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Sample records for oxidative stress caused

  1. Oxidative stress causes plasma protein modification.

    PubMed

    Tetik, Sermin; Kiliç, Arzu; Aksoy, Halil; Rizaner, Nahit; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Yardimci, Turay

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of oxidative systems on plasma proteins using Chloramine-T, a source of free radicals. Plasma specimens from 10 healthy volunteers were treated with 40 mmol/L Chloramine-T (1:1 v/v). Total protein and plasma carbonyl levels were evaluated spectrophotometrically. Identification of plasma proteins modifications was performed by SDS-PAGE, protein and lipid electrophoresis. Protein fragmentation was evaluated by HPLC. Total protein levels of oxidised plasmas were significantly lower (4.08 ± 0.12 g/dL) than control (7.86 ± 0.03 g/dL) (P < 0.01). Plasma carbonyl levels were higher (1.94 ± 0.38 nmol/mg protein) in oxidised plasma than that of control (0.03 ± 0.01 nmol/mg protein) (P < 0.01). Plasma oxidation had no significant effect on the levels of proteins and lipids. Protein fragmentations were detected in oxidised groups compared to those of the control. We conclude that protein modifications have direct effect on the protein functions, which are related to stress agent, its treatment period(s), and the methodology used for evaluating such experimental results.

  2. Oxidative stress in the brain causes hypertension via sympathoexcitation.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Takuya; Hirooka, Yoshitaka

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, and is determined by the brain. Previous many studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress, mainly produced by angiotensin II type 1 (AT(1)) receptor and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD (P) H) oxidase, in the autonomic brain regions was involved in the activation of the SNS of hypertension. In this concept, we have investigated the role of oxidative stress in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), which is known as the cardiovascular center in the brainstem, in the activation of the SNS, and demonstrated that AT(1) receptor and NAD (P) H oxidase-induced oxidative stress in the RVLM causes sympathoexcitation in hypertensive rats. The mechanisms in which brain oxidative stress causes sympathoexcitation have been investigated, such as the interactions with nitric oxide (NO), effects on the signal transduction, or inflammations. Interestingly, the environmental factors of high salt intake and high calorie diet may also increase the oxidative stress in the brain, particularly in the RVLM, thereby activating the central sympathetic outflow and increasing the risk of hypertension. Furthermore, several orally administered AT(1) receptor blockers have been found to cause sympathoinhibition via reduction of oxidative stress through the inhibition of central AT(1) receptor. In conclusion, we must consider that AT(1) receptor and the related oxidative stress production in the brain cause the activation of SNS in hypertension, and that AT(1) receptor in the brain could be novel therapeutic target of the treatments for hypertension.

  3. Oxidative stress in kidney transplantation: causes, consequences, and potential treatment.

    PubMed

    Nafar, Mohsen; Sahraei, Zahra; Salamzadeh, Jamshid; Samavat, Shiva; Vaziri, Nosartolah D

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a major mediator of adverse outcomes throughout the course of transplantation. Transplanted kidneys are prone to oxidative stress-mediated injury by pre-transplant and post-transplant conditions that cause reperfusion injury or imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants. Besides adversely affecting the allograft, oxidative stress and its constant companion, inflammation, cause cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic syndrome, and other disorders in transplant recipients. Presence and severity of oxidative stress can be assessed by various biomarkers produced from interaction of reactive oxygen species with lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, nitric oxide, glutathione, etc. In addition, expression and activities of redox-sensitive molecules such as antioxidant enzymes can serve as biomarkers of oxidative stress. Via activation of nuclear factor kappa B, oxidative stress promotes inflammation which, in turn, amplifies oxidative stress through reactive oxygen species generation by activated immune cells. Therefore, inflammation markers are indirect indicators of oxidative stress. Many treatment options have been evaluated in studies conducted at different stages of transplantation in humans and animals. These studies have provided useful strategies for use in donors or in organ preservation solutions. However, strategies tested for use in post-transplant phase have been largely inconclusive and controversial. A number of therapeutic options have been exclusively examined in animal models and only a few have been tested in humans. Most of the clinical investigations have been of short duration and have provided no insight into their impact on the long-term survival of transplant patients. Effective treatment of oxidative stress in transplant population remains elusive and awaits future explorations.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  5. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent.

    PubMed

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress.

  6. Causes and consequences of oxidative stress in spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Robert John; Gibb, Zamira; Baker, Mark A; Drevet, Joel; Gharagozloo, Parviz

    2016-01-01

    Spermatozoa are highly vulnerable to oxidative attack because they lack significant antioxidant protection due to the limited volume and restricted distribution of cytoplasmic space in which to house an appropriate armoury of defensive enzymes. In particular, sperm membrane lipids are susceptible to oxidative stress because they abound in significant amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Susceptibility to oxidative attack is further exacerbated by the fact that these cells actively generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in order to drive the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation associated with sperm capacitation. However, this positive role for ROS is reversed when spermatozoa are stressed. Under these conditions, they default to an intrinsic apoptotic pathway characterised by mitochondrial ROS generation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exposure and oxidative DNA damage. In responding to oxidative stress, spermatozoa only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair pathway, 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase. This enzyme catalyses the formation of abasic sites, thereby destabilising the DNA backbone and generating strand breaks. Because oxidative damage to sperm DNA is associated with both miscarriage and developmental abnormalities in the offspring, strategies for the amelioration of such stress, including the development of effective antioxidant formulations, are becoming increasingly urgent.

  7. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  8. Morphine as a Potential Oxidative Stress-Causing Agent

    PubMed Central

    Skrabalova, Jitka; Drastichova, Zdenka; Novotny, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Morphine exhibits important pharmacological effects for which it has been used in medical practice for quite a long time. However, it has a high addictive potential and can be abused. Long-term use of this drug can be connected with some pathological consequences including neurotoxicity and neuronal dysfunction, hepatotoxicity, kidney dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, most studies examining the impact of morphine have been aimed at determining the effects induced by chronic morphine exposure in the brain, liver, cardiovascular system and macrophages. It appears that different tissues may respond to morphine diversely and are distinctly susceptible to oxidative stress and subsequent oxidative damage of biomolecules. Importantly, production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species induced by morphine, which have been observed under different experimental conditions, can contribute to some pathological processes, degenerative diseases and organ dysfunctions occurring in morphine abusers or morphine-treated patients. This review attempts to provide insights into the possible relationship between morphine actions and oxidative stress. PMID:24376392

  9. Binge ethanol exposure causes endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress and tissue injury in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhenhua; Wang, Xin; Xu, Mei; Yang, Fanmuyi; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Ke, Zun-ji; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is associated with both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis or pancreatic injury may result in chronic pancreatitis. We investigated ethanol-induced pancreatic injury using a mouse model of binge ethanol exposure. Male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to ethanol intragastrically (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 10 days. Binge ethanol exposure caused pathological changes in pancreas demonstrated by tissue edema, acinar atrophy and moderate fibrosis. Ethanol caused both apoptotic and necrotic cell death which was demonstrated by the increase in active caspase-3, caspase-8, cleaved PARP, cleaved CK-18 and the secretion of high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). Ethanol altered the function of the pancreas which was indicated by altered levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Ethanol exposure stimulated cell proliferation in the acini, suggesting an acinar regeneration. Ethanol caused pancreatic inflammation which was indicated by the induction of TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, MCP-1 and CCR2, and the increase of CD68 positive macrophages in the pancreas. Ethanol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress was demonstrated by a significant increase in ATF6, CHOP, and the phosphorylation of PERK and eiF-2alpha. In addition, ethanol increased protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and the expression of iNOS, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, this paradigm of binge ethanol exposure caused a spectrum of tissue injury and cellular stress to the pancreas, offering a good model to study alcoholic pancreatitis. PMID:27527870

  10. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization causes oxidative stress and ferritin induction in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Moumita; Carlsson, Fredrik; Laskar, Amit; Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei

    2011-02-18

    Moderate lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is an important inducer of apoptosis. Macrophages are professional scavengers and are rich in hydrolytic enzymes and iron. In the present study, we found that LMP by lysosomotropic detergent MSDH resulted in early up-regulation of lysosomal cathepsins, oxidative stress and ferritin up-regulation, and cell death. Lysosomotropic base NH(4)Cl reduced the ferritin induction and oxidative stress in apoptotic cells induced by MSDH. Cysteine cathepsin inhibitors significantly protected cell death and oxidative stress, but had less effect on ferritin induction. We conclude that oxidative stress induced by lysosomal rupture causes ferritin induction with concomitant mitochondrial damage, which are the potential target for prevention of cellular oxidative stress and cell death induced by typical lysosomotropic substances in different disorders.

  11. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-07-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  12. Acute and sub-lethal exposure to copper oxide nanoparticles causes oxidative stress and teratogenicity in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Santhanamari; Anaimalai Thirumurthi, Naveenkumar; Raghunath, Azhwar; Vijayakumar, Savitha; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2016-04-01

    Nano-copper oxides are a versatile inorganic material. As a result of their versatility, the immense applications and usage end up in the environment causing a concern for the lifespan of various beings. The ambiguities surround globally on the toxic effects of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs). Hence, the present study endeavored to study the sub-lethal acute exposure effects on the developing zebrafish embryos. The 48 hpf LC50 value was about 64 ppm. Therefore, we have chosen the sub-lethal dose of 40 and 60 ppm for the study. Accumulation of CuO-NPs was evidenced from the SEM-EDS and AAS analyzes. The alterations in the AChE and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities disrupted the development process. An increment in the levels of oxidants with a concomitant decrease in the antioxidant enzymes confirmed the induction of oxidative stress. Oxidative stress triggered apoptosis in the exposed embryos. Developmental anomalies were observed with CuO-NPs exposure in addition to oxidative stress in the developing embryos. Decreased heart rate and hatching delay hindered the normal developmental processes. Our work has offered valuable data on the connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity leading to lethality caused by CuO-NPs. A further molecular mechanism unraveling the uncharted connection between oxidative stress and teratogenicity will aid in the safe use of CuO-NPs.

  13. Efavirenz Causes Oxidative Stress, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Autophagy in Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Marlene; Kost, Bernd; Renner-Müller, Ingrid; Wolf, Eckhard; Mylonas, Ioannis; Brüning, Ansgar

    2016-01-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz is a widely prescribed antiretroviral drug used in combined antiretroviral therapy. Despite being an essential and life-saving medication, the required lifelong use of HIV drugs has been associated with a variety of adverse effects, including disturbances in lipid metabolism and increased cardiovascular risk. Efavirenz belongs to those HIV drugs for which cardiovascular and endothelial dysfunctions have been reported. It is here shown that elevated concentrations of efavirenz can inhibit endothelial meshwork formation on extracellular matrix gels by normal and immortalized human umbilical vein cells. This inhibition was associated with an increase in oxidative stress markers, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, and autophagy. Induction of ER stress occurred at pharmacologically relevant concentrations of efavirenz and resulted in reduced proliferation and cell viability of endothelial cells, which worsened in the presence of elevated efavirenz concentrations. In combination with the HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir, both oxidative stress and ER stress became elevated in endothelial cells. These data indicate that pharmacologically relevant concentrations of efavirenz can impair cell viability of endothelial cells and that these effects may be aggravated by either elevated concentrations of efavirenz or by a combined use of efavirenz with other oxidative stress-inducing medications.

  14. [Oxidative stress: one of the major causes of vascular calcification in chronic kidney disease patients].

    PubMed

    Nyitrai, Mónika; Balla, György; Balla, József

    2015-11-22

    The leading cause of high mortality in dialyzed patients is cardiovascular disease. One of the main contributors of cardiovascular event is vascular calcification, which occurs even in very young patients. Multiple factors and complex mechanisms are involved in the formation of robust vascular calcification which affects a large vascular area observed in chronic kidney diseases. Patients on dialysis are exposed to enhanced oxidative stress as a result of increased pro-oxidant activity and reduced anti-oxidant systems. The oxidation of lipoprotein particles is implicated in the development of vascular damage representing oxidative threat, which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Moreover, in a pro-oxidant environment osteoblastic trans-differentiation of smooth muscle cells was shown to occur. Heme derived from oxidized hemoglobin might contribute to the formation of reactive lipid metabolites. This oxidative burden contributes to the development of atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. Heme oxygenase-1 and ferritin may serve as intracellular defense mechanisms against such an insult.

  15. Excessive caloric intake acutely causes oxidative stress, GLUT4 carbonylation, and insulin resistance in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Homko, Carol; Barrero, Carlos A; Stein, T Peter; Chen, Xinhua; Cheung, Peter; Fecchio, Chiara; Koller, Sarah; Merali, Salim

    2015-09-09

    Obesity-linked insulin resistance greatly increases the risk for type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, together known as the metabolic or insulin resistance syndrome. How obesity promotes insulin resistance remains incompletely understood. Plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and proinflammatory cytokines, endoplasmic reticulum ( ER) stress, and oxidative stress are all elevated in obesity and have been shown to induce insulin resistance. However, they may be late events that only develop after chronic excessive nutrient intake. The nature of the initial event that produces insulin resistance at the beginning of excess caloric intake and weight gain remains unknown. We show that feeding healthy men with ~6000 kcal/day of the common U.S. diet [~50% carbohydrate (CHO), ~ 35% fat, and ~15% protein] for 1 week produced a rapid weight gain of 3.5 kg and the rapid onset (after 2 to 3 days) of systemic and adipose tissue insulin resistance and oxidative stress but no inflammatory or ER stress. In adipose tissue, the oxidative stress resulted in extensive oxidation and carbonylation of numerous proteins, including carbonylation of GLUT4 near the glucose transport channel, which likely resulted in loss of GLUT4 activity. These results suggest that the initial event caused by overnutrition may be oxidative stress, which produces insulin resistance, at least in part, via carbonylation and oxidation-induced inactivation of GLUT4.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium release potentiates the ER stress and cell death caused by an oxidative stress in MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Tajeddine, Nicolas; Beck, Raphaël; Verrax, Julien; Taper, Henryk; Gailly, Philippe; Calderon, Pedro Buc

    2010-05-01

    Increase in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+](c)), release of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium ([Ca2+](er)) and ER stress have been proposed to be involved in oxidative toxicity. Nevertheless, their relative involvements in the processes leading to cell death are not well defined. In this study, we investigated whether oxidative stress generated during ascorbate-driven menadione redox cycling (Asc/Men) could trigger these three events, and, if so, whether they contributed to Asc/Men cytoxicity in MCF-7 cells. Using microspectrofluorimetry, we demonstrated that Asc/Men-generated oxidative stress was associated with a slow and moderate increase in [Ca2+](c), largely preceding permeation of propidium iodide, and thus cell death. Asc/Men treatment was shown to partially deplete ER calcium stores after 90 min (decrease by 45% compared to control). This event was associated with ER stress activation, as shown by analysis of eIF2 phosphorylation and expression of the molecular chaperone GRP94. Thapsigargin (TG) was then used to study the effect of complete [Ca2+](er) emptying during the oxidative stress generated by Asc/Men. Surprisingly, the combination of TG and Asc/Men increased ER stress to a level considerably higher than that observed for either treatment alone, suggesting that [Ca2+](er) release alone is not sufficient to explain ER stress activation during oxidative stress. Finally, TG-mediated [Ca2+](er) release largely potentiated ER stress, DNA fragmentation and cell death caused by Asc/Men, supporting a role of ER stress in the process of Asc/Men cytotoxicity. Taken together, our results highlight the involvement of ER stress and [Ca2+](er) decrease in the process of oxidative stress-induced cell death in MCF-7 cells.

  17. A single, mild, transient scrotal heat stress causes hypoxia and oxidative stress in mouse testes, which induces germ cell death.

    PubMed

    Paul, Catriona; Teng, Serena; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2009-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a temperature-dependent process, and increases in scrotal temperature can disrupt its progression. We previously showed that heat stress causes DNA damage in germ cells, an increase in germ cell death (as seen on TUNEL staining), and subfertility. The present study evaluated the stress response in mouse testes following a single mild transient scrotal heat exposure (40 degrees C or 42 degrees C for 30 min). We investigated markers of three types of stress response, namely, hypoxia, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Heat stress caused an increase in expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1a) mRNA expression and translocation of HIF1A protein to the germ cell nucleus, consistent with hypoxic stress. Increased expression of heme oxygenase 1 (Hmox1) and the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) and glutathione S-transferase alpha (GSTA) was consistent with a robust oxidative stress response. Germ cell death was associated with an increase in expression of the effector caspase cleaved caspase 3 and a decrease in expression of the protein inhibitor of caspase-activated DNase (ICAD). Reduced expression of ICAD contributes to increased activity of caspase-activated DNase and is consistent with the increased rates of DNA fragmentation that have been detected previously using TUNEL staining. These studies confirmed that transient mild testicular hyperthermia results in temperature-dependent germ cell death and demonstrated that elevated temperature results in a complex stress response, including induction of genes associated with oxidative stress and hypoxia.

  18. Acute exposure of Drosophila melanogaster to paraquat causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2013-05-01

    Paraquat (PQ; 1, 1'-dimethyl-4-4'-bipyridinium), an herbicide and model neurotoxicant, is identified to be one of the prime risk factors in Parkinson's disease (PD). In the Drosophila system, PQ is commonly used to measure acquired resistance against oxidative stress (PQ resistance test). Despite this, under acute PQ exposure, data on the oxidative stress response and associated impact on mitochondria among flies is limited. Accordingly, in this study, we measured markers of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions among adult male flies (8-10 days old) exposed to varying concentrations of PQ (10, 20, and 40 mM in 5% sucrose solution) employing a conventional filter disc method for 24 h. PQ exposure resulted in significant elevation in the levels of oxidative stress biomarkers (malondialdehyde: 43% increase: hydroperoxide: 32-39% increase), with concomitant enhancement in reduced glutathione and total thiol levels in cytosol. Higher activity of antioxidant enzymes were also evident along with increased free iron levels. Furthermore, PQ exposure caused a concentration-dependent increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation and activity of manganese-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD). The activity levels of complex I-III, complex II-III, and Mg+2 adinosine triphosphatase (ATPase) were also decreased significantly. A robust diminution in the activity of succinate dehydrogenase and moderate decline in the citrate synthase activity suggested a specific effect on citric acid cycle enzymes. Collectively, these data suggest that acute PQ exposure causes significant oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction among flies in vivo. It is suggested that in various experimental settings, while conducting the "PQ resistance stress test" incorporation of selected biochemical end points is likely to enhance the quality of the data.

  19. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  20. Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ) Prevents Cognitive Deficit Caused by Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ohwada, Kei; Takeda, Hironobu; Yamazaki, Makiko; Isogai, Hirosi; Nakano, Masahiko; Shimomura, Masao; Fukui, Koji; Urano, Shiro

    2008-01-01

    The effects of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and coenzyme Q10 (Co Q10), either alone or together, on the learning ability and memory function of rats were investigated. Rats fed a PQQ-supplemented diet showed better learning ability than rats fed a CoQ10-supplemented diet at the early stage of the Morris water maze test. The combination of both compounds resulted in no significant improvement in the learning ability compared with the supplementation of PQQ alone. At the late stage of the test, rats fed PQQ-, CoQ10- and PQQ + CoQ10-supplemented diets showed similar improved learning abilities. When all the groups were subjected to hyperoxia as oxidative stress for 48 h, rats fed the PQQ- and CoQ10 supplemented diets showed better memory function than the control rats. The concurrent diet markedly improved the memory deficit of the rats caused by oxidative stress. Although the vitamin E-deficient rats fed PQQ or CoQ10 improved their learning function even when subjected to hyperoxia, their memory function was maintained by PQQ rather than by CoQ10 after the stress. These results suggest that PQQ is potentially effective for preventing neurodegeneration caused by oxidative stress, and that its effect is independent of either antioxidant’s interaction with vitamin E. PMID:18231627

  1. Smoke exposure causes endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipid accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium through oxidative stress and complement activation.

    PubMed

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-05-23

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD.

  2. Scrambled and fried: Cigarette smoke exposure causes antral follicle destruction and oocyte dysfunction through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Beckett, E.L.; Jarnicki, A.G.; Sutherland, J.M.; McCluskey, A.; Hansbro, P.M.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2013-09-01

    Cigarette smoke is a reproductive hazard associated with pre-mature reproductive senescence and reduced clinical pregnancy rates in female smokers. Despite an increased awareness of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke exposure on systemic health, many women remain unaware of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke on female fertility. This issue is compounded by our limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind cigarette smoke induced infertility. In this study we used a direct nasal exposure mouse model of cigarette smoke-induced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to characterise mechanisms of cigarette-smoke induced ovotoxicity. Cigarette smoke exposure caused increased levels of primordial follicle depletion, antral follicle oocyte apoptosis and oxidative stress in exposed ovaries, resulting in fewer follicles available for ovulation. Evidence of oxidative stress also persisted in ovulated oocytes which escaped destruction, with increased levels of mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation resulting in reduced fertilisation potential. Microarray analysis of ovarian tissue correlated these insults with a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving genes associated with detoxification, inflammation, follicular activation, immune cell mediated apoptosis and membrane organisation. In particular, the phase I detoxifying enzyme cyp2e1 was found to be significantly up-regulated in developing oocytes; an enzyme known to cause molecular bioactivation resulting in oxidative stress. Our results provide a preliminary model of cigarette smoke induced sub-fertility through cyp2e1 bioactivation and oxidative stress, resulting in developing follicle depletion and oocyte dysfunction. - Highlights: • Cigarette smoke exposure targets developing follicle oocytes. • The antral follicle oocyte is a primary site of ovarian cigarette smoke metabolism. • Cyp2e1 is a major enzyme involved in ameliorating smoke-induced ovotoxicity. • Cigarette smoke causes oocyte

  3. Obesity, Oxidative Stress, Adipose Tissue Dysfunction, and the Associated Health Risks: Causes and Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Jain, Sushil K

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxidases, oxidative phosphorylation, glyceraldehyde auto-oxidation, protein kinase C activation, and polyol and hexosamine pathways. Other factors that also contribute to oxidative stress in obesity include hyperleptinemia, low antioxidant defense, chronic inflammation, and postprandial reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, recent studies suggest that adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating the pathophysiological mechanisms of obesity and its related co-morbidities. To establish an adequate platform for the prevention of obesity and its associated health risks, understanding the factors that contribute to the cause of obesity is necessary. The most current list of obesity determinants includes genetic factors, dietary intake, physical activity, environmental and socioeconomic factors, eating disorders, and societal influences. On the basis of the currently identified predominant determinants of obesity, a broad range of strategies have been recommended to reduce the prevalence of obesity, such as regular physical activity, ad libitum food intake limiting to certain micronutrients, increased dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, and meal replacements. This review aims to highlight recent findings regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated risk factors, the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue in

  4. Obesity, Oxidative Stress, Adipose Tissue Dysfunction, and the Associated Health Risks: Causes and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxidases, oxidative phosphorylation, glyceraldehyde auto-oxidation, protein kinase C activation, and polyol and hexosamine pathways. Other factors that also contribute to oxidative stress in obesity include hyperleptinemia, low antioxidant defense, chronic inflammation, and postprandial reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, recent studies suggest that adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating the pathophysiological mechanisms of obesity and its related co-morbidities. To establish an adequate platform for the prevention of obesity and its associated health risks, understanding the factors that contribute to the cause of obesity is necessary. The most current list of obesity determinants includes genetic factors, dietary intake, physical activity, environmental and socioeconomic factors, eating disorders, and societal influences. On the basis of the currently identified predominant determinants of obesity, a broad range of strategies have been recommended to reduce the prevalence of obesity, such as regular physical activity, ad libitum food intake limiting to certain micronutrients, increased dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, and meal replacements. This review aims to highlight recent findings regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated risk factors, the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue

  5. Adipocytes cause leukemia cell resistance to daunorubicin via oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xia; Tucci, Jonathan; Parmentier, Jean-Hugues; Ji, Lingyun; Behan, James W.; Heisterkamp, Nora; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes promote cancer progression and impair treatment, and have been shown to protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells from chemotherapies. Here we investigate whether this protection is mediated by changes in oxidative stress. Co-culture experiments showed that adipocytes protect ALL cells from oxidative stress induced by drugs or irradiation. We demonstrated that ALL cells induce intracellular ROS and an oxidative stress response in adipocytes. This adipocyte oxidative stress response leads to the secretion of soluble factors which protect ALL cells from daunorubicin (DNR). Collectively, our investigation shows that ALL cells elicit an oxidative stress response in adipocytes, leading to adipocyte protection of ALL cells against DNR. PMID:27705905

  6. Housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

    PubMed

    Bhat, M Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2007-03-01

    The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC) housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups) subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC) having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP) being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS) in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA) and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH) levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  7. Exposure to HT-2 toxin causes oxidative stress induced apoptosis/autophagy in porcine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Han, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Tang, Feng; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    T-2 toxin is a main type A trichothecene mycotoxin which is the most toxic trichothecence. T-2 toxin has posed various toxic effects on human and animals in vigorous cell proliferation tissues like lymphoid, hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues, while HT-2 toxin is the major metabolite which is deacetylated by T-2 toxin. In this study, we focused on the toxic effects of HT-2 on porcine oocyte maturation. We treated the porcine oocyte with HT-2 toxin in vitro, and we first found that HT-2 treatment inhibited porcine oocyte polar body extrusion and cumulus cell expansion. We observed the disrupted meiotic spindle morphology after treatment, which might be due to the reduced p-MAPK protein level. Actin distribution was also disturbed, indicating that HT-2 affects cytoskeleton of porcine oocytes. We next explored the causes for the failure of oocyte maturation after HT-2 treatment. We found that HT-2 treated oocytes showed the increased ROS level, which indicated that oxidative stress had occurred. We also detected autophagy as well as early apoptosis in the treatment oocytes. Due to the fact that oxidative stress could induced apoptosis, our results indicated that HT-2 toxin caused oxidative stress induced apoptosis and autophagy, which further affected porcine oocyte maturation. PMID:27658477

  8. Restoration of nuclear-import failure caused by triple A syndrome and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kiriyama, Takao; Hirano, Makito Asai, Hirohide; Ikeda, Masanori; Furiya, Yoshiko; Ueno, Satoshi

    2008-10-03

    Triple A syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurological disease, mimicking motor neuron disease, and is caused by mutant ALADIN, a nuclear-pore complex component. We recently discovered that the pathogenesis involved impaired nuclear import of DNA repair proteins, including DNA ligase I and the cerebellar ataxia causative protein aprataxin. Such impairment was overcome by fusing classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) and 137-aa downstream sequence of XRCC1, designated stretched NLS (stNLS). We report here that the minimum essential sequence of stNLS (mstNLS) is residues 239-276, downsized by more than 100 aa. mstNLS enabled efficient nuclear import of DNA repair proteins in patient fibroblasts, functioned under oxidative stress, and reduced oxidative-stress-induced cell death, more effectively than stNLS. The stress-tolerability of mstNLS was also exerted in control fibroblasts and neuroblastoma cells. These findings may help develop treatments for currently intractable triple A syndrome and other oxidative-stress-related neurological diseases, and contribute to nuclear compartmentalization study.

  9. Imbalanced oxidative stress causes chlamydial persistence during non-productive human herpes virus co-infection.

    PubMed

    Prusty, Bhupesh K; Böhme, Linda; Bergmann, Birgit; Siegl, Christine; Krause, Eva; Mehlitz, Adrian; Rudel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Both human herpes viruses and Chlamydia are highly prevalent in the human population and are detected together in different human disorders. Here, we demonstrate that co-infection with human herpes virus 6 (HHV6) interferes with the developmental cycle of C. trachomatis and induces persistence. Induction of chlamydial persistence by HHV6 is independent of productive virus infection, but requires the interaction and uptake of the virus by the host cell. On the other hand, viral uptake is strongly promoted under co-infection conditions. Host cell glutathione reductase activity was suppressed by HHV6 causing NADPH accumulation, decreased formation of reduced glutathione and increased oxidative stress. Prevention of oxidative stress restored infectivity of Chlamydia after HHV6-induced persistence. We show that co-infection with Herpes simplex virus 1 or human Cytomegalovirus also induces chlamydial persistence by a similar mechanism suggesting that Chlamydia -human herpes virus co-infections are evolutionary shaped interactions with a thus far unrecognized broad significance.

  10. PM2.5 collected in China causes inflammatory and oxidative stress responses in macrophages through the multiple pathways.

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Ito, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; He, Cuiying; Arashidani, Keiichi; He, Miao; Sun, Guifan; Zeng, Yang; Sone, Hideko; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi

    2016-07-01

    Air pollution continues to increase in East Asia, particularly in China, and is considered to cause serious health problems. In this study, we investigated the toxicological properties of particulate matter ≤2.5mm (PM2.5) collected in an urban area in China (Shenyang), focusing on inflammation and oxidative stress tightly linked to respiratory diseases. Exposure to PM2.5 significantly increased the expression levels of inflammatory (interleukin-1β and cyclooxygenase-2) and oxidative stress (heme oxygenase1) genes in the mouse macrophages. PM2.5-caused inflammatory response was strongly suppressed by endotoxin neutralizer (polymyxin B) and knock-out of toll-like receptor 4, while oxidative stress was not. On the other hand, an antioxidant (N-acetylcystein) suppressed oxidative stress, but not inflammatory response. These results suggest that PM2.5 in the atmospheric environment of China causes inflammation and oxidative stress in macrophages via separate pathways.

  11. The R439C mutation in LMNA causes lamin oligomerization and susceptibility to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Verstraeten, Valerie LRM; Caputo, Sandrine; Van Steensel, Maurice AM; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Kamps, Miriam; Kuijpers, Helma JH; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J; Briedé, Jacob J; Le Dour, Caroline; Marcelis, Carlo LM; Van Geel, Michel; Steijlen, Peter M; Van Den Wijngaard, Arthur; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Broers, Jos LV

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Dunnigan-type familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a laminopathy characterized by an aberrant fat distribution and a metabolic syndrome for which oxidative stress has recently been suggested as one of the disease-causing mechanisms. In a family affected with FPLD, we identified a heterozygous missense mutation c.1315C>T in the LMNA gene leading to the p.R439C substitution. Cultured patient fibroblasts do not show any prelamin A accumulation and reveal honeycomb-like lamin A/C formations in a significant percentage of nuclei. The mutation affects a region in the C-terminal globular domain of lamins A and C, different from the FPLD-related hot spot. Here, the introduction of an extra cysteine allows for the formation of disulphide-mediated lamin A/C oligomers. This oligomerization affects the interaction properties of the C-terminal domain with DNA as shown by gel retardation assays and causes a DNA-interaction pattern that is distinct from the classical R482W FPLD mutant. Particularly, whereas the R482W mutation decreases the binding efficiency of the C-terminal domain to DNA, the R439C mutation increases it. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy studies show significantly higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon induction of oxidative stress in R439C patient fibroblasts compared to healthy controls. This increased sensitivity to oxidative stress seems independent of the oligomerization and enhanced DNA binding typical for R439C, as both the R439C and R482W mutants show a similar and significant increase in ROS upon induction of oxidative stress by H2O2. PMID:19220582

  12. Baicalein protects against oxLDL-caused oxidative stress and inflammation by modulation of AMPK- alpha

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shih-Hung; Shih, Jhih-Yuan; Cheng, Yung-Hsin; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Lin, Huei-Chen; Chu, Pei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered to be a form of chronic inflammation and a disorder of lipid metabolism. Oxidative transformations in the lipid and apolipoprotein B (Apo B) constituent of low density lipoprotein drive the initial step in atherogenesis due to macrophage scavenger receptors identify oxidized LDL (oxLDL) but non-oxidized LDL. The human vascular endothelial cells fact a critical role in vasodilation, provides a nonadhesive surface for circulation, reduces vascular smooth muscle proliferation, inflammation, thrombus formation and platelet aggregation. Assembly of oxLDL contribute to stimulation of endothelial cells with up-regulation of adhesion molecules, increase oxidative stress to the vascular endothelium and inhibition of NO-mediated vasodilation. When adhesion molecules are over-expressed on the surface of endothelial cells under oxLDL stimulation, it will recruit monocytes to the arterial wall. Then adherent monocytes will migrate into the subendothelial space and subsequently differentiate into macrophages. In the subendothelial space, oxLDL will be taken up by macrophages, thereby causing the substantial cholesterol accumulation and the foam cells production. PMID:27776344

  13. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Aggregation Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction during Oxidative Stress-induced Cell Death*

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Masanori; Kubo, Takeya; Kaneshige, Akihiro; Harada, Naoki; Izawa, Takeshi; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamaji, Ryouichi; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Glycolytic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional protein that also mediates cell death under oxidative stress. We reported previously that the active-site cysteine (Cys-152) of GAPDH plays an essential role in oxidative stress-induced aggregation of GAPDH associated with cell death, and a C152A-GAPDH mutant rescues nitric oxide (NO)-induced cell death by interfering with the aggregation of wild type (WT)-GAPDH. However, the detailed mechanism underlying GAPDH aggregate-induced cell death remains elusive. Here we report that NO-induced GAPDH aggregation specifically causes mitochondrial dysfunction. First, we observed a correlation between NO-induced GAPDH aggregation and mitochondrial dysfunction, when GAPDH aggregation occurred at mitochondria in SH-SY5Y cells. In isolated mitochondria, aggregates of WT-GAPDH directly induced mitochondrial swelling and depolarization, whereas mixtures containing aggregates of C152A-GAPDH reduced mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, treatment with cyclosporin A improved WT-GAPDH aggregate-induced swelling and depolarization. In doxycycline-inducible SH-SY5Y cells, overexpression of WT-GAPDH augmented NO-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and increased mitochondrial GAPDH aggregation, whereas induced overexpression of C152A-GAPDH significantly suppressed mitochondrial impairment. Further, NO-induced cytochrome c release into the cytosol and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria were both augmented in cells overexpressing WT-GAPDH but ameliorated in C152A-GAPDH-overexpressing cells. Interestingly, GAPDH aggregates induced necrotic cell death via a permeability transition pore (PTP) opening. The expression of either WT- or C152A-GAPDH did not affect other cell death pathways associated with protein aggregation, such as proteasome inhibition, gene expression induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress, or autophagy. Collectively, these results suggest that NO-induced GAPDH

  14. Oxidative stress and anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Rammal, Hassan; Soulimani, Rachid

    2009-01-01

    High O2 consumption, modest antioxidant defenses and a lipid-rich constitution make the brain highly vulnerable to redox imbalances. Oxidative damage in the brain causes nervous system impairment. Recently, oxidative stress has also been implicated in depression, anxiety disorders and high anxiety levels. The findings which establish a link between oxidative stress and pathological anxiety have inspired a number of other recent studies focusing on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety and also on a possible causal relationship between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines the recent discoveries made on the link between oxidative status and normal anxiety levels and the putative role of oxidative stress in genesis of anxiety. We discuss the different opinions and questions that exist in the field and review the methodological approaches that are being used to determine a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress. PMID:20357926

  15. A vanillin derivative causes mitochondrial dysfunction and triggers oxidative stress in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyo; Lee, Han-Ok; Cho, Yong-Joon; Kim, Jeongmi; Chun, Jongsik; Choi, Jaehyuk; Lee, Younghoon; Jung, Won Hee

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a well-known food and cosmetic additive and has antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. It has also been suggested to have antifungal activity against major human pathogenic fungi, although it is not very effective. In this study, the antifungal activities of vanillin and 33 vanillin derivatives against the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the main pathogen of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients, were investigated. We found a structural correlation between the vanillin derivatives and antifungal activity, showing that the hydroxyl or alkoxy group is more advantageous than the halogenated or nitrated group in benzaldehyde. Among the vanillin derivatives with a hydroxyl or alkoxy group, o-vanillin and o-ethyl vanillin showed the highest antifungal activity against C. neoformans. o-Vanillin was further studied to understand the mechanism of antifungal action. We compared the transcriptome of C. neoformans cells untreated or treated with o-vanillin by using RNA sequencing and found that the compound caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered oxidative stress. These antifungal mechanisms of o-vanillin were experimentally confirmed by the significantly reduced growth of the mutants lacking the genes involved in mitochondrial functions and oxidative stress response.

  16. A Vanillin Derivative Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Triggers Oxidative Stress in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyo; Lee, Han-Ok; Cho, Yong-Joon; Kim, Jeongmi; Chun, Jongsik; Choi, Jaehyuk; Lee, Younghoon; Jung, Won Hee

    2014-01-01

    Vanillin is a well-known food and cosmetic additive and has antioxidant and antimutagenic properties. It has also been suggested to have antifungal activity against major human pathogenic fungi, although it is not very effective. In this study, the antifungal activities of vanillin and 33 vanillin derivatives against the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the main pathogen of cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients, were investigated. We found a structural correlation between the vanillin derivatives and antifungal activity, showing that the hydroxyl or alkoxy group is more advantageous than the halogenated or nitrated group in benzaldehyde. Among the vanillin derivatives with a hydroxyl or alkoxy group, o-vanillin and o-ethyl vanillin showed the highest antifungal activity against C. neoformans. o-Vanillin was further studied to understand the mechanism of antifungal action. We compared the transcriptome of C. neoformans cells untreated or treated with o-vanillin by using RNA sequencing and found that the compound caused mitochondrial dysfunction and triggered oxidative stress. These antifungal mechanisms of o-vanillin were experimentally confirmed by the significantly reduced growth of the mutants lacking the genes involved in mitochondrial functions and oxidative stress response. PMID:24586538

  17. Diphenyl Diselenide Reduces Oxidative Stress and Toxicity Caused by HSV-2 Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Sartori, Gláubia; Jardim, Natália Silva; Sari, Marcel Henrique Marcondes; Flores, Eduardo F; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2017-05-01

    Herpes simplex viruses can cause uncommon systemic complications as acute liver failure (ALT) or urinary tract dysfunctions. Diphenyl diselenide, (PhSe)2 , a classical studied organic selenium compound, has a novel antiviral action against HSV-2 infection and well-known antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to investigate if (PhSe)2 reduces oxidative stress and systemic toxicity caused by HSV-2 infection in mice. Adult BALB/c mice were pre-treated with (PhSe)2 (5 mg kg(-1) /day, intragastric, i.g.) during 5 days; at day 6 mice were infected with HSV-2 (10 μl-10(5) PFU/mL(-1) ) and post-treated with (PhSe)2 for more 5 days. At day 11, they were killed and samples of liver and kidney were obtained to determine: reactive species (RS); malondialdehyde (MDA), and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels; the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT). The activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA), Na(+) /K(+) -ATPase (liver and kidney); alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and the levels of urea (plasma) were determined as markers of hepatic and renal toxicity. The results revealed that (PhSe)2 treatment was effective against the increase of renal and hepatic oxidative stress in infected mice and also normalized hepatic and renal ADA activity. It recovered the activity of Na(+) /K(+) - and was not effective against the increase in urea levels in infected mice. Different from (PhSe)2 , acyclovir (positive control), caused an increase in ADA activity and a decrease in hepatic CAT activity. Considering the interest of alternative therapies to treat HSV-2 infections and secondary complications, (PhSe)2 become a notable candidate. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1028-1037, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Inorganic arsenic causes cell apoptosis in mouse cerebrum through an oxidative stress-regulated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yen, Cheng Chien; Ho, Tsung Jung; Wu, Chin Ching; Chang, Chun Fang; Su, Chin Chuan; Chen, Ya Wen; Jinn, Tzyy Rong; Lu, Tien Hui; Cheng, Po Wen; Su, Yi Chang; Liu, Shing Hwa; Huang, Chun Fa

    2011-06-01

    Arsenic pollution is a major public health problem worldwide. Inorganic arsenic (iAs) is usually more harmful than organic ones. iAs pollution increases the risk of human diseases such as peripheral vascular disease and cancer. However, the toxicological effects of iAs in the brain are mostly unclear. Here, we investigated the toxic effects and possible mechanisms of iAs in the cerebrum of mice after exposure to iAs (0.5 and 5 ppm (mg/l) As(2)O(3), via the drinking water), which was the possible human exposed dose via the ingestion in iAs-contaminated areas, for 6 consecutive weeks. iAs dose-dependently caused an increase of LPO production in the plasma and cerebral cortex. iAs also decreased the reduced glutathione levels and the expressions of NQO1 and GPx mRNA in the cerebral cortex. These impairments in the cerebral cortex caused by iAs exposure were significantly correlated with the accumulation of As. Moreover, iAs induced the production of apoptotic cells and activation of caspase-3, up-regulation of Bax and Bak, and down-regulation of Mcl-1 in the cerebral cortex. Exposure to iAs also triggered the expression of ER stress-related genes, including GRP78, GRP94, and CHOP. Meanwhile, an increase of p38 activation and dephosphorylation of ERK1/2 were shown in the cerebral cortex as a result of iAs-exposed mice. These iAs-induced damages and apoptosis-related signals could be significantly reversed by NAC. Taken together, these results suggest that iAs-induced oxidative stress causes cellular apoptosis in the cerebrum, signaling of p38 and ERK1/2, and ER stress may be involved in iAs-induced cerebral toxicity.

  19. Exposure to Fine Particulate Air Pollution Causes Vascular Insulin Resistance by Inducing Pulmonary Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Toole TE, Bhatnagar A, Conklin DJ. 2016. Exposure to fine particulate air pollution causes vascular insulin resistance by inducing pulmonary oxidative stress. Environ Health Perspect 124:1830–1839; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP212 PMID:27128347

  20. The anti-cancer drug, doxorubicin, causes oxidant stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2006-02-01

    The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is toxic to target cells, but also causes endothelial dysfunction and edema, secondary to oxidative stress in the vascular wall. Thus, the mechanism of action of this drug may involve chemotoxicity to both cancer cells and to the endothelium. Indeed, we found that the permeability of monolayers of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (BPAEC) to albumin was increased by approximately 10-fold above control, following 24-h exposure to clinically relevant concentrations of DOX (up to 1 microM). DOX also caused >4-fold increases in lactate dehydrogenase leakage and large decreases in ATP and reduced glutathione (GSH) in BPAECs, which paralleled the increases in endothelial permeability. A large part of the ATP loss could be attributed to DOX-induced hydrogen peroxide production which inhibited key thiol-enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). Depletion of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) appeared to be a major factor leading to DOX-induced GSH depletion. At low concentrations, the sulfhydryl reagent, iodoacetate (IA), inhibited GAPDH, caused a decrease in ATP and increased permeability, without inhibiting G6PDH or decreasing GSH. These results, coupled with those of previous work on a related quinone, menadione, suggest that depletion of either GSH or ATP may lead independently to endothelial dysfunction during chemotherapy, contributing to the cardiotoxicity and other systemic side-effects of the drug.

  1. Mechanism study on mitochondrial fragmentation under oxidative stress caused by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shengnan; Zhou, Feifan; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that undergo continual fusion and fission to maintain their morphology and functions, but the mechanism involved is still not clear. Here, we investigated the effect of mitochondrial oxidative stress triggered by high-fluence low-power laser irradiation (HF-LPLI) on mitochondrial dynamics in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1). Upon HF-LPLI-triggered oxidative stress, mitochondria displayed a fragmented structure, which was abolished by exposure to dehydroascorbic acid (DHA), a reactive oxygen species scavenger, indicating that oxidative stress can induce mitochondrial fragmentation. Mitochondrial translocation of the profission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) was observed following HF-LPLI, demonstrating apoptosis-related activation of Drp1. Notably, DHA pre-treatment prevented HF-LPLI-induced Drp1 activation. We conclude that mitochondrial oxidative stress through activation of Drp1 causes mitochondrial fragmentation.

  2. The protective effect of lipoic acid on selected cardiovascular diseases caused by age-related oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Skibska, Beata; Goraca, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered to be the primary cause of many cardiovascular diseases, including endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease, hypertension, and heart failure. Oxidative stress increases during the aging process, resulting in either increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production or decreased antioxidant defense. The increase in the incidence of cardiovascular disease is directly related to age. Aging is also associated with oxidative stress, which in turn leads to accelerated cellular senescence and organ dysfunction. Antioxidants may help lower the incidence of some pathologies of cardiovascular diseases and have antiaging properties. Lipoic acid (LA) is a natural antioxidant which is believed to have a beneficial effect on oxidative stress parameters in relation to diseases of the cardiovascular system.

  3. Protective effect of quercetin against oxidative stress caused by dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of quercetin in alleviating the cytotoxic effects of Dimethoate in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Methods Lymphocytes were divided into too groups. The first group, lymphocytes were incubated for 4 h at 37°C with different concentrations (0, 40, 60 and 100 mM) of Dimethoate. The second group was preincubated with quercetin for 30 min and followed by Dim incubation for 4 h at 37°C. Results Following in vitro incubation, Dimethoate caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde levels, a significant decrease in thiol levels, as well as a significant increase in superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in lymphocytes at different concentrations. Quercetin pretreated lymphocytes showed a significant protection against the cytotoxic effects inducted by Dimethoate on the studied parameters. Conclusion In conclusion, antioxidant quercetin could protect against Dimethoate-induced oxidative stress by decreasing lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and increasing superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in human lymphocytes. PMID:21861917

  4. Neuroserpin polymers cause oxidative stress in a neuronal model of the dementia FENIB.

    PubMed

    Guadagno, Noemi A; Moriconi, Claudia; Licursi, Valerio; D'Acunto, Emanuela; Nisi, Paola S; Carucci, Nicoletta; De Jaco, Antonella; Cacci, Emanuele; Negri, Rodolfo; Lupo, Giuseppe; Miranda, Elena

    2017-03-28

    The serpinopathies are human pathologies caused by mutations that promote polymerisation and intracellular deposition of proteins of the serpin superfamily, leading to a poorly understood cell toxicity. The dementia FENIB is caused by polymerisation of the neuronal serpin neuroserpin (NS) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of neurons. With the aim of understanding the toxicity due to intracellular accumulation of neuroserpin polymers, we have generated transgenic neural progenitor cell (NPC) cultures from mouse foetal cerebral cortex, stably expressing the control protein GFP (green fluorescent protein), or human wild type, G392E or delta NS. We have characterised these cell lines in the proliferative state and after differentiation to neurons. Our results show that G392E NS formed polymers that were mostly retained within the ER, while wild type NS was correctly secreted as a monomeric protein into the culture medium. Delta NS was absent at steady state due to its rapid degradation, but it was easily detected upon proteasomal block. Looking at their intracellular distribution, wild type NS was found in partial co-localisation with ER and Golgi markers, while G392E NS was localised within the ER only. Furthermore, polymers of NS were detected by ELISA and immunofluorescence in neurons expressing the mutant but not the wild type protein. We used control GFP and G392E NPCs differentiated to neurons to investigate which cellular pathways were modulated by intracellular polymers by performing RNA sequencing. We identified 747 genes with a significant upregulation (623) or downregulation (124) in G392E NS-expressing cells, and we focused our attention on several genes involved in the defence against oxidative stress that were up-regulated in cells expressing G392E NS (Aldh1b1, Apoe, Gpx1, Gstm1, Prdx6, Scara3, Sod2). Inhibition of intracellular anti-oxidants by specific pharmacological reagents uncovered the damaging effects of NS polymers. Our results support a role

  5. Cadmium and mercury cause an oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the ability of cadmium and mercury ions to cause endothelial dysfunction in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. Exposure of monolayers for 48 h to metal concentrations greater than 3-5 microM produced profound cytotoxicity (increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage), a permeability barrier failure, depletion of glutathione and ATP and almost complete inhibition of the activity of key thiol enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In contrast, metal concentrations less than 1-2 microM induced increases in glutathione and thiol-enzyme activities with minimal changes in LDH leakage, barrier function and ATP content. At shorter incubation times (24 h or less), high concentrations of cadmium caused glutathione induction rather than depletion. Thus, oxidative stress and cytotoxicity induced by lower concentrations of the metal ions stimulate compensatory responses, including increased synthesis of glutathione, which presumably preserved the activity of key thiol enzymes, however these responses were not sustainable at higher metal ion concentrations. We conclude, while high concentrations of heavy metals are cytotoxic, lower concentration induce a compensatory protective response, which may explain threshold effects in metal-ion toxicity.

  6. CD4+ T cells are important mediators of oxidative stress that cause hypertension in response to placental ischemia.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Kedra; Cornelius, Denise C; Scott, Jeremy; Heath, Judith; Moseley, Janae; Chatman, Krystal; LaMarca, Babbette

    2014-11-01

    Preeclampsia is associated with oxidative stress, which is suspected to play a role in hypertension, placental ischemia, and fetal demise associated with the disease. Various cellular sources of oxidative stress, such as neutrophils, monocytes, and CD4(+) T cells have been suggested as culprits in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. The objective of this study was to examine a role of circulating and placental CD4(+) T cells in oxidative stress in response to placental ischemia during pregnancy. CD4(+) T cells and oxidative stress were measured in preeclamptic and normal pregnant women, placental ischemic and normal pregnant rats, and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells. Women with preeclampsia had significantly increased circulating (P=0.02) and placental CD4(+) T cells (P=0.0001); lymphocyte secretion of myeloperoxidase (P=0.004); and placental reactive oxygen species (P=0.0004) when compared with normal pregnant women. CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats cause many facets of preeclampsia when injected into normal pregnant recipient rats on gestational day 13. On gestational day 19, blood pressure increased in normal pregnant recipients of placental ischemic CD4(+) T cells (P=0.002) compared with that in normal pregnant rats. Similar to preeclamptic patients, CD4(+) T cells from placental ischemic rats secreted significantly more myeloperoxidase (P=0.003) and induced oxidative stress in cultured vascular cells (P=0.003) than normal pregnant rat CD4(+)Tcells. Apocynin, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate inhibitor, attenuated hypertension and all oxidative stress markers in placental ischemic and normal pregnant recipient rats of placental ischemic CD4(+)Tcells (P=0.05). These data demonstrate an important role for CD4(+) T cells in mediating another factor, oxidative stress, to cause hypertension during preeclampsia.

  7. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Takamasa; Miyazawa, Masaki; Takanashi, Yumi; Tanigawa, Maya; Yasuda, Kayo; Onouchi, Hiromi; Kawabe, Noboru; Mitsushita, Junji; Hartman, Phil S.; Ishii, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHCV69E transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility. PMID:24936442

  8. Genetically induced oxidative stress in mice causes thrombocytosis, splenomegaly and placental angiodysplasia that leads to recurrent abortion.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takamasa; Miyazawa, Masaki; Takanashi, Yumi; Tanigawa, Maya; Yasuda, Kayo; Onouchi, Hiromi; Kawabe, Noboru; Mitsushita, Junji; Hartman, Phil S; Ishii, Naoaki

    2014-01-01

    Historical data in the 1950s suggests that 7%, 11%, 33%, and 87% of couples were infertile by ages 30, 35, 40 and 45, respectively. Up to 22.3% of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Oxidative stress is associated with male and female infertility. However, there is insufficient evidence relating to the influence of oxidative stress on the maintenance of a viable pregnancy, including pregnancy complications and fetal development. Recently, we have established Tet-mev-1 conditional transgenic mice, which can express the doxycycline-induced mutant SDHC(V69E) transgene and experience mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction leading to intracellular oxidative stress. In this report, we demonstrate that this kind of abnormal mitochondrial respiratory chain-induced chronic oxidative stress affects fertility, pregnancy and delivery rates as well as causes recurrent abortions, occasionally resulting in maternal death. Despite this, spermatogenesis and early embryogenesis are completely normal, indicating the mutation's effects to be rather subtle. Female Tet-mev-1 mice exhibit thrombocytosis and splenomegaly in both non-pregnant and pregnant mice as well as placental angiodysplasia with reduced Flt-1 protein leading to hypoxic conditions, which could contribute to placental inflammation and fetal abnormal angiogenesis. Collectively these data strongly suggest that chronic oxidative stress caused by mitochondrial mutations provokes spontaneous abortions and recurrent miscarriage resulting in age-related female infertility.

  9. Immune Response in a Wild Bird Is Predicted by Oxidative Status, but Does Not Cause Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cram, Dominic L.; Blount, Jonathan D.; York, Jennifer E.; Young, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The immune system provides vital protection against pathogens, but extensive evidence suggests that mounting immune responses can entail survival and fecundity costs. The physiological mechanisms that underpin these costs remain poorly understood, despite their potentially important role in shaping life-histories. Recent studies involving laboratory models highlight the possibility that oxidative stress could mediate these costs, as immune-activation can increase the production of reactive oxygen species leading to oxidative stress. However, this hypothesis has rarely been tested in free-ranging wild populations, where natural oxidative statuses and compensatory strategies may moderate immune responses and their impacts on oxidative status. Furthermore, the possibility that individuals scale their immune responses according to their oxidative status, conceivably to mitigate such costs, remains virtually unexplored. Here, we experimentally investigate the effects of a phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) immune-challenge on oxidative status in wild male and female white-browed sparrow weavers, Plocepasser mahali. We also establish whether baseline oxidative status prior to challenge predicts the scale of the immune responses. Contrary to previous work on captive animals, our findings suggest that PHA-induced immune-activation does not elicit oxidative stress. Compared with controls (n = 25 birds), PHA-injected birds (n = 27 birds) showed no evidence of a differential change in markers of oxidative damage or enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant protection 24 hours after challenge. We did, however, find that the activity of a key antioxidant enzyme (superoxide dismutase, SOD) prior to immune-activation predicted the scale of the resulting swelling: birds with stronger initial SOD activity subsequently produced smaller swellings. Our findings (i) suggest that wild birds can mount immune responses without suffering from systemic oxidative stress, and (ii) lend support to

  10. Vitamin D3 Reduces Tissue Damage and Oxidative Stress Caused by Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chun-Yen; Yang, Fwu-Lin; Wu, Wen-Tien; Chung, Chen-Han; Lee, Ru-Ping; Yang, Wan-Ting; Subeq, Yi-Maun; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustive exercise results in inflammation and oxidative stress, which can damage tissue. Previous studies have shown that vitamin D has both anti-inflammatory and antiperoxidative activity. Therefore, we aimed to test if vitamin D could reduce the damage caused by exhaustive exercise. Rats were randomized to one of four groups: control, vitamin D, exercise, and vitamin D+exercise. Exercised rats received an intravenous injection of vitamin D (1 ng/mL) or normal saline after exhaustive exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and blood samples were collected for biochemical testing. Histological examination and immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses were performed on lungs and kidneys after the animals were sacrificed. In comparison to the exercise group, blood markers of skeletal muscle damage, creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in the vitamin D+exercise group. The exercise group also had more severe tissue injury scores in the lungs (average of 2.4 ± 0.71) and kidneys (average of 3.3 ± 0.6) than the vitamin D-treated exercise group did (1.08 ± 0.57 and 1.16 ± 0.55). IHC staining showed that vitamin D reduced the oxidative product 4-Hydroxynonenal in exercised animals from 20.6% to 13.8% in the lungs and from 29.4% to 16.7% in the kidneys. In summary, postexercise intravenous injection of vitamin D can reduce the peroxidation induced by exhaustive exercise and ameliorate tissue damage, particularly in the kidneys and lungs. PMID:26941574

  11. Orally administered phenylbutazone causes oxidative stress in the equine gastric mucosa.

    PubMed

    Martínez Aranzales, J R; Cândido de Andrade, B S; Silveira Alves, G E

    2015-06-01

    Phenylbutazone (PBZ) is widely used in equine medicine, and its side effects on the gastrointestinal tract are well known. The inhibition of prostaglandins and the oxidative stress induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are described as mechanisms of gastric mucosal injury in humans. In horses, only the secondary effect of changes in cyclooxygenases is related to gastric mucosal injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of PBZ on certain antioxidative/oxidative parameters of the gastric mucosa. The concentrations of antioxidants and oxidants (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT; nitric oxide, NO; total glutathione, GSH; myeloperoxidase, MPO; and malondialdehyde, MDA), PGE2 levels, and the ulcerative lesions score were assessed. The results demonstrated decreased levels of antioxidant variables, increased levels of oxidant variables, and alterations in the prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and glutathione (GSH) levels. In conclusion, PBZ induces oxidative stress in the gastric glandular mucosa of horses by changing the antioxidant-oxidant balance of this surface, which might be regarded as another mechanism of injury in the horse stomach.

  12. Oxidative Stress Predicts All-Cause Mortality in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Fernández, Marta; Rodríguez, Carmen; Moreno, Ana; Oteo, Jose A.; Antela, Antonio; Moreno, Santiago; del Amo, Julia; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess whether oxidative stress is a predictor of mortality in HIV-infected patients. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in CoRIS, a contemporary, multicentre cohort of HIV-infected patients, antiretroviral-naïve at entry, launched in 2004. Cases were patients who died with available stored plasma samples collected. Two age and sex-matched controls for each case were selected. We measured F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and malondialdehyde (MDA) plasma levels in the first blood sample obtained after cohort engagement. Results 54 cases and 93 controls were included. Median F2-IsoPs and MDA levels were significantly higher in cases than in controls. When adjustment was performed for age, HIV-transmission category, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load at cohort entry, and subclinical inflammation measured with highly-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), the association of F2-IsoPs with mortality remained significant (adjusted OR per 1 log10 increase, 2.34 [1.23–4.47], P = 0.009). The association of MDA with mortality was attenuated after adjustment: adjusted OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 2.05 [0.91–4.59], P = 0.080. Median hsCRP was also higher in cases, and it also proved to be an independent predictor of mortality in the adjusted analysis: OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.39 (1.01–1.91), P = 0.043; and OR (95% CI) per 1 log10 increase, 1.46 (1.07–1.99), P = 0.014, respectively, when adjustment included F2-IsoPs and MDA. Conclusion Oxidative stress is a predictor of all-cause mortality in HIV-infected patients. For plasma F2-IsoPs, this association is independent of HIV-related factors and subclinical inflammation. PMID:27111769

  13. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  14. Exposure of colonic epithelial cells to oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress causes rapid potassium efflux and calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Lana; Walker, Emma J; Eklund, Annelie; Randall-Demllo, Sarron; Shabala, Sergey; Guven, Nuri; Cook, Anthony L; Eri, Rajaraman D

    2013-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and oxidative stress have recently been linked to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel diseases. Under physiological conditions, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to ER and oxidative stress affecting the cellular ionic homeostasis. However, these altered ion flux 'signatures' during these stress conditions are poorly characterized. We investigated the kinetics of K(+) , Ca(2+) and H(+) ion fluxes during ER and oxidative stress in a colonic epithelial cell line LS174T using a non-invasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique. ER and oxidative stress were induced by cell exposure to tunicamycin (TM) and copper ascorbate (CuAsc), respectively, from 1 to 24 h. Dramatic K(+) efflux was observed following acute ER stress with peak K(+) efflux being -30·6 and -138·7 nmolm(-2)  s(-1) for 10 and 50 µg ml(-1) , respectively (p < 0·01). TM-dependent Ca(2+) uptake was more prolonged with peak values of 0·85 and 2·68 nmol m(-2)  s(-1) for 10 and 50 µg ml(-1) TM, respectively (p < 0·02). Ion homeostasis was also affected by the duration of ER stress. Increased duration of TM treatment from 0 to 18 h led to increases in both K(+) efflux and Ca(2+) uptake. While K(+) changes were significantly higher at each time point tested, Ca(2+) uptake was significantly higher only after prolonged treatment (18 h). CuAsc also led to an increased K(+) efflux and Ca(2+) uptake. Functional assays to investigate the effect of inhibiting K(+) efflux with tetraethylammonium resulted in increased cell viability. We conclude that ER/oxidative stress in colonic epithelial cells cause dramatic K(+) , Ca(2+) and H(+) ion flux changes, which may predispose this lineage to poor stress recovery reminiscent of that seen in inflammatory bowel diseases.

  15. Absence of DJ-1 causes age-related retinal abnormalities in association with increased oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bonilha, Vera L; Bell, Brent A; Rayborn, Mary E; Samuels, Ivy S; King, Anna; Hollyfield, Joe G; Xie, Chengsong; Cai, Huaibin

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress alters physiological function in most biological tissues and can lead to cell death. In the retina, oxidative stress initiates a cascade of events leading to focal loss of RPE and photoreceptors, which is thought to be a major contributing factor to geographic atrophy. Despite these implications, the molecular regulation of RPE oxidative stress under normal and pathological conditions remains largely unknown. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in regulating RPE and photoreceptors oxidative stress response is greatly needed. To this end we evaluated photoreceptor and RPE changes in mice deficient in DJ-1, a protein that is thought to be important in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Young (3 months) and aged (18 months) DJ-1 knockout (DJ-1 KO) and age-matched wild-type mice were examined. In both group of aged mice, scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO) showed the presence of a few autofluorescent foci. The 18 month-old DJ-1 KO retinas were also characterized by a noticeable increase in RPE fluorescence to wild-type. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging demonstrated that all retinal layers were present in the eyes of both DJ-1 KO groups. ERG comparisons showed that older DJ-1 KO mice had reduced sensitivity under dark- and light-adapted conditions compared to age-matched control. Histologically, the RPE contained prominent vacuoles in young DJ-1 KO group with the appearance of enlarged irregularly shaped RPE cells in the older group. These were also evident in OCT and in whole mount RPE/choroid preparations labeled with phalloidin. Photoreceptors in the older DJ-1 KO mice displayed decreased immunoreactivity to rhodopsin and localized reduction in cone markers compared to the wild-type control group. Lower levels of activated Nrf2 were evident in retina/RPE lysates in both young and old DJ-1 KO mouse groups compared to wild-type control levels. Conversely, higher levels of protein carbonyl derivatives and i

  16. Genetic damage caused by methyl-parathion in mouse spermatozoa is related to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pina-Guzman, B.; Solis-Heredia, M.J.; Rojas-Garcia, A.E.; Uriostegui-Acosta, M.; Quintanilla-Vega, B. . E-mail: mquintan@cinvestav.mx

    2006-10-15

    Organophosphorous (OP) pesticides are considered genotoxic mainly to somatic cells, but results are not conclusive. Few studies have reported OP alterations on sperm chromatin and DNA, and oxidative stress has been related to their toxicity. Sperm cells are very sensitive to oxidative damage which has been associated with reproductive dysfunctions. We evaluated the effects of methyl-parathion (Me-Pa; a widely used OP) on sperm DNA, exploring the sensitive stage(s) of spermatogenesis and the relationship with oxidative stress. Male mice (10-12-weeks old) were administered Me-Pa (3-20 mg/kg bw/i.p.) and euthanized at 7- or 28-days post-treatment. Mature spermatozoa were obtained and evaluated for chromatin structure through SCSA (Sperm Chromatin Structure Assay; DNA Fragmentation Index parameters: Mean DFI and DFI%) and chromomycin-A{sub 3} (CMA{sub 3})-staining, for DNA damage through in situ-nick translation (NT-positive) and for oxidative stress through lipid peroxidation (LPO; malondialdehyde production). At 7-days post-treatment (mature spermatozoa when Me-Pa exposure), dose-dependent alterations in chromatin structure (Mean DFI and CMA{sub 3}-staining) were observed, as well as increased DNA damage, from 2-5-fold in DFI% and NT-positive cells. Chromatin alterations and DNA damage were also observed at 28-days post-treatment (cells at meiosis at the time of exposure); suggesting that the damage induced in spermatocytes was not repaired. Positive correlations were observed between LPO and sperm DNA-related parameters. These data suggest that oxidative stress is related to Me-Pa alterations on sperm DNA integrity and cells at meiosis (28-days post-treatment) and epididymal maturation (7-days post-treatment) are Me-Pa targets. These findings suggest a potential risk of Me-Pa to the offspring after transmission.

  17. Role of calreticulin in the sensitivity of myocardiac H9c2 cells to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kondo, Takahito

    2006-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca2+-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac apoptosis in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In the present study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on susceptibility to apoptosis under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. Under oxidative stress due to H2O2, the CRT-overexpressing cells were highly susceptible to apoptosis compared with controls. In the overexpressing cells, the levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) were significantly increased by H2O2, whereas in controls, only a slight increase was observed. The H2O2-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the increase in [Ca2+]i caused by thapsigargin in control cells but was suppressed by BAPTA-AM, a cell-permeable Ca2+ chelator in the CRT-overexpressing cells, indicating the importance of the level of [Ca2+]i in the sensitivity to H2O2-induced apoptosis. Suppression of CRT by the introduction of the antisense cDNA of CRT enhanced cytoprotection against oxidative stress compared with controls. Furthermore, we found that the levels of activity of calpain and caspase-12 were elevated through the regulation of [Ca2+]i in the CRT-overexpressing cells treated with H2O2 compared with controls. Thus we conclude that the level of CRT regulates the sensitivity to apoptosis under oxidative stress due to H2O2 through a change in Ca2+ homeostasis and the regulation of the Ca2+-calpain-caspase-12 pathway in myocardiac cells.

  18. Induction of oxidative stress causes functional alterations in mouse urothelium via a TRPM8-mediated mechanism: implications for aging.

    PubMed

    Nocchi, Linda; Daly, Donna M; Chapple, Christopher; Grundy, David

    2014-06-01

    The incidence of bladder conditions such as overactive bladder syndrome and its associated urinary incontinence is highly prevalent in the elderly. However, the mechanisms underlying these disorders are unclear. Studies suggest that the urothelium forms a 'sensory network' with the underlying innervation, alterations in which, could compromise bladder function. As the accumulation of reactive oxygen species can cause functional alterations with age, the aim of this study was to investigate whether oxidative stress alters urothelial sensory signalling and whether the mechanism underlying the effect of oxidative stress on the urothelium plays a role in aging. Five-month-old(young) and 24-month-old (aged) mice were used. H2O2 , used to induce oxidative stress, resulted in an increase in bladder afferent nerve activity and urothelial intracellular calcium in preparations from young mice. These functional changes were concurrent with upregulation of TRPM8 in the urothelium. Moreover, application of a TRPM8 antagonist significantly attenuated the H2O2 -induced calcium responses. Interestingly, an upregulation of TRPM8 was also found in the urothelium from aged mice, where high oxidative stress levels were observed, together with a greater calcium response to the TRPM8 agonist WS12. Furthermore, these calcium responses were attenuated by pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine. This study shows that oxidative stress affects urothelial function involving a TRPM8-mediated mechanism and these effects may have important implications for aging. These data provide an insight into the possible mechanisms by which oxidative stress causes physiological alterations in the bladder, which may also occur in other organs susceptible to aging.

  19. Involvement of Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Liver Injury Caused by Perfluorooctanoic Acid Exposure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bei; Zou, Weiying; Hu, Zhenzhen; Liu, Fangming; Zhou, Ling; Yang, Shulong; Kuang, Haibin; Wu, Lei; Wei, Jie; Wang, Jinglei; Zou, Ting; Zhang, Dalei

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is widely present in the environment and has been reported to induce hepatic toxicity in animals and humans. In this study, mice were orally administered different concentrations of PFOA (2.5, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day). Histological examination showed that the exposure to PFOA for 14 consecutive days led to serious hepatocellular injury and obvious inflammatory cell infiltration. In addition, malondialdehyde formation and hydrogen peroxide generation, indicators of oxidative stress, were significantly induced by PFOA treatment in the liver of mice. Furthermore, hepatic levels of interleukin-6, cyclooxygenase-2, and C-reactive protein, markers of inflammatory response, were markedly increased by exposure to PFOA in mice. These results demonstrated that PFOA-induced hepatic toxicity may be involved in oxidative stress and inflammatory response in mice. PMID:24724082

  20. Rosiglitazone causes cardiotoxicity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-independent mitochondrial oxidative stress in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    He, Huamei; Tao, Hai; Xiong, Hui; Duan, Sheng Zhong; McGowan, Francis X; Mortensen, Richard M; Balschi, James A

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to test the hypothesis that thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone (RSG), a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, causes cardiotoxicity independently of PPARγ. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were measured in perfused hearts isolated from C57BL/6, cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ-deficient mice, and their littermates. Cardiac function and mitochondrial oxidative stress were measured in both in vitro and in vivo settings. Treatment of isolated hearts with RSG at the supratherapeutic concentrations of 10 and 30 μM caused myocardial energy deficiency as evidenced by the decreases in [PCr], [ATP], ATP/ADP ratio, energy charge with a concomitant cardiac dysfunction as indicated by the decreases in left ventricular systolic pressure, rates of tension development and relaxation, and by an increase in end-diastolic pressure. When incubated with tissue homogenate or isolated mitochondria at these same concentrations, RSG caused mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by the decreases in respiration rate, substrate oxidation rates, and activities of complexes I and IV. RSG also increased complexes I- and III-dependent O₂⁻ production, decreased glutathione content, inhibited superoxide dismutase, and increased the levels of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine in mitochondria, consistent with oxidative stress. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) 20 mM prevented RSG-induced above toxicity at those in vitro settings. Cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ deletion and PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not prevent the observed cardiotoxicity. Intravenous injection of 10 mg/kg RSG also caused cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress, 600 mg/kg NAC antagonized these adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that RSG at supratherapeutic concentrations causes cardiotoxicity via a PPARγ-independent mechanism involving oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse hearts.

  1. Deletion of afpab1 Causes Increased Sensitivity to Oxidative Stress and Hypovirulence in Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dongyang; Wang, Shunan; He, Dan; Gao, Song; Xue, Baiji; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus AFPAB1 is the ortholog of the Aspergillus oryzae cytoplasmic messenger ribonucleoprotein granules AOPAB1 that function to depress the initiation of translation during stress. A. fumigatus can regulate its cellular physiology in response to environmental stresses, but there has been no research on Pab1 in A. fumigatus. The associated gene afpab1 was replaced with a hygromycin-selectable marker to generate the strain Δafpab1. Phenotypic analysis showed that the Δafpab1 grew more weakly than the wild-type strain. Also the germination rate of Δafpab1 was decreased when exposed to oxidative stress. The morphology of Δafpab1 spores also showed great changes. The killing rate of Δafpab1 by RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells was increased, and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability of Δafpab1 was decreased. Pathogenicity testing showed that the deletion strain had decreased virulence. Therefore, we conclude that afpab1 activity is correlated with susceptibility to oxidative stress, and deletion of afpab1 from A. fumigatus possibly leads to observed hypovirulence in an immunosuppressed mouse model. PMID:27801871

  2. A combination of He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO application efficiently protect wheat seedling from oxidative stress caused by elevated UV-B stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongfeng; Gao, Limei; Han, Rong

    2016-12-01

    The elevated ultraviolet-B (UV-B) stress induces the accumulation of a variety of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which seems to cause oxidative stress for plants. To date, very little work has been done to evaluate the biological effects of a combined treatment with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous nitric oxide (NO) application on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation. Thus, our study investigated the effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative damages in wheat seedlings under elevated UV-B stress. Our data showed that the reductions in ROS levels, membrane damage parameters, while the increments in antioxidant contents and antioxidant enzyme activity caused by a combination with He-Ne laser and exogenous NO treatment were greater than those of each individual treatment. Furthermore, these treatments had a similar effect on transcriptional activities of plant antioxidant enzymes. This implied that the protective effects of a combination with He-Ne laser irradiation and exogenous NO treatment on oxidative stress resulting from UV-B radiation was more efficient than each individual treatment with He-Ne laser or NO molecule. Our findings might provide beneficial theoretical references for identifying some effective new pathways for plant UV-B protection.

  3. Dominant repression by Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 causes oxidative damage and hypersensitivity to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Persak, Helene; Pitzschke, Andrea

    2014-02-13

    In any living species, stress adaptation is closely linked with major changes of the gene expression profile. As a substrate protein of the rapidly stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3, Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 likely acts at the front line of stress-induced re-programming. We recently characterized MYB44 as phosphorylation-dependent positive regulator of salt stress signaling. Molecular events downstream of MYB44 are largely unknown. Although MYB44 binds to the MBSII element in vitro, it has no discernible effect on MBSII-driven reporter gene expression in plant co-transfection assays. This may suggest limited abundance of a synergistic co-regulator. MYB44 carries a putative transcriptional repression (Ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression, EAR) motif. We employed a dominant repressor strategy to gain insights into MYB44-conferred stress resistance. Overexpression of a MYB44-REP fusion markedly compromised salt and drought stress tolerance--the opposite was seen in MYB44 overexpression lines. MYB44-mediated resistance likely results from induction of tolerance-enhancing, rather than from repression of tolerance-diminishing factors. Salt stress-induced accumulation of destructive reactive oxygen species is efficiently prevented in transgenic MYB44, but accelerated in MYB44-REP lines. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of MYB44-REP caused tissue collapse in Nicotiana. A mechanistic model of MAPK-MYB-mediated enhancement in the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance is proposed. Genetic engineering of MYB44 variants with higher trans-activating capacity may be a means to further raise stress resistance in crops.

  4. Cytotoxicity of Silver Nanoparticle and Chitin-Nanofiber Sheet Composites Caused by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kinoda, Jun; Ishihara, Masayuki; Hattori, Hidemi; Nakamura, Shingo; Fukuda, Koichi; Yokoe, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    Size-controlled spherical silver nanoparticles (<10 nm) and chitin-nanofiber sheet composites (Ag NPs/CNFS) have previously been reported to have strong antimicrobial activity in vitro. Although Ag NPs/CNFS have strong antimicrobial activity, their cytotoxicity has not been investigated. This study was performed to evaluate the effects of Ag NPs/CNFS on cytotoxicity for fibroblasts in vitro and healing delay of wound repair in vivo, focused on oxidative stress. Cytotoxic activities of Ag NPs/CNFS were investigated using a fibroblast cell proliferation assay, nitric oxide/nitrogen dioxide (NO/NO2) measurement of the cell lysates in vitro, inhibitory effects of Ag NPs/CNFS on healing-impaired wound repair using diabetic mice in vivo, 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) immunohistochemical staining of the skin sections, and generation of carbonyl protein in the wound was performed to evaluate cytotoxicity with oxidative stress. Ag NPs/CNFS exhibited cytotoxicity for fibroblasts and a significant increase of total NO/NO2 levels in the cell lysates in vitro and increased levels of 8-OHdG and carbonyl proteins in vivo. Although wound repair in the continuously Ag NPs/CNFS-treated group was delayed, it could be mitigated by washing the covered wound with saline. Thus, Ag NPs/CNFS may become accepted as an anti-infectious wound dressing. PMID:28335317

  5. Creatine and pyruvate prevent behavioral and oxidative stress alterations caused by hypertryptophanemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Vivian Strassburger; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Oliveira, Lenise; Nunes, Mychely Lopes; de Castro, Fernanda Luz; Garcia, Cristina; Gemelli, Tanise; de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Wannmacher, Clóvis Milton Duval

    2012-03-01

    It is known that the accumulation of tryptophan and its metabolites is related to brain damage associated with both hypertryptophanemia and neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, we investigated the effect of tryptophan administration on various parameters of behavior in the open-field task and oxidative stress, and the effects of creatine and pyruvate, on the effect of tryptophan. Forty, 60-day-old male Wistar rats, were randomly divided into four groups: saline, tryptophan, pyruvate + creatine, tryptophan + pyruvate + creatine. Animals received three subcutaneous injections of tryptophan (2 μmol/g body weight each one at 3 h of intervals) and/or pyruvate (200 μg/g body weight 1 h before tryptophan), and/or creatine (400 μg/g body weight twice a day for 5 days before tryptophan twice a day for 5 days before training); controls received saline solution (NaCl 0.85%) at the same volumes (30 μl/g body weight) than the other substances. Results showed that tryptophan increased the activity of the animals, suggesting a reduction in the ability of habituation to the environment. Tryptophan induced increase of TBA-RS and total sulfhydryls. The effects of tryptophan in the open field, and in oxidative stress were fully prevented by the combination of creatine plus pyruvate. In case these findings also occur in humans affected by hypertryptophanemia or other neurodegenerative disease in which tryptophan accumulates, it is feasible that oxidative stress may be involved in the mechanisms leading to the brain injury, suggesting that creatine and pyruvate supplementation could benefit patients affected by these disorders.

  6. Role of p47phox in Vascular Oxidative Stress and Hypertension Caused by Angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Landmesser, Ulf; Cai, Hua; Dikalov, Sergey; McCann, Louise; Hwang, Jinah; Jo, Hanjoong; Holland, Steven M.; Harrison, David G.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension caused by angiotensin II is dependent on vascular superoxide (O2·–) production. The nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD[P]H) oxidase is a major source of vascular O2·– and is activated by angiotensin II in vitro. However, its role in angiotensin II–induced hypertension in vivo is less clear. In the present studies, we used mice deficient in p47phox, a cytosolic subunit of the NADPH oxidase, to study the role of this enzyme system in vivo. In vivo, angiotensin II infusion (0.7 mg/kg per day for 7 days) increased systolic blood pressure from 105±2 to 151±6 mm Hg and increased vascular O2·– formation 2- to 3-fold in wild-type (WT) mice. In contrast, in p47phox−/− mice the hypertensive response to angiotensin II infusion (122±4 mm Hg; P<0.05) was markedly blunted, and there was no increase of vascular O2·– production. In situ staining for O2·– using dihydroethidium revealed a marked increase of O2·–production in both endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells of angiotensin II–treated WT mice, but not in those of p47phox−/− mice. To directly examine the role of the NAD(P)H oxidase in endothelial production of O2·–, endothelial cells from WT and p47phox−/− mice were cultured. Western blotting confirmed the absence of p47phox in p47phox−/− mice. Angiotensin II increased O2·– production in endothelial cells from WT mice, but not in those from p47phox−/− mice, as determined by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These results suggest a pivotal role of the NAD(P)H oxidase and its subunit p47phox in the vascular oxidant stress and the blood pressure response to angiotensin II in vivo. PMID:12364355

  7. Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil reduces oxidative stress in human skin explants caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedir, S; Moalla, D; Jardak, N; Mzid, M; Sahnoun, Z; Rebai, T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO) for protecting human skin from damage due to oxidative stress. PLFO contains natural antioxidants including polyphenols, sterols and tocopherols. We compared the antioxidant potential of PLFO with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Explants of healthy adult human skin were grown in culture with either PLFO or EVOO before adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We also used cultured skin explants to investigate the effects of PLFO on lipid oxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) one day after 2 h exposure to H2O2. We found that PLFO scavenged radicals and protected skin against oxidative injury. PLFO exhibited greater antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity than EVOO. Skin explants treated with PLFO inhibited H2O2 induced MDA formation by inhibition of lipid oxidation. In addition, the oil inhibited H2O2 induced depletion of antioxidant defense enzymes including GPx, SOD and CAT. We found that treatment with PLFO repaired skin damage owing to its antioxidant properties.

  8. The brominated flame retardant BDE-47 causes oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death in vitro and in vivo in mice.

    PubMed

    Costa, Lucio G; Pellacani, Claudia; Dao, Khoi; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Roque, Pamela J

    2015-05-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), used for decades as flame retardants, have become widespread environmental contaminants. Exposure is believed to occur primarily through diet and dust, and infants and toddlers have the highest body burden, raising concern for potential developmental neurotoxicity. The exact mechanisms of PBDE neurotoxicity have not been elucidated, but two relevant modes of action relate to impairment of thyroid hormone homeostasis and to direct effects on brain cells causing alterations in signal transduction, oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. The present study shows that BDE-47 (2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether) induces oxidative stress and ensuing apoptotic cell death in mouse cerebellar granule neurons in vitro. Similarly, in vivo administration of BDE-47, according to an exposure protocol shown to induce behavioral and biochemical alterations (10mg/kg, per os on post-natal day 10), induces oxidative stress and apoptosis, without altering serum levels of thyroid hormones. The effects of BDE-47 both in vitro and in vivo were more pronounced in a mouse model lacking the modifier subunit of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM) which results in reduced anti-oxidant capability due to low levels of GSH. Concentrations of BDE-47 in brain were in the mid-nanomolar range. These findings indicate that effects observed with BDE-47 in vitro are also present after in vivo administration, suggesting that in addition to potential endocrine effects, which were not seen here, direct interactions with brain cells should be considered as a potential mechanism of BDE-47 neurotoxicity.

  9. Mitochondrial oxidative stress caused by Sod2 deficiency promotes cellular senescence and aging phenotypes in the skin.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Michael C; Flynn, James M; Day, Nicholas U; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence arrests the proliferation of mammalian cells at risk for neoplastic transformation, and is also associated with aging. However, the factors that cause cellular senescence during aging are unclear. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to cause cellular senescence in culture, and accumulated molecular damage due to mitochondrial ROS has long been thought to drive aging phenotypesin vivo. Here, we test the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative stress can promote cellular senescence in vivo and contribute to aging phenotypes in vivo, specifically in the skin. We show that the number of senescent cells, as well as impaired mitochondrial (complex II) activity increase in naturally aged mouse skin. Using a mouse model of genetic Sod2 deficiency, we show that failure to express this important mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme also impairs mitochondrial complex II activity, causes nuclear DNA damage, and induces cellular senescence but not apoptosis in the epidermis. Sod2 deficiency also reduced the number of cells and thickness of the epidermis, while increasing terminal differentiation. Our results support the idea that mitochondrial oxidative stress and cellular senescence contribute to aging skin phenotypes in vivo.

  10. [Enhanced Resistance of Pea Plants to Oxidative: Stress Caused by Paraquat during Colonization by Aerobic Methylobacteria].

    PubMed

    Agafonova, N V; Doronina, N Y; Trotsenko, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    The influence of colonization of the pea (Pisum sativum L.) by aerobic methylobacteria of five different species (Methylophilus flavus Ship, Methylobacterium extorquens G10, Methylobacillus arboreus Iva, Methylopila musalis MUSA, Methylopila turkiensis Sidel) on plant resistance to paraquat-induced stresses has been studied. The normal conditions of pea colonization by methylobacteria were characterized by a decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidases) and in the concentrations of endogenous H2O2, proline, and malonic dialdehyde, which is a product of lipid peroxidation and indicator of damage to plant cell membranes, and an increase in the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus (the content of chlorophylls a, b and carotenoids). In the presence of paraquat, the colonized plants had higher activities of antioxidant enzymes, stable photosynthetic indices, and a less intensive accumulation of the products of lipid peroxidation as compared to noncolonized plants. Thus, colonization by methylobacteria considerably increased the adaptive protection of pea plants to the paraquat-induced oxidative stress.

  11. Oxidative stress in the brain of mice caused by translocated nanoparticulate TiO2 delivered to the abdominal cavity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Linglan; Liu, Jie; Li, Na; Wang, Jue; Duan, Yanmei; Yan, Jinying; Liu, Huiting; Wang, Han; Hong, Fashui

    2010-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms underlying the effects of TiO(2) nanoparticles on the brain, ICR mice were injected with nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) (5 nm) of various doses into the abdominal cavity daily for 14 days. We then examined the coefficient of the brain, the brain pathological changes and oxidative stress-mediated responses, and the accumulation of nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) and levels of neurochemicals in the brain. The results showed that high-dose nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) could induce some neurons to turn into filamentous shapes and others into inflammatory cells. The concentration of nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) in the brain was increased as increases in nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) dosages used. The oxidative stress and injury of the brain occurred as nanoparticulate anatase TiO(2) appeared to trigger a cascade of reactions such as lipid peroxidation, the decreases of the total anti-oxidation capacity and activities of antioxidative enzymes, the excessive release of nitric oxide, the reduction of glutamic acid, and the downregulated level of acetylcholinesterase activities. We concluded that TiO(2) nanoparticles injected at the abdominal cavity could be translocated into the brain and in turn caused the brain injury.

  12. Auranofin-induced oxidative stress causes redistribution of the glutathione pool in Taenia crassiceps cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Martínez-González, J J; Guevara-Flores, A; Rendón, J L; del Arenal, I P

    2015-05-01

    Previously, we have studied the effect of the gold-compound auranofin (AF) on both thioredoxin-glutathione reductasa (TGR) activity and viability of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci. It was demonstrated that micromolar concentrations of AF were high enough to fully inhibit TGR and kill the parasites. In this work, the dynamics of changes in the glutathione pool of T. crassiceps cysticerci following the addition of AF, was analyzed. A dose-dependent decrease in the internal glutathione concentration, concomitant with an increase in ROS production was observed. These changes were simultaneous with the formation of glutathione-protein complexes and the export of glutathione disulfide (GSSG) to the culture medium. Incubation of cysticerci in the presence of both AF and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) prevents all the above changes, maintaining cysticerci viability. By contrast, the presence of both AF and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) resulted in a potentiation of the effects of the gold compound, jeopardizing cysticerci viability. These results suggest the lethal effect of AF on T. crassiceps cysticerci, observed at micromolar concentrations, can be explained as a consequence of major changes in the glutathione status, which results in a significant increase in the oxidative stress of the parasites.

  13. Melatonin protects rat thymus against oxidative stress caused by exposure to microwaves and modulates proliferation/apoptosis of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Sokolovic, Dusan; Djordjevic, Branka; Kocic, Gordana; Veljkovic, Andrej; Marinkovic, Milena; Basic, Jelena; Jevtovic-Stoimenov, Tatjana; Stanojkovic, Zoran; Sokolovic, Danka M; Pavlovic, Voja; Djindjic, Boris; Krstic, Dejan

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of melatonin on oxidative stress, DNA fragmentation, apoptsis and proliferation in thymus tissue of rats exposed to microwaves. Wistar rats were divided in four groups: I - treated with saline; II - treated with melatonin; III - microwaves exposed; IV - microwaves exposed and melatonin treated. Melatonin (2 mg/kg i.p.) was administered daily. Animals were sacrificed after 20, 40 and 60 days. A significant increase in malondialdehyde and carbonyl group content, as well as decrease in catalase and increase in xanthine oxidase activity were registered under microwave exposure. Melatonin prevented the increase in malondialdehyde and carbonyl group content, and reversed the effect on catalase and xanthine oxidase activity. Both, alkaline and acid DNase activity were increased due to microwave exposure. Furthermore, microwaves caused increase in apoptosis rate (detected using Annexin V-FITC/PI kit) and reduced proliferative capacity of thymocytes (induced by ConA). However, melatonin caused decrease in alkaline and acid DNase activity, decrease in apoptotic rate and increase in proliferation rate of thymocytes. Melatonin exerts protective effects on rat thymocytes by modulating processes of apoptosis and proliferation, and causes decrease in DNA fragmentation and oxidative stress intensity under exposure to microwaves.

  14. Sodium nitrite-induced oxidative stress causes membrane damage, protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and alters major metabolic pathways in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Fariheen Aisha; Ali, Shaikh Nisar; Mahmood, Riaz

    2015-10-01

    Nitrite salts are present as contaminants in drinking water and in the food and feed chain. In this work, the effect of sodium nitrite (NaNO2) on human erythrocytes was studied under in vitro conditions. Incubation of erythrocytes with 0.1-10.0 mM NaNO2 at 37 °C for 30 min resulted in dose dependent decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, total sulfhydryl and amino groups. It was accompanied by increase in hemoglobin oxidation and aggregation, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and hydrogen peroxide levels suggesting the induction of oxidative stress. Activities of all major erythrocyte antioxidant defense enzymes were decreased in NaNO2-treated erythrocytes. The activities of enzymes of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were also compromised. However, there was a significant increase in acid phosphatase and also AMP deaminase, a marker of erythrocyte oxidative stress. Thus, the major metabolic pathways of cell were altered. Erythrocyte membrane damage was suggested by lowered activities of membrane bound enzymes and confirmed by electron microscopic images. These results show that NaNO2-induced oxidative stress causes hemoglobin denaturation and aggregation, weakens the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism, damages the cell membrane and also perturbs normal energy metabolism in erythrocytes. This nitrite-induced damage can reduce erythrocyte life span in the blood.

  15. Oxidative stress causes DNA triplet expansion in Huntington's disease mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jonson, Ida; Ougland, Rune; Klungland, Arne; Larsen, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded trinucleotide CAG repeat in the Huntingtin (Htt) gene. The molecular basis for the development and progression of HD is currently poorly understood. However, different DNA repair pathways have been implicated in both somatic expansion and disease progression. Embryonic stem cells provide a remarkable in vitro system to study HD and could have implications for understanding disease development and for therapeutic treatment. Here, we derive pluripotent stem cells from the mouse R6/1 HD model and demonstrate that repeated exposure to genotoxic agents inducing oxidative DNA damage gave a significant and dose dependent increase in somatic triplet expansion. Further investigation into specific steps of DNA repair revealed impaired double stranded break repair in exposed R6/1 cells, accompanied by the induction of apoptosis. We also found that differentiation status, and consequently DNA repair efficiency influenced somatic expansion. Our data underscore the importance of DNA damage and repair for the stability of the HD triplet in pluripotent stem cells.

  16. Oxidative Stress, Nitric Oxide, and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A.; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway”, through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:20703435

  17. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide, and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Zaccardi, Francesco; Di Stasio, Enrico; Romitelli, Federica; Santini, Stefano A; Zuppi, Cecilia; Ghirlanda, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    In the recent decades, oxidative stress has become focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence from research on several diseases show that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on this research, the emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the "final common pathway", through which risk factors of several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis. In this review, we discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes, and in the pathogenesis of diabetic vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients.

  18. Beneficial effects of quercetin on renal injury and oxidative stress caused by ciprofloxacin in rats: A histological and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Elbe, H; Dogan, Z; Taslidere, E; Cetin, A; Turkoz, Y

    2016-03-01

    Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum quinolone antibiotic commonly used in clinical practice. Quercetin is an antioxidant belongs to flavonoid group. It inhibits the production of superoxide anion. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of quercetin on renal injury and oxidative stress caused by ciprofloxacin. Twenty-eight female Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: control, quercetin (20 mg kg(-1) day(-1) gavage for 21 days), ciprofloxacin (20 mg kg(-1) twice a day intraperitoneally for 10 days), and ciprofloxacin + quercetin. Samples were processed for histological and biochemical evaluations. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in kidney tissue. The ciprofloxacin group showed histopathological changes such as infiltration, dilatation in tubules, tubular atrophy, reduction of Bowman's space, congestion, hemorrhage, and necrosis. In the ciprofloxacin + quercetin group, these histopathological changes markedly reduced. MDA levels increased in the ciprofloxacin group and decreased in the ciptofloxacin + quercetin group. SOD and CAT activities and GSH levels significantly decreased in the ciprofloxacin group. On the other hand, in the ciprofloxacin + quercetin group, SOD and CAT activities and GSH levels significantly increased with regard to the ciprofloxacin group. We concluded that quercetin has antioxidative and therapeutic effects on renal injury and oxidative stress caused by ciprofloxacin in rats.

  19. A high calorie diet causes memory loss, metabolic syndrome and oxidative stress into hippocampus and temporal cortex of rats.

    PubMed

    Treviño, Samuel; Aguilar-Alonso, Patrícia; Flores Hernandez, Jose Angel; Brambila, Eduardo; Guevara, Jorge; Flores, Gonzalo; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Morales-Medina, Julio Cesar; Toxqui, Veronica; Venegas, Berenice; Diaz, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    A high calorie intake can induce the appearance of the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is a serious public health problem because it affects glucose levels and triglycerides in the blood. Recently, it has been suggested that MS can cause complications in the brain, since chronic hyperglycemia and insulin resistance are risk factors for triggering neuronal death by inducing a state of oxidative stress and inflammatory response that affect cognitive processes. This process, however, is not clear. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the consumption of a high-calorie diet (HCD) on both neurodegeneration and spatial memory impairment in rats. Our results demonstrated that HCD (90 day consumption) induces an alteration of the main energy metabolism markers, indicating the development of MS in rats. Moreover, an impairment of spatial memory was observed. Subsequently, the brains of these animals showed activation of an inflammatory response (increase in reactive astrocytes and interleukin1-β as well as tumor necrosis factor-α) and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation), causing a reduction in the number of neurons in the temporal cortex and hippocampus. Altogether, these results suggest that a HCD promotes the development of MS and contributes to the development of a neurodegenerative process and cognitive failure. In this regard, it is important to understand the relationship between MS and neuronal damage in order to prevent the onset of neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras’Kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-02-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy•yr‑1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy•yr‑1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  1. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations

    PubMed Central

    Volkova, Polina Yu.; Geras’kin, Stanislav A.; Kazakova, Elizaveta A.

    2017-01-01

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy∙yr−1 caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy∙yr−1 caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species. PMID:28223696

  2. Radiation exposure in the remote period after the Chernobyl accident caused oxidative stress and genetic effects in Scots pine populations.

    PubMed

    Volkova, Polina Yu; Geras'kin, Stanislav A; Kazakova, Elizaveta A

    2017-02-22

    Even 30 years after the Chernobyl accident, biological effects of irradiation are observed in the chronically exposed Scots pine populations. Chronic radiation exposure at dose rates above 50 mGy∙yr(-1) caused oxidative stress and led to the increase of antioxidants concentrations in these populations. Genetic variability was examined for 6 enzymes and 14 enzymatic loci of 6 Scots pine populations. Dose rates over 10 mGy∙yr(-1) caused the increased frequency of mutations and changes in genetic structure of Scots pine populations. However, the same dose rates had no effect on enzymatic activities. The results indicate that even relatively low dose rates of radiation can be considered as an ecological factor which should be taken into account for ecological management and radiation protection of biota species.

  3. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  4. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  5. Endogenous salicylic acid protects rice plants from oxidative damage caused by aging as well as biotic and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yinong; Qi, Min; Mei, Chuansheng

    2004-12-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key endogenous signal that mediates defense gene expression and disease resistance in many dicotyledonous species. In contrast to tobacco and Arabidopsis, which contain low basal levels of SA, rice has two orders of magnitude higher levels of SA and appears to be insensitive to exogenous SA treatment. To determine the role of SA in rice plants, we have generated SA-deficient transgenic rice by expressing the bacterial salicylate hydroxylase that degrades SA. Depletion of high levels of endogenous SA in transgenic rice does not measurably affect defense gene expression, but reduces the plant's capacity to detoxify reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI). SA-deficient transgenic rice contains elevated levels of superoxide and H2O2, and exhibits spontaneous lesion formation in an age- and light-dependent manner. Exogenous application of SA analog benzothiadiazole complements SA deficiency and suppresses ROI levels and lesion formation. Although an increase of conjugated catechol was detected in SA-deficient rice, catechol does not appear to significantly affect ROI levels based on the endogenous catechol data and exogenous catechol treatment. When infected with the blast fungus (Magnaporthe grisea), SA-deficient rice exhibits increased susceptibility to oxidative bursts elicited by avirulent isolates. Furthermore, SA-deficient rice is hyperresponsive to oxidative damage caused by paraquat treatment. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that SA plays an important role to modulate redox balance and protect rice plants from oxidative stress.

  6. Pathogenicity and oxidative stress in Nile tilapia caused by Aphanomyces laevis and Phoma herbarum isolated from farmed fish.

    PubMed

    Ali, Esam H; Hashem, Mohamed; Al-Salahy, M Bassam

    2011-03-16

    Identified (n = 17) and unidentified (n = 1) fish-pathogenic fungal species from 10 genera of Oomycetes and soil fungi were isolated from 40 infected freshwater fish samples of the species Oreochromis niloticus niloticus (Nile tilapia) and Clarias gariepinus (African catfish). Samples were collected from various fish farms in the Nile Delta, Egypt. Nile tilapia were tested in aquaria for their susceptibility to the commonest Oomycetes species, Aphanomyces laevis and Achlya klebsiana, and also against the 2 most prevalent pathogenic soil fungi, Paecilomyces lilacinus and Phoma herbarum. Two techniques were used: water bath exposure and intramuscular (subcutaneous) injection. Water bath exposure to the 2 species of Oomycetes caused greater mortalities of O. niloticus niloticus than intramuscular injection, but the reverse was true of the soil fungal species. Regardless of the infection method, the 2 Oomycetes species were more potent pathogens than the soil fungal species. In both gills and mytomal muscles of fish infected by A. laevis and P. herbarum, we measured and compared with controls the oxidative stress parameters total peroxide (TP), lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO), as well as levels of the antioxidants vitamin E and glutathione (GSH), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities. Infection by these 2 fungal species through either spore suspension or spore injection significantly increased oxidative damage in gills and induced marked decrease in most studied antioxidants. In addition, both routes showed similar effects and A. laevis depressed the antioxidants CAT, vitamin E and GSH more than P. herbarum.

  7. Assessment at the single-cell level identifies neuronal glutathione depletion as both a cause and effect of ischemia-reperfusion oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Won, Seok Joon; Kim, Ji-Eun; Cittolin-Santos, Giordano Fabricio; Swanson, Raymond A

    2015-05-06

    Oxidative stress contributes to neuronal death in brain ischemia-reperfusion. Tissue levels of the endogenous antioxidant glutathione (GSH) are depleted during ischemia-reperfusion, but it is unknown whether this depletion is a cause or an effect of oxidative stress, and whether it occurs in neurons or other cell types. We used immunohistochemical methods to evaluate glutathione, superoxide, and oxidative stress in mouse hippocampal neurons after transient forebrain ischemia. GSH levels in CA1 pyramidal neurons were normally high relative to surrounding neuropil, and exhibited a time-dependent decrease during the first few hours of reperfusion. Colabeling for superoxide in the neurons showed a concurrent increase in detectable superoxide over this interval. To identify cause-effect relationships between these changes, we independently manipulated superoxide production and GSH metabolism during reperfusion. Mice in which NADPH oxidase activity was blocked to prevent superoxide production showed preservation of neuronal GSH content, thus demonstrating that neuronal GSH depletion is result of oxidative stress. Conversely, mice in which neuronal GSH levels were maintained by N-acetyl cysteine treatment during reperfusion showed less neuronal superoxide signal, oxidative stress, and neuronal death. At 3 d following ischemia, GSH content in reactive astrocytes and microglia was increased in the hippocampal CA1 relative to surviving neurons. Results of these studies demonstrate that neuronal GSH depletion is both a result and a cause of neuronal oxidative stress after ischemia-reperfusion, and that postischemic restoration of neuronal GSH levels can be neuroprotective.

  8. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  9. [Cyclosporin A causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Hornedo, J; de Arriba, G; Calvino, M; Benito, S; Parra, T

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cyclosporin A (CsA) nephrotoxicity. As mitochondria are one of the main sources of ROS in cells, we evaluated the role of CsA in mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells. We incubated cells with CsA 1 microM for 24 hours and studies were performed with flow citometry and confocal microscopy. We studied mitochondrial NAD(P)H content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production (MitoSOX Red), oxidation of cardiolipin of inner mitochondrial membrane (NAO) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DIOC2(3)). Also we analyzed the intracellular ROS synthesis (H2DCF-DA) and reduced glutation (GSH) of cells. Our results showed that CsA decreased NAD(P)H and membrane potential, and increased O2.- in mitochondria. CsA also provoked oxidation of cardiolipin. Furthermore, CsA increased intracellular ROS production and decreased GSH content. These results suggest that CsA has crucial effects in mitochondria. CsA modified mitochondrial physiology through the decrease of antioxidant mitochondrial compounds as NAD(P)H and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of oxidants as O2.-. Also, CsA alters lipidic structure of inner mitochondrial membrane through the oxidation of cardiolipin. These effects trigger a chain of events that favour intracellular synthesis of ROS and depletion of GSH that can compromise cellular viability. Nephrotoxic cellular effects of CsA can be explained, at least in part, through its influence on mitochondrial functionalism.

  10. Glucantime® causes oxidative stress-derived DNA damage in Balb/c mice infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vanessa Ribeiro; de Jesus, Luís Cláudio Lima; Soares, Rossy-Eric Pereira; Silva, Luis Douglas Miranda; Pinto, Bruno Araújo Serra; Melo, Maria Norma; Paes, Antonio Marcus de Andrade; Pereira, Silma Regina Ferreira

    2017-03-20

    Leishmaniasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by over 20 species of the protozoan parasite Leishmania Regarding treatment, Glucantime® is the first-choice drug recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of all types of leishmaniasis. However, the mechanisms of action and toxicity of pentavalent antimonials, including genotoxic effetcs, remain unclear. Therefore, the mechanism by which Glucantime® causes DNA damage was investigated in BALB/c mice infected by Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum and treated with Glucantime® (20 mg/kg for 20 days). DNA damage was carried out by comet assay using mice leukocytes. Furthermore, comet assays followed by Formamidopyrimidine-DNA-glicosilase and Endonuclease III were performed, which remove oxidized DNA bases. In addition, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were also assessed in the animals serum. To investigate mutagenicity, we carried out micronucleus test. Our data demonstrate that Glucantime® as well as Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum infection induce DNA damage in mammalian cell by oxidation of nitrogenous bases. Additionally, the antileishmanial increased the frequency of micronucleated cells, confirming its mutagenic potential. According to our data, either Glucantime® treatment as well as Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum infection promote oxidative stress-derived DNA damage, which promoted overactivation of the SOD-CAT axis, whereas SOD-GPx axis was inhibited as a probable consequence of GSH depletion. Finally, our data still enable us to suggest that Glucantime® regimen, as recommended by World Health Organization, would compromise GPx activity leading to saturation of antioxidant defense systems that use thiol groups and might be harmful to patients under treatment.

  11. EGFR-TKI, erlotinib, causes hypomagnesemia, oxidative stress, and cardiac dysfunction: attenuation by NK-1 receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Mak, I Tong; Kramer, Jay H; Chmielinska, Joanna J; Spurney, Christopher F; Weglicki, William B

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, erlotinib may cause hypomagnesemia, inflammation, and cardiac stress, erlotinib was administered to rats (10 mg · kg(-1)· d(-1)) for 9 weeks. Plasma magnesium decreased progressively between 3 and 9 weeks (-9% to -26%). Modest increases in plasma substance P (SP) occurred at 3 (27%) and 9 (25%) weeks. Neutrophil superoxide-generating activity increased 3-fold, and plasma 8-isoprostane rose 210%, along with noticeable appearance of cardiac perivascular nitrotyrosine. The neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist, aprepitant (2 mg · kg(-1) · d(-1)), attenuated erlotinib-induced hypomagnesemia up to 42%, reduced circulating SP, suppressed neutrophil superoxide activity and 8-isoprostane elevations; cardiac nitrotyrosine was diminished. Echocardiography revealed mild to moderately decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (-11%) and % fractional shortening (-17%) by 7 weeks of erlotinib treatment and significant reduction (-17.5%) in mitral valve E/A ratio at week 9 indicative of systolic and early diastolic dysfunction. Mild thinning of the left ventricular posterior wall suggested early dilated cardiomyopathy. Aprepitant completely prevented the erlotinib-induced systolic and diastolic dysfunction and partially attenuated the anatomical changes. Thus, chronic erlotinib treatment does induce moderate hypomagnesemia, triggering SP-mediated oxidative/inflammation stress and mild-to-moderate cardiac dysfunction, which can largely be corrected by the administration of the SP receptor blocker.

  12. Oxidative stress and myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Tada, Yuko; Suzuki, Jun-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide are produced highly in myocarditis. ROS, which not only act as effectors for pathogen killing but also mediate signal transduction in the stress responsive pathways, are closely related with both innate and adaptive immunity. On the other hand, oxidative stress overwhelming the capacity of anti-oxidative system generated in severe inflammation has been suggested to damage tissues and exacerbate inflammation. Oxidative stress worsens the autoimmunological process of myocarditis, and suppression of the anti-oxidative system and long-lasting oxidative stress could be one of the pathological mechanisms of cardiac remodeling leading to inflammatory cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is considered to be one of the promising treatment targets of myocarditis. Evidences of anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis have not been fully established. Basic strategies of anti-oxidative treatments include inhibition of ROS production, activation of anti-oxidative enzymes and elimination of generated free radicals. ROS are produced by mitochondrial respiratory chain reactions and enzymes including NADPH oxidases, cyclooxygenase, and xanthine oxidase. Other systems involved in inflammation and stress response, such as NF-κB, Nrf2/Keap1, and neurohumoral factors also influence oxidative stress in myocarditis. The efficacy of anti-oxidative treatments could also depend on the etiology and the phases of myocarditis. We review in this article the pathological significance of ROS and oxidative stress, and the potential anti-oxidative treatments in myocarditis.

  13. Environmental stress causes oxidative damage to plant mitochondria leading to inhibition of glycine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicolas L; Day, David A; Millar, A Harvey

    2002-11-08

    A cytotoxic product of lipid peroxidation, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), rapidly inhibited glycine, malate/pyruvate, and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent O2 consumption by pea leaf mitochondria. Dose- and time-dependence of inhibition showed that glycine oxidation was the most severely affected with a K(0.5) of 30 microm. Several mitochondrial proteins containing lipoic acid moieties differentially lost their reactivity to a lipoic acid antibody following HNE treatment. The most dramatic loss of antigenicity was seen with the 17-kDa glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) H-protein, which was correlated with the loss of glycine-dependent O2 consumption. Paraquat treatment of pea seedlings induced lipid peroxidation, which resulted in the rapid loss of glycine-dependent respiration and loss of H-protein reactivity with lipoic acid antibodies. Pea plants exposed to chilling and water deficit responded similarly. In contrast, the damage to other lipoic acid-containing mitochondrial enzymes was minor under these conditions. The implication of the acute sensitivity of glycine decarboxylase complex H-protein to lipid peroxidation products is discussed in the context of photorespiration and potential repair mechanisms in plant mitochondria.

  14. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers. PMID:24704793

  15. The combination of maternal and offspring high-fat diets causes marked oxidative stress and development of metabolic syndrome in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Ito, Junya; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Kato, Shunji; Miyazawa, Taiki; Kimura, Fumiko; Miyazawa, Teruo

    2016-04-15

    Maternal overnutrition (e.g., high-fat (HF) diet) during pregnancy and lactation is believed to cause oxidative stress and increase the risk of metabolic syndrome in offspring. In the present study, we investigated the effects of both maternal and offspring HF diets on metabolic syndrome risk and oxidative stress profiles in mice. Dams of the C57BL/6J mouse strain were fed a HF or control (CO) diet during gestation and lactation. Offspring were weaned at 3weeks of age. The female offspring were sacrificed at weaning, while the males were maintained on the HF or CO diet until 11weeks of age. Tissue samples, including those from liver, were collected from offspring at 3 and 11weeks of age, and lipids, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxide (PCOOH, an oxidative stress marker), and gene expression were evaluated. Accumulation of lipids, but not PCOOH, was found in the livers of 3-week-old offspring from dams fed the HF diet. When the offspring were maintained on a HF diet until 11weeks of age, marked accumulation of both liver lipids and PCOOH was observed. PCOOH manifestation was supported by the expression of genes such as Gpx4, encoding a PCOOH degrading enzyme. These results suggest that the combination of maternal and offspring overnutrition causes marked oxidative stress in offspring, which accelerates metabolic syndrome. The present findings in offspring from infancy to adulthood may be useful for better understanding the cause-and-effect relationships between oxidative stress and metabolic syndrome development.

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress and genetic damage caused by detergents in the zebrafish Danio rerio (Cyprinidae).

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Figueroa, Alma S

    2013-08-01

    Detergents are used in large quantities and some of their ingredients are highly toxic to aquatic organisms. In the present study the toxicity (lipid peroxidation) and genotoxic (frequency of DNA strand breaks) effects were evaluated in the gill and liver tissues of zebrafish (Danio rerio), exposed for 16days to a sublethal concentration (CL10) of two commercial detergents (laundry and dishwasher use) and an anionic surfactant: alkyl lauryl sulfonate (LAS). The results demonstrated high toxicity with dishwasher detergent, resulting in high lipid peroxidation levels (MDA malondialdehyde evaluation). No differences in MDA concentrations were found among fish exposed to laundry detergent and organisms exposed to LAS. In the genetic damage evaluation, significant differences in the number of cells with DNA strand breaks (comets) were observed: the fish exposed to dishwasher detergent presented the highest number of damaged cells (79%), in comparison with those exposed to other products (laundry and LAS) and the control group (8% damaged cells). The toxicity of dishwasher detergent (biological detergent containing enzymes and perfume) was higher than the value observed with LAS. Laundry detergent does not contain enzymes or perfume and its toxicity was similar to LAS. Since detergents are complex mixtures of different substances, in which additive and/or synergistic effects may occur, the deleterious effect caused by the dishwasher detergent was probably due to the combined effects of the ingredients of detergent.

  17. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  18. Oxidative stress in myopia.

    PubMed

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem.

  19. Deficiency of methionine sulfoxide reductase A causes cellular dysfunction and mitochondrial damage in cardiac myocytes under physical and oxidative stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Nan, Changlong; Li, Yuejin; Jean-Charles, Pierre-Yves; Chen, Guozhen; Kreymerman, Alexander; Prentice, Howard; Weissbach, Herbert; Huang, Xupei

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} Deficiency of MsrA in the heart renders myocardial cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. {yields} Mitochondrial damage happens in the heart lacking MsrA. {yields} More protein oxidation in myocardial cells lacking MsrA. {yields} MsrA protects the heart against oxidative stress. -- Abstract: Methionine sulfoxide reductase A (MsrA) is an enzyme that reverses oxidation of methionine in proteins. Using a MsrA gene knockout (MsrA{sup -/-}) mouse model, we have investigated the role of MsrA in the heart. Our data indicate that cellular contractility and cardiac function are not significantly changed in MsrA{sup -/-} mice if the hearts are not stressed. However, the cellular contractility, when stressed using a higher stimulation frequency (2 Hz), is significantly reduced in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes. MsrA{sup -/-} cardiac myocytes also show a significant decrease in contractility after oxidative stress using H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Corresponding changes in Ca{sup 2+} transients are observed in MsrA{sup -/-} cardiomyocytes treated with 2 Hz stimulation or with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Electron microscope analyses reveal a dramatic morphological change of mitochondria in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts. Further biochemical measurements indicate that protein oxidation levels in MsrA{sup -/-} mouse hearts are significantly higher than those in wild type controls. Our study demonstrates that the lack of MsrA in cardiac myocytes reduces myocardial cell's capability against stress stimulations resulting in a cellular dysfunction in the heart.

  20. Subclinical mastitis in goats is associated with upregulation of nitric oxide-derived oxidative stress that causes reduction of milk antioxidative properties and impairment of its quality.

    PubMed

    Silanikove, Nissim; Merin, Uzi; Shapiro, Fira; Leitner, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the existence of a nitric oxide (NO) cycle in goat milk and to study how changes in it affect milk composition during subclinical mastitis. Fifteen lactating dairy goats in which one udder-half was free from bacterial infection and the contra-lateral one was naturally infected with various species of coagulase-negative staphylococci were used. In comparison to uninfected glands, subclinical mastitis was associated with a decrease in milk yield, lactose concentration, and curd yield and an increase in nitrite and nitrate concentrations and with measurements reflecting increased formation of NO-derived free-radical nitrogen dioxide. The occurrence of NO cycling in goat milk was largely confirmed. The increase in the NO-derived stress during subclinical infection was not associated with significant increase in oxidatively modified substances, 3-nitrotyrosine, and carbonyls on proteins, but with increased levels of peroxides on fat. However, the relatively modest nitrosative stress in subclinically infected glands was associated with significant reduction in total antioxidant capacity and vitamin C levels in milk. We concluded that subclinical mastitis in goats caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci imposes negative changes in milk yield, milk quality for cheese production, and negatively affects the nutritional value of milk as food. Thus, subclinical mastitis in goats should be considered as a serious economic burden both by farmers and by the dairy industry.

  1. Mutations and environmental factors affecting regulation of riboflavin synthesis and iron assimilation also cause oxidative stress in the yeast Pichia guilliermondii.

    PubMed

    Boretsky, Yuriy R; Protchenko, Olga V; Prokopiv, Tetiana M; Mukalov, Igor O; Fedorovych, Daria V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2007-10-01

    Iron deficiency causes oversynthesis of riboflavin in several yeast species, known as flavinogenic yeasts. However, the mechanisms of such regulation are not known. We found that mutations causing riboflavin overproduction and iron hyperaccumulation (rib80, rib81 and hit1), as well as cobalt excess or iron deficiency all provoke oxidative stress in the Pichia guilliermondii yeast. Iron content in the cells, production both of riboflavin and malondialdehyde by P. guilliermondii wild type and hit1 mutant strains depend on a type of carbon source used in cultivation media. The data suggest that the regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and iron assimilation in P. guilliermondii are linked with cellular oxidative state.

  2. Attenuation by creatine of myocardial metabolic stress in Brattleboro rats caused by chronic inhibition of nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Constantin-Teodosiu, D.; Greenhaff, P. L.; Gardiner, S. M.; Randall, M. D.; March, J. E.; Bennett, T.

    1995-01-01

    1. The present experiment was undertaken to investigate: (a) the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition, mediated by oral supplementation of the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), on measures of myocardial energy metabolism and function: (b) the effect of oral creatine supplementation on these variables, in the absence and presence of L-NAME. 2. In one series of experiments, 4 weeks oral administration of L-NAME (0.05 mg ml-1 day-1 in the drinking water) to Brattleboro rats caused significant reductions in myocardial ATP, creatine, and total creatine concentrations and an accumulation of tissue lactate when compared with control animals. Administration of creatine (0.63 mg ml-1 day-1 in the drinking water) for 4 weeks elevated myocardial creatine and total creatine concentrations and reduced lactate accumulation, but did not significantly affect ATP or phosphocreatine (PCr). Concurrent treatment with creatine and L-NAME prevented the reduction in creatine and total creatine concentrations, and significantly attenuated the accumulation of lactate and the reduction in ATP seen with L-NAME alone. 3. In a second series of experiments, 4 weeks treatment with L-NAME and creatine plus L-NAME increased mean arterial blood pressure in conscious Brattleboro rats. Hearts isolated from these animals showed decreased coronary flow and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP), and total mechanical performance. Treatment with creatine alone had no measurable effect on either mean arterial blood pressure or coronary flow in isolated hearts. However, there was an increase in LVDP, but not in total mechanical performance, because there was a bradycardia. 4. These results indicate that creatine supplementation can attenuate the metabolic stress associated with L-NAME administration and that this effect occurs as a consequence of the action of creatine on myocardial energy metabolism. PMID:8719809

  3. Inorganic mercury causes pancreatic beta-cell death via the oxidative stress-induced apoptotic and necrotic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yawen; Huang Chunfa; Yang Chingyao; Yen Chengchieh; Tsai Kehsung; Liu Shinghwa

    2010-03-15

    Mercury is a well-known highly toxic metal. In this study, we characterize and investigate the cytotoxicity and its possible mechanisms of inorganic mercury in pancreatic beta-cells. Mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) dose-dependently decreased the function of insulin secretion and cell viability in pancreatic beta-cell-derived HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. HgCl{sub 2} significantly increased ROS formation in HIT-T15 cells. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine effectively reversed HgCl{sub 2}-induced insulin secretion dysfunction in HIT-T15 cells and isolated mouse pancreatic islets. Moreover, HgCl{sub 2} increased sub-G1 hypodiploids and annexin-V binding in HIT-T15 cells, indicating that HgCl{sub 2} possessed ability in apoptosis induction. HgCl{sub 2} also displayed several features of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signals including disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, increase of mitochondrial cytochrome c release and activations of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase 3. Exposure of HIT-T15 cells to HgCl{sub 2} could significantly increase both apoptotic and necrotic cell populations by acridine orange/ethidium bromide dual staining. Meanwhile, HgCl{sub 2} could also trigger the depletion of intracellular ATP levels and increase the LDH release from HIT-T15 cells. These HgCl{sub 2}-induced cell death-related signals could be significantly reversed by N-acetylcysteine. The intracellular mercury levels were markedly elevated in HgCl{sub 2}-treated HIT-T15 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that HgCl{sub 2}-induced oxidative stress causes pancreatic beta-cell dysfunction and cytotoxicity involved the co-existence of apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  4. Oxidative Stress Causes Imbalance of Renal Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) Components and Hypertension in Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hao; Wang, Xinquan; Chen, Caiyu; Wang, Jialiang; Zou, Xue; Li, Chuanwei; Xu, Zaicheng; Yang, Xiaoli; Shi, Weibin; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, especially in obesity‐related hypertension. The natriuretic and antinatriuretic components of the renal renin angiotensin system (RAS) maintain sodium homeostasis and blood pressure. Here, we test the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress leads to the imbalance of RAS components and hypertension in obese Zucker rats. Methods and Results Lean and obese rats received vehicle or tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic in the drinking water for 4 weeks. Compared with vehicle‐treated lean rats, vehicle‐treated obese rats exhibited higher blood pressure and increased renal oxidative stress, accompanied by increased diuretic and natriuretic responses to AT1R antagonist (Candesartan) and AT2R agonist (CGP‐42112A) and reduced diuretic and natriuretic response to MasR agonist (Ang‐[1 to 7]). Moreover, obese rats had higher ACE, AT1R and AT2R, lower ACE2 and MasR expressions in the kidney. All of the above‐mentioned abnormalities were reversed to some degree by tempol treatment. In primary cultures of renal proximal tubular (RPT) cells from lean and obese rats, tempol treatment also increased AT2R, ACE2, and MasR expressions but decreased AT1R and ACE expressions in obese rats. Conclusions Taken together, our study indicated that the imbalance of renal RAS components was associated with increased oxidative stress in obese rats. Furthermore, antioxidant treatment with tempol reversed the imbalance of renal RAS components and led to diuresis and natriuresis, which, at least in part, explains the blood pressure‐lowering effect of antioxidant supplementation in obesity‐related hypertension. PMID:25687731

  5. Evidence for induction of oxidative stress caused by chronic exposure of Chinese residents to arsenic contained in drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Jingbo; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Kumagai, Yoshito; Sun, Guifan; Yoshida, Takahiko; Aikawa, Hiroyuki; Hopenhayn-Rich, Claudia; Shimojo, Nobuhiro

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of experimental animals or cultured cells to arsenic induces oxidative stress, but, to date, no examination of this phenomenon in humans has been reported. In this study we conducted a cross-sectional study in Wuyuan, Inner Mongolia, China, to explore the relationship between chronic arsenic exposure from drinking water and oxidative stress in humans. Thirty-three inhabitants who had been drinking tube-well water with high concentrations of inorganic arsenic (mean value = 0.41 mg/L) for about 18 years constituted the high-exposure group, and 10 residents who lived nearby but were exposed to much lower concentrations of arsenic in their drinking water (mean value = 0.02 mg/L) were selected as the low-exposure comparison group. Results of the present study indicated that although the activity for superoxide dismutase (SOD) in blood did not differ significantly between the two groups, the mean serum level of lipid peroxides (LPO) was significantly higher among the high-exposed compared with the low-exposed group. Elevated serum LPO concentrations were correlated with blood levels of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites. In addition, they showed an inverse correlation with nonprotein sulfhydryl (NPSH) levels in whole blood. The subjects in the high-arsenic-exposure group had mean blood NPSH levels 57.6% lower than those in the low-exposure group. Blood NPSH levels were inversely correlated with the concentrations of inorganic arsenic and its methylated metabolites in blood and with the ratio of monomethylarsenic to inorganic arsenic. These results provide evidence that chronic exposure to arsenic from drinking water in humans results in induction of oxidative stress, as indicated by the reduction in NPSH and the increase in LPO. Some possible mechanisms for the arsenic-induced oxidative stress are discussed. PMID:11940449

  6. Chronic Oxidative Stress Causes Amplification and Overexpression of ptprz1 Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase to Activate β-Catenin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase ζ or receptor tyrosine phosphatase β) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16∼552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the β-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated β-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear β-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating β-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification. PMID:18055543

  7. Chronic oxidative stress causes amplification and overexpression of ptprz1 protein tyrosine phosphatase to activate beta-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-Ting; Shang, Donghao; Akatsuka, Shinya; Ohara, Hiroki; Dutta, Khokon Kumar; Mizushima, Katsura; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Abe, Kouichiro; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Noguchi, Noriko; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2007-12-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate induces oxidative renal tubular damage via Fenton-reaction, which subsequently leads to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) in rodents. Here, we used gene expression microarray and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analyses to find target oncogenes in this model. At the common chromosomal region of amplification (4q22) in rat RCCs, we found ptprz1, a tyrosine phosphatase (also known as protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta or receptor tyrosine phosphatase beta) highly expressed in the RCCs. Analyses revealed genomic amplification up to eightfold. Despite scarcity in the control kidney, the amounts of PTPRZ1 were increased in the kidney after 3 weeks of oxidative stress, and mRNA levels were increased 16 approximately 552-fold in the RCCs. Network analysis of the expression revealed the involvement of the beta-catenin pathway in the RCCs. In the RCCs, dephosphorylated beta-catenin was translocated to nuclei, resulting in the expression of its target genes cyclin D1, c-myc, c-jun, fra-1, and CD44. Furthermore, knockdown of ptprz1 with small interfering RNA (siRNA), in FRCC-001 and FRCC-562 cell lines established from the induced RCCs, decreased the amounts of nuclear beta-catenin and suppressed cellular proliferation concomitant with a decrease in the expression of target genes. These results demonstrate that chronic oxidative stress can induce genomic amplification of ptprz1, activating beta-catenin pathways without the involvement of Wnt signaling for carcinogenesis. Thus, iron-mediated persistent oxidative stress confers an environment for gene amplification.

  8. Oxidative stress is a consequence, not a cause, of aluminum toxicity in the forage legume Lotus corniculatus.

    PubMed

    Navascués, Joaquín; Pérez-Rontomé, Carmen; Sánchez, Diego H; Staudinger, Christiana; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Rellán-Álvarez, Rubén; Becana, Manuel

    2012-02-01

    • Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major limiting factor of crop production on acid soils, but the implication of oxidative stress in this process is controversial. A multidisciplinary approach was used here to address this question in the forage legume Lotus corniculatus. • Plants were treated with low Al concentrations in hydroponic culture, and physiological and biochemical parameters, together with semiquantitative metabolic and proteomic profiles, were determined. • The exposure of plants to 10 μM Al inhibited root and leaf growth, but had no effect on the production of reactive oxygen species or lipid peroxides. By contrast, exposure to 20 μM Al elicited the production of superoxide radicals, peroxide and malondialdehyde. In response to Al, there was a progressive replacement of the superoxide dismutase isoforms in the cytosol, a loss of ascorbate and consistent changes in amino acids, sugars and associated enzymes. • We conclude that oxidative stress is not a causative factor of Al toxicity. The increased contents in roots of two powerful Al chelators, malic and 2-isopropylmalic acids, together with the induction of an Al-activated malate transporter gene, strongly suggest that both organic acids are implicated in Al detoxification. The effects of Al on key proteins involved in cytoskeleton dynamics, protein turnover, transport, methylation reactions, redox control and stress responses underscore a metabolic dysfunction, which affects multiple cellular compartments, particularly in plants exposed to 20 μM Al.

  9. The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine on oxidative stress in the brain caused by the long-term intake of aspartame by rats.

    PubMed

    Finamor, Isabela A; Ourique, Giovana M; Pês, Tanise S; Saccol, Etiane M H; Bressan, Caroline A; Scheid, Taína; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Llesuy, Susana F; Partata, Wânia A; Pavanato, Maria A

    2014-09-01

    Long-term intake of aspartame at the acceptable daily dose causes oxidative stress in rodent brain mainly due to the dysregulation of glutathione (GSH) homeostasis. N-Acetylcysteine provides the cysteine that is required for the production of GSH, being effective in treating disorders associated with oxidative stress. We investigated the effects of N-acetylcysteine treatment (150 mg kg(-1), i.p.) on oxidative stress biomarkers in rat brain after chronic aspartame administration by gavage (40 mg kg(-1)). N-Acetylcysteine led to a reduction in the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides, and carbonyl protein levels, which were increased due to aspartame administration. N-Acetylcysteine also resulted in an elevation of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase activities, as well as non-protein thiols, and total reactive antioxidant potential levels, which were decreased after aspartame exposure. However, N-acetylcysteine was unable to reduce serum glucose levels, which were increased as a result of aspartame administration. Furthermore, catalase and glutathione S-transferase, whose activities were reduced due to aspartame treatment, remained decreased even after N-acetylcysteine exposure. In conclusion, N-acetylcysteine treatment may exert a protective effect against the oxidative damage in the brain, which was caused by the long-term consumption of the acceptable daily dose of aspartame by rats.

  10. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats.

  11. Energy Drink Administration in Combination with Alcohol Causes an Inflammatory Response and Oxidative Stress in the Hippocampus and Temporal Cortex of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Alfonso; Treviño, Samuel; Guevara, Jorge; Muñoz-Arenas, Guadalupe; Brambila, Eduardo; Espinosa, Blanca; Moreno-Rodríguez, Albino; Lopez-Lopez, Gustavo; Peña-Rosas, Ulises; Venegas, Berenice; Handal-Silva, Anabella; Morán-Perales, José Luis; Flores, Gonzalo; Aguilar-Alonso, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) are often consumed in combination with alcohol because they reduce the depressant effects of alcohol. However, different researches suggest that chronic use of these psychoactive substances in combination with alcohol can trigger an oxidative and inflammatory response. These processes are regulated by both a reactive astrogliosis and an increase of proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β, TNF-α, and iNOS, causing cell death (apoptosis) at the central and peripheral nervous systems. Currently, mechanisms of toxicity caused by mixing alcohol and ED in the brain are not well known. In this study, we evaluated the effect of chronic alcohol consumption in combination with ED on inflammatory response and oxidative stress in the temporal cortex (TCx) and hippocampus (Hp) of adult rats (90 days old). Our results demonstrated that consuming a mixture of alcohol and ED for 60 days induced an increase in reactive gliosis, IL-1β, TNF-α, iNOS, reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, and nitric oxide, in the TCx and Hp. We also found immunoreactivity to caspase-3 and a decrease of synaptophysin in the same brain regions. The results suggested that chronic consumption of alcohol in combination with ED causes an inflammatory response and oxidative stress, which induced cell death via apoptosis in the TCx and Hp of the adult rats. PMID:27069534

  12. Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongxiu; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic skin disorder affecting many people especially young children. It is a disease caused by the combination of genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, and skin barrier defect. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests oxidative stress may play an important role in many skin diseases and skin aging, possibly including AD. In this review, we give an update on scientific progress linking oxidative stress to AD and discuss future treatment strategies for better disease control and improved quality of life for AD patients. PMID:27006746

  13. Erythropoietin and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2008-05-01

    Unmitigated oxidative stress can lead to diminished cellular longevity, accelerated aging, and accumulated toxic effects for an organism. Current investigations further suggest the significant disadvantages that can occur with cellular oxidative stress that can lead to clinical disability in a number of disorders, such as myocardial infarction, dementia, stroke, and diabetes. New therapeutic strategies are therefore sought that can be directed toward ameliorating the toxic effects of oxidative stress. Here we discuss the exciting potential of the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin for the treatment of diseases such as cardiac ischemia, vascular injury, neurodegeneration, and diabetes through the modulation of cellular oxidative stress. Erythropoietin controls a variety of signal transduction pathways during oxidative stress that can involve Janus-tyrosine kinase 2, protein kinase B, signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, Wnt proteins, mammalian forkhead transcription factors, caspases, and nuclear factor kappaB. Yet, the biological effects of erythropoietin may not always be beneficial and may be poor tolerated in a number of clinical scenarios, necessitating further basic and clinical investigations that emphasize the elucidation of the signal transduction pathways controlled by erythropoietin to direct both successful and safe clinical care.

  14. Overexpression of PCNA Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Caused Delay of Gap-Filling during Repair of UV-Induced DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    UVC irradiation-caused DNA lesions are repaired in mammalian cells solely by nucleotide excision repair (NER), which consists of sequential events including initial damage recognition, dual incision of damage site, gap-filling, and ligation. We have previously shown that gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions may be delayed by a subsequent treatment of oxidants or prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, flavonoids, and colcemid. We considered the delay as a result of competition for limiting protein/enzyme factor(s) during repair synthesis between NER and base excision repair (BER) induced by the oxidative chemicals. In this report, using colcemid as oxidative stress inducer, we showed that colcemid-caused delay of gap-filling during the repair of UV-induced DNA lesions was attenuated by overexpression of PCNA but not ligase-I. PCNA knockdown, as expected, delayed the gap-filling of NER but also impaired the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Fen-1 knockdown, however, did not affect the repair of oxidative DNA damage, suggesting repair of oxidative DNA damage is not of long patch BER. Furthermore, overexpression of XRCC1 delayed the gap-filling, and presumably increase of XRCC1 pulls PCNA away from gap-filling of NER for BER, consistent with our hypothesis that delay of gap-filling of NER attributes the competition between NER and BER. PMID:28116145

  15. Phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect against HgCl(2)-caused oxidative stress and renal damage.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, R; Ortiz-Butrón, R; Blas-Valdivia, V; Hernández-García, A; Cano-Europa, E

    2012-12-15

    Our objective was to determine if the phycobiliproteins of Arthrospira (Spirulina) maxima protect renal cells against mercury-caused oxidative stress and cellular damage in the kidney. We used 40 male mice that were assigned into eight groups: (1) a control group that received 100mM phosphate buffer (PB) ig and 0.9% saline ip, (2) PB+HgCl(2) (5mg/kg ip), (3) PB plus phycobiliproteins (100mg/kg ig), (4) PB plus C-phycocyanin (100mg/kg ig), and four groups receiving HgCl(2)+phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin (50, and 100mg/kg ig). The left kidneys were used to determine lipid peroxidation, quantification of reactive oxygen species, and reduced glutathione and oxidised content. The right kidneys were processed for histology. The HgCl(2) caused oxidative stress and cellular damage. All doses of phycobiliproteins or C-phycocyanin prevented enhancement of oxidative markers and they protected against HgCl(2)-caused cellular damage.

  16. AMPA receptor activation causes preferential mitochondrial Ca²⁺ load and oxidative stress in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Dinesh C; Tewari, Bhanu P; Singh, Mahendra; Joshi, Preeti G; Joshi, Nanda B

    2015-08-07

    It is well established that motor neurons are highly vulnerable to glutamate induced excitotoxicity. The selective vulnerability of these neurons has been attributed to AMPA receptor mediated excessive rise in cytosolic calcium and consequent mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading. Earlier we have reported that in motor neurons a generic rise in [Ca(2+)]i does not always lead to mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading and membrane depolarization but it occurs upon AMPA receptor activation. The mechanism of such specific mitochondrial involvement upon AMPA receptor activation is not known. The present study examines the mitochondrial Ca(2+) regulation and oxidative stress in spinal cord neurons upon AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor activation. Stimulating the spinal neurons with AMPA exhibited a sharp rise in [Ca(2+)]m in both motor and other spinal neurons that was sustained up to the end of recording time of 30min. The rise in [Ca(2+)]m was substantially higher in motor neurons than in other spinal neurons which could be due to the differential mitochondrial homeostasis in two types of neurons. To examine this possibility, we measured AMPA induced [Ca(2+)]m loading in the presence of mitochondrial inhibitors. In both cell types the AMPA induced [Ca(2+)]m loading was blocked by mitochondrial calcium uniporter blocker ruthenium red. In motor neurons it was also inhibited substantially by CGP37157 and cyclosporine-A, the blockers of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) respectively, whereas no effect of these agents was observed in other spinal neurons. Thus in motor neurons the Ca(2+) sequestration by mitochondria occurs through mitochondrial calcium uniporter as well as due to reversal of Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger, in contrast the latter pathway does not contribute in other spinal neurons. The ROS formation was inhibited by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor L-NAME in both types of neurons, however the mitochondrial complex-I inhibitor rotenone

  17. DNA damage and oxidative stress in human liver cell L-02 caused by surface water extracts during drinking water treatment in a waterworks in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shao-Hua; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Hui-Juan; Jin, Bang-Xiong; Lu, Wen-Hong; Li, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2010-04-01

    Because of the daily and life-long exposure to disinfection by-products formed during drinking water treatment, potential adverse human health risk of drinking water disinfection is of great concern. Toxicological studies have shown that drinking water treatment increases the genotoxicity of surface water. Drinking water treatment is comprised of different potabilization steps, which greatly influence the levels of genotoxic products in the surface water and thus may alter the toxicity and genotoxicity of surface water. The aim of the present study was to understand the influence of specific steps on toxicity and genotoxicity during the treatment of surface water in a water treatment plant using liquid chlorine as the disinfectant in China. An integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays was used in the study, and the results showed that both the prechlorination and postchlorination steps increased DNA damage and oxidative stress caused by water extracts in human derived L-02 cells while the tube settling and filtration steps had the opposite effect. This research also highlighted the usefulness of an integrated approach of the comet and oxidative stress assays in evaluating the genotoxicity of surface water during drinking water treatment.

  18. Metals from mine waste as potential cause of oxidative stress in burrowing crab Neohelice granulata from San Antonio bay.

    PubMed

    Giarratano, Erica; Gil, Mónica N; Marinho, Carmen H; Malanga, Gabriela

    2016-10-01

    The Natural Protected Area San Antonio bay is of particular importance for its congregation of migratory shorebirds and it has been declared one of the Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network International site (WHSRN). Present study represents the first assessment of variation on oxidative stress biomarkers in male crab Neohelice granulata from San Antonio bay (Río Negro, Argentina) under field conditions, associated mainly to metal contamination coming from passive mining wastes. Three sites were sampled once every three months from November 2012 to August 2013 within this sea inlet (Pile, Fishery and Port) and a control site at the southeast of the bay (Punta Perdices). Accumulation of Ni, Zn, Cr and Al varied only with seasons although without a constant trend, meanwhile Cd, Cu and Pb also varied among sites being highest in Pile and Port. Biochemical results indicated that variations in catalase activity was only site specific being maximum in Pile; meanwhile lipid radical, α-tocopherol and metallothioneins were only seasonal specific being higher in autumn and winter. Seasonal variation was also found for total thioles, being the content higher in summer and autumn than in winter. Correlation analysis revealed that malondialdehyde and α-tocopherol have a positive association with Al and negative with Ni, meanwhile GST has a positive association with Fe. Crabs from the closest area to the waste pile did not exhibit a differentiated oxidative pressure despite the higher accumulation of metals. It is possible that crabs from contaminated areas have developed a tolerance to metals, indicating a strong ecotoxicological selective pressure. More studies are needed to assess whether there is a transfer of metals through the food chain.

  19. Haemophilus influenzae and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Alistair; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Munson, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. H. influenzae can, however, move out of its commensal niche and cause multiple respiratory tract diseases. Such diseases include otitis media in young children, as well as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sinusitis, conjunctivitis, and bronchitis. During the course of colonization and infection, H. influenzae must withstand oxidative stress generated by multiple reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by other co-pathogens and by host cells. H. influenzae has, therefore, evolved multiple mechanisms that protect the cell against oxygen-generated stresses. In this review, we will describe these systems relative to the well-described systems in Escherichia coli. Moreover, we will compare how H. influenzae combats the effect of oxidative stress as a necessary phenotype for its roles as both a successful commensal and pathogen. PMID:22919631

  20. Exposure of breast cancer cells to a subcytotoxic dose of apigenin causes growth inhibition, oxidative stress, and hypophosphorylation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Megan E; Power Coombs, Melanie R; Delaney, Leanne M; Hoskin, David W

    2014-10-01

    Epidemiological studies show that fruit- and vegetable-rich diets are associated with a reduced risk of developing certain forms of cancer, including breast cancer. In this study we demonstrate that a subcytotoxic concentration of apigenin, which is a flavone found at high concentrations in parsley, onions, grapefruit, oranges, and chamomile tea, inhibited DNA synthesis in a panel of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MBA-MB-468, MCF-7, SK-BR-3). Decreased proliferation of MDA-MB-468 cells in the presence of apigenin was associated with G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and the production of reactive oxygen species. Apigenin-treated MDA-MB-468 cells also showed reduced phosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B), which is an essential effector serine/threonine kinase in the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase pathway that promotes tumor growth and progression. However, exposure to the antioxidant reduced glutathione failed to reverse apigenin-mediated inhibition of Akt phosphorylation and cell proliferation, indicating that these effects were not due to oxidative stress. Taken together, these findings suggest that low-dose apigenin has the potential to slow or prevent breast cancer progression.

  1. Inflammation and oxidative stress caused by nitric oxide synthase uncoupling might lead to left ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction in patients with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Szelényi, Zsuzsanna; Fazakas, Ádám; Szénási, Gábor; Kiss, Melinda; Tegze, Narcis; Fekete, Bertalan Csaba; Nagy, Eszter; Bodó, Imre; Nagy, Bálint; Molvarec, Attila; Patócs, Attila; Pepó, Lilla; Prohászka, Zoltán; Vereckei, András

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability and neuroendocrine activation in the transition of hypertensive heart disease to heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Methods We performed echocardiography for 112 patients (≥ 60 years old) with normal EF (18 controls and 94 with hypertension), and determined protein carbonylation (PC), and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), fibrinogen, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-I (PAI-I), von Willebrand factor, chromogranin A (cGA) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels from their blood samples. Results We found that 40% (38/94) of the patients with hypertension (HT) had no diastolic dysfunction (HTDD−), and 60% (56/94) had diastolic dysfunction (HTDD+). Compared to the controls, both patient groups had increased PC and BH4, TNF-α, PAI-I and BNP levels, while the HTDD+ group had elevated cGA and CRP levels. Decreased atrial and longitudinal left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic myocardial deformation (strain and strain rate) was demonstrated in both patient groups versus the control. Patients whose LV diastolic function deteriorated during the follow-up had elevated PC and IL-6 level compared to their own baseline values, and to the respective values of patients whose LV diastolic function remained unchanged. Oxidative stress, inflammation, BNP and PAI-I levels inversely correlated with LV systolic, diastolic and atrial function. Conclusions In patients with HT and normal EF, the most common HFPEF precursor condition, oxidative stress and inflammation may be responsible for LV systolic, diastolic and atrial dysfunction, which are important determinants of the transition of HT to HFPEF. PMID:25678898

  2. Cigarette smoke causes lung vascular barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase

    PubMed Central

    Sakhatskyy, Pavlo; Grinnell, Katie; Newton, Julie; Ortiz, Melanie; Wang, Yulian; Sanchez-Esteban, Juan; Harrington, Elizabeth O.; Rounds, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is a major cause of chronic lung and cardiovascular diseases. Recent studies indicate that tobacco use is also a risk factor for acute lung injury (ALI) associated with blunt trauma. Increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability is a hallmark of ALI. CS increases EC permeability in vitro and in vivo; however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. In this study, we found that only 6 h of exposure to CS impaired endothelial barrier function in vivo, an effect associated with increased oxidative stress in the lungs and attenuated by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). CS also exacerbated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in vascular permeability in vivo. Similar additive effects were also seen in cultured lung EC exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and LPS. We further demonstrated that CSE caused disruption of focal adhesion complexes (FAC), F-actin fibers, and adherens junctions (AJ) and decreased activities of RhoA and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in cultured lung EC. CSE-induced inhibition of RhoA and FAK, endothelial barrier dysfunction, and disassembly of FAC, F-actin, and AJ were prevented by NAC. In addition, the deleterious effects of CSE on FAC, F-actin fibers, and AJ were blunted by overexpression of constitutively active RhoA and of FAK. Our data indicate that CS causes endothelial barrier dysfunction via oxidative stress-mediated inhibition of RhoA and FAK. PMID:21984567

  3. Hemoglobin oxidative stress in cancer.

    PubMed

    Della Rovere, F; Granata, A; Broccio, M; Zirilli, A; Broccio, G

    1995-01-01

    The role played by free radicals in carcinogenesis and their relationships with antioxidant pool and cancer have already been shown. Free radicals induce increased membrane permeability through membrane lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and histamine release from mast cells. Free radicals also cause oxyhemoglobin oxidative stress which increases methemoglobin and hemichromes. For this reason, we studied the in vitro formation of methemoglobin at 0' and 90', dosed following the HPLC method, after oxidative stress of blood by means of acetylphenylhydrazine in 40 subjects with cancer and 40 healthy donors. The results showed that methemoglobin formation was highly significant in tumors as compared to controls (P < 0.0001). The statistical analyses we carried out showed that metHb formation is not affected by age, sex, smoking habit, red blood cell number, Hb, Ht or tumor staging. This makes us believe that free radicals alter erythrocyte membrane permeability and predenaturate oxyhemoglobin so that erythrocyte membrane becomes more susceptible to new oxidative stress. This caused the abnormal response we found. Our results clearly underline the role played by free radicals in tumorous disease and provide a successful and easy method to detect early, even in a pre-clinical stage, the presence of tumorous alterations in the human body.

  4. Oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces β-amyloid 1-42 overproduction and mitochondrial accumulation by activating the amyloidogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, L F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2015-09-24

    Oxidative stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has been suggested to be the trigger of AD pathology. However, whether oxidative damage precedes and contributes directly to the intracellular accumulation of beta amyloid 1-42 (βA42) peptide remains a matter of debate. Chronic exposure to low doses of ozone similar to the levels during a day of high pollution in México City causes a state of oxidative stress that elicits progressive neurodegeneration in the hippocampi of rats. Several reports have demonstrated that the mitochondria are among the first organelles to be affected by oxidative stress and βA42 toxicity and act as sites of the accumulation of βA42, which affects energy metabolism. However, the mechanisms related to the neurodegeneration process and organelle damage that occur in conditions of chronic exposure to low doses of ozone have not been demonstrated. To analyze the effect of chronic ozone chronic exposure on changes in the production and accumulation of the βA42 and βA40 peptides in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons of rats exposed to ozone, we examined the mitochondrial expression levels of Presenilins 1 and 2 and ADAM10 to detect changes related to the oxidative stress caused by low doses of ozone (0.25ppm). The results revealed significant accumulations of βA42 peptide in the mitochondrial fractions on days 60 and 90 of ozone exposure along with reductions in beta amyloid 1-40 accumulation, significant overexpressions of Pres2 and significant reductions in ADAM10 expression. Beta amyloid immunodetection revealed that there were some intracellular deposits of βA42 and that βA42 and the mitochondrial markers OPA1 and COX1 colocalized. These results indicate that the time of exposure to ozone and the accumulation of βA42 in the mitochondria of the hippocampal cells of rats were correlated. Our results suggest that the accumulation of the βA42 peptide may promote mitochondrial dysfunction due to its

  5. Alcohol Causes Alveolar Epithelial Oxidative Stress by Inhibiting the Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-Derived 2)–Like 2–Antioxidant Response Element Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, J. Spencer; Fan, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of acute lung injury and pneumonia. Chronic alcohol ingestion causes oxidative stress within the alveolar space, including near depletion of glutathione (GSH), which impairs alveolar epithelial and macrophage function, in experimental animals and human subjects. However, the fundamental mechanism(s) by which alcohol induces such profound lung oxidative stress is unknown. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)–like 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive master transcription factor that regulates activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). As the alveolar epithelium controls GSH levels within the alveolar space, we hypothesized that alcohol also decreases Nrf2 expression and/or activation within the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that alcohol ingestion in vivo or direct alcohol exposure in vitro down-regulated the Nrf2–ARE pathway in lung epithelial cells, decreased the expression of antioxidant genes, and lowered intracellular GSH levels. RNA silencing of Nrf2 gene expression in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro decreased expression of these same antioxidant genes, and likewise lowered intracellular GSH levels, findings that mirrored the effects of alcohol. In contrast, treating alcohol-exposed alveolar epithelial cells in vitro with the Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, preserved Nrf2 expression, ARE activation, intracellular GSH levels, and epithelial barrier function. These new experimental findings implicate down-regulation of the Nrf2–ARE signaling pathway as a fundamental mechanism by which alcohol causes profound oxidative stress and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, and suggest that treatments, such as sulforaphane, that activate this pathway could mitigate the pathophysiological consequences of alcohol on the lung and other organs. PMID:23306837

  6. Alcohol causes alveolar epithelial oxidative stress by inhibiting the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2-antioxidant response element signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Jensen, J Spencer; Fan, Xian; Guidot, David M

    2013-04-01

    Excessive alcohol use increases the risk of acute lung injury and pneumonia. Chronic alcohol ingestion causes oxidative stress within the alveolar space, including near depletion of glutathione (GSH), which impairs alveolar epithelial and macrophage function, in experimental animals and human subjects. However, the fundamental mechanism(s) by which alcohol induces such profound lung oxidative stress is unknown. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive master transcription factor that regulates activation of the antioxidant response element (ARE). As the alveolar epithelium controls GSH levels within the alveolar space, we hypothesized that alcohol also decreases Nrf2 expression and/or activation within the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that alcohol ingestion in vivo or direct alcohol exposure in vitro down-regulated the Nrf2-ARE pathway in lung epithelial cells, decreased the expression of antioxidant genes, and lowered intracellular GSH levels. RNA silencing of Nrf2 gene expression in alveolar epithelial cells in vitro decreased expression of these same antioxidant genes, and likewise lowered intracellular GSH levels, findings that mirrored the effects of alcohol. In contrast, treating alcohol-exposed alveolar epithelial cells in vitro with the Nrf2 activator, sulforaphane, preserved Nrf2 expression, ARE activation, intracellular GSH levels, and epithelial barrier function. These new experimental findings implicate down-regulation of the Nrf2-ARE signaling pathway as a fundamental mechanism by which alcohol causes profound oxidative stress and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, and suggest that treatments, such as sulforaphane, that activate this pathway could mitigate the pathophysiological consequences of alcohol on the lung and other organs.

  7. Oxidative stress causes hypertension and activation of nuclear factor-κB after high-fructose and salt treatments

    PubMed Central

    Dornas, Waleska C.; Cardoso, Leonardo M.; Silva, Maísa; Machado, Natália L. S.; Chianca-Jr., Deoclécio A.; Alzamora, Andréia C.; Lima, Wanderson G.; Lagente, Vincent; Silva, Marcelo E.

    2017-01-01

    There is evidence that diets rich in salt or simple sugars as fructose are associated with abnormalities in blood pressure regulation. However, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of salt- and fructose-induced kidney damage and/or consequent hypertension yet remain largely unexplored. Here, we tested the role of oxidative state as an essential factor along with high salt and fructose treatment in causing hypertension. Fischer male rats were supplemented with a high-fructose diet (20% in water) for 20 weeks and maintained on high-salt diet (8%) associate in the last 10 weeks. Fructose-fed rats exhibited a salt-dependent hypertension accompanied by decrease in renal superoxide dismutase activity, which is the first footprint of antioxidant inactivation by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Metabolic changes and the hypertensive effect of the combined fructose-salt diet (20 weeks) were markedly reversed by a superoxide scavenger, Tempol (10 mg/kg, gavage); moreover, Tempol (50 mM) potentially reduced ROS production and abolished nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells incubated with L-fructose (30 mM) and NaCl (500 mosmol/kg added). Taken together, our data suggested a possible role of oxygen radicals and ROS-induced activation of NF-κB in the fructose- and salt-induced hypertension associated with the progression of the renal disease.

  8. CVD and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes Gracia, Karla; Llanas-Cornejo, Daniel; Husi, Holger

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, it is known that oxidative stress plays at least two roles within the cell, the generation of cellular damage and the involvement in several signaling pathways in its balanced normal state. So far, a substantial amount of time and effort has been expended in the search for a clear link between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the effects of oxidative stress. Here, we present an overview of the different sources and types of reactive oxygen species in CVD, highlight the relationship between CVD and oxidative stress and discuss the most prominent molecules that play an important role in CVD pathophysiology. Details are given regarding common pharmacological treatments used for cardiovascular distress and how some of them are acting upon ROS-related pathways and molecules. Novel therapies, recently proposed ROS biomarkers, as well as future challenges in the field are addressed. It is apparent that the search for a better understanding of how ROS are contributing to the pathophysiology of CVD is far from over, and new approaches and more suitable biomarkers are needed for the latter to be accomplished. PMID:28230726

  9. Role of oxidative stress on platelet hyperreactivity during aging.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2016-03-01

    Thrombotic events are common causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Age-accelerated vascular injury is commonly considered to result from increased oxidative stress. There is abundant evidence that oxidative stress regulate several components of thrombotic processes, including platelet activation. Thus oxidative stress can trigger platelet hyperreactivity by decreasing nitric oxide bioavailability. Therefore oxidative stress measurement may help in the early identification of asymptomatic subjects at risk of thrombosis. In addition, oxidative stress inhibitors and platelet-derived nitric oxide may represent a novel anti-aggregation/-activation approach. In this article the relative contribution of oxidative stress and platelet activation in aging is explored.

  10. Oxidative stress and glycemic regulation.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A

    2000-02-01

    Oxidative stress is an acknowledged pathogenetic mechanism in diabetic complications. Hyperglycemia is a widely known cause of enhanced free radical concentration, whereas oxidative stress involvement in glycemic regulation is still debated. Glucose transport is a cascade of events starting from the interaction of insulin with its own receptor at the plasma membrane and ending with intracellular glucose metabolism. In this complex series of events, each step plays an important role and can be inhibited by a negative effect of oxidative stress. Several studies show that an acute increase in the blood glucose level may impair the physiological homeostasis of many systems in living organisms. The mechanisms through which acute hyperglycemia exerts these effects may be identified in the production of free radicals. It has been suggested that insulin resistance may be accompanied by intracellular production of free radicals. In adipocytes cultured in vitro, insulin increases the production of hydrogen peroxide, which has been shown to mimic the action of insulin. These data allow us to hypothesize that a vicious circle between hyperinsulinemia and free radicals could be operating: insulin resistance might cause elevated plasma free radical concentrations, which, in turn, might be responsible for a deterioration of insulin action, with hyperglycemia being a contributory factor. Data supporting this hypothesis are available. Vitamin E improves insulin action in healthy, elderly, and non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects. Similar results can be obtained by vitamin C administration.

  11. Neonatal exposure to mild hyperoxia causes persistent increases in oxidative stress and immune cells in the lungs of mice without altering lung structure.

    PubMed

    Bouch, Sheena; O'Reilly, Megan; Harding, Richard; Sozo, Foula

    2015-09-01

    Preterm infants often require supplemental oxygen due to lung immaturity, but hyperoxia can contribute to an increased risk of respiratory illness later in life. Our aim was to compare the effects of mild and moderate levels of neonatal hyperoxia on markers of pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation and on lung architecture; both immediate and persistent effects were assessed. Neonatal mice (C57BL6/J) were raised in either room air (21% O2), mild (40% O2), or moderate (65% O2) hyperoxia from birth until postnatal day 7 (P7d). The mice were killed at either P7d (immediate effects) or lived in air until adulthood (P56d, persistent effects). We enumerated macrophages in lung tissue at P7d and immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) at P56d. At P7d and P56d, we assessed pulmonary oxidative stress [heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and nitrotyrosine staining] and lung architecture. The data were interrogated for sex differences. At P7d, HO-1 gene expression was greater in the 65% O2 group than in the 21% O2 group. At P56d, the area of nitrotyrosine staining and number of immune cells were greater in the 40% O2 and 65% O2 groups relative to the 21% O2 group. Exposure to 65% O2, but not 40% O2, led to larger alveoli and lower tissue fraction in the short term and to persistently fewer bronchiolar-alveolar attachments. Exposure to 40% O2 or 65% O2 causes persistent increases in pulmonary oxidative stress and immune cells, suggesting chronic inflammation within the adult lung. Unlike 65% O2, 40% O2 does not affect lung architecture.

  12. Oxidative stress and ageing.

    PubMed

    Birch-Machin, M A; Bowman, A

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress is the resultant damage due to redox imbalances (increase in destructive free radicals [reactive oxygen species (ROS)] and reduction in antioxidant protection/pathways) and is linked to ageing in many tissues including skin. In ageing skin there are bioenergetic differences between keratinocytes and fibroblasts which provide a potential ageing biomarker. The differences in skin bioenergy are part of the mitochondrial theory of ageing which remains one of the most widely accepted ageing theories describing subsequent increasing free radical generation. Mitochondria are the major source of cellular oxidative stress and form part of the vicious cycle theory of ageing. External and internal sources of oxidative stress include UVR/IR, pollution (environment), lifestyle (exercise and diet), alcohol and smoking all of which may potentially impact on skin although many exogenous actives and endogenous antioxidant defence systems have been described to help abrogate the increased stress. This also links to differences in skin cell types in terms of the UVR action spectrum for nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage (the latter a previously described UVR biomarker in skin). Recent work associates bioenergy production and oxidative stress with pigment production thereby providing another additional potential avenue for targeted anti-ageing intervention in skin. This new data supporting the detrimental effects of the numerous wavelengths of UVR may aid in the development of cosmetic/sunscreen design to reduce the effects of photoageing. Recently, complex II of the mitochondrial electron transport chain appears to be more important than previously thought in the generation of free radicals (suggested predominantly by non-human studies). We investigated the relationship between complex II and ageing using human skin as a model tissue. The rate of complex II activity per unit of mitochondria was determined in fibroblasts and keratinocytes cultured from skin covering

  13. Malfunctioning of the Iron–Sulfur Cluster Assembly Machinery in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Produces Oxidative Stress via an Iron-Dependent Mechanism, Causing Dysfunction in Respiratory Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Mauricio; Pérez-Gallardo, Rocío V.; Sánchez, Luis A.; Díaz-Pérez, Alma L.; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Meza Carmen, Victor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Lara-Romero, Javier; Jiménez-Sandoval, Sergio; Rodríguez, Francisco; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S.; Campos-García, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Biogenesis and recycling of iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters play important roles in the iron homeostasis mechanisms involved in mitochondrial function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Fe–S clusters are assembled into apoproteins by the iron–sulfur cluster machinery (ISC). The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ISC gene deletion and consequent iron release under oxidative stress conditions on mitochondrial functionality in S. cerevisiae. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, caused by H2O2, menadione, or ethanol, was associated with a loss of iron homeostasis and exacerbated by ISC system dysfunction. ISC mutants showed increased free Fe2+ content, exacerbated by ROS-inducers, causing an increase in ROS, which was decreased by the addition of an iron chelator. Our study suggests that the increment in free Fe2+ associated with ROS generation may have originated from mitochondria, probably Fe–S cluster proteins, under both normal and oxidative stress conditions, suggesting that Fe–S cluster anabolism is affected. Raman spectroscopy analysis and immunoblotting indicated that in mitochondria from SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants, the content of [Fe–S] centers was decreased, as was formation of Rieske protein-dependent supercomplex III2IV2, but this was not observed in the iron-deficient ATX1 and MRS4 mutants. In addition, the activity of complexes II and IV from the electron transport chain (ETC) was impaired or totally abolished in SSQ1 and ISA1 mutants. These results confirm that the ISC system plays important roles in iron homeostasis, ROS stress, and in assembly of supercomplexes III2IV2 and III2IV1, thus affecting the functionality of the respiratory chain. PMID:25356756

  14. Prenatal methylmercury exposure hampers glutathione antioxidant system ontogenesis and causes long-lasting oxidative stress in the mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Stringari, James; Nunes, Adriana K.C.; Franco, Jeferson L.; Bohrer, Denise; Garcia, Solange C.; Dafre, Alcir L.; Milatovic, Dejan; Souza, Diogo O.; Rocha, Joao B.T.; Aschner, Michael; Farina, Marcelo

    2008-02-15

    During the perinatal period, the central nervous system (CNS) is extremely sensitive to metals, including methylmercury (MeHg). Although the mechanism(s) associated with MeHg-induced developmental neurotoxicity remains obscure, several studies point to the glutathione (GSH) antioxidant system as an important molecular target for this toxicant. To extend our recent findings of MeHg-induced GSH dyshomeostasis, the present study was designed to assess the developmental profile of the GSH antioxidant system in the mouse brain during the early postnatal period after in utero exposure to MeHg. Pregnant mice were exposed to different doses of MeHg (1, 3 and 10 mg/l, diluted in drinking water, ad libitum) during the gestational period. After delivery, pups were killed at different time points - postnatal days (PND) 1, 11 and 21 - and the whole brain was used for determining biochemical parameters related to the antioxidant GSH system, as well as mercury content and the levels of F{sub 2}-isoprostane. In control animals, cerebral GSH levels significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period; gestational exposure to MeHg caused a dose-dependent inhibition of this developmental event. Cerebral glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities significantly increased over time during the early postnatal period in control animals; gestational MeHg exposure induced a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on both developmental phenomena. These adverse effects of prenatal MeHg exposure were corroborated by marked increases in cerebral F{sub 2}-isoprostanes levels at all time points. Significant negative correlations were found between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GSH, as well as between F{sub 2}-isoprostanes and GPx activity, suggesting that MeHg-induced disruption of the GSH system maturation is related to MeHg-induced increased lipid peroxidation in the pup brain. In utero MeHg exposure also caused a dose-dependent increase in the cerebral levels of

  15. [Effect of normobaric hyperoxia on cerebral oxygenation, metabolism and oxidative stress in patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by intracranial aneurysm rupture].

    PubMed

    Solodov, A A; Petrikov, S S; Klychnikova, E V; Tazina, E V; Krylov, V V; Godkov, M A; Khamidova, L T

    2013-01-01

    The development of cerebral vasospasm in subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) due to cerebral aneurysms rupture results in cerebral circulation disturbances. Application of normobaric hyperoxia can be an effective way for improving of oxygen delivery to injured brain tissues. The purpose of this study was to assess of normobaric hyperoxia influence on intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral oxygenation and metabolism, oxidative stress and endogenous factors of vascular regulation in II critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture. Increase of FiO2 from 0.3 to 0.5 and 1.0 was accompanied with brain oxygen tension (PbrO2) increase and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen (O2ER) decrease. Application of normobaric hyperoxia had no effect on ICP, cerebral perfusion pressure, arterial blood pressure and cerebral metabolism. The results obtained from patients with nontraumatic SAH showed an evident increase of oxidative stress which had a significant effect on vascular endothelial function, causing an imbalance in the endogenous regulation of vascular tone. Application of normobaric hyperoxia was not accompanied by an increase of free-radical processes in critically ill patients with nontraumatic SAH due to cerebral aneurysms rupture.

  16. [Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Jarasūniene, Dalia; Simaitis, Audrius

    2003-01-01

    Growing numbers of morbidity and mortality due to the Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is recognized as the more increasing challenge in the world. The initial stage of atherosclerosis, early diagnosis and treatment of CHD are the main objectives of current research. Endothelium dysfunction, the earliest expression of the atherosclerotic process is associated with subtle biochemical changes that gradually are transformed into the structural changes of the arterial wall. The theory of free radicals is the most common among the atherosclerosis explanations. Overproduction or impaired neutralization of the free radicals accounts for oxidative stress that is causing substantial damage to the low density lipoproteins, nitric oxyde (NO), endothelium cells, tissue cells and finally leads to the endothelium dysfuction. Pathophysiology of oxidative stress and its role in the endothelium dysfunction are discussed in this paper. Positive role of various medications (statins, angiotensin converting enzym inhibitors, aldosteron antagonists, estrogens, antioxidants, b-blockers with vasodilatative properties) to the oxidative stress and consequently to the endothelium dysfuction are discussed as well.

  17. Airway oxidative stress causes vascular and hepatic inflammation via upregulation of IL-17A in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Al-Harbi, Naif O; Nadeem, Ahmed; Al-Harbi, Mohammed M; Ansari, Mushtaq A; AlSharari, Shakir D; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Attia, Sabry M; Al-Hosaini, Khaled A; Al Hoshani, Ali R; Ahmad, Sheikh F

    2016-05-01

    Oxidants are generated in asthmatic airways due to infiltration of inflammatory leukocytes and resident cells in the lung. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical may leak into systemic circulation when generated in uncontrolled manner and may impact vasculature. Our previous studies have shown an association between airway inflammation and systemic inflammation; however so far none has investigated the impact of airway oxidative inflammation on hepatic oxidative stress and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine markers in liver/vasculature in a murine model of asthma. Therefore, this study investigated the contribution of oxidative stress encountered in asthmatic airways in modulation of systemic/hepatic Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines balance and hepatic oxidative stress. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally with cockroach extract (CE) in the presence of aluminum hydroxide followed by several intranasal (i.n.) challenges with CE. Mice were then assessed for systemic/hepatic inflammation through assessment of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines and oxidative stress (iNOS, protein nitrotyrosine, lipid peroxides and myeloperoxidase activity). Challenge with CE led to increased Th2/Th17 cytokines in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. However, only Th17 related pro-inflammatory markers were upregulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) inhalation in vasculature and liver, whereas antioxidant treatment, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) downregulated them. Hepatic oxidative stress was also upregulated by H2O2 inhalation, whereas NAC attenuated it. Therefore, our study shows that airway oxidative inflammation may contribute to systemic inflammation through upregulation of Th17 immune responses in blood/liver and hepatic oxidative stress. This might predispose these patients to increased risk for the development of cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and cancer: respirable particulate matter, fibrous dusts and ozone as major causes of lung carcinogenesis through reactive oxygen species mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Vlachogianni, Thomais; Fiotakis, Konstantinos; Loridas, Spyridon

    2013-08-27

    Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS) and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.). Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM), at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc.) play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅) are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  19. Oxidative Stress Adaptation with Acute, Chronic and Repeated Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Andrew M.; Vojtovich, Lesya; Tower, John; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress adaptation or hormesis is an important mechanism by which cells and organisms respond to, and cope with, environmental and physiological shifts in the level of oxidative stress. Most studies of oxidative stress adaption have been limited to adaptation induced by acute stress. In contrast, many if not most environmental and physiological stresses are either repeated or chronic. In this study we find that both cultured mammalian cells, and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, are capable of adapting to chronic or repeated stress by up-regulating protective systems, such as their proteasomal proteolytic capacity to remove oxidized proteins. Repeated stress adaptation resulted in significant extension of adaptive responses. Repeated stresses must occur at sufficiently long intervals, however (12 hours or more for MEF cells and 7 days or more for flies), for adaptation to be successful, and the level of both repeated and chronic stress must be lower than is optimal for adaptation to acute stress. Regrettably, regimens of adaptation to both repeated and chronic stress that were successful for short-term survival in Drosophila, nevertheless also caused significant reductions in lifespan for the flies. Thus, although both repeated and chronic stress can be tolerated, they may result in a shorter life. PMID:23142766

  20. Moderate swimming exercise and caffeine supplementation reduce the levels of inflammatory cytokines without causing oxidative stress in tissues of middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; Dobrachinski, Fernando; da Rocha, Juliana T; Carvalho, Nelson R; Duarte, Marta M M F; Soares, Félix A A; Bresciani, Guilherme; Royes, Luiz F F; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-05-01

    The levels of circulatory inflammatory markers, including interleukin (IL) IL-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon (INF-γ), are known to increase associated to aging. Caffeine has been reported to produce many beneficial effects for health. Exercise is considered to be a safe medicine to attenuate inflammation and cellular senescence. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of a moderate-intensity swimming exercise (3 % of body weight, 20 min per day, 4 weeks) and sub-chronic supplementation with caffeine (30 mg/kg, 4 weeks) on the serum cytokine levels in middle-aged (18 months) Wistar rats. The effects of swimming exercise and caffeine on oxidative stress in muscle and liver of middle-aged rats were also investigated. The two-way ANOVA of pro-inflammatory cytokine levels demonstrated a significant exercise x caffeine interaction for IL-1β (F (1, 16) = 9.5772; p = 0.0069), IL-6 (F (1, 16) = 8.0463; p = 0.0119) and INF-γ (F (1, 16) = 15.078; p = 0.0013). The two-way ANOVA of TNF-α levels revealed a significant exercise × caffeine interaction (F (1, 16) = 9.6881; p = 0.00670). Swimming exercise and caffeine supplementation increased the ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in the rat liver and gastrocnemius muscle. Hepatic and renal markers of damage were not modified. In conclusion, a moderate-intensity swimming exercise protocol and caffeine supplementation induced positive adaptations in modulating cytokine levels without causing oxidative stress in muscle and liver of middle-aged rats.

  1. Neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Emerit, J; Edeas, M; Bricaire, F

    2004-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now recognized as accountable for redox regulation involving reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Its role is pivotal for the modulation of critical cellular functions, notably for neurons astrocytes and microglia, such as apoptosis program activation, and ion transport, calcium mobilization, involved in excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity and apoptosis are the two main causes of neuronal death. The role of mitochondria in apoptosis is crucial. Multiple apoptotic pathways emanate from the mitochondria. The respiratory chain of mitochondria that by oxidative phosphorylation, is the fount of cellular energy, i.e. ATP synthesis, is responsible for most of ROS and notably the first produced, superoxide anion (O(2)(;-)). Mitochondrial dysfunction, i.e. cell energy impairment, apoptosis and overproduction of ROS, is a final common pathogenic mechanism in aging and in neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Nitric oxide (NO(;)), an RNS, which can be produced by three isoforms of NO-synthase in brain, plays a prominent role. The research on the genetics of inherited forms notably ALS, AD, PD, has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of the sporadic forms of neurodegenerative diseases or of aging of the brain. ROS and RNS, i.e. oxidative stress, are not the origin of neuronal death. The cascade of events that leads to neurons, death is complex. In addition to mitochondrial dysfunction (apoptosis), excitotoxicity, oxidative stress (inflammation), the mechanisms from gene to disease involve also protein misfolding leading to aggregates and proteasome dysfunction on ubiquinited material.

  2. Inhibition of NAPDH Oxidase 2 (NOX2) Prevents Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Abnormalities Caused by Saturated Fat in Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Leroy C; Barca, Emanuele; Subramanyam, Prakash; Komrowski, Michael; Pajvani, Utpal; Colecraft, Henry M; Hirano, Michio; Morrow, John P

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and high saturated fat intake increase the risk of heart failure and arrhythmias. The molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that physiologic levels of saturated fat could increase mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiomyocytes, leading to abnormalities of calcium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. We investigated the effect of saturated fat on mitochondrial function and calcium homeostasis in isolated ventricular myocytes. The saturated fatty acid palmitate causes a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in cardiomyocytes. Palmitate, but not the monounsaturated fatty acid oleate, causes an increase in both total cellular ROS and mitochondrial ROS. Palmitate depolarizes the mitochondrial inner membrane and causes mitochondrial calcium overload by increasing sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak. Inhibitors of PKC or NOX2 prevent mitochondrial dysfunction and the increase in ROS, demonstrating that PKC-NOX2 activation is also required for amplification of palmitate induced-ROS. Cardiomyocytes from mice with genetic deletion of NOX2 do not have palmitate-induced ROS or mitochondrial dysfunction. We conclude that palmitate induces mitochondrial ROS that is amplified by NOX2, causing greater mitochondrial ROS generation and partial depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane. The abnormal sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium leak caused by palmitate could promote arrhythmia and heart failure. NOX2 inhibition is a potential therapy for heart disease caused by diabetes or obesity.

  3. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  4. Oxidative stress in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Latifi, Amel; Ruiz, Marion; Zhang, Cheng-Cai

    2009-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are byproducts of aerobic metabolism and potent agents that cause oxidative damage. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, ROS are inevitably generated by photosynthetic electron transport, especially when the intensity of light-driven electron transport outpaces the rate of electron consumption during CO(2) fixation. Because cyanobacteria in their natural habitat are often exposed to changing external conditions, such as drastic fluctuations of light intensities, their ability to perceive ROS and to rapidly initiate antioxidant defences is crucial for their survival. This review summarizes recent findings and outlines important perspectives in this field.

  5. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  6. Jumping the gun: Smoking constituent BaP causes premature primordial follicle activation and impairs oocyte fusibility through oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sobinoff, A.P.; Pye, V.; Nixon, B.; Roman, S.D.; McLaughlin, E.A.

    2012-04-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is an ovotoxic constituent of cigarette smoke associated with pre-mature ovarian failure and decreased rates of conception in IVF patients. Although the overall effect of BaP on female fertility has been documented, the exact molecular mechanisms behind its ovotoxicity remain elusive. In this study we examined the effects of BaP exposure on the ovarian transcriptome, and observed the effects of in vivo exposure on oocyte dysfunction. Microarray analysis of BaP cultured neonatal ovaries revealed a complex mechanism of ovotoxicity involving a small cohort of genes associated with follicular growth, cell cycle progression, and cell death. Histomorphological and immunohistochemical analysis supported these results, with BaP exposure causing increased primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia in vitro and in vivo. Functional analysis of oocytes obtained from adult Swiss mice treated neonatally revealed significantly increased levels of mitochondrial ROS/lipid peroxidation, and severely reduced sperm-egg binding and fusion in both low (1.5 mg/kg/daily) and high (3 mg/kg/daily) dose treatments. Our results reveal a complex mechanism of BaP induced ovotoxicity involving developing follicle atresia and accelerated primordial follicle activation, and suggest short term neonatal BaP exposure causes mitochondrial leakage resulting in reduced oolemma fluidity and impaired fertilisation in adulthood. This study highlights BaP as a key compound which may be partially responsible for the documented effects of cigarette smoke on follicular development and sub-fertility. -- Highlights: ► BaP exposure up-regulates canonical pathways linked with follicular growth/atresia. ► BaP causes primordial follicle activation and developing follicle atresia. ► BaP causes oocyte mitochondrial ROS and lipid peroxidation, impairing fertilisation. ► Short term neonatal BaP exposure compromises adult oocyte quality.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kashihara, N.; Haruna, Y.; Kondeti, V.K.; Kanwar, Y.S.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is a leading cause of end-stage renal failure worldwide. Its morphologic characteristics include glomerular hypertrophy, basement membrane thickening, mesangial expansion, tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolar thickening. All of these are part and parcel of microvascular complications of diabetes. A large body of evidence indicates that oxidative stress is the common denominator link for the major pathways involved in the development and progression of diabetic micro- as well as macrovascular complications of diabetes. There are a number of macromolecules that have been implicated for increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as, NAD(P)H oxidase, advanced glycation end products (AGE), defects in polyol pathway, uncoupled nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and mitochondrial respiratory chain via oxidative phosphorylation. Excess amounts of ROS modulate activation of protein kinase C, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and various cytokines and transcription factors which eventually cause increased expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes with progression to fibrosis and end stage renal disease. Activation of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) further worsens the renal injury induced by ROS in diabetic nephropathy. Buffering the generation of ROS may sound a promising therapeutic to ameliorate renal damage from diabetic nephropathy, however, various studies have demonstrated minimal reno-protection by these agents. Interruption in the RAS has yielded much better results in terms of reno-protection and progression of diabetic nephropathy. In this review various aspects of oxidative stress coupled with the damage induced by RAS are discussed with the anticipation to yield an impetus for designing new generation of specific antioxidants that are potentially more effective to reduce reno-vascular complications of diabetes. PMID:20939814

  8. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  9. Cocaine causes memory and learning impairments in rats: involvement of nuclear factor kappa B and oxidative stress, and prevention by topiramate.

    PubMed

    Muriach, María; López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Barcia, Jorge M; Sanchez-Villarejo, María V; Almansa, Inmaculada; Romero, Francisco J

    2010-08-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine toxicity including an increase in oxidative stress but the association between oxidative status in the brain and cocaine induced-behaviour is poorly understood. Nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) is a sensor of oxidative stress and participates in memory formation that could be involved in drug toxicity and addiction mechanisms. Therefore NFkappaB activity, oxidative stress, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity, spatial learning and memory as well as the effect of topiramate, a previously proposed therapy for cocaine addiction, were evaluated in an experimental model of cocaine administration in rats. NFkappaB activity was decreased in the frontal cortex of cocaine treated rats, as well as GSH concentration and glutathione peroxidase activity in the hippocampus, whereas nNOS activity in the hippocampus was increased. Memory retrieval of experiences acquired prior to cocaine administration was impaired and negatively correlated with NFkappaB activity in the frontal cortex. In contrast, learning of new tasks was enhanced and correlated with the increase of nNOS activity and the decrease of glutathione peroxidase. These results provide evidence for a possible mechanistic role of oxidative and nitrosative stress and NFkappaB in the alterations induced by cocaine. Topiramate prevented all the alterations observed, showing novel neuroprotective properties.

  10. Chromosomal instability causes sensitivity to metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    Shaukat, Z; Liu, D; Choo, A; Hussain, R; O'Keefe, L; Richards, R; Saint, R; Gregory, S L

    2015-07-30

    Chromosomal INstability (CIN), a hallmark of cancer, refers to cells with an increased rate of gain or loss of whole chromosomes or chromosome parts. CIN is linked to the progression of tumors with poor clinical outcomes such as drug resistance. CIN can give tumors the diversity to resist therapy, but it comes at the cost of significant stress to tumor cells. To tolerate this, cancer cells must modify their energy use to provide adaptation against genetic changes as well as to promote their survival and growth. In this study, we have demonstrated that CIN induction causes sensitivity to metabolic stress. We show that mild metabolic disruption that does not affect normal cells, can lead to high levels of oxidative stress and subsequent cell death in CIN cells because they are already managing elevated stress levels. Altered metabolism is a differential characteristic of cancer cells, so our identification of key regulators that can exploit these changes to cause cell death may provide cancer-specific potential drug targets, especially for advanced cancers that exhibit CIN.

  11. Coccidian Infection Causes Oxidative Damage in Greenfinches

    PubMed Central

    Sepp, Tuul; Karu, Ulvi; Blount, Jonathan D.; Sild, Elin; Männiste, Marju; Hõrak, Peeter

    2012-01-01

    The main tenet of immunoecology is that individual variation in immune responsiveness is caused by the costs of immune responses to the hosts. Oxidative damage resulting from the excessive production of reactive oxygen species during immune response is hypothesized to form one of such costs. We tested this hypothesis in experimental coccidian infection model in greenfinches Carduelis chloris. Administration of isosporan coccidians to experimental birds did not affect indices of antioxidant protection (TAC and OXY), plasma triglyceride and carotenoid levels or body mass, indicating that pathological consequences of infection were generally mild. Infected birds had on average 8% higher levels of plasma malondialdehyde (MDA, a toxic end-product of lipid peroxidation) than un-infected birds. The birds that had highest MDA levels subsequent to experimental infection experienced the highest decrease in infection intensity. This observation is consistent with the idea that oxidative stress is a causative agent in the control of coccidiosis and supports the concept of oxidative costs of immune responses and parasite resistance. The finding that oxidative damage accompanies even the mild infection with a common parasite highlights the relevance of oxidative stress biology for the immunoecological research. PMID:22615772

  12. Diphenyl diselenide supplementation in infected mice by Toxoplasma gondii: Protective effect on behavior, neuromodulation and oxidative stress caused by disease.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vanessa Schopf; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Rech, Virginia C; Ianiski, Francine R; Signor, Cristiane; Rubin, Maribel A; Waczuk, Emily P; Schwertz, Claiton I; Mendes, Ricardo E; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; de la Rue, Mario L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Frühauf, Pâmella K S; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-10-01

    untreated animals (group C). It was concluded that (PhSe)2 showed antioxidant activity, but the dose used had no anti-inflammatory effect and failed to reverse the behavioral changes caused by the parasite.

  13. Fipronil insecticide toxicology: oxidative stress and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María Aránzazu; Wu, Qinghua; Ares, Irma; Martínez-Larrañaga, María Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-11-01

    Fipronil (FIP) is widely used across the world as a broad-spectrum phenylpyrazole insecticide and veterinary drug. FIP was the insecticide to act by targeting the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor and has favorable selective toxicity towards insects rather than mammals. However, because of accidental exposure, incorrect use of FIP or widespread FIP use leading to the contamination of water and soil, there is increasing evidence that FIP could cause a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans, such as neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, nephrotoxic, reproductive, and cytotoxic effects on vertebrate and invertebrates. In the last decade, oxidative stress has been suggested to be involved in the various toxicities induced by FIP. To date, few reviews have addressed the toxicity of FIP in relation to oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily intended to summarize the progress in research associated with oxidative stress as a possible mechanism for FIP-induced toxicity as well as metabolism. The present review reports that studies have been conducted to reveal the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress as a result of FIP treatment and have correlated them with various types of toxicity. Furthermore, the metabolism of FIP was also reviewed, and during this process, various CYP450 enzymes were involved and oxidative stress might occur. The roles of various compounds in protecting against FIP-induced toxicity based on their anti-oxidative effects were also summarized to further understand the role of oxidative stress in FIP-induced toxicity.

  14. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  15. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  16. [STUDY OF GLUTATHIONE AND ENZYMES OF ITS METABOLISM UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ENRICHED DAIRY PRODUCTS FOR PROPHYLACTIC USE IN CONDITIONS OF OXIDATIVE STRESS CAUSED BY EXCESSIVE EXERCISE].

    PubMed

    Boyarskaya, L A; Turchaninov, D V; Efremenko, E S; Bogdashin, I V; Vilms, E A; Yunatskaya, T A

    2015-01-01

    There was performed the study of the activity of the antioxidant system of glutathione under regular taking of enriched with micronutrients dairy products "Bifidin " and "Prolacta" in conditions ofsimulation of xcessive exercise loads. Target of research: white outbred male rats weighing 180-200 g (n = 68). Research methods and equipment: information retrieval, biochemical, and statistical. In the subacute experiment there was established that in conditions of excessive exercise loads (CEEL) the body of the rat meets with significant oxidative stress, causing the suppression of the activity of glutathione system: the number of reduced glutathione and the activity of selenium-dependent glutathione-peroxidase decline. Regular taking of dairy products "Bifidin" and "Prolacta" in conditions of CEEL (active training process) allows effectively to neutralize lipid peroxidation processes and normalize indices of the system of glutathione. There is established an increase in the activity ofglutathione-S-transferase in the homogenates of liver tissue in the simulation CEEL in combination with the use ofproduct "Bifidin".

  17. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias DJ; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos LV; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Koopman, Werner JH; Willems, Peter HGM; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies. PMID:25996284

  18. Exposure to O-16 particle irradiation causes age-like decrements in rats through increased oxidative stress, inflammation and loss of autophagy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exposing young rats to particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles) enhances indices of oxidative stress and inflammation, disrupts the functioning of neuronal communication, and alters cognitive behaviors. Even though exposure to these highly charged particles occurs at low fluence rates, p...

  19. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  20. Oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S K; Sontakke, Ajit V

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson's disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, nitric oxide in the form of nitrite & nitrate. Enzymatic antioxidants in the form of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin and non enzymatic antioxidant vitamins e.g. vitamin E and C in either serum or plasma or erythrocyte in 40 patients of Parkinson's disease in the age group 40-80 years. Trace elements e.g. copper, zinc and selenium were also estimated. Plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and nitric oxide levels were Significantly high but superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, ceruloplasmin, vitamin-E, vitamin-C, copper, zinc and selenium levels were significantly low in Parkinson's disease when compared with control subjects. Present study showed that elevated oxidative stress may be playing a role in dopaminergic neuronal loss in substentia nigra pars compacta and involved in pathogenesis of the Parkinson's disease.

  1. Proteomics, oxidative stress and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Halabi, Jacques; Peng, Jason; Vazquez-Levin, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been established as one of the main causes of male infertility and has been implicated in many diseases associated with infertile men. It results from high concentrations of free radicals and suppressed antioxidant potential, which may alter protein expression in seminal plasma and/or spermatozoa. In recent years, proteomic analyses have been performed to characterize the protein profiles of seminal ejaculate from men with different clinical conditions, such as high oxidative stress. The aim of the present review is to summarize current findings on proteomic studies performed in men with high oxidative stress compared with those with physiological concentrations of free radicals, to better understand the aetiology of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. Each of these studies has suggested candidate biomarkers of oxidative stress, among them are DJ-1, PIP, lactotransferrin and peroxiredoxin. Changes in protein concentrations in seminal plasma samples with oxidative stress conditions were related to stress responses and to regulatory pathways, while alterations in sperm proteins were mostly associated to metabolic responses (carbohydrate metabolism) and stress responses. Future studies should include assessment of post-translational modifications in the spermatozoa as well as in seminal plasma proteomes of men diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. Oxidative stress, which occurs due to a state of imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants, has been implicated in most cases of male infertility. Cells that are in a state of oxidative stress are more likely to have altered protein expression. The aim of this review is to better understand the causes of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. To achieve this, we assessed proteomic studies performed on the seminal plasma and spermatozoa of men with high levels of oxidative stress due to various clinical conditions and compared them with men who had physiological concentrations of free

  2. The metabolomics of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Mhamdi, Amna

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from increased availability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key component of many responses of plants to challenging environmental conditions. The consequences for plant metabolism are complex and manifold. We review data on small compounds involved in oxidative stress, including ROS themselves and antioxidants and redox buffers in the membrane and soluble phases, and we discuss the wider consequences for plant primary and secondary metabolism. While metabolomics has been exploited in many studies on stress, there have been relatively few non-targeted studies focused on how metabolite signatures respond specifically to oxidative stress. As part of the discussion, we present results and reanalyze published datasets on metabolite profiles in catalase-deficient plants, which can be considered to be model oxidative stress systems. We emphasize the roles of ROS-triggered changes in metabolites as potential oxidative signals, and discuss responses that might be useful as markers for oxidative stress. Particular attention is paid to lipid-derived compounds, the status of antioxidants and antioxidant breakdown products, altered metabolism of amino acids, and the roles of phytohormone pathways.

  3. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  4. Gradual decrease in spermatogenesis caused by chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Juárez-Rojas, Lizbeth; Vigueras-Villaseñor, Rosa María; Casillas, Fahiel; Retana-Márquez, Socorro

    2017-02-21

    Chronic stress induces decreased sperm motility, viability and concentration in stressed males. Also, stress modifies oxidative status and causes apoptosis in testes, as well as a decrease in the epithelial area of seminiferous tubules. However, there are no studies that analyze the alterations caused by stress in testicular cells. Thus, in this study, alterations in the morphology of testicular germ cells caused by different days of chronic stress were assessed. Adult male rats were exposed to stress by immersion in cold water (ICW) daily for 3, 8, 20 or 50 consecutive days. Plasma testosterone and corticosterone were also assessed. Results showed that chronic stress causes loss of germ cells, and alteration of spermatogenesis. Seminiferous tubules from stressed males showed several degenerative signs, such as vacuoles in the basal epithelium, with picnotic indicia; moderate to severe exfoliation of degenerative germinal cells in the tubule lumen was also observed. These alterations were observed in all days of stress in a gradual way, from day 3-50. Testosterone levels were decreased at all those times, and corticosterone concentrations were increased on the same days. These results show that chronic stress causes severe damage to germ cells, which can account for infertility problems in males. These alterations are related to a decrease in testosterone as well as an increase in corticosterone caused by stress.

  5. Assessing of oxidative stress related parameters in diabetes mellitus type 2: cause excessive damaging to DNA and enhanced homocysteine in diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bukhari, Shazia Anwer; Naqvi, Syed Ali Raza; Nagra, Saeed Ahmad; Anjum, Fauzia; Javed, Sadia; Farooq, Muhammad

    2015-03-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been documented subsist to the pathogenesis of many diseases including diabetes mellitus. The strength of both parameters could be estimated by measuring oxidative stress marker thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), its related parameters and the antioxidants glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in plasma of DM patients. Lipid peroxidation was measured as TBARS and presented as malondialdehyde, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), triglyceride (Tg), the antioxidants (vitamin A (β-carotene), vitamin E, vitamin C, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase) levels. The results showed that these parameters, commonly, were declined appreciably in diabetic individuals as compared to the healthy individuals. In most cases, age and gender were appeared to involve in having greater values of diabetes marker. Further, increased level of lipid peroxidation and random behaviour of antioxidant potential also associated with Diabetes. For that reason these biomarkers might be of great important to diagnosis DNA damages of diabetic patients.

  6. Ammonium, microcystins, and hypoxia of blooms in eutrophic water cause oxidative stress and C-N imbalance in submersed and floating-leaved aquatic plants in Lake Taihu, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Wang, Zhengqi; Xu, Jun; Liu, Yaqin; Ni, Leyi; Cao, Te; Xie, Ping

    2011-01-01

    The heavy bloom of cyanobacteria is a disastrous consequence of freshwater eutrophication, and the bloom is highly toxic due to its secondary metabolites called microcystins (MCs). The release of organic substances from dense blooms causes an increase in NH4+ and decrease in oxygen in lake water. In the present study, the dynamics of physio-biochemical responses of five aquatic macrophytes to MCs and NH4+ stresses in Meiliang Bay were evaluated. The bay is one of the most seriously eutrophized areas dominated by the toxic cyanobacteria of Lake Taihu, China. The results demonstrate that aquatic macrophytes in Meiliang Bay are subjected to successive external stresses. From January to May, they are subjected to high NH4+ stress (>0.56 mg L(-1)), whereas from June to September or during dense blooms, the macrophytes experience both MC proliferation and moderate NH4+ toxicity (>0.3 mg L(-1)). In August, high NH4+ stress occurs along with hypoxia stress, whereas from September to December, the macrophytes experience moderate NH4+ stress, causing a serious imbalance in C-N metabolism and oxidative stress. Between the two aquatic plant life forms, floating-leaved plants are more resistant to the stresses of eutrophication than are submersed plants. Elevated MCs in the water column can aggravate oxidative stress and suppress the soluble protein contents of aquatic plants. High NH4+ in the water causes severe C and N imbalance in submersed macrophytes because of considerable carbon consumption for free amino acid synthesis. The superoxide dismutase activities of submersed macrophytes are suppressed by low light penetrating the eutrophic water, which might impair the antioxidative function of the plants. The findings of this study provide mainly field evidence that reveals the physical, chemical, and biological stresses on aquatic plants in bloom-prevailed eutrophic lakes.

  7. Heat waves imposed during early pod development in soybean (Glycine max) cause significant yield loss despite a rapid recovery from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Matthew H; Yendrek, Craig R; Drag, David; Locke, Anna M; Rios Acosta, Lorena; Leakey, Andrew D B; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Bernacchi, Carl J; Ort, Donald R

    2015-08-01

    Heat waves already have a large impact on crops and are predicted to become more intense and more frequent in the future. In this study, heat waves were imposed on soybean using infrared heating technology in a fully open-air field experiment. Five separate heat waves were applied to field-grown soybean (Glycine max) in central Illinois, three in 2010 and two in 2011. Thirty years of historical weather data from Illinois were analyzed to determine the length and intensity of a regionally realistic heat wave resulting in experimental heat wave treatments during which day and night canopy temperatures were elevated 6 °C above ambient for 3 days. Heat waves were applied during early or late reproductive stages to determine whether and when heat waves had an impact on carbon metabolism and seed yield. By the third day of each heat wave, net photosynthesis (A), specific leaf weight (SLW), and leaf total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC) were decreased, while leaf oxidative stress was increased. However, A, SLW, TNC, and measures of oxidative stress were no different than the control ca. 12 h after the heat waves ended, indicating rapid physiological recovery from the high-temperature stress. That end of season seed yield was reduced (~10%) only when heat waves were applied during early pod developmental stages indicates the yield loss had more to do with direct impacts of the heat waves on reproductive process than on photosynthesis. Soybean was unable to mitigate yield loss after heat waves given during late reproductive stages. This study shows that short high-temperature stress events that reduce photosynthesis and increase oxidative stress resulted in significant losses to soybean production in the Midwest, U.S. The study also suggests that to mitigate heat wave-induced yield loss, soybean needs improved reproductive and photosynthetic tolerance to high but increasingly common temperatures.

  8. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  9. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Galley, H F

    2011-07-01

    Sepsis-related organ dysfunction remains the most common cause of death in the intensive care unit (ICU), despite advances in healthcare and science. Marked oxidative stress as a result of the inflammatory responses inherent with sepsis initiates changes in mitochondrial function which may result in organ damage. Normally, a complex system of interacting antioxidant defences is able to combat oxidative stress and prevents damage to mitochondria. Despite the accepted role that oxidative stress-mediated injury plays in the development of organ failure, there is still little conclusive evidence of any beneficial effect of systemic antioxidant supplementation in patients with sepsis and organ dysfunction. It has been suggested, however, that antioxidant therapy delivered specifically to mitochondria may be useful.

  10. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  11. Enhanced nitric oxide generation from nitric oxide synthases as the cause of increased peroxynitrite formation during acute restraint stress: Effects on carotid responsiveness to angiotensinergic stimuli in type-1 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Josimar D; Pernomian, Larissa; Gomes, Mayara S; Moreira, Rafael P; do Prado, Alejandro F; da Silva, Carlos H T P; de Oliveira, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulation. Behavioral stress increases nitric oxide production, which may trigger a massive impact on vascular cells and accelerate cardiovascular complications under oxidative stress conditions such as Diabetes. For this study, type-1 Diabetes mellitus was induced in Wistar rats by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. After 28 days, cumulative concentration-response curves for angiotensin II were obtained in endothelium-intact carotid rings from diabetic rats that underwent to acute restraint stress for 3h. The contractile response evoked by angiotensin II was increased in carotid arteries from diabetic rats. Acute restraint stress did not alter angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid arteries from normoglycaemic rats. However acute stress combined with Diabetes increased angiotensin II-induced contraction in carotid rings. Western blot experiments and the inhibition of nitric oxide synthases in functional assays showed that neuronal, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoforms contribute to the increased formation of peroxynitrite and contractile hyperreactivity to angiotensin II in carotid rings from stressed diabetic rats. In summary, these findings suggest that the increased superoxide anion generation in carotid arteries from diabetic rats associated to the increased local nitric oxide synthases expression and activity induced by acute restrain stress were responsible for exacerbating the local formation of peroxynitrite and the contraction induced by angiotensin II.

  12. Interpreting Causes of Personal Stress with "Cheese"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Karl L.

    2008-01-01

    Attempts to identify the root causes of individual stress have been made for centuries. The result has been the development of a myriad of approaches and explanations as to the cause of stress by psychologists, educators, researchers, and self-help authors. Each approach carries a degree of validity in the context that individuals experience…

  13. [Vitamins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Mazo, V K

    2013-01-01

    The central and local stress limiting systems, including the antioxidant defense system involved in defending the organism at the cellular and systemic levels from excess activation response to stress influence, leading to damaging effects. The development of stress, regardless of its nature [cold, increased physical activity, aging, the development of many pathologies (cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, ischemia, the effects of burns), immobilization, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperoxia, radiation effects etc.] leads to a deterioration of the vitamin status (vitamins E, A, C). Damaging effect on the antioxidant defense system is more pronounced compared to the stress response in animals with an isolated deficiency of vitamins C, A, E, B1 or B6 and the combined vitamins deficiency in the diet. Addition missing vitamin or vitamins restores the performance of antioxidant system. Thus, the role of vitamins in adaptation to stressors is evident. However, vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in high doses, significantly higher than the physiological needs of the organism, may be not only antioxidants, but may have also prooxidant properties. Perhaps this explains the lack of positive effects of antioxidant vitamins used in extreme doses for a long time described in some publications. There is no doubt that to justify the current optimal doses of antioxidant vitamins and other dietary antioxidants specially-designed studies, including biochemical testing of initial vitamin and antioxidant status of the organism, as well as monitoring their change over time are required.

  14. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood.

  15. 1,3,4-Thiadiazole derivatives of R-(+)-limonene benzaldehyde-thiosemicarbazones cause death in Trypanosoma cruzi through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martins, Solange C; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Desoti, Vânia C; Falzirolli, Hugo; da Silva, Cleuza C; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Silva, Sueli de O; Nakamura, Celso V

    2016-12-01

    This work evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of TDZ 2 on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes and determined the possible mechanism of action of this compound on T. cruzi death. TDZ 2 inhibited T. cruzi proliferation in vitro and had low haemolytic potential. It also induced morphological and ultrastructural alterations. We observed a reduction of cell volume, the depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane, an increase in ROS production, lipoperoxidation of the cell membrane, lipid bodies formation and production of nitric oxide, a decrease in reduced thiols levels and, presence of autophagic vacuoles. The in vivo study found a reduction of parasitemia in animals treated with TDZ 2 alone or combined with benznidazole. Altogether, the alterations induced by TDZ 2 point to an oxidative stress condition that lead to T. cruzi cell death.

  16. Peroxisomes, oxidative stress, and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Terlecky, Stanley R; Terlecky, Laura J; Giordano, Courtney R

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisomes are intracellular organelles mediating a wide variety of biosynthetic and biodegradative reactions. Included among these are the metabolism of hydrogen peroxide and other reactive species, molecules whose levels help define the oxidative state of cells. Loss of oxidative equilibrium in cells of tissues and organs potentiates inflammatory responses which can ultimately trigger human disease. The goal of this article is to review evidence for connections between peroxisome function, oxidative stress, and inflammation in the context of human health and degenerative disease. Dysregulated points in this nexus are identified and potential remedial approaches are presented. PMID:22649571

  17. Oxidative stress and DNA damage caused by the urban air pollutant 3-NBA and its isomer 2-NBA in human lung cells analyzed with three independent methods.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eszter; Johansson, Clara; Zeisig, Magnus; Möller, Lennart

    2005-11-15

    The air pollutant 3-nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA), emitted in diesel exhaust, is a potent mutagen and genotoxin. 3-NBA can isomerise to 2-nitrobenzanthrone (2-NBA), which can become more than 70-fold higher in concentration in ambient air. In this study, three independent methods have been employed to evaluate the oxidative stress and genotoxicity of 2-NBA compared to 3-NBA in the human A549 lung cell line. HPLC-EC/UV was applied for measurements of oxidative damage in the form of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), (32)P-HPLC for measurements of lipophilic DNA-adducts, and the Comet assay to measure a variety of DNA lesions, including oxidative stress. No significant oxidative damage from either isomer was found regarding formation of 8-oxodG analysed using HPLC-EC/UV. However, the Comet assay (with FPG-treatment), which is more sensitive and detects more types of damages compared to HPLC-EC/UV, showed a significant effect from both 3-NBA and 2-NBA. (32)P-HPLC revealed a strong DNA-adduct formation from both 3-NBA and 2-NBA, and also a significant difference between both isomers compared to negative control. These results clearly show that 2-NBA has a genotoxic potential. Even if the DNA-adduct forming capacity and the amount of DNA lesions measured with the (32)P-HPLC and Comet assay is about one third of 3-NBA, the high abundance of 2-NBA in ambient air calls for further investigation and evaluation of its health hazard.

  18. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Dendooven, Amélie; Ishola, David A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Van der Giezen, Dionne M; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the factors contributing to the pathophysiology of UUO, highlighting the role of oxidative stress.

  19. Oxidative stress in obstructive nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Dendooven, Amélie; Ishola, David A; Nguyen, Tri Q; Van der Giezen, Dionne M; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Joles, Jaap A

    2011-01-01

    Unilateral ureteric obstruction (UUO) is one of the most commonly applied rodent models to study the pathophysiology of renal fibrosis. This model reflects important aspects of inflammation and fibrosis that are prominent in human kidney diseases. In this review, we present an overview of the factors contributing to the pathophysiology of UUO, highlighting the role of oxidative stress. PMID:20804541

  20. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  1. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  2. Estradiol and neurodegenerative oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Jon

    2008-10-01

    Estradiol is a potent preventative against neurodegenerative disease, in part, by activating antioxidant defense systems scavenging reactive oxygen species, limiting mitochondrial protein damage, improving electron transport chain activity and reducing mitochondrial DNA damage. Estradiol also increases the activity of complex IV of the electron transport chain, improving mitochondrial respiration and ATP production under normal and stressful conditions. However, the high oxidative cellular environment present during neurodegeneration makes estradiol a poor agent for treatment of existing disease. Oxidative stress stimulates the production of the hydroperoxide-dependent hydroxylation of estradiol to the catecholestrogen metabolites, which can undergo reactive oxygen species producing redox cycling, setting up a self-generating toxic cascade offsetting any antioxidant/antiapoptotic effects generated by the parent estradiol. Additional disease-induced factors can further perpetuate this cycle. For example dysregulation of the catecholamine system could alter catechol-O-methyltransferase-catalyzed methylation, preventing removal of redox cycling catecholestrogens from the system enhancing pro-oxidant effects of estradiol.

  3. Critical Role of FoxO1 in Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Caused by Oxidative Stress and Protective Effects of Grape Seed Procyanidin B2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jia-Qing; Gao, Bin-Wen; Wang, Jing; Ren, Qiao-Ling; Chen, Jun-Feng; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Zi-Jing; Xing, Bao-Song

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to the follicular granulosa cell apoptosis. Grape seed procyanidin B2 (GSPB2) has been reported to possess potent antioxidant activity. However, the GSPB2-mediated protective effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms in granulosa cell apoptosis process remain unknown. In this study, we showed for the first time that GSPB2 treatment decreased FoxO1 protein level, improved granulosa cell viability, upregulated LC3-II protein level, and reduced granulosa cell apoptosis rate. Under a condition of oxidative stress, GSPB2 reversed FoxO1 nuclear localization and increased its level in cytoplasm. In addition, FoxO1 knockdown inhibited the protective effects of GSPB2 induced. Our findings suggest that FoxO1 plays a pivotal role in regulating autophagy in granulosa cells, GSPB2 exerts a potent and beneficial role in reducing granulosa cell apoptosis and inducing autophagy process, and targeting FoxO1 could be significant in fighting against oxidative stress-reduced female reproductive system diseases. PMID:27057282

  4. Oxidative Stress Mechanisms Caused by Ag Nanoparticles (NM300K) are Different from Those of AgNO3: Effects in the Soil Invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Maria J.; Maria, Vera L.; Scott-Fordsmand, Janeck J.; Amorim, Mónica J. B.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of toxicity of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are unclear, in particular in the terrestrial environment. In this study the effects of AgNP (AgNM300K) were assessed in terms of oxidative stress in the soil worm Enchytraeus crypticus, using a range of biochemical markers [catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), total glutathione (TG), metallothionein (MT), lipid peroxidation (LPO)]. E. crypticus were exposed during 3 and 7 days (d) to the reproduction EC20, EC50 and EC80 levels of both AgNP and AgNO3. AgNO3 induced oxidative stress earlier (3 d) than AgNP (7 d), both leading to LPO despite the activation of the anti-redox system. MT increased only for AgNP. The Correspondence Analysis showed a clear separation between AgNO3 and AgNP, with e.g., CAT being the main descriptor for AgNP for 7 d. LPO, GST and GPx were for both 3 and 7 d associated with AgNO3, whereas MT and TG were associated with AgNP. These results may reflect a delay in the effects of AgNP compared to AgNO3 due to the slower release of Ag+ ions from the AgNP, although this does not fully explain the observed differences, i.e., we can conclude that there is a nanoparticle effect. PMID:26287225

  5. Oxidative stress, phototherapy and the neonate.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, G; Sharma, S

    2000-11-01

    Phototherapy is the most widely used form of therapy for unconjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Its non-invasive nature and few side effects reported earlier have led to the assumption that it is innocuous. Recent research has revealed that phototherapy is a photodynamic stress and can induce lipid peroxidation. There is increasing evidence that many severe diseases of the neonate are caused by oxidative injury and lipid peroxidation. In the present communique, we review the oxidative susceptibility of the neonate and the evidence now available that phototherapy induces oxidative stress. Although intensive phototherapy (up to 40 mwatt/cm2/nm) has been reported to be increasingly effective, a little caution, we believe is warranted, till more definite data in the human neonate, help resolve the issue.

  6. Chasing great paths of Helmut Sies "Oxidative Stress".

    PubMed

    Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J; Ozawa, Toshihiko; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-04-01

    Prof. Dr. Helmut Sies is a pioneer of "Oxidative Stress", and has published over 18 papers with the name of "Oxidative Stress" in the title. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics" for many years, and is a former Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Free Radical Research". He has clarified our understanding of the causes of chronic developing diseases, and has studied antioxidant factors. In this article, importance of "Oxidative Stress" and our mitochondrial oxidative stress studies; roles of mitochondrial ROS, effects of vitamin E and its homologues in oxidative stress-related diseases, effects of antioxidants in vivo and in vitro, and a mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging are introduced, and some of our interactions with Helmut are described, congratulating and appreciating his great path.

  7. Inheritance of the Bantu/Benin haplotype causes less severe hemolytic and oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxycarbamide.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Jéssika V; Silva, Danilo G H; Torres, Lidiane S; Belini-Junior, Edis; Barberino, Willian M; Oliveira, Renan G; Carrocini, Gisele C S; Gelaleti, Gabriela B; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-07-01

    Beta S-globin gene cluster haplotypes (β(S)-haplotypes) can modulate the response to hydroxycarbamide (HC) treatment in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. In Brazil, the most common haplotypes are Bantu and Benin, and both confer a poor prognosis for patients when untreated with HC. We evaluated oxidative and hemolytic biomarkers in 48 SCA patients undergoing HC treatment separated in three subgroups: Bantu/Bantu, Bantu/Benin and Benin/Benin haplotype. On the basis of reduced haptoglobin (HP) levels, patients with Bantu/Bantu haplotypes had 3.0% higher hemolysis degree when compared with those with Bantu/Benin haplotypes (P=0.01). The Benin/Benin patients had 53.6% greater lipid peroxidation index than the Bantu/Bantu patients (P=0.01) because of evaluated thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels. The Bantu/Benin subgroup had intermediate levels of hemolytic and oxidative stress markers compared with the homozygous subgroups. Through strict inclusion criteria adopted, as well as consolidated and well-described hemolytic and the oxidative parameters evaluated, we suggest a haplotype-interaction response to HC treatment mediated by a 'balance' between the genetic factors of each haplotype studied.

  8. HPV16 E6 and E7 proteins induce a chronic oxidative stress response via NOX2 that causes genomic instability and increased susceptibility to DNA damage in head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Rossella; Werner, Erica; Zhang, Hongzheng; Chen, Georgia Z; Shin, Dong M; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of a subgroup of head and neck cancer characterized by an intrinsic radiosensitivity. HPV initiates cellular transformation through the activity of E6 and E7 proteins. E6 and E7 expression is necessary but not sufficient to transform the host cell, as genomic instability is required to acquire the malignant phenotype in HPV-initiated cells. This study reveals a key role played by oxidative stress in promoting genomic instability and radiosensitivity in HPV-positive head and neck cancer. By employing an isogenic human cell model, we observed that expression of E6 and E7 is sufficient to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in head and neck cancer cells. E6/E7-induced oxidative stress is mediated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (NOXs) and causes DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. This mechanism for genomic instability distinguishes HPV-positive from HPV-negative tumors, as we observed NOX-induced oxidative stress in HPV-positive but not HPV-negative head and neck cancer cells. We identified NOX2 as the source of HPV-induced oxidative stress as NOX2 silencing significantly reduced ROS generation, DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations in HPV-positive cells. Due to their state of chronic oxidative stress, HPV-positive cells are more susceptible to DNA damage induced by ROS and ionizing radiation (IR). Furthermore, exposure to IR results in the formation of complex lesions in HPV-positive cells as indicated by the higher amount of chromosomal breakage observed in this group of cells. These results reveal a novel mechanism for sustaining genomic instability in HPV-positive head and neck tumors and elucidate its contribution to their intrinsic radiosensitivity.

  9. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Muriach, María; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Romero, Francisco J.; Barcia, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation. PMID:25215171

  10. Diabetes and the brain: oxidative stress, inflammation, and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Muriach, María; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Romero, Francisco J; Barcia, Jorge M

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation.

  11. [Oxidative stress and preeclampsia: A review].

    PubMed

    Guerby, P; Vidal, F; Garoby-Salom, S; Vayssiere, C; Salvayre, R; Parant, O; Negre-Salvayre, A

    2015-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a leading cause of pregnancy complications and affects 3-7% of pregnant women. Pathophysiology of preeclampsia is still unclear. According to the two-stage model of preeclampsia, the abnormal and hypoperfused placenta (stage 1) releases factors to the bloodstream, which are responsible for the maternal symptoms (stage 2), characterised by a systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of the preeclampsia and could be the common denominator between the two. This review summarizes the current knowledge of a new potential etiology of the disease, with a special focus on oxidative stress. We also review the different factors that have been proposed to cause endothelial cell dysfunction in preeclampsia, and trials investigating the role of antioxidant supplementation in preeclampsia.

  12. Oxidative stress and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Almenier, Hazem A; Al Menshawy, Hazem H; Maher, Maha M; Al Gamal, Salah

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a chronic relapsing and remitting inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract. The exact cause of IBD remains undetermined, the condition appears to be related to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology ; but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response, immunologic and genetic aspects. We review some recent points of research in pathogenesis with special stress on oxidative stress and its correlations with disease activity.

  13. Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Møller, Kirsten; Bailey, Damian M

    2011-07-01

    Neuro-oxidative-nitrosative stress may prove the molecular basis underlying brain dysfunction in sepsis. In the current review, we describe how sepsis-induced reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) trigger lipid peroxidation chain reactions throughout the cerebrovasculature and surrounding brain parenchyma, due to failure of the local antioxidant systems. ROS/RNS cause structural membrane damage, induce inflammation, and scavenge nitric oxide (NO) to yield peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). This activates the inducible NO synthase, which further compounds ONOO(-) formation. ROS/RNS cause mitochondrial dysfunction by inhibiting the mitochondrial electron transport chain and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, which ultimately leads to neuronal bioenergetic failure. Furthermore, in certain 'at risk' areas of the brain, free radicals may induce neuronal apoptosis. In the present review, we define a role for ROS/RNS-mediated neuronal bioenergetic failure and apoptosis as a primary mechanism underlying sepsis-associated encephalopathy and, in sepsis survivors, permanent cognitive deficits.

  14. Oxidative Stress: A Promising Target for Chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    John, AM Sashi Papu; Ankem, Murali K; Damodaran, Chendil

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide, and treating advanced stages of cancer remains clinically challenging. Epidemiological studies have shown that oxidants and free radicals induced DNA damage is one of the predominant causative factors for cancer pathogenesis. Hence, oxidants are attractive targets for chemoprevention as well as therapy. Dietary agents are known to exert an anti-oxidant property which is one of the most efficient preventive strategy in cancer progression. In this article, we highlight dietary agents can potentially target oxidative stress, in turn delaying, preventing, or treating cancer development. Some of these agents are currently in use in basic research, while some have been launched successfully into clinical trials. PMID:27088073

  15. Oxidative stress in diabetes: implications for vascular and other complications.

    PubMed

    Pitocco, Dario; Tesauro, Manfredi; Alessandro, Rizzi; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-10-30

    In recent decades, oxidative stress has become a focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on these studies, an emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the "final common pathway" through which the risk factors for several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell-cell homeostasis; in particular, oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Diabetes: Implications for Vascular and Other Complications

    PubMed Central

    Pitocco, Dario; Tesauro, Manfredi; Alessandro, Rizzi; Ghirlanda, Giovanni; Cardillo, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, oxidative stress has become a focus of interest in most biomedical disciplines and many types of clinical research. Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of diabetes, obesity, cancer, ageing, inflammation, neurodegenerative disorders, hypertension, apoptosis, cardiovascular diseases, and heart failure. Based on these studies, an emerging concept is that oxidative stress is the “final common pathway” through which the risk factors for several diseases exert their deleterious effects. Oxidative stress causes a complex dysregulation of cell metabolism and cell–cell homeostasis; in particular, oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction. These are the two most relevant mechanisms in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes and its vascular complications, the leading cause of death in diabetic patients. PMID:24177571

  17. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  18. Oxidative stress caused by a SOD1 deficiency ameliorates thioacetamide-triggered cell death via CYP2E1 inhibition but stimulates liver steatosis.

    PubMed

    Shirato, Takaya; Homma, Takujiro; Lee, Jaeyong; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Fujii, Junichi

    2017-03-01

    We investigated the responses of mice that are defective in the superoxide-scavenging enzyme SOD1 to thioacetamide (TAA)-induced hepatotoxicity. When a lethal dose of TAA (500 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected, the wild-type (WT) mice all died within 36 h, but all of the SOD1-knockout (KO) mice survived. Treatment with an SOD1 inhibitor rendered the WT mice resistant to TAA toxicity. To elucidate the mechanism responsible for this, we examined the acute effects of a sublethal dose of TAA (200 mg/kg) on the livers of WT and KO mice. The extent of TAA-induced liver damage was less in the KO mice, but, instead, lipogenesis was further advanced in the SOD1-KO livers. The levels of proteins modified with acetyllysine, a marker for TAA-mediated injury, were lower in the KO mice than the WT mice upon the TAA treatment. The KO mice, which were under oxidative stress per se, exhibited a lower CYP2E1 activity, and this appeared to result in a decrease in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during TAA metabolism. Both cleaved ATF6, a transcriptional regulator that is activated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and CHOP, a death signal mediator, were highly elevated in the WT mice as the result of the TAA treatment and consistent with the liver damage. We conclude that elevated TAA metabolites and reactive oxygen species that are produced by CYP-mediated drug metabolism trigger lipogenesis as well as liver damage via ER stress and determine the fate of the mice.

  19. Methylglyoxal promotes oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Matafome, Paulo; Crisóstomo, Joana; Rodrigues, Lisa; Fernandes, Rosa; Pereira, Paulo; Seiça, Raquel M

    2012-05-01

    Modern diets can cause modern diseases. Research has linked a metabolite of sugar, methylglyoxal (MG), to the development of diabetic complications, but the exact mechanism has not been fully elucidated. The present study was designed to investigate whether MG could directly influence endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammation in Wistar and Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of type 2 diabetes. Wistar and GK rats treated with MG in the drinking water for 3 months were compared with the respective control rats. The effects of MG were investigated on NO-dependent vasorelaxation in isolated rat aortic arteries from the different groups. Insulin resistance, NO bioavailability, glycation, a pro-inflammatory biomarker monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and vascular oxidative stress were also evaluated. Methylglyoxal treated Wistar rats significantly reduced the efficacy of NO-dependent vasorelaxation (p<0.001). This impairment was accompanied by a three fold increase in the oxidative stress marker nitrotyrosine. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) formation was significantly increased as well as MCP-1 and the expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE). NO bioavailability was significantly attenuated and accompanied by an increase in superoxide anion immunofluorescence. Methylglyoxal treated GK rats significantly aggravated endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, AGEs accumulation and diminished NO bioavailability when compared with control GK rats. These results indicate that methylglyoxal induced endothelial dysfunction in normal Wistar rats and aggravated the endothelial dysfunction present in GK rats. The mechanism is at least in part by increasing oxidative stress and/or AGEs formation with a concomitant increment of inflammation and a decrement in NO bioavailability. The present study provides further evidence for methylglyoxal as one of the causative factors in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and development of macrovascular

  20. p53, Oxidative Stress, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits prooxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1669–1678. PMID:21050134

  1. Electromagnetic Fields, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Consales, Claudia; Merla, Caterina; Marino, Carmela; Benassi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) originating both from both natural and manmade sources permeate our environment. As people are continuously exposed to EMFs in everyday life, it is a matter of great debate whether they can be harmful to human health. On the basis of two decades of epidemiological studies, an increased risk for childhood leukemia associated with Extremely Low Frequency fields has been consistently assessed, inducing the International Agency for Research on Cancer to insert them in the 2B section of carcinogens in 2001. EMFs interaction with biological systems may cause oxidative stress under certain circumstances. Since free radicals are essential for brain physiological processes and pathological degeneration, research focusing on the possible influence of the EMFs-driven oxidative stress is still in progress, especially in the light of recent studies suggesting that EMFs may contribute to the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders. This review synthesizes the emerging evidences about this topic, highlighting the wide data uncertainty that still characterizes the EMFs effect on oxidative stress modulation, as both pro-oxidant and neuroprotective effects have been documented. Care should be taken to avoid methodological limitations and to determine the patho-physiological relevance of any alteration found in EMFs-exposed biological system. PMID:22991514

  2. [Atherosclerosis, oxidative stress and physical activity. Review].

    PubMed

    Calderón, Juan Camilo; Fernández, Ana Zita; María de Jesús, Alina Isabel

    2008-09-01

    Atherosclerosis and related diseases have emerged as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the western world and, therefore, as a problem of public health. Free radicals and reactive oxygen species have been suggested to be part of the pathophysiology of these diseases. It is well known that physical activity plays an important role as a public health measure by reducing the risk of developing atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular events in the general population. It is also known that physical activity increases in some tissues, the reactive oxygen species production. In this review the atherosclerosis-oxidative stress-physical activity relationship is focused on the apparent paradox by which physical activity reduces atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk in parallel with the activation of an apparently damaging mechanism which is an increased oxidative stress. A hypothesis including the experimental and clinical evidence is presented to explain the aforementioned paradox.

  3. Causes and Consequences of Replication Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zeman, Michelle K.; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2015-01-01

    Replication stress is a complex phenomenon which has serious implications for genome stability, cell survival, and human disease. Generation of aberrant replication fork structures containing single-stranded DNA activates the replication stress response, primarily mediated by the kinase ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR). ATR and its downstream effectors stabilize and help to restart stalled replication forks, avoiding the generation of DNA damage and genome instability. Understanding these pathways may be key to diagnosis and treatment of human diseases caused by defective responses to replication stress. PMID:24366029

  4. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  5. Biphasic regulation of lysosomal exocytosis by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Sreeram; Peña, Karina A; Chu, Charleen T; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2016-11-01

    Oxidative stress drives cell death in a number of diseases including ischemic stroke and neurodegenerative diseases. A better understanding of how cells recover from oxidative stress is likely to lead to better treatments for stroke and other diseases. The recent evidence obtained in several models ties the process of lysosomal exocytosis to the clearance of protein aggregates and toxic metals. The mechanisms that regulate lysosomal exocytosis, under normal or pathological conditions, are only beginning to emerge. Here we provide evidence for the biphasic effect of oxidative stress on lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal exocytosis was measured using the extracellular levels of the lysosomal enzyme beta-hexosaminidase (ß-hex). Low levels or oxidative stress stimulated lysosomal exocytosis, but inhibited it at high levels. Deletion of the lysosomal ion channel TRPML1 eliminated the stimulatory effect of low levels of oxidative stress. The inhibitory effects of oxidative stress appear to target the component of lysosomal exocytosis that is driven by extracellular Ca(2+). We propose that while moderate oxidative stress promotes cellular repair by stimulating lysosomal exocytosis, at high levels oxidative stress has a dual pathological effect: it directly causes cell damage and impairs damage repair by inhibiting lysosomal exocytosis. Harnessing these adaptive mechanisms may point to pharmacological interventions for diseases involving oxidative proteotoxicity or metal toxicity.

  6. Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) cause lifespan reduction and reproductive impairment through oxidative stress-mediated expression of the defensome in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus).

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Hwang, Un-Ki; Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan (TCS) and Triclocarban (TCC) are used as antimicrobial agents and have been widely dispersed and detected in the marine environment. However, the toxicities of TCS and TCC have been poorly investigated in marine invertebrates. In this study, the effects of TCS and TCC on mortality, population growth, lifespan, and fecundity were examined in the monogonont rotifer (Brachionus koreanus) using cellular ROS levels, GST enzymatic activity, and gene expression of defensomes. The median lethal concentration (LC50) of TCS (393.1μg/L) and TCC (388.1μg/L) was also determined in the same species. In TCS- and TCC-exposed B. koreanus, growth retardation and reduced fecundity were observed and were shown to have a potentially deleterious effect on the life cycle of B. koreanus. In addition, time-dependent increases in ROS content (%) and GST enzymatic activity were shown in response to TCS and TCC exposure. Additionally, transcript levels of detoxification proteins (e.g., CYPs), antioxidant proteins (e.g., GST-sigma, Cu/ZnSOD, CAT), and heat shock proteins (Hsps) were modulated in response to TCS and TCC exposure over a 24h period. Our results indicate that TCS and TCC induce oxidative stress and transcriptional regulation of detoxification, antioxidant, and heat shock proteins, resulting in changes in lifespan and fecundity.

  7. Protective effect of Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B upon oxidative stress caused by ozone and acid rain in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba".

    PubMed

    Esposito, Jéssica Bordotti Nobre; Esposito, Breno Pannia; Azevedo, Ricardo Antunes; Cruz, Luciano Soares; da Silva, Luzimar Campos; de Souza, Silvia Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of the Mn complex (Mn(III)-desferrioxamine B (MnDFB)) on oxidative stress in the Brazilian soybean cultivar Glycine max "Sambaiba" following exposure to ozone and acid rain. We determined the suitable dose of MnDFB to apply to G. max seedlings using a dose-response curve. The highest superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and Mn content in leaves were found upon the application of 8 μM MnDFB. Thus, G. max seedlings pretreated with 8 μM MnDFB were individually exposed to ozone and acid rain simulated. Pretreatment with MnDFB reduced lipid peroxidation upon ozone exposure and increased SOD activity in leaves; it did not alter the metal content in any part of the plant. Conversely, following acid rain exposure, neither the metal content in leaves nor SOD enzyme activity were directly affected by MnDFB, unlike pH. Our findings demonstrated that exogenous MnDFB application before ozone exposure may modulate the MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, and FeSOD activities to combat the ROS excess in the cell. Here, we demonstrated that the applied dose of MnDFB enhances antioxidative defenses in soybean following exposure to acid rain and especially to ozone.

  8. Metabolomics analysis of the toxicity pathways of triphenyl phosphate in HepaRG cells and comparison to oxidative stress mechanisms caused by acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Van den Eede, Nele; Cuykx, Matthias; Rodrigues, Robim M; Laukens, Kris; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian; Vanhaecke, Tamara

    2015-12-01

    Since the publication of REACH guidelines, the need for in vitro tools for toxicity testing has increased. We present here the development of a hepatotoxicity testing tool using human HepaRG cell cultures and metabolomics. HepaRG cells were exposed to either 4mM acetaminophen (APAP) as reference toxicant for oxidative stress or 50 μM triphenyl phosphate (TPHP) as toxicant with unknown toxicity pathways (TPs). After 72 h exposure, cells were subjected to quenching and liquid-liquid extraction which resulted in a polar and an apolar fraction. Analysis of fractions was performed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF-MS). Significantly up or down regulated metabolites were selected by univariate statistics prior to identification. In order to obtain robust and specific TP biomarkers, the experiment was also repeated using a different culture medium composition to assess which metabolites show consistent changes. Potential biomarkers belonging to different TPs were found for APAP and TPHP. For APAP, the biomarkers were related to a decrease in unsaturated phospholipids, and for TPHP to an accumulation of phosphoglycerolipids and increase of palmitoyl lysophosphatidylcholine. This first proof-of-concept opens new perspectives for the analysis of other (reference) toxicants with different TPs and it can be used to expand the in vitro tool for hepatotoxicity screening of various compounds.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-11-02

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  10. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  11. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Prie, BE; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale:Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient’s psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective:We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results:27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (p<0.01) SOD activity was found in patients with androgenetic alopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (p<0.001), increased MDA levels (p<0.001) and no change in total thiols concentration were found in patients when compared with the controls. Discussions:Decreased total antioxidant activity and increased MDA levels found in plasma samples of patients with androgenetic alopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia. Abbreviations: AAG = androgenetic alopecia, MDA = malondialdehyde, SOD = superoxide dismutase

  12. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Prie, B E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale:Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient's psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective:We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results:27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (p<0.01) SOD activity was found in patients with androgenetic alopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (p<0.001), increased MDA levels (p<0.001) and no change in total thiols concentration were found in patients when compared with the controls. Discussions:Decreased total antioxidant activity and increased MDA levels found in plasma samples of patients with androgenetic alopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia.

  13. Oxidative Stress in Inherited Mitochondrial Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially-expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production, or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stresses in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases; Friedreich's ataxia (FA), LHON, MELAS, MERRF and Leigh Syndrome (LS) is discussed. Published reports for oxidative stress involvement in pathomechanism in these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest for oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was in Friedreich's ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for oxidative stress citation count frequency within each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is in Friedreich's ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich's diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich's ataxia. PMID:26073122

  14. Oxidative Stress in Oral Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kesarwala, Aparna H.; Krishna, Murali C.; Mitchell, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  15. Oxidative Stress and HPV Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    De Marco, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Extensive experimental work has conclusively demonstrated that infection with certain types of human papillomaviruses, the so-called high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV), represent a most powerful human carcinogen. However, neoplastic growth is a rare and inappropriate outcome in the natural history of HPV, and a number of other events have to concur in order to induce the viral infection into the (very rare) neoplastic transformation. From this perspective, a number of putative viral, host, and environmental co-factors have been proposed as potential candidates. Among them oxidative stress (OS) is an interesting candidate, yet comparatively underexplored. OS is a constant threat to aerobic organisms being generated during mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, as well as during inflammation, infections, ionizing irradiation, UV exposure, mechanical and chemical stresses. Epithelial tissues, the elective target for HPV infection, are heavily exposed to all named sources of OS. Two different types of cooperative mechanisms are presumed to occur between OS and HPV: I) The OS genotoxic activity and the HPV-induced genomic instability concur independently to the generation of the molecular damage necessary for the emergence of neoplastic clones. This first mode is merely a particular form of co-carcinogenesis; and II) OS specifically interacts with one or more molecular stages of neoplastic initiation and/or progression induced by the HPV infection. This manuscript was designed to summarize available data on this latter hypothesis. Experimental data and indirect evidences on promoting the activity of OS in viral infection and viral integration will be reviewed. The anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenetic role of NO (nitric oxide) and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) will be discussed together with the OS/HPV cooperation in inducing cancer metabolism adaptation. Unexplored/underexplored aspects of the OS interplay with the HPV-driven carcinogenesis will be

  16. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bergsma, Alexis L.; Senchuk, Megan M.; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage. PMID:27053445

  17. Aging causes decreased resistance to multiple stresses and a failure to activate specific stress response pathways.

    PubMed

    Dues, Dylan J; Andrews, Emily K; Schaar, Claire E; Bergsma, Alexis L; Senchuk, Megan M; Van Raamsdonk, Jeremy M

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we examine the relationship between stress resistance and aging. We find that resistance to multiple types of stress peaks during early adulthood and then declines with age. To dissect the underlying mechanisms, we use C. elegans transcriptional reporter strains that measure the activation of different stress responses including: the heat shock response, mitochondrial unfolded protein response, endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response, hypoxia response, SKN-1-mediated oxidative stress response, and the DAF-16-mediated stress response. We find that the decline in stress resistance with age is at least partially due to a decreased ability to activate protective mechanisms in response to stress. In contrast, we find that any baseline increase in stress caused by the advancing age is too mild to detectably upregulate any of the stress response pathways. Further exploration of how worms respond to stress with increasing age revealed that the ability to mount a hormetic response to heat stress is also lost with increasing age. Overall, this work demonstrates that resistance to all types of stress declines with age. Based on our data, we speculate that the decrease in stress resistance with advancing age results from a genetically-programmed inactivation of stress response pathways, not accumulation of damage.

  18. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure.

    PubMed

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A

    2013-12-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines.

  19. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  20. Experimental evidence of oxidative stress in patients with l-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria and that l-carnitine attenuates in vitro DNA damage caused by d-2-hydroxyglutaric and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Daiane Grigolo Bardemaker; de Moura Coelho, Daniella; Sitta, Ângela; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Hauschild, Tatiane; Manfredini, Vanusa; Bakkali, Abdellatif; Struys, Eduard A; Jakobs, Cornelis; Wajner, Moacir; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2017-04-07

    d-2-hydroxyglutaric (D-2-HGA) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric (L-2-HGA) acidurias are rare neurometabolic disorders biochemically characterized by increased levels of d-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (D-2-HG) and l-2-hydroxyglutaric acid (L-2-HG) respectively, in biological fluids and tissues. These diseases are caused by mutations in the specific enzymes involved in the metabolic pathways of these organic acids. In the present work, we first investigated whether D-2-HG and L-2-HGA could provoke DNA oxidative damage in blood leukocytes and whether l-carnitine (LC) could prevent the in vitro DNA damage induced by these organic acids. It was verified that 50μM of D-2-HG and 30μM of L-2-HG significantly induced DNA damage that was prevented by 30 and 150μM of LC. We also evaluated oxidative stress parameters in urine of L-2-HGA patients and observed a significant increase of oxidized guanine species and di-tyrosine, biomarkers of oxidative DNA and protein damage, respectively. In contrast, no significant changes of urinary isoprostanes and reactive nitrogen species levels were observed in these patients. Taken together, our data indicate the involvement of oxidative damage, especially on DNA, in patients affected by these diseases and the protective effect of LC.

  1. Does normobaric hyperoxia cause oxidative stress in the injured brain? A microdialysis study using 8-iso-PGF2α as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Jorge, Marian; Sánchez-Guerrero, Angela; Mur-Bonet, Gemma; Castro, Lidia; Rădoi, Andreea; Riveiro, Marilyn; Fernández-Prado, Natividad; Baena, Jacinto; Poca, Maria A; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2017-03-21

    Significant controversy exists regarding the potential clinical benefit of normobaric hyperoxia therapy (NBO) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study consisted of two aims: 1) to assess whether NBO improves brain oxygenation and metabolism and 2) to determine whether this therapy may increase the risk of oxidative stress (OxS), using 8-iso-PGF2α as a biomarker. Thirty-one patients with a median admission Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4 (min: 3, max: 12) were monitored with cerebral microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen sensors and treated with FiO2 of 1.0 for 4 h. Patients were divided into two groups according to the area monitored by the probes: normal injured brain and traumatic penumbra/traumatic core. NBO maintained for 4 h did not induce OxS in patients without preOxS at baseline, except in one case. However, for patients in whom OxS was detected at baseline, NBO induced a significant increase in 8-iso-PGF2α. The results of our study showed that NBO did not change energy metabolism in the whole group of patients. In the five patients with [Lac]brain>3.5 mmol/L at baseline, NBO induced a marked reduction in both [Lac]brain and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio. Although these differences were not statistically significant, together with the results of our previous study, they suggest that TBI patients would benefit from receiving NBO when they show indications of disturbed brain metabolism. These findings, in combination with increasing evidence that TBI metabolic crises are common without brain ischemia, open new possibilities for the use of this accessible therapeutic strategy in TBI patients.

  2. Assessment of Workplace Stress: Occupational Stress, Its Consequences, and Common Causes of Teacher Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Jo-Ida; Sullivan, Brandon A.

    This chapter introduces teachers and other education professionals to the assessment of occupational stress. It begins with a brief discussion of what occupational stress is, and overview of the consequences of prolonged stress, and a review of the common causes of teacher stress. Next, it presents methods for reducing occupational stress through…

  3. Inflammation, oxidative stress, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Angel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  4. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  5. Severe Life Stress and Oxidative Stress in the Brain: From Animal Models to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Vincent; Trabace, Luigia; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Severe life stress (SLS), as opposed to trivial everyday stress, is defined as a serious psychosocial event with the potential of causing an impacting psychological traumatism. Recent Advances: Numerous studies have attempted to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to SLS. This response includes a variety of morphological and neurochemical modifications; among them, oxidative stress is almost invariably observed. Oxidative stress is defined as disequilibrium between oxidant generation and the antioxidant response. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss how SLS leads to oxidative stress in the CNS, and how the latter impacts pathophysiological outcomes. We also critically discuss experimental methods that measure oxidative stress in the CNS. The review covers animal models and human observations. Animal models of SLS include sleep deprivation, maternal separation, and social isolation in rodents, and the establishment of hierarchy in non-human primates. In humans, SLS, which is caused by traumatic events such as child abuse, war, and divorce, is also accompanied by oxidative stress in the CNS. Future Directions: The outcome of SLS in humans ranges from resilience, over post-traumatic stress disorder, to development of chronic mental disorders. Defining the sources of oxidative stress in SLS might in the long run provide new therapeutic avenues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1475–1490. PMID:22746161

  6. Oxidative stress and male reproductive health

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, Robert J; Smith, Tegan B; Jobling, Matthew S; Baker, Mark A; De Iuliis, Geoffry N

    2014-01-01

    One of the major causes of defective sperm function is oxidative stress, which not only disrupts the integrity of sperm DNA but also limits the fertilizing potential of these cells as a result of collateral damage to proteins and lipids in the sperm plasma membrane. The origins of such oxidative stress appear to involve the sperm mitochondria, which have a tendency to generate high levels of superoxide anion as a prelude to entering the intrinsic apoptotic cascade. Unfortunately, these cells have very little capacity to respond to such an attack because they only possess the first enzyme in the base excision repair (BER) pathway, 8-oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (OGG1). The latter successfully creates an abasic site, but the spermatozoa cannot process the oxidative lesion further because they lack the downstream proteins (APE1, XRCC1) needed to complete the repair process. It is the responsibility of the oocyte to continue the BER pathway prior to initiation of S-phase of the first mitotic division. If a mistake is made by the oocyte at this stage of development, a mutation will be created that will be represented in every cell in the body. Such mechanisms may explain the increase in childhood cancers and other diseases observed in the offspring of males who have suffered oxidative stress in their germ line as a consequence of age, environmental or lifestyle factors. The high prevalence of oxidative DNA damage in the spermatozoa of male infertility patients may have implications for the health of children conceived in vitro and serves as a driver for current research into the origins of free radical generation in the germ line. PMID:24369131

  7. Oxidative stress in neonatology: a review.

    PubMed

    Mutinati, M; Pantaleo, M; Roncetti, M; Piccinno, M; Rizzo, A; Sciorsci, R L

    2014-02-01

    Free radicals are highly reactive oxidizing agents containing one or more unpaired electrons. Both in human and veterinary neonathology, it is generally accepted that oxidative stress functions as an important catalysator of neonatal disease. Soon after birth, many sudden physiological and environmental conditions make the newborn vulnerable for the negative effects of oxidative stress, which potentially can impair neonatal vitality. As a clinician, it is important to have in depth knowledge about factors affecting maternal/neonatal oxidative status and the cascades of events that enrol when the neonate is subjected to oxidative stress. This report aims at providing clinicians with an up-to-date review about oxidative stress in neonates across animal species. It will be emphasized which handlings and treatments that are applied during neonatal care or resuscitation can actually impose oxidative stress upon the neonate. Views and opinions about maternal and/or neonatal antioxydative therapy will be shared.

  8. Impact of oxidative stress in fetal programming.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Loren P; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring.

  9. Lung injury and lung cancer caused by cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress: Molecular mechanisms and therapeutic opportunities involving the ceramide-generating machinery and epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, Tzipora; Filosto, Simone; Chung, Samuel

    2014-11-20

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are frequently caused by tobacco smoking. However, these diseases present opposite phenotypes involving redox signaling at the cellular level. While COPD is characterized by excessive airway epithelial cell death and lung injury, lung cancer is caused by uncontrolled epithelial cell proliferation. Notably, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that lung cancer incidence is significantly higher in patients who have preexisting emphysema/lung injury. However, the molecular link and common cell signaling events underlying lung injury diseases and lung cancer are poorly understood. This review focuses on studies of molecular mechanism(s) underlying smoking-related lung injury (COPD) and lung cancer. Specifically, the role of the ceramide-generating machinery during cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leading to both apoptosis and proliferation of lung epithelial cells is emphasized. Over recent years, it has been established that ceramide is a sphingolipid playing a major role in lung epithelia structure/function leading to lung injury in chronic pulmonary diseases. However, new and unexpected findings draw attention to its potential role in lung development, cell proliferation, and tumorigenesis. To address this dichotomy in detail, evidence is presented regarding several protein targets, including Src, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, and neutral sphingomyelinase 2, the major sphingomyelinase that controls ceramide generation during oxidative stress. Furthermore, their roles are presented not only in apoptosis and lung injury but also in enhancing cell proliferation, lung cancer development, and resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted therapy for treating lung cancer.

  10. Static Stress Transfers Causes Delayed Seismicity Shutdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, K.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.; Dieterich, J. H.; Cochran, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    It has been long debated what role static stress changes play in the enhancement and suppression of seismicity in the near-field region of large earthquakes. While numerous observations have correlated earthquake triggering and elevated seismicity rates with regions of increased Coulomb failure stress (CFS), observations of seismic quiescence in stress shadow regions are more controversial. When observed, seismicity shutdowns are often delayed by days to months following a negative stress perturbation. Some studies propose that the delay in the seismic shutdown can be caused by rupture promoting failure on one fault type while suppressing activity on another; thus the observed seismicity reflects the weighted contribution of the two faulting populations. For example, it was noted that in the 75 years following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, strike-slip faulting earthquakes were inhibited, while thrust faulting events were promoted. However, definitive observations supporting this delayed shutdown mechanism are rare. In this study, we report seismicity rate increases and decreases that correlate with regions of Coulomb stress transfer, and show observations of a delayed shutdown in the Yuha Desert, California. We use a Coulomb stress change model coupled with a rate-and state- earthquake model to show that the delay in the shutdown is due to the combined changes in the rates of normal and strike-slip faulting events following the 2010 M5.72 Ocotillo aftershock of the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake.

  11. Oxidative stress in brain ischemia.

    PubMed

    Love, S

    1999-01-01

    Brain ischemia initiates a complex cascade of metabolic events, several of which involve the generation of nitrogen and oxygen free radicals. These free radicals and related reactive chemical species mediate much of damage that occurs after transient brain ischemia, and in the penumbral region of infarcts caused by permanent ischemia. Nitric oxide, a water- and lipid-soluble free radical, is generated by the action of nitric oxide synthases. Ischemia causes a surge in nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS 1) activity in neurons and, possibly, glia, increased NOS 3 activity in vascular endothelium, and later an increase in NOS 2 activity in a range of cells including infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages, activated microglia and astrocytes. The effects of ischemia on the activity of NOS 1, a Ca2+-dependent enzyme, are thought to be secondary to reversal of glutamate reuptake at synapses, activation of NMDA receptors, and resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+. The up-regulation of NOS 2 activity is mediated by transcriptional inducers. In the context of brain ischemia, the activity of NOS 1 and NOS 2 is broadly deleterious, and their inhibition or inactivation is neuroprotective. However, the production of nitric oxide in blood vessels by NOS 3, which, like NOS 1, is Ca2+-dependent, causes vasodilatation and improves blood flow in the penumbral region of brain infarcts. In addition to causing the synthesis of nitric oxide, brain ischemia leads to the generation of superoxide, through the action of nitric oxide synthases, xanthine oxidase, leakage from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and other mechanisms. Nitric oxide and superoxide are themselves highly reactive but can also combine to form a highly toxic anion, peroxynitrite. The toxicity of the free radicals and peroxynitrite results from their modification of macromolecules, especially DNA, and from the resulting induction of apoptotic and necrotic pathways. The mode of cell death that prevails probably

  12. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  13. Increased oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage in non-remission schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Sertan Copoglu, U; Virit, Osman; Hanifi Kokacya, M; Orkmez, Mustafa; Bulbul, Feridun; Binnur Erbagci, A; Semiz, Murat; Alpak, Gokay; Unal, Ahmet; Ari, Mustafa; Savas, Haluk A

    2015-09-30

    Increasing evidence shows that oxidative stress plays a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. But there is not any study which examines the effects of oxidative stress on DNA in schizophrenia patients. Therefore we aimed to assess the oxidative stress levels and oxidative DNA damage in schizophrenia patients with and without symptomatic remission. A total of 64 schizophrenia patients (38 with symptomatic remission and 26 without symptomatic remission) and 80 healthy volunteers were included in the study. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured in plasma. TOS, oxidative stress index (OSI) and 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher in non-remission schizophrenic (Non-R-Sch) patients than in the controls. TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher in remission schizophrenic (R-Sch) patients than in the controls. TAS level were significantly lower and TOS and OSI levels were significantly higher in R-Sch patients than in Non-R-Sch patients. Despite the ongoing oxidative stress in patients with both R-Sch and Non-R-Sch, oxidative DNA damage was higher in only Non-R-Sch patients compared to controls. It is suggested that oxidative stress can cause the disease via DNA damage, and oxidative stress plays a role in schizophrenia through oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Do the serum oxidative stress biomarkers provide a reasonable index of the general oxidative stress status?

    PubMed

    Argüelles, Sandro; García, Sonia; Maldonado, Mariam; Machado, Alberto; Ayala, Antonio

    2004-11-01

    The oxidant status of an individual is assessed by determining a group of markers in noninvasive samples. One limitation when measuring these biomarkers is that they do not give information about tissue localization of oxidative stress. The present study was undertaken to establish whether the serum oxidative stress biomarkers are indicative of oxidative stress in tissues of an individual. To accomplish this, we determined a few generic markers of oxidation in serum and tissues of six groups of rats treated experimentally, to modulate their oxidative stress status. The correlation between serum and tissue levels was calculated for each marker. Also, for each tissue, the correlation between the values of these oxidative stress biomarkers was analysed. Our results show that only lipid peroxides in serum could be useful to predict the oxidative stress in tissues. No correlation was found between any of the oxidative stress markers in serum.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of ROS production and oxidative stress in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Newsholme, Philip; Cruzat, Vinicius Fernandes; Keane, Kevin Noel; Carlessi, Rodrigo; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem

    2016-12-15

    Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are known to be associated with the development of metabolic diseases, including diabetes. Oxidative stress, an imbalance between oxidative and antioxidative systems of cells and tissues, is a result of over production of oxidative-free radicals and associated reactive oxygen species (ROS). One outcome of excessive levels of ROS is the modification of the structure and function of cellular proteins and lipids, leading to cellular dysfunction including impaired energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, impaired cell transport mechanisms and overall dysfunctional biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. Nutritional stress, such as that caused by excess high-fat and/or carbohydrate diets, promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation and decreased antioxidant status. In obesity, chronic oxidative stress and associated inflammation are the underlying factors that lead to the development of pathologies such as insulin resistance, dysregulated pathways of metabolism, diabetes and cardiovascular disease through impaired signalling and metabolism resulting in dysfunction to insulin secretion, insulin action and immune responses. However, exercise may counter excessive levels of oxidative stress and thus improve metabolic and inflammatory outcomes. In the present article, we review the cellular and molecular origins and significance of ROS production, the molecular targets and responses describing how oxidative stress affects cell function including mechanisms of insulin secretion and action, from the point of view of possible application of novel diabetic therapies based on redox regulation.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking.

  17. Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: What Polyphenols Can Do for Us?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tarique; Yin, Yulong; Blachier, Francois; Tossou, Myrlene C. B.; Rahu, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is viewed as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination by protective mechanisms, which can lead to chronic inflammation. Oxidative stress can activate a variety of transcription factors, which lead to the differential expression of some genes involved in inflammatory pathways. The inflammation triggered by oxidative stress is the cause of many chronic diseases. Polyphenols have been proposed to be useful as adjuvant therapy for their potential anti-inflammatory effect, associated with antioxidant activity, and inhibition of enzymes involved in the production of eicosanoids. This review aims at exploring the properties of polyphenols in anti-inflammation and oxidation and the mechanisms of polyphenols inhibiting molecular signaling pathways which are activated by oxidative stress, as well as the possible roles of polyphenols in inflammation-mediated chronic disorders. Such data can be helpful for the development of future antioxidant therapeutics and new anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:27738491

  18. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  19. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheresh, Paul; Kim, Seok-Jo; Tulasiram, Sandhya; Kamp, David W.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as an important molecular mechanism underlying fibrosis in a variety of organs, including the lungs. However, the causal role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) released from environmental exposures and inflammatory / interstitial cells in mediating fibrosis as well as how best to target an imbalance in ROS production in patients with fibrosis are not firmly established. We focus on the role of ROS in pulmonary fibrosis and, where possible, highlight overlapping molecular pathways in other organs. The key origins of oxidative stress in pulmonary fibrosis (e.g. environmental toxins, mitochondria / NADPH oxidase of inflammatory and lung target cells, and depletion of antioxidant defenses) are reviewed. The role of alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) apoptosis by mitochondria- and p53-regulated death pathways are examined. We emphasize an emerging role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pulmonary fibrosis. After briefly summarizing how ROS trigger a DNA damage response, we concentrate on recent studies implicating a role for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and repair mechanisms focusing on 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (Ogg1) as well as crosstalk between ROS production, mtDNA damage, p53, Ogg1, and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2). Finally, the association between ROS and TGF-β1-induced fibrosis is discussed. Novel insights into the molecular basis of ROS-induced pulmonary diseases and, in particular, lung epithelial cell death may promote the development of unique therapeutic targets for managing pulmonary fibrosis as well as fibrosis in other organs and tumors, and in aging; diseases for which effective management is lacking. PMID:23219955

  1. Oxidative stress, thyroid dysfunction & Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos; Casado, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one out of 700-1000 live births, and the most common cause of mental retardation. Thyroid dysfunction is the most typical endocrine abnormality in patients with DS. It is well known that thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent in children and adults with DS and that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are more common in patients with DS than in the general population. Increasing evidence has shown that DS individuals are under unusual increased oxidative stress, which may be involved in the higher prevalence and severity of a number of pathologies associated with the syndrome, as well as the accelerated ageing observed in these individuals. The gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is coded on chromosome 21 and it is overexpressed (~50%) resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). ROS leads to oxidative damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, therefore, oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:26354208

  2. Chronic oxidative stress after irradiation: an unproven hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Samuel R; Cohen, Eric P

    2012-01-01

    Injury and organ failure after irradiation of late-responding tissues is a substantial problem in radiation oncology and a major threat after accidental or belligerent exposures. The mechanisms of injury may include death of clonogens, vascular injury, activation of cytokine networks, and/or chronic oxidative stress. Knowledge of mechanisms may guide optimal use of mitigators. The hypothesis of chronic oxidative stress as a mechanism of late radiation injury has received much attention. We review herein the published evidence for chronic oxidative stress in vivo, and for use of antioxidants as mitigators of normal tissue radiation injury. We conclude that there is only indirect evidence for chronic oxidative stress after irradiation, and there are only limited published reports of mitigation by antioxidants. We did not find a differentiation of persistent markers of oxidative stress from an ongoing production of oxygen radicals. It is thus unproven that chronic oxidative stress plays a major role in causing radiation injury and organ failure in late-responding tissues. Further investigation is justified, to identify persistent oxidative stress and to identify optimal mitigators of radiation injury. PMID:23245910

  3. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy.

  4. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  5. Aircraft crash caused by stress corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kolkman, H.J.; Kool, G.A.; Wanhill, R.J.H.

    1996-01-01

    An aircraft crash in the Netherlands was caused by disintegration of a jet engine. Fractography showed that the chain of events started with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of a pin attached to a lever arm of the compressor variable vane system. Such a lever arm-pin assembly costs only a few dollars. Investigation of hundreds of pins from the accident and a number of identical engines revealed that this was not an isolated case. Many pins exhibited various amounts of SCC. The failed pin in the accident engine happened to be the first fractured one. SCC requires the simultaneous presence of tensile stress, a corrosive environment, and a susceptible material. In this case the stress was a residual stress arising from the production method. There was a clear correlation between the presence of salt deposits on the levers and SCC of the pins. It was shown that these deposits were able to reach the internal space between the pin and lever arm, thereby initiating SCC in this space. The corrosive environment in Western Europe explains why the problem manifested itself in the Netherlands at a relatively early stage in engine life. The main point is, however, that the manufacturer selected an SCC-prone material in the design stage. The solution has been to change the pin material.

  6. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Torequl

    2017-01-01

    Reactive species play an important role in physiological functions. Overproduction of reactive species, notably reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species along with the failure of balance by the body's antioxidant enzyme systems results in destruction of cellular structures, lipids, proteins, and genetic materials such as DNA and RNA. Moreover, the effects of reactive species on mitochondria and their metabolic processes eventually cause a rise in ROS/RNS levels, leading to oxidation of mitochondrial proteins, lipids, and DNA. Oxidative stress has been considered to be linked to the etiology of many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) such as Alzheimer diseases, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Friedreich's ataxia, Huntington's disease, Multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's diseases. In addition, oxidative stress causing protein misfold may turn to other NDDs include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy, Kuru, Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome, and Fatal Familial Insomnia. An overview of the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction-linked NDDs has been summarized in this review.

  7. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  8. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  9. Oxidative stress in the neonate.

    PubMed

    Robles, R; Palomino, N; Robles, A

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the oxidative state of term and preterm neonates at the moment of birth and during the first days of life, and the influence of exposure to oxygen on the premature neonates.A total of 20 neonates were selected. Group A: 10 healthy full-term neonates, and Group B: 10 preterm neonates with no other pathology associated, requiring oxygen therapy. Venous samples were taken in cord at 3 and 72 h in Group A, and in cord at 3, 24 and 72 h and 7 days in Group B.Hydroperoxides, Q10 coenzyme (Co Q10) and alpha-tocopherol were measured within the erythrocyte membrane. Levels of hydroperoxides present in erythrocyte membrane were higher than normal both in Group A and in Group B at birth. This increase was greater in the group of premature neonates. Levels of alpha-tocopherol at birth increase significantly at 72 h in term neonates. Among the premature newborns, alpha-tocopherol levels are two to three times lower at birth and do not rise to higher levels as in the term neonate group. Fall in levels of Co Q10 in erythrocyte membranes is observed, and perhaps is due to the role of Co Q10 in maintaining the pool of reduced tocopherol. At birth, the neonate presents an increase of markers of oxidative stress and a decrease of their antioxidant defenses. This difference is greater as gestational age decreases. The application of oxygen therapy resulted in these levels which remain low throughout the study period.

  10. Effect of heat stress on oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and some stress parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Altan, O; Pabuçcuoğlu, A; Altan, A; Konyalioğlu, S; Bayraktar, H

    2003-09-01

    1. This study was conducted to determine the effects of heat stress on fearfulness, leucocyte components, oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation in two commercial broiler strains, Cobb (C) and Ross (R). 2. At 36 and 37 d of age birds were exposed to 38 +/- 1 degree C for 3 h. Rectal temperatures, duration of tonic immobility (TI), haematocrit values, proportions of leucocyte components (heterophil, lymphocyte, basophil, eosinophil, monocyte), malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations and antioxidant enzyme activities (CAT, SOD, GPx) of all the birds were determined, before and after heat treatment. 3. Rectal temperatures increased and haematocrit values decreased in birds exposed to heat stress. Heat stress caused a significant increase in heterophil/lymphocyte and in basophil ratios. 4. Exposing birds to heat stress increased duration of TI, suggesting heat-stressed birds tended to be more fearful. 5. Heat stress resulted in a significant Genotype x Treatment interaction for MDA concentration. CAT, SOD and GPx activities; MDA concentrations in heat-stressed R strain birds were greater than in heat-stressed C strain birds.

  11. Phenazine derivatives cause proteotoxicity and stress in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arpita; Rentas, Courtney; Caldwell, Guy A.; Caldwell, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely recognized that bacterial metabolites have toxic effects in animal systems. Phenazines are a common bacterial metabolite within the redox-active exotoxin class. These compounds have been shown to be toxic to the soil invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans with the capability of causing oxidative stress and lethality. Here we report that chronic, low-level exposure to three separate phenazine molecules (phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, pyocyanin and 1-hydroxyphenazine) upregulated ER stress response and enhanced expression of a superoxide dismutase reporter in vivo. Exposure to these molecules also increased of polyglutamine and α-synuclein in the bodywall muscle cells of C. elegans. Exposure of worms to these phenazines caused additional sensitivity in dopamine neurons expressing wild-type α-synuclein, indicating a possible defect in protein homeostasis. The addition of an anti-oxidant failed to rescue the neurotoxic and protein aggregation phenotypes caused by these compounds. Thus, increased production of superoxide radicals that occurs in whole animals in response to these phenazines appears independent from the toxicity phenotype observed. Collectively, these data provide cause for further consideration of the neurodegenerative impact of phenazines. PMID:25304539

  12. PARTICULATE MATTER, OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Particulate matter (PM), a component of air pollution has been epidemiologically associated with sudden deaths, cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. The effects are more pronounced in patients with pre-existing conditions such as asthma, diabetes or obstructive pulmonary disorders. Clinical and experimental studies have historically focused on the cardiopulmonary effects of PM. However, since PM particles carry numerous biocontaminants that are capable of triggering free radical production and cytokine release, the possibility that PM may affect organs systems sensitive to oxidative stress must be considered. Four independent studies that summarize the neurochemical and neuropathological changes found in the brains of PM exposed animals are described here. These were recently presented at two 2007 symposia sponsored by the Society of Toxicology (Charlotte, NC) and the International Neurotoxicology Association (Monterey, CA). Particulates are covered with biocontaminants (e.g., endotoxins, mold, pollen) which convey free radical activity that can damage the lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins of target cells on contact and stimulate inflammatory cytokine release. Although, the historical focus of PM toxicity has been cardiopulmonary targets, it is now appreciated that inhaled nano-size (<100 nm) particles quickly exit the lungs and enter the circulation where they distribute to various organ systems (l.e., liver, kidneys, testes, lymph nodes) (Takenaka et aI

  13. [Psychological stress caused by work: burnout syndrome].

    PubMed

    Keel, P

    1993-01-01

    In a variety of helping professions emotional stress can lead to "burnout". The syndrome is characterised by emotional exhaustion, attitudinal hardening (loss of empathy) and a sense of decreased accomplishment. Longterm consequences of burnout can be mental problems such as depression or psychosomatic disorders. Affected employees are less productive and sick more often. They may even quit their jobs or need early retirement. In spite of this considerable loss of working force often neither those affected nor the employers are aware of the problem in time. Burnout seems to be caused by disproportionally high efforts (time, emotional involvement, empathy) and poor satisfaction (negative outcome) in addition to stressful working conditions (high demands). It affects mainly nurses, physicians, social workers, teachers and other similar professions. In order to prevent burnout, awareness of the problem must be promoted. Examples of job-specific measures for nurses and teachers are given. Their goal is to lower the professional stress and improve satisfaction. Social support and improved team cooperation can further protect against burnout.

  14. Ageing, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Harper, M-E; Bevilacqua, L; Hagopian, K; Weindruch, R; Ramsey, J J

    2004-12-01

    Mitochondria are a cell's single greatest source of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are important for many life sustaining processes of cells and tissues, but they can also induce cell damage and death. If their production and levels within cells is not effectively controlled, then the detrimental effects of oxidative stress can accumulate. Oxidative stress is widely thought to underpin many ageing processes, and the oxidative stress theory of ageing is one of the most widely acknowledged theories of ageing. As well as being the major source of reactive oxygen species, mitochondria are also a major site of oxidative damage. The purpose of this review is a concise and current review of the effects of oxidative stress and ageing on mitochondrial function. Emphasis is placed upon the roles of mitochondrial proton leak, the uncoupling proteins, and the anti-ageing effects of caloric restriction.

  15. PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA: A CATECHOLAMINE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    -oncogene activation, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, DNA damage, and genomic instability. Since the mitochondria serves as the main source of prooxidants, any mitochondrial impairment leads to severe oxidative stress, a major outcome of which is tumor development. In terms of cancer pathogenesis, pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas represent tumors where the oxidative phosphorylation defect due to the mutation of succinate dehydrogenase is the cause, not a consequence, of tumor development. Any succinate dehydrogenase pathogenic mutation results in the shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis in the cytoplasm (also called anaerobic glycolysis if hypoxia is the main cause of such a shift). This phenomenon, also called the Warburg effect, is well demonstrated by a positive [18F]-fluorodeoxyglycose positron emission tomography scan. Microarray studies, genome-wide association studies, proteomics and protein arrays, metabolomics, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics approaches will remain powerful tools to further uncover the pathogenesis of these tumors and their unique markers, with the ultimate goal to introduce new therapeutic options for those with metastatic or malignant pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. Soon oxidative stress will be tightly linked to a multistep cancer process in which the mutation of various genes (perhaps in a logistic way) ultimately results in uncontrolled growth, proliferation, and metastatic potential of practically any cell. Targeting the mTORC, IGF-1, HIF and other pathways, topoisomerases, protein degradation by proteosomes, balancing the activity of protein kinases and phosphatases or even synchronizing the cell cycle before any exposure to any kind of therapy will soon become a reality. Facing such a reality today will favor our chances to “beat” this disease tomorrow. PMID:21615192

  16. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  17. Relationships between Stress Granules, Oxidative Stress, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) are critical for facilitating stress responses and for preventing the accumulation of misfolded proteins. SGs, however, have been linked to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, in part because SGs share many components with neuronal granules. Oxidative stress is one of the conditions that induce SG formation. SGs regulate redox levels, and SG formation in turn is differently regulated by various types of oxidative stress. These associations and other evidences suggest that SG formation contributes to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. In this paper, we review the regulation of SG formation/assembly and discuss the interactions between oxidative stress and SG formation. We then discuss the links between SGs and neurodegenerative diseases and the current therapeutic approaches for neurodegenerative diseases that target SGs. PMID:28194255

  18. Association between heat stress and oxidative stress in poultry; mitochondrial dysfunction and dietary interventions with phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, Abdollah; Michiels, Joris; Degroote, Jeroen; Majdeddin, Maryam; Golian, Abolghasem; De Smet, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Heat as a stressor of poultry has been studied extensively for many decades; it affects poultry production on a worldwide basis and has significant impact on well-being and production. More recently, the involvement of heat stress in inducing oxidative stress has received much interest. Oxidative stress is defined as the presence of reactive species in excess of the available antioxidant capacity of animal cells. Reactive species can modify several biologically cellular macromolecules and can interfere with cell signaling pathways. Furthermore, during the last decade, there has been an ever-increasing interest in the use of a wide array of natural feed-delivered phytochemicals that have potential antioxidant properties for poultry. In light of this, the current review aims to (1) summarize the mechanisms through which heat stress triggers excessive superoxide radical production in the mitochondrion and progresses into oxidative stress, (2) illustrate that this pathophysiology is dependent on the intensity and duration of heat stress, (3) present different nutritional strategies for mitigation of mitochondrial dysfunction, with particular focus on antioxidant phytochemicals. Oxidative stress that occurs with heat exposure can be manifest in all parts of the body; however, mitochondrial dysfunction underlies oxidative stress. In the initial phase of acute heat stress, mitochondrial substrate oxidation and electron transport chain activity are increased resulting in excessive superoxide production. During the later stage of acute heat stress, down-regulation of avian uncoupling protein worsens the oxidative stress situation causing mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue damage. Typically, antioxidant enzyme activities are upregulated. Chronic heat stress, however, leads to downsizing of mitochondrial metabolic oxidative capacity, up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein, a clear alteration in the pattern of antioxidant enzyme activities, and depletion of antioxidant

  19. The effects of anesthetic agents on oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakan, Selvinaz; Düzgüner, Vesile

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress can be defined as the instability between antioxidant defense of the body and the production of free radical that causes peroxydation on the lipid layer. Free radicals are reactive oxygen species that are produced in the course of normal metabolisms of aerobe organisms and they may cause disorders in cell structure and organelles by interacting macromolecules, like lipid, protein, nucleic acids. Therefore, they may cause cardiovascular, immune system, liver, kidney illnesses and many other illnesses like cancer, aging, cataract, diabetes. It is known that many drugs used for the purpose of anesthetizing may cause lipid peroxidation in organism. For these reasons, determining the Oxidative stress index of anaesthetic stress chosen in the ones that are exposed to long term anaesthetic agents and anaesthesia appliccations, is so substantial.

  20. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  1. Emerging importance of oxidative stress in regulating striated muscle elasticity.

    PubMed

    Beckendorf, Lisa; Linke, Wolfgang A

    2015-02-01

    The contractile function of striated muscle cells is altered by oxidative/nitrosative stress, which can be observed under physiological conditions but also in diseases like heart failure or muscular dystrophy. Oxidative stress causes oxidative modifications of myofilament proteins and can impair myocyte contractility. Recent evidence also suggests an important effect of oxidative stress on muscle elasticity and passive stiffness via modifications of the giant protein titin. In this review we provide a short overview of known oxidative modifications in thin and thick filament proteins and then discuss in more detail those oxidative stress-related modifications altering titin stiffness directly or indirectly. Direct modifications of titin include reversible disulfide bonding within the cardiac-specific N2-Bus domain, which increases titin stiffness, and reversible S-glutathionylation of cryptic cysteines in immunoglobulin-like domains, which only takes place after the domains have unfolded and which reduces titin stiffness in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Indirect effects of oxidative stress on titin can occur via reversible modifications of protein kinase signalling pathways (especially the NO-cGMP-PKG axis), which alter the phosphorylation level of certain disordered titin domains and thereby modulate titin stiffness. Oxidative stress also activates proteases such as matrix-metalloproteinase-2 and (indirectly via increasing the intracellular calcium level) calpain-1, both of which cleave titin to irreversibly reduce titin-based stiffness. Although some of these mechanisms require confirmation in the in vivo setting, there is evidence that oxidative stress-related modifications of titin are relevant in the context of biomarker design and represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in some forms of muscle and heart disease.

  2. Nitric oxide ameliorates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manish Singh; Srivastava, Meenakshi; Srivastava, Alka; Singh, Anumeha; Mishra, Arun Kumar

    2016-11-01

    In cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120, iron deficiency leads to oxidative stress with unavoidable consequences. Nitric oxide reduces pigment damage and supported the growth of Anabaena 7120 in iron-deficient conditions. Elevation in nitric oxide accumulation and reduced superoxide radical production justified the role of nitric oxide in alleviating oxidative stress in iron deficiency. Increased activities of antioxidative enzymes and higher levels of ROS scavengers (ascorbate, glutathione and thiol) in iron deficiency were also observed in the presence of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide also supported the membrane integrity of Anabaena cells and reduces protein and DNA damage caused by oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency. Results suggested that nitric oxide alleviates the damaging effects of oxidative stress induced by iron deficiency in cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120.

  3. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  4. Oxidative-stress-induced epigenetic changes in chronic diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Biao; Ruiz, Michael Anthony; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications. Diabetes causes mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in the endothelial cells of both large and small vessels. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of several signal pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic complications. In particular, endothelial cells are major targets of glucose-induced oxidative damage in the target organs. Oxidative stress activates cellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in endothelial cells including protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), forkhead box O (FOXO), and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Oxidative stress also causes DNA damage and activates DNA nucleotide excision repair enzymes including the excision repair cross complimenting 1(ERCC1), ERCC4, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Augmented production of histone acetyltransferase p300, and alterations of histone deacetylases, including class III deacetylases sirtuins, are also involved in this process. Recent research has found that small noncoding RNAs, like microRNA, are a new kind of regulator associated with chronic diabetic complications. There are extensive and complicated interactions and among these molecules. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic complications in relation to epigenetic changes such as acetylation and microRNA alterations.

  5. Myelophil ameliorates brain oxidative stress in mice subjected to restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Geug; Han, Jong-Min; Lee, Jong-Suk; Son, Seung-Wan; Ahn, Yo-Chan; Son, Chang-Gue

    2012-12-03

    We evaluated the pharmacological effects of Myelophil, a 30% ethanol extract of a mix of Astragali Radix and Salviae Radix, on oxidative stress-induced brain damage in mice caused by restraint stress. C57BL/6 male mice (eight weeks old) underwent daily oral administration of distilled water, Myelophil (25, 50, or 100mg/kg), or ascorbic acid (100mg/kg) 1h before induction of restraint stress, which involved 3h of immobilization per day for 21days. Nitric oxide levels, lipid peroxidation, activities of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione redox system enzymes), and concentrations of adrenaline, corticosterone, and interferon-γ, were measured in brain tissues and/or sera. Restraint stress-induced increases in nitric oxide levels (serum and brain tissues) and lipid peroxidation (brain tissues) were significantly attenuated by Myelophil treatment. Restraint stress moderately lowered total antioxidant capacity, catalase activity, glutathione content, and the activities of glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione S-transferase; all these responses were reversed by Myelophil. Myelophil significantly attenuated the elevated serum concentrations of adrenaline and corticosterone and restored serum and brain interferon-γ levels. Moreover, Myelophil normalized expression of the genes encoding monoamine oxidase A, catechol-O-methyltransferase, and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, which was up-regulated by restraint stress in brain tissues. These results suggest that Myelophil has pharmacological properties protects brain tissues against stress-associated oxidative stress damage, perhaps in part through regulation of stress hormones.

  6. Salivary markers of oxidative stress in oral diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tóthová, L'ubomíra; Kamodyová, Natália; Červenka, Tomáš; Celec, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is an interesting alternative diagnostic body fluid with several specific advantages over blood. These include non-invasive and easy collection and related possibility to do repeated sampling. One of the obstacles that hinders the wider use of saliva for diagnosis and monitoring of systemic diseases is its composition, which is affected by local oral status. However, this issue makes saliva very interesting for clinical biochemistry of oral diseases. Periodontitis, caries, oral precancerosis, and other local oral pathologies are associated with oxidative stress. Several markers of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species can be measured in saliva. Clinical studies have shown an association with oral pathologies at least for some of the established salivary markers of oxidative stress. This association is currently limited to the population level and none of the widely used markers can be applied for individual diagnostics. Oxidative stress seems to be of local oral origin, but it is currently unclear whether it is caused by an overproduction of reactive oxygen species due to inflammation or by the lack of antioxidants. Interventional studies, both, in experimental animals as well as humans indicate that antioxidant treatment could prevent or slow-down the progress of periodontitis. This makes the potential clinical use of salivary markers of oxidative stress even more attractive. This review summarizes basic information on the most commonly used salivary markers of oxidative damage, antioxidant status, and carbonyl stress and the studies analyzing these markers in patients with caries or periodontitis. PMID:26539412

  7. Oxidative stress and autophagy: Crucial modulators of kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Ryter, Stefan W.; Choi, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) that lead to diminished kidney function are interdependent risk factors for increased mortality. If untreated over time, end stage renal disease (ESRD) is an inevitable outcome. Acute and chronic kidney diseases occur partly due to imbalance between the molecular mechanisms that govern oxidative stress, inflammation, autophagy and cell death. Oxidative stress refers to the cumulative effects of highly reactive oxidizing molecules that cause cellular damage. Autophagy removes damaged organelles, protein aggregates and pathogens by recruiting these substrates into double membrane vesicles called autophagosomes which subsequently fuse with lysosomes. Mounting evidence suggests that both oxidative stress and autophagy are significantly involved in kidney health and disease. However, very little is known about the signaling processes that link them. This review is focused on understanding the role of oxidative stress and autophagy in kidney diseases. In this review, we also discuss the potential relationships between oxidative stress and autophagy that may enable the development of better therapeutic intervention to halt the progression of kidney disease and promote its repair and resolution. PMID:25613291

  8. Oxidative Stress, Prooxidants, and Antioxidants: The Interplay

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Anu; Kumar, Amit; Singh, Vivek; Yadav, Brijesh

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a normal phenomenon in the body. Under normal conditions, the physiologically important intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are maintained at low levels by various enzyme systems participating in the in vivo redox homeostasis. Therefore, oxidative stress can also be viewed as an imbalance between the prooxidants and antioxidants in the body. For the last two decades, oxidative stress has been one of the most burning topics among the biological researchers all over the world. Several reasons can be assigned to justify its importance: knowledge about reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production and metabolism; identification of biomarkers for oxidative damage; evidence relating manifestation of chronic and some acute health problems to oxidative stress; identification of various dietary antioxidants present in plant foods as bioactive molecules; and so on. This review discusses the importance of oxidative stress in the body growth and development as well as proteomic and genomic evidences of its relationship with disease development, incidence of malignancies and autoimmune disorders, increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases, and an interplay with prooxidants and antioxidants for maintaining a sound health, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue. PMID:24587990

  9. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  10. Mammalian Metallothionein-2A and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xue-Bin; Wei, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jun; Kong, Yue-Qiong; Wu, Yu-You; Guo, Jun-Li; Li, Tian-Fa; Li, Ji-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian metallothionein-2A (MT2A) has received considerable attention in recent years due to its crucial pathophysiological role in anti-oxidant, anti-apoptosis, detoxification and anti-inflammation. For many years, most studies evaluating the effects of MT2A have focused on reactive oxygen species (ROS), as second messengers that lead to oxidative stress injury of cells and tissues. Recent studies have highlighted that oxidative stress could activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and MT2A, as a mediator of MAPKs, to regulate the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, the molecule mechanism of MT2A remains elusive. A deeper understanding of the functional, biochemical and molecular characteristics of MT2A would be identified, in order to bring new opportunities for oxidative stress therapy. PMID:27608012

  11. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  12. Oxidative stress in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Coppo, R; Camilla, R; Amore, A; Peruzzi, L

    2010-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is characterized by mesangial deposits of IgA1, likely due to accumulation of IgA immune complexes. The activation of intracellular signaling mostly results in oxidative stress, as detected in mesangial cells cultured with aberrantly glycosylated IgA or IgA aggregates and in renal biopsies of patients with IgAN. Signs of altered oxidation/antioxidation balance have been detected in sera and/or in erythrocytes of patients with IgAN, including increased levels of lipoperoxide or malondialdehyde and reduced activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Moreover, increased levels of a marker of oxidative stress, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), have been reported to be significantly associated with proteinuria and disease progression in patients with IgAN. AOPPs are often carried by albumin and can in turn enhance the oxidative stress in the circulation. Recent research suggests that the nephrotoxicity of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN is enhanced in the presence of systemic signs of oxidative stress, and it is tempting to hypothesize that the level of the oxidative milieu conditions the different expression and progression of IgAN.

  13. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T.; Brody, Edward N.

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione–glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin–oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD+–NADH (and NADP–NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation–reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents. PMID:25644686

  14. Influence of Oxidative Stress on Stored Platelets

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Platelet storage and its availability for transfusion are limited to 5-6 days. Oxidative stress (OS) is one of the causes for reduced efficacy and shelf-life of platelets. The studies on platelet storage have focused on improving the storage conditions by altering platelet storage solutions, temperature, and materials. Nevertheless, the role of OS on platelet survival during storage is still unclear. Hence, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of storage on platelets. Platelets were stored for 12 days at 22°C. OS markers such as aggregation, superoxides, reactive oxygen species, glucose, pH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and antioxidant enzymes were assessed. OS increased during storage as indicated by increments in aggregation, superoxides, pH, conjugate dienes, and superoxide dismutase and decrements in glucose and catalase. Thus, platelets could endure OS till 6 days during storage, due to the antioxidant defense system. An evident increase in OS was observed from day 8 of storage, which can diminish the platelet efficacy. The present study provides an insight into the gradual changes occurring during platelet storage. This lays the foundation towards new possibilities of employing various antioxidants as additives in storage solutions. PMID:26949396

  15. Oxidative stress, protein modification and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Tramutola, A; Lanzillotta, C; Perluigi, M; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-06-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that affects the elderly population with complex etiology. Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain different causes of AD, but the exact mechanisms remain unclear. In this review, we focus attention on the oxidative-stress hypothesis of neurodegeneration and we discuss redox proteomics approaches to analyze post-mortem human brain from AD brain. Collectively, these studies have provided valuable insights into the molecular mechanisms involved both in the pathogenesis and progression of AD, demonstrating the impairment of numerous cellular processes such as energy production, cellular structure, signal transduction, synaptic function, mitochondrial function, cell cycle progression, and degradative systems. Each of these cellular functions normally contributes to maintain healthy neuronal homeostasis, so the deregulation of one or more of these functions could contribute to the pathology and clinical presentation of AD. In particular, we discuss the evidence demonstrating the oxidation/dysfunction of a number of enzymes specifically involved in energy metabolism that support the view that reduced glucose metabolism and loss of ATP are crucial events triggering neurodegeneration and progression of AD.

  16. [Selenium and oxidative stress in cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Gorozhanskaia, É G; Sviridova, S P; Dobrovol'skaia, M M; Zybrikhina, G N; Kashnia, Sh R

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify the features of violations of free-radical processes in blood serum of 94 untreated cancer patients with different localization of the tumor (cancer of the stomach, colon, breast, ovarian, hemoblastoses) were determined selenium levels and indicators of oxidative stress (sum of metabolites of nitrogen--NOx, the level of superoxide dismutase--Cu/ZnSOD and malondiialdehyde-MDA, and the activity of catalase). In addition, 40 patients with malignant liver disease and clinical signs of liver failure in the early postoperative period was carried out a comparative evaluation of the efficacy of selenium-containing drug "Selenaze" (sodium selenite pentahydrate). It was found that selenium levels in cancer patients by 25-30% below the norm of 110-120 mg/l at a rate of 73.0 +/- 2.6 mg/l. Low levels of NOx was detected in patients with all tumor localizations (22.1 +/- 1.1 microM, with normal range 28.4 +/- 0.9 microM). The exceptions were patients with extensive malignant process in the liver, in which the NOx levels were significantly higher than normal (p < 0.001). The high level of NOx has a toxic effect on the hepatocyte, causing metabolic disorders and inflammatory-necrotic changes in the liver. Elevated levels of SOD and MDA in normal values of catalase activity was detected in all patients. The use of "Selenaze" in postoperative patients with tumors of the liver increased selenium levels by 10-12%, which was accompanied by a decrease in the content of SOD and NOx, and contributed to earlier recovery of detoxic and synthetic liver function. These findings point to an intensification of oxidative stress and metabolic disorders in the malignant process, which is the basis for metabolic correction.

  17. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  18. Role of Nrf2 in Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Organismal life encounters reactive oxidants from internal metabolism and environmental toxicant exposure. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species cause oxidative stress and are traditionally viewed as being harmful. On the other hand, controlled production of oxidants in normal cells serves useful purposes to regulate signaling pathways. Reactive oxidants are counterbalanced by complex antioxidant defense systems regulated by a web of pathways to ensure that the response to oxidants is adequate for the body’s needs. A recurrent theme in oxidant signaling and antioxidant defense is reactive cysteine thiol–based redox signaling. The nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2 (Nrf2) is an emerging regulator of cellular resistance to oxidants. Nrf2 controls the basal and induced expression of an array of antioxidant response element–dependent genes to regulate the physiological and pathophysiological outcomes of oxidant exposure. This review discusses the impact of Nrf2 on oxidative stress and toxicity and how Nrf2 senses oxidants and regulates antioxidant defense. PMID:23294312

  19. Oxidative stress and aberrant signaling in aging and cognitive decline

    PubMed Central

    Dröge, Wulf; Schipper, Hyman M

    2007-01-01

    Brain aging is associated with a progressive imbalance between antioxidant defenses and intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as exemplified by increases in products of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, and DNA oxidation. Oxidative conditions cause not only structural damage but also changes in the set points of redox-sensitive signaling processes including the insulin receptor signaling pathway. In the absence of insulin, the otherwise low insulin receptor signaling is strongly enhanced by oxidative conditions. Autophagic proteolysis and sirtuin activity, in turn, are downregulated by the insulin signaling pathway, and impaired autophagic activity has been associated with neurodegeneration. In genetic studies, impairment of insulin receptor signaling causes spectacular lifespan extension in nematodes, fruit flies, and mice. The predicted effects of age-related oxidative stress on sirtuins and autophagic activity and the corresponding effects of antioxidants remain to be tested experimentally. However, several correlates of aging have been shown to be ameliorated by antioxidants. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA and the electron transport chain, perturbations in brain iron and calcium homeostasis, and changes in plasma cysteine homeostasis may altogether represent causes and consequences of increased oxidative stress. Aging and cognitive decline thus appear to involve changes at multiple nodes within a complex regulatory network. PMID:17517043

  20. The calcium channel blocker verapamil inhibits oxidative stress response in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Xiao, Chenpeng; Zhang, Kailun; Jia, Chang; Ding, Xiaohui; Zhang, Bing; Wang, Yu; Li, Mingchun

    2014-04-01

    Candida albicans is a common opportunistic fungal pathogen, causing both superficial candidiasis and life-threatening systemic infections in immune-compromised individuals. Calcium signaling is responsible for this pathogen in responding to several stresses, such as antifungal drugs, alkaline pH and membrane-perturbing agents. Our recent study revealed that it is also involved in oxidative stress response. In this study, we investigated the effect of verapamil, an L-type voltage-gated calcium channel blocker, on oxidative stress response in this fungus. The addition of verapamil resulted in increased sensitivity to the oxidative agent H2O2, which is associated with a decrease of calcium fluctuation under the stress. Moreover, this agent caused enhanced oxidative stress, with increased levels of ROS and enhanced dysfunction of the mitochondria under the oxidative stress. Further investigations in SOD activity, GSH contents and expression of oxidative stress response-related genes indicated that the effect of verapamil is related to the repression of oxidative stress response. Our findings demonstrated that verapamil has an inhibitory effect on oxidative stress response, confirming the relationship between calcium signaling and oxidative stress in C. albicans. Therefore, calcium channels may be potential targets for therapy to enhance the efficacy of oxidative stress against C. albicans-related infections.

  1. Radical-free biology of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Dean P.

    2008-01-01

    Free radical-induced macromolecular damage has been studied extensively as a mechanism of oxidative stress, but large-scale intervention trials with free radical scavenging antioxidant supplements show little benefit in humans. The present review summarizes data supporting a complementary hypothesis for oxidative stress in disease that can occur without free radicals. This hypothesis, which is termed the “redox hypothesis,” is that oxidative stress occurs as a consequence of disruption of thiol redox circuits, which normally function in cell signaling and physiological regulation. The redox states of thiol systems are sensitive to two-electron oxidants and controlled by the thioredoxins (Trx), glutathione (GSH), and cysteine (Cys). Trx and GSH systems are maintained under stable, but nonequilibrium conditions, due to a continuous oxidation of cell thiols at a rate of about 0.5% of the total thiol pool per minute. Redox-sensitive thiols are critical for signal transduction (e.g., H-Ras, PTP-1B), transcription factor binding to DNA (e.g., Nrf-2, nuclear factor-κB), receptor activation (e.g., αIIbβ3 integrin in platelet activation), and other processes. Nonradical oxidants, including peroxides, aldehydes, quinones, and epoxides, are generated enzymatically from both endogenous and exogenous precursors and do not require free radicals as intermediates to oxidize or modify these thiols. Because of the nonequilibrium conditions in the thiol pathways, aberrant generation of nonradical oxidants at rates comparable to normal oxidation may be sufficient to disrupt function. Considerable opportunity exists to elucidate specific thiol control pathways and develop interventional strategies to restore normal redox control and protect against oxidative stress in aging and age-related disease. PMID:18684987

  2. Iron homeostatis and oxidative stress in idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis: a case-control study

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lung injury caused by both inhaled dusts and infectious agents depends on increased availability of iron and metal-catalyzed oxidative stress. Because inhaled particles, such as silica, and certain infections can cause secondary pulmonary alveolar proteinosi...

  3. Oxidative Stress Marker and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Draganovic, Dragica; Lucic, Nenad; Jojic, Dragica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. Hence, research and test of role and significance of oxidative stress in hypertensive disturbance in pregnancy is very important. Aim: Aims of this research were to determine a level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as oxidative stress marker in blood of pregnant woman with pregnancy induced hypertension and to analyze correlation of TBARS values with blood pressure values in pregnancy induced hypertensive pregnant women. Patients and methods: Research has been performed at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Clinical Centre in the Republic of Srpska. It covered 100 pregnant women with hypertension and 100 healthy pregnant women of gestation period from 28 to 40 weeks. Level of TBARS is determined as an equivalent of malondialdehyde standard, in accordance with recommendations by producer (Oxi Select TBARS Analisa Kit). Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. All pregnant women experiencing hypertension had increased TBARS values in medium value interval over 20 µmol, 66%, whereas in group of healthy pregnant women, only 1% experienced increased TBARS value. Pregnant women with difficult preeclampsia (32%) had high TBARS values, over 40 µmol, and with mild PIH, only 4.9% pregnant women. Conclusion: Pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension have extremely increased degree of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. TBARS values are in positive correlation with blood pressure values, respectively the highest TBARS value were present in pregnant women with the highest blood pressure values. PMID:28210016

  4. Contribution of mitochondrial oxidative stress to hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dikalov, Sergey I.; Dikalova, Anna E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In 1954 Harman proposed the free radical theory of aging, and in 1972 he suggested that mitochondria are both the source and the victim of toxic free radicals. Interestingly, hypertension is age-associated disease and clinical data show that by age 70, 70% of the population has hypertension and this is accompanied by oxidative stress. Antioxidant therapy however is not currently available and common antioxidants like ascorbate and vitamin E are ineffective in preventing hypertension. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial oxidative stress and therapeutic potential of targeting mitochondria in hypertension. Recent findings In the past several years, we have shown that the mitochondria become dysfunctional in hypertension and have defined novel role of mitochondrial superoxide radicals in this disease. We have shown that genetic manipulation of mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD2) affects blood pressure and have developed mitochondria-targeted therapies such as SOD2 mimetics that effectively lower blood pressure. The specific mechanism of mitochondrial oxidative stress in hypertension, however, remains unclear. Recent animal and clinical studies have demonstrated several hormonal, metabolic, inflammatory, and environmental pathways contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Summary Nutritional supplements, calorie restriction, and life style change are the most effective preventive strategies to improve mitochondrial function and reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Aging associated mitochondrial dysfunction, however, reduces efficacy of these strategies. Therefore, we propose that new classes of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can provide high therapeutic potential to improve endothelial function and reduce hypertension. PMID:26717313

  5. Repression of gene expression by oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Barouki, R

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression is modulated by both physiological signals (hormones, cytokines, etc.) and environmental stimuli (physical parameters, xenobiotics, etc.). Oxidative stress appears to be a key pleiotropic modulator which may be involved in either pathway. Indeed, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been described as second messengers for several growth factors and cytokines, but have also been shown to rise following cellular insults such as xenobiotic metabolism or enzymic deficiency. Extensive studies on the induction of stress-response genes by oxidative stress have been reported. In contrast, owing to the historical focus on gene induction, less attention has been paid to gene repression by ROS. However, a growing number of studies have shown that moderate (i.e. non-cytotoxic) oxidative stress specifically down-regulates the expression of various genes. In this review, we describe the alteration of several physiological functions resulting from oxidative-stress-mediated inhibition of gene transcription. We will then focus on the repressive oxidative modulation of various transcription factors elicited by ROS. PMID:10477257

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kudryavtseva, Anna V.; Krasnov, George S.; Dmitriev, Alexey A.; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Kardymon, Olga L.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Fedorova, Maria S.; Pokrovsky, Anatoly V.; Melnikova, Nataliya V.; Kaprin, Andrey D.; Moskalev, Alexey A.; Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.

    2016-01-01

    Aging and cancer are the most important issues to research. The population in the world is growing older, and the incidence of cancer increases with age. There is no doubt about the linkage between aging and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this association are still unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that the oxidative stress as a cause and/or consequence of the mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the main drivers of these processes. Increasing ROS levels and products of the oxidative stress, which occur in aging and age-related disorders, were also found in cancer. This review focuses on the similarities between ageing-associated and cancer-associated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction as their common phenotype. PMID:27270647

  7. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health.

  8. Potential markers of oxidative stress in stroke.

    PubMed

    Cherubini, Antonio; Ruggiero, Carmelinda; Polidori, M Cristina; Mecocci, Patrizia

    2005-10-01

    Free radical production is increased in ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, leading to oxidative stress that contributes to brain damage. The measurement of oxidative stress in stroke would be extremely important for a better understanding of its pathophysiology and for identifying subgroups of patients that might receive targeted therapeutic intervention. Since direct measurement of free radicals and oxidized molecules in the brain is difficult in humans, several biological substances have been investigated as potential peripheral markers. Among lipid peroxidation products, malondialdehyde, despite its relevant methodological limitations, is correlated with the size of ischemic stroke and clinical outcome, while F2-isoprostanes appear to be promising, but they have not been adequately evaluated. 8-Hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine has been extensively investigated as markers of oxidative DNA damage but no study has been done in stroke patients. Also enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants have been proposed as indirect markers. Among them ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, uric acid, and superoxide dismutase are related to brain damage and clinical outcome. After a critical evaluation of the literature, we conclude that, while an ideal biomarker is not yet available, the balance between antioxidants and by-products of oxidative stress in the organism might be the best approach for the evaluation of oxidative stress in stroke patients.

  9. Oxidative stress in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Passali, D; Corallo, G; Yaremchuk, S; Longini, M; Proietti, F; Passali, G C; Bellussi, L

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder that leads to metabolic abnormalities and increased cardiovascular risk. The aim of this study was to identify early laboratory markers of cardiovascular disease through analysis of oxidative stress in normal subjects and patients with OSAS. A prospective study was designed to compare outcomes of oxidative stress laboratory tests in 20 adult patients with OSAS and a control group of 20 normal subjects. Laboratory techniques for detecting and quantifying free radical damage must be targeted to assess the pro-oxidant component and the antioxidant in order to obtain an overall picture of oxidative balance. No statistical differences in age, sex distribution, or BMI were found between the two groups (p>0.05). There were significant differences in the apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) between OSAS patients and the control group (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences in isoprostane, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and non-protein bound iron (NPBI) levels were found between the study and control groups. No significant difference in the levels of thiol biomarkers was found between the two groups. The main finding of the present study was increased production of oxidative stress biomarkers in OSAS patients. The major difference between thiols and other oxidative stress biomarkers is that thiols are antioxidants, while the others are expressions of oxidative damage. The findings of the present study indicate that biomarkers of oxidative stress in OSAS may be used as a marker of upper airway obstructive episodes due to mechanical trauma, as well as a marker of hypoxaemia causing local oropharyngeal inflammation.

  10. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  11. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment.

  12. Cellular Mechanisms of Oxidative Stress and Action in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Venza, Mario; Visalli, Maria; Beninati, Concetta; De Gaetano, Giuseppe Valerio; Teti, Diana; Venza, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Most melanomas occur on the skin, but a small percentage of these life-threatening cancers affect other parts of the body, such as the eye and mucous membranes, including the mouth. Given that most melanomas are caused by ultraviolet radiation (UV) exposure, close attention has been paid to the impact of oxidative stress on these tumors. The possibility that key epigenetic enzymes cannot act on a DNA altered by oxidative stress has opened new perspectives. Therefore, much attention has been paid to the alteration of DNA methylation by oxidative stress. We review the current evidence about (i) the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression; (ii) the mechanisms by which ROS influence the DNA methylation pattern of transformed melanocytes; (iii) the transformative potential of oxidative stress-induced changes in global and/or local gene methylation and expression; (iv) the employment of this epimutation as a biomarker for melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and drug resistance evaluation; (v) the impact of this new knowledge in clinical practice for melanoma treatment. PMID:26064422

  13. Perturbations Caused by Lateral Stress Gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, R. E.; Harris, E. J.

    2007-12-01

    In principle, stress gauges mounted to measure lateral stresses in a shocked matrix allow the shear strength of the material to be determined. Interpreting the records from lateral stress gauges is hindered by the fact that the stress field in the insulating layer in which the gauges are mounted can differ signifcantly from the stress field that would be generated in the sample if no gauge were present. A series of high resolution Eulerian code calculations have been run which suggest that the stresses in the insulating layer vary with distance and time in a way that depends on the thickness of the layer, the shock strength, and the elastic and plastic properties of both the layer and the matrix. In particular, if the shock velocity in the matrix material is high the stress at a typical gauge position initially rises to a sharp peak then falls with time, but when the shock velocity in the matrix is low the stress rises relatively gradually throughout the time of interest. The shapes of the stress-time profiles predicted by the hydrocode compare well with the results of lateral gauge experiments on several different materials.

  14. Oxidative stress as a mechanism of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jason M

    2006-12-01

    Emerging evidence shows that redox-sensitive signal transduction pathways are critical for developmental processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. As a consequence, teratogens that induce oxidative stress (OS) may induce teratogenesis via the misregulation of these same pathways. Many of these pathways are regulated by cellular thiol redox couples, namely glutathione/glutathione disulfide, thioredoxinred/thioredoinox, and cysteine/cystine. This review outlines oxidative stress as a mechanism of teratogenesis through the disruption of thiol-mediated redox signaling. Due to the ability of many known and suspected teratogens to induce oxidative stress and the many signaling pathways that have redox-sensitive components, further research is warranted to fully understand these mechanisms.

  15. Protective effects of pulmonary epithelial lining fluid on oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breaks caused by ultrafine carbon black, ferrous sulphate and organic extract of diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Cheng, Yi-Ling; Lei, Yu-Chen; Chang, Hui-Hsien; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary epithelial lining fluid (ELF) is the first substance to make contact with inhaled particulate matter (PM) and interacts chemically with PM components. The objective of this study was to determine the role of ELF in oxidative stress, DNA damage and the production of proinflammatory cytokines following physicochemical exposure to PM. Ultrafine carbon black (ufCB, 15 nm; a model carbonaceous core), ferrous sulphate (FeSO{sub 4}; a model transition metal) and a diesel exhaust particle (DEP) extract (a model organic compound) were used to examine the acellular oxidative potential of synthetic ELF and non-ELF systems. We compared the effects of exposure to ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract on human alveolar epithelial Type II (A549) cells to determine the levels of oxidative stress, DNA single-strand breaks and interleukin-8 (IL-8) production in ELF and non-ELF systems. The effects of ufCB and FeSO{sub 4} on the acellular oxidative potential, cellular oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated significantly by the addition of ELF, whereas there was no decrease following treatment with the DEP extract. There was no significant effect on IL-8 production following exposure to samples that were suspended in ELF/non-ELF systems. The results of the present study indicate that ELF plays an important role in the initial defence against PM in the pulmonary environment. Experimental components, such as ufCB and FeSO{sub 4}, induced the production of oxidative stress and led to DNA single-strand breaks, which were moderately prevented by the addition of ELF. These findings suggest that ELF plays a protective role against PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA damage. -- Highlights: ► To determine the role of ELF in ROS, DNA damage and IL-8 after exposure to PM. ► ufCB, FeSO{sub 4} and DEP extract were used to examine the protective effects of ELF. ► PM-driven oxidative stress and DNA single-strand breakage were mitigated by ELF. ► The findings

  16. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees.

  17. Cold defence responses: the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Blagojevic, Dusko P; Grubor-Lajsic, Gordana N; Spasic, Mihajlo B

    2011-01-01

    Low temperatures provoke increased production of heat accompanied by increased respiration, oxygen consumption and the production of partially reduced oxygen species called ROS. ROS induce different forms of cellular oxidative damage, disturb the redox state and can change the activity of several metabolic enzymes. Organisms have developed a functionally connected set of anti-oxidant enzymes and low molecular mass compounds (together termed the ADS) that metabolise primary ROS. If ROS production within cells overwhelms the ADS, oxidative damage arises and oxidative stress can occur. Short-term cold exposure in endotherms leads to oxidative stress. As cold exposure persists organisms develop adaptive changes toward reducing ROS production and increasing the ADS. In contrast, heterotherms and ectotherms as a normal part of their over-wintering strategy slow down metabolism, oxygen consumption and subsequently cause ROS production. Increased baseline activity of key anti-oxidant enzymes as well as 'secondary' enzymatic defence and/or glutathione levels in preparation for a putative oxidative stressful situation arising from tissue re-oxygenation seems to be the preferred evolutionary adaptation of such animals exposed to low environmental temperatures.

  18. Oxidative stress in development: nature or nurture?

    PubMed

    Dennery, Phyllis A

    2010-10-15

    An unavoidable consequence of aerobic respiration is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These may negatively impact development. Nevertheless, a certain amount of oxidative stress is required to allow for the normal progression of embryonic and fetal growth. Alterations in placental oxidative stress results in altered placental function and ultimately altered fetal growth and/or developmental programming leading to long-term consequences into adulthood. This article reviews the role of redox in fetal development and will focus on how developmental programming is influenced by the fetal and placental redox state as well as discuss potential therapeutic interventions.

  19. Involvement of oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Castellani, Rudy J; Zhu, Xiongwei; Moreira, Paula I; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A

    2006-07-01

    Genetic and lifestyle-related risk factors for Alzheimer disease (AD) are associated with an increase in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress is involved at an early stage of the pathologic cascade. Moreover, oxidative stress is mechanistically and chronologically associated with other key features of AD, namely, metabolic, mitochondrial, metal, and cell-cycle abnormalities. Contrary to the commonly held notion that pathologic hallmarks of AD signify etiology, several lines of evidence now indicate that aggregation of amyloid-beta and tau is a compensatory response to underlying oxidative stress. Therefore, removal of proteinaceous accumulations may treat the epiphenomenon rather than the disease and may actually enhance oxidative damage. Although some antioxidants have been shown to reduce the incidence of AD, the magnitude of the effect may be modified by individual factors such as genetic predisposition (e.g. apolipoprotein E genotype) and habitual behaviors. Because caloric restriction, exercise, and intellectual activity have been experimentally shown to promote neuronal survival through enhancement of endogenous antioxidant defenses, a combination of dietary regimen of low total calorie and rich antioxidant nutrients and maintaining physical and intellectual activities may ultimately prove to be one of the most efficacious strategies for AD prevention.

  20. Molecular and biochemical responses of Volvox carteri to oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingappa, U.; Rankin-Gee, E. K.; Lera, M.; Bebour, B.; Marcu, O.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the intracellular response to environmental stresses is a key aspect to understanding the limits of habitability for life as we know it. A wide range of relevant stressors, from heat shock to radiation, result in the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are used physiologically as signaling molecules to cause changes in gene expression and metabolism. However, ROS, including superoxide (O2-) and peroxides, are also highly reactive molecules that cause oxidative damage to proteins, lipids and DNA. Here we studied stress response in the multicellular, eukaryotic green alga Volvox carteri, after exposure to heat shock conditions. We show that the ROS response to heat stress is paralleled by changes in photosynthetic metabolism, antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression, and fluctuations in the elemental composition of cells. Metabolism, as measured by pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) fluorometry over two hours of heat stress, showed a linear decrease in the photosynthetic efficiency of Volvox. ROS quantification uncovered an increase in ROS in the culture medium, paralleled by a decrease in ROS within the Volvox colonies, suggesting an export mechanism is utilized to mitigate stress. Enzyme kinetics indicated an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity over the heat stress timecourse. Using X-ray fluorescence (XRF) at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, we show that these changes coincide with cell-specific import/export and intracellular redistribution of transition elements and halides, suggesting that the cellular metallome is also engaged in mediating oxidative stress in Volvox.

  1. Mild oxidative stress is beneficial for sperm telomere length maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Swetasmita; Kumar, Rajeev; Malhotra, Neena; Singh, Neeta; Dada, Rima

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate telomere length in sperm DNA and its correlation with oxidative stress (normal, mild, severe). METHODS: The study included infertile men (n = 112) and age matched fertile controls (n = 102). The average telomere length from the sperm DNA was measured using a quantitative real time PCR based assay. Seminal reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-Isoprostane (8-IP) levels were measured by chemiluminescence assay and ELISA respectively. RESULTS: Average sperm telomere length in infertile men and controls was 0.609 ± 0.15 and 0.789 ± 0.060, respectively (P < 0.0001). Seminal ROS levels in infertile was higher [66.61 ± 28.32 relative light units (RLU)/s/million sperm] than in controls (14.04 ± 10.67 RLU/s/million sperm) (P < 0.0001). The 8-IP level in infertile men was significantly higher (421.55 ± 131.29 pg/mL) than in controls (275.94 ± 48.13 pg/mL) (P < 0.001). When correlated to oxidative stress, in normal range of oxidative stress (ROS, 0-21.3 RLU/s/million sperm) the average telomere length in cases was 0.663 ± 0.14, in mild oxidative stress (ROS, 21.3-35 RLU/s/million sperm) it was elevated (0.684 ± 0.12) and in severe oxidative stress (ROS > 35 RLU/s/million sperm) average telomere length was decreased to 0.595 ± 0.15. CONCLUSION: Mild oxidative stress results in lengthening of telomere length, but severe oxidative stress results in shorter telomeres. Although telomere maintenance is a complex trait, the study shows that mild oxidative stress is beneficial in telomere length maintenance and thus a delicate balance needs to be established to maximize the beneficial effects of free radicals and prevent harmful effects of supra physiological levels. Detailed molecular evaluation of telomere structure, its correlation with oxidative stress would aid in elucidating the cause of accelerated telomere length attrition. PMID:27376021

  2. Nonezymatic formation of succinate in mitochondria under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fedotcheva, Nadezhda I; Sokolov, Alexander P; Kondrashova, Mariya N

    2006-07-01

    The products of the reactions of mitochondrial 2-oxo acids with hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tert-BuOOH) were studied in a chemical system and in rat liver mitochondria. It was found by HPLC that the decarboxylation of alpha-ketoglutarate (KGL), pyruvate (PYR), and oxaloacetate (OA) by both oxidants results in the formation of succinate, acetate, and malonate, respectively. The two latter products do not metabolize in rat liver mitochondria, whereas succinate is actively oxidized, and its nonenzymatic formation from KGL may shunt the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle upon inactivation of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) under oxidative stress, which is inherent in many diseases and aging. The occurrence of nonenzymatic oxidation of KGL in mitochondria was established by an increase in the CO(2) and succinate levels in the presence of the oxidants and inhibitors of enzymatic oxidation. H(2)O(2) and menadione as an inductor of reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused the formation of CO(2) in the presence of sodium azide and the production of succinate, fumarate, and malate in the presence of rotenone. These substrates were also formed from KGL when mitochondria were incubated with tert-BuOOH at concentrations that completely inhibit KGDH. The nonenzymatic oxidation of KGL can support the TCA cycle under oxidative stress, provided that KGL is supplied via transamination. This is supported by the finding that the strong oxidant such as tert-BuOOH did not impair respiration and its sensitivity to the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetate when glutamate and malate were used as substrates. The appearance of two products, KGL and fumarate, also favors the involvement of transamination. Thus, upon oxidative stress, nonenzymatic decarboxylation of KGL and transamination switch the TCA cycle to the formation and oxidation of succinate.

  3. Nitric oxide and oxidative stress in placental explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Juvic M; Casart, Ysabel C; Camejo, María I

    2016-01-01

    Placental explant culture, and cellular cytolysis and cellular differentiation have been previously studied. However, oxidative stress and nitric oxide profiles have not been evaluated in these systems. The aim of this study was to determine the release of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide from placental explants cultured over a seven day period. Placental explants were maintained for seven days in culture and the medium was changed every 24 hours. The response was assessed in terms of syncytiotrophoblast differentiation (human chorionic gonadotropin, hCG), cellular cytolysis (lactate dehydrogenase, LDH), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and nitric oxide (NO). Levels of hCG increased progressively from day two to attain its highest level on days four and five after which it decreased gradually. In contrast, the levels of LDH, TBARS, and NO were elevated in the early days of placental culture when new syncytiotrophoblast from cytotrophoblast were forming and also in the last days of culture when tissue was declining. In conclusion, the levels of NO and lipid peroxidation follow a pattern similar to LDH and contrary to hCG. Future placental explant studies to evaluate oxidative stress and NO should consider the physiological changes inherent during the time of culture.

  4. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  5. Apoptosis modulated by oxidative stress and inflammation during obstructive nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter; Vallés, Patricia G

    2012-08-01

    Kidney apoptosis and fibrosis are an inevitable outcome of progressive chronic kidney diseases where congenital obstructive nephropathy is the primary cause of the end-stage renal disease in children, and is also a major cause of renal failure in adults. The injured tubular cells linked to interstitial macrophages, and myofibroblasts produce cytokines and growth factors that promote an inflammatory state in the kidney, induce tubular cell apoptosis, and facilitate the accumulation of extracellular matrix. Angiotensin II plays a central role in the renal fibrogenesis at a very early stage leading to a rapid progression in chronic kidney disease. The increasing levels of angiotensin II induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, NF-κB activation, adhesion molecules, chemokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress. Furthermore, growing evidence reports that angiotensin II (a pro-inflammatory hormone) increases the mitochondrial oxidative stress regulating apoptosis induction. This review summarizes our understanding about possible mechanisms that contribute to apoptosis modulated by inflammation and/or oxidative stress during obstructive nephropathy. The new concept of antiinflammatory tools regulating mitochondrial oxidative stress will directly affect the inflammatory process and apoptosis. This idea could have attractive consequences in the treatment of renal and other inflammatory pathologies.

  6. Oxidative stress alters physiological and morphological neuronal properties.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Sonia M; Joe, Mary; Alshuaib, Waleed B

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of H(2)O(2)-induced oxidative stress on the delayed-rectifier current (IK(DR)), neuronal physiological and morphological properties. Measurements were obtained from hippocampal CA1 neurons in control solution and from the same neurons after exposure to oxidative stress (short- and long-term H(2)O(2) external applications at 0.1, 1, and 10 mM). With short-term (6 min) H(2)O(2) (1 mM) treatment, IK(DR) measured in the H(2)O(2)-containing solution (778 +/- 23 pA, n=20), was smaller than that measured in the control Ca(2+)-free Hepes solution (1,112 +/- 38 pA, n=20). Coenzyme Q(10) (0.1 mM) pretreatment prevented the H(2)O(2)-induced inhibition of IK(DR). With long-term (40, 80 min) H(2)O(2) (0.1, 10 mM) treatment, the neuron lost its distinctive shape (rounded up) and the neurite almost disappeared. These results suggest that oxidative stress, which inhibits IK(DR), can alter neural activity. The morphological changes caused by H(2)O(2) support the idea that oxidative stress causes intracellular damage and compromises neural function.

  7. Targeting Oxidative Stress for Treatment of Glaucoma and Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Atsuko; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Guo, Xiaoli; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako

    2017-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disease of the eye and it is one of the leading causes of blindness. Glaucoma is characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, namely, the optic nerve, usually associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP). Current glaucoma therapies target reduction of IOP, but since RGC death is the cause of irreversible vision loss, neuroprotection may be an effective strategy for glaucoma treatment. One of the risk factors for glaucoma is increased oxidative stress, and drugs with antioxidative properties including valproic acid and spermidine, as well as inhibition of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, an enzyme that is involved in oxidative stress, have been reported to prevent glaucomatous retinal degeneration in mouse models of glaucoma. Optic neuritis is a demyelinating inflammation of the optic nerve that presents with visual impairment and it is commonly associated with multiple sclerosis, a chronic demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Although steroids are commonly used for treatment of optic neuritis, reduction of oxidative stress by approaches such as gene therapy is effective in ameliorating optic nerve demyelination in preclinical studies. In this review, we discuss oxidative stress as a therapeutic target for glaucoma and optic neuritis. PMID:28270908

  8. Restraint stress alters immune parameters and induces oxidative stress in the mouse uterus during embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-12-01

    The influence of stress on embryo implantation is not well understood. Prior studies have focused on later gestational stages and the long-term impact of stress on immune function. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of restraint stress on the immune parameters and the oxidative states of the uterus during implantation. In this study, pregnant CD1 mice were subjected to restraint stress (4 h/d) on embryonic day 1 (E1) and sacrificed on E3, E5, and E7. Maternal plasma corticosterone (CORT) secretion and implantation sites in the uterus were examined. The uterine (excluding embryos) homogenate and uterine lymphocytes were collected to examine oxidative stress states and associated immune parameters. The results demonstrated that restraint stress increased maternal plasma CORT secretion and reduced the number of implantation sites by 15.3% on E5 and by 26.1% on E7. Moreover, restraint stress decreased the density of uterine natural killer (uNK) cells in the endometrium by 22.1-47.9% and increased the density of mast cells in the myometrium by 55.6-76.9%. Restraint stress remarkably decreased the CD3(+)CD4(+) T/CD3(+)CD8(+) T cell ratio (by 26.2-28.9%) and attenuated uterine lymphocyte proliferation and secretion of cytokines. In addition, restraint stress threatened the intracellular equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants, resulting in decreased glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) (32.2% and 45.7%), superoxide dismutase (SOD) (15.5% and 26.1%), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) (18.4% and 18.2%) activities and increased malondialdehyde (MDA) (34.4% and 43.0%) contents on E5 and E7. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that restraint stress causes abnormal implantation and negatively impacts immune parameters in association with oxidative stress in mice.

  9. Overexpression of calreticulin sensitizes SERCA2a to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Kageyama, Kan; Kondo, Takahito

    2005-04-22

    Calreticulin (CRT), a Ca(2+)-binding molecular chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a vital role in cardiac physiology and pathology. Oxidative stress is a main cause of myocardiac disorder in the ischemic heart, but the function of CRT under oxidative stress is not fully understood. In this study, the effect of overexpression of CRT on sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) 2a under oxidative stress was examined using myocardiac H9c2 cells transfected with the CRT gene. The in vitro activity of SERCA2a and uptake of (45)Ca(2+) into isolated microsomes were suppressed by H(2)O(2) in CRT-overexpressing cells compared with controls. Moreover, SERCA2a protein was degraded via a proteasome-dependent pathway following the formation of a complex with CRT under the stress with H(2)O(2). Thus, we conclude that overexpression of CRT enhances the inactivation and degradation of SERCA2a in the cells under oxidative stress, suggesting some pathophysiological functions of CRT in Ca(2+) homeostasis of myocardiac disease.

  10. Epigenetic Regulation of Oxidative Stress in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiping; Han, Ziping; Ji, Xunming; Luo, Yumin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and incidence of stroke rises with life expectancy. However, except for the use of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator, the translation of new therapies for acute stroke from animal models into humans has been relatively unsuccessful. Oxidative DNA and protein damage following stroke is typically associated with cell death. Cause-effect relationships between reactive oxygen species and epigenetic modifications have been established in aging, cancer, acute pancreatitis, and fatty liver disease. In addition, epigenetic regulatory mechanisms during stroke recovery have been reviewed, with focuses mainly on neural apoptosis, necrosis, and neuroplasticity. However, oxidative stress-induced epigenetic regulation in vascular neural networks following stroke has not been sufficiently explored. Improved understanding of the epigenetic regulatory network upon oxidative stress may provide effective antioxidant approaches for treating stroke. In this review, we summarize the epigenetic events, including DNA methylation, histone modification, and microRNAs, that result from oxidative stress following experimental stroke in animal and cell models, and the ways in which epigenetic changes and their crosstalk influence the redox state in neurons, glia, and vascular endothelial cells, helping us to understand the foregone and vicious epigenetic regulation of oxidative stress in the vascular neural network following stroke. PMID:27330844

  11. Polyphenols action against oxidative stress formation in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Łuczaj, Wojciech; Zapora, Ewa; Szczepański, Marek; Wnuczko, Krzysztof; Skrzydlewska, Elzbieta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), theaflavins (TFs) and black tea extract (BTE) on oxidative stress formation as well as on antioxidant system of human vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC were incubated for 0,5 h with 100 mM tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP) for oxidative stress formation. The influence of EGCG, TFs, and BTE on oxidative stress and antioxidant system parameters was investigated by the pre-incubation for 2 h with 50 mg/mL of each compound. Half hour exposure to t-BHP caused statistically significant decrease in GSH-Px activity and in the content of GSH, vitamin A, vitamin E as well as tryptophan. Moreover, pretreatment of cells with t-BHP caused statistically significant increase in activities of Cu,Zn-SOD, GSSG-R and in the level of MDA and dityrosine. Pretreated with t-BHP endothelial cells, subjected to EGCG, TFs and black tea extract, are partially protected against oxidative activity of t-BHP causing statistically significant increase in GSH-Px activity, GSH and tryptophan level and decrease in MDA and dityrosine level in comparison with HUVEC pretreated with t-BHP group. These results indicate the beneficial effect of tea polyphenolic compounds on HUVEC antioxidant abilities and, in consequence, their protective effect in cell components.

  12. Good Stress, Bad Stress and Oxidative Stress: Insights from Anticipatory Cortisol Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as “peak” cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as “anticipatory” cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-OxoG and IsoP (but not

  13. Good stress, bad stress and oxidative stress: insights from anticipatory cortisol reactivity.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2013-09-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as "peak" cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as "anticipatory" cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-oxoG and IsoP (but not 8-OHd

  14. Oxidative stress markers in affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Marcin; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Dudek, Dominika; Styczeń, Krzysztof; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Misztakk, Paulina; Pilc, Agnieszka; Wolak, Małgorzata; Nowak, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    Affective disorders are a medical condition with a complex biological pattern of etiology, involving genetic and epigenetic factors, along with different environmental stressors. Increasing numbers of studies indicate that induction of oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) pathways, which is accompanied by immune-inflammatory response, might play an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying many major psychiatric disorders, including depression and bipolar disorder. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species have been shown to impair the brain function by modulating activity of principal neurotransmitter (e.g., glutamatergic) systems involved in the neurobiology of depression. Both preclinical and clinical studies revealed that depression is associated with altered levels of oxidative stress markers and typically reduced concentrations of several endogenous antioxidant compounds, such as glutathione, vitamin E, zinc and coenzyme Q10, or enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, and with an impairment of the total antioxidant status. These oxidative stress parameters can be normalized by successful antidepressant therapy. On the other hand, some antioxidants (zinc, N-acetylcysteine, omega-3 free fatty acids) may exhibit antidepressant properties or enhance standard antidepressant therapy. These observations introduce new potential targets for the development of therapeutic interventions based on antioxidant compounds. The present paper reviews selected animal and human studies providing evidence that oxidative stress is implicated in the pathophysiology and treatment of depression and bipolar disorder.

  15. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    PubMed

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field.

  16. Nitric oxide accumulation is required to protect against iron-mediated oxidative stress in frataxin-deficient Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mariana; Colman, María José Rodríguez; Gómez-Casati, Diego F; Lamattina, Lorenzo; Zabaleta, Eduardo Julián

    2009-02-04

    Frataxin is a mitochondrial protein that is conserved throughout evolution. In yeast and mammals, frataxin is essential for cellular iron (Fe) homeostasis and survival during oxidative stress. In plants, frataxin deficiency causes increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and high sensitivity to oxidative stress. In this work we show that a knock-down T-DNA frataxin-deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (atfh-1) contains increased total and organellar Fe levels. Frataxin deficiency leads also to nitric oxide (NO) accumulation in both, atfh-1 roots and frataxin null mutant yeast. Abnormally high NO production might be part of the defence mechanism against Fe-mediated oxidative stress.

  17. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  18. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.

  19. Endogenous ROS levels in C. elegans under exogenous stress support revision of oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The oxidative stress theory of life-history tradeoffs states that oxidative stress caused by damaging free radicals directly underpins tradeoffs between reproduction and longevity by altering the allocation of energetic resources between these tasks. We test this theory by characterizing the effects of exogenous oxidative insult and its interaction with thermal stress and diet quality on a suite of life-history traits and correlations in Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes. We also quantify demographic aging rates and endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in live animals. Results Our findings indicate a tradeoff between investment in reproduction and antioxidant defense (somatic maintenance) consistent with theoretical predictions, but correlations between standard life-history traits yield little evidence that oxidative stress generates strict tradeoffs. Increasing oxidative insult, however, shows a strong tendency to uncouple positive phenotypic correlations and, in particular, to reduce the correlation between reproduction and lifespan. We also found that mild oxidative insult results in lower levels of endogenous ROS accompanied by hormetic changes in lifespan, demographic aging, and reproduction that disappear in combined-stress treatments--consistent with the oxidative stress theory of aging. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that oxidative stress is a direct contributor to life-history trait variation and that traditional tradeoffs are not necessary to invoke oxidative stress as a mediator of relationships between life-history traits, supporting previous calls for revisions to theory. PMID:25056725

  20. EFL Foreign Teacher Stress in Korea: Causes and Coping Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundage, Gregory C.

    2007-01-01

    Survey study of 53 foreign EFL teachers in Jeonju City, South Korea looks at causes of teacher stress and coping mechanisms between the years of 2004 and 2006. Results show foreign EFL teachers report moderate levels of stress and attribute stresses in roughly equal measures to student misbehavior and school director/administrative sources. Survey…

  1. Oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Zabaiou, N; Mabed, D; Lobaccaro, J M; Lahouel, M

    2016-02-01

    To assess the status of oxidative stress in benign prostate hyperplasia, a very common disease in older men which constitutes a public health problem in Jijel, prostate tissues were obtained by transvesical adenomectomy from 10 men with benign prostate hyperplasia. We measured the cytosolic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) and cytosolic enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase. The development of benign prostate hyperplasia is accompanied by impaired oxidative status by increasing levels of MDA, depletion of GSH concentrations and a decrease in the activity of all the antioxidant enzymes studied. These results have allowed us to understand a part of the aetiology of benign prostate hyperplasia related to oxidative stress.

  2. A mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging.

    PubMed

    Indo, Hiroko P; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Tamura, Masato; Nagano, Yumiko; Matsui, Hirofumi; Gusev, Oleg; Cornette, Richard; Okuda, Takashi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Oki, Misato; Sato, Tsuyoshi; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Clair, Daret K St; Majima, Hideyuki J

    2015-01-01

    Fridovich identified CuZnSOD in 1969 and manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in 1973, and proposed "the Superoxide Theory," which postulates that superoxide (O2 (•-)) is the origin of most reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that it undergoes a chain reaction in a cell, playing a central role in the ROS producing system. Increased oxidative stress on an organism causes damage to cells, the smallest constituent unit of an organism, which can lead to the onset of a variety of chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurological diseases caused by abnormalities in biological defenses or increased intracellular reactive oxygen levels. Oxidative stress also plays a role in aging. Antioxidant systems, including non-enzyme low-molecular-weight antioxidants (such as, vitamins A, C and E, polyphenols, glutathione, and coenzyme Q10) and antioxidant enzymes, fight against oxidants in cells. Superoxide is considered to be a major factor in oxidant toxicity, and mitochondrial MnSOD enzymes constitute an essential defense against superoxide. Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide. The reaction of superoxide generated from mitochondria with nitric oxide is faster than SOD catalyzed reaction, and produces peroxynitrite. Thus, based on research conducted after Fridovich's seminal studies, we now propose a modified superoxide theory; i.e., superoxide is the origin of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) and, as such, causes various redox related diseases and aging.

  3. Piracetam improves mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Keil, Uta; Scherping, Isabel; Hauptmann, Susanne; Schuessel, Katin; Eckert, Anne; Müller, Walter E

    2006-01-01

    1.--Mitochondrial dysfunction including decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential and reduced ATP production represents a common final pathway of many conditions associated with oxidative stress, for example, hypoxia, hypoglycemia, and aging. 2.--Since the cognition-improving effects of the standard nootropic piracetam are usually more pronounced under such pathological conditions and young healthy animals usually benefit little by piracetam, the effect of piracetam on mitochondrial dysfunction following oxidative stress was investigated using PC12 cells and dissociated brain cells of animals treated with piracetam. 3.--Piracetam treatment at concentrations between 100 and 1000 microM improved mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production of PC12 cells following oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and serum deprivation. Under conditions of mild serum deprivation, piracetam (500 microM) induced a nearly complete recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels. Piracetam also reduced caspase 9 activity after SNP treatment. 4.--Piracetam treatment (100-500 mg kg(-1) daily) of mice was also associated with improved mitochondrial function in dissociated brain cells. Significant improvement was mainly seen in aged animals and only less in young animals. Moreover, the same treatment reduced antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in aged mouse brain only, which are elevated as an adaptive response to the increased oxidative stress with aging. 5.--In conclusion, therapeutically relevant in vitro and in vivo concentrations of piracetam are able to improve mitochondrial dysfunction associated with oxidative stress and/or aging. Mitochondrial stabilization and protection might be an important mechanism to explain many of piracetam's beneficial effects in elderly patients.

  4. MEASUREMENT OF OXIDATIVE STRESS PARAMETERS USING LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY - TANDEM MASS SPECTROSCOPY (LC-MS/MS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    What is the study?
    An invited review article. Measurement of oxidative stress parameters using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS)
    Why was it done?
    Although oxidative stress is frequently cited as a cause of various adverse biological eff...

  5. Changes in the metabolome of rats after exposure to arginine and N-carbamylglutamate in combination with diquat, a compound that causes oxidative stress, assessed by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangmang; Xiao, Liang; Cao, Wei; Fang, Tingting; Jia, Gang; Chen, Xiaoling; Zhao, Hua; Wu, Caimei; Wang, Jing

    2016-02-01

    Numerous factors can induce oxidative stress in animal production and lead to growth retardation, disease, and even death. Arginine and N-carbamylglutamate can alleviate the effects of oxidative stress. However, the systematic changes in metabolic biochemistry linked to oxidative stress and arginine and N-carbamylglutamate treatment remain largely unknown. This study aims to examine the effects of arginine and N-carbamylglutamate on rat metabolism under oxidative stress. Thirty rats were randomly divided into three dietary groups (n = 10 each). The rats were fed a basal diet supplemented with 0 (control), 1% arginine, or 0.1% N-carbamylglutamate for 30 days. On day 28, the rats in each treatment were intraperitoneally injected with diquat at 12 mg per kg body weight or sterile solution. Urine and plasma samples were analyzed by metabolomics. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly lower levels of acetamide, alanine, lysine, pyruvate, tyrosine, α-glucose, and β-glucose in plasma; N-carbamylglutamate + diquat had higher levels of 3-hydroxybutyrate, 3-methylhistidine, acetone, allantoin, asparagine, citrate, phenylalanine, trimethylamine-N-oxide, and tyrosine, and lower levels of low density lipoprotein, lipid, lysine, threonine, unsaturated lipid, urea, and very low density lipoprotein (P < 0.05) in plasma. Compared with the diquat group, the arginine + diquat group had significantly higher levels of citrate, creatinine, homogentisate, and α-ketoglutarate while lower levels of acetamide, citrulline, ethanol, glycine, isobutyrate, lactate, malonate, methymalonate, N-acetylglutamate, N-methylnicotinamide, propionate, and β-glucose (P < 0.05) in urine. Compared with the diquat group, the N-carbamylglutamate + diquat group had significantly higher levels of allantoin, citrate, homogentisate, phenylacetylglycine, α-ketoglutarate, and β-glucose while lower levels of acetamide, acetate, acetone, benzoate, citrulline, ethanol

  6. Multimarker Screening of Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Syslová, Kamila; Böhmová, Adéla; Kuzma, Marek; Pelclová, Daniela; Kačer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of organism decline in physiological functions. There is no clear theory explaining this phenomenon, but the most accepted one is the oxidative stress theory of aging. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, substances, which are formed during oxidative damage of phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, are present in body fluids of diseased people as well as the healthy ones (in a physiological concentration). 8-iso prostaglandin F2α is the most prominent biomarker of phospholipid oxidative damage, o-tyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine, and 3-nitrotyrosine are biomarkers of protein oxidative damage, and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and 8-hydroxyguanosine are biomarkers of oxidative damage of nucleic acids. It is thought that the concentration of biomarkers increases as the age of people increases. However, the concentration of biomarkers in body fluids is very low and, therefore, it is necessary to use a sensitive analytical method. A combination of HPLC and MS was chosen to determine biomarker concentration in three groups of healthy people of a different age (twenty, forty, and sixty years) in order to find a difference among the groups. PMID:25147595

  7. [Mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging].

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Sümegi, Balázs

    2014-03-23

    The free radical theory of aging was defined in the 1950s. On the base of this theory, the reactive oxygen species formed in the metabolic pathways can play pivotal role in ageing. The theory was modified by defining the mitochondrial respiration as the major cellular source of reactive oxygen species and got the new name mitochondrial theory of aging. Later on the existence of a "vicious cycle" was proposed, in which the reactive oxygen species formed in the mitochondrial respiration impair the mitochondrial DNA and its functions. The formation of reactive oxygen species are elevated due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The formation of mitochondrial DNA mutations can be accelerated by this "vicious cycle", which can lead to accelerated aging. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ, the polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA was impaired in mtDNA mutator mouse recently. The rate of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA was elevated and an aging phenotype could have been observed in these mice. Surprisingly, no oxidative impairment neither elevated reactive oxygen species formation could have been observed in the mtDNA mutator mice, which may question the existence of the "vicious cycle".

  8. Linking phosphorus availability with photo-oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of mechanisms to circumvent the potential damaging effects of living under low phosphorus availability in the soil. These mechanisms include different levels of organization, from root-shoot signalling at the whole-plant level to specific biochemical responses at the subcellular level, such as reductions in photosynthesis and the consequent activation of photo- and antioxidant mechanisms in chloroplasts. Some recent studies clearly indicate that severe phosphorus deficiency can lead to alterations in the photosynthetic apparatus, including reductions in CO2 assimilation rates, a down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes and photoinhibition at the photosystem II level, thus causing potential photo-oxidative stress. Photo-oxidative stress is characterized by an increased production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which at low concentrations can serve a signalling, protective role, but when present at high concentrations can cause damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, thus leading to irreversible injuries. We discuss here the mechanisms that phosphate-starved plants have evolved to withstand photo-oxidative stress, including changes at the subcellular level (e.g. activation of photo- and antioxidant protection mechanisms in chloroplasts), cellular and tissular levels (e.g. activation of photorespiration and anthocyanin accumulation) and whole-plant level (alterations in source-sink relationships modulated by hormones). Of particular importance is the current evidence demonstrating that phosphate-starved plants activate simultaneous responses at multiple levels, from transcriptional changes to root-shoot signalling, to prevent oxidative damage. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the occurrence of photo-oxidative stress in phosphate-starved plants and highlight the mechanisms these plants have evolved to prevent oxidative damage under phosphorus limitation at the subcellular, cellular and whole

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  10. Oxidative stress response in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Elida G; Jesuino, Rosália Santos Amorim; Dantas, Alessandra da Silva; Brígido, Marcelo de Macedo; Felipe, Maria Sueli S

    2005-06-30

    Survival of pathogenic fungi inside human hosts depends on evasion from the host immune system and adaptation to the host environment. Among different insults that Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has to handle are reactive oxygen and nitrogen species produced by the human host cells, and by its own metabolism. Knowing how the parasite deals with reactive species is important to understand how it establishes infection and survives within humans. The initiative to describe the P. brasiliensis transcriptome fostered new approaches to study oxidative stress response in this organism. By examining genes related to oxidative stress response, one can evaluate the parasite's ability to face this condition and infer about possible ways to overcome this ability. We report the results of a search of the P. brasiliensis assembled expressed sequence tag database for homologous sequences involved in oxidative stress response. We described several genes coding proteins involved in antioxidant defense, for example, catalase and superoxide dismutase isoenzymes, peroxiredoxin, cytochrome c peroxidase, glutathione synthesis enzymes, thioredoxin, and the transcription factors Yap1 and Skn7. The transcriptome analysis of P. brasiliensis reveals a pathogen that has many resources to combat reactive species. Besides characterizing the antioxidant defense system in P. brasiliensis, we also compared the ways in which different fungi respond to oxidative damage, and we identified the basic features of this response.

  11. Role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) recognized as a major cause of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has become one of the major public health challenges worldwide. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is multiple and still poorly understood. No single factor has yet been identified as an underlying causal factor. There is a growing belief, however, that obesity, especially visceral obesity, may play an important role in the development of the syndrome. Visceral adiposity seems to be an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure. An increasing number of studies confirm that oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and angiogenesis all play important roles in the pathogenesis of MS. Chronic hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues prone to complications in patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress occurs in a cellular system when the production of free radical moieties exceeds the antioxidant capacity of that system. If cellular antioxidants do not remove free radicals, radicals attack and damage proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The oxidized or nitrosylated products of free radical attack have decreased biological activity, leading to loss of energy metabolism, cell signaling, transport, and other major functions. These altered products are also targeted for proteosome degradation, further decreasing cellular function. Accumulation of such injury ultimately leads a cell to die through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In conclusion, a puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that free radical overgeneration may be considered the key in the generation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26557292

  12. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  13. Nuclear lamins and oxidative stress in cell proliferation and longevity.

    PubMed

    Shimi, Takeshi; Goldman, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the nuclear lamina is composed of a complex fibrillar network associated with the inner membrane of the nuclear envelope. The lamina provides mechanical support for the nucleus and functions as the major determinant of its size and shape. At its innermost aspect it associates with peripheral components of chromatin and thereby contributes to the organization of interphase chromosomes. The A- and B-type lamins are the major structural components of the lamina, and numerous mutations in the A-type lamin gene have been shown to cause many types of human diseases collectively known as the laminopathies. These mutations have also been shown to cause a disruption in the normal interactions between the A and B lamin networks. The impact of these mutations on nuclear functions is related to the roles of lamins in regulating various essential processes including DNA synthesis and damage repair, transcription and the regulation of genes involved in the response to oxidative stress. The major cause of oxidative stress is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is critically important for cell proliferation and longevity. Moderate increases in ROS act to initiate signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation and differentiation, whereas excessive increases in ROS cause oxidative stress, which in turn induces cell death and/or senescence. In this review, we cover current findings about the role of lamins in regulating cell proliferation and longevity through oxidative stress responses and ROS signaling pathways. We also speculate on the involvement of lamins in tumor cell proliferation through the control of ROS metabolism.

  14. Glycosphingolipids and oxidative stress: evaluation of hydroxyl radical oxidation of galactosyl and lactosylceramides using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Couto, Daniela; Santinha, Deolinda; Melo, Tânia; Ferreira-Fernandes, Emanuel; Videira, Romeu A; Campos, Ana; Fardilha, Margarida; Domingues, Pedro; Domingues, M Rosário M

    2015-10-01

    Galactosylceramide (GalCer) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) are structural and signaling lipids, playing important roles in signal transduction and cell adhesion. They are especially abundant in the nervous system and in important components of the myelin sheath. Although neurodegenerative disorders are associated with increased oxidative stress and lipid oxidation, the connection between oxidative stress and glycosphingolipid modification has been scarcely addressed. In this study, we aimed to characterize the structural changes caused by the hydroxyl radical to GalCer and LacCer molecular species using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS and MS/MS) and high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS(n)). ESI-MS and LC-MS spectra of 24:1GalCer and 24:1LacCer after free radical oxidation showed the formation of new species, which were identified as keto, hydroxyl and hydroperoxy derivatives, arising from modification in the mono unsaturated fatty acyl chain. Formation of ceramide and oxidized ceramides was also observed as a result of 24:1GalCer and 24:1LacCer radical oxidation. 24:1GlcCer (glucosylceramide) was detected after LacCer oxidation, probably due to oxidative cleavage of lactosyl moiety. This study shows that glycosphingolipids are prone to radical induced oxidation, which can be one of the causes of the increased ceramides content and pro apoptotic events during oxidative conditions and neurodegeneration. This MS study will support the future identification of oxidized galactosyl- and lactosylceramide species in sphingolipidomic studies applied to biological samples related with oxidative conditions.

  15. Oxidative stress in songbirds exposed to dietary methylmercury.

    PubMed

    Henry, Katie A; Cristol, Daniel A; Varian-Ramos, Claire W; Bradley, Eric L

    2015-04-01

    Long-term, sublethal methylmercury exposure can cause reproductive depression, immune suppression, endocrine disruption and other problems in birds. We used two biomarkers to detect oxidative stress in livers of zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) developmentally exposed to sublethal levels of dietary methylmercury (0.0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2, or 2.4 μg/g wet weight in diet). Our findings indicate that young adult finches exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of mercury in ovo and through their diets, exhibited oxidative stress in their livers. We measured the ratio of the antioxidant glutathione in its reduced form (GSH) versus its oxidized form (GSSG) and the activity of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme suite. Blood total mercury served as a proxy for liver mercury concentration, and was on average 8.4 times the dietary dose (e.g., birds consuming 0.6 μg/g had blood mercury levels of ~5 μg/g on a wet weight basis). Consistent with what is known from large, aquatic bird species, there was a significant, negative relationship between GSH/GSSG ratios and tissue mercury concentrations, which is indicative of oxidative stress. This relationship was driven by a significant increase in the oxidized glutathione in the livers of birds with higher blood mercury levels. SOD activity was also found to have a significant, negative relationship with blood mercury.

  16. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  17. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalin, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  18. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalın, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women. Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status

  19. The effect of sunblock against oxidative stress in farmers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yong-Dae, Kim; Dong-Hyuk, Yim; Sang-Yong, Eom; Ji, Yeoun Lee; Heon, Kim

    2017-01-19

    Farmers are frequently exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation which causes various diseases by inducing oxidative stress. This study aimed to assess the effects of sunblock on oxidative stress in the body. Eighty-seven farmers were divided into two groups: those who wore sunblock for five days and those who did not. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) in urine, which is an antioxidant indicator, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels in urine, an oxidative stress indicator, were measured. The urinary TAC of sunblock users was significantly higher than that of non-users, but urinary 8-OHdG levels were not significantly different. Even after adjustment for potential confounders, urinary TAC was found to be markedly increased with sunblock usage. These results suggest that sunblock is effective in preventing oxidative stress among farmers. In addition, they show that urinary TAC can be used as a good effect marker of oxidative stress caused by UV exposure.

  20. Protective Effects of Carvacrol against Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Stress in Rat's Brain, Liver, and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz; Borji, Abasalt

    2016-01-01

    Restraint stress may be associated with elevated free radicals, and thus, chronic exposure to oxidative stress may cause tissue damage. Several studies have reported that carvacrol (CAR) has a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CAR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver, and kidney. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 6 h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CAR daily for 21 days. To evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the brain, liver, and kidney. In the stressed animals that received vehicle, the MDA level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower than the nonstressed animals (P < 0.001). CAR ameliorated the changes in the stressed animals as compared with the control group (P < 0.001). This study indicates that CAR can prevent restraint stress induced oxidative damage. PMID:26904286

  1. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  2. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Javier; Trigo-Damas, Ines; Quiroga-Varela, Anna; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in PD. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, pesticides, insecticides, dopamine (DA) itself, and genetic mutations in PD-associated proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process. PMID:26217195

  3. Immune mechanisms linked to depression via oxidative stress and neuroprogression.

    PubMed

    Bakunina, Nataliia; Pariante, Carmine M; Zunszain, Patricia A

    2015-01-10

    Emerging evidence suggests the significant role of inflammation and oxidative stress as main contributors to the neuroprogression that is observed in major depressive disorder (MDD), where patients show increased inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers. The process of neuroprogression includes stage-related neurodegeneration, cell death, reduced neurogenesis, reduced neuronal plasticity and increased autoimmune responses. Oxidative stress is a consequence of the biological imbalance between Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and antioxidants, leading to the alteration of biomolecules and the loss of control of the intracellular redox-related signaling pathways. ROS serve as crucial secondary messengers in signal transduction and significantly affect inflammatory pathways by activating NF-κB and MAPK family stress kinases. When present in excess, ROS inflict damage, affecting cellular constituents with the formation of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as malondialdehyde, 4-Hydroxynonenal, neoepitopes and damage-associated molecular patterns promoting immune response, and ultimately leading to cell death. The failure of cells to adapt to the changes in redox homeostasis and the subsequent cell death, together with the damage caused by inflammatory mediators, have been considered as major causes of neuroprogression and hence MDD. Both an activated immune-inflammatory system and increased oxidative stress act synergistically, complicating our understanding of the pathogenesis of depression. The cascade of antioxidative and inflammatory events is orchestrated by several transcription factors, with Nrf2 and NF-κB having particular relevance to MDD. This review focuses on potential molecular mechanisms through which impaired redox homeostasis and neuroinflammation can affect the neuronal environment and contribute to depression This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Lamins as mediators of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sieprath, Tom; Darwiche, Rabih; De Vos, Winnok H.

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear lamina defines structural and functional properties of the cell nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lamina dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of laminopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent data is reviewed connecting laminopathies to oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A framework is proposed to explain interactions between lamins and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The nuclear lamina defines both structural and functional properties of the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, lead to a broad spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. While different hypotheses have been postulated to explain disease development, there is still no unified view on the mechanistic basis of laminopathies. Recent observations indicate that laminopathies are often accompanied by altered levels of reactive oxygen species and a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress at the cellular level. In this review, we highlight the role of reactive oxygen species for cell function and disease development in the context of laminopathies and present a framework of non-exclusive mechanisms to explain the reciprocal interactions between a dysfunctional lamina and altered redox homeostasis.

  5. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  6. Chrononutrition against Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, M.; Terrón, M. P.; Rodríguez, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress have been recognized as important factors in the biology of aging and in many age-associated degenerative diseases. Antioxidant systems deteriorate during aging. It is, thus, considered that one way to reduce the rate of aging and the risk of chronic disease is to avoid the formation of free radicals and reduce oxidative stress by strengthening antioxidant defences. Phytochemicals present in fruits, vegetables, grains, and other foodstuffs have been linked to reducing the risk of major oxidative stress-induced diseases. Some dietary components of foods possess biological activities which influence circadian rhythms in humans. Chrononutrition studies have shown that not only the content of food, but also the time of ingestion contributes to the natural functioning of the circadian system. Dietary interventions with antioxidant-enriched foods taking into account the principles of chrononutrition are of particular interest for the elderly since they may help amplify the already powerful benefits of phytochemicals as natural instruments with which to prevent or delay the onset of common age-related diseases. PMID:23861994

  7. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles against lead-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Asieh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Najafi, Rezvan; Baeeri, Maryam; Rayegan, Samira; Cheshmehnour, Jamshid; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Bayrami, Zahra; Safa, Majid

    2015-03-01

    Due to numerous industrial applications, lead has caused widespread pollution in the environment; it seems that the central nervous system (CNS) is the main target for lead in the human body. Oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the CNS have been assumed as two mechanisms related to neurotoxicity of lead. Cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles have recently shown antioxidant effects, particularly when used together, through scavenging the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) required for cell apoptosis. We looked into the neuroprotective effects of the combinations of these nanoparticles against acute lead-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus. We used five groups in this study: control, lead, CeO2 nanoparticles + lead, Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead, and CeO2 and Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead. Nanoparticles of CeO2 (1000 mg/kg) and Y2O3 (230 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during 2 days prior to intraperitoneal injection of the lead (25 mg/kg for 3 days). At the end of the treatments, oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes activity, and apoptosis indexes were investigated. The results demonstrated that pretreatments with CeO2 and/or Y2O3 nanoparticles recovered lead-caused oxidative stress markers (ROS, lipid peroxidation, and total thiol molecules) and apoptosis indexes (Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3 protein expression). Besides, these nanoparticles reduced the activities of lead-induced superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as the ADP/ATP ratio. Interestingly, the best recovery resulted from the compound of these nanoparticles. Based on these outcomes, it appears that this combination may potentially be beneficial for protection against lead-caused acute toxicity in the brain through improving the oxidative stress-mediated programmed cell death pathway.

  8. Targets of oxidative stress in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, T; Ghosh, S K; Michael, J R; Batabyal, S K; Chakraborti, S

    1998-10-01

    Although oxidants such as superoxide (O2.) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a role in host-mediated destruction of foreign pathogens yet excessive generation of oxidants may lead to a variety of pathological complications in the cardiovascular system. An important mechanism by which oxidants cause dysfunction of the cardiovascular system appears to be due to the increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. Oxidants cause cellular Ca2+ mobilization by modulating activities of a variety of regulators such as Na+/H+ and Na+/Ca2+ exchangers, Na+/K+ ATPase and Ca2+ ATPase and Ca2+ channels that are associated with Ca2+ transport in the plasma membrane and the sarco(endo)plasmic reticular membrane of myocardial cells. Recent research have suggested that the increase in Ca2+ level by oxidants plays a pivotal role in inducing several protein kinases such as protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and mitogen activated protein kinases. Oxidant-mediated alteration of different signal transduction systems and their interations eventually regulate a variety of pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis, apoptosis and necrosis in the myocardium.

  9. The effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on serum oxidative stress levels.

    PubMed

    Turan, Mehmet Nuri; Aslan, Mehmet; Bolukbas, Filiz Fusun; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Selek, Sahbettin; Sabuncu, Tevfik

    2016-12-01

    Some authors have investigated the effects of oxidative stress in some process such as undergoing laparoscopic. However, the effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress is unclear. We evaluated the short-term effect of upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process on oxidative stress. Thirty patients who underwent endoscopy process and 20 healthy controls were enrolled in the prospective study. Serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status measurements were measured before and after endoscopy process. The ratio percentage of total oxidant status to total antioxidant capacity was regarded as oxidative stress index. Before endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity levels were higher, while serum total oxidant status levels and oxidative stress index values were lower in patients than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant (all, p > 0.05). After endoscopy process, serum total antioxidant capacity and total oxidant status levels were significantly higher in patients than before endoscopy process (both, p < 0.05). However, oxidative stress index values were slight higher in patients but this difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). We observed that serum TAC and TOS levels were increased in patients who underwent endoscopy process after endoscopy process. However, short-time upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy process did not cause an important change in the oxidative stress index. Further studies enrolling a larger number of patients are required to clarify the results obtained here.

  10. Acetaminophen protects brain endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Debjani; Grammas, Paula

    2009-05-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that acetaminophen has unappreciated anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Drugs that affect oxidant and inflammatory stress in the brain are of interest because both processes are thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. The objective of this study is to determine whether acetaminophen affects the response of brain endothelial cells to oxidative stress. Cultured brain endothelial cells are pre-treated with acetaminophen and then exposed to the superoxide-generating compound menadione (25 microM). Cell survival, inflammatory protein expression, and anti-oxidant enzyme activity are measured. Menadione causes a significant (p<0.001) increase in endothelial cell death as well as an increase in RNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, macrophage inflammatory protein alpha, and RANTES. Menadione also evokes a significant (p<0.001) increase in the activity of the anti-oxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). Pre-treatment of endothelial cell cultures with acetaminophen (25-100 microM) increases endothelial cell survival and inhibits menadione-induced expression of inflammatory proteins and SOD activity. In addition, we document, for the first time, that acetaminophen increases expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl2. Suppressing Bcl2 with siRNA blocks the pro-survival effect of acetaminophen. These data show that acetaminophen has anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects on the cerebrovasculature and suggest a heretofore unappreciated therapeutic potential for this drug in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease that are characterized by oxidant and inflammatory stress.

  11. Oxidative stress and fertility: incorrect assumptions and ineffective solutions?

    PubMed

    Ménézo, Yves; Entezami, Frida; Lichtblau, Isabelle; Belloc, Stephanie; Cohen, Marc; Dale, Brian

    2014-02-01

    One of the most important concerns in assisted reproduction (ART), and in particular ICSI, is the quality of sperm DNA. Oxidative stress is one of the major causes of damage to DNA and attempting to reduce generation of DNA damage related to reactive oxygen species (ROS) through consumption of antioxidants is often tempting. However, current antioxidant treatments, given irrespectively of clinically quantified deficiencies, are poorly efficient, potentially detrimental and over-exposure is risky. Here we discuss new treatments in relation to present day concepts on oxidative stress. This discussion includes stimulation of endogenous anti-ROS defense i.e. glutathione synthesis and recycling of homocysteine, the epicentre of multiple ROS-linked pathologies.

  12. [Research of antioxidant defence system under alimentary induced oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Iu V; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Vasil'ev, A V

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary induced oxidative stress and its corrections in children and adults with homocysteine metabolism disorder are urgent problems for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease prophylactics. For determination antioxidant status GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities were detected. Effectiveness of Se-contained antioxidant complex "Selenec" was determined in experimental model with pubertal male Wistar rats. Including high value of methionine to semipurified diet with pyridoxine and folate deficiency induced oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation substances were increased in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aortal endothelium and myocardium. GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities decreased significant compared to control. "Selenec" supplementation caused a decrease of thiobarbituric-reactive substances level, increasing SOD and catalase activity and decreasing GSH-Px and GSH-reductase activity in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aorta and myocardium.

  13. Oxidative Stress in Critically Ill Children with Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Derek S

    2011-10-07

    Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit. Sepsis accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in critically ill children as well. The pathophysiology of sepsis is characterized by a complex systemic inflammatory response, endothelial dysfunction, and alterations in the coagulation system, which lead to perturbations in the delivery of oxygen and metabolic substrates to the tissues, end-organ dysfunction, and ultimately death. Oxidative stress plays a crucial role as both a promoter and mediator of the systemic inflammatory response, suggesting potential targets for the treatment of critically ill children with the sepsis syndrome. Herein, we will provide a brief review of the role of oxidative and nitrosative stress in the pathophysiology of sepsis.

  14. [Oxidative stress and antioxitant therapy of chronic periodontitis].

    PubMed

    Shen, Y X; Guo, S J; Wu, Y F

    2016-07-01

    Chronic periodontitis is a progressive, infectious inflammation disease, caused by the dysbiosis of oral resident flora, leading to the destruction of periodontium. The onset of pathogenic microorganisms is the etiological factor of periodontitis, while the immuno-inflammatory response affects the progression of the disease. Under chronic periodontitis, oxidative stress occurs when excessive reactive oxygen species are produced and exceed the compensative capacity of the organism. Oxidative stress leads to the destruction of periodontium, in a direct way(damaging the biomolecule) or an indirect way(enhancing the produce of inflammatory cytokine and destructive enzymes). Therefore, as the antagonist of the reactive oxygen species, antioxidants may be helpful to treat the chronic periodontitis. This paper reviewed relevant literatures about the destructive role of excessive reactive oxygen species and protective role of antioxidants in chronic periodontitis.

  15. Cardiovascular Complications in CKD Patients: Role of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Gosmanova, Elvira O.; Le, Ngoc-Anh

    2011-01-01

    Starting with the early stages, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience higher burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Moreover, CVD complications are the major cause of mortality in CKD patients as compared with complications from chronic kidney failure. While traditional CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, obesity, physical inactivity, may be more prevalent among CKD patients, these factors seem to underestimate the accelerated cardiovascular disease in the CKD population. Search for additional biomarkers that could explain the enhanced CVD risk in CKD patients has gained increasing importance. Although it is unlikely that any single nontraditional risk factor would fully account for the increased CVD risk in individuals with CKD, oxidative stress appears to play a central role in the development and progression of CVD and its complications. We will review the data that support the contribution of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of CVD in patients with chronic kidney failure. PMID:21253517

  16. The effect of reagents mimicking oxidative stress on fibrinogen function.

    PubMed

    Štikarová, Jana; Kotlín, Roman; Riedel, Tomáš; Suttnar, Jiří; Pimková, Kristýna; Chrastinová, Leona; Dyr, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the plasma proteins most susceptible to oxidative modification. It has been suggested that modification of fibrinogen may cause thrombotic/bleeding complications associated with many pathophysiological states of organism. We exposed fibrinogen molecules to three different modification reagents-malondialdehyde, sodium hypochlorite, and peroxynitrite-that are presented to various degrees in different stages of oxidative stress. We studied the changes in fibrin network formation and platelet interactions with modified fibrinogens under flow conditions. The fastest modification of fibrinogen was caused by hypochlorite. Fibers from fibrinogen modified with either reagent were thinner in comparison with control fibers. We found that platelet dynamic adhesion was significantly lower on fibrinogen modified with malondialdehyde and significantly higher on fibrinogen modified either with hypochlorite or peroxynitrite reflecting different prothrombotic/antithrombotic properties of oxidatively modified fibrinogens. It seems that, in the complex reactions ongoing in living organisms at conditions of oxidation stress, hypochlorite modifies proteins (e.g., fibrinogen) faster and more preferentially than malondialdehyde. It suggests that the prothrombotic effects of prior fibrinogen modifications may outweigh the antithrombotic effect of malondialdehyde-modified fibrinogen in real living systems.

  17. [Hydrogen and oxidative stress injury--from an inert gas to a medical gas].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao-li; Du, Jun-bao; Tang, Chao-shu

    2011-04-18

    Oxidative stress is intensive cellular oxidation caused by redundant reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals. Redundant ROS causes DNA fracture, lipid peroxidation and protein inactivation, thus leading to severe cell damage. Recent studies have shown that hydrogen is a good anti-oxidant. It selectively reduces the hydroxyl radical, the most cytotoxic of ROS; however, it does not react with other ROS, which play physiological roles. As a result, it could protect tissues against oxidative stress injuries, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury of the heart, liver and intestine, cisplatin nephrotoxicity, sepsis and colon inflammation. As a medical gas, hydrogen may have a prospect for far-reaching clinical application.

  18. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both transcriptional and post-translational events. This cross talk, in turn, regulates the structural integrity of cardiomyocytes, promotes proteostasis, and reduces inflammation, events critical to disease pathogenesis. Critical Issues: Dysregulation of either autophagy or redox state has been implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Cardiomyocytes are rich in mitochondria, which make them particularly sensitive to oxidative damage. Maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis and elimination of defective mitochondria are each critical to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Future Directions: The complex interplay between autophagy and oxidative stress underlies a wide range of physiological and pathological events and its elucidation holds promise of potential clinical applicability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 507–518. PMID:23641894

  19. Chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence causes long-term anxiety.

    PubMed

    Chaby, L E; Cavigelli, S A; Hirrlinger, A M; Caruso, M J; Braithwaite, V A

    2015-02-01

    Exposure to stress during adolescence can cause long-term changes in behavior and cognition. Anxiety diagnoses rise during adolescence and are increased by adverse experiences. Currently, it is unknown how long stress during adolescence alters anxiety in adulthood. We found that rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress during adolescence expressed altered behavior 6.5 months later; showing increased anxiety in a feeding test in a novel environment. Although behavioral changes indicative of anxiety were detected in late adulthood, the basal levels of fecal corticoid metabolites in prior-stressed rats did not differ from unstressed, control rats.

  20. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  1. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial oxidative stress damage induced by copper orthophenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Correa, Francisco; Díaz-Ruiz, Jorge Luis; Chávez, Edmundo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of tamoxifen and cyclosporin A on mitochondrial permeability transition caused by addition of the thiol-oxidizing pair Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline. The findings indicate that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A circumvent the oxidative membrane damage manifested by matrix Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and transmembrane electrical gradient collapse. Furthermore, it was found that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A prevent the generation of TBARs promoted by Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline, as well as the inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and disruption of mDNA. Electrophoretic analysis was unable to demonstrate a cross-linking reaction between membrane proteins. Yet, it was found that Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline induced the generation of reactive oxygen species. It is thus plausible that membrane leakiness is due to an oxidative stress injury.

  2. Oxidative stress markers in Thoroughbred horses after castration surgery under inhalation anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Nao; Sasaki, Naoki; Kusano, Kanichi; Endo, Yoshiro; Torisu, Shidow

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been reported to occur during surgery. It is important to reduce intraoperative oxidative stress to improve the postoperative prognosis. However, there are no reports regarding oxidative stress related to surgery in horses. In the present study, we measured pre and postsurgical diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP); the oxidative stress index (OSI) was then calculated (OSI=d-ROMs/BAP × 100). d-ROMs were not significantly different between the pre and postsurgical periods. However, BAP significantly decreased after surgery (P=0.02), and OSI significantly increased after surgery (P=0.02). Based on these results, it suggested that castration surgery under inhalation anesthesia decreases the antioxidant potential and causes oxidative stress in horses.

  3. Oxidative stress markers in Thoroughbred horses after castration surgery under inhalation anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    TSUZUKI, Nao; SASAKI, Naoki; KUSANO, Kanichi; ENDO, Yoshiro; TORISU, Shidow

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oxidative stress has been reported to occur during surgery. It is important to reduce intraoperative oxidative stress to improve the postoperative prognosis. However, there are no reports regarding oxidative stress related to surgery in horses. In the present study, we measured pre and postsurgical diacron-reactive oxygen metabolites (d-ROMs) and biological antioxidant potential (BAP); the oxidative stress index (OSI) was then calculated (OSI=d-ROMs/BAP × 100). d-ROMs were not significantly different between the pre and postsurgical periods. However, BAP significantly decreased after surgery (P=0.02), and OSI significantly increased after surgery (P=0.02). Based on these results, it suggested that castration surgery under inhalation anesthesia decreases the antioxidant potential and causes oxidative stress in horses. PMID:27330401

  4. Flavonoids and oxidative stress in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Sotibrán, América Nitxin Castañeda; Ordaz-Téllez, María Guadalupe; Rodríguez-Arnaiz, Rosario

    2011-11-27

    Flavonoids are a family of antioxidants that are widely represented in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes, and chocolate, as well as in popular beverages, such as red wine, coffee, and tea. The flavonoids chlorogenic acid, kaempferol, quercetin and quercetin 3β-d-glycoside were investigated for genotoxicity using the wing somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART). This test makes use of two recessive wing cell markers: multiple wing hairs (mwh) and flare (flr(3)), which are mutations located on the left arm of chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster and are indicative of both mitotic recombination and various types of mutational events. In order to test the antioxidant capacities of the flavonoids, experiments were conducted with various combinations of oxidants and polyphenols. Oxidative stress was induced using hydrogen peroxide, the Fenton reaction and paraquat. Third-instar transheterozygous larvae were chronically treated for all experiments. The data obtained in this study showed that, at the concentrations tested, the flavonoids did not induce somatic mutations or recombination in D. melanogaster with the exception of quercetin, which proved to be genotoxic at only one concentration. The oxidants hydrogen peroxide and the Fenton reaction did not induce mutations in the wing somatic assay of D. melanogaster, while paraquat and combinations of flavonoids produced significant numbers of small single spots. Quercetin 3β-d-glycoside mixed with paraquat was shown to be desmutagenic. Combinations of the oxidants with the other flavonoids did not show any antioxidant activity.

  5. Oxidative stress and antioxidants: Distress or eustress?

    PubMed

    Niki, Etsuo

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing consensus that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not just associated with various pathologies, but that they act as physiological redox signaling messenger with important regulatory functions. It is sometimes stated that "if ROS is a physiological signaling messenger, then removal of ROS by antioxidants such as vitamins E and C may not be good for human health." However, it should be noted that ROS acting as physiological signaling messenger and ROS removed by antioxidants are not the same. The lipid peroxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol induce adaptive response and enhance defense capacity against subsequent oxidative insults, but it is unlikely that these lipid peroxidation products are physiological signaling messenger produced on purpose. The removal of ROS and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by antioxidants should be beneficial for human health, although it has to be noted also that they may not be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage mediated by non-radical oxidants. The term ROS is vague and, as there are many ROS and antioxidants which are different in chemistry, it is imperative to explicitly specify ROS and antioxidant to understand the effects and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants properly.

  6. Biocompatibility of implantable materials: An oxidative stress viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Mouthuy, Pierre-Alexis; Snelling, Sarah J B; Dakin, Stephanie G; Milković, Lidija; Gašparović, Ana Čipak; Carr, Andrew J; Žarković, Neven

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress occurs when the production of oxidants surpasses the antioxidant capacity in living cells. Oxidative stress is implicated in a number of pathological conditions such as cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases but it also has crucial roles in the regulation of cellular activities. Over the last few decades, many studies have identified significant connections between oxidative stress, inflammation and healing. In particular, increasing evidence indicates that the production of oxidants and the cellular response to oxidative stress are intricately connected to the fate of implanted biomaterials. This review article provides an overview of the major mechanisms underlying the link between oxidative stress and the biocompatibility of biomaterials. ROS, RNS and lipid peroxidation products act as chemo-attractants, signalling molecules and agents of degradation during the inflammation and healing phases. As chemo-attractants and signalling molecules, they contribute to the recruitment and activation of inflammatory and healing cells, which in turn produce more oxidants. As agents of degradation, they contribute to the maturation of the extracellular matrix at the healing site and to the degradation of the implanted material. Oxidative stress is itself influenced by the material properties, such as by their composition, their surface properties and their degradation products. Because both cells and materials produce and react with oxidants, oxidative stress may be the most direct route mediating the communication between cells and materials. Improved understanding of the oxidative stress mechanisms following biomaterial implantation may therefore help the development of new biomaterials with enhanced biocompatibility.

  7. Air pollution and circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Staimer, Norbert; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical components of air pollutant exposures that induce oxidative stress and subsequent inflammation may be partly responsible for associations of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with airborne particulate matter and combustion-related pollutant gasses. However, epidemiologic evidence regarding this is limited. An exposure-assessment approach is to measure the oxidative potential of particle mixtures because it is likely that hundreds of correlated chemicals are involved in overall effects of air pollution on health. Oxidative potential likely depends on particle composition and size distribution, especially ultrafine particle concentration, and on transition metals and certain semivolatile and volatile organic chemicals. For health effects, measuring systemic oxidative stress in the blood is one feasible approach, but there is no universal biomarker of oxidative stress and there are many potential target molecules (lipids, proteins, DNA, nitric oxide, etc.), which may be more or less suitable for specific study goals. Concurrent with the measurement of oxidative stress, it is important to measure gene and/or protein expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes because they can modify relations between oxidative stress biomarkers and air pollutants. Conversely, the expression and activities of these enzymes are modified by oxidative stress. This interplay will likely determine the observed effects of air pollutants on systemic inflammatory and thrombotic mediators and related clinical outcomes. Studies are needed to assess the reliability and validity of oxidative stress biomarkers, evaluate differences in associations between oxidative stress biomarkers and various pollutant measurements (mass, chemical components, and oxidative potential), and evaluate impacts of antioxidant responses on these relations. PMID:23626660

  8. Correlates of oxidative stress in wild kestrel nestlings (Falco tinnunculus).

    PubMed

    Costantini, David; Casagrande, Stefania; De Filippis, Stefania; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fanfani, Alberto; Tagliavini, James; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2006-05-01

    The fitness of an organism can be affected by conditions experienced during early development. In light of the impact that oxidative stress can have on the health and ageing of a bird species, this study evaluated factors accounting for the variation in oxidative stress levels in nestlings of the Eurasian kestrel (Falco tinnunculus) by measuring the serum concentration of reactive oxygen metabolites and the serum antioxidant barrier against hypochlorite-induced oxidation. The ratio between these two variables was considered as an index of oxidative stress, with higher values meaning higher oxidative damage. Six-chick broods showed the highest level of oxidative stress, while no effect of sex was found. Age showed an inverse relationship with the oxidants and the levels of oxidative stress, with younger birds having higher levels. Hatching date, body condition, body mass and carotenoid concentration did not show any relationship with oxidants, antioxidants or degree of oxidative stress. These findings suggest that intrabrood sibling competition could play a role in determining oxidative stress, and that in carnivorous birds other antioxidant molecules could be more important than carotenoids to reduce oxidative stress.

  9. Oxidative stress and longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans as mediated by SKN-1.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Kyu; Tedesco, Patricia M; Johnson, Thomas E

    2009-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been hypothesized to play a role in normal aging. The response to oxidative stress is regulated by the SKN-1 transcription factor, which also is necessary for intestinal development in Caenorhabditis elegans. Almost a thousand genes including the antioxidant and heat-shock responses, as well as genes responsible for xenobiotic detoxification were induced by the oxidative stress which was found using transcriptome analysis. There were also 392 down-regulated genes including many involved in metabolic homeostasis, organismal development, and reproduction. Many of these oxidative stress-induced transcriptional changes are dependent on SKN-1 action; the induction of the heat-shock response is not. When RNAi to inhibit genes was used, most had no effect on either resistance to oxidative stress or longevity; however two SKN-1-dependent genes, nlp-7 and cup-4, that were up-regulated by oxidative stress were found to be required for resistance to oxidative stress and for normal lifespan. nlp-7 encodes a neuropeptide-like protein, expressed in neurons, while cup-4 encodes a coelomocyte-specific, ligand-gated ion channel. RNAi of nlp-7 or cup-4 increased sensitivity to oxidative stress and reduced lifespan. Among down-regulated genes, only inhibition of ent-1, a nucleoside transporter, led to increased resistance to oxidative stress; inhibition had no effect on lifespan. In contrast, RNAi of nhx-2, a Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, extended lifespan significantly without affecting sensitivity to oxidative stress. These findings showed that a transcriptional shift from growth and maintenance towards the activation of cellular defense mechanisms was caused by the oxidative stress; many of these transcriptional alterations are SKN-1 dependent.

  10. Concepts of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Alzoghaibi, Mohammed A

    2013-10-21

    Oxygen free radical and lipid peroxides (oxidative stress) are highly reactive and represent very damaging compounds. Oxidative stress could be a major contributing factor to the tissue injury and fibrosis that characterize Crohn's disease. An imbalance between increased reactive oxygen species levels and decreased antioxidant defenses occurs in Crohn's patients. Decreased blood levels of vitamins C and E and decreased intestinal mucosal levels of CuZn superoxide dismutase, glutathione, vitamin A, C, E, and β-carotene have been reported for Crohn's patients. Increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1 and -8 and tumor necrosis factor, have been detected in inflammatory bowel disease. Oxidative stress significantly increased the production of neutrophils, chemokines, and interleukin-8. These effects were inhibited by antioxidant vitamins and arachidonic acid metabolite inhibitors in human intestinal smooth muscle cells isolated from the bowels of Crohn's disease patients. The main pathological feature of Crohn's disease is an infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils and mononuclear cells into the affected part of the intestine. Activated neutrophils produce noxious substances that cause inflammation and tissue injury. Due to the physiological and biochemical actions of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides, many of the clinical and pathophysiological features of Crohn's disease might be explained by an imbalance of increased reactive oxygen species and a net decrease of antioxidant molecules. This review describes the general concepts of free radical, lipid peroxide and antioxidant activities and eventually illustrates their interferences in the development of Crohn's strictures.

  11. Oxidative stress and an altered methionine metabolism in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bleich, S; Spilker, K; Kurth, C; Degner, D; Quintela-Schneider, M; Javaheripour, K; Rüther, E; Kornhuber, J; Wiltfang, J

    2000-11-03

    The exact mechanism of brain atrophy in patients with chronic alcoholism remains unknown. There is growing evidence that chronic alcoholism is associated with oxidative stress and with a derangement in sulphur amino acid metabolism (e.g. ethanol-induced hyperhomocysteinemia). Furthermore, it has been reported that homocysteine induces neuronal cell death by stimulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as well as by producing free radicals. To further evaluate this latter hypothesis we analysed serum levels of both homocysteine and markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) in alcoholic patients who underwent withdrawal from alcohol. Homocysteine and malondialdehyde were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in serum samples of 35 patients (active drinkers). There was a significant correlation (P<0. 01) between blood alcohol concentration and elevated homocysteine (Spearman's r=0.71) and malondialdehyde (r=0.90) levels on admission. In addition, homocysteine and malondialdehyde levels were found to be significant decreased after 3 days of withdrawal treatment (Wilcoxon test: homocysteine, Z=-5.127; malondialdehyde, Z=-3.120; P<0.01). We postulate that excitatory neurotransmitters and mechanisms of oxidative stress in patients with chronic alcoholism may partly mediate excitotoxic neuronal damage and hereby cause brain shrinkage.

  12. Chemiluminescent examination of abiotic oxidative stress of watercress.

    PubMed

    Beals, Christopher; Byl, Thomas

    2013-06-20

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale) is an aquatic plant that readily bioaccumulates heavy metals that may be found in contaminated aquatic systems. Toxic effects of contaminants on the physiological processes cause changes in oxidase enzymatic activity in watercress, which can be measured using a luminometer. The luminometer uses the reaction produced when peroxidases break down hydrogen peroxide into water and an oxygen radical. The resulting oxyradical binds to and oxidizes phenolic groups producing a measureable luminescent reaction. N. officinale plants were exposed to three different concentrations of heavy metals including lead, nickel, copper, and manganese for 24, 48, and 72 hour exposures. Aquatic exposure to the four heavy metals caused a significant increase in oxidative enzyme production. Fluorometric and morphometric measurements were also conducted in order to compare plant stress to the oxidative enzyme analyses. Fluorometric measurements performed on plants stressed by exposure to heavy metals revealed no significant decreases in photosystem II efficiency. Morphometric measurements of root length showed decreased root growth resulting from exposures to nickel, copper, and manganese. Environ Toxicol Chem © 2013 SETAC.

  13. Chemiluminescent examination of abiotic oxidative stress of watercress.

    PubMed

    Beals, Christopher; Byl, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Watercress (Nasturtium officinale) is an aquatic plant that readily bioaccumulates heavy metals that may be found in contaminated aquatic systems. Toxic effects of contaminants on the physiological processes cause changes in oxidase enzymatic activity in watercress, which can be measured with a luminometer. The luminometer uses the reaction produced when peroxidases break down hydrogen peroxide into water and an oxygen radical. The resulting oxyradical binds to and oxidizes phenolic groups, producing a measureable luminescent reaction. Nasturtium officinale plants were exposed to 3 different concentrations of heavy metals, including lead, nickel, copper, and manganese for 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Aquatic exposure to the 4 heavy metals caused a significant increase in oxidative enzyme production. Fluorometric and morphometric measurements were also conducted to compare plant stress with the oxidative enzyme analyses. Fluorometric measurements performed on plants stressed by exposure to heavy metals revealed no significant decreases in photosystem II efficiency. Morphometric measurements of root length showed decreased root growth resulting from exposures to Ni, Cu, and Mn.

  14. Mutations of C19orf12, coding for a transmembrane glycine zipper containing mitochondrial protein, cause mis-localization of the protein, inability to respond to oxidative stress and increased mitochondrial Ca2+

    PubMed Central

    Venco, Paola; Bonora, Massimo; Giorgi, Carlotta; Papaleo, Elena; Iuso, Arcangela; Prokisch, Holger; Pinton, Paolo; Tiranti, Valeria

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in C19orf12 have been identified in patients affected by Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation (NBIA), a clinical entity characterized by iron accumulation in the basal ganglia. By using western blot analysis with specific antibody and confocal studies, we showed that wild-type C19orf12 protein was not exclusively present in mitochondria, but also in the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) and MAM (Mitochondria Associated Membrane), while mutant C19orf12 variants presented a different localization. Moreover, after induction of oxidative stress, a GFP-tagged C19orf12 wild-type protein was able to relocate to the cytosol. On the contrary, mutant isoforms were not able to respond to oxidative stress. High mitochondrial calcium concentration and increased H2O2 induced apoptosis were found in fibroblasts derived from one patient as compared to controls. C19orf12 protein is a 17 kDa mitochondrial membrane-associated protein whose function is still unknown. Our in silico investigation suggests that, the glycine zipper motifs of C19orf12 form helical regions spanning the membrane. The N- and C-terminal regions with respect to the transmembrane portion, on the contrary, are predicted to rearrange in a structural domain, which is homologs to the N-terminal regulatory domain of the magnesium transporter MgtE, suggesting that C19orf12 may act as a regulatory protein for human MgtE transporters. The mutations here described affect respectively one glycine residue of the glycine zipper motifs, which are involved in dimerization of transmembrane helices and predicted to impair the correct localization of the protein into the membranes, and one residue present in the regulatory domain, which is important for protein-protein interaction. PMID:26136767

  15. Oxidative stress and antioxidant response in a thermotolerant yeast.

    PubMed

    Mejía-Barajas, Jorge A; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Salgado-Garciglia, Rafael; Aguilera-Aguirre, Leopoldo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Arellano-Plaza, Melchor; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo

    Stress tolerance is a key attribute that must be considered when using yeast cells for industrial applications. High temperature is one factor that can cause stress in yeast. High environmental temperature in particular may exert a natural selection pressure to evolve yeasts into thermotolerant strains. In the present study, three yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, MC4, and Kluyveromyces marxianus, OFF1 and SLP1) isolated from hot environments were exposed to increased temperatures and were then compared with a laboratory yeast strain. Their resistance to high temperature, oxidative stress, and antioxidant response were evaluated, along with the fatty acid composition of their cell membranes. The SLP1 strain showed a higher specific growth rate, biomass yield, and biomass volumetric productivity while also showing lower duplication time, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lipid peroxidation. In addition, the SLP1 strain demonstrated more catalase activity after temperature was increased, and this strain also showed membranes enriched in saturated fatty acids. It is concluded that the SLP1 yeast strain is a thermotolerant yeast with less oxidative stress and a greater antioxidant response. Therefore, this strain could be used for fermentation at high temperatures.

  16. Oxidative stress: Biomarkers and novel therapeutic pathways.

    PubMed

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-03-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation.

  17. OXIDATIVE STRESS: BIOMARKERS AND NOVEL THERAPEUTIC PATHWAYS

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling; Shang, Yan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress significantly impacts multiple cellular pathways that can lead to the initiation and progression of varied disorders throughout the body. It therefore becomes imperative to elucidate the components and function of novel therapeutic strategies against oxidative stress to further clinical diagnosis and care. In particular, both the growth factor and cytokine erythropoietin (EPO) and members of the mammalian forkhead transcription factors of the O class (FoxOs) may offer the greatest promise for new treatment regimens since these agents and the cellular pathways they oversee cover a range of critical functions that directly influence progenitor cell development, cell survival and degeneration, metabolism, immune function, and cancer cell invasion. Furthermore, both EPO and FoxOs function not only as therapeutic targets, but also as biomarkers of disease onset and progression, since their cellular pathways are closely linked and overlap with several unique signal transduction pathways. However, biological outcome with EPO and FoxOs may sometimes be both unexpected and undesirable that can raise caution for these agents and warrant further investigations. Here we present the exciting as well as complicated role EPO and FoxOs possess to uncover the benefits as well as the risks of these agents for cell biology and clinical care in processes that range from stem cell development to uncontrolled cellular proliferation. PMID:20064603

  18. Neuroprotective effects of sildenafil against oxidative stress and memory dysfunction in mice exposed to noise stress.

    PubMed

    Sikandaner, Hu Erxidan; Park, So Young; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Shi Nae; Yang, Dong Won

    2017-02-15

    Noise exposure has been well characterized as an environmental stressor, and is known to have auditory and non-auditory effects. Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors affect memory and hippocampus plasticity through various signaling cascades which are regulated by cGMP. In this study, we investigated the effects of sildenafil on memory deficiency, neuroprotection and oxidative stress in mice caused by chronic noise exposure. Mice were exposed to noise for 4h every day up to 14days at 110dB SPL of noise level. Sildenafil (15mg/kg) was orally administered 30min before noise exposure for 14days. Behavioral assessments were performed using novel object recognition (NOR) test and radial arm maze (RAM) test. Higher levels of memory dysfunction and oxidative stress were observed in noise alone-induced mice compared to control group. Interestingly, sildenafil administration increased memory performance, decreased oxidative stress, and increased neuroprotection in the hippocampus region of noise alone-induced mice likely through affecting memory related pathways such as cGMP/PKG/CREB and p25/CDK5, and induction of free radical scavengers such as SOD1, SOD2, SOD3, Prdx5, and catalase in the brain of stressed mice.

  19. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  20. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  1. Oxidative stress induction by nanoparticles in THP-1 cells with 4-HNE production: stress biomarker or oxidative stress signalling molecule?

    PubMed

    Foucaud, L; Goulaouic, S; Bennasroune, A; Laval-Gilly, P; Brown, D; Stone, V; Falla, J

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether carbon black (CB) nanoparticles might induce toxicity to monocytic cells in vitro via an oxidative stress mechanism involving formation of the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the subsequent role of 4-HNE in inducing further cytotoxic effects. ROS production in cells by CB nanoparticles was shown by the oxidation of DCFH after a short time exposure. These particles induced the formation of 4-HNE-protein adducts and significant modification of glutathione content corresponding to an increase of oxidized glutathione form (GSSG) and a decrease of total glutathione (GSX) content. These results attest to an oxidative stress induced by the carbon black nanoparticles, although no induction of HO-1 protein expression was detected. Concerning the effects of a direct exposure to 4-HNE, our results showed that 4-HNE is not cytotoxic for concentrations lower than 12.5 microM. By contrast, it provokes a very high cytotoxicity for concentrations above 25 microM. An induction of HO-1 expression was observed from concentrations above 5 microM of 4-HNE. Finally, glutathione content decreased significantly from 5 microM of 4-HNE but no modification was observed under this concentration. The discrepancy between effects of carbon black nanoparticles and 4-HNE on the intracellular markers of oxidative stress suggests that 4-HNE is not directly implied in the signalling of oxidative toxicity of nanoparticles but is an effective biomarker of oxidative effects of nanoparticles.

  2. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  3. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-01-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs’ apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and ‘necroapoptophagy’. The concept of ‘necroapoptophagy’ is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a

  4. DNA replication stress and cancer: cause or cure?

    PubMed

    Taylor, Elaine M; Lindsay, Howard D

    2016-01-01

    There is an extensive and growing body of evidence that DNA replication stress is a major driver in the development and progression of many cancers, and that these cancers rely heavily on replication stress response pathways for their continued proliferation. This raises the possibility that the pathways that ordinarily protect cells from the accumulation of cancer-causing mutations may actually prove to be effective therapeutic targets for a wide range of malignancies. In this review, we explore the mechanisms by which sustained proliferation can lead to replication stress and genome instability, and discuss how the pattern of mutations observed in human cancers is supportive of this oncogene-induced replication stress model. Finally, we go on to consider the implications of replication stress both as a prognostic indicator and, more encouragingly, as a potential target in cancer treatment.

  5. Biomarkers of exposure to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress.

    PubMed

    Bruce, W Robert; Lee, Owen; Liu, Zhen; Marcon, Norman; Minkin, Salomon; O'Brien, Peter J

    2011-08-01

    We observed an unexpectedly strong association of three different endogenous aldehydes and noted that the association could be explained by multiple reactions in which oxidative stress increased the formation of endogenous aldehydes and endogenous aldehydes increased oxidative stress. These interactions make it reasonable to assess multiple exposures to endogenous oxidative and aldehyde stress with less specific measures such as advanced glycation end-products or protein carbonyls.

  6. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ammonia neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Skowrońska, Marta; Albrecht, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Increased ammonia accumulation in the brain due to liver dysfunction is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). Fatal outcome of rapidly progressing (acute) HE is mainly related to cytotoxic brain edema associated with astrocytic swelling. An increase of brain ammonia in experimental animals or treatment of cultured astrocytes with ammonia generates reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the target tissues, leading to oxidative/nitrosative stress (ONS). In cultured astrocytes, ammonia-induced ONS is invariably associated with the increase of the astrocytic cell volume. Interrelated mechanisms underlying this response include increased nitric oxide (NO) synthesis which is partly coupled to the activation of NMDA receptors and increased generation of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase. ONS and astrocytic swelling are further augmented by excessive synthesis of glutamine (Gln) which impairs mitochondrial function following its accumulation in there and degradation back to ammonia ("the Trojan horse" hypothesis). Ammonia also induces ONS in other cell types of the CNS: neurons, microglia and the brain capillary endothelial cells (BCEC). ONS in microglia contributes to the central inflammatory response, while its metabolic and pathophysiological consequences in the BCEC evolve to the vasogenic brain edema associated with HE. Ammonia-induced ONS results in the oxidation of mRNA and nitration/nitrosylation of proteins which impact intracellular metabolism and potentiate the neurotoxic effects. Simultaneously, ammonia facilitates the antioxidant response of the brain, by activating astrocytic transport and export of glutathione, in this way increasing the availability of precursors of neuronal glutathione synthesis.

  7. Alterations in magnesium and oxidative status during chronic emotional stress.

    PubMed

    Cernak, I; Savic, V; Kotur, J; Prokic, V; Kuljic, B; Grbovic, D; Veljovic, M

    2000-03-01

    Magnesium and oxidative status were investigated in young volunteers exposed to chronic stress (political intolerance, awareness of potential military attacks, permanent stand-by duty and reduced holidays more than 10 years) or subchronic stress consisting of everyday mortal danger in military actions lasting more than 3 months. Significant decreases in plasma ionized Mg2+, total Mg and ionized Ca2+ concentrations were found in both groups. Similarly, both study groups exhibited oxidative stress as assessed by increased plasma superoxide anions and malondialdehyde and modified antioxidant defense. There were no significant differences between the two stress groups. A negative correlation between magnesium balance and oxidative stress was observed suggesting that the same etiological factor (chronic stress) initiate decreases in both free and total magnesium concentrations and simultaneously increase oxidative stress intensity. These findings support the need for magnesium supplementation with antioxidant vitamins for people living in conditions of chronic stress.

  8. Evidence against the nuclear in situ binding of arsenicals-oxidative stress theory of arsenic carcinogenesis

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large amount of evidence suggests that arsenicals act via oxidative stress in causing cancer in humans and experimental animals. It is possible that arsenicals could bind in situ close to nuclear DNA followed by Haber-Weiss type oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, we tested this...

  9. Oxidative stress and antibacterial properties of a graphene oxide-cystamine nanohybrid

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Sitansu Sekhar; An, Seong Soo A; Yi, Dong Kee

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress can damage proteins, DNA, and lipids, and is involved in the progression of many diseases. Damage to infected cells caused by oxidative stress is related to increased levels of reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide. During oxidative stress, hydrogen peroxide levels are often increased and catalase level decreased inside cells. This can lead to the death of skin and other cells. Hydrophobic low molecular weight compounds are useful in treating hemorrhagic conditions of the skin. To this end, cystamine has been successfully conjugated with graphene oxide (GO) as a drug carrier. The current study used the microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of cystamine-conjugated GO against four types of pathogenic bacteria. Minimum inhibitory concentrations values were 1 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, 6 μg/mL against Enterococcus faecalis, and 4 μg/mL against Bacillus subtilis. Toxicity of the conjugate against squamous cell carcinoma 7 cells was minimal at low concentrations, but increased in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrated that our protocol produced a cystamine-conjugated GO with low cytotoxicity, but strong reactive oxygen species effects and high antibacterial activity. This nanohybrid may be useful in the treatment of dermatological disorders. Moreover, this class of nanohybrid may have other biomedical applications due to their low cytotoxicity and high antibacterial activity. PMID:25609960

  10. Targeting oxidative stress response by green tea polyphenols: clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, Eugenia Ch

    2013-09-01

    Green tea polyphenols, the most interesting constituent of green tea leaves, have been shown to have both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties. Both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties are expected to contribute to modulation of oxidative stress response under ideal optimal dosage regimens. Exposure to a low concentration of a pro-oxidant prior to exposure to oxidative stress induces the expression of genes that code for proteins that induce adaptation in a subsequent oxidative stress. On the other hand, exposure to an antioxidant concurrently with exposure to the oxidative stress affords protection through free radical scavenging or through other indirect antioxidant mechanisms. In any case, the optimal conditions that afford protection from oxidative stress should be defined for any substance with redox properties. Green tea polyphenols, being naturally occurring substances, seem to be an ideal option for the modulation of oxidative stress response. This paper reviews available data on the pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties of green tea polyphenols focusing on their potential on the modulation of oxidative stress response.

  11. Effects of oxidative stress on erythrocyte deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Wasser, Gerd

    1996-05-01

    Hemolysis as a consequence of open heart surgery is well investigated and explained by the oxidative and/or mechanical stress produced, e.g. by the heart lung machine. In Europe O3 is widely used by physicians, dedicated to alternative medicine. They apply O3 mostly by means of the Major Autohematotherapy (MAH, a process of removing 50 - 100 ml of blood, adding O3 gas to it and returning it to the patient's body). No controlled studies on the efficacy of O3 are available so far, but several anecdotal cases appear to confirm that MAH improves microcirculation, possibly due to increased RBC flexibility. Most methods established to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include high error of measurement. For our present investigation we used the method of laser diffraction in combination with image analysis. The variation coefficient of the measurement is less than 1%. Previous investigations of our group have shown, that mechanical stress decreases deformability, already at rather low levels of mechanical stress which do not include hemolysis. On the other hand exposure to O2, H2O2 or O3 does not alter the deformability of RBC and--except O3--does not induce considerably hemolysis. However this only holds true if deformability (shear rates 36/s - 2620/s) is determined in isotonic solutions. In hypertonic solutions O3 decreases RBC deformability, but improves it in hypotonic solutions. The results indicate that peroxidative stress dehydrates RBC and reduces their size. To explain the positive effect of O3 on the mechanical fragility of RBC we tentatively assume, that the reduction of RBC size facilitates the feed through small pore filters. In consequence, the size reduction in combination with undisturbed deformability at iso-osmolarity may have a beneficial effect on microcirculation.

  12. Effect of paraquat-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Matthias; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of biological systems is influenced by various factors, conditions and processes. Among others, processes allowing organisms to deal with various types of stress are of key importance. In particular, oxidative stress as the result of the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the accumulation of ROS-induced molecular damage has been strongly linked to aging. Here we view the impact of ROS from a different angle: their role in the control of gene expression. We report a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the fungal aging model Podospora anserina grown on medium containing paraquat (PQ). This treatment leads to an increased cellular generation and release of H2O2, a reduced growth rate, and a decrease in lifespan. The combined challenge by PQ and copper has a synergistic negative effect on growth and lifespan. The data from the transcriptome analysis of the wild type cultivated under PQ-stress and their comparison to those of a longitudinal aging study as well as of a copper-uptake longevity mutant of P. anserina revealed that PQ-stress leads to the up-regulation of transcripts coding for components involved in mitochondrial remodeling. PQ also affects the expression of copper-regulated genes suggesting an increase of cytoplasmic copper levels as it has been demonstrated earlier to occur during aging of P. anserina and during senescence of human fibroblasts. This effect may result from the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore via PQ-induced ROS, leading to programmed cell death as part of an evolutionary conserved mechanism involved in biological aging and lifespan control. PMID:28357247

  13. Evaluation of Oxidative Stress in Bipolar Disorder in terms of Total Oxidant Status, Total Antioxidant Status, and Oxidative Stress Index

    PubMed Central

    CİNGİ YİRÜN, Merve; ÜNAL, Kübranur; ALTUNSOY ŞEN, Neslihan; YİRÜN, Onur; AYDEMİR, Çiğdem; GÖKA, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder is one of the most debilitating psychiatric disorders characterized by disruptive episodes of mania/hypomania and depression. Considering the complex role of biological and environmental factors in the etiology of affective disorders, recent studies have focused on oxidative stress, which may damage nerve cell components and take part in pathophysiology. The aim of the present study was to contribute to the data about oxidative stress in bipolar disorder by detecting the total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) levels of manic episode (ME) and euthymic (EU) patients and by comparing these results with those of healthy controls (HCs). Methods The study population consisted of 28 EU outpatients meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) criteria for bipolar disorder I and 23 inpatients who were currently hospitalized in a psychiatry ward with the diagnosis of the bipolar disorder ME according to the DSM-5 criteria. Forty-three healthy subjects were included in the study as the control group (HC). Serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels of all the participants were determined. Results Statistical analysis of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels did not show any significant differences between the ME patients, EU patients, and HCs. Comparison between the bipolar disorder patients (ME+EU) and HC also did not reveal any statistically significant difference between these two groups in terms of serum TAS, TOS, and OSI levels. Conclusion To date, studies on oxidative stress in bipolar disorder have led to controversial results. In the present study, no statistically significant difference was detected between the oxidative parameters of bipolar disorder patients and HCs. In order to comprehensively evaluate oxidative stress in bipolar disorder, further studies are needed. PMID:28373794

  14. Oxidative Stress and ADHD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Nidhin; Zhang-James, Yanli; Perl, Andras; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To clarify the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant activity in ADHD. Method We examined the association of ADHD and oxidative stress by applying random effects meta-analysis to studies of oxidative stress and antioxidant status in medication naive patients with ADHD and controls. Results Six studies of a total of 231 ADHD patients and 207 controls met our selection criteria. The association between ADHD and antioxidant status was not significant. We found a significant association between ADHD and oxidative stress that could not be accounted for by publication bias. The significant association lost significance after correcting for intrastudy clustering. No one observation accounted for the positive result. Conclusion These results are preliminary given the small number of studies. They suggest that patients with ADHD have normal levels of antioxidant production, but that their response to oxidative stress is insufficient, leading to oxidative damage. PMID:24232168

  15. Indium and indium tin oxide induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Christen, Verena; Furrer, Gerhard; Fent, Karl

    2014-10-07

    Indium and indium tin oxide (ITO) are extensively used in electronic technologies. They may be introduced into the environment during production, use, and leaching from electronic devices at the end of their life. At present, surprisingly little is known about potential ecotoxicological implications of indium contamination. Here, molecular effects of indium nitrate (In(NO3)3) and ITO nanoparticles were investigated in vitro in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) cells and in zebrafish embryos and novel insights into their molecular effects are provided. In(NO3)3 led to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of transcripts of pro-apoptotic genes and TNF-α in vitro at a concentration of 247 μg/L. In(NO3)3 induced the ER stress key gene BiP at mRNA and protein level, as well as atf6, which ultimately led to induction of the important pro-apoptotic marker gene chop. The activity of In(NO3)3 on ER stress induction was much stronger than that of ITO, which is explained by differences in soluble free indium ion concentrations. The effect was also stronger in ZFL cells than in zebrafish embryos. Our study provides first evidence of ER stress and oxidative stress induction by In(NO3)3 and ITO indicating a critical toxicological profile that needs further investigation.

  16. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  17. The Oxygen Paradox, oxidative stress, and ageing.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-04-01

    Professor Helmut Sies is being lauded in this special issue of Archives of Biochemistry & Biophysics, on the occasion of his retirement as Editor-in-Chief. There is no doubt that Helmut has exerted an enormously positive influence on this journal, the fields of Biochemistry & Biophysics in general, and the areas of free radical and redox biology & medicine in particular. Helmut Sies' many discoveries about peroxide metabolism, glutathione, glutathione peroxidases, singlet oxygen, carotenoids in general and lycopene in particular, and flavonoids, fill the pages of his more than 600 publications. In addition, he will forever be remembered for coining the term 'oxidative stress' that is so widely used (and sometimes abused) by most of his colleagues.

  18. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  19. Cerulein Pancreatitis: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Cerulein pancreatitis is similar to human edematous pancreatitis, manifesting with dysregulation of digestive enzyme production and cytoplasmic vacuolization, the death of acinar cells, edema formation, and infiltration of inflammatory cells into the pancreas. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nuclear factor-κB activation, cytokine expression, apoptosis and pathogenesis of pancreatitis. There is recent evidence that cerulein activates NADPH oxidase, which is a major source of reactive oxygen species during inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells. In addition, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway has been suggested as being involved in inflammatory signaling in the pancreas. This review discusses the involvement of oxidative stress in inflammation and apoptosis in pancreatic acinar cells stimulated with cerulein as an in vitro model of pancreatitis. PMID:20485614

  20. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  1. Air pollution, oxidative stress, and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Paula Valencia; Yang, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia affecting millions of people worldwide and will continue to affect millions more with population aging on the rise. AD causality is multifactorial. Known causal factors include genetic predisposition, age, and sex. Environmental toxins such as air pollution (AP) have also been implicated in AD causation. Exposure to AP can lead to chronic oxidative stress (OS), which is involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Whereas AP plays a role in AD pathology, the epidemiological evidence for this association is limited. Given the significant prevalence of AP exposure combined with increased population aging, epidemiological evidence for this link is important to consider. In this paper, we examine the existing evidence supporting the relationship between AP, OS, and AD and provide recommendations for future research on the population level, which will provide evidence in support of public health interventions.

  2. Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Poljsak, B.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of oxidative stress could be achieved in three levels: by lowering exposure to environmental pollutants with oxidizing properties, by increasing levels of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants, or by lowering the generation of oxidative stress by stabilizing mitochondrial energy production and efficiency. Endogenous oxidative stress could be influenced in two ways: by prevention of ROS formation or by quenching of ROS with antioxidants. However, the results of epidemiological studies where people were treated with synthetic antioxidants are inconclusive and contradictory. Recent evidence suggests that antioxidant supplements (although highly recommended by the pharmaceutical industry and taken by many individuals) do not offer sufficient protection against oxidative stress, oxidative damage or increase the lifespan. The key to the future success of decreasing oxidative-stress-induced damage should thus be the suppression of oxidative damage without disrupting the wellintegrated antioxidant defense network. Approach to neutralize free radicals with antioxidants should be changed into prevention of free radical formation. Thus, this paper addresses oxidative stress and strategies to reduce it with the focus on nutritional and psychosocial interventions of oxidative stress prevention, that is, methods to stabilize mitochondria structure and energy efficiency, or approaches which would increase endogenous antioxidative protection and repair systems. PMID:22191011

  3. Oxidative stress decreases with elevation in the lizard Psammodromus algirus.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Senda; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Trenzado, Cristina E; Sanz, Ana; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress is considered one of the main ecological and evolutionary forces. Several environmental stressors vary geographically and thus organisms inhabiting different sites face different oxidant environments. Nevertheless, there is scarce information about how oxidative damage and antioxidant defences vary geographically in animals. Here we study how oxidative stress varies from lowlands (300-700 m asl) to highlands (2200-2500 m asl) in the lizard Psammodromus algirus. To accomplish this, antioxidant enzymatic activity (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione transferase, DT-diaphorase) and lipid peroxidation were assayed in tissue samples from the lizards' tail. Lipid peroxidation was higher in individuals from lowlands than from highlands, indicating higher oxidative stress in lowland lizards. These results suggest that environmental conditions are less oxidant at high elevations with respect to low ones. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative stress varies geographically, which should have important consequences for our understanding of geographic variation in physiology and life-history of organisms.

  4. Role of oxidative stress in cadmium toxicity and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie Qu Wei; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2009-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a toxic metal, targeting the lung, liver, kidney, and testes following acute intoxication, and causing nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, osteotoxicity and tumors after prolonged exposures. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are often implicated in Cd toxicology. This minireview focused on direct evidence for the generation of free radicals in intact animals following acute Cd overload and discussed the association of ROS in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis. Cd-generated superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals in vivo have been detected by the electron spin resonance spectra, which are often accompanied by activation of redox sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B, AP-1 and Nrf2) and alteration of ROS-related gene expression. It is generally agreed upon that oxidative stress plays important roles in acute Cd poisoning. However, following long-term Cd exposure at environmentally-relevant low levels, direct evidence for oxidative stress is often obscure. Alterations in ROS-related gene expression during chronic exposures are also less significant compared to acute Cd poisoning. This is probably due to induced adaptation mechanisms (e.g., metallothionein and glutathione) following chronic Cd exposures, which in turn diminish Cd-induced oxidative stress. In chronic Cd-transformed cells, less ROS signals are detected with fluorescence probes. Acquired apoptotic tolerance renders damaged cells to proliferate with inherent oxidative DNA lesions, potentially leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, ROS are generated following acute Cd overload and play important roles in tissue damage. Adaptation to chronic Cd exposure reduces ROS production, but acquired Cd tolerance with aberrant gene expression plays important roles in chronic Cd toxicity and carcinogenesis.

  5. Genetic solutions to infertility caused by heat stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reproductive function in mammals is very susceptible to disruption by heat stress. In lactating dairy cows, for example, pregnancy rates per insemination can be as low as 10-15% in the summer vs. 25-40% in cool weather. Reduced fertility in females is caused by a combination of 1) the negative cons...

  6. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and posttraumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sadeh, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and then identify mechanisms by which PTSD might promote OXS and accelerated aging. We review studies on OXS-related genes and the role that they may play in moderating the effects of PTSD on neural integrity and conclude with a discussion of directions for future research on antioxidant treatments and biomarkers of accelerated aging in PTSD. PMID:25245500

  7. Increased oxidative stress and impaired antioxidant response in Lafora disease.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Aguado, Carmen; García-Giménez, José Luis; Ibáñez-Cabellos, José Santiago; Seco-Cervera, Marta; Pallardó, Federico V; Knecht, Erwin; Sanz, Pascual

    2015-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD, OMIM 254780, ORPHA501) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the presence of glycogen-like intracellular inclusions called Lafora bodies and caused, in the vast majority of cases, by mutations in either EPM2A or EPM2B genes, encoding respectively laforin and malin. In the last years, several reports have revealed molecular details of these two proteins and have identified several processes affected in LD, but the pathophysiology of the disease still remains largely unknown. Since autophagy impairment has been reported as a characteristic treat in both Lafora disease cell and animal models, and as there is a link between autophagy and mitochondrial performance, we sought to determine if mitochondrial function could be altered in those models. Using fibroblasts from LD patients, deficient in laforin or malin, we found mitochondrial alterations, oxidative stress and a deficiency in antioxidant enzymes involved in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Similar results were obtained in brain tissue samples from transgenic mice deficient in either the EPM2A or EPM2B genes. Furthermore, in a proteomic analysis of brain tissue obtained from Epm2b-/- mice, we observed an increase in a modified form of peroxiredoxin-6, an antioxidant enzyme involved in other neurological pathologies, thus corroborating an alteration of the redox condition. These data support that oxidative stress produced by an increase in ROS production and an impairment of the antioxidant enzyme response to this stress play an important role in development of LD.

  8. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment. PMID:19943946

  9. Oxidative Stress in Obesity: A Critical Component in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Nicotera, Antonio; Parisi, Eleonora; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Arrigo, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, a social problem worldwide, is characterized by an increase in body weight that results in excessive fat accumulation. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to several diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, fatty liver diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence allows us to understand the critical role of adipose tissue in controlling the physic-pathological mechanisms of obesity and related comorbidities. Recently, adipose tissue, especially in the visceral compartment, has been considered not only as a simple energy depository tissue, but also as an active endocrine organ releasing a variety of biologically active molecules known as adipocytokines or adipokines. Based on the complex interplay between adipokines, obesity is also characterized by chronic low grade inflammation with permanently increased oxidative stress (OS). Over-expression of oxidative stress damages cellular structures together with under-production of anti-oxidant mechanisms, leading to the development of obesity-related complications. The aim of this review is to summarize what is known in the relationship between OS in obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:25548896

  10. Oxidative and Nitrative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Catherine A.; Cole, Marsha P.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobes require oxygen for metabolism and normal free radical formation. As a result, maintaining the redox homeostasis is essential for brain cell survival due to their high metabolic energy requirement to sustain electrochemical gradients, neurotransmitter release, and membrane lipid stability. Further, brain antioxidant levels are limited compared to other organs and less able to compensate for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generation which contribute oxidative/nitrative stress (OS/NS). Antioxidant treatments such as vitamin E, minocycline, and resveratrol mediate neuroprotection by prolonging the incidence of or reversing OS and NS conditions. Redox imbalance occurs when the antioxidant capacity is overwhelmed, consequently leading to activation of alternate pathways that remain quiescent under normal conditions. If OS/NS fails to lead to adaptation, tissue damage and injury ensue, resulting in cell death and/or disease. The progression of OS/NS-mediated neurodegeneration along with contributions from microglial activation, dopamine metabolism, and diabetes comprise a detailed interconnected pathway. This review proposes a significant role for OS/NS and more specifically, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and other lipid modifications, by triggering microglial activation to elicit a neuroinflammatory state potentiated by diabetes or abnormal dopamine metabolism. Subsequently, sustained stress in the neuroinflammatory state overwhelms cellular defenses and prompts neurotoxicity resulting in the onset or amplification of brain damage. PMID:26024962

  11. Anti-Oxidative Effects of Rooibos Tea (Aspalathus linearis) on Immobilization-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS may not be sufficient to suppress ROS-associated oxidative damage. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to protect neurons against a variety of experimental neurodegenerative conditions. In particular, Rooibos tea might be a good source of antioxidants due to its larger proportion of polyphenolic compounds. An optimal animal model for stress should show the features of a stress response and should be able to mimic natural stress progression. However, most animal models of stress, such as cold-restraint, electric foot shock, and burn shock, usually involve physical abuse in addition to the psychological aspects of stress. Animals subjected to chronic restraint or immobilization are widely believed to be a convenient and reliable model to mimic psychological stress. Therefore, in the present study, we propose that immobilization-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by treatment with Rooibos tea. This conclusion is demonstrated by Rooibos tea’s ability to (i) reverse the increase in stress-related metabolites (5-HIAA and FFA), (ii) prevent lipid peroxidation (LPO), (iii) restore stress-induced protein degradation (PD), (iv) regulate glutathione metabolism (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio), and (v) modulate changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT). PMID:24466326

  12. Anti-oxidative effects of Rooibos tea (Aspalathus linearis) on immobilization-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Hong, In-Sun; Lee, Hwa-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Pyo

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to chronic psychological stress may be related to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) or free radicals, and thus, long-term exposure to high levels of oxidative stress may cause the accumulation of oxidative damage and eventually lead to many neurodegenerative diseases. Compared with other organs, the brain appears especially susceptible to excessive oxidative stress due to its high demand for oxygen. In the case of excessive ROS production, endogenous defense mechanisms against ROS may not be sufficient to suppress ROS-associated oxidative damage. Dietary antioxidants have been shown to protect neurons against a variety of experimental neurodegenerative conditions. In particular, Rooibos tea might be a good source of antioxidants due to its larger proportion of polyphenolic compounds. An optimal animal model for stress should show the features of a stress response and should be able to mimic natural stress progression. However, most animal models of stress, such as cold-restraint, electric foot shock, and burn shock, usually involve physical abuse in addition to the psychological aspects of stress. Animals subjected to chronic restraint or immobilization are widely believed to be a convenient and reliable model to mimic psychological stress. Therefore, in the present study, we propose that immobilization-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by treatment with Rooibos tea. This conclusion is demonstrated by Rooibos tea's ability to (i) reverse the increase in stress-related metabolites (5-HIAA and FFA), (ii) prevent lipid peroxidation (LPO), (iii) restore stress-induced protein degradation (PD), (iv) regulate glutathione metabolism (GSH and GSH/GSSG ratio), and (v) modulate changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT).

  13. Correlation of Zinc with Oxidative Stress Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Llopis-González, Agustín; González-Albert, Verónica; López-Izquierdo, Raúl; González-Manzano, Isabel; Cháves, Javier; Huerta-Biosca, Vicente; Martin-Escudero, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and smoking are related with oxidative stress (OS), which in turn reports on cellular aging. Zinc is an essential element involved in an individual’s physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of zinc levels in serum and urine with OS and cellular aging and its effect on the development of hypertension. In a Spanish sample with 1500 individuals, subjects aged 20–59 years were selected, whose zinc intake levels fell within the recommended limits. These individuals were classified according to their smoking habits and hypertensive condition. A positive correlation was found (Pearson’s C = 0.639; p = 0.01) between Zn serum/urine quotient and oxidized glutathione levels (GSSG). Finally, risk of hypertension significantly increased when the GSSG levels exceeded the 75 percentile; OR = 2.80 (95%CI = 1.09–7.18) and AOR = 3.06 (95%CI = 0.96–9.71). Low zinc levels in serum were related with OS and cellular aging and were, in turn, to be a risk factor for hypertension.  PMID:25774936

  14. Oxidative stress in atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lankin, V Z; Lisina, M O; Arzamastseva, N E; Konovalova, G G; Nedosugova, L V; Kaminnyi, A I; Tikhaze, A K; Ageev, F T; Kukharchuk, V V; Belenkov, Yu N

    2005-07-01

    We measured the content of lipid peroxides in plasma LDL from patients with chronic CHD not accompanied by hypercholesterolemia; CHD and hypercholesterolemia; type 2 diabetes mellitus and decompensation of carbohydrate metabolism; and CHD, circulatory insufficiency, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (without hypercholesterolemia). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL isolated from blood plasma by differential ultracentrifugation in a density gradient was estimated by a highly specific method with modifications (reagent Fe(2+) xylene orange and triphenylphosphine as a reducing agent for organic peroxides). The content of lipid peroxides in LDL from patients was much higher than in controls (patients without coronary heart disease and diabetes). Hypercholesterolemia and diabetes can be considered as factors promoting LDL oxidation in vivo. Our results suggest that stimulation of lipid peroxidation in low-density lipoproteins during hypercholesterolemia and diabetes is associated with strong autooxidation of cholesterol and glucose during oxidative and carbonyl (aldehyde) stress, respectively. These data illustrate a possible mechanism of the progression of atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

  15. Oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio) sperm.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Mary; McCarthy, Megan; Carter, Virginia L; Meyers, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    Laboratories around the world have produced tens of thousands of mutant and transgenic zebrafish lines. As with mice, maintaining all of these valuable zebrafish genotypes is expensive, risky, and beyond the capacity of even the largest stock centers. Because reducing oxidative stress has become an important aspect of reducing the variability in mouse sperm cryopreservation, we examined whether antioxidants might improve cryopreservation of zebrafish sperm. Four experiments were conducted in this study. First, we used the xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) system to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). The X-XO system was capable of producing a stress reaction in zebrafish sperm reducing its sperm motility in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). Second, we examined X-XO and the impact of antioxidants on sperm viability, ROS and motility. Catalase (CAT) mitigated stress and maintained viability and sperm motility (P>0.05), whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) and vitamin E did not (P<0.05). Third, we evaluated ROS in zebrafish spermatozoa during cryopreservation and its effect on viability and motility. Methanol (8%) reduced viability and sperm motility (P<0.05), but the addition of CAT mitigated these effects (P>0.05), producing a mean 2.0 to 2.9-fold increase in post-thaw motility. Fourth, we examined the effect of additional cryoprotectants and CAT on fresh sperm motility. Cryoprotectants, 8% methanol and 10% dimethylacetamide (DMA), reduced the motility over the control value (P<0.5), whereas 10% dimethylformamide (DMF) with or without CAT did not (P>0.05). Zebrafish sperm protocols should be modified to improve the reliability of the cryopreservation process, perhaps using a different cryoprotectant. Regardless, the simple addition of CAT to present-day procedures will significantly improve this process, assuring increased and less variable fertilization success and allowing resource managers to dependably plan how many straws are needed to safely

  16. The role of oxidative stress and antioxidants in male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Walczak–Jedrzejowska, Renata; Wolski, Jan Karol

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress results from the imbalance between production of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the protective effect of the antioxidant system responsible for their neutralization and removal. An excess of ROS causes a pathological reaction resulting in damage to cells and tissues. Spermatozoa are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of ROS. Oxidative stress affects their activity, damages DNA structure, and accelerates apoptosis, all of which consequently decrease their numbers, hinders motility and development of normal morphology, and impairs function. This leads to disturbances in fertility or embryo development disorder. The main cellular source of ROS in the semen are immature sperm cells and white blood cells. The increase in the number of leukocytes may be due to infection and inflammation, but can also be secondary to harmful environmental factors, long sexual abstinence, or varicocele. The protective antioxidant system in the semen is composed of enzymes, as well as nonenzymatic substances, which closely interact with each other to ensure optimal protection against ROS. Non–enzymatic antioxidants include vitamins A, E, C, and B complex, glutathione, pantothenic acid, coenzyme Q10 and carnitine, and micronutrients such as zinc, selenium, and copper. It seems that a deficiency of any of them can cause a decrease in total antioxidant status. In vitro and in vivo that studies demonstrate many antioxidants possess a beneficial effect on fertility and, therefore, their use is recommended as supportive therapy for the treatment of infertility in men. PMID:24578993

  17. Classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity

    PubMed Central

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I.

    2014-01-01

    In living organisms production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is counterbalanced by their elimination and/or prevention of formation which in concert can typically maintain a steady-state (stationary) ROS level. However, this balance may be disturbed and lead to elevated ROS levels called oxidative stress. To our best knowledge, there is no broadly acceptable system of classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity due to which proposed here system may be helpful for interpretation of experimental data. Oxidative stress field is the hot topic in biology and, to date, many details related to ROS-induced damage to cellular components, ROS-based signaling, cellular responses and adaptation have been disclosed. However, it is common situation when researchers experience substantial difficulties in the correct interpretation of oxidative stress development especially when there is a need to characterize its intensity. Careful selection of specific biomarkers (ROS-modified targets) and some system may be helpful here. A classification of oxidative stress based on its intensity is proposed here. According to this classification there are four zones of function in the relationship between “Dose/concentration of inducer” and the measured “Endpoint”: I – basal oxidative stress (BOS); II – low intensity oxidative stress (LOS); III – intermediate intensity oxidative stress (IOS); IV – high intensity oxidative stress (HOS). The proposed classification will be helpful to describe experimental data where oxidative stress is induced and systematize it based on its intensity, but further studies will be in need to clear discriminate between stress of different intensity. PMID:26417312

  18. Blood and Oxidative Stress (BOS): Soyuz mission "Eneide"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, Angela Maria; Adorni, Laura; Montorfano, Gigliola; Negroni, Manuela; Zava, Stefania; Berra, Bruno

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this experiment was to assay astronaut antioxidant status, to analyse red blood cell membrane composition of astronauts prior and after flight and to study the correlation with oxidative stress that erythrocytes have undergone due to space radiations. Results obtained from this single case study, indicate that during a short time flight, erythrocytes decrease their antioxidant defences, to counteract oxidative stress.

  19. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  20. Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress Modulation with Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Debevec, Tadej; Millet, Grégoire P.; Pialoux, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, defined as an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, resulting in molecular damage and disruption of redox signaling, is associated with numerous pathophysiological processes and known to exacerbate chronic diseases. Prolonged systemic hypoxia, induced either by exposure to terrestrial altitude or a reduction in ambient O2 availability is known to elicit oxidative stress and thereby alter redox balance in healthy humans. The redox balance modulation is also highly dependent on the level of physical activity. For example, both high-intensity exercise and inactivity, representing the two ends of the physical activity spectrum, are known to promote oxidative stress. Numerous to-date studies indicate that hypoxia and exercise can exert additive influence upon redox balance alterations. However, recent evidence suggests that moderate physical activity can attenuate altitude/hypoxia-induced oxidative stress during long-term hypoxic exposure. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on hypoxia-related oxidative stress modulation by different activity levels during prolonged hypoxic exposures and examine the potential mechanisms underlying the observed redox balance changes. The paper also explores the applicability of moderate activity as a strategy for attenuating hypoxia-related oxidative stress. Moreover, the potential of such moderate intensity activities used to counteract inactivity-related oxidative stress, often encountered in pathological, elderly and obese populations is also discussed. Finally, future research directions for investigating interactive effects of altitude/hypoxia and exercise on oxidative stress are proposed. PMID:28243207

  1. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  2. Antioxidant status and biomarkers of oxidative stress in canine lymphoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background – Oxidative stress might play a role in carcinogenesis, as well as impacting morbidity and mortality of veterinary cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antioxidant concentrations and biomarkers of oxidative stress in dogs with newly-diagnosed lymphoma prior to treatm...

  3. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  4. The evaluation of the oxidative stress for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Serbanescu, GL; Gruia, MI; Bara, M; Anghel, RM

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Nowadays, rectal cancer is an important healthcare challenge that affects many thousands of people each year worldwide, being diagnosed especially after the age of 50 years. Objective: This study attempted to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and results: 30 patients from the “Prof. Dr. Al. Trestioreanu” Institute of Oncology in Bucharest were treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy during 2014 and 2016 and were included in the clinical study. Blood samples were obtained in dynamics during the treatment. From the blood samples, the serum was separated and used to identify the biochemical oxidative stress parameters. Results: Regarding the determination of lipid peroxides, albumin thiols, the cuprum oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin, the values registered in the dynamic of the treatment highlighted their increase to a maximum at the treatment’s endpoint due to an important oxidative stress. Regarding the serum values for total antioxidants, the results pointed out the activation of the natural protection systems, which in time were overwhelmed, due to the installed oxidative stress. Conclusion: Part of the cytotoxic effect of radiotherapy was due to the production of oxidative stress. The cell was constantly exposed to the cytotoxic action of the reactive oxygen species. The obtained results indicated the dual relation to which the tumoral cell exposed itself and the installed oxidative stress, respectively, the oxidative stress being a cause or a consequence of the malign transformation. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, ECOG = performance status scale PMID:28255388

  5. The evaluation of the oxidative stress for patients receiving neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Serbanescu, G L; Gruia, M I; Bara, M; Anghel, R M

    2017-01-01

    Hypothesis: Nowadays, rectal cancer is an important healthcare challenge that affects many thousands of people each year worldwide, being diagnosed especially after the age of 50 years. Objective: This study attempted to evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with rectal cancer. Methods and results: 30 patients from the "Prof. Dr. Al. Trestioreanu" Institute of Oncology in Bucharest were treated with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy during 2014 and 2016 and were included in the clinical study. Blood samples were obtained in dynamics during the treatment. From the blood samples, the serum was separated and used to identify the biochemical oxidative stress parameters. Results: Regarding the determination of lipid peroxides, albumin thiols, the cuprum oxidase activity of ceruloplasmin, the values registered in the dynamic of the treatment highlighted their increase to a maximum at the treatment's endpoint due to an important oxidative stress. Regarding the serum values for total antioxidants, the results pointed out the activation of the natural protection systems, which in time were overwhelmed, due to the installed oxidative stress. Conclusion: Part of the cytotoxic effect of radiotherapy was due to the production of oxidative stress. The cell was constantly exposed to the cytotoxic action of the reactive oxygen species. The obtained results indicated the dual relation to which the tumoral cell exposed itself and the installed oxidative stress, respectively, the oxidative stress being a cause or a consequence of the malign transformation. Abbreviations: CT = computed tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging, ESMO = European Society for Medical Oncology, ECOG = performance status scale.

  6. Nanoparticles, Lung Injury, and the Role of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Amy K.; Plummer, Laurel E.; Carosino, Christopher; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of engineered nanoscale materials has provided significant advancements in electronic, biomedical, and material science applications. Both engineered nanoparticles and nanoparticles derived from combustion or incidental processes exhibit a range of physical and chemical properties, which have been shown to induce inflammation and oxidative stress in biologic systems. Oxidative stress reflects the imbalance between the generation of reaction oxygen species (ROS) and the biochemical mechanisms to detoxify and repair resulting damage of reactive intermediates. This review examines current research incidental and engineered nanoparticles in terms of their health effects on the lungs and mechanisms by which oxidative stress via physicochemical characteristics influence toxicity or biocompatibility. Although oxidative stress has generally been thought of as an adverse biological outcome, this review will also briefly discuss some of the potential emerging technologies to use nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress to treat disease in a site specific fashion. PMID:24215442

  7. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  8. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  9. Hyperhomocysteinemia causes ER stress and impaired autophagy that is reversed by Vitamin B supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Madhulika; Zhang, Cheng Wu; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Moe, Kyaw Thu; DeSilva, Deidre Anne; Yen, Paul Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a well-known risk factor for stroke; however, its underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using both mouse and cell culture models, we have provided evidence that impairment of autophagy has a central role in HHcy-induced cellular injury in the mouse brain. We observed accumulation of LC3B-II and p62 that was associated with increased MTOR signaling in human and mouse primary astrocyte cell cultures as well as a diet-induced mouse model of HHcy, HHcy decreased lysosomal membrane protein LAMP2, vacuolar ATPase (ATP6V0A2), and protease cathepsin D, suggesting that lysosomal dysfunction also contributed to the autophagic defect. Moreover, HHcy increased unfolded protein response. Interestingly, Vitamin B supplementation restored autophagic flux, alleviated ER stress, and reversed lysosomal dysfunction due to HHCy. Furthermore, the autophagy inducer, rapamycin was able to relieve ER stress and reverse lysosomal dysfunction caused by HHcy in vitro. Inhibition of autophagy by HHcy exacerbated cellular injury during oxygen and glucose deprivation and reperfusion (OGD/R), and oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by Vitamin B co-treatment, suggesting that it may be helpful in relieving detrimental effects of HHcy in ischemia/reperfusion or oxidative stress. Collectively, these findings show that Vitamin B therapy can reverse defects in cellular autophagy and ER stress due to HHcy; and thus may be a potential treatment to reduce ischemic damage caused by stroke in patients with HHcy. PMID:27929536

  10. Hyperhomocysteinemia causes ER stress and impaired autophagy that is reversed by Vitamin B supplementation.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Madhulika; Zhang, Cheng Wu; Singh, Brijesh Kumar; Sinha, Rohit Anthony; Moe, Kyaw Thu; DeSilva, Deidre Anne; Yen, Paul Michael

    2016-12-08

    Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is a well-known risk factor for stroke; however, its underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Using both mouse and cell culture models, we have provided evidence that impairment of autophagy has a central role in HHcy-induced cellular injury in the mouse brain. We observed accumulation of LC3B-II and p62 that was associated with increased MTOR signaling in human and mouse primary astrocyte cell cultures as well as a diet-induced mouse model of HHcy, HHcy decreased lysosomal membrane protein LAMP2, vacuolar ATPase (ATP6V0A2), and protease cathepsin D, sugges