrations of citrate (102 +/- 6 vs. 137 +/- 7 nmol/g, P < 0.001), an allosteric activator of the rate-limiting enzyme in the malonyl-CoA formation, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and malate (80 +/- 6 vs. 126 +/- 9 nmol/g, P = 0.002), an antiporter for citrate efflux from the mitochondria. Significant correlations were observed between the concentration of malonyl-CoA and both glucose utilization (r = 0.53, P = 0.002) and the sum of the concentrations of citrate and malate (r = 0.52, P < 0.001), a proposed index of the cytosolic concentration of citrate. In addition, an inverse correlation between malonyl-CoA concentration and fatty acid oxidation was observed (r = -0.32, P = 0.03). The results indicate that an infusion of insulin and glucose at a high rate leads to increases in the concentration of malonyl-CoA in skeletal muscle and to

  11. Defence force activities in marine protected areas: environmental management of Shoalwater Bay Training Area, Queensland, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Wang, Xiaohua; Paull, David; Kesby, Julie

    2010-05-01

    Environmental management of military activities is of growing global concern by defence forces. As one of the largest landholders in Australia, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) is increasingly concerned with sustainable environmental management. This paper focuses on how the ADF is maintaining effective environmental management, especially in environmentally sensitive marine protected areas. It uses Shoalwater Bay Training Area (SWBTA) as a research example to examine environmental management strategies conducted by the ADF. SWBTA is one of the most significant Defence training areas in Australia, with a large number of single, joint and combined military exercises conducted in the area. With its maritime component contained in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP), the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area (GBRWHA), and abutting Queensland’s State Marine Parks, it has high protection values. It is therefore vital for the ADF to adopt environmentally responsible management while they are conducting military activities. As to various tools employed to manage environmental performance, the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System (EMS) is widely used by the ADF. This paper examines military activities and marine environmental management within SWBTA, using the Talisman Saber (TS) exercise series as an example. These are extensive joint exercises conducted by the ADF and the United States defence forces. The paper outlines relevant legislative framework and environmental policies, analyses how the EMS operates in environmental management of military activities, and how military activities comply with these regulations. It discusses the implementation of the ADF EMS, including risk reduction measures, environmental awareness training, consultation and communication with stakeholders. A number of environmental management actions used in the TS exercises are presented to demonstrate the EMS application. Our investigations to this point indicate that the ADF is

  12. The genetic architecture of defence as resistance to and tolerance of bacterial infection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Howick, Virginia M; Lazzaro, Brian P

    2017-03-01

    Defence against pathogenic infection can take two forms: resistance and tolerance. Resistance is the ability of the host to limit a pathogen burden, whereas tolerance is the ability to limit the negative consequences of infection at a given level of infection intensity. Evolutionarily, a tolerance strategy that is independent of resistance could allow the host to avoid mounting a costly immune response and, theoretically, to avoid a co-evolutionary arms race between pathogen virulence and host resistance. Biomedically, understanding the mechanisms of tolerance and how they relate to resistance could potentially yield treatment strategies that focus on health improvement instead of pathogen elimination. To understand the impact of tolerance on host defence and identify genetic variants that determine host tolerance, we defined genetic variation in tolerance as the residual deviation from a binomial regression of fitness under infection against infection intensity. We then performed a genomewide association study to map the genetic basis of variation in resistance to and tolerance of infection by the bacterium Providencia rettgeri. We found a positive genetic correlation between resistance and tolerance, and we demonstrated that the level of resistance is highly predictive of tolerance. We identified 30 loci that predict tolerance, many of which are in genes involved in the regulation of immunity and metabolism. We used RNAi to confirm that a subset of mapped genes have a role in defence, including putative wound repair genes grainy head and debris buster. Our results indicate that tolerance is not an independent strategy from resistance, but that defence arises from a collection of physiological processes intertwined with canonical immunity and resistance.

  13. Grazing-activated chemical defence in a unicellular marine alga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Gordon V.; Steinke, Michael; Kirst, Gunter O.

    1997-06-01

    Marine plankton use a variety of defences against predators, some of which affect trophic structure and biogeochemistry. We have previously shown that, during grazing by the protozoan Oxyrrhis marina on the alga Emiliania huxleyi, dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) from the prey is converted to dimethyl sulphide (DMS) when lysis of ingested prey cells initiates mixing of algal DMSP and the enzyme DMSP lyase. Such a mechanism is similar to macrophyte defence reactions,. Here we show that this reaction deters protozoan herbivores, presumably through the production of highly concentrated acrylate, which has antimicrobial activity. Protozoan predators differ in their ability to ingest and survive on prey with high-activity DMSP lyase, but all grazers preferentially select strains with low enzyme activity when offered prey mixtures. This defence system involves investment in a chemical precursor, DMSP, which is not self-toxic and has other useful metabolic functions. We believe this is the first report of grazing-activated chemical defence in unicellular microorganisms.

  14. Development of a Defence Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) Database Demonstrator,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    This report discusses the development of a Defence Distributed Computing Environment (DCE) database demonstrator program. The Demonstrator program...showcases the interoperability, portability, survivability and security features of Open Software Foundation’s Distributed Computing Environment.

  15. Damaged-self recognition in plant herbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Heil, Martin

    2009-07-01

    Feeding by herbivores induces plant defences, but we still do not know all the signals that mediate this response. Here, I argue that a general principle in this mediation is 'damaged-self recognition', that is, the perception of motifs by the plant that indicate disintegrated plant cells. Most defence-inducing molecules are (or contain) plant-derived motifs or disintegrate plant cells and thereby release defence elicitors. By perceiving the 'damaged self', plants can retain evolutionary control over their interactions with herbivores rather than allowing herbivores to dominate the interaction. The concept of 'damaged-self recognition' provides a paradigm for plant responses to herbivory and helps the search for the currently unknown elicitors of those defence responses, which have so far only been described at the phenotypic level.

  16. Chemical antipredator defence is linked to higher extinction risk

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many attributes of species may be linked to contemporary extinction risk, though some such traits remain untested despite suggestions that they may be important. Here, I test whether a trait associated with higher background extinction rates, chemical antipredator defence, is also associated with current extinction risk, using amphibians as a model system—a group facing global population declines. I find that chemically defended species are approximately 60% more likely to be threatened than species without chemical defence, although the severity of the contemporary extinction risk may not relate to chemical defence. The results confirm that background and contemporary extinction rates can be predicted from the same traits, at least in certain cases. This suggests that associations between extinction risk and phenotypic traits can be temporally stable over long periods. The results also provide novel insights into the relevance of antipredator defences for species subject to conservation concerns. PMID:28018657

  17. Methionine sulfoxide reductase 2 reversibly regulates Mge1, a cochaperone of mitochondrial Hsp70, during oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Allu, Praveen Kumar; Marada, Adinarayana; Boggula, Yerranna; Karri, Srinivasu; Krishnamoorthy, Thanuja; Sepuri, Naresh Babu V.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide methionine sulfoxide reductases are conserved enzymes that reduce oxidized methionines in protein(s). Although these reductases have been implicated in several human diseases, there is a dearth of information on the identity of their physiological substrates. By using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we show that of the two methionine sulfoxide reductases (MXR1, MXR2), deletion of mitochondrial MXR2 renders yeast cells more sensitive to oxidative stress than the cytosolic MXR1. Our earlier studies showed that Mge1, an evolutionarily conserved nucleotide exchange factor of Hsp70, acts as an oxidative sensor to regulate mitochondrial Hsp70. In the present study, we show that Mxr2 regulates Mge1 by selectively reducing MetO at position 155 and restores the activity of Mge1 both in vitro and in vivo. Mge1 M155L mutant rescues the slow-growth phenotype and aggregation of proteins of mxr2Δ strain during oxidative stress. By identifying the first mitochondrial substrate for Mxrs, we add a new paradigm to the regulation of the oxidative stress response pathway. PMID:25428986

  18. Expression of PUMA in Follicular Granulosa Cells Regulated by FoxO1 Activation During Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Qun; Shen, Ming; Wu, Wang-Jun; Li, Bo-Jiang; Weng, Qian-Nan; Li, Mei; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a main cause of follicular atresia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways involving numerous genes and transcription factors. In this study, we found expression of the p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), a BH3-only Bcl-2 subfamily protein, in ovarian GCs during oxidative stress. By overexpression and knockdown of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), we found that FoxO1 regulates PUMA at the protein level. Moreover, as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to activate FoxO1 by promoting its nuclear import, we used a JNK inhibitor to reduce FoxO1 activation and detected decreased PUMA messenger RNA expression and protein levels during oxidative stress. In addition, in vivo oxidative stress-induced upregulation of PUMA was found following injection of 3 nitropropionic acid in mice. In conclusion, oxidative stress increases PUMA expression regulated by FoxO1 in follicular GCs.

  19. Characterization of an oxidative stress response regulator, homologous to Escherichia coli OxyR, from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Toledo, M A S; Schneider, D R; Azzoni, A R; Favaro, M T P; Pelloso, A C; Santos, C A; Saraiva, A M; Souza, A P

    2011-02-01

    The OxyR oxidative stress transcriptional regulator is a DNA-binding protein that belongs to the LysR-type transcriptional regulators (LTTR) family. It has the ability to sense oxidative species inside the cell and to trigger the cell's response, activating the transcription of genes involved in scavenging oxidative species. In the present study, we have overexpressed, purified and characterized the predicted OxyR homologue (orf xf1273) of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa. This bacterium is the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) disease caused by the 9a5c strain, resulting in economic and social losses. The secondary structure of the recombinant protein was analyzed by circular dichroism. Gel filtration showed that XfoxyR is a dimer in solution. Gel shift assays indicated that it does bind to its own predicted promoter under in vitro conditions. However, considering our control experiment we cannot state that this interaction occurs in vivo. Functional complementation assays indicated that xfoxyR is able to restore the oxidative stress response in an oxyr knockout Escherichia coli strain. These results show that the predicted orfxf1273 codes for a transcriptional regulator, homologous to E. coli OxyR, involved in the oxidative stress response. This may be important for X. fastidiosa to overcome the defense mechanisms of its host during the infection and colonization processes.

  20. Phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid in plant defence response: from protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions to hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Phospholipase Ds (PLDs) and PLD-derived phosphatidic acids (PAs) play vital roles in plant hormonal and environmental responses and various cellular dynamics. Recent studies have further expanded the functions of PLDs and PAs into plant-microbe interaction. The molecular diversities and redundant functions make PLD-PA an important signalling complex regulating lipid metabolism, cytoskeleton dynamics, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling in plant defence through protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions or hormone signalling. Different PLD-PA signalling complexes and their targets have emerged as fast-growing research topics for understanding their numerous but not yet established roles in modifying pathogen perception, signal transduction, and downstream defence responses. Meanwhile, advanced lipidomics tools have allowed researchers to reveal further the mechanisms of PLD-PA signalling complexes in regulating lipid metabolism and signalling, and their impacts on jasmonic acid/oxylipins, salicylic acid, and other hormone signalling pathways that essentially mediate plant defence responses. This review attempts to summarize the progress made in spatial and temporal PLD/PA signalling as well as PLD/PA-mediated modification of plant defence. It presents an in-depth discussion on the functions and potential mechanisms of PLD-PA complexes in regulating actin filament/microtubule cytoskeleton, vesicle trafficking, and hormonal signalling, and in influencing lipid metabolism-derived metabolites as critical signalling components in plant defence responses. The discussion puts PLD-PA in a broader context in order to guide future research.

  1. Middle Devonian liverwort herbivory and antiherbivore defence.

    PubMed

    Labandeira, Conrad C; Tremblay, Susan L; Bartowski, Kenneth E; VanAller Hernick, Linda

    2014-04-01

    To test the extent of herbivory in early terrestrial ecosystems, we examined compression-impression specimens of the late Middle Devonian liverwort Metzgeriothallus sharonae, from the Catskill Delta deposit of eastern New York state. Shale fragments of field-collected specimens were processed by applying liquid nitrocellulose on exposed surfaces. After drying, the film coatings were lifted off and mounted on microscope slides for photography. Unprocessed fragments were photographed under cedarwood oil for enhanced contrast. An extensive repertoire of arthropodan-mediated herbivory was documented, representing three functional feeding groups and nine subordinate plant-arthropod damage types (DTs). The herbivory is the earliest occurrence of external foliage-feeding and galling in the terrestrial fossil record. Our evidence indicates that thallus oil body cells, similar to the terpenoid-containing oil bodies of modern liverworts, were probably involved in the chemical defence of M. sharonae against arthropod herbivores. Based on damage patterns of terrestrial plants and an accompanying but sparse body-fossil record, Devonian arthropodan herbivores were significantly smaller compared to those of the later Palaeozoic. These data collectively suggest that a broad spectrum herbivory may have had a more important role in early terrestrial ecosystems than previously thought.

  2. Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Wendy S.; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Burrill, Joel S.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Foncea, Rocio; Jensen, Michael D.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar A.

    2014-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines differentially regulate adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism, oxidative stress, and dynamics. Macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue and the chronic low-grade production of inflammatory cytokines have been mechanistically linked to the development of insulin resistance, the forerunner of type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this study, we evaluated the chronic effects of TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β on adipocyte mitochondrial metabolism and morphology using the 3T3-L1 model cell system. TNFα treatment of cultured adipocytes led to significant changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics, including increased proton leak, decreased ΔΨm, increased basal respiration, and decreased ATP turnover. In contrast, although IL-6 and IL-1β decreased maximal respiratory capacity, they had no effect on ΔΨm and varied effects on ATP turnover, proton leak, or basal respiration. Only TNFα treatment of 3T3-L1 cells led to an increase in oxidative stress (as measured by superoxide anion production and protein carbonylation) and C16 ceramide synthesis. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with cytokines led to decreased mRNA expression of key transcription factors and control proteins implicated in mitochondrial biogenesis, including PGC-1α and eNOS as well as deceased expression of COX IV and Cyt C. Whereas each cytokine led to effects on expression of mitochondrial markers, TNFα exclusively led to mitochondrial fragmentation and decreased the total level of OPA1 while increasing OPA1 cleavage, without expression of levels of mitofusin 2, DRP-1, or mitofilin being affected. In summary, these results indicate that inflammatory cytokines have unique and specialized effects on adipocyte metabolism, but each leads to decreased mitochondrial function and a reprogramming of fat cell biology. PMID:24595304

  3. E3 ubiquitin ligase NKLAM positively regulates macrophage inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Donald W; Gullickson, Gail; Kornbluth, Jacki

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated macrophages generate potent anti-microbial reactive oxygen and nitrogen species within their phagosomes. Previous studies have shown that the E3 ubiquitin ligase natural killer lytic-associated molecule (NKLAM) is a macrophage phagosomal protein that plays a role in macrophage anti-bacterial activity. In vivo, NKLAM-knockout (KO) mice produce less nitric oxide (NO) upon exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) than wild type (WT) mice. In vitro, we found that NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein were diminished in LPS-stimulated NKLAM-KO bone marrow-derived and splenic macrophages. Additionally, LPS-stimulated NKLAM-KO macrophages displayed defects in STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation and production of interferon beta (IFNβ). The JAK/STAT pathway is critical for the production of IFNβ, which augments iNOS protein expression in mice. iNOS protein expression is also regulated by the transcription factor NFκB, thus we investigated whether NKLAM influences NFκB function. LPS-stimulated NKLAM-KO macrophages showed evidence of delayed nuclear translocation of the NFκB subunit p65. This was associated with a reduction in p65/DNA colocalization. The defect in p65 translocation was independent of IKBα degradation. NKLAM-KO macrophages also expressed less p65 and showed evidence of defective p65 phosphorylation at serine 536. Importantly, LPS-stimulated NKLAM-KO macrophages have diminished NFκB transcriptional activity as assessed by transfection of a luciferase reporter plasmid. Collectively, our data implicate NKLAM as a novel modulator of macrophage iNOS expression.

  4. Macrophage-tumor cell interactions regulate the function of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.; Hemmerlein, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tumor cell-macrophage interactions change as the tumor progresses, and the generation of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) plays a major role in this interplay. In early stages, macrophages employ their killing mechanisms, particularly the generation of high concentrations of NO and its derivative reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to initiate tumor cell apoptosis and destroy emerging transformed cells. If the tumor escapes the immune system and grows, macrophages that infiltrate it are reprogramed in situ by the tumor microenvironment. Low oxygen tensions (hypoxia) and immunosuppressive cytokines inhibit iNOS activity and lead to production of low amounts of NO/RNS, which are pro-angiogenic and support tumor growth and metastasis by inducing growth factors (e.g., VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We review here the different roles of NO/RNS in tumor progression and inhibition, and the mechanisms that regulate iNOS expression and NO production, highlighting the role of different subtypes of macrophages and the microenvironment. We finally claim that some tumor cells may become resistant to macrophage-induced death by increasing their expression of microRNA-146a (miR-146a), which leads to inhibition of iNOS translation. This implies that some cooperation between tumor cells and macrophages is required to induce tumor cell death, and that tumor cells may control their fate. Thus, in order to induce susceptibility of tumors cells to macrophage-induced death, we suggest a new therapeutic approach that couples manipulation of miR-146a levels in tumors with macrophage therapy, which relies on ex vivo stimulation of macrophages and their re-introduction to tumors. PMID:23785333

  5. HBx regulates fatty acid oxidation to promote hepatocellular carcinoma survival during metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Qin, Chen-Jie; Zhao, Ling-Hao; Fu, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Xian-Ming; Tang, Liang; Wen, Wen; Yang, Wen; Tang, Shan-Hua; Cao, Dan; Guo, Lin-Na; Zeng, Min; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Due to a high rate of nutrient consumption and inadequate vascularization, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells constantly undergo metabolic stress during tumor development. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HBV-induced HCC. In this study, we investigated the functional roles of HBx in HCC adaptation to metabolic stress. Up-regulation of HBx increased the intracellular ATP and NADPH generation, and induced the resistance to glucose deprivation, whereas depletion of HBx via siRNA abolished these effects and conferred HCC cells sensitive to glucose restriction. Though HBx did not affect the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation capacity of HCC cells under normal culture conditions, it facilitated fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the absence of glucose, which maintained NADPH and ATP levels. Further investigation showed that HBx expression, under glucose deprivation, stimulated phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) via a calcium/CaMKK-dependent pathway, which was required for the activation of FAO. Conversely, inhibition of FAO by etomoxir (ETO) restored the sensitivity of HBx-expressing cells to glucose deficiency in vitro and retarded xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Finally, HBx-induced activation of the AMPK and FAO pathways were also observed in xenograft tumors and HBV-associated HCC specimens. Our data suggest that HBx plays a key role in the maintenance of redox and energy homeostasis by activating FAO, which is critical for HCC cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress and might be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:26744319

  6. Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase: mechanism of action and role in regulating oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David F; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2014-12-15

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation has a central role in eukaryotic metabolism, providing the energy (ATP) required for survival. Regulation of this important pathway is, however, still not understood, largely due to limitations in the ability to measure the essential metabolites, including oxygen (pO2, oxygen pressure), ADP, and AMP. In addition, neither the mechanism of oxygen reduction by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase nor how its rate is controlled is understood, although this enzyme determines the rate of oxygen consumption and thereby the rate of ATP synthesis. Cytochrome c oxidase is responsible for reduction of molecular oxygen to water using reducing equivalents donated by cytochrome c and for site 3 energy coupling in oxidative phosphorylation. A mechanism-based model of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction is presented in which transfer of reducing equivalents from the lower- to the higher-potential region of the coupling site occurs against an opposing energy barrier, Q. The steady-state rate equation is fitted to data for the dependence of mitochondrial respiratory rate on cytochrome c reduction, oxygen pressure (pO2), and [ATP]/[ADP][Pi] at pH 6.5 to 8.35 (where Pi is inorganic phosphate). The fit of the rate expression to the experimental data is very good for all experimental conditions. Levels of the intermediates in oxygen reduction in the oxidase reaction site have been calculated. An intermediate in the reaction, tentatively identified as peroxide, bridged between the iron and copper atoms of the reaction site has a central role in coupling mitochondrial respiration to the [ATP]/[ADP][Pi].

  7. Regulation of egg quality and lipids metabolism by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Li, Lan; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Ding, Zhao-Peng; Wang, Shi-Wen; Shen, Wei; Min, Ling-Jiang; Hao, Zhi-Hui

    2016-04-01

    This investigation was designed to explore the effects of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NP) on egg quality and the mechanism of decreasing of yolk lipids. Different concentration of ZnO NP and ZnSO4 were used to treat hens for 24 weeks. The body weight and egg laying frequency were recorded and analyzed. Albumen height, Haugh unit, and yolk color score were analyzed by an Egg Multi Tester. Breaking strength was determined by an Egg Force Reader. Egg shell thickness was measured using an Egg Shell Thickness Gouge. Shell color was detected by a spectrophotometer. Egg shape index was measured by Egg Form Coefficient Measuring Instrument. Albumen and yolk protein was determined by the Kjeldahl method. Amino acids were determined by an amino acids analyzer. Trace elements Zn, Fe, Cu, and P (mg/kg wet mass) were determined in digested solutions using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry. TC and TG were measured using commercial analytical kits. Yolk triglyceride, total cholesterol, pancreatic lipase, and phospholipids were determined by appropriate kits. β-carotene was determined by spectrophotometry. Lipid metabolism was also investigated with liver, plasma, and ovary samples. ZnO NP did not change the body weight of hens during the treatment period. ZnO NP slowed down egg laying frequency at the beginning of egg laying period but not at later time. ZnO NP did not affect egg protein or water contents, slightly decreased egg physical parameters (12 to 30%) and trace elements (20 to 35%) after 24 weeks treatment. However, yolk lipids content were significantly decreased by ZnO NP (20 to 35%). The mechanism of Zinc oxide nanoparticles decreasing yolk lipids was that they decreased the synthesis of lipids and increased lipid digestion. These data suggested ZnO NP affected egg quality and specifically regulated lipids metabolism in hens through altering the function of hen's ovary and liver.

  8. Mitochondrial PKM2 regulates oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by stabilizing Bcl2

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Ji; Cao, Ruixiu; Wang, Xiongjun; Zhang, Yajuan; Wang, Pan; Gao, Hong; Li, Chen; Yang, Fan; Zeng, Rong; Wei, Ping; Li, Dawei; Li, Wenfeng; Yang, Weiwei

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase M2 isoform (PKM2) catalyzes the last step of glycolysis and plays an important role in tumor cell proliferation. Recent studies have reported that PKM2 also regulates apoptosis. However, the mechanisms underlying such a role of PKM2 remain elusive. Here we show that PKM2 translocates to mitochondria under oxidative stress. In the mitochondria, PKM2 interacts with and phosphorylates Bcl2 at threonine (T) 69. This phosphorylation prevents the binding of Cul3-based E3 ligase to Bcl2 and subsequent degradation of Bcl2. A chaperone protein, HSP90α1, is required for this function of PKM2. HSP90α1's ATPase activity launches a conformational change of PKM2 and facilitates interaction between PKM2 and Bcl2. Replacement of wild-type Bcl2 with phosphorylation-deficient Bcl2 T69A mutant sensitizes glioma cells to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and impairs brain tumor formation in an orthotopic xenograft model. Notably, a peptide that is composed of the amino acid residues from 389 to 405 of PKM2, through which PKM2 binds to Bcl2, disrupts PKM2-Bcl2 interaction, promotes Bcl2 degradation and impairs brain tumor growth. In addition, levels of Bcl2 T69 phosphorylation, conformation-altered PKM2 and Bcl2 protein correlate with one another in specimens of human glioblastoma patients. Moreover, levels of Bcl2 T69 phosphorylation and conformation-altered PKM2 correlate with both grades and prognosis of glioma malignancy. Our findings uncover a novel mechanism through which mitochondrial PKM2 phosphorylates Bcl2 and inhibits apoptosis directly, highlight the essential role of PKM2 in ROS adaptation of cancer cells, and implicate HSP90-PKM2-Bcl2 axis as a potential target for therapeutic intervention in glioblastoma. PMID:28035139

  9. Regulation of neuronal growth cone filopodia by nitric oxide depends on soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Van Wagenen, S; Rehder, V

    2001-02-15

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to play an important role in neuronal development. We have previously shown that growth cones from an identified neuron, B5, in the snail Helisoma trivolvis, respond to nitric oxide (NO) donors by increasing the length of their filopodia within minutes of application (Van Wagenen and Rehder, 1999). This effect was mediated through a cGMP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i and resulted in an enlargement of the growth cone's action radius, suggesting that NO could function as a signaling molecule during neuronal pathfinding. We show here that NO functions as a specific rather than a general regulator of growth cone filopodia, because another identified neuron from the same ganglion, B19, failed to respond to NO with an increase in filopodial length. We found that, contrary to B5 neurons, B19 growth cones contained little or no soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) immunoreactivity, presumably preventing their response to NO. This hypothesis was supported by the finding that the sGC activator YC-1 (10 microM) had no effect on B19 filopodia but induced elongation of B5 filopodia. These results indicate that the effects of NO can be quite specific, and raise the interesting possibility that neurons could selectively tune in to NO by differentially expressing the target enzyme sGC in the appropriate cellular location during critical developmental stages. In addition, our NADPH-diaphorase staining and anti-NOS immunohistochemisty suggest that growth cones of B5 neurons, but not of B19 neurons, could be a source of NO, making NO a potential intra- and transcellular messenger.

  10. Functional regulation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression and activity in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Walter, Lais Takata; Higa, Guilherme Shigueto Vilar; Schmeltzer, Christian; Sousa, Erica; Kinjo, Erika Reime; Rüdiger, Sten; Hamassaki, Dânia Emi; Cerchiaro, Giselle; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki

    2014-11-01

    In the nervous system within physiological conditions, nitric oxide (NO) production depends on the activity of nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), and particularly on the expression of the neuronal isoform (nNOS). In the sensory systems, the role of NO is poorly understood. In this study, we identified nNOS-positive cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) of the rat retina, with distinct characteristics such as somata size, immunolabeling level and location. Employing mathematical cluster analysis, we determined that nNOS amacrine cells are formed by two distinct populations. We next investigated the molecular identity of these cells, which did not show colocalization with calbindin (CB), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), parvalbumin (PV) or protein kinase C (PKC), and only partial colocalization with calretinin (CR), revealing the accumulation of nNOS in specific amacrine cell populations. To access the functional, circuitry-related roles of these cells, we performed experiments after adaptation to different ambient light conditions. After 24h of dark-adaptation, we detected a subtle, yet statistically significant decrease in nNOS transcript levels, which returned to steady-state levels after 24h of normal light-dark cycle, revealing that nNOS expression is governed by ambient light conditions. Employing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), we demonstrated that dark-adaptation decreases NO production in the retina. Furthermore, nNOS accumulation changed in the dark-adapted retinas, with a general reduction in the inner plexiform layer. Finally, computational analysis based on clustering techniques revealed that dark-adaptation differently affected both types of nNOS-positive amacrine cells. Taken together, our data disclosed functional regulation of nNOS expression and activity, disclosing new circuitry-related roles of nNOS-positive cells. More importantly, this study indicated unsuspected roles for NO in the sensory systems, particularly related to adaptation to

  11. Nitric oxide interacts with salicylate to regulate biphasic ethylene production during the hypersensitive response.

    PubMed

    Mur, Luis A J; Laarhoven, Lucas J J; Harren, Frans J M; Hall, Michael A; Smith, Aileen R

    2008-11-01

    C(2)H(4) is associated with plant defense, but its role during the hypersensitive response (HR) remains largely uncharacterized. C(2)H(4) production in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) following inoculation with HR-eliciting Pseudomonas syringae pathovars measured by laser photoacoustic detection was biphasic. A first transient rise (C(2)H(4)-I) occurred 1 to 4 h following inoculation with HR-eliciting, disease-forming, and nonpathogenic strains and also with flagellin (flg22). A second (avirulence-dependent) rise, at approximately 6 h (C(2)H(4)-II), was only seen with HR-eliciting strains. Tobacco leaves treated with the C(2)H(4) biosynthesis inhibitor, aminoethoxyvinylglycine, suggested that C(2)H(4) influenced the kinetics of a HR. Challenging salicylate hydroxylase-expressing tobacco lines and tissues exhibiting systemic acquired resistance suggested that C(2)H(4) production was influenced by salicylic acid (SA). Disrupted expression of a C(2)H(4) biosynthesis gene in salicylate hydroxylase tobacco plants implicated transcriptional control as a mechanism through which SA regulates C(2)H(4) production. Treating leaves to increase oxidative stress or injecting with SA initiated monophasic C(2)H(4) generation, but the nitric oxide (NO) donor sodium nitroprusside initiated biphasic rises. To test whether NO influenced biphasic C(2)H(4) production during the HR, the NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester was coinoculated with the avirulent strain of P. syringae pv phaseolicola into tobacco leaves. The first transient C(2)H(4) rise appeared to be unaffected by N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, but the second rise was reduced. These data suggest that NO and SA are required to generate the biphasic pattern of C(2)H(4) production during the HR and may influence the kinetics of HR formation.

  12. Nitric oxide increases GLUT4 expression and regulates AMPK signaling in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Lira, Vitor A; Soltow, Quinlyn A; Long, Jodi H D; Betters, Jenna L; Sellman, Jeff E; Criswell, David S

    2007-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are involved in glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. Here, we examined whether NO regulates the expression of the major glucose transporter in muscle (GLUT4) and whether it influences AMPK-induced upregulation of GLUT4. At low levels, the NO donor S-nitroso-N-penicillamine (SNAP, 1 and 10 microM) significantly increased GLUT4 mRNA ( approximately 3-fold; P < 0.05) in L6 myotubes, and cotreatment with the AMPK inhibitor compound C ablated this effect. The cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP, 2 mM) increased GLUT4 mRNA by approximately 50% (P < 0.05). GLUT4 protein expression was elevated 40% by 2 days treatment with 8-Br-cGMP, whereas 6 days treatment with 10 microM SNAP increased GLUT4 expression by 65%. Cotreatment of cultures with the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3,-a]quinoxalin-1-one prevented the SNAP-induced increase in GLUT4 protein. SNAP (10 microM) also induced significant phosphorylation of alpha-AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase and translocation of phosphorylated alpha-AMPK to the nucleus. Furthermore, L6 myotubes exposed to 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) for 16 h presented an approximately ninefold increase in GLUT4 mRNA, whereas cotreatment with the non-isoform-specific NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, prevented approximately 70% of this effect. In vivo, GLUT4 mRNA was increased 1.8-fold in the rat plantaris muscle 12 h after AICAR injection, and this induction was reduced by approximately 50% in animals cotreated with the neuronal and inducible nitric oxide synthases selective inhibitor 1-(2-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-imidazole. We conclude that, in skeletal muscle, NO increases GLUT4 expression via a cGMP- and AMPK-dependent mechanism. The data are consistent with a role for NO in the regulation of AMPK, possibly via control of cellular activity of AMPK kinases and/or AMPK phosphatases.

  13. Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity Regulation in Solution-Gated Indium-Gallium-Zinc-Oxide Electric-Double-Layer Transistors.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chang Jin; Liu, Yang Hui; Zhu, Li Qiang; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-04-20

    In the biological nervous system, synaptic plasticity regulation is based on the modulation of ionic fluxes, and such regulation was regarded as the fundamental mechanism underlying memory and learning. Inspired by such biological strategies, indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (IGZO) electric-double-layer (EDL) transistors gated by aqueous solutions were proposed for synaptic behavior emulations. Short-term synaptic plasticity, such as paired-pulse facilitation, high-pass filtering, and orientation tuning, was experimentally emulated in these EDL transistors. Most importantly, we found that such short-term synaptic plasticity can be effectively regulated by alcohol (ethyl alcohol) and salt (potassium chloride) additives. Our results suggest that solution gated oxide-based EDL transistors could act as the platforms for short-term synaptic plasticity emulation.

  14. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPARalpha activation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Li, L; Prabhakaran, K; Zhang, L; Leavesley, H B; Borowitz, J L; Isom, G E

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPARalpha antagonist) or PPARalpha knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPARalpha activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPARalpha did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPARalpha-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPARalpha-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPARalpha-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPARalpha mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  15. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  16. Nitric oxide is a positive regulator of the Warburg effect in ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Caneba, C A; Yang, L; Baddour, J; Curtis, R; Win, J; Hartig, S; Marini, J; Nagrath, D

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OVCA) is among the most lethal gynecological cancers leading to high mortality rates among women. Increasing evidence indicate that cancer cells undergo metabolic transformation during tumorigenesis and growth through nutrients and growth factors available in tumor microenvironment. This altered metabolic rewiring further enhances tumor progression. Recent studies have begun to unravel the role of amino acids in the tumor microenvironment on the proliferation of cancer cells. One critically important, yet often overlooked, component to tumor growth is the metabolic reprogramming of nitric oxide (NO) pathways in cancer cells. Multiple lines of evidence support the link between NO and tumor growth in some cancers, including pancreas, breast and ovarian. However, the multifaceted role of NO in the metabolism of OVCA is unclear and direct demonstration of NO's role in modulating OVCA cells' metabolism is lacking. This study aims at indentifying the mechanistic links between NO and OVCA metabolism. We uncover a role of NO in modulating OVCA metabolism: NO positively regulates the Warburg effect, which postulates increased glycolysis along with reduced mitochondrial activity under aerobic conditions in cancer cells. Through both NO synthesis inhibition (using L-arginine deprivation, arginine is a substrate for NO synthase (NOS), which catalyzes NO synthesis; using L-Name, a NOS inhibitor) and NO donor (using DETA-NONOate) analysis, we show that NO not only positively regulates tumor growth but also inhibits mitochondrial respiration in OVCA cells, shifting these cells towards glycolysis to maintain their ATP production. Additionally, NO led to an increase in TCA cycle flux and glutaminolysis, suggesting that NO decreases ROS levels by increasing NADPH and glutathione levels. Our results place NO as a central player in the metabolism of OVCA cells. Understanding the effects of NO on cancer cell metabolism can lead to the development of NO targeting drugs

  17. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Manuel F.; Puebla, Mariela; Figueroa, Xavier F.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30) and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1). The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO) can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in this process

  18. Inorganic arsenic causes cell apoptosis in mouse cerebrum through an oxidative stress-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng Chien; Ho, Tsung Jung; Wu, Chin Ching; Chang, Chun Fang; Su, Chin Chuan; Chen, Ya Wen; Jinn, Tzyy Rong; Lu, Tien Hui; Cheng, Po Wen; Su, Yi Chang; Liu, Shing Hwa; Huang, Chun Fa

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic pollution is a major public health problem worldwide. Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is usually more harmful than organic ones. iAs pollution increases the risk of human diseases such as peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the toxicological effects of iAs in the brain are mostly unclear. Here, we investigated the toxic effects and possible mechanisms of iAs in the cerebrum of mice after exposure to iAs (0.5 and 5 ppm (mg/l) As(2)O(3), via the drinking water), which was the possible human exposed dose via the ingestion in iAs-contaminated areas, for 6 consecutive weeks. iAs dose-dependently caused an increase of LPO production in the plasma and cerebral cortex. iAs also decreased the reduced glutathione levels and the expressions of NQO1 and GPx mRNA in the cerebral cortex. These impairments in the cerebral cortex caused by iAs exposure were significantly correlated with the accumulation of As. Moreover, iAs induced the production of apoptotic cells and activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, and down-regulation of Mcl-1 in the cerebral cortex. Exposure to iAs also triggered the expression of ER stress-related genes, including GRP78, GRP94, and CHOP. Meanwhile, an increase of p38 activation and dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 were shown in the cerebral cortex as a result of iAs-exposed mice. These iAs-induced damages and apoptosis-related signals could be significantly reversed by NAC. Taken together, these results suggest that iAs-induced oxidative stress causes cellular apoptosis in the cerebrum, signaling of p38 and ERK1/2, and ER stress may be involved in iAs-induced cerebral toxicity.

  19. Cross-Regulation between N Metabolism and Nitric Oxide (NO) Signaling during Plant Immunity.

    PubMed

    Thalineau, Elise; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Berger, Antoine; Fournier, Carine; Boscari, Alexandre; Wendehenne, David; Jeandroz, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that have evolved a complex immune system which helps them cope with pathogen attacks. However, the capacity of a plant to mobilize different defense responses is strongly affected by its physiological status. Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient that can play an important role in plant immunity by increasing or decreasing plant resistance to pathogens. Although no general rule can be drawn about the effect of N availability and quality on the fate of plant/pathogen interactions, plants' capacity to acquire, assimilate, allocate N, and maintain amino acid homeostasis appears to partly mediate the effects of N on plant defense. Nitric oxide (NO), one of the products of N metabolism, plays an important role in plant immunity signaling. NO is generated in part through Nitrate Reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in nitrate assimilation, and its production depends on levels of nitrate/nitrite, NR substrate/product, as well as on L-arginine and polyamine levels. Cross-regulation between NO signaling and N supply/metabolism has been evidenced. NO production can be affected by N supply, and conversely NO appears to regulate nitrate transport and assimilation. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that N availability partly controls plant resistance to pathogens by controlling NO homeostasis. Using the Medicago truncatula/Aphanomyces euteiches pathosystem, we showed that NO homeostasis is important for resistance to this oomycete and that N availability impacts NO homeostasis by affecting S-nitrosothiol (SNO) levels and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity in roots. These results could therefore explain the increased resistance we noted in N-deprived as compared to N-replete M. truncatula seedlings. They open onto new perspectives for the studies of N/plant defense interactions.

  20. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Manuel F; Puebla, Mariela; Figueroa, Xavier F

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca(2+) signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca(2+) signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30) and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1). The neuronal activity-initiated Ca(2+) waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca(2+) entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO) can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca(2+)-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca(2+) influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in

  1. Cross-Regulation between N Metabolism and Nitric Oxide (NO) Signaling during Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Thalineau, Elise; Truong, Hoai-Nam; Berger, Antoine; Fournier, Carine; Boscari, Alexandre; Wendehenne, David; Jeandroz, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that have evolved a complex immune system which helps them cope with pathogen attacks. However, the capacity of a plant to mobilize different defense responses is strongly affected by its physiological status. Nitrogen (N) is a major nutrient that can play an important role in plant immunity by increasing or decreasing plant resistance to pathogens. Although no general rule can be drawn about the effect of N availability and quality on the fate of plant/pathogen interactions, plants’ capacity to acquire, assimilate, allocate N, and maintain amino acid homeostasis appears to partly mediate the effects of N on plant defense. Nitric oxide (NO), one of the products of N metabolism, plays an important role in plant immunity signaling. NO is generated in part through Nitrate Reductase (NR), a key enzyme involved in nitrate assimilation, and its production depends on levels of nitrate/nitrite, NR substrate/product, as well as on L-arginine and polyamine levels. Cross-regulation between NO signaling and N supply/metabolism has been evidenced. NO production can be affected by N supply, and conversely NO appears to regulate nitrate transport and assimilation. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that N availability partly controls plant resistance to pathogens by controlling NO homeostasis. Using the Medicago truncatula/Aphanomyces euteiches pathosystem, we showed that NO homeostasis is important for resistance to this oomycete and that N availability impacts NO homeostasis by affecting S-nitrosothiol (SNO) levels and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase activity in roots. These results could therefore explain the increased resistance we noted in N-deprived as compared to N-replete M. truncatula seedlings. They open onto new perspectives for the studies of N/plant defense interactions. PMID:27092169

  2. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neuronal Activity via Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lei Ray; Estes, Stephen; Artinian, Liana; Rehder, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an unconventional membrane-permeable messenger molecule that has been shown to play various roles in the nervous system. How NO modulates ion channels to affect neuronal functions is not well understood. In gastropods, NO has been implicated in regulating the feeding motor program. The buccal motoneuron, B19, of the freshwater pond snail Helisoma trivolvis is active during the hyper-retraction phase of the feeding motor program and is located in the vicinity of NO-producing neurons in the buccal ganglion. Here, we asked whether B19 neurons might serve as direct targets of NO signaling. Previous work established NO as a key regulator of growth cone motility and neuronal excitability in another buccal neuron involved in feeding, the B5 neuron. This raised the question whether NO might modulate the electrical activity and neuronal excitability of B19 neurons as well, and if so whether NO acted on the same or a different set of ion channels in both neurons. To study specific responses of NO on B19 neurons and to eliminate indirect effects contributed by other cells, the majority of experiments were performed on single cultured B19 neurons. Addition of NO donors caused a prolonged depolarization of the membrane potential and an increase in neuronal excitability. The effects of NO could mainly be attributed to the inhibition of two types of calcium-activated potassium channels, apamin-sensitive and iberiotoxin-sensitive potassium channels. NO was found to also cause a depolarization in B19 neurons in situ, but only after NO synthase activity in buccal ganglia had been blocked. The results suggest that NO acts as a critical modulator of neuronal excitability in B19 neurons, and that calcium-activated potassium channels may serve as a common target of NO in neurons. PMID:24236040

  3. Glyphosate-based herbicide exposure causes antioxidant defence responses in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    de Aguiar, Lais Mattos; Figueira, Fernanda Hernandes; Gottschalk, Marco Silva; da Rosa, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective and post-emergent herbicide that affects plant growth. Animal exposure to this herbicide can lead to adverse effects, such as endocrine disruption, oxidative stress and behavioural disorders. Drosophilids have been utilized previously as an effective tool in toxicological tests. In the present study, the effects of a glyphosate-based herbicide (Roundup [Original]) were investigated regarding oxidative stress, the antioxidant defence system and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in Drosophila melanogaster. Flies (of both genders) that were 1 to 3days old were exposed to different glyphosate concentrations (0.0mg/L=control, 1.0mg/L, 2.0mg/L, 5.0mg/L and 10.0mg/L) in the diet for 24h and 96h. After the exposure periods, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels were quantified. In addition, the mRNA expression of antioxidant genes (i.e., keap1, sod, sod2, cat, irc, gclc, gclm, gss, trxt, trxr-1 and trxr-2) was evaluated via RT-PCR. Additionally, AChE activity was evaluated only after the 96h exposure period. The results indicated that Roundup exposure leads to a reduction in ROS levels in flies exposed for 96h. ACAP levels and gene expression of the antioxidant defence system exhibited an increase from 24h, while LPO did not show any significant alterations in both exposure periods. AChE activity was not affected following Roundup exposure. Our data suggest that Roundup exposure causes an early activation of the antioxidant defence system in D. melanogaster, and this can prevent subsequent damage caused by ROS.

  4. Transcriptional regulation of bacterial virulence gene expression by molecular oxygen and nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jeffrey; Rolfe, Matthew D; Smith, Laura J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular oxygen (O2) and nitric oxide (NO) are diatomic gases that play major roles in infection. The host innate immune system generates reactive oxygen species and NO as bacteriocidal agents and both require O2 for their production. Furthermore, the ability to adapt to changes in O2 availability is crucial for many bacterial pathogens, as many niches within a host are hypoxic. Pathogenic bacteria have evolved transcriptional regulatory systems that perceive these gases and respond by reprogramming gene expression. Direct sensors possess iron-containing co-factors (iron–sulfur clusters, mononuclear iron, heme) or reactive cysteine thiols that react with O2 and/or NO. Indirect sensors perceive the physiological effects of O2 starvation. Thus, O2 and NO act as environmental cues that trigger the coordinated expression of virulence genes and metabolic adaptations necessary for survival within a host. Here, the mechanisms of signal perception by key O2- and NO-responsive bacterial transcription factors and the effects on virulence gene expression are reviewed, followed by consideration of these aspects of gene regulation in two major pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. PMID:25603427

  5. Redox regulation and pro-oxidant reactions in the physiology of circadian systems.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Isabel; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    Rhythms of approximately 24 h are pervasive in most organisms and are known as circadian. There is a molecular circadian clock in each cell sustained by a feedback system of interconnected "clock" genes and transcription factors. In mammals, the timing system is formed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, in coordination with a collection of peripheral oscillators. Recently, an extensive interconnection has been recognized between the molecular circadian clock and the set of biochemical pathways that underlie the bioenergetics of the cell. A principle regulator of metabolic networks is the flow of electrons between electron donors and acceptors. The concomitant reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions directly influence the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This review summarizes and discusses recent findings concerning the mutual and dynamic interactions between the molecular circadian clock, redox reactions, and redox signaling. The scope includes the regulatory role played by redox coenzymes (NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H, GSH/GSSG), reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide), antioxidants (melatonin), and physiological events that modulate the redox state (feeding condition, circadian rhythms) in determining the timing capacity of the molecular circadian clock. In addition, we discuss a purely metabolic circadian clock, which is based on the redox enzymes known as peroxiredoxins and is present in mammalian red blood cells and in other biological systems. Both the timing system and the metabolic network are key to a better understanding of widespread pathological conditions such as the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes.

  6. Anandamide and decidual remodelling: COX-2 oxidative metabolism as a key regulator.

    PubMed

    Almada, M; Piscitelli, F; Fonseca, B M; Di Marzo, V; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N

    2015-11-01

    Recently, endocannabinoids have emerged as signalling mediators in reproduction. It is widely accepted that anandamide (AEA) levels must be tightly regulated, and that a disturbance in AEA levels may impact decidual stability and regression. We have previously characterized the endocannabinoid machinery in rat decidual tissue and reported the pro-apoptotic action of AEA on rat decidual cells. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that plays a crucial role in early pregnancy, and is also a key modulator in the crosstalk between endocannabinoids and prostaglandins. On the other hand, AEA-oxidative metabolism by COX-2 is not merely a mean to inactivate its action, but it yields the formation of a new class of mediators, named prostaglandin-ethanolamides, or prostamides. In this study we found that AEA-induced apoptosis in decidual cells involves COX-2 metabolic pathway. AEA induced COX-2 expression through p38 MAPK, resulting in the formation of prostamide E2 (PME2). Our findings also suggest that AEA-induced effect is associated with NF-kB activation. Finally, we describe the involvement of PME2 in the induction of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in rat decidual cells. Altogether, our findings highlight the role of COX-2 as a gatekeeper in the uterine environment and clarify the impact of the deregulation of AEA levels on the decidual remodelling process.

  7. Regulation of neuroendocrine cells and neuron factors in the ovary by zinc oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Hao, Ya-Nan; Song, Ran; Li, Lan; Feng, Yan-Ni; Hao, Zhi-Hui; Shen, Wei; Min, Ling-Jiang; Yang, Hong-Di; Zhao, Yong

    2016-08-10

    The pubertal period is an important window during the development of the female reproductive system. Development of the pubertal ovary, which supplies the oocytes intended for fertilization, requires growth factors, hormones, and neuronal factors. It has been reported that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) cause cytotoxicity of neuron cells. However, there have been no reports of the effects of ZnO NPs on neuronal factors and neuroendocrine cells in the ovary (in vivo). For the first time, this in vivo study investigated the effects of ZnO NPs on gene and protein expression of neuronal factors and the population of neuroendocrine cells in ovaries. Intact NPs were detected in ovarian tissue and although ZnO NPs did not alter body weight, they reduced the ovary organ index. Compared to the control or ZnSO4 treatments, ZnO NPs treatments differentially regulated neuronal factor protein and gene expression, and the population of neuroendocrine cells. ZnO NPs changed the contents of essential elements in the ovary; however, they did not alter levels of the steroid hormones estrogen and progesterone. These data together suggest that intact ZnO NPs might pose a toxic effect on neuron development in the ovary and eventually negatively affect ovarian developmental at puberty.

  8. Nitric oxide synthesis in the lung. Regulation by oxygen through a kinetic mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Dweik, R A; Laskowski, D; Abu-Soud, H M; Kaneko, F; Hutte, R; Stuehr, D J; Erzurum, S C

    1998-01-01

    In this study, we show that oxygen regulates nitric oxide (NO) levels through effects on NO synthase (NOS) enzyme kinetics. Initially, NO synthesis in the static lung was measured in bronchiolar gases during an expiratory breath-hold in normal individuals. NO accumulated exponentially to a plateau, indicating balance between NO production and consumption in the lung. Detection of NO2-, NO3-, and S-nitrosothiols in lung epithelial lining fluids confirmed NO consumption by chemical reactions in the lung. Interestingly, alveolar gas NO (estimated from bronchiolar gases at end-expiration) was near zero, suggesting NO in exhaled gases is not derived from circulatory/systemic sources. Dynamic NO levels during tidal breathing in different airway regions (mouth, trachea, bronchus, and bronchiole) were similar. However, in individuals breathing varying levels of inspired oxygen, dynamic NO levels were notably dependent on O2 concentration in the hypoxic range (KmO2 190 microM). Purified NOS type II enzyme activity in vitro was similarly dependent on molecular oxygen levels (KmO2 135 microM), revealing a means by which oxygen concentration affects NO levels in vivo. Based upon these results, we propose that NOS II is a mediator of the vascular response to oxygen in the lung, because its KmO2 allows generation of NO in proportion to the inspired oxygen concentration throughout the physiologic range. PMID:9449700

  9. Nitric oxide regulates gene expression in cancers by controlling histone posttranslational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Divya; Hickok, Jason R.; Bovee, Rhea C.; Pham, Vy; Mantell, Lin L.; Bahroos, Neil; Kanabar, Pinal; Cao, Xing-Jun; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Thomas, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Altered nitric oxide (•NO) metabolism underlies cancer pathology, but mechanisms explaining many •NO-associated phenotypes remain unclear. We have found that cellular exposure to •NO changes histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases. Herein, we describe how •NO exposure links modulation of histone PTMs to gene expression changes that promote oncogenesis. Through high-resolution mass spectrometry, we generated an extensive map of •NO-mediated histone PTM changes at 15 critical lysine residues on the core histones H3 and H4. Concomitant microarray analysis demonstrated that exposure to physiologic •NO resulted in the differential expression of over 6,500 genes in breast cancer cells. Measurements of the association of H3K9me2 and H3K9ac across genomic loci revealed that differential distribution of these particular PTMs correlated with changes in the level of expression of numerous oncogenes, consistent with epigenetic code. Our results establish that •NO functions as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression mediated by changes in histone PTMs. PMID:26542213

  10. Beta 3-adrenoreceptor regulation of nitric oxide in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Moens, An L; Yang, Ronghua; Watts, Vabren L; Barouch, Lili A

    2010-06-01

    The presence of a third beta-adrenergic receptor (beta 3-AR) in the cardiovascular system has challenged the classical paradigm of sympathetic regulation by beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptors. While beta 3-AR's role in the cardiovascular system remains controversial, increasing evidence suggests that it serves as a "brake" in sympathetic overstimulation - it is activated at high catecholamine concentrations, producing a negative inotropic effect that antagonizes beta1- and beta2-AR activity. The anti-adrenergic effects induced by beta 3-AR were initially linked to nitric oxide (NO) release via endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), although more recently it has been shown under some conditions to increase NO production in the cardiovascular system via the other two NOS isoforms, namely inducible NOS (iNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS). We summarize recent findings regarding beta 3-AR effects on the cardiovascular system and explore its prospective as a therapeutic target, particularly focusing on its emerging role as an important mediator of NO signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders.

  11. Nitric oxide regulates cell behavior on an interactive cell-derived extracellular matrix scaffold.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qi; Zhang, Lijun; Redman, Travis; Qi, Shaohai; Zhao, Feng

    2015-12-01

    During tissue injury and wound healing process, there are dynamic reciprocal interactions among cells, extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediating molecules which are crucial for functional tissue repair. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the key mediating molecules that can positively regulate various biological activities involved in wound healing. Various ECM components serve as binding sites for cells and mediating molecules, and the interactions further stimulate cellular activities. Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) can migrate to the wound site and contribute to tissue regeneration through differentiation and paracrine signaling. The objective of this work was to investigate the regulatory effect of NO on hMSCs in an interactive ECM-rich microenvironment. In order to mimic the in vivo stromal environment in wound site, a cell-derived ECM scaffold that was able to release NO within the range of in vivo wound fluid NO level was fabricated. Results showed that the micro-molar level of NO released from the ECM scaffold had an inhibitory effect on cellular activities of hMSCs. The NO impaired cell growth, altered cell morphology, disrupted the F-actin organization, also decreased the expression of focal adhesion related molecules integrin α5 and paxillin. These results may contribute to the elucidation of how NO acts on hMSCs in wound healing process.

  12. Nitric oxide controls fat deposition in dystrophic skeletal muscle by regulating fibro-adipogenic precursor differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Nicoletta; Pisa, Viviana; Pozzi, Laura; Sciorati, Clara; Clementi, Emilio

    2014-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an hereditary disease characterized by loss of muscle fibers and their progressive substitution by fat and fibrous tissue. Mesenchymal fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) expressing the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) are an important source of fibrosis and adipogenesis in dystrophic skeletal muscle. Among the therapies suggested for dystrophy are those based on nitric oxide (NO) donating drugs, the administration of which slows disease progression. NO has been shown to act by enhancing the regenerative potential of the diseased muscle. Whether it acts also by inhibiting fibrosis and adipogenesis was not known. Here, we show in vitro that NO regulates FAP fate through inhibition of their differentiation into adipocytes. In mdx mice, an animal model of DMD, treatment with the NO donating drug molsidomine reduced the number of PDGFRα(+) cells as well as the deposition of both skeletal muscle fat and connective tissues. Inhibition of adipogenesis was due to NO-induced increased expression of miR-27b leading to downregulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (Pparγ1) expression in a pathway independent of cGMP generation. These findings reveal an additional effect of NO in dystrophic muscle that conceivably synergizes with its known effects on regeneration improvement and explain why NO-based therapies appear effective in the treatment of muscular dystrophy.

  13. Scorpions regulate their energy metabolism towards increased carbohydrate oxidation in response to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Bhawna; Gefen, Eran

    2012-08-01

    Scorpions successfully inhabit some of the most arid habitats on earth. During exposure to desiccating stress water is mobilized from the scorpion hepatopancreas to replenish the hemolymph and retain hydration and osmotic stability. Carbohydrate catabolism is advantageous under these conditions as it results in high metabolic water production rate, as well as the release of glycogen-bound water. Hypothesizing that metabolic fuel utilization in scorpions is regulated in order to boost body water management under stressful conditions we used a comparative approach, studying energy metabolism during prolonged desiccation in four species varying in resistance performance. We used respirometry for calculating respiratory gas exchange ratios, indicative of metabolic fuel utilization, and measured metabolic fuel contents in the scorpion hepatopancreas. We found that hydrated scorpions used a mixture of metabolic fuels (respiratory exchange rates, RER~0.9), but a shift towards carbohydrate catabolism was common during prolonged desiccation stress. Furthermore, the timing of metabolic shift to exclusive carbohydrate oxidation (RER not different from 1.0) was correlated with desiccation resistance of the respective studied species, suggesting triggering by alterations to hemolymph homeostasis.

  14. Glutathione-induced drought stress tolerance in mung bean: coordinated roles of the antioxidant defence and methylglyoxal detoxification systems

    PubMed Central

    Nahar, Kamrun; Hasanuzzaman, Mirza; Alam, Md. Mahabub; Fujita, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Drought is considered one of the most acute environmental stresses presently affecting agriculture. We studied the role of exogenous glutathione (GSH) in conferring drought stress tolerance in mung bean (Vigna radiata L. cv. Binamoog-1) seedlings by examining the antioxidant defence and methylglyoxal (MG) detoxification systems and physiological features. Six-day-old seedlings were exposed to drought stress (−0.7 MPa), induced by polyethylene glycol alone and in combination with GSH (1 mM) for 24 and 48 h. Drought stress decreased seedling dry weight and leaf area; resulted in oxidative stress as evidenced by histochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and O2⋅− in the leaves; increased lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde), reactive oxygen species like H2O2 content and O2⋅− generation rate and lipoxygenase activity; and increased the MG level. Drought decreased leaf succulence, leaf chlorophyll and relative water content (RWC); increased proline (Pro); decreased ascorbate (AsA); increased endogenous GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG) content; decreased the GSH/GSSG ratio; increased ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase activities; and decreased the activities of monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) and catalase. The activities of glyoxalase I (Gly I) and glyoxalase II (Gly II) increased due to drought stress. In contrast to drought stress alone, exogenous GSH enhanced most of the components of the antioxidant and glyoxalase systems in drought-affected mung bean seedlings at 24 h, but GSH did not significantly affect AsA, Pro, RWC, leaf succulence and the activities of Gly I and DHAR after 48 h of stress. Thus, exogenous GSH supplementation with drought significantly enhanced the antioxidant components and successively reduced oxidative damage, and GSH up-regulated the glyoxalase system and reduced MG toxicity, which played a significant role in improving the physiological features and drought

  15. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase: its role and regulation in macula densa cells.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Gergely; Komlósi, Péter; Fuson, Amanda; Peti-Peterdi, János; Rosivall, László; Bell, P Darwin

    2003-10-01

    Macula densa (MD) cells detect changes in distal tubular sodium chloride concentration ([NaCl](L)), at least in part, through an apical Na:2Cl:K co-transporter. This co-transporter may be a site for regulation of tubuloglomerular feedback (TGF), and recently angiotensin II (Ang II) was shown to regulate the MD Na:2Cl:K co-transporter. In addition, nitric oxide (NO) produced via neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) in MD cells attenuates MD-TGF signaling. This study investigated [NaCl](L)-dependent MD-NO production, the regulation of co-transporter activity by NO, and the possible interaction of NO with Ang II. MD cell Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)](i)) and NO production were measured using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate and 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorescein diacetate, respectively, using fluorescence microscopy. Na:2Cl:K co-transport activity was assessed as the initial rate of increase in [Na(+)](i) when [NaCl](L) was elevated from 25 to 150 mM. 10(-4) M 7-nitroindazole, a specific nNOS blocker, significantly increased by twofold the initial rate of rise in [Na(+)](i) when [NaCl](L) was increased from 25 to 150 mM, indicating co-transporter stimulation. There was no evidence for an interaction between the stimulatory effect of Ang II and the inhibitory effect of NO on co-transport activity, and, furthermore, Ang II failed to alter MD-NO production. NO production was sensitive to [NaCl](L) but increased only when [NaCl](L) was elevated from 60 to 150 mM. These studies indicate that MD-NO directly inhibits Na:2Cl:K co-transport and that NO and Ang II independently alter co-transporter activity. In addition, generation of MD-NO seems to occur only at markedly elevated [NaCl](L), suggesting that NO may serve as a buffer against high rates of MD cell transport and excessive TGF-mediated vasoconstriction.

  16. Knowing your friends and foes--plant receptor-like kinases as initiators of symbiosis or defence.

    PubMed

    Antolín-Llovera, Meritxell; Petutsching, Elena Kristin; Ried, Martina Katharina; Lipka, Volker; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Robatzek, Silke; Parniske, Martin

    2014-12-01

    The decision between defence and symbiosis signalling in plants involves alternative and modular plasma membrane-localized receptor complexes. A critical step in their activation is ligand-induced homo- or hetero-oligomerization of leucine-rich repeat (LRR)- and/or lysin motif (LysM) receptor-like kinases (RLKs). In defence signalling, receptor complexes form upon binding of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), including the bacterial flagellin-derived peptide flg22, or chitin. Similar mechanisms are likely to operate during the perception of microbial symbiont-derived (lipo)-chitooligosaccharides. The structurally related chitin-oligomer ligands chitooctaose and chitotetraose trigger defence and symbiosis signalling, respectively, and their discrimination involves closely related, if not identical, LysM-RLKs. This illustrates the demand for and the challenges imposed on decision mechanisms that ensure appropriate signal initiation. Appropriate signalling critically depends on abundance and localization of RLKs at the cell surface. This is regulated by internalization, which also provides a mechanism for the removal of activated signalling RLKs. Abundance of the malectin-like domain (MLD)-LRR-RLK Symbiosis Receptor-like Kinase (SYMRK) is additionally controlled by cleavage of its modular ectodomain, which generates a truncated and rapidly degraded RLK fragment. This review explores LRR- and LysM-mediated signalling, the involvement of MLD-LRR-RLKs in symbiosis and defence, and the role of endocytosis in RLK function.

  17. Antagonism between salicylic and abscisic acid reflects early host-pathogen conflict and moulds plant defence responses.

    PubMed

    de Torres Zabala, Marta; Bennett, Mark H; Truman, William H; Grant, Murray R

    2009-08-01

    The importance of phytohormone balance is increasingly recognized as central to the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions. Recently it has been demonstrated that abscisic acid signalling pathways are utilized by the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae to promote pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the dynamics, inter-relationship and impact of three key acidic phytohormones, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, and the bacterial virulence factor, coronatine, during progression of P. syringae infection of Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that levels of SA and ABA, but not JA, appear to play important early roles in determining the outcome of the infection process. SA is required in order to mount a full innate immune responses, while bacterial effectors act rapidly to activate ABA biosynthesis. ABA suppresses inducible innate immune responses by down-regulating SA biosynthesis and SA-mediated defences. Mutant analyses indicated that endogenous ABA levels represent an important reservoir that is necessary for effector suppression of plant-inducible innate defence responses and SA synthesis prior to subsequent pathogen-induced increases in ABA. Enhanced susceptibility due to loss of SA-mediated basal resistance is epistatically dominant over acquired resistance due to ABA deficiency, although ABA also contributes to symptom development. We conclude that pathogen-modulated ABA signalling rapidly antagonizes SA-mediated defences. We predict that hormonal perturbations, either induced or as a result of environmental stress, have a marked impact on pathological outcomes, and we provide a mechanistic basis for understanding priming events in plant defence.

  18. The emerging role of autophagy in plant pathogen attack and host defence.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nicholas J; Kershaw, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    Autophagy is emerging as an important process in plant infection by pathogenic fungi, which develop differentiated infection cells to breach the plant cuticle. Conversely, autophagic processes are also important in the defence responses of plants that are able to perceive and react to invading pathogens. The pivotal role of autophagy in both fungal pathogenesis and disease resistance is linked to its function in the regulation of programmed cell death which is a key component of plant immunity responses and fungal infection-related development.

  19. Blood cells of Drosophila: cell lineages and role in host defence.

    PubMed

    Meister, Marie

    2004-02-01

    Drosophila haemopoiesis gives rise to three independent cell lineages: plasmatocytes, crystal cells and lamellocytes. The regulation of Drosophila stem cell proliferation and lineage specification involves transactivators and signalling pathways, many of which have mammalian counterparts that control haemopoietic processes. Drosophila plasmatocytes are professional phagocytes that resemble the monocyte/macrophage lineage, crystal cells play a critical role in defence-related melanisation, and lamellocytes encapsulate large invaders. Crystal cells and lamellocytes have no clear mammalian homologues. Research into the molecular mechanisms that underlie the various immune functions of Drosophila blood cells, such as non-self recognition, is now taking wing.

  20. mTOR complex 1 signalling regulates the balance between lipid synthesis and oxidation in hypoxia lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Geng; Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-min

    2017-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to different environmental conditions and alter cellular metabolic pathways to meet the energy demand for survival. Thus, the metabolic regulation of cells under special conditions, such as hypoxia, should be precisely regulated. During the metabolic regulation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a vital role in the sensing of extracellular stimulations and regulating intracellular adaptations. Here, we report that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a central regulator of lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. In hypoxia, mTORC1 activity is reduced and shifts lipid synthesis to lipid oxidation. Moreover, knockdown tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) constitutively activates mTORC1 activity and impairs the hypoxia-induced metabolic shift. Therefore, TSC1 knockdown enhances hypoxia-induced cell death. Re-inactivation of mTORC1 activity via rapamycin may resist hypoxia-induced cell death in TSC1 knockdown lymphocytes. Our findings provide a deep insight into mTORC1 in the metabolic balance of lipid synthesis and oxidation, and imply that mTORC1 activity should be precisely regulated for the lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. PMID:28057888

  1. mTOR complex 1 signalling regulates the balance between lipid synthesis and oxidation in hypoxia lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Liang, Yan; Wang, Ying; Yang, Yuan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-Min; Xie, Qi-Bing

    2017-02-28

    Mammalian cells adapt to different environmental conditions and alter cellular metabolic pathways to meet the energy demand for survival. Thus, the metabolic regulation of cells under special conditions, such as hypoxia, should be precisely regulated. During the metabolic regulation, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a vital role in the sensing of extracellular stimulations and regulating intracellular adaptations. Here, we report that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) signalling is a central regulator of lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes. In hypoxia, mTORC1 activity is reduced and shifts lipid synthesis to lipid oxidation. Moreover, knockdown tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) constitutively activates mTORC1 activity and impairs the hypoxia-induced metabolic shift. Therefore, TSC1 knockdown enhances hypoxia-induced cell death. Re-inactivation of mTORC1 activity via rapamycin may resist hypoxia-induced cell death in TSC1 knockdown lymphocytes. Our findings provide a deep insight into mTORC1 in the metabolic balance of lipid synthesis and oxidation, and imply that mTORC1 activity should be precisely regulated for the lipid homoeostasis in lymphocytes.

  2. AsrR is an oxidative stress sensing regulator modulating Enterococcus faecium opportunistic traits, antimicrobial resistance, and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lebreton, François; van Schaik, Willem; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; Le Bras, Florian; Verneuil, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinglin; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Willems, Rob J L; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress serves as an important host/environmental signal that triggers a wide range of responses in microorganisms. Here, we identified an oxidative stress sensor and response regulator in the important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium belonging to the MarR family and called AsrR (antibiotic and stress response regulator). The AsrR regulator used cysteine oxidation to sense the hydrogen peroxide which results in its dissociation to promoter DNA. Transcriptome analysis showed that the AsrR regulon was composed of 181 genes, including representing functionally diverse groups involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide resistance, oxidative stress, and adaptive responses. Consistent with the upregulated expression of the pbp5 gene, encoding a low-affinity penicillin-binding protein, the asrR null mutant was found to be more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of asrR markedly decreased the bactericidal activity of ampicillin and vancomycin, which are both commonly used to treat infections due to enterococci, and also led to over-expression of two major adhesins, acm and ecbA, which resulted in enhanced in vitro adhesion to human intestinal cells. Additional pathogenic traits were also reinforced in the asrR null mutant including greater capacity than the parental strain to form biofilm in vitro and greater persistance in Galleria mellonella colonization and mouse systemic infection models. Despite overexpression of oxidative stress-response genes, deletion of asrR was associated with a decreased oxidative stress resistance in vitro, which correlated with a reduced resistance to phagocytic killing by murine macrophages. Interestingly, both strains showed similar amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Finally, we observed a mutator phenotype and enhanced DNA transfer frequencies in the asrR deleted strain. These data indicate that AsrR plays a major role in antimicrobial resistance and

  3. AsrR Is an Oxidative Stress Sensing Regulator Modulating Enterococcus faecium Opportunistic Traits, Antimicrobial Resistance, and Pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lebreton, François; van Schaik, Willem; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Posteraro, Brunella; Torelli, Riccardo; Le Bras, Florian; Verneuil, Nicolas; Zhang, Xinglin; Giard, Jean-Christophe; Dhalluin, Anne; Willems, Rob J. L.; Leclercq, Roland; Cattoir, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress serves as an important host/environmental signal that triggers a wide range of responses in microorganisms. Here, we identified an oxidative stress sensor and response regulator in the important multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen Enterococcus faecium belonging to the MarR family and called AsrR (antibiotic and stress response regulator). The AsrR regulator used cysteine oxidation to sense the hydrogen peroxide which results in its dissociation to promoter DNA. Transcriptome analysis showed that the AsrR regulon was composed of 181 genes, including representing functionally diverse groups involved in pathogenesis, antibiotic and antimicrobial peptide resistance, oxidative stress, and adaptive responses. Consistent with the upregulated expression of the pbp5 gene, encoding a low-affinity penicillin-binding protein, the asrR null mutant was found to be more resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Deletion of asrR markedly decreased the bactericidal activity of ampicillin and vancomycin, which are both commonly used to treat infections due to enterococci, and also led to over-expression of two major adhesins, acm and ecbA, which resulted in enhanced in vitro adhesion to human intestinal cells. Additional pathogenic traits were also reinforced in the asrR null mutant including greater capacity than the parental strain to form biofilm in vitro and greater persistance in Galleria mellonella colonization and mouse systemic infection models. Despite overexpression of oxidative stress-response genes, deletion of asrR was associated with a decreased oxidative stress resistance in vitro, which correlated with a reduced resistance to phagocytic killing by murine macrophages. Interestingly, both strains showed similar amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Finally, we observed a mutator phenotype and enhanced DNA transfer frequencies in the asrR deleted strain. These data indicate that AsrR plays a major role in antimicrobial resistance and

  4. Endothelial surface glycocalyx can regulate flow-induced nitric oxide production in microvessels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yen, Wanyi; Cai, Bin; Yang, Jinlin; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min; Tarbell, John M; Fu, Bingmei M

    2015-01-01

    Due to its unique location, the endothelial surface glycocalyx (ESG) at the luminal side of the microvessel wall may serve as a mechano-sensor and transducer of blood flow and thus regulate endothelial functions. To examine this role of the ESG, we used fluorescence microscopy to measure nitric oxide (NO) production in post-capillary venules and arterioles of rat mesentery under reduced (low) and normal (high) flow conditions, with and without enzyme pretreatment to remove heparan sulfate (HS) of the ESG and in the presence of an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) inhibitor, NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA). Rats (SD, 250-300 g) were anesthetized. The mesentery was gently taken out from the abdominal cavity and arranged on the surface of a glass coverslip for the measurement. An individual post-capillary venule or arteriole was cannulated and loaded for 45 min with 5 μM 4, 5-Diaminofluorescein diacetate, a membrane permeable fluorescent indictor for NO, then the NO production was measured for ~10 min under a low flow (~300 μm/s) and for ~60 min under a high flow (~1000 μm/s). In the 15 min after switching to the high flow, DAF-2-NO fluorescence intensity increased to 1.27-fold of its baseline, DAF-2-NO continuously increased under the high flow, to 1.53-fold of its baseline in 60 min. Inhibition of eNOS by 1 mM L-NMMA attenuated the flow-induced NO production to 1.13-fold in 15 min and 1.30-fold of its baseline in 60 min, respectively. In contrast, no significant increase in NO production was observed after switching to the high flow for 60 min when 1 h pretreatment with 50 mU/mL heparanase III to degrade the ESG was applied. Similar NO production was observed in arterioles under low and high flows and under eNOS inhibition. Our results suggest that ESG participates in endothelial cell mechanosensing and transduction through its heparan sulfate to activate eNOS.

  5. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP).

    PubMed

    Basak, Souvik; Jiang, Rongrong

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP), which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3) were identified with improved tolerance via H(2)O(2) enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2)O(2) with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1), whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2)O(2) concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2)O(2) treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold), but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold). qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE) could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli.

  6. Evaluating arguments during instigations of defence motivation and accuracy motivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Hong

    2017-05-01

    When people evaluate the strength of an argument, their motivations are likely to influence the evaluation. However, few studies have specifically investigated the influences of motivational factors on argument evaluation. This study examined the effects of defence and accuracy motivations on argument evaluation. According to the compatibility between the advocated positions of arguments and participants' prior beliefs and the objective strength of arguments, participants evaluated four types of arguments: compatible-strong, compatible-weak, incompatible-strong, and incompatible-weak arguments. Experiment 1 revealed that participants possessing a high defence motivation rated compatible-weak arguments as stronger and incompatible-strong ones as weaker than participants possessing a low defence motivation. However, the strength ratings between the high and low defence groups regarding both compatible-strong and incompatible-weak arguments were similar. Experiment 2 revealed that when participants possessed a high accuracy motivation, they rated compatible-weak arguments as weaker and incompatible-strong ones as stronger than when they possessed a low accuracy motivation. However, participants' ratings on both compatible-strong and incompatible-weak arguments were similar when comparing high and low accuracy conditions. The results suggest that defence and accuracy motivations are two major motives influencing argument evaluation. However, they primarily influence the evaluation results for compatible-weak and incompatible-strong arguments, but not for compatible-strong and incompatible-weak arguments.

  7. Defence and Security Research Coexistence, Coherence, and Convergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breant, Christian; Karock, Ulrich

    Defence and security research have coexisted at the European Union level since the inception of the European Defence Agency (EDA). The agency was established under a Joint Action of the Council of Ministers on 12 July 2004, "to support the Member States and the Council in their effort to improve European defence capabilities in the field of crisis management and to sustain the European Security and Defence Policy as it stands now and develops in the future".1 The political decision to create the EDA was taken at the Thessaloniki European Council on 19 and 20 June 2003. Heads of State or Government tasked the Council bodies to undertake the requisite actions, in the course of 2004, to create an intergovernmental agency in the field of defence capabilities development, research, acquisition and armaments. The EDA has been located in Brussels right from the start. It is an intergovernmental EU agency under the Council's authority within the single institutional framework of the Union. It performs its mission in close cooperation with its participating Member States (pMS) and the European institutional actors.

  8. Serine 1179 Phosphorylation of Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Increases Superoxide Generation and Alters Cofactor Regulation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Zhuang, Yugang; Harbeck, Mark C; He, Donghong; Xie, Lishi; Chen, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is responsible for maintaining systemic blood pressure, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis. In addition to producing NO, eNOS can also generate superoxide (O2-.) in the absence of the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). Previous studies have shown that bovine eNOS serine 1179 (Serine 1177/human) phosphorylation critically modulates NO synthesis. However, the effect of serine 1179 phosphorylation on eNOS superoxide generation is unknown. Here, we used the phosphomimetic form of eNOS (S1179D) to determine the effect of S1179 phosphorylation on superoxide generating activity, and its sensitivity to regulation by BH4, Ca2+, and calmodulin (CAM). S1179D eNOS exhibited significantly increased superoxide generating activity and NADPH consumption compared to wild-type eNOS (WT eNOS). The superoxide generating activities of S1179D eNOS and WT eNOS did not differ significantly in their sensitivity to regulation by either Ca2+ or CaM. The sensitivity of the superoxide generating activity of S1179D eNOS to inhibition by BH4 was significantly reduced compared to WT eNOS. In eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells, BH4 depletion with 10mM DAHP for 48 hours followed by 50ng/ml VEGF for 30 min to phosphorylate eNOS S1179 increased ROS accumulation compared to DAHP-only treated cells. Meanwhile, MTT assay indicated that overexpression of eNOS in HEK293 cells decreased cellular viability compared to control cells at BH4 depletion condition (P<0.01). VEGF-mediated Serine 1179 phosphorylation further decreased the cellular viability in eNOS-overexpressing 293 cells (P<0.01). Our data demonstrate that eNOS serine 1179 phosphorylation, in addition to enhancing NO production, also profoundly affects superoxide generation: S1179 phosphorylation increases superoxide production while decreasing sensitivity to the inhibitory effect of BH4 on this activity.

  9. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification

    PubMed Central

    Giguere, Andrew T.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi. We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi. Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable. PMID:27795404

  10. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, Brett L; Giguere, Andrew T; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2016-10-25

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable.

  11. Cytokines, prostaglandins and nitric oxide in the regulation of stress-response systems.

    PubMed

    Gądek-Michalska, Anna; Tadeusz, Joanna; Rachwalska, Paulina; Bugajski, Jan

    2013-01-01

    pituitary. NO also participates in signal transduction pathways that result in the release of corticosterone from the adrenal gland. NO participates in multiple interactions between neuroendocrine and neuroimmune systems in physiological and pathological processes. Neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) modulates learning and memory and is involved in development of neuropsychiatric diseases, including depression. Nitric oxide generated in response to stress exposure is associated with depression-like and anxiety-like behaviors. In the central nervous system (CNS), prostaglandins (PG) generated by the cyclooxygenase (COX) enzyme are involved in the regulation of HPA axis activity. Prior exposure to chronic stress alters constitutive (COX-1) and inducible (COX-2) cyclooxygenase responses to homotypic stress differently in the PFC, hippocampus and hypothalamus. Both PG and NO generated within the PVN participate in this modulation. Acute stress affects the functionality of COX/PG and NOS/NO systems in brain structures. The complex responses of central and peripheral pathways to acute and chronic stress involve cytokines, NO and PG systems that regulate and turn off responses that would be potentially harmful for cellular homeostasis and overall health.

  12. Nitric oxide in the regulation of the sleep-wake states.

    PubMed

    Cespuglio, Raymond; Amrouni, Donia; Meiller, Anne; Buguet, Alain; Gautier-Sauvigné, Sabine

    2012-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production involves four different NO-synthases (NOSs) that are either constitutive (neuronal, nNOS; endothelial, eNOS; mitochondrial, mNOS) or inducible (iNOS) in nature. Three main processes regulate NO/NOSs output, i.e., the L-arginine/arginase substrate-competing system, the L-citrulline/arginosuccinate-recycling system and the asymmetric dimethyl-/monomethyl-L-arginine-inhibiting system. In adult animals, nNOS exhibits a dense innervation intermingled with pontine sleep structures. It is well established that the NO/nNOS production makes a key contribution to daily homeostatic sleep (slow-wave sleep, SWS; rapid eye movement sleep, REM sleep). In the basal hypothalamus, the NO/nNOS production further contributes to the REM sleep rebound that takes place after a sleep deprivation (SD). This production may also contribute to the sleep rebound that is associated with an immobilization stress (IS). In adult animals, throughout the SD time-course, an additional NO/iNOS production takes place in neurons. Such production mediates a transitory SD-related SWS rebound. A transitory NO/iNOS production is also part of the immune system. Such a production contributes to the SWS increase that accompanies inflammatory events and is ensured by microglial cells and astrocytes. Finally, with aging, the iNOS expression becomes permanent and the corresponding NO/iNOS production is important to ensure an adequate maintenance of REM sleep and, to a lesser extent, SWS. Despite such maintenance, aged animals, however, are not able to elicit a sleep rebound to deal with the challenge of SD or IS. Sleep regulatory processes in adult animals thus become impaired with age. Reduced iNOS expression during aging may contribute to accelerated senescence, as observed in senescence-accelerated mice (SAMP-8 mice).

  13. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones

    PubMed Central

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3- fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3- resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs. PMID:26834770

  14. Nitric Oxide-Mediated Maize Root Apex Responses to Nitrate are Regulated by Auxin and Strigolactones.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Alessandro; Trevisan, Sara; Voigt, Boris; Yokawa, Ken; Baluška, František; Quaggiotti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3 (-)) is a key element for crop production but its levels in agricultural soils are limited. Plants have developed mechanisms to cope with these NO3 (-) fluctuations based on sensing nitrate at the root apex. Particularly, the transition zone (TZ) of root apex has been suggested as a signaling-response zone. This study dissects cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying NO3 (-) resupply effects on primary root (PR) growth in maize, confirming nitric oxide (NO) as a putative modulator. Nitrate restoration induced PR elongation within the first 2 h, corresponding to a stimulation of cell elongation at the basal border of the TZ. Xyloglucans (XGs) immunolocalization together with Brefeldin A applications demonstrated that nitrate resupply induces XG accumulation. This effect was blocked by cPTIO (NO scavenger). Transcriptional analysis of ZmXET1 confirmed the stimulatory effect of nitrate on XGs accumulation in cells of the TZ. Immunolocalization analyses revealed a positive effect of nitrate resupply on auxin and PIN1 accumulation, but a transcriptional regulation of auxin biosynthesis/transport/signaling genes was excluded. Short-term nitrate treatment repressed the transcription of genes involved in strigolactones (SLs) biosynthesis and transport, mainly in the TZ. Enhancement of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs) transcription in presence of cPTIO indicated endogenous NO as a negative modulator of CCDs activity. Finally, treatment with the SLs-biosynthesis inhibitor (TIS108) restored the root growth in the nitrate-starved seedlings. Present report suggests that the NO-mediated root apex responses to nitrate are accomplished in cells of the TZ via integrative actions of auxin, NO and SLs.

  15. Nitric oxide regulation of leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase activity: implication in sorghum responses to salinity.

    PubMed

    Monreal, José A; Arias-Baldrich, Cirenia; Tossi, Vanesa; Feria, Ana B; Rubio-Casal, Alfredo; García-Mata, Carlos; Lamattina, Lorenzo; García-Mauriño, Sofía

    2013-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a signaling molecule that mediates many plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses, including salt stress. Interestingly, salinity increases NO production selectively in mesophyll cells of sorghum leaves, where photosynthetic C₄ phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (C₄ PEPCase) is located. PEPCase is regulated by a phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase-kinase (PEPCase-k), which levels are greatly enhanced by salinity in sorghum. This work investigated whether NO is involved in this effect. NO donors (SNP, SNAP), the inhibitor of NO synthesis NNA, and the NO scavenger cPTIO were used for long- and short-term treatments. Long-term treatments had multifaceted consequences on both PPCK gene expression and PEPCase-k activity, and they also decreased photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and plant growth. Nonetheless, it could be observed that SNP increased PEPCase-k activity, resembling salinity effect. Short-term treatments with NO donors, which did not change photosynthetic gas-exchange parameters and PPCK gene expression, increased PEPCase-k activity both in illuminated leaves and in leaves kept at dark. At least in part, these effects were independent on protein synthesis. PEPCase-k activity was not decreased by short-term treatment with cycloheximide in NaCl-treated plants; on the contrary, it was decreased by cPTIO. In summary, NO donors mimicked salt effect on PEPCase-k activity, and scavenging of NO abolished it. Collectively, these results indicate that NO is involved in the complex control of PEPCase-k activity, and it may mediate some of the plant responses to salinity.

  16. Vasoinhibins regulate the inner and outer blood-retinal barrier and limit retinal oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo Zamarripa, David; Díaz-Lezama, Nundehui; Meléndez García, Rodrigo; Chávez Balderas, Jesús; Adán, Norma; Ledesma-Colunga, Maria G.; Arnold, Edith; Clapp, Carmen; Thebault, Stéphanie

    2014-01-01

    Vasoinhibins are prolactin fragments present in the retina, where they have been shown to prevent the hypervasopermeability associated with diabetes. Enhanced bradykinin (BK) production contributes to the increased transport through the blood-retina barrier (BRB) in diabetes. Here, we studied if vasoinhibins regulate BRB permeability by targeting the vascular endothelium and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) components of this barrier. Intravitreal injection of BK in male rats increased BRB permeability. Vasoinhibins prevented this effect, as did the B2 receptor antagonist Hoe-140. BK induced a transient decrease in mouse retinal and brain capillary endothelial monolayer resistance that was blocked by vasoinhibins. Both vasoinhibins and the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor L-NAME, but not the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), blocked the transient decrease in bovine umbilical vein endothelial cell (BUVEC) monolayer resistance induced by BK; this block was reversed by the NO donor DETANONOate. Vasoinhibins also prevented the BK-induced actin cytoskeleton redistribution, as did L-NAME. BK transiently decreased human RPE (ARPE-19) cell monolayer resistance, and this effect was blocked by vasoinhibins, L-NAME, and NAC. DETANONOate reverted the blocking effect of vasoinhibins. Similar to BK, the radical initiator Luperox induced a reduction in ARPE-19 cell monolayer resistance, which was prevented by vasoinhibins. These effects on RPE resistance coincided with actin cytoskeleton redistribution. Intravitreal injection of vasoinhibins reduced the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in retinas of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats, particularly in the RPE and capillary-containing layers. Thus, vasoinhibins reduce BRB permeability by targeting both its main inner and outer components through NO- and ROS-dependent pathways, offering potential treatment strategies against diabetic retinopathies. PMID:25368550

  17. RIP1 maintains DNA integrity and cell proliferation by regulating PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Wang, Q; Bai, L; Chen, W; Wang, X; Tellez, C S; Leng, S; Padilla, M T; Nyunoya, T; Belinsky, S A; Lin, Y

    2014-07-01

    Aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect contributes to cancer cell proliferation; however, how this glucose metabolism pathway is precisely regulated remains elusive. Here we show that receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1), a cell death and survival signaling factor, regulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis. Loss of RIP1 in lung cancer cells suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression, impairing mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and accelerating glycolysis, resulting in spontaneous DNA damage and p53-mediated cell proliferation inhibition. Thus, although aerobic glycolysis within a certain range favors cancer cell proliferation, excessive glycolysis causes cytostasis. Our data suggest that maintenance of glycolysis by RIP1 is pivotal to cancer cell energy homeostasis and DNA integrity and may be exploited for use in anticancer therapy.

  18. RIP1 maintains DNA integrity and cell proliferation by regulating PGC-1α-mediated mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, W; Wang, Q; Bai, L; Chen, W; Wang, X; Tellez, C S; Leng, S; Padilla, M T; Nyunoya, T; Belinsky, S A; Lin, Y

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect contributes to cancer cell proliferation; however, how this glucose metabolism pathway is precisely regulated remains elusive. Here we show that receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1), a cell death and survival signaling factor, regulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and aerobic glycolysis. Loss of RIP1 in lung cancer cells suppressed peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) expression, impairing mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and accelerating glycolysis, resulting in spontaneous DNA damage and p53-mediated cell proliferation inhibition. Thus, although aerobic glycolysis within a certain range favors cancer cell proliferation, excessive glycolysis causes cytostasis. Our data suggest that maintenance of glycolysis by RIP1 is pivotal to cancer cell energy homeostasis and DNA integrity and may be exploited for use in anticancer therapy. PMID:24583643

  19. Anti-carcinogenic action of ellagic acid mediated via modulation of oxidative stress regulated genes in Dalton lymphoma bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sudha; Vinayak, Manjula

    2011-11-01

    An elevated level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a cancerous condition causes oxidative stress which in turn activates a number of genes, and therefore an interruption in the oxidative microenvironment should be able to inactivate these genes, contributing to cancer prevention. The present work was designed to evaluate the role of ellagic acid in the modulation of protein kinase Cα (PKCα) activity and expression and its correlation with the oncogene, c-Myc, and tumor suppressor gene, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1), in lymphoma bearing mice. We also evaluated its implication for cell viability. Our results show that ellagic acid leads to down-regulation of the expression and activity of PKCα via decreasing the oxidative stress, measured in terms of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation. It also reduces c-Myc expression and improves TGF-β1 expression besides decreasing cell viability in Dalton lymphoma bearing mice, which supports its anti-carcinogenic action.

  20. Regulation of fatty acid oxidation in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes during maturation and modulation by PPAR agonists.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Kylie R; Anastasi, Marie R; Zhang, Voueleng J; Russell, Darryl L; Robker, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid oxidation is an important energy source for the oocyte; however, little is known about how this metabolic pathway is regulated in cumulus-oocyte complexes. Analysis of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation showed that many are regulated by the luteinizing hormone surge during in vivo maturation, including acyl-CoA synthetases, carnitine transporters, acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and acetyl-CoA transferase, but that many are dysregulated when cumulus-oocyte complexes are matured under in vitro maturation conditions using follicle stimulating hormone and epidermal growth factor. Fatty acid oxidation, measured as production of ³H₂O from [³H]palmitic acid, occurs in mouse cumulus-oocyte complexes in response to the luteinizing hormone surge but is significantly reduced in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vitro. Thus we sought to determine whether fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes could be modulated during in vitro maturation by lipid metabolism regulators, namely peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) agonists bezafibrate and rosiglitazone. Bezafibrate showed no effect with increasing dose, while rosiglitazone dose dependently inhibited fatty acid oxidation in cumulus-oocyte complexes during in vitro maturation. To determine the impact of rosiglitazone on oocyte developmental competence, cumulus-oocyte complexes were treated with rosiglitazone during in vitro maturation and gene expression, oocyte mitochondrial activity and embryo development following in vitro fertilization were assessed. Rosiglitazone restored Acsl1, Cpt1b and Acaa2 levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes and increased oocyte mitochondrial membrane potential yet resulted in significantly fewer embryos reaching the morula and hatching blastocyst stages. Thus fatty acid oxidation is increased in cumulus-oocyte complexes matured in vivo and deficient during in vitro maturation, a known model of poor oocyte quality. That rosiglitazone further decreased fatty acid

  1. An ethanol extract of Piper betle Linn. mediates its anti-inflammatory activity via down-regulation of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sudipto; Mula, Soumyaditya; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Chatterjee, Mitali

    2007-05-01

    The leaves of Piper betle (locally known as Paan) have long been in use in the Indian indigenous system of medicine for the relief of pain; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms of this effect have not been elucidated. The anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of an ethanolic extract of the leaves of P. betle (100 mg kg(-1); PB) were demonstrated in a complete Freund's adjuvant-induced model of arthritis in rats with dexamethasone (0.1 mg kg(-1)) as the positive control. At non-toxic concentrations of PB (5-25 microg mL(-1)), a dose-dependent decrease in extracellular production of nitric oxide in murine peritoneal macrophages was measured by the Griess assay and corroborated by flow cytometry using the nitric oxide specific probe, 4,5-diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate. This decreased generation of reactive nitrogen species was mediated by PB progressively down-regulating transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages, and concomitantly causing a dose-dependent decrease in the expression of interleukin-12 p40, indicating the ability of PB to down-regulate T-helper 1 pro-inflammatory responses. Taken together, the anti-inflammatory and anti-arthrotic activity of PB is attributable to its ability to down-regulate the generation of reactive nitrogen species, thus meriting further pharmacological investigation.

  2. [Autowave mode of functioning of the system nitric oxide + free iron + thiols may ensure the regulation of biological action of nitric oxide and its endogenic compounds].

    PubMed

    Vanin, A F

    2006-01-01

    It has been shown earlier that, in a system NO + Fe2+ + thiols in aqueous solution, an oscillatory mode of changes with time in the concentration of paramagnetic dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing legends and S-nitrosothiols formed in this system and in the concentration of free iron (not included into dinitrosyl iron complexes) can be realized. It is assumed that, in this system, autowaves can arise, which ensure periodic changes with time and space in the concentration of the system constituents. These changes may underlie the regulation of the physiologic effect of nitric oxide, dinitrosyl iron complexes, and S-nitrosothiols as agents affecting various intracellular and tissue targets.

  3. Plant defence as a complex and changing phenotype throughout ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa-López, Sofía; Villamil, Nora; Zedillo-Avelleyra, Paulina; Boege, Karina

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Ontogenetic changes in anti-herbivore defences are common and result from variation in resource availability and herbivore damage throughout plant development. However, little is known about the simultaneous changes of multiple defences across the entire development of plants, and how such changes affect plant damage in the field. The aim of this study was to assess if changes in the major types of plant resistance and tolerance can explain natural herbivore damage throughout plant ontogeny. Methods An assessment was made of how six defensive traits, including physical, chemical and biotic resistance, simultaneously change across the major transitions of plant development, from seedlings to reproductive stages of Turnera velutina growing in the greenhouse. In addition, an experiment was performed to assess how plant tolerance to artificial damage to leaves changed throughout ontogeny. Finally, leaf damage by herbivores was evaluated in a natural population. Key Results The observed ontogenetic trajectories of all defences were significantly different, sometimes showing opposite directions of change. Whereas trichome density, leaf toughness, extrafloral nectary abundance and nectar production increased, hydrogen cyanide and compensatory responses decreased throughout plant development, from seedlings to reproductive plants. Only water content was higher at the intermediate juvenile ontogenetic stages. Surveys in a natural population over 3 years showed that herbivores consumed more tissue from juvenile plants than from younger seedlings or older reproductive plants. This is consistent with the fact that juvenile plants were the least defended stage. Conclusions The results suggest that defensive trajectories are a mixed result of predictions by the Optimal Defence Theory and the Growth–Differentiation Balance Hypothesis. The study emphasizes the importance of incorporating multiple defences and plant ontogeny into further studies for a more

  4. Nitric oxide enhances plant ultraviolet-B protection up-regulating gene expression of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway.

    PubMed

    Tossi, Vanesa; Amenta, Melina; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Cassia, Raúl

    2011-06-01

    The link between ultraviolet (UV)-B, nitric oxide (NO) and phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway (PPBP) was studied in maize and Arabidopsis. The transcription factor (TF) ZmP regulates PPBP in maize. A genetic approach using P-rr (ZmP+) and P-ww (ZmP⁻) maize lines demonstrate that: (1) NO protects P-rr leaves but not P-ww from UV-B-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell damage; (2) NO increases flavonoid and anthocyanin content and prevents chlorophyll loss in P-rr but not in P-ww and (3) the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO) blocks the UV-B-induced expression of ZmP and their targets CHS and CHI suggesting that NO plays a key role in the UV-B-regulated PPBP. Involvement of endogenous NO was studied in Arabidopsis nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) plants that express a NO dioxygenase gene under the control of a dexamethasone (DEX)-inducible promoter. Expression of HY5 and MYB12, TFs involved in PPBP regulation, was induced by UV-B, reduced by DEX in NOD plants and recovered by subsequent NO treatment. C4H regulates synapate esters synthesis and is UV-B-induced in a NO-independent pathway. Data indicate that UV-B perception increases NO concentration, which protects plant against UV-B by two ways: (1) scavenging ROS; and (2) up-regulating the expression of HY5, MYB12 and ZmP, resulting in the PPBP activation.

  5. Oxidative stress regulated genes in nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells: correlation with the known pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Myung S; Chun, Hong S; Son, Jessica J; DeGiorgio, Lorraine A; Kim, Dae J; Peng, Chu; Son, Jin H

    2003-01-31

    Oxidative stress (OS) is a primary pathogenic mechanism of nigral dopaminergic (DA) cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative damage, Lewy body formation and decreased mitochondrial complex I activity are the consistent pathological findings in PD. In nigral DA neurons, however, it is unknown whether any gene expressional changes induced by OS contribute to the typical PD pathology. Here, using microarray analysis, we identified several groups of genes in the nigral DA cell line, SN4741 [J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 10; J. Neurochem. 76 (2001) 1010], that were regulated by OS. Approximately 36 significantly regulated genes that encode functional molecules of nuclear subunits of mitochondrial complex I, exocytosis and membrane trafficking proteins, markers for OS and oxidoreductases, regulatory molecules of apoptosis and unidentified EST clones were further analysed. OS modulated the expression of specific genes, of which physiological dysfunctions have been implicated in PD. For instance, the expression of the nuclear-encoded subunits of mitochondrial complex I, B8 and B17, were significantly down-regulated by OS, possibly contributing to selective defect in mitochondrial complex I activity in PD. Furthermore, syntaxin 8 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) are most dramatically up-regulated by OS in DA cells. Syntaxin 8 is a SNARE protein, regulating lipid vesicle docking and fusion as well as early endosome membrane recycling. Lipid membranes are significantly oxidative-damaged in PD. HO-1 is an important cytoplasmic constituent of Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of idiopathic PD. Thus, our findings provide novel molecular probes that may be useful in unraveling the molecular mechanism(s) of OS-induced pathogenesis in PD. Further functional characterization of the affected genes including ESTs can help elucidate the underlying molecular pathology as well as develop biomarkers for monitoring degenerating DA neurons in PD.

  6. Glial cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M.; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M.; Pavan, William J.; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A.; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers1. ILC3 development has been considered to be programmed1. Nevertheless, how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a novel glial-ILC3-epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate II22, downstream of p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Strikingly, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic factor expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88 dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired ILC3-derived IL-22 and pronounced propensity to gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light into a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing glial cells as central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation via neurotrophic factor signals. PMID:27409807

  7. Glial-cell-derived neuroregulators control type 3 innate lymphoid cells and gut defence.

    PubMed

    Ibiza, Sales; García-Cassani, Bethania; Ribeiro, Hélder; Carvalho, Tânia; Almeida, Luís; Marques, Rute; Misic, Ana M; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Larson, Denise M; Pavan, William J; Eberl, Gérard; Grice, Elizabeth A; Veiga-Fernandes, Henrique

    2016-07-21

    Group 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3) are major regulators of inflammation and infection at mucosal barriers. ILC3 development is thought to be programmed, but how ILC3 perceive, integrate and respond to local environmental signals remains unclear. Here we show that ILC3 in mice sense their environment and control gut defence as part of a glial–ILC3–epithelial cell unit orchestrated by neurotrophic factors. We found that enteric ILC3 express the neuroregulatory receptor RET. ILC3-autonomous Ret ablation led to decreased innate interleukin-22 (IL-22), impaired epithelial reactivity, dysbiosis and increased susceptibility to bowel inflammation and infection. Neurotrophic factors directly controlled innate Il22 downstream of the p38 MAPK/ERK-AKT cascade and STAT3 activation. Notably, ILC3 were adjacent to neurotrophic-factor-expressing glial cells that exhibited stellate-shaped projections into ILC3 aggregates. Glial cells sensed microenvironmental cues in a MYD88-dependent manner to control neurotrophic factors and innate IL-22. Accordingly, glial-intrinsic Myd88 deletion led to impaired production of ILC3-derived IL-22 and a pronounced propensity towards gut inflammation and infection. Our work sheds light on a novel multi-tissue defence unit, revealing that glial cells are central hubs of neuron and innate immune regulation by neurotrophic factor signals.

  8. HDAC2 selectively regulates FOXO3a-mediated gene transcription during oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death.

    PubMed

    Peng, Shengyi; Zhao, Siqi; Yan, Feng; Cheng, Jinbo; Huang, Li; Chen, Hong; Liu, Qingsong; Ji, Xunming; Yuan, Zengqiang

    2015-01-21

    All neurodegenerative diseases are associated with oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) is a key transcription factor involved in neuronal apoptosis. However, how FOXO3a forms complexes and functions in oxidative stress processing remains largely unknown. In the present study, we show that histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) forms a physical complex with FOXO3a, which plays an important role in FOXO3a-dependent gene transcription and oxidative stress-induced mouse cerebellar granule neuron (CGN) apoptosis. Interestingly, we also found that HDAC2 became selectively enriched in the promoter region of the p21 gene, but not those of other target genes, and inhibited FOXO3a-mediated p21 transcription. Furthermore, we found that oxidative stress reduced the interaction between FOXO3a and HDAC2, leading to an increased histone H4K16 acetylation level in the p21 promoter region and upregulated p21 expression in a manner independent of p53 or E2F1. Phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 is important for the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction, and we found that cerebral ischemia/reperfusion reduced phosphorylation of HDAC2 at Ser 394 and mitigated the HDAC2-FOXO3a interaction in mouse brain tissue. Our study reveals the novel regulation of FOXO3a-mediated selective gene transcription via epigenetic modification in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death, which could be exploited therapeutically.

  9. Regulation of apoptosis by vitamin C. Specific protection of the apoptotic machinery against exposure to chlorinated oxidants.

    PubMed

    Vissers, M C; Lee, W G; Hampton, M B

    2001-12-14

    We have investigated the ability of intracellular vitamin C to protect human umbilical vein endothelial cells from exposure to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and a range of derived chloramines. Ascorbate provided minimal protection against the cytotoxicity induced by these oxidants, as measured by propidium iodide uptake. In contrast, there was a marked effect on apoptosis, monitored by caspase-3 activation and phosphatidylserine exposure. Extended incubation of the cells with glycine chloramine or histamine chloramine completely blocked apoptosis initiated in the cells by serum withdrawal. This effect was significantly abrogated by ascorbate. Inhibition of apoptosis required the oxidant to be present for an extended period after serum withdrawal and occurred prior to caspase-3 activation. General protection of thiols by ascorbate was not responsible for the protection of apoptosis, because intracellular oxidation by HOCl or chloramines was not prevented in supplemented cells. The results suggest a new role for vitamin C in the regulation of apoptosis. We propose that, by protection of an oxidant-sensitive step in the initiation phase, ascorbate allows apoptosis to proceed in endothelial cells under sustained oxidative stress.

  10. Hypochlorous acid generated by neutrophils inactivates ADAMTS13: an oxidative mechanism for regulating ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Chen, Junmei; Ling, Minhua; López, José A; Chung, Dominic W; Fu, Xiaoyun

    2015-01-16

    ADAMTS13 is a plasma metalloproteinase that cleaves large multimeric forms of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to smaller, less adhesive forms. ADAMTS13 activity is reduced in systemic inflammatory syndromes, but the cause is unknown. Here, we examined whether neutrophil-derived oxidants can regulate ADAMTS13 activity. We exposed ADAMTS13 to hypochlorous acid (HOCl), produced by a myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl(-) system, and determined its residual proteolytic activity using both a VWF A2 peptide substrate and multimeric plasma VWF. Treatment with 25 nm myeloperoxidase plus 50 μm H2O2 reduced ADAMTS13 activity by >85%. Using mass spectrometry, we demonstrated that Met(249), Met(331), and Met(496) in important functional domains of ADAMTS13 were oxidized to methionine sulfoxide in an HOCl concentration-dependent manner. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with the extent of oxidation of these residues. These Met residues were also oxidized in ADAMTS13 exposed to activated human neutrophils, accompanied by reduced enzyme activity. ADAMTS13 treated with either neutrophil elastase or plasmin was inhibited to a lesser extent, especially in the presence of plasma. These observations suggest that oxidation could be an important mechanism for ADAMTS13 inactivation during inflammation and contribute to the prothrombotic tendency associated with inflammation.

  11. DJ-1 Interacts with and Regulates Paraoxonase-2, an Enzyme Critical for Neuronal Survival in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parsanejad, Mohammad; Bourquard, Noam; Qu, Dianbo; Zhang, Yi; Huang, En; Rousseaux, Maxime W. C.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Irrcher, Isabella; Callaghan, Steve; Vaillant, Dominique C.; Kim, Raymond H.; Slack, Ruth S.; Mak, Tak W.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Figeys, Daniel; Park, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) gene account for about 1% of all familial Parkinson's disease (PD). While its physiological function(s) are not completely clear, DJ-1 protects neurons against oxidative stress in both in vitro and in vivo models of PD. The molecular mechanism(s) through which DJ-1 alleviates oxidative stress-mediated damage remains elusive. In this study, we identified Paraoxonase-2 (PON2) as an interacting target of DJ-1. PON2 activity is elevated in response to oxidative stress and DJ-1 is crucial for this response. Importantly, we showed that PON2 deficiency hypersensitizes neurons to oxidative stress induced by MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium). Conversely, over-expression of PON2 protects neurons in this death paradigm. Interestingly, PON2 effectively rescues DJ-1 deficiency-mediated hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which DJ-1 exerts its antioxidant activities, at least partly through regulation of PON2. PMID:25210784

  12. Atg7 enhances host defense against infection via down-regulation of superoxide but up-regulation of nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuefeng; Ye, Yan; Zhou, Xikun; Zhao, Kelei; Huang, Canhua; Wu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium that can cause serious infection in immunocompromised individuals. Although autophagy may augment immune responses against P. aeruginosa (Pa) infection in macrophages, the critical components and their role of autophagy in host defense are largely unknown. Here, we show that Pa infection-induced autophagy activates JAK2/STAT1α and increases nitric oxide (NO) production. Knocking down Atg7 resulted in increased IFN-γ release, excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS), and increased SHP2 (Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase 2) activity, which led to lowered phosphorylation of JAK2/STAT1α and subdued expression of NOS2 (NO Synthase 2). In addition, we demonstrated the physiological relevance of dysregulated NO under Atg7 deficiency as atg7−/− mice were more susceptible to Pa infection with increased mortality and severe lung injury than wild-type (WT) mice. Furthermore, Pa infected-atg7−/− mice exhibited increased oxidation but decreased bacterial clearance in the lung and other organs compared to WT mice. Mechanistically, atg7 deficiency suppressed NOS2 activity by down-modulating JAK2/STAT1α, leading to decreased NO both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, these findings revealed that the JAK2/STAT1α/NOS2 dysfunction leads to dysregulated immune responses, and worsened disease phenotypes. PMID:25535282

  13. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  14. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  15. Molecular hydrogen regulates gene expression by modifying the free radical chain reaction-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, Katsuya; Imoto, Akemi; Kamimura, Naomi; Nishimaki, Kiyomi; Ichimiya, Harumi; Yokota, Takashi; Ohta, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that H2 acts as a novel antioxidant to protect cells against oxidative stress. Subsequently, numerous studies have indicated the potential applications of H2 in therapeutic and preventive medicine. Moreover, H2 regulates various signal transduction pathways and the expression of many genes. However, the primary targets of H2 in the signal transduction pathways are unknown. Here, we attempted to determine how H2 regulates gene expression. In a pure chemical system, H2 gas (approximately 1%, v/v) suppressed the autoxidation of linoleic acid that proceeds by a free radical chain reaction, and pure 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PAPC), one of the major phospholipids, was autoxidized in the presence or absence of H2. H2 modified the chemical production of the autoxidized phospholipid species in the cell-free system. Exposure of cultured cells to the H2-dependently autoxidized phospholipid species reduced Ca2+ signal transduction and mediated the expression of various genes as revealed by comprehensive microarray analysis. In the cultured cells, H2 suppressed free radical chain reaction-dependent peroxidation and recovered the increased cellular Ca2+, resulting in the regulation of Ca2+-dependent gene expression. Thus, H2 might regulate gene expression via the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway by modifying the free radical-dependent generation of oxidized phospholipid mediators. PMID:26739257

  16. Global Regulator IscR Positively Contributes to Antimonite Resistance and Oxidation in Comamonas testosteroni S44

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongliang; Zhuang, Weiping; Zhang, Shengzhe; Rensing, Christopher; Huang, Jun; Li, Jie; Wang, Gejiao

    2015-01-01

    Antimonial compounds can be found as a toxic contaminant in the environment. Knowledge on mechanisms of microbial Sb oxidation and its role in microbial tolerance are limited. Previously, we found that Comamonas testosteroni S44 was resistant to multiple heavy metals and was able to oxidize the toxic antimonite [Sb(III)] to the much less toxic antimonate [Sb(V)]. In this study, transposon mutagenesis was performed in C. testosteroni S44 to isolate genes responsible for Sb(III) resistance and oxidation. An insertion mutation into iscR, which regulates genes involved in the biosynthesis of Fe-S clusters, generated a strain called iscR-280. This mutant strain was complemented with a plasmid carrying iscR to generate strain iscR-280C. Compared to the wild type S44 and iscR-280C, strain iscR-280 showed lower resistance to Sb(III) and a lower Sb(III) oxidation rate. Strain iscR-280 also showed lower resistance to As(III), Cd(II), Cu(II), and H2O2. In addition, intracellular γ-glutamylcysteine ligase (γ-GCL) activity and glutathione (GSH) content were decreased in the mutated strain iscR-280. Real-time RT-PCR and lacZ fusion expression assay indicated that transcription of iscR and iscS was induced by Sb(III). Results of electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and bacterial one-hybrid (B1H) system demonstrated a positive interaction between IscR and its promoter region. The diverse defective phenotypes and various expression patterns suggest a role for IscR in contributing to multi-metal(loid)s resistance and Sb(III) oxidation via Fe-S cluster biogenesis and oxidative stress protection. Bacterial Sb(III) oxidation is a detoxification reaction. PMID:26734615

  17. Role of nitric oxide in the maintenance of pluripotency and regulation of the hypoxia response in stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Beltran-Povea, Amparo; Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Salguero-Aranda, Carmen; Martín, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R; Cahuana, Gladys M

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell pluripotency and differentiation are global processes regulated by several pathways that have been studied intensively over recent years. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule that affects gene expression at the level of transcription and translation and regulates cell survival and proliferation in diverse cell types. In embryonic stem cells NO has a dual role, controlling differentiation and survival, but the molecular mechanisms by which it modulates these functions are not completely defined. NO is a physiological regulator of cell respiration through the inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase. Many researchers have been examining the role that NO plays in other aspects of metabolism such as the cellular bioenergetics state, the hypoxia response and the relationship of these areas to stem cell stemness. PMID:25914767

  18. Fine-tuned regulation of the dissimilatory nitrite reductase gene by oxygen and nitric oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kuroki, Miho; Igarashi, Yasuo; Ishii, Masaharu; Arai, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    Nitrite reductase (NIR) catalyses the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide (NO) in the denitrification pathway. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, expression of the gene encoding NIR (nirS) is induced by NO and is under control of the NO-sensing regulator DNR (dissimilatory nitrate respiration regulator). Because DNR is under control of the oxygen-sensing regulator ANR (anaerobic regulator of arginine deiminase and nitrate reductase), nirS is expressed only under low oxygen and anaerobic conditions. Both ANR and DNR are FNR (fumarate and nitrate reductase regulator)-type regulators and recognize the consensus FNR-binding motif. The motif of the nirS promoter is thought to be recognized only by DNR, and not by ANR. Here, mutant strains expressing either ANR or DNR were constructed and used to analyse the role of ANR and DNR in the activation of nirS expression. Analysis of transcriptional activity by microarray and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that nirS is transcribed under low oxygen conditions in an ANR-dependent manner, although the expression level was 10-fold lower than that of the DNR-dependent expression. An artificial promoter containing the FNR-binding motif of the nirS promoter was also twofold upregulated by ANR. These results indicate that low-level expression of NIR in the presence of nitrite may provide NO as a trigger for the full expression of denitrification genes when oxygen is depleted.

  19. The novel zinc cluster regulator Tog1 plays important roles in oleate utilization and oxidative stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Thepnok, Piyasuda; Ratanakhanokchai, Khanok; Soontorngun, Nitnipa

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • TOG1 deletion results in defective growth on non-fermentable carbon sources. • Removal of TOG1 sensitizes cells to oxidative stress. • Tog1 directly binds and activates expression of oleate utilizing genes. • The Δtog1 cells display reduced peroxisomal content in oleate culture. • S. cerevisiae zinc cluster Tog1 is a novel activator of oleate utilization. - Abstract: Many zinc cluster proteins have been shown to play a role in the transcriptional regulation of glucose-repressible genes during glucose exhaustion and diauxic shift. Here, we studied an additional member of this family called Yer184c (herein called Tog1) for transcriptional regulator of oleate. Our results showed that a Δtog1 strain displays impaired growth with several non-fermentable carbons. Tog1 is also implicated in oxidative stress tolerance. Importantly, during the glucose–oleate shift, combined results from quantitative real time-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments showed that Tog1 acts as a direct activator of oleate utilizing genes, encoded key enzymes in β-Oxidation and NADPH regeneration (POX1, FOX2, POT1 and IDP2), the glyoxylate shunt (MLS1 and ICL1), and gluconeogenesis (PCK1 and FBP1). A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of the Δtog1 strain assayed with oleate also revealed a substantial decrease in peroxisome abundance that is vital for fatty acid oxidation. Overall, our results clearly demonstrated that Tog1 is a newly characterized zinc cluster regulator that functions in the complex network of non-fermentable carbon metabolism in Saccharomycescerevisiae.

  20. Crystal structure of peroxide stress regulator from Streptococcus pyogenes provides functional insights into the mechanism of oxidative stress sensing.

    PubMed

    Makthal, Nishanth; Rastegari, Sheila; Sanson, Misu; Ma, Zhen; Olsen, Randall J; Helmann, John D; Musser, James M; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2013-06-21

    Regulation of oxidative stress responses by the peroxide stress regulator (PerR) is critical for the in vivo fitness and virulence of group A Streptococcus. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of DNA binding, peroxide sensing, and gene regulation by PerR, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of PerR. Sequence-specific DNA binding by PerR does not require regulatory metal occupancy. However, metal binding promotes higher affinity PerR-DNA interactions. PerR metallated with iron directly senses peroxide stress and dissociates from operator sequences. The crystal structure revealed that PerR exists as a homodimer with two metal-binding sites per subunit as follows: a structural zinc site and a regulatory metal site that is occupied in the crystals by nickel. The regulatory metal-binding site in PerR involves a previously unobserved HXH motif located in its unique N-terminal extension. Mutational analysis of the regulatory site showed that the PerR metal ligands are involved in regulatory metal binding, and integrity of this site is critical for group A Streptococcus virulence. Interestingly, the metal-binding HXH motif is not present in the structurally characterized members of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family but is fully conserved among PerR from the genus Streptococcus. Thus, it is likely that the PerR orthologs from streptococci share a common mechanism of metal binding, peroxide sensing, and gene regulation that is different from that of well characterized PerR from Bacillus subtilis. Together, our findings provide key insights into the peroxide sensing and regulation of the oxidative stress-adaptive responses by the streptococcal subfamily of PerR.

  1. Crystal Structure of Peroxide Stress Regulator from Streptococcus pyogenes Provides Functional Insights into the Mechanism of Oxidative Stress Sensing*

    PubMed Central

    Makthal, Nishanth; Rastegari, Sheila; Sanson, Misu; Ma, Zhen; Olsen, Randall J.; Helmann, John D.; Musser, James M.; Kumaraswami, Muthiah

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of oxidative stress responses by the peroxide stress regulator (PerR) is critical for the in vivo fitness and virulence of group A Streptococcus. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of DNA binding, peroxide sensing, and gene regulation by PerR, we performed biochemical and structural characterization of PerR. Sequence-specific DNA binding by PerR does not require regulatory metal occupancy. However, metal binding promotes higher affinity PerR-DNA interactions. PerR metallated with iron directly senses peroxide stress and dissociates from operator sequences. The crystal structure revealed that PerR exists as a homodimer with two metal-binding sites per subunit as follows: a structural zinc site and a regulatory metal site that is occupied in the crystals by nickel. The regulatory metal-binding site in PerR involves a previously unobserved HXH motif located in its unique N-terminal extension. Mutational analysis of the regulatory site showed that the PerR metal ligands are involved in regulatory metal binding, and integrity of this site is critical for group A Streptococcus virulence. Interestingly, the metal-binding HXH motif is not present in the structurally characterized members of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family but is fully conserved among PerR from the genus Streptococcus. Thus, it is likely that the PerR orthologs from streptococci share a common mechanism of metal binding, peroxide sensing, and gene regulation that is different from that of well characterized PerR from Bacillus subtilis. Together, our findings provide key insights into the peroxide sensing and regulation of the oxidative stress-adaptive responses by the streptococcal subfamily of PerR. PMID:23645680

  2. Nitric oxide as a mediator of gastrointestinal mucosal injury?—Say it ain't so

    PubMed Central

    Kubes, Paul

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested as a contributor to tissue injury in various experimental models of gastrointestinal inflammation. However, there is overwhelming evidence that nitric oxide is one of the most important mediators of mucosal defence, influencing such factors as mucus secretion, mucosal blood flow, ulcer repair and the activity of a variety of mucosal immunocytes. Nitric oxide has the capacity to down-regulate inflammatory responses in the gastrointestinal tract, to scavenge various free radical species and to protect the mucosa from injury induced by topical irritants. Moreover, questions can be raised regarding the evidence purported to support a role for nitric oxide in producing tissue injury. In this review, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting a role for nitric oxide in protecting the gastrointestinal tract from injury. PMID:18475671

  3. Failure of regulation results in an amplified oxidation burst by neutrophils in children with primary nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bertelli, R; Trivelli, A; Magnasco, A; Cioni, M; Bodria, M; Carrea, A; Montobbio, G; Barbano, G; Ghiggeri, G M

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism responsible for proteinuria in non-genetic idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (iNS) is unknown. Animal models suggest an effect of free radicals on podocytes, and indirect evidence in humans confirm this implication. We determined the oxidative burst by blood CD15+ polymorphonucleates (PMN) utilizing the 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCF-DA) fluorescence assay in 38 children with iNS. Results were compared with PMN from normal subjects and patients with renal pathologies considered traditionally to be models of oxidative stress [six anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA) vasculitis, seven post-infectious glomerulonephritis]. Radicals of oxygen (ROS) production was finally determined in a patient with immunodeficiency, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy X-linked (IPEX) and in seven iNS children after treatment with Rituximab. Results demonstrated a 10-fold increase of ROS production by resting PMN in iNS compared to normal PMN. When PMN were separated from other cells, ROS increased significantly in all conditions while a near-normal production was restored by adding autologous cells and/or supernatants in controls, vasculitis and post-infectious glomerulonephritis but not in iNS. Results indicated that the oxidative burst was regulated by soluble factors and that this regulatory circuit was altered in iNS. PMN obtained from a child with IPEX produced 100 times more ROS during exacerbation of clinical symptoms and restored to a near normal-level in remission. Rituximab decreased ROS production by 60%. In conclusion, our study shows that oxidant production is increased in iNS for an imbalance between PMN and other blood cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and CD20 are probably involved in this regulation. Overall, our observations reinforce the concept that oxidants deriving from PMN are implicated in iNS. PMID:20491793

  4. Nitric oxide retards xanthine oxidase-mediated superoxide anion generation in Phalaenopsis flower: an implication of NO in the senescence and oxidative stress regulation.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Soohyun; Hahn, Eun-Joo; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2009-02-01

    Senescence is a developmentally regulated and highly ordered sequence of events. Senescence leads to abscission of plant organs and eventually leads to death of a plant or part of it. Present study revealed that Phalaenopsis flower undergo senescence due to over activation of O(2) (.-)generating xanthine oxidase (XO), which consequently increases the concentrations of O(2) (.-) leading to enhanced oxidative damage and disturbed cellular redox environment as indicated by increased lipid peroxidation and DHA/AsA + DHA ratio, respectively. While activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and non-specific peroxidase (POD) were enhanced in sepals and petals of old flower, activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) were decreased. Exogenous application of nitric oxide (NO) retarded H(2)O(2)-induced senescence of Phalaenopsis flower by downregulating activity of XO and concentrations of O(2) (.-), H(2)O(2) and malondialdehyde (MDA, an index of lipid peroxidation). Exogenous application of NO also downregulated SOD activity and upregulated antioxidant enzymes involved in the detoxification of H(2)O(2) (CAT and APX), and in the regulation of redox couples viz, monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and GR, together with the modulation in non-protein thiol status and DHA/AsA + DHA ratio.

  5. Targeted mRNA oxidation regulates sunflower seed dormancy alleviation during dry after-ripening.

    PubMed

    Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Vincourt, Patrick; Arribat, Sandrine; Balzergue, Sandrine; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Bailly, Christophe

    2011-06-01

    After-ripening is the mechanism by which dormant seeds become nondormant during their dry storage after harvest. The absence of free water in mature seeds does not allow detectable metabolism; thus, the processes associated with dormancy release under these conditions are largely unknown. We show here that sunflower (Helianthus annuus) seed alleviation of dormancy during after-ripening is associated with mRNA oxidation and that this oxidation is prevented when seeds are maintained dormant. In vitro approaches demonstrate that mRNA oxidation results in artifacts in cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphim analysis and alters protein translation. The oxidation of transcripts is not random but selective, and, using microarrays, we identified 24 stored mRNAs that became highly oxidized during after-ripening. Oxidized transcripts mainly correspond to genes involved in responses to stress and in cell signaling. Among them, protein phosphatase 2C PPH1, mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1, and phenyl ammonia lyase 1 were identified. We propose that targeted mRNA oxidation during dry after-ripening of dormant seeds could be a process that governs cell signaling toward germination in the early steps of seed imbibition.

  6. Graphene oxide modulates root growth of Brassica napus L. and regulates ABA and IAA concentration.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fan; Liu, Yu-Feng; Lu, Guang-Yuan; Zhang, Xue-Kun; Xie, Ling-Li; Yuan, Cheng-Fei; Xu, Ben-Bo

    2016-04-01

    Researchers have proven that nanomaterials have a significant effect on plant growth and development. To better understand the effects of nanomaterials on plants, Zhongshuang 11 was treated with different concentrations of graphene oxide. The results indicated that 25-100mg/l graphene oxide treatment resulted in shorter seminal root length compared with the control samples. The fresh root weight decreased when treated with 50-100mg/l graphene oxide. The graphene oxide treatment had no significant effect on the Malondialdehyde (MDA) content. Treatment with 50mg/l graphene oxide increased the transcript abundance of genes involved in ABA biosynthesis (NCED, AAO, and ZEP) and some genes involved in IAA biosynthesis (ARF2, ARF8, IAA2, and IAA3), but inhibited the transcript levels of IAA4 and IAA7. The graphene oxide treatment also resulted in a higher ABA content, but a lower IAA content compared with the control samples. The results indicated that graphene oxide modulated the root growth of Brassica napus L. and affected ABA and IAA biosynthesis and concentration.

  7. Formulating Infrared Coatings for Defence Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    coatings applied to metal substrates combine high solar absorption with low emissivity in the TIR as thin oxide layers absorb short wavelength radiation...10 and s also given in Table 3. 16 Table 2: Diffuse reflectance values (in percent) of paint films applied over white (R,) and black (Rd...phosphate, chromi’te and other coatings applied by chemical or electrochemical processes [33]. When cooling of a coated object is important, high

  8. Role of Arginine decarboxylase (ADC) in Arabidopsis thaliana defence against the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas viridiflava.

    PubMed

    Rossi, F R; Marina, M; Pieckenstain, F L

    2015-07-01

    Polyamine biosynthesis starts with putrescine production through the decarboxylation of arginine or ornithine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, putrescine is synthesised exclusively by arginine decarboxylase (ADC), which exists as two isoforms (ADC1 and 2) that are differentially regulated by abiotic stimuli, but their role in defence against pathogens has not been studied in depth. This work analysed the participation of ADC in Arabidopsis defence against Pseudomonas viridiflava. ADC activity and expression, polyamine levels and bacterial resistance were analysed in null mutants of each ADC isoform. In non-infected wild-type (WT) plants, ADC2 expression was much higher than ADC1. Analysis of adc mutants demonstrated that ADC2 contributes to a much higher extent than ADC1 to basal ADC activity and putrescine biosynthesis. In addition, adc2 mutants showed increased basal expression of salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid-dependent PR genes. Bacterial infection induced putrescine accumulation and ADC1 expression in WT plants, but pathogen-induced putrescine accumulation was blocked in adc1 mutants. Results suggest a specific participation of ADC1 in defence, although basal resistance was not decreased by dysfunction of either of the two ADC genes. In addition, and as opposed to WT plants, bacterial infection increased ADC2 expression and ADC activity in adc1 mutants, which could counterbalance the lack of ADC1. Results demonstrate a major contribution of ADC2 to total ADC activity and the specific induction of ADC1 in response to infection. A certain degree of functional redundancy between the two isoforms in relation to their contribution to basal resistance is also evident.

  9. Plant defence responses in oilseed rape MINELESS plants after attack by the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Ishita; van Dam, Nicole Marie; Winge, Per; Trælnes, Marianne; Heydarova, Aysel; Rohloff, Jens; Langaas, Mette; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2015-02-01

    The Brassicaceae family is characterized by a unique defence mechanism known as the 'glucosinolate-myrosinase' system. When insect herbivores attack plant tissues, glucosinolates are hydrolysed by the enzyme myrosinase (EC 3.2.1.147) into a variety of degradation products, which can deter further herbivory. This process has been described as 'the mustard oil bomb'. Additionally, insect damage induces the production of glucosinolates, myrosinase, and other defences. Brassica napus seeds have been genetically modified to remove myrosinase-containing myrosin cells. These plants are termed MINELESS because they lack myrosin cells, the so-called toxic mustard oil mines. Here, we examined the interaction between B. napus wild-type and MINELESS plants and the larvae of the cabbage moth Mamestra brassicae. No-choice feeding experiments showed that M. brassicae larvae gained less weight and showed stunted growth when feeding on MINELESS plants compared to feeding on wild-type plants. M. brassicae feeding didn't affect myrosinase activity in MINELESS plants, but did reduce it in wild-type seedlings. M. brassicae feeding increased the levels of indol-3-yl-methyl, 1-methoxy-indol-3-yl-methyl, and total glucosinolates in both wild-type and MINELESS seedlings. M. brassicae feeding affected the levels of glucosinolate hydrolysis products in both wild-type and MINELESS plants. Transcriptional analysis showed that 494 and 159 genes were differentially regulated after M. brassicae feeding on wild-type and MINELESS seedlings, respectively. Taken together, the outcomes are very interesting in terms of analysing the role of myrosin cells and the glucosinolate-myrosinase defence system in response to a generalist cabbage moth, suggesting that similar studies with other generalist or specialist insect herbivores, including above- and below-ground herbivores, would be useful.

  10. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, immune stimulation and host defence against infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Jared H; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is intricately regulated allowing potent effectors to expand and become rapidly mobilized after infection, while simultaneously silencing potentially detrimental responses that averts immune-mediated damage to host tissues. This relies in large part on the delicate interplay between immune suppressive regulatory CD4+ T (Treg) cells and immune effectors that without active suppression by Treg cells cause systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity. Although these beneficial roles have been classically described as counterbalanced by impaired host defence against infection, newfound protective roles for Treg cells against specific viral pathogens (e.g. herpes simplex virus 2, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, West Nile virus) have been uncovered using transgenic mice that allow in vivo Treg-cell ablation based on Foxp3 expression. In turn, Foxp3+ Treg cells also provide protection against some parasitic (Plasmodium sp., Toxoplasma gondii) and fungal (Candida albicans) pathogens. By contrast, for bacterial and mycobacterial infections (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis), experimental manipulation of Foxp3+ cells continues to indicate detrimental roles for Treg cells in host defence. This variance is probably related to functional plasticity in Treg cell suppression that shifts discordantly following infection with different types of pathogens. Furthermore, the efficiency whereby Treg cells silence immune activation coupled with the plasticity in Foxp3+ cell activity suggest that overriding Treg-mediated suppression represents a prerequisite ‘signal zero’ that together with other stimulation signals [T-cell receptor (signal 1), co-stimulation (signal 2), inflammatory cytokines (signal 3)] are essential for T-cell activation in vivo. Herein, the importance of Foxp3+ Treg cells in host defence against infection, and the significance of infection-induced shifts in Treg-cell suppression are summarized. PMID

  11. Oxidation of Membrane Curvature-Regulating Phosphatidylethanolamine Lipid Results in Formation of Bilayer and Cubic Structures.

    PubMed

    Sankhagowit, Shalene; Lee, Ernest Y; Wong, Gerard C L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2016-03-15

    Oxidation is associated with conditions related to chronic inflammations and aging. Cubic structures have been observed in the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes of cells under oxidative stress (e.g., tumor cells and virus-infected cells). It has been previously suspected that oxidation can result in the rearrangement of lipids from a fluid lamellar phase to a cubic structure in organelles containing membranes enriched with amphiphiles that have nonzero intrinsic curvature, such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and cardiolipin. This study focuses on the oxidation of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), a lipid that natively forms an inverted hexagonal phase at physiological conditions. The oxidized samples contain an approximately 3:2 molar ratio of nonoxidized to oxidized DOPE. Optical microscopy images collected during the hydration of this mixture from a dried film suggest that the system evolves into a coexistence of a stable fluid lamellar phase and transient square lattice structures with unit cell sizes of 500-600 nm. Small-angle X-ray scattering of the same lipid mixture yielded a body-centered Im3m cubic phase with the lattice parameter of 14.04 nm. On average, the effective packing parameter of the oxidized DOPE species was estimated to be 0.657 ± 0.069 (standard deviation). This suggests that the oxidation of PE leads to a group of species with inverted molecular intrinsic curvature. Oxidation can create amphiphilic subpopulations that potently impact the integrity of the membrane, since negative Gaussian curvature intrinsic to cubic phases can enable membrane destabilization processes.

  12. The blood antioxidant defence capacity during intermittent hypoxic training in elite swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Poprzęcki, S; Zając, A; Karpiński, J; Wilk, R; Bril, G; Maszczyk, A; Toborek, M

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the chronic effect of simulated intermittent normobaric hypoxia on blood antioxidant defence capacity in swimmers. The study included 14 male and 14 female competitive swimmers performing part of land training under simulated intermittent normobaric hypoxia (O2 = 15.5%) or in normoxia. Land interval training took place twice per week, with a total of 8 training units during the study, performed with individualized intensity. The activities of blood antioxidant enzymes did not change significantly during the first and last training unit in the hypoxic and normoxic group. However, when comparing individual variables a significant effect of exercise was observed on GPx an CAT activities, whereas training units significantly differentiated GPx and GR activities. The oxygen conditions and gender had a significant influence on CAT activity. The total antioxidant capacity was not significantly affected. Only in male swimmers from the hypoxic group did the training significantly increase resting levels of MDA. In conclusion, training in normobaric hypoxia was not an adequate stimulus for the excessive response of the antioxidant defence system, despite increased oxidative stress in these conditions. PMID:28090139

  13. The wheat NB-LRR gene TaRCR1 is required for host defence response to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuliang; Lu, Chungui; Du, Lipu; Ye, Xingguo; Liu, Xin; Coules, Anne; Zhang, Zengyan

    2016-11-18

    The necrotrophic fungus Rhizoctonia cerealis is the major pathogen causing sharp eyespot disease in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins often mediate plant disease resistance to biotrophic pathogens. Little is known about the role of NB-LRR genes involved in wheat response to R. cerealis. In this study, a wheat NB-LRR gene, named TaRCR1, was identified in response to R. cerealis infection using Artificial Neural Network analysis based on comparative transcriptomics and its defence role was characterized. The transcriptional level of TaRCR1 was enhanced after R. cerealis inoculation and associated with the resistance level of wheat. TaRCR1 was located on wheat chromosome 3BS and encoded an NB-LRR protein that was consisting of a coiled-coil domain, an NB-ARC domain and 13 imperfect leucine-rich repeats. TaRCR1 was localized in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Silencing of TaRCR1 impaired wheat resistance to R. cerealis, whereas TaRCR1 overexpression significantly increased the resistance in transgenic wheat. TaRCR1 regulated certain reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging and production, and defence-related genes, and peroxidase activity. Furthermore, H2 O2 pretreatment for 12-h elevated expression levels of TaRCR1 and the above defence-related genes, whereas treatment with a peroxidase inhibitor for 12 h reduced the resistance of TaRCR1-overexpressing transgenic plants and expression levels of these defence-related genes. Taken together, TaRCR1 positively contributes to defence response to R. cerealis through maintaining ROS homoeostasis and regulating the expression of defence-related genes.

  14. Oxidation of proteins: Basic principles and perspectives for blood proteomics.

    PubMed

    Barelli, Stefano; Canellini, Giorgia; Thadikkaran, Lynne; Crettaz, David; Quadroni, Manfredo; Rossier, Joël S; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Lion, Niels

    2008-02-01

    Protein oxidation mechanisms result in a wide array of modifications, from backbone cleavage or protein crosslinking to more subtle modifications such as side chain oxidations. Protein oxidation occurs as part of normal regulatory processes, as a defence mechanism against oxidative stress, or as a deleterious processes when antioxidant defences are overcome. Because blood is continually exposed to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, blood proteomics should inherently adopt redox proteomic strategies. In this review, we recall the biochemical basis of protein oxidation, review the proteomic methodologies applied to analyse redox modifications, and highlight some physiological and in vitro responses to oxidative stress of various blood components.

  15. Sense Making in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) Intelligence Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Sense Making in the Australian Defence Organisation (ADO) Intelligence Community Mark Burnett, Pete Wooding * and Paul Prekop...3 And it is possible to inter-relate all three models – see Rousseau and Breton 2005. DSTO-GD...worthy of more detailed consideration. DSTO-GD-0440 22 References Breton , R. and Rousseau, R. (2005), "The C-OODA: A Cognitive Version

  16. Communal range defence in primates as a public goods dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Erik P.; Arseneau, T. Jean. M.; Schleuning, Xenia; van Schaik, Carel P.

    2015-01-01

    Classic socio-ecological theory holds that the occurrence of aggressive range defence is primarily driven by ecological incentives, most notably by the economic defendability of an area or the resources it contains. While this ecological cost–benefit framework has great explanatory power in solitary or pair-living species, comparative work on group-living primates has always found economic defendability to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition to account for the distribution of effective range defence across the taxon. This mismatch between theory and observation has recently been ascribed to a collective action problem among group members in, what is more informatively viewed as, a public goods dilemma: mounting effective defence of a communal range against intrusions by outgroup conspecifics. We here further develop this framework, and report on analyses at three levels of biological organization: across species, across populations within a single lineage and across groups and individuals within a single population. We find that communal range defence in primates very rarely involves collective action sensu stricto and that it is best interpreted as the outcome of opportunistic and strategic individual-level decisions. Whether the public good of a defended communal range is produced by solitary, joint or collective action is thus the outcome of the interplay between the unique characteristics of each individual, local and current socio-ecological conditions, and fundamental life-history traits of the species. PMID:26503678

  17. A Review of Enterprise Architecture Use in Defence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    functions in Defence. The concept of CIS support to operations recognises the intrinsic relationship between information in its broadest sense and...guidance was provided on the conduct of the ARM, including considerations such as information to be provided, reviewer requirements, attendance quorum

  18. The Case to Widen Defence Acquisition Research Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-30

    can be conducted Key issues associated with changes in acquisition practices Acquisition will become increasingly dependent on social science...military have been outsourced to the privately owned defence industrial base (DIB). This change has seen a movement away from procurement to... changes raises the question: Are the traditional research methodologies previously employed to examine procurement phenomena adequate for modern

  19. Evolution of hosts paying manifold costs of defence.

    PubMed

    Cressler, Clayton E; Graham, Andrea L; Day, Troy

    2015-04-07

    Hosts are expected to incur several physiological costs in defending against parasites. These include constitutive energetic (or other resource) costs of a defence system, facultative resource costs of deploying defences when parasites strike, and immunopathological costs of collateral damage. Here, we investigate the evolution of host recovery rates, varying the source and magnitude of immune costs. In line with previous work, we find that hosts paying facultative resource costs evolve faster recovery rates than hosts paying constitutive costs. However, recovery rate is more sensitive to changes in facultative costs, potentially explaining why constitutive costs are hard to detect empirically. Moreover, we find that immunopathology costs which increase with recovery rate can erode the benefits of defence, promoting chronicity of infection. Immunopathology can also lead to hosts evolving low recovery rate in response to virulent parasites. Furthermore, when immunopathology reduces fecundity as recovery rate increases (e.g. as for T-cell responses to urogenital chlamydiosis), then recovery and reproductive rates do not covary as predicted in eco-immunology. These results suggest that immunopathological and resource costs have qualitatively different effects on host evolution and that embracing the complexity of immune costs may be essential for explaining variability in immune defence in nature.

  20. Communal range defence in primates as a public goods dilemma.

    PubMed

    Willems, Erik P; Arseneau, T Jean M; Schleuning, Xenia; van Schaik, Carel P

    2015-12-05

    Classic socio-ecological theory holds that the occurrence of aggressive range defence is primarily driven by ecological incentives, most notably by the economic defendability of an area or the resources it contains. While this ecological cost-benefit framework has great explanatory power in solitary or pair-living species, comparative work on group-living primates has always found economic defendability to be a necessary, but not sufficient condition to account for the distribution of effective range defence across the taxon. This mismatch between theory and observation has recently been ascribed to a collective action problem among group members in, what is more informatively viewed as, a public goods dilemma: mounting effective defence of a communal range against intrusions by outgroup conspecifics. We here further develop this framework, and report on analyses at three levels of biological organization: across species, across populations within a single lineage and across groups and individuals within a single population. We find that communal range defence in primates very rarely involves collective action sensu stricto and that it is best interpreted as the outcome of opportunistic and strategic individual-level decisions. Whether the public good of a defended communal range is produced by solitary, joint or collective action is thus the outcome of the interplay between the unique characteristics of each individual, local and current socio-ecological conditions, and fundamental life-history traits of the species.