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Sample records for oxide fiber targets

  1. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U. C.; Carminati, D.; Catherall, R.; Cederkäll, J.; Correia, J. G.; Crepieux, B.; Dietrich, M.; Elder, K.; Fedoseyev, V. N.; Fraile, L.; Franchoo, S.; Fynbo, H.; Georg, U.; Giles, T.; Joinet, A.; Jonsson, O. C.; Kirchner, R.; Lau, Ch.; Lettry, J.; Maier, H. J.; Mishin, V. I.; Oinonen, M.; Peräjärvi, K.; Ravn, H. L.; Rinaldi, T.; Santana-Leitner, M.; Wahl, U.; Weissman, L.; Isolde Collaboration

    2003-05-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce very intense 6He beams (order of 10 13 ions per second) via the 9Be(n,α) reaction using spallation neutrons.

  2. Quasar target selection fiber efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Newberg, H.; Yanny, B.

    1996-05-01

    We present estimates of the efficiency for finding QSOs as a function of limiting magnitude and galactic latitude. From these estimates, we have formulated a target selection strategy that should net 80,000 QSOs in the north galactic cap with an average of 70 fibers per plate, not including fibers reserved for high-redshift quasars. With this plan, we expect 54% of the targets to be QSOs. The North Galactic Cap is divided into two zones of high and low stellar density. We use about five times as many fibers for QSO candidates in the half of the survey with the lower stellar density as we use in the half with higher stellar density. The current plan assigns 15% of the fibers to FIRST radio sources; if these are not available, those fibers would be allocated to lower probability QSO sources, dropping the total number of QSOs by a small factor (5%). We will find about 17,000 additional quasars in the southern strips, and maybe a few more at very high redshift. Use was made of two data sets: the star and quasar simulated test data generated by Don Schneider, and the data from UJFN plate surveys by Koo (1986) and Kron (1980). This data was compared to results from the Palomar-Green Survey and a recent survey by Pat Osmer and collaborators.

  3. Fiber optic applications for laser polarized targets

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, W.J.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1997-10-01

    For the past two years, the laser polarized target group at Argonne has been used multi-mode fiber optic patch cords for a variety of applications. In this paper, the authors describe the design for transporting high power laser beams with optical fibers currently in use at IUCF.

  4. Polyacrylonitrile fibers containing graphene oxide nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Chien, An-Ting; Liu, H Clive; Newcomb, Bradley A; Xiang, Changsheng; Tour, James M; Kumar, Satish

    2015-03-11

    Graphene oxide nanoribbon (GONR) made by the oxidative unzipping of multiwalled carbon nanotube was dispersed in dimethylformamide and mixed with polyacrylonitrile (PAN) to fabricate continuous PAN/GONR composite fibers by gel spinning. Subsequently, PAN/GONR composite fibers were stabilized and carbonized in a batch process to fabricate composite carbon fibers. Structure, processing, and properties of the composite precursor and carbon fibers have been studied. This study shows that GONR can be used to make porous precursor and carbon fibers. In addition, GONR also shows the potential to make higher mechanical property carbon fibers than that achieved from PAN precursor only. PMID:25671488

  5. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  6. Radiation oxidation and subsequent thermal curing of polyacrylonitrile fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weihua; Wang, Mouhua; Xing, Zhe; Wu, Guozhong

    2014-01-01

    Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers were exposed to gamma-ray irradiation at room temperature under vacuum, air and oxygen to investigate the radiation oxidation effects on PAN fibers. Radiation-induced oxidation degradation and crosslinking was evaluated by measuring the gel fraction. It was found that radiation oxidation took place mainly on the fiber surface due to the limited penetration of oxygen into PAN fibers from the surface, and the oxidation thickness increased with the oxygen pressure. Chain scission was dominant in the oxidized area, and crosslinking occurred in the inner part of the fibers. However, the oxidized regions of the fibers can be converted to gel via crosslinking by thermal curing at 160 °C in a N2 atmosphere. Higher extents of radiation oxidation degradation led to a greater increase in the gel fraction. These results suggest that the radiation treatment of PAN fibers prior to thermal oxidation may be useful for manufacturing carbon fibers.

  7. Large flake graphene oxide fibers with unconventional 100% knot efficiency and highly aligned small flake graphene oxide fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Changsheng; Young, Colin C; Wang, Xuan; Yan, Zheng; Hwang, Chi-Chau; Cerioti, Gabriel; Lin, Jian; Kono, Junichiro; Pasquali, Matteo; Tour, James M

    2013-09-01

    Two types of graphene oxide fibers are spun from high concentration aqueous dopes. Fibers extruded from large flake graphene oxide dope without drawing show unconventional 100% knot efficiency. Fibers spun from small sized graphene oxide dope with stable and continuous drawing yield in good intrinsic alignment with a record high tensile modulus of 47 GPa.

  8. Strong, damage tolerant oxide-fiber/oxide matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yahua

    Electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is an easy and cost effective method to fabricate fiber-reinforced green composites. Non-conductive Nextel(TM) 720 fibers were successfully coated with a transient, conductive polypyrrole submicron surface layer for use directly as an electrode in EPD processing. However, electric-field shielding limits particle infiltration into the conductive fiber bundles and they mostly deposit on the outer surface of the fiber bundle. When the bundle is large, central cavities exist after deposition. The EPD cell was modified for electrophoretic infiltration deposition (EPID). Non conductive fibers were laid on an electrode and charged particles in an ethanol suspension are driven there through by an electric field, infiltrate and deposit on the electrode to then build up into the fiber preform and fill the voids therein. Dense, uniform, green fiber composites were successfully fabricated via constant current EPID. The EPID process is modeled as capillary electrophoretic infiltration. The process consists of two steps: particle electrophoresis outside the capillaries and electrophoretic infiltration inside the capillaries. Due to the zero net flow of the ethanol across the capillary cross-section, there is no electro-osmotic flow contribution to the deposition rate. Hamaker's law was extended to the EPID process, i.e., the deposition yield is proportional to the electric field inside the capillaries. The total deposition yield is controlled by the slow step of the process, i.e., the rate of electrophoresis in the open suspension outside the capillaries. AlPO4 was proposed as a weak layer between oxide fibers and oxide matrix in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC's). AlPO 4 nano particles were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation of Al 3+ and HPO42- with urea at 95°C. The solution pH basic region and amorphous AlPO4 precipitated of narrow size distribution with a mean particle size 50nm. Nextel 720 fibers were pretreated with

  9. Fiber optic moisture sensor with moisture-absorbing reflective target

    DOEpatents

    Kirkham, Randy R.

    1987-01-01

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  10. The high temperature creep behavior of oxides and oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Linda E.; Tressler, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A thorough review of the literature was conducted on the high-temperature creep behavior of single and polycrystalline oxides which potentially could serve as fiber reinforcements in ceramics or metal matrix applications. Sapphire when oriented with the basal plane perpendicular to the fiber axis (c-axis oriented) is highly creep resistant at temperatures in excess of 1600 C and applied loads of 100 MPa and higher. Pyramidal slip is preferentially activated in sapphire under these conditions and steady-state creep rates in the range of 10(exp -7) to 10 (exp -8)/s were reported. Data on the creep resistance of polycrystalline beryllia suggest that C-axiz oriented single crystal beryllia may be a viable candidate as a fiber reinforcement material; however, the issure of fabricability and moisture sensitivity must be addressed for this material. Yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) also appears to be a fiber candidate material having a high resistance to creep which is due to it's complex crystal structure and high Peierl resistance. The high creep resistance of garnet suggests that there may be other complex ternary oxides such as single crystal mullite which may also be candidate materials for fiber reinforcements. Finally, CVD and single crystal SiC, although not oxides, do possess a high resistance to creep in the temperature range between 1550 and 1850 C and under stresses of 110 to 220 MPa. From a review of the literature, it appears that for high creep resistant applications sapphire, silicon carbide, yttrium aluminum garnet, mullite, and beryllia are desirable candidate materials which require further investigation.

  11. Characterization and Oxidation Behavior of Rayon-Derived Carbon Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Hull, David

    2010-01-01

    Rayon-derived fibers are the central constituent of reinforced carbon/ carbon (RCC) composites. Optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the as-fabricated fibers and the fibers after oxidation. Oxidation rates were measured with weight loss techniques in air and oxygen. The as-received fibers are approximately 10 micron in diameter and characterized by grooves or crenulations around the edges. Below 800 C, in the reaction-controlled region, preferential attack began in the crenulations and appeared to occur down fissures in the fibers.

  12. Highly ytterbium-doped bismuth-oxide-based fiber.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Seiki; Kuroiwa, Yutaka

    2009-08-01

    Thermally stable highly ytterbium-doped bismuth-oxide-based glasses have been investigated. The absorbance increased linearly with Yb(2)O(3) concentration, reaching 7800 dB/m with 3 mol-% of Yb(2)O(3). An ytterbium-doped bismuth-oxide-based fiber has also been fabricated with a fiber loss of 0.24 dB/m. A fiber laser is also demonstrated, and it shows a slope efficiency of 36%.

  13. A comparison of fiber effects on polymer matrix composite oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of thermo-oxidative stability studies addressing the effects of fiber reinforcement on composite thermal stability and influence of geometry on the results of aging studies were performed at NASA-Lewis. The information presented herein, a compilation of some results from these studies, shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various PMR-15 composites. Reinforcement of graphite and ceramics were studied and three composite oxidation mechanisms were observed. One was a dominant attack of the reinforcement fiber, the second was the aggressive oxidation of the matrix material, and the third was interfacial degradation.

  14. The muscle fiber type–fiber size paradox: hypertrophy or oxidative metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    van Wessel, T.; de Haan, A.; van der Laarse, W. J.

    2010-01-01

    An inverse relationship exists between striated muscle fiber size and its oxidative capacity. This relationship implies that muscle fibers, which are triggered to simultaneously increase their mass/strength (hypertrophy) and fatigue resistance (oxidative capacity), increase these properties (strength or fatigue resistance) to a lesser extent compared to fibers increasing either of these alone. Muscle fiber size and oxidative capacity are determined by the balance between myofibrillar protein synthesis, mitochondrial biosynthesis and degradation. New experimental data and an inventory of critical stimuli and state of activation of the signaling pathways involved in regulating contractile and metabolic protein turnover reveal: (1) higher capacity for protein synthesis in high compared to low oxidative fibers; (2) competition between signaling pathways for synthesis of myofibrillar proteins and proteins associated with oxidative metabolism; i.e., increased mitochondrial biogenesis via AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates the rate of protein synthesis; (3) relatively higher expression levels of E3-ligases and proteasome-mediated protein degradation in high oxidative fibers. These observations could explain the fiber type–fiber size paradox that despite the high capacity for protein synthesis in high oxidative fibers, these fibers remain relatively small. However, it remains challenging to understand the mechanisms by which contractile activity, mechanical loading, cellular energy status and cellular oxygen tension affect regulation of fiber size. Therefore, one needs to know the relative contribution of the signaling pathways to protein turnover in high and low oxidative fibers. The outcome and ideas presented are relevant to optimizing treatment and training in the fields of sports, cardiology, oncology, pulmonology and rehabilitation medicine. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00421-010-1545-0) contains

  15. Crystal-free Formation of Non-Oxide Optical Fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nabors, Sammy A.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have devised a method for the creation of crystal-free nonoxide optical fiber preforms. Non-oxide fiber optics are extensively used in infrared transmitting applications such as communication systems, chemical sensors, and laser fiber guides for cutting, welding and medical surgery. However, some of these glasses are very susceptible to crystallization. Even small crystals can lead to light scatter and a high attenuation coefficient, limiting their usefulness. NASA has developed a new method of non-oxide fiber formation that uses axial magnetic fields to suppress crystallization. The resulting non-oxide fibers are crystal free and have lower signal attenuation rates than silica based optical fibers.

  16. Fiber-modified adenoviruses for targeted gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongju; Curiel, David T

    2008-01-01

    Human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) has been widely explored as a gene delivery vector. To achieve highly efficient and specific gene delivery, it is often necessary to re-direct Ad5 tropism. Because the capsid protein fiber plays an essential role in directing Ad5 infection, our laboratory attempted to re-target Ad5 through fiber modification. We have developed two strategies in this regard. One is a bi-specific adaptor protein strategy, in which the adaptor protein is designed to bind both the Ad5 fiber and an alternative cell-surface receptor. Another is genetic modification, in which alternative targeting motifs are genetically incorporated into the fiber knob domain so that the Ad5 vectors can infect cells through the alternative receptors. In this chapter, we will focus on the genetic fiber modification strategy and provide a detailed protocol for generation of fiber-modified Ad5 vectors. A series of techniques/procedures used in our laboratory will be described, which include the generation of fiber-modified Ad5 genome by homologous recombination in a bacterial system, rescuing the modified Ad5 viruses, virus amplification and purification, and virus titration.

  17. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in Water Vapor Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.

    2003-01-01

    T-300 carbon fibers (BP Amoco Chemicals, Greenville, SC) are a common reinforcement for silicon carbide composite materials, and carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites (C/SiC) are proposed for use in space propulsion applications. It has been shown that the time to failure for C/SiC in stressed oxidation tests is directly correlated with the fiber oxidation rate (ref. 1). To date, most of the testing of these fibers and composites has been conducted in oxygen or air environments; however, many components for space propulsion, such as turbopumps, combustors, and thrusters, are expected to operate in hydrogen and water vapor (H2/H2O) environments with very low oxygen contents. The oxidation rate of carbon fibers in conditions representative of space propulsion environments is, therefore, critical for predicting component lifetimes for real applications. This report describes experimental results that demonstrate that, under some conditions, lower oxidation rates of carbon fibers are observed in water vapor and H2/H2O environments than are found in oxygen or air. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, the weight loss of the fibers was studied as a function of water pressure, temperature, and gas velocity. The rate of carbon fiber oxidation was determined, and the reaction mechanism was identified.

  18. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku-Herrera, J. J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J. V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

    2015-03-01

    Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as "sizing"), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  19. Oxidation-induced contraction and strengthening of boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Wagner, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to measure and understand the physical and mechanical effects that occur in boron fibers during and after thermal treatment in a controlled oxygen argon gaseous mixture. Of principal concern was the optimization of this treatment as a secondary processing method for significantly improving fiber tensile strength. Strengthening was accomplished by an oxidation induced axial contraction of the fiber and a resulting axial compression of strength limiting flaws within the fiber's tungsten boride core. Various physical observations were used to develop mechanistic models for oxidation, contraction, and flow formation. Processing guidelines are discussed for possibly exceeding the 5.5 GN/sq m strength limit and also for achieving fiber strengthening during application of boron containing diffusion barrier coatings.

  20. Target allocation yields for massively multiplexed spectroscopic surveys with fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, Will; Smedley, Scott; Gillingham, Peter; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Jouvel, Stephanie; Nord, Brian

    2014-08-05

    We present Simulated Annealing fiber-to-target allocation simulations for the proposed DESI and 4MOST massively multiplexed spectroscopic surveys, and for both Poisson and realistically clustered mock target samples. We simulate both Echidna and theta-phi actuator designs, including the restrictions caused by the physical actuator characteristics during repositioning. For DESI, with theta-phi actuators, used in 5 passes over the sky for a mock ELG/LRG/QSO sample, with matched fiber and target densities, a total target allocation yield of 89.3% was achieved, but only 83.7% for the high-priority Ly-alpha QSOs. If Echidna actuators are used with the same pitch and number of passes, the yield increases by 5.7% and 16% respectively. Echidna also allows a factor-of-two increase in the number of close Ly-alpha QSO pairs that can be observed. Echidna spine tilt causes a variable loss of throughput, with average loss being the same as the loss at the rms tilt. With a natural tilt minimization scheme, we find an rms tilt always close to 0.58 x maximum. There is an additional but much smaller defocus loss, equivalent to an average defocus of 30microns. These tilt losses offset the gains in yield for Echidna, but because the survey strategy is driven by the higher priority targets, a clear survey speed advantage remains. For 4MOST, high and low latitude sample mock catalogs were supplied by the 4MOST team, and allocations were carried out with the proposed Echidna-based positioner geometry. At high latitudes, the resulting target completeness was 85.3% for LR targets and 78.9% for HR targets. At low latitude, the target completeness was 93.9% for LR targets and 71.2% for HR targets.

  1. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1988-09-13

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  2. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1988-01-01

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  3. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for continuous fiber ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Besmann, T.M.; Bleier, A.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1995-08-01

    Continuous fiber ceramic composites mechanical behavior are influenced by the bonding characteristics between the fiber and the matrix. Finite modeling studies suggest that a low-modulus interfacial coating material will be effective in reducing the residual thermal stresses that are generated upon cooling from processing temperatures. Nicalon{trademark}/SiC composites with carbon, alumina and mullite interfacial coatings were fabricated with the SiC matrix deposited using a forced-flow, thermal gradient chemical vapor infiltration process. Composites with mullite interfacial coatings exhibited considerable fiber pull-out even after oxidation and have potential as a composite system.

  4. Recent developments in zinc oxide target chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Heaton, R.C.; Taylor, W.A.; Phillips, D.R.; Jamriska, D.J. Sr.; Garcia, J.B.

    1994-04-01

    Zinc oxide targets irradiated with high energy protons at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) contain a number of radioactive spallation products in quantities large enough to warrant recovery. This paper describes methods for recovering {sup 7}Be, {sup 46}Sc, and {sup 48}V from such targets and offers suggestions on possible ways to recover additional isotopes. The proposed methods are based on traditional precipitation and ion exchange techniques, are readily adaptable to hot cell use, and produce no hazardous waste components. The products are obtained in moderate to high yields and have excellent radiopurity.

  5. Target allocation yields for massively multiplexed spectroscopic surveys with fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Will; Smedley, Scott; Gillingham, Peter; Forero-Romero, Jaime E.; Jouvel, Stephanie; Nord, Brian

    2014-08-01

    We present Simulated Annealing fiber-to-target allocation simulations for the proposed DESI and 4MOST massively multiplexed spectroscopic surveys. We simulate various survey strategies, for both Poisson and realistically clustered mock target samples. We simulate both Echidna and theta-phi actuator designs, including the restrictions caused by the physical actuator characteristics during repositioning. For DESI, with theta-phi actuators, used in 5 passes over the sky for a mock ELG/LRG/QSO sample, with matched fiber and target densities, a total target allocation yield of 89.3% was achieved, but only 83.7% for the high-priority Ly-alpha QSOs. If Echidna actuators are used with the same pitch and number of passes, the yield increases to 94.4% and 97.2% respectively, representing fractional gains of 5.7% and 16% respectively. Echidna also allows a factor-of-two increase in the number of close Ly-alpha QSO pairs that can be observed. Echidna spine tilt causes a variable loss of throughput, with average loss being the same as the loss at the rms tilt. The simulated annealing allows spine tilt minimization to be included in the optimization, at some small cost to the yield. With a natural minimization scheme, we find an rms tilt always close to 0.58 x maximum. There is an additional but much smaller defocus loss, equivalent to an average defocus of 30 μm. These tilt losses offset the gains in yield for Echidna, but because the survey strategy is driven by the higher priority targets, a clear survey speed advantage remains. For 4MOST, high and low latitude sample mock catalogs were supplied by the 4MOST team, and allocations were carried out with the proposed Echidna-based positioner geometry. At high latitudes, the resulting target completeness was 85.3% for LR targets and 78.9% for HR targets. At low latitude, the target completeness was 93.9% for LR targets and 71.2% for HR targets.

  6. Production of graphene oxide from pitch-based carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Jihoon; Park, Sung Young; Min, Byunggak; Kim, Bongsoo; in, Insik

    2015-07-01

    Pitch-based graphene oxide (p-GO) whose compositional/structural features are comparable to those of graphene oxide (GO) was firstly produced by chemical exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber rather than natural graphite. Incorporation of p-GO as nanofillers into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a matrix polymer resulted in excellent mechanical reinforcement. p-GO/PMMA nanocomposite (1 wt.-% p-GO) demonstrated 800% higher modulus of toughness of neat PMMA.

  7. Production of graphene oxide from pitch-based carbon fiber

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miyeon; Lee, Jihoon; Park, Sung Young; Min, Byunggak; Kim, Bongsoo; In, Insik

    2015-01-01

    Pitch-based graphene oxide (p-GO) whose compositional/structural features are comparable to those of graphene oxide (GO) was firstly produced by chemical exfoliation of pitch-based carbon fiber rather than natural graphite. Incorporation of p-GO as nanofillers into poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as a matrix polymer resulted in excellent mechanical reinforcement. p-GO/PMMA nanocomposite (1 wt.-% p-GO) demonstrated 800% higher modulus of toughness of neat PMMA. PMID:26156067

  8. Interphase for ceramic matrix composites reinforced by non-oxide ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Bhatt, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Morscher, Gregory N. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A ceramic matrix composite material is disclosed having non-oxide ceramic fibers, which are formed in a complex fiber architecture by conventional textile processes; a thin mechanically weak interphase material, which is coated on the fibers; and a non-oxide or oxide ceramic matrix, which is formed within the interstices of the interphase-coated fiber architecture. During composite fabrication or post treatment, the interphase is allowed to debond from the matrix while still adhering to the fibers, thereby providing enhanced oxidative durability and damage tolerance to the fibers and the composite material.

  9. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2008-01-01

    OXIMAP is a numerical (FEA-based) solution tool capable of calculating the carbon fiber and fiber coating oxidation patterns within any arbitrarily shaped carbon silicon carbide composite structure as a function of time, temperature, and the environmental oxygen partial pressure. The mathematical formulation is derived from the mechanics of the flow of ideal gases through a chemically reacting, porous solid. The result of the formulation is a set of two coupled, non-linear differential equations written in terms of the oxidant and oxide partial pressures. The differential equations are solved simultaneously to obtain the partial vapor pressures of the oxidant and oxides as a function of the spatial location and time. The local rate of carbon oxidation is determined at each time step using the map of the local oxidant partial vapor pressure along with the Arrhenius rate equation. The non-linear differential equations are cast into matrix equations by applying the Bubnov-Galerkin weighted residual finite element method, allowing for the solution of the differential equations numerically.

  10. Eliminating Crystals in Non-Oxide Optical Fiber Preforms and Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; LaPointe, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Non ]oxide fiber optics such as heavy metal fluoride and chalcogenide glasses are extensively used in infrared transmitting applications such as communication systems, chemical sensors, and laser fiber guides for cutting, welding and medical surgery. The addition of rare earths such as erbium, enable these materials to be used as fiber laser and amplifiers. Some of these glasses however are very susceptible to crystallization. Even small crystals can lead to light scatter and a high attenuation coefficient, limiting their usefulness. Previously two research teams found that microgravity suppressed crystallization in heavy metal fluoride glasses. Looking for a less expensive method to suppress crystallization, ground based research was performed utilizing an axial magnetic field. The experiments revealed identical results to those obtained via microgravity processing. This research then led to a patented process for eliminating crystals in optical fiber preforms and the resulting optical fibers. In this paper, the microgravity results will be reviewed as well as patents and papers relating to the use of magnetic fields in various material and glass processing applications. Finally our patent to eliminate crystals in non ]oxide glasses utilizing a magnetic field will be detailed.

  11. Various-sourced pectin and polyethylene oxide electrospun fibers.

    PubMed

    Rockwell, Pamela L; Kiechel, Marjorie A; Atchison, Jennifer S; Toth, Laura J; Schauer, Caroline L

    2014-07-17

    Pectin, a naturally occurring and biorenewable polysaccharide, is derived from plant cell wall tissue and used in applications ranging from food processing to biomedical engineering. Due to extraction methods and source variation, there is currently no consensus in literature as to the exact structure of pectin. Here, we have studied key material properties of electrospun pectin blends with polyethylene oxide (PEO) (1:1, v/v) in order to demonstrate the fabrication of a fibrous and less toxic material system, as well as to understand the effects of source variability on the resulting fibrous mats. The bulk pectin degree of esterification (DE) estimated using FTIR (bulk apple pomace (AP)=28%, bulk citrus peel (CP)=86% and bulk sugar beet pulp (SBP)=91%) was shown to inversely correlate with electrospun fiber crystallinity determined using XRD (PEO-AP=37%, PEO-CP=28% and PEO-SBP=23%). This in turn affected the trend observed for the mean fiber diameter (n=50) (PEO-AP=124 ± 26 nm, PEO-CP=493 ± 254 nm and PEO-SBP=581 ± 178 nm) and elastic tensile moduli (1.6 ± 0.2 MPa, 4.37 ± 0.64 MPa and 2.49 ± 1.46 MPa, respectively) of the fibrous mats. Electrospun fibers containing bulk AP had the lowest DE, highest crystallinity, smallest mean fiber diameter, and lowest tensile modulus compared to either the bulk CP or bulk SBP. Bound water in PEO-CP fiber and bulk pectin impurities in PEO-SPB were observed to influence fiber branching and mean diameter distributions, which in turn influenced the fiber tensile properties. These results indicate that pectin, when blended with PEO in water, produces submicron fibrous mats with pectin influencing the blend fiber properties. Moreover, the source of pectin is an important variable in creating electrospun blend fibrous mats with desired material properties.

  12. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Yao, B C; Wu, Y; Yu, C B; He, J R; Rao, Y J; Gong, Y; Fu, F; Chen, Y F; Li, Y R

    2016-03-24

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel 'FRET on Fiber' concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based 'FRET on fiber' configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated 'FRET on Fiber' sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response.

  13. Bismuth oxide nanotubes-graphene fiber-based flexible supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsamy, Karthikeyan; Xu, Zhen; Zheng, Bingna; Huang, Tieqi; Kou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaoli; Gao, Chao

    2014-07-01

    Graphene-bismuth oxide nanotube fiber as electrode material for constituting flexible supercapacitors using a PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte is reported with a high specific capacitance (Ca) of 69.3 mF cm-2 (for a single electrode) and 17.3 mF cm-2 (for the whole device) at 0.1 mA cm-2, respectively. Our approach opens the door to metal oxide-graphene hybrid fibers and high-performance flexible electronics.Graphene-bismuth oxide nanotube fiber as electrode material for constituting flexible supercapacitors using a PVA/H3PO4 gel electrolyte is reported with a high specific capacitance (Ca) of 69.3 mF cm-2 (for a single electrode) and 17.3 mF cm-2 (for the whole device) at 0.1 mA cm-2, respectively. Our approach opens the door to metal oxide-graphene hybrid fibers and high-performance flexible electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Equations and characterization. SEM images of GGO, XRD and XPS of Bi2O3 NTs, HRTEM images and EDX Spectra of Bi2O3 NT5-GF, CV curves of Bi2O3NT5-GF, Bi2O3 NTs and bismuth nitrate in three-electrode system (vs. Ag/AgCl). CV and GCD curves of Bi2O3 NT1-GF and Bi2O3 NT3-GF. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02615b

  14. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  15. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentin, Victor M.

    1995-01-01

    Carbon fiber reinforced Silicon Carbide (C-SiC) composites offer high strength at high temperatures and good oxidation resistance. However, these composites present some matrix microcracks which allow the path of oxygen to the fiber. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of a new Silicon Carbide (SiC) coating developed by DUPONT-LANXIDE to enhance the oxidation resistance of C-SiC composites. A thermogravimetric analysis was used to determine the oxidation rate of the samples at different temperatures and pressures. The Dupont coat proved to be a good protection for the SiC matrix at temperatures lower than 1240 C at low and high pressures. On the other hand, at temperatures above 1340 C the Dupont coat did not seem to give good protection to the composite fiber and matrix. Even though some results of the tests have been discussed, because of time restraints, only a small portion of the desired tests could be completed. Therefore, no major conclusions or results about the effectiveness of the coat are available at this time.

  16. Methionine oxidation reduces lag-times for amyloid-β(1-40) fiber formation but generates highly fragmented fibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Miao; Viles, John H

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and the formation of amyloid plaques containing amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are two key hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. A proportion of methionine (Met) at position 35 within Aβ is oxidized to methionine sulphoxide (Met(OX)) within the Alzheimer's plaques. These oxidative processes may be the key to understanding the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. In vitro oxidation of Aβ, by the physiological oxidant H2O2, was monitored using (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. Here we investigate the effect of Aβ methionine oxidation on fiber formation kinetics and morphology using the amyloid specific fluorescence dye Thioflavin T (ThT) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Methionine oxidation reduces the total amount of fibers generated for both dominant forms of Aβ, however there are marked differences in the effect of Met(OX) between Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). Surprisingly the presence of Met(OX) reduces lag-times for Aβ(1-40) fiber formation but extends lag-times for Aβ(1-42). TEM indicates a change in fiber morphology with a pronounced reduction in fiber length for both methionine oxidized Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). In contrast, the morphology of preformed amyloid fibers is largely unaffected by the presence of H2O2. Our studies suggest that methionine oxidation promotes highly fragmented fiber assemblies of Aβ. Oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer's disease can cause oxidation of methionine within Aβ and this in turn will influence the complex assembly of Aβ monomer into amyloid fibers, which is likely to impact Aβ toxicity.

  17. A scintillating fiber-optic active target (SFT) for studies of high energy photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1988-02-01

    A high resolution, gateable, Scintillating Fiber Target (SFT) has been developed for Fermilab Experiment E687 to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon interactions. The detector consists of a scintillating target of either GS1 Cerium glass fibers or polystyrene fibers of 29..mu..m cross section, a multi-stage image intensifier and an intensified CCD or SIT/VIDICON camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system.

  18. Rosamines Targeting the Cancer Oxidative Phosphorylation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Siang Hui; Wu, Liangxing; Kiew, Lik Voon; Chung, Lip Yong; Burgess, Kevin; Lee, Hong Boon

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming of energy metabolism is pivotal to cancer, so mitochondria are potential targets for anticancer therapy. A prior study has demonstrated the anti-proliferative activity of a new class of mitochondria-targeting rosamines. This present study describes in vitro cytotoxicity of second-generation rosamine analogs, their mode of action, and their in vivo efficacies in a tumor allografted mouse model. Here, we showed that these compounds exhibited potent cytotoxicity (average IC50<0.5 µM), inhibited Complex II and ATP synthase activities of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway and induced loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. A NCI-60 cell lines screen further indicated that rosamine analogs 4 and 5 exhibited potent antiproliferative effects with Log10GI50 = −7 (GI50 = 0.1 µM) and were more effective against a colorectal cancer sub-panel than other cell lines. Preliminary in vivo studies on 4T1 murine breast cancer-bearing female BALB/c mice indicated that treatment with analog 5 in a single dosing of 5 mg/kg or a schedule dosing of 3 mg/kg once every 2 days for 6 times (q2d×6) exhibited only minimal induction of tumor growth delay. Our results suggest that rosamine analogs may be further developed as mitochondrial targeting agents. Without a doubt proper strategies need to be devised to enhance tumor uptake of rosamines, i.e. by integration to carrier molecules for better therapeutic outcome. PMID:24622277

  19. A novel electrospinning target to improve the yield of uniaxially aligned fibers.

    PubMed

    Secasanu, Virgil P; Giardina, Christopher K; Wang, Yadong

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning is a useful technique that can generate micro and nanometer-sized fibers. Modification of the electrospinning parameters, such as deposition target geometry, can generate uniaxially aligned fibers for use in diverse applications ranging from tissue engineering to material fabrication. For example, meshes of fibers have been shown to mimic the extracellular matrix networks for use in smooth muscle cell proliferation. Further, aligned fibers can guide neurites to grow along the direction of the fibers. Here we present a novel electrospinning deposition target that combines the benefits of two previously reported electrodes: the standard parallel electrodes and the spinning wheel with a sharpened edge. This new target design significantly improves aligned fiber yield. Specifically, the target consists of two parallel aluminum plates with sharpened edges containing a bifurcating angle of 26 degrees. Electric field computations show a larger probable area of aligned electric field vectors. This new deposition target allows fibers to deposit on a larger cross-sectional area relative to the existing parallel electrode and at least doubles the yield of uniaxially aligned fibers. Further, fiber alignment and morphology are preserved after collection from the deposition target. PMID:19562742

  20. Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Fiber Preforms on Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation and fiber preforms on the fatigue life of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic-matrix composites (C/SiC CMCs) have been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D, 2.5D and 3D C/SiC composites at room temperature, 800 °C in air, 1100, 1300 and 1500 °C in vacuum conditions have been predicted.

  1. Fiber optic relative humidity sensor based on the tilted fiber Bragg grating coated with graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youqing; Shen, Changyu; Lou, Weimin; Shentu, Fengying; Zhong, Chuan; Dong, Xinyong; Tong, Limin

    2016-07-01

    A fiber optic relative humidity (RH) sensor based on the tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) coated with graphene oxide (GO) film was presented. Amplitudes of the cladding mode resonances of the TFGB varies with the water sorption and desorption processes of the GO film, because of the strong interactions between the excited backward propagating cladding modes and the GO film. By detecting the transmission intensity changes of the cladding mode resonant dips at the wavelength of 1557 nm, the maximum sensitivity of 0.129 dB/%RH with a linear correlation coefficient of 99% under the RH range of 10-80% was obtained. The Bragg mode of TFBG can be used as power or wavelength references, since it is inherently insensitive to RH changes. In addition, the proposed humidity sensor shows a good performance in repeatability and stability.

  2. Broadly tunable multiwavelength fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF using large effective area fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-02-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using 2.49 m Bismuth-oxide erbium-doped fiber (Bi-EDF) with different lengths of large effective area fiber (LEAF) in a ring cavity configuration is realized. The Bi-EDF is used as the linear gain medium and LEAF is used as the non-linear gain medium for stimulated Brillouin scattering. Out of the four different lengths, the longest length of 25 km LEAF exhibits the widest tuning range of 44 nm (1576 to 1620 nm) in the L-band at 264 mW pump power and 5 mW Brillouin pump power. In addition, a total of 15 output channels are achieved with total average output power of -8 dBm from this laser structure. All Brillouin Stokes signals exhibit high peak power of above -20 dBm per signal and their optical signal-to-noise ratio of greater than 15 dB.

  3. Effect of fiber reinforcement on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1992-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermooxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-4OR graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  4. Resin/fiber thermo-oxidative interactions in PMR polymide/graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    The amounts of resin weight loss and fiber weight loss in four PMR-polyimide graphite fiber composites were calculated from the composite weight losses and the fiber/resin ratios of the composites after long term thermo-oxidative aging in 600 F air. The accelerating effect of graphite fiber on resin weight loss, compared to neat resin weight loss, indicated the presence of a deleterious resin/fiber thermo-oxidative interaction, presumably due to fiber impurities. Similarly, the decelerating effect of the protective matrix resin on fiber weight loss, compared to bare fiber weight loss, was also demonstrated. The amount of hydrazine-indigestible resin and the amount of loose surface graphite fiber that formed during 600 deg F exposure of the composites were quantitatively determined. The indigestible residual resin was also qualitatively studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  6. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  7. A Comparative Study of Natural Fiber and Glass Fiber Fabrics Properties with Metal or Oxide Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusis, Andrej; Pentjuss, Evalds; Bajars, Gunars; Sidorovicha, Uljana; Strazds, Guntis

    2015-03-01

    Rapidly growing global demand for technical textiles industries is stimulated to develop new materials based on hybrid materials (yarns, fabrics) made from natural and glass fibres. The influence of moisture on the electrical properties of metal and metal oxide coated bast (flax, hemp) fibre and glass fibre fabrics are studied by electrical impedance spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The bast fibre and glass fiber fabrics are characterized with electrical sheet resistance. The method for description of electrical sheet resistance of the metal and metal oxide coated technical textile is discussed. The method can be used by designers to estimate the influence of moisture on technical data of new metal coated hybrid technical textile materials and products.

  8. Combining Untargeted and Targeted Proteomic Strategies for Discrimination and Quantification of Cashmere Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shanshan; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jihua; Yang, Yunfei; Miao, Chen; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Cao, Qichen; Shui, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Cashmere is regarded as a specialty and luxury fiber due to its scarcity and high economic value. For fiber quality assessment, it is technically very challenging to distinguish and quantify the cashmere fiber from yak or wool fibers because of their highly similar physical appearance and substantial protein sequence homology. To address this issue, we propose a workflow combining untargeted and targeted proteomics strategies for selecting, verifying and quantifying biomarkers for cashmere textile authentication. Untargeted proteomic surveys were first applied to identify 174, 157, and 156 proteins from cashmere, wool and yak fibers, respectively. After marker selection at different levels, peptides turned out to afford much higher selectivity than proteins for fiber species discrimination. Subsequently, parallel reaction monitoring (PRM) methods were developed for ten selected peptide markers. The PRM-based targeted analysis of peptide markers enabled accurate determination of fiber species and cashmere percentages in different fiber mixtures. Furthermore, collective use of these peptide makers allowed us to discriminate and quantify cashmere fibers in commercial finished fabrics that have undergone heavy chemical treatments. Cashmere proportion measurement in fabric samples using our proteomic approach was in good agreement with results from traditional light microscopy, yet our method can be more readily standardized to become an objective and robust assay for assessing authenticity of fibers and textiles. We anticipate that the proteomic strategies presented in our study could be further implicated in discovery of quality trait markers for other products containing highly homologous proteomes. PMID:26789629

  9. Delivery of Erbium:YAG laser radiation through side-firing germanium oxide optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo, Anthony K.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2006-02-01

    The Erbium:YAG laser is currently being tested experimentally for endoscopic applications in urology, including more efficient laser lithotripsy and more precise incision of urethral strictures than the Holmium:YAG laser. While side-firing silica fibers are available for use with the Ho:YAG laser in urology, no such fibers exist for use with the Er:YAG laser. These applications may benefit from the availability of a side-firing, mid-infrared optical fiber capable of delivering the laser radiation at a 90-degree angle to the tissue. The objective of this study is to describe the simple construction and characterization of a side-firing germanium oxide fiber for potential use in endoscopic laser surgery. Side-firing fibers were constructed from 450-micron-core germanium oxide fibers of 1.45-m-length by polishing the distal tip at a 45-degree angle and placing a 1-cm-long protective quartz cap over the fiber tip. Er:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 2.94 microns, pulse duration of 300 microseconds, pulse repetition rate of 3 Hz, and pulse energies of from 5 to 550 mJ was coupled into the fibers. The fiber transmission rate and damage threshold measured 48 +/- 4 % and 149 +/- 37 mJ, respectively (n = 6 fibers). By comparison, fiber transmission through normal germanium oxide trunk fibers measured 66 +/- 3 %, with no observed damage (n = 5 fibers). Sufficient pulse energies were transmitted through the side-firing fibers for contact tissue ablation. Although these initial tests are promising, further studies will need to be conducted, focusing on assembly of more flexible, smaller diameter fibers, fiber bending transmission tests, long-term fiber reliability tests, and improvement of the fiber output spatial beam profile.

  10. The role of nitric oxide in muscle fibers with oxidative phosphorylation defects

    SciTech Connect

    Tengan, Celia H. . E-mail: chtengan@neuro.epm.br; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Godinho, Rosely O.; Gamba, Juliana; Neves, Afonso C.; Schmidt, Beny; Oliveira, Acary S.B.; Gabbai, Alberto A.

    2007-08-03

    NO has been pointed as an important player in the control of mitochondrial respiration, especially because of its inhibitory effect on cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, all the events involved in this control are still not completely elucidated. We demonstrate compartmentalized abnormalities on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity on muscle biopsies of patients with mitochondrial diseases. NOS activity was reduced in the sarcoplasmic compartment in COX deficient fibers, whereas increased activity was found in the sarcolemma of fibers with mitochondrial proliferation. We observed increased expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) in patients and a correlation between nNOS expression and mitochondrial content. Treatment of skeletal muscle culture with an NO donor induced an increase in mitochondrial content. Our results indicate specific roles of NO in compensatory mechanisms of muscle fibers with mitochondrial deficiency and suggest the participation of nNOS in the signaling process of mitochondrial proliferation in human skeletal muscle.

  11. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  12. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  13. Helical graphene oxide fibers as a stretchable sensor and an electrocapillary sucker.

    PubMed

    Hua, Chunfei; Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Xiying; Hu, Xiaoyang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xinchang; Zhang, Yingjiu; Li, Xinjian; Duan, Huiling; Cao, Anyuan

    2016-05-19

    Fibers made from carbon nanotubes or graphene are strong and conductive; encoding helical structures into these fibers may render useful properties such as high stretchability. Here, we directly spin freestanding graphene oxide (GO) films into helical fibers consisting of uniformly arranged loops with tunable diameters, under controlled environmental humidity. Reduced GO fibers with a helical shape are stretched elastically with a reversible electrical resistance change for many strain cycles. Stretchable temperature sensors built on helical fibers work at large strains (up to 50%) and high temperature (up to 300 °C), with a reliable deformation-independent response. The GO fibers also contain through-channels inside with suitable pore size, which can take up an aqueous electrolyte quickly under a low bias, resulting in a fiber-shaped, on-off switchable electrocapillary sucker. Our multifunctional helical and hollow GO fibers have potential applications in stretchable fiber-shaped sensors, actuators and nano-fluid systems. PMID:27147483

  14. A scintillating fiber-optic active target (SFT) for studies of high energy photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Busenitz, J.; Cason, N.; Cunningham, J.; Gardner, R.; Kennedy, C.; Mannel, E.; Mountain, R.J.

    1987-10-01

    A high resolution, gateable, Scintillating Fiber Target (SFT) has been developed for Fermilab Experiment E687 to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon interactions. The detector consists of a scintillating target of either GS1 Cerium glass fibers or polystyrene fibers of 29..mu..m cross section, a multi-stage image intensifier and an intensified CCD or SIT/VIDICON camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Cellulose nanowhiskers extracted from TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2012-10-01

    Cellulose nanowhiskers is a kind of renewable and biocompatible nanomaterials evoke much interest because of its versatility in various applications. Here, for the first time, a novel controllable fabrication of cellulose nanowhiskers from jute fibers with a high yield (over 80%) via a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)/NaBr/NaClO system selective oxidization combined with mechanical homogenization is reported. The versatile jute cellulose nanowhiskers with ultrathin diameters (3-10 nm) and high crystallinity (69.72%), contains C6 carboxylate groups converted from C6 primary hydroxyls, which would be particularly useful for applications in the nanocomposites as reinforcing phase, as well as in tissue engineering, pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives.

  16. Cellulose nanowhiskers extracted from TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2012-10-01

    Cellulose nanowhiskers is a kind of renewable and biocompatible nanomaterials evoke much interest because of its versatility in various applications. Here, for the first time, a novel controllable fabrication of cellulose nanowhiskers from jute fibers with a high yield (over 80%) via a 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical (TEMPO)/NaBr/NaClO system selective oxidization combined with mechanical homogenization is reported. The versatile jute cellulose nanowhiskers with ultrathin diameters (3-10 nm) and high crystallinity (69.72%), contains C6 carboxylate groups converted from C6 primary hydroxyls, which would be particularly useful for applications in the nanocomposites as reinforcing phase, as well as in tissue engineering, pharmaceutical and optical industries as additives. PMID:22840042

  17. The Regulation of Corticofugal Fiber Targeting by Retinal Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Eleanor; Hoerder-Suabedissen, Anna; Molnár, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Corticothalamic projection systems arise from 2 main cortical layers. Layer V neurons project exclusively to higher-order thalamic nuclei, while layer VIa fibers project to both first-order and higher-order thalamic nuclei. During early postnatal development, layer VIa and VIb fibers accumulate at the borders of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) before they innervate it. After neonatal monocular enucleation or silencing of the early retinal activity, there is premature entry of layer VIa and VIb fibers into the dLGN contralateral to the manipulation. Layer V fibers do not innervate the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus during the first postnatal week, but also demonstrate premature entry to the contralateral superficial gray layer following neonatal enucleation. Normally, layer V driver projections to the thalamus only innervate higher-order nuclei. Our results demonstrate that removal of retinal input from the dLGN induces cortical layer V projections to aberrantly enter, arborize, and synapse within the first-order dLGN. These results suggest that there is cross-hierarchical corticothalamic plasticity after monocular enucleation. Cross-hierarchical rewiring has been previously demonstrated in the thalamocortical system (Pouchelon et al. 2014), and now we provide evidence for cross-hierarchical corticothalamic rewiring after loss of the peripheral sensory input. PMID:26744542

  18. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection

    PubMed Central

    Yao, B. C.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C. B.; He, J. R.; Rao, Y. J.; Gong, Y.; Fu, F.; Chen, Y. F.; Li, Y. R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel ‘FRET on Fiber’ concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based ‘FRET on fiber’ configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated ‘FRET on Fiber’ sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response PMID:27010752

  19. Partially reduced graphene oxide based FRET on fiber-optic interferometer for biochemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, B. C.; Wu, Y.; Yu, C. B.; He, J. R.; Rao, Y. J.; Gong, Y.; Fu, F.; Chen, Y. F.; Li, Y. R.

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) with naturally exceptional selectivity is a powerful technique and widely used in chemical and biomedical analysis. However, it is still challenging for conventional FRET to perform as a high sensitivity compact sensor. Here we propose a novel ‘FRET on Fiber’ concept, in which a partially reduced graphene oxide (prGO) film is deposited on a fiber-optic modal interferometer, acting as both the fluorescent quencher for the FRET and the sensitive cladding for optical phase measurement due to refractive index changes in biochemical detection. The target analytes induced fluorescence recovery with good selectivity and optical phase shift with high sensitivity are measured simultaneously. The functionalized prGO film coated on the fiber-optic interferometer shows high sensitivities for the detections of metal ion, dopamine and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), with detection limits of 1.2 nM, 1.3 μM and 1 pM, respectively. Such a prGO based ‘FRET on fiber’ configuration, bridging the FRET and the fiber-optic sensing technology, may serve as a platform for the realization of series of integrated ‘FRET on Fiber’ sensors for on-line environmental, chemical, and biomedical detection, with excellent compactness, high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response

  20. Dissipative soliton generation from a graphene oxide mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jia; Wu, Sida; Li, Huihui; Liu, Jiang; Sun, Ruoyu; Tan, Fangzhou; Yang, Quan-Hong; Wang, Pu

    2012-10-01

    We demonstrated dissipative soliton obtained from a graphene oxide mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser, which operated in normal dispersion cavity by employing the dispersion compensation fiber. The highly chirped pulses at the repetition rate of 19.5 MHz can be compressed from 11 ps to 542 fs by using single mode fiber. Numerical simulations were in good agreement with the experimental results. The hydrophilic graphene oxide with easier fabrication shows great potential to be a novel low-cost saturable absorber in reliable and compact mode-locked fiber laser system.

  1. FETs Based on Doped Polyaniline/Polyethylene Oxide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofylaktos, Noulie; Robinson, Daryl; Miranda, Felix; Pinto, Nicholas; Johnson, Alan, Jr.; MacDiarmid, Alan; Mueller, Carl

    2006-01-01

    A family of experimental highly miniaturized field-effect transistors (FETs) is based on exploitation of the electrical properties of nanofibers of polyaniline/ polyethylene oxide (PANi/PEO) doped with camphorsulfonic acid. These polymer-based FETs have the potential for becoming building blocks of relatively inexpensive, low-voltage, highspeed logic circuits that could supplant complementary metal oxide/semiconductor (CMOS) logic circuits. The development of these polymerbased FETs offers advantages over the competing development of FETs based on carbon nanotubes. Whereas it is difficult to control the molecular structures and, hence, the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes, it is easy to tailor the electrical properties of these polymerbased FETs, throughout the range from insulating through semiconducting to metallic, through choices of doping levels and chemical manipulation of polymer side chains. A further advantage of doped PANi/PEO nanofibers is that they can be made to draw very small currents and operate at low voltage levels, and thus are promising for applications in which there are requirements to use many FETs to obtain large computational capabilities while minimizing power demands. Fabrication of an experimental FET in this family begins with the preparation of a substrate as follows: A layer of silicon dioxide between 50 and 200 nm thick is deposited on a highly doped (resistivity 0.01 W.cm) silicon substrate, then gold electrodes/contact stripes are deposited on the oxide. Next, one or more fibers of camphorsulphonic acid-doped PANi/PEO having diameters of the order of 100 nm are electrospun onto the substrate so as to span the gap between the gold electrodes (see Figure 1). Figure 2 depicts measured current-versus-voltage characteristics of the device of Figure 1, showing that saturation channel currents occur at source-todrain potentials that are surprisingly low, relative to those of CMOS FETs. The hole mobility in the depletion regime in

  2. Oxidation Kinetics and Strength Degradation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental results and oxidation modeling will be presented to discuss carbon fiber susceptibility to oxidation, the oxidation kinetics regimes and composite strength degradation and failure due to oxidation. Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation rates of carbon fiber and of a pyro-carbon interphase. The analysis was used to separately obtain activation energies for the carbon constituents within a C/SiC composite. TGA was also conducted on C/SiC composite material to study carbon oxidation and crack closure as a function of temperature. In order to more closely match applications conditions C/SiC tensile coupons were also tested under stressed oxidation conditions. The stressed oxidation tests show that C/SiC is much more susceptible to oxidation when the material is under an applied load where the cracks are open and allow for oxygen ingress. The results help correlate carbon oxidation with composite strength reduction and failure.

  3. Designing future prebiotic fiber to target metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jakobsdottir, Greta; Nyman, Margareta; Fåk, Frida

    2014-05-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS), characterized by obesity, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance, is a growing epidemic worldwide, requiring new prevention strategies and therapeutics. The concept of prebiotics refers to selective stimulation of growth and/or activity(ies) of one or a limited number of microbial genus(era)/species in the gut microbiota that confer(s) health benefits to the host. Sequencing the gut microbiome and performing metagenomics has provided new knowledge of the significance of the composition and activity of the gut microbiota in metabolic disease. As knowledge of how a healthy gut microbiota is composed and which bacterial metabolites are beneficial increases, tailor-made dietary interventions using prebiotic fibers could be developed for individuals with MetS. In this review, we describe how dietary fibers alter short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) profiles and the intrinsic and extrinsic effects of prebiotics on host metabolism. We focus on several key aspects in prebiotic research in relation to MetS and provide mechanistic data that support the use of prebiotic fibers in order to alter the gut microbiota composition and SCFA profiles. Further studies in the field should provide reliable mechanistic and clinical evidence for how prebiotics can be used to alleviate MetS and its complications. Additionally, it will be important to clarify the effect of individual differences in the gut microbiome on responsiveness to prebiotic interventions.

  4. Dissolution of Neptunium Oxide in Unirradiated Mark 53 Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-06-07

    Nine unirradiated Mark 53 targets currently stored at the K-Reactor must be dissolved to allow recovery of the neptunium content. The Mark 53 targets are an aluminum clad neptunium oxide (NpO2)/aluminum metal cermet used for the production of plutonium-238. The targets will be dissolved in H-Canyon and blended with solutions generated from routine fuel dissolutions for purification by solvent extraction

  5. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide includes heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  6. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  7. Improving fiber/matrix interfacial strength through graphene and graphene-oxide nano platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoretti, A.; Mahmood, H.; Pedrazzoli, D.; Kalaitzidou, K.

    2016-07-01

    Fiber/matrix interfacial shear strength (ISS) is a key factor determining the mechanical properties of structural composites. In this manuscript the positive effects of both graphene and graphene oxide in improving the ISS value of glass-fiber reinforced composites are experimentally demostrated. Two strategies will be presented: i) uniform dispersion of the nanofillers in the polymer matrix or ii) selective deposition of the nanofillers at the fiber/matrix interface. Both thermoplastic (polypropylene) and thermosetting (epoxy) matrices are investigated and the effects of nanoparticles on the fiber/matrix interface are determined through micromechanical tests on single-fiber composites. Finally, the beneficial effects of the investigated nanofillers on both mechanical and functional (strain monitoring) properties of multiscale macrocomposites are experimentally proved for the cases of polypropylene-based composites reinforced with short glass fibers and on epoxy-based composites reinforced with continuous unidirectional glass fibers.

  8. Mechanical and dye adsorption properties of graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers prepared by wet spinning.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Sun, Jiankun; Du, Qiuju; Zhang, Luhui; Yang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Shaoling; Xia, Yanzhi; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Linhua; Cao, Anyuan

    2014-02-15

    Graphene oxide/chitosan composite fibers were prepared by a wet spinning method, and their mechanical properties were investigated. Experimental results showed that the introduction of graphene oxide at 4 wt% loading can improve the tensile strengths of chitosan fibers. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out to study the effect of various parameters, such as the initial pH value, adsorbent dosage, contact time and temperature on adsorption of fuchsin acid dye. The Langmuir model was used to fit the experimental data of adsorption isotherm, and kinetic studies showed that the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second order model. Thermodynamic studies indicated that the adsorption of fuchsin acid dye on graphene oxide/chitosan fibers was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Our results indicate that the graphene oxide/chitosan fibers have excellent mechanical properties and can serve as a promising adsorbent for the removal of dyes from aqueous solutions.

  9. Relative sliding durability of two candidate high temperature oxide fiber seal materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1991-01-01

    A test program to determine the relative sliding durability of two candidate ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. Pin on disk tests were used to evaluate potential seal materials. Friction during the tests and fiber wear, indicated by the extent of fibers broken in a test bundle or yarn, was measured at the end of a test. In general, friction and wear increase with test temperature. This may be due to a reduction in fiber strength, a change in the surface chemistry at the fiber/counterface interface due to oxidation, adsorption and/or desorption of surface species and, to a lesser extent, an increase in counterface surface roughness due to oxidation at elevated temperatures. The relative fiber durability correlates with tensile strength indicating that tensile data, which is more readily available than sliding durability data, may be useful in predicting fiber wear behavior under various conditions. A simple model developed using dimensional analysis shows that the fiber durability is related to a dimensionless parameter which represents the ratio of the fiber strength to the fiber stresses imposed by sliding.

  10. Photoelectrochemical cell using dye sensitized zinc oxide nanowires grown on carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unalan, Husnu Emrah; Wei, Di; Suzuki, Kenichi; Dalal, Sharvari; Hiralal, Pritesh; Matsumoto, Hidetoshi; Imaizumi, Shinji; Minagawa, Mie; Tanioka, Akihiko; Flewitt, Andrew J.; Milne, William I.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2008-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires (NWs) grown on carbon fibers using a vapor transport and condensation approach are used as the cathode of a photoelectrochemical cell. The carbon fibers were obtained by electrospray deposition and take the form of a flexible carbon fabric. The ZnO NW on carbon fiber anode is combined with a "black dye" photoabsorber, an electrolyte, and a platinum (Pt) counterelectrode to complete the cell. The results show that ZnO NW and carbon fibers can be used for photoinduced charge separation/charge transport and current collection, respectively, in a photoelectrochemical cell.

  11. Zinc Oxide Nanowire Interphase for Enhanced Lightweight Polymer Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sodano, Henry A.; Brett, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to increase the interfacial strength between aramid fiber and epoxy matrix. This was achieved by functionalizing the aramid fiber followed by growth of a layer of ZnO nanowires on the fiber surface such that when embedded into the polymer, the load transfer and bonding area could be substantially enhanced. The functionalization procedure developed here created functional carboxylic acid surface groups that chemically interact with the ZnO and thus greatly enhance the strength of the interface between the fiber and the ZnO.

  12. Adhesion enhancement of indium tin oxide (ITO) coated quartz optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yihua; Liu, Jing; Wu, Xu; Yang, Bin

    2014-07-01

    Transparent conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) film was prepared on optical fiber through a multi-step sol-gel process. The influence of annealing temperature on the adhesion of ITO coated optical fibers was studied. Different surface treatments were applied to improve the adhesion between ITO film and quartz optical fiber. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), UV-vis spectrophotometer and Avometer were used to characterize the morphology, crystal structure and photo-electric properties. A thermal shock test was used to evaluate the adhesion. The result shows that the adhesion between ITO film and quartz optical fiber can be strongly influenced by the annealing process, and optimal adhesion can be acquired when annealing temperature is 500 °C. Surface treatments of ultrasonic cleaning and the application of surface-active agent have effectively enhanced the adhesion and photo-electric properties of indium tin oxide film coated quartz optical fiber.

  13. Effect of plasma etching on destructive adsorption properties of polypropylene fibers containing magnesium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lange, Laura E; Obendorf, S Kay

    2012-02-01

    Dermal absorption of pesticides poses a danger for agricultural workers. Use of personal protection equipment (PPE) is required to provide protection; some of the current PPE involves impermeable barriers. In these barrier materials, the same mechanism that prevents the penetration of toxic chemicals also blocks the passage of water vapor and air from flowing through the material, making the garments uncomfortable. Fibers that degrade organophosphate pesticides, such as methyl parathion, were developed by incorporating metal oxides. These modified fibers can be incorporated into conventional fabric structures that allow water vapor to pass through, thereby maintaining comfort. Fibers with self-decontamination functionality were developed by incorporating magnesium oxide (MgO) nanoparticles into a polypropylene (PP) melt-extruded fiber. These fibers were then treated with plasma etching to expose increased surface area of the MgO nanoparticles. Three steps were involved in this research project: (1) determining the reactivity of MgO and methyl parathion, (2) making melt-spun MgO/PP fibers, and (3) testing the reactivity of MgO/PP composite fibers and methyl parathion. It was confirmed that MgO stoichiometrically degrades methyl parathion by way of destructive adsorption. The etching of the PP fibers containing MgO nanoparticles increased the chemical accessibility of MgO reactive sites, therefore making them more effective in degrading methyl parathion. These fibers can enhance the protection provided by PPE to agricultural and horticultural workers and military personnel. PMID:21850511

  14. Studies on non-oxide coating on carbon fibers using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Sharma, S.; Prajapati, K. K.; Vyas, M. M.; Batra, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    A new way of improving the oxidative behavior of carbon fibers coated with SiC through Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition technique. The complete study includes coating of SiC on glass slab and Stainless steel specimen as a starting test subjects but the major focus was to increase the oxidation temperature of carbon fibers by PECVD technique. This method uses relatively lower substrate temperature and guarantees better stoichiometry than other coating methods and hence the substrate shows higher resistance towards mechanical and thermal stresses along with increase in oxidation temperature.

  15. Application of diffusion barriers to the refractory fibers of tungsten, columbium, carbon and aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, F. C.; Paradis, E. L.; Veltri, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A radio frequency powered ion-plating system was used to plate protective layers of refractory oxides and carbide onto high strength fiber substrates. Subsequent overplating of these combinations with nickel and titanium was made to determine the effectiveness of such barrier layers in preventing diffusion of the overcoat metal into the fibers with consequent loss of fiber strength. Four substrates, five coatings, and two metal matrix materials were employed for a total of forty material combinations. The substrates were tungsten, niobium, NASA-Hough carbon, and Tyco sapphire. The diffusion-barrier coatings were aluminum oxide, yttrium oxide, titanium carbide, tungsten carbide with 14% cobalt addition, and zirconium carbide. The metal matrix materials were IN 600 nickel and Ti 6/4 titanium. Adhesion of the coatings to all substrates was good except for the NASA-Hough carbon, where flaking off of the oxide coatings in particular was observed.

  16. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  17. Oxide Fiber Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Catherine E.; Welker, Mark F.

    2008-01-01

    LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 fibers have been investigated as alternatives to LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 powders used as lithium-intercalation compounds in cathodes of rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells. In making such a cathode, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 powder is mixed with a binder [e.g., poly(vinylidene fluoride)] and an electrically conductive additive (usually carbon) and the mixture is pressed to form a disk. The binder and conductive additive contribute weight and volume, reducing the specific energy and energy density, respectively. In contrast, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 fibers can be pressed and sintered to form a cathode, without need for a binder or a conductive additive. The inter-grain contacts of the fibers are stronger and have fewer defects than do those of powder particles. These characteristics translate to increased flexibility and greater resilience on cycling and, consequently, to reduced loss of capacity from cycle to cycle. Moreover, in comparison with a powder-based cathode, a fiber-based cathode is expected to exhibit significantly greater ionic and electronic conduction along the axes of the fibers. Results of preliminary charge/discharge-cycling tests suggest that energy densities of LiCoO2- and LiNiO2-fiber cathodes are approximately double those of the corresponding powder-based cathodes.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Sources, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xin; Tao, Chuanyuan; Gan, Qi; Zheng, Jun; Li, Hao; You, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is associated with the highest mortality and morbidity despite only constituting approximately 10–15% of all strokes. Complex underlying mechanisms consisting of cytotoxic, excitotoxic, and inflammatory effects of intraparenchymal blood are responsible for its highly damaging effects. Oxidative stress (OS) also plays an important role in brain injury after ICH but attracts less attention than other factors. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that the metabolite axis of hemoglobin-heme-iron is the key contributor to oxidative brain damage after ICH, although other factors, such as neuroinflammation and prooxidases, are involved. This review will discuss the sources, possible molecular mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets of OS in ICH. PMID:26843907

  19. Proposal of Liquid Cannon Target Driven by Fiber Laser for Micro-Thruster in Satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Yabe, Takashi; Ohzono, Hirokazu; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Baasandash, Choijil; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Oku, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Kazumoto; Miyazaki, Sho; Akoh, Ryosuke; Ogata, Yoichi; Rosenberg, Benjamin; Yoshida, Minoru

    2004-03-30

    We propose a new concept controlling a satellite by a fiber laser loaded in it and demonstrated the acceleration of pendulum with 7kW/2n and 2kHz fiber laser, and measured the Cm of 16Ns/MJ corresponding to the scaling of YAG laser. This laser can be easily bundled to generate much larger power. For more efficient acceleration, we propose 'metal-free water cannon target', the new concept of propulsion using only water. The momentum coupling coefficient of 2500[Ns/MJ] was achieved with vacuum pump oil instead of water, and we succeeded in controlling the driving direction by the system based on the new concept. This can be used for thrusting a satellite and controlling its posture in combination with fiber lasers.

  20. Carbon aerogel composites prepared by ambient drying and using oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibers as reinforcements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Junzong; Zhang, Changrui; Feng, Jian; Jiang, Yonggang; Zhao, Nan

    2011-12-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced carbon aerogel composites (C/CAs) for thermal insulators were prepared by copyrolysis of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels reinforced by oxidized polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber felts. The RF aerogel composites were obtained by impregnating PAN fiber felts with RF sols, then aging, ethanol exchanging, and drying at ambient pressure. Upon carbonization, the PAN fibers shrink with the RF aerogels, thus reducing the difference of shrinkage rates between the fiber reinforcements and the aerogel matrices, and resulting in C/CAs without any obvious cracks. The three point bend strength of the C/CAs is 7.1 ± 1.7 MPa, and the thermal conductivity is 0.328 W m(-1) K(-1) at 300 °C in air. These composites can be used as high-temperature thermal insulators (in inert atmospheres or vacuum) or supports for phase change materials in thermal protection system.

  1. Influences of temperature, oxidative stress, and phosphorylation on binding of heat shock proteins in skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Larkins, Noni T; Murphy, Robyn M; Lamb, Graham D

    2012-09-15

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) help maintain cellular function in stressful situations, but the processes controlling their interactions with target proteins are not well defined. This study examined the binding of HSP72, HSP25, and αB-crystallin in skeletal muscle fibers following various stresses. Rat soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles were subjected in vitro to heat stress or strongly fatiguing stimulation. Superficial fibers were "skinned" by microdissection and HSP diffusibility assessed from the extent of washout following 10- to 30 min exposure to a physiological intracellular solution. In fibers from nonstressed (control) SOL muscle, >80% of each HSP is readily diffusible. However, after heating a muscle to 40°C for 30 min ∼95% of HSP25 and αB-crystallin becomes tightly bound at nonmembranous myofibrillar sites, whereas HSP72 bound at membranous sites only after heat treatment to ≥44°C. The ratio of reduced to oxidized cytoplasmic glutathione (GSH:GSSG) decreased approximately two- and fourfold after heating muscles to 40° and 45°C, respectively. The reducing agent dithiothreitol reversed HSP72 binding in heated muscles but had no effect on the other HSPs. Intense in vitro stimulation of SOL muscles, sufficient to elicit substantial oxidation-related loss of maximum force and approximately fourfold decrease in the GSH:GSSG ratio, had no effect on diffusibility of any of the HSPs. When skinned fibers from heat-treated muscles were bathed with additional exogenous HSP72, total binding increased approximately two- and 10-fold, respectively, in SOL and EDL fibers, possibly reflective of the relative sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump densities in the two fiber types. Phosphorylation at Ser59 on αB-crystallin and Ser85 on HSP25 increased with heat treatment but did not appear to determine HSP binding. The findings highlight major differences in the processes controlling binding of HSP72 and the two small HSPs. Binding

  2. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tefft, Brandon J; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S

    2015-10-19

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering.

  3. Development of a core sheath process for production of oxide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freske, S.

    1972-01-01

    Improvements were sought in an oxide fiber of a core sheath configuration intended for structural applications at 2000 F (1093 C). Discontinuities in the core were eliminated by using core materials other than pure alumina, and continuous core sheath fibers were produced. In the case of some core materials, the continuous sections were sufficiently long for applications in short fiber composites. Creep at 2000 F (1093 C) was found to be due, in most cases, to breaks in the core, allowing the glass sheath to creep. Evidence was obtained indicating that a closer match between the thermal expansion coefficient of the sheath and the core would greatly improve the strength.

  4. Surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic detection of chlorine utilizing polyvinylpyrolidone supported zinc oxide thin films.

    PubMed

    Tabassum, Rana; Gupta, Banshi D

    2015-03-21

    A highly sensitive chlorine sensor for an aqueous medium is fabricated using an optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (OFSPR) system. An OFSPR-based chlorine sensor is designed with a multilayer-type platform by zinc oxide (ZnO) and polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) film morphology manipulations. Among all the methodologies of transduction reported in the field of solid state chemical and biochemical sensing, our attention is focused on the Kretschmann configuration optical fiber sensing technique using the mechanism of surface plasmon resonance. The optical fiber surface plasmon resonance (SPR) chlorine sensor is developed using a multimode optical fiber with the PVP-supported ZnO film deposited over a silver-coated unclad core of the fiber. A spectral interrogation mode of operation is used to characterize the sensor. In an Ag/ZnO/PVP multilayer system, the absorption of chlorine in the vicinity of the sensing region is performed by the PVP layer and the zinc oxide layer enhances the shift in resonance wavelength. It is, experimentally, demonstrated that the SPR wavelength shifts nonlinearly towards the red side of the visible region with an increase in the chlorine concentration in an aqueous medium while the sensitivity of the sensor decreases linearly with an increase in the chlorine concentration. As the proposed sensor utilizes an optical fiber, it possesses the additional advantages of fiber such as less signal degradation, less susceptibility to electromagnetic interference, possibility of remote sensing, probe miniaturization, probe re-usability, online monitoring, small size, light weight and low cost.

  5. Targeting Oxidative Stress in Central Nervous System Disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha

    2016-09-01

    There is widespread recognition that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in normal brain function and pathology in the context of neurological disease. Oxidative stress continues to be a key therapeutic target for neurological diseases. In developing antioxidant therapies for neurological disease, special attention should be given to the brain's unique vulnerability to oxidative insults and its architecture. Consideration of antioxidant therapy should be guided by a strong rationale for oxidative stress in a given neurological disease. This review provides an overview of processes that can guide the development of antioxidant therapies in neurological diseases, such as knowledge of basic redox mechanisms, unique features of brain pathophysiology, mechanisms and classes of antioxidants, and desirable properties of drug candidates.

  6. Targeting Oxidative Stress in Central Nervous System Disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Manisha

    2016-09-01

    There is widespread recognition that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in normal brain function and pathology in the context of neurological disease. Oxidative stress continues to be a key therapeutic target for neurological diseases. In developing antioxidant therapies for neurological disease, special attention should be given to the brain's unique vulnerability to oxidative insults and its architecture. Consideration of antioxidant therapy should be guided by a strong rationale for oxidative stress in a given neurological disease. This review provides an overview of processes that can guide the development of antioxidant therapies in neurological diseases, such as knowledge of basic redox mechanisms, unique features of brain pathophysiology, mechanisms and classes of antioxidants, and desirable properties of drug candidates. PMID:27491897

  7. Carbon oxidation in ceramic composites and the evaluation of interfacial sealing for oxidation resistant fiber-reinforced composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glime, William Harrison, III

    1997-11-01

    Carbon offers desirable properties as a fiber-matrix interphase material in ceramic matrix composites (CMC's), but oxidation of carbon at temperatures above 500sp°C has limited its utility. In an effort to better understand the kinetics associated with carbon oxidation pertaining to CMC applications, the origin of non-planar morphologies observed in the reaction front of carbon fibers and interphases receding into a ceramic matrix in the temperature range of 700sp°C to 1000sp°C was analyzed. A numerical simulation based on the finite difference method is utilized to evaluate the parameters which govern the morphology of the receding carbon reaction front. The study indicates that the morphology of the reaction front contains information regarding the interplay between oxidation behavior and microstructural features of the carbon. Carbon oxidation was found to obey "weak-link" behavior, that is, a sub-component which is more susceptible to oxidation governs the recession kinetics. The implications of weak link oxidation to preservation of a carbon interphase in a ceramic composite are discussed. Interrupted interphases have demonstrated the ability to confine oxidation of a carbon interphase to a localized region adjacent to a matrix crack. Commercial SiC mono-filaments (SCS-6, Textron Specialty Materials) were modified with a laser to produce fibers with discontinuous carbon coatings that were used in experiments to study mechanical properties. The laser-scribed fibers were tested in isolation, used in single-fiber microcomposites, or incorporated into small bulk composite specimens using a powder processing route to produce the matrix. The mechanical performance of the various types of specimens prepared using the laser scribing technique is presented and these results are used in a simulation of ultimate composite properties. The effect of fiber matrix fusion, by direct bonding or through a reaction product which seals the interface, was investigated with

  8. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  9. Targeted illumination and tracking using optical fiber probe for optogenetics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Anant; Perinchery, Sandeep M.; Matham, Murukeshan V.

    2016-03-01

    There was a renewed interest, during the recent years, in the imaging and tracking of targeted cells or organelles for a variety of biomedical and lab-on a chip applications that include particles movement. However, nonspecific illumination during tracking can have adverse effects such as heating, reduced image contrast and photo bleaching. In fact, current available tracking and imaging systems are unable to selectively illuminate the particle being tracked. To fill this void, we have developed a fiber optics based probe system incorporating a spatial light modulator (SLM) and an imaging fiber bundle for selective illumination on the targeted particle. A GRIN lens is attached at the distal endface of the image fiber bundle for optimised illumination and collection. A tracking algorithm is developed in order to enable controlled illumination through SLM to target the illumination point or location in accordance with the particle movement and size variation. Further with this probe, particles can be illuminated with light pulses of controllable duty cycle and frequency. The proposed methodology and developed probe have good significance and expected to find potential applications areas such as optogenetics, cell signalling studies, and lab-on a chip systems.

  10. Multiwavelength L-band fiber laser with bismuth-oxide EDF and photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramzia Salem, A. M.; Al-Mansoori, M. H.; Hizam, H.; Mohd Noor, S. B.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2011-05-01

    A multiwavelength laser comb using a bismuth-based erbium-doped fiber and 50 m photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated in a ring cavity configuration. The fiber laser is solely pumped by a single 1455 nm Raman pump laser to exploit its higher power delivery compared to that of a single-mode laser diode pump. At 264 mW Raman pump power and 1 mW Brillouin pump power, 38 output channels in the L-band have been realized with an optical signal-to-noise ratio above 15 dB and a Stokes line spacing of 0.08 nm. The laser exhibits a tuning range of 12 nm and produces stable Stokes lines across the tuning range between Brillouin pump wavelengths of 1603 nm and 1615 nm.

  11. Innovative fabrication of the flower-like nanocomposite coating on a nitinol fiber through Fenton's oxidation for selective and sensitive solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhen, Qi; Wang, Huiju; Guo, Mei; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Xuemei; Du, Xinzhen

    2016-09-01

    A novel flower-like nanostructure was successfully in situ fabricated on the surface of nitinol wire through Fenton's oxidation for the first time. It was found that the densely immobilized coating on the surface of the nitinol fiber was composed of nickel and titanium oxide nanocomposite (NiO/TiO2NC). The NiO/TiO2NC coated fiber was used to extract aromatic compounds coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection and exhibited excellent extraction efficiency for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with larger delocalized π-system among the studied analytes. Important factors affecting extraction efficiency of PAHs were examined. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.05 to 500μgL(-1) with correlation coefficients of R(2)≥0.999, and the lowest limit of detection of 0.006μgL(-1) was achieved for benzo[a]pyrene. Furthermore, the intra-day and inter-day precisions for the single fiber varied from 4.69% to 5.97% and from 5.28% to 6.32% for five replicates of PAHs at the spiking level of 50μgL(-1), respectively. The fiber-to-fiber precision for five fibers prepared in different batches ranged from 6.19% to 8.35%. The developed method was successfully applied to concentration and determination of target PAHs from real environmental water samples. Moreover, this novel nitinol-based fiber exhibited long lifespan. Therefore, the proposed fiber can be used as a promising candidate for a conventional fused silica-based fiber in SPME.

  12. Innovative fabrication of the flower-like nanocomposite coating on a nitinol fiber through Fenton's oxidation for selective and sensitive solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhen, Qi; Wang, Huiju; Guo, Mei; Zhou, Shanshan; Wang, Xuemei; Du, Xinzhen

    2016-09-01

    A novel flower-like nanostructure was successfully in situ fabricated on the surface of nitinol wire through Fenton's oxidation for the first time. It was found that the densely immobilized coating on the surface of the nitinol fiber was composed of nickel and titanium oxide nanocomposite (NiO/TiO2NC). The NiO/TiO2NC coated fiber was used to extract aromatic compounds coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection and exhibited excellent extraction efficiency for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with larger delocalized π-system among the studied analytes. Important factors affecting extraction efficiency of PAHs were examined. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration curves were linear in the range from 0.05 to 500μgL(-1) with correlation coefficients of R(2)≥0.999, and the lowest limit of detection of 0.006μgL(-1) was achieved for benzo[a]pyrene. Furthermore, the intra-day and inter-day precisions for the single fiber varied from 4.69% to 5.97% and from 5.28% to 6.32% for five replicates of PAHs at the spiking level of 50μgL(-1), respectively. The fiber-to-fiber precision for five fibers prepared in different batches ranged from 6.19% to 8.35%. The developed method was successfully applied to concentration and determination of target PAHs from real environmental water samples. Moreover, this novel nitinol-based fiber exhibited long lifespan. Therefore, the proposed fiber can be used as a promising candidate for a conventional fused silica-based fiber in SPME. PMID:27343598

  13. Dissolution of Neptunium Oxide in Unirradiated Mark 53 Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.S.

    2002-12-06

    Nine unirradiated Mark 53 targets currently stored at the K-Reactor must be dissolved to allow recovery of the neptunium content. The Mark 53 targets are an aluminum clad, neptunium oxide (NpO2)/aluminum metal cermet used for the production of plutonium-238. The targets will be dissolved in H-Canyon and blended with solutions generated from routine fuel dissolutions for purification by solvent extraction. The increased neptunium concentration should not have a significant effect on the neptunium decontamination factor achieved by the 1st cycle of solvent extraction; however, the neptunium content of the uranium product (1CU) will likely increase in proportion to the increase in the neptunium feed concentration. The recovered neptunium will be combined with the existing inventory of neptunium solution currently stored in H-Canyon. The combined inventory will undergo subsequent purification and conversion to an oxide for shipment to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory where plutonium- 238 will be manufactured using the High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  14. In Inclusion-Body Myositis Muscle Fibers Parkinson-Associated DJ-1 is Increased and Oxidized

    PubMed Central

    Terracciano, Chiara; Nogalska, Anna; Engel, W. King; Wojcik, Slawomir; Askanas, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    Sporadic inclusion-body myositis (s-IBM) is the most common muscle disease of older persons. The muscle-fiber molecular phenotype exhibits similarities to both Alzheimer-disease (AD) and Parkinson-disease (PD) brains, including accumulations of amyloid-β, phosphorylated tau, α-synuclein and parkin, as well as evidence of oxidative stress and mitochondrial abnormalities. Early-onset autosomal-recessive PD can be caused by mutations in the DJ-1 gene, leading to its inactivation. DJ-1 has anti-oxidative and mitochondrial-protective properties. In AD and PD brains, DJ-1 is increased and oxidized. We studied DJ-1 in 17 s-IBM and 18 disease-control and normal muscle biopsies by: 1) immunoblots of muscle homogenates and mitochondrial fractions; 2) real-time PCR; 3) oxyblots evaluating DJ-1 oxidation; 4) light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry. Compared to controls, in s-IBM muscle fibers DJ-1 was: a) increased in the soluble fraction, monomer 2-fold (p=0.01), and dimer 2.8-fold (p=0.004); b) increased in the mitochondrial fraction; c) highly oxidized; and d) aggregated in about 15% of the abnormal muscle fibers. DJ-1 mRNA was increased 3.5-fold (p=0.034). Accordingly, DJ-1 might play a role in human muscle disease, and thus not be limited to human CNS degenerations. In s-IBM muscle fibers, DJ-1 could be protecting these fibers against oxidative stress, including protection of mitochondria. PMID:18601999

  15. Adrenaline and noradrenaline: protectors against oxidative stress or molecular targets?

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Diduk, Ruslán; Galano, Annia

    2015-02-26

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the potential role of neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline regarding oxidative stress. It is predicted that they can be efficient as free radical scavengers both in lipid and aqueous media, with the main reaction mechanism being the hydrogen transfer and the sequential proton loss electron transfer, respectively. Despite the polarity of the environment, adrenaline and noradrenaline react with (•)OOH faster than Trolox, which suggests that they are better peroxyl radical scavengers than the reference compound. Both catecholamines are also proposed to be capable of efficiently inhibiting the oxidative stress induced by copper(II)-ascorbate mixtures, and the (•)OH production via Haber-Weiss reaction, albeit the effects on the later are only partial. They exert such beneficial effects by sequestering Cu(II) ions. In summary, these catecholamines can be capable of reducing oxidative stress, by scavenging free radicals and by sequestering metal ions. However, at the same time they might lose their functions in the process due to the associated structural modifications. Consequently, adrenaline and noradrenaline can be considered as both protectors and molecular targets of oxidative stress. Fortunately, under the proper conditions, both catecholamines can be regenerated to their original form so their functions are restored.

  16. Adrenaline and noradrenaline: protectors against oxidative stress or molecular targets?

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Diduk, Ruslán; Galano, Annia

    2015-02-26

    Density functional theory was used to investigate the potential role of neurotransmitters adrenaline and noradrenaline regarding oxidative stress. It is predicted that they can be efficient as free radical scavengers both in lipid and aqueous media, with the main reaction mechanism being the hydrogen transfer and the sequential proton loss electron transfer, respectively. Despite the polarity of the environment, adrenaline and noradrenaline react with (•)OOH faster than Trolox, which suggests that they are better peroxyl radical scavengers than the reference compound. Both catecholamines are also proposed to be capable of efficiently inhibiting the oxidative stress induced by copper(II)-ascorbate mixtures, and the (•)OH production via Haber-Weiss reaction, albeit the effects on the later are only partial. They exert such beneficial effects by sequestering Cu(II) ions. In summary, these catecholamines can be capable of reducing oxidative stress, by scavenging free radicals and by sequestering metal ions. However, at the same time they might lose their functions in the process due to the associated structural modifications. Consequently, adrenaline and noradrenaline can be considered as both protectors and molecular targets of oxidative stress. Fortunately, under the proper conditions, both catecholamines can be regenerated to their original form so their functions are restored. PMID:25646569

  17. Thermo-oxidative stability of graphite fiber/PMR-15 polyimide composites at 350 deg C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    A series of graphite fiber/PMR-15 polyimide composites were subjected to isothermal aging at 350 C in flowing air (100 cc/min and 1000 cc/min) over a 520 hr time period. The graphite fibers were analyzed by ISS/SIMS techniques before composite fabrication. Fibers exposed at the surface of the composite due to the isothermal aging process were also analyzed by the ISS/SIMS method. Component and composite weight less studies were also conducted for similarly exposed materials. Optical micrograph investigations of composites to follow the progress of the thermo-oxidative process were also conducted. Flexural and interlaminar shear strengths of the imaged and aged composites were measured. The relationship of component and composite properties as they relate to the thermo-oxidative behavior of the materials was discussed.

  18. Target delivery to sensors by using generated uniform three fiber pseudo Bessel beams from one source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongki; Lee, Sungrae; Jeong, Yoonseob; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2011-05-01

    A new and flexible method to deliver target particle to sensor through optical trapping with pseudo Bessel beam is presented. Pseudo Bessel beam generator was based upon a Fourier optical system. Single mode fiber (SMF) delivered a fundamental mode without loss. SMF was spliced with Hollow optical fiber (HOF) which served as an annular aperture. A light wave with ring shape was propagated in Coreless Silica Fiber (CSF) and simultaneously transformed a Bessel shape. A Bessel shape with central peak profile will be maintained by a tiny polymer lens on the end of CSF. Delicate control of particle position was enabled by 3 pseudo Bessel beam sources which can be controlled individually. Unique characteristic of Bessel beam allows target particle to have few hundred micrometer tolerance in propagation length and sudden change of propagating direction was achieved by applying another Bessel beam source from other direction. Experimental results on Polystyrene beads which have 4 um diameter are shown. Also, living cell such as Jurkat cell was tested to check practicality.

  19. Supplementing obese Zucker rats with niacin induces the transition of glycolytic to oxidative skeletal muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Rosenbaum, Susann; Gessner, Denise K; Herges, Lea; Kubens, Johanna F; Mooren, Frank-Christoph; Krüger, Karsten; Eder, Klaus

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that niacin increases the oxidative capacity of muscle by increasing the oxidative type I muscle fiber content. Twenty-four obese Zucker rats were assigned to 2 groups of 12 rats that were fed either a control diet (O group) or a diet supplemented with 750 mg/kg diet niacin (O+N group) for 4 wk. In addition, one group of lean rats (L group) was included in the experiment and fed the control diet for 4 wk. Plasma and liver concentrations of TG were markedly greater in obese groups than in the L group but markedly lower in the O+N group than in the O group (P < 0.05). Rats of the O+N group had a higher percentage of oxidative type I fibers and higher mRNA levels of genes encoding regulators of muscle fiber composition (Ppard, Ppargc1a, Ppargc1b), angiogenic factors (Vegfa, Vegfb), and genes involved in fatty acid utilization (Cpt1b, Slc25a20, Slc22a4, Slc22a5, Slc27a1) and oxidative phosphorylation (Cox4i1, Cox6a2) and a higher activity of the mitochondrial oxidative enzyme succinate dehydrogenase in muscle than rats of the O and L groups (P < 0.05). These niacin-induced changes in muscle metabolic phenotype are indicative of an increased capacity of muscle for oxidative utilization of fatty acids and are likely mediated by the upregulation of Ppard, Ppargc1a, and Ppargc1b, which are key regulators of muscle fiber composition, mitochondrial biogenesis, angiogenesis, and genes involved in fatty acid catabolism and oxidative phosphorylation. The increased utilization of fatty acids by muscle might contribute to the strong TG-lowering effect of niacin treatment.

  20. Fiber-Optic SPR Immunosensors Tailored To Target Epithelial Cells through Membrane Receptors.

    PubMed

    Malachovská, Viera; Ribaut, Clotilde; Voisin, Valérie; Surin, Mathieu; Leclère, Philippe; Wattiez, Ruddy; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2015-06-16

    We report, for the first time, the use of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber-optic immunosensor for selective cellular detection through membrane protein targeting. The sensor architecture lies on gold-coated tilted fiber Bragg gratings (Au-coated TFBGs) photoimprinted in the fiber core via a laser technique. TFBGs operate in the near-infrared wavelength range at ∼1550 nm, yielding optical and SPR sensing characteristics that are advantageous for the analyses of cellular bindings and technical compatibility with relatively low-cost telecommunication-grade measurement devices. In this work, we take consider their numerous assets to figure out their ability to selectively detect intact epithelial cells as analytes in cell suspensions in the range of 2-5 × 10(6) cells mL(-1). For this, the probe was first thermally annealed to ensure a strong adhesion of the metallic coating to the fiber surface. Its surface was then functionalized with specific monoclonal antibodies via alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) against extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and characterized by peak force tapping atomic force microscopy. A differential diagnosis has been demonstrated between two model systems. The developed immunosensors were able to monitor, in real time, the specific attachment of single intact cells in concentrations from 3 × 10(6) cells mL(-1). Such results confirm that the developed probe fits the lab-on-fiber technology and has the potential to be used as a disposable device for in situ and real-time clinical diagnosis.

  1. Fiber-Optic SPR Immunosensors Tailored To Target Epithelial Cells through Membrane Receptors.

    PubMed

    Malachovská, Viera; Ribaut, Clotilde; Voisin, Valérie; Surin, Mathieu; Leclère, Philippe; Wattiez, Ruddy; Caucheteur, Christophe

    2015-06-16

    We report, for the first time, the use of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fiber-optic immunosensor for selective cellular detection through membrane protein targeting. The sensor architecture lies on gold-coated tilted fiber Bragg gratings (Au-coated TFBGs) photoimprinted in the fiber core via a laser technique. TFBGs operate in the near-infrared wavelength range at ∼1550 nm, yielding optical and SPR sensing characteristics that are advantageous for the analyses of cellular bindings and technical compatibility with relatively low-cost telecommunication-grade measurement devices. In this work, we take consider their numerous assets to figure out their ability to selectively detect intact epithelial cells as analytes in cell suspensions in the range of 2-5 × 10(6) cells mL(-1). For this, the probe was first thermally annealed to ensure a strong adhesion of the metallic coating to the fiber surface. Its surface was then functionalized with specific monoclonal antibodies via alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) against extracellular domain of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) and characterized by peak force tapping atomic force microscopy. A differential diagnosis has been demonstrated between two model systems. The developed immunosensors were able to monitor, in real time, the specific attachment of single intact cells in concentrations from 3 × 10(6) cells mL(-1). Such results confirm that the developed probe fits the lab-on-fiber technology and has the potential to be used as a disposable device for in situ and real-time clinical diagnosis. PMID:25962700

  2. Graphene oxide vs. reduced graphene oxide as saturable absorbers for Er-doped passively mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Sobon, Grzegorz; Sotor, Jaroslaw; Jagiello, Joanna; Kozinski, Rafal; Zdrojek, Mariusz; Holdynski, Marcin; Paletko, Piotr; Boguslawski, Jakub; Lipinska, Ludwika; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2012-08-13

    In this work we demonstrate comprehensive studies on graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) based saturable absorbers (SA) for mode-locking of Er-doped fiber lasers. The paper describes the fabrication process of both saturable absorbers and detailed comparison of their parameters. Our results show, that there is no significant difference in the laser performance between the investigated SA. Both provided stable, mode-locked operation with sub-400 fs soliton pulses and more than 9 nm optical bandwidth at 1560 nm center wavelength. It has been shown that GO might be successfully used as an efficient SA without the need of its reduction to rGO. Taking into account simpler manufacturing technology and the possibility of mass production, GO seems to be a good candidate as a cost-effective material for saturable absorbers for Er-doped fiber lasers.

  3. The effects of pre-oxidation heating rate on bio-based carbon fibers and its surface repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, H.; Cheng, L. F.; Fan, S. W.; Yuan, X. W.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2015-03-01

    Low-cost carbon fibers (CFs) are fabricated from jute fibers after pre-oxidation, carbonization and surface repair. This paper investigates the effects of pre-oxidation heating rate on jute fibers, and explores a repair method for surface defects of CFs in C/C composite. The results show the reaction mechanism of jute fibers in air is not changed at higher pre-oxidation heating rates while a low heating rate is still required as the oxidation of jute fibers cannot be fully achieved under rapid heating. The tensile strength of CFs increases after repair with a 5% phenolic resin solution. Jute-based CFs play a positive role in C/C composite performance through crack bridging and deflection.

  4. Single Crystal Fibers of Yttria-Stabilized Cubic Zirconia with Ternary Oxide Additions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritzert, F. J.; Yun, H. M.; Miner, R. V.

    1997-01-01

    Single crystal fibers of yttria (Y2O3)-stabilized cubic zirconia, (ZrO2) with ternary oxide additions were grown using the laser float zone fiber processing technique. Ternary additions to the ZrO2-Y2O3 binary system were studied aimed at increasing strength while maintaining the high coefficient of thermal expansion of the binary system. Statistical methods aided in identifying the most promising ternary oxide candidate (Ta2O5, Sc2O3, and HfO2) and optimum composition. The yttria, range investigated was 14 to 24 mol % and the ternary oxide component ranged from 1 to 5 mol %. Hafnium oxide was the most promising ternary oxide component based on 816 C tensile strength results and ease of fabrication. The optimum composition for development was 81 ZrO2-14 Y203-5 HfO2 based upon the same elevated temperature strength tests. Preliminary results indicate process improvements could improve the fiber performance. We also investigated the effect of crystal orientation on strength.

  5. Destruction of monocrystalline silicon with nanosecond pulsed fiber laser accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veiko, V. P.; Skvortsov, A. M.; Huynh, C. T.; Petrov, A. A.

    2013-11-01

    In this work, we report an observation of process of local destruction monocrystalline silicon with a scanning beam irradiation of pulse ytterbium fiber laser with a wavelength λ= 1062 nm, accompanied by the oxidation of ablation microparticles. It is shown that depending on the power density of irradiation was observed a large scatter size of the microparticles. From a certain average power density is observed beginning oxidation particulate emitted from the surface of the irradiated area. By varying the parameters of the laser beam such as scanning speed, pulse repetition rate, overlap of laser spot, radiation dose can be achieved almost complete oxidation of all formed during the ablation of microparticles.

  6. Microfluorescence analysis of nanostructuring inhomogeneity in optical fibers with embedded gallium oxide nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Mashinsky, Valery M; Karatun, Nikita M; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A; Sigaev, Vladimir N; Golubev, Nikita V; Ignat'eva, Elena S; Lorenzi, Roberto; Mozzati, Maria Cristina; Paleari, Alberto; Dianov, Evgeny M

    2012-04-01

    A spectroscopic protocol is proposed to implement confocal microfluorescence imaging to the analysis of microinhomogeneity in the nanocrystallization of the core of fibers belonging to a new kind of broadband fiber amplifier based on glass with embedded nanocrystals. Nanocrystallization, crucial for achieving an adequate light emission efficiency of transition metal ions in these materials, has to be as homogeneous as possible in the fiber to assure optical amplification. This requirement calls for a sensitive method for monitoring nanostructuring in oxide glasses. Here we show that mapping microfluorescence excited at 633 nm by a He-Ne laser may give a useful tool in this regard, thanks to quasi-resonant excitation of coordination defects typical of germanosilicate materials, such as nonbridging oxygens and charged Ge-O-Ge sites, whose fluorescence are shown to undergo spectral modifications when nanocrystals form into the glass. The method has been positively checked on prototypes of optical fibers--preventively characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy--fabricated from preforms of Ni-doped Li₂O-Na₂O-Sb₂O₃-Ga₂O₃-GeO₂-SiO₂ glass in silica cladding and subjected to heat treatment to activate gallium oxide nanocrystal growth. The method indeed enables not only the mapping of the crystallization degree but also the identification of drawing-induced defects in the fiber cladding.

  7. Oxidative stress as a novel target in pediatric sepsis management.

    PubMed

    von Dessauer, Bettina; Bongain, Jazmina; Molina, Víctor; Quilodrán, Julio; Castillo, Rodrigo; Rodrigo, Ramón

    2011-02-01

    Sepsis with secondary multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome is the leading cause of death in the pediatric intensive care unit. Increased reactive oxygen species may influence circulating and endothelial cells, contributing to inflammatory tissue injury and explaining the tissue hypoxia paradigm based on microvascular dysfunction. An impaired mitochondrial cellular oxygen utilization, rather than inadequate oxygen delivery, was claimed to play a more important role in the development of multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome. Anyway, it seems plausible that reactive oxygen species can mediate the pathophysiologic processes occurring in sepsis. However, the consensus guidelines for the management of patients with these conditions do not include the enhancement of antioxidant potential. Therefore, further investigation is needed to support interventions aimed to attenuate the severity of the systemic compromise by abrogating the mechanism of oxidative damage. Antioxidant supplementation currently in use lacks a mechanistic support. Specific pharmacologic targets, such as mitochondria or Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate-Oxidase (NADPH) oxidase system, need to be explored. Furthermore, the early recognition of oxidative damage in these seriously ill patients and the usefulness of oxidative stress biomarkers to define a cut point for more successful therapeutic antioxidant interventions to be instituted would offer a new strategy to improve the outcome of critically ill children.

  8. Highly stable microtubular solid oxide fuel cells based on integrated electrolyte/anode hollow fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiuxia; Yan, Wei; Yang, Naitao; Tan, Xiaoyao; Liu, Shaomin

    2015-02-01

    The asymmetric YSZ hollow fibers have been prepared by a phase-inversion method, based on which, the integrated electrolyte/anode hollow fibers are fabricated via a vacuum-assisted impregnation of nickel nitrate. The content of NiO in the integrated hollow fibers enhances linearly from 0 to 42 wt.% with the impregnation cycles from 0 to 10. The porosity of the integrated electrolyte/anode hollow fibers decreases from 43% to 31% with the repeated impregnation and calcination of Ni catalyst. Its conductivity reaches up to 728 S cm-1 after 10 cycles of impregnation. And the mechanical strength of the integrated hollow fiber enhances from 128 to 156 MPa due to the increased NiO content. Based on the integrated electrolyte/anode hollow fibers, the prepared microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) deliver a peak power density of 562 mW cm-2 after ten cycles of Ni impregnation. The cell stability has been verified in 40 thermal cycles with a steady OCV of 1.1 V and stable power density around 560 mW cm-2 operated at 800 °C.

  9. Vector rectangular-shape laser based on reduced graphene oxide interacting with a long fiber taper.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Zhu, Tao; Huang, Wei; Zeng, Jing

    2014-10-01

    A vector dual-wavelength rectangular-shape laser (RSL) based on a long fiber taper deposited with reduced graphene oxide is proposed, where nonlinearity is enhanced due to a large evanescent-field-interacting length and strong field confinement of an 8 mm fiber taper with a waist diameter of 4 μm. Graphene flakes are deposited uniformly on the taper waist with light pressure effect, so this structure guarantees both excellent saturable absorption and high nonlinearity. The RSL with a repetition rate of 7.9 MHz shows fast polarization switching in two orthogonal polarization directions, and temporal and spectral characteristics are investigated. PMID:25322232

  10. Modification of surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing lifetime of neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. M. Dvoichenkova, O. A.; Evsin, A. E.

    2015-12-15

    The peculiarities of interaction of hydrogen ions with a titanium target and its surface oxide layer were studied. Two ways of modification of the surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing the lifetime of neutron tubes were proposed: (1) deposition of an yttrium oxide barrier layer on the target surface; (2) implementation of neutron tube work regime in which the target is irradiated with ions with energies lower than 1000 eV between high-energy ion irradiation pulses.

  11. Sliding durability of two carbide-oxide candidate high temperature fiber seal materials in air to 900 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    A test program to determine the friction and wear properties of two complex carbide oxide ceramic fibers for high temperature sliding seal applications is described. The fibers are based on Si, C, O, and Ti or Si, C, N, and O ceramic systems. Pin on disk tests using ceramic fiber covered pins and Inconel 718 disks, were conducted in air from 25 to 900 C to evaluate potential seal materials. This testing procedure was used in a previous study of oxide ceramic fibers which were found to exhibit wear behavior based predominantly on their mechanical properties. Like the oxide fibers tested previously, these carbide oxide ceramic fibers, show an increase in friction and wear with increased test temperature. At room temperature, the wear behavior seems to be based upon mechanical properties, namely tensile strength. At 500 and especially 900 C, the fibers wear by both mechanical fracture and by oxidative type wear. Based upon post test microscopic and x ray analyses, interaction between the fiber constituents and elements transferred from the counterface, namely Ni and Cr, may have occurred enhancing the tribochemical wear process. These results are interpreted.

  12. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  13. Molecular weight distribution and functional group profiles of TEMPO-oxidized lyocell fibers.

    PubMed

    Milanovic, Jovana; Schiehser, Sonja; Milanovic, Predrag; Potthast, Antje; Kostic, Mirjana

    2013-10-15

    The effects of TEMPO-mediated oxidation, performed with NaClO, a catalytic amount of NaBr, and 2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy radical (TEMPO), were studied on lyocell fibers by means of GPC using multiple detection and group-selective fluorescence labeling according to the CCOA and FDAM methodology. The applied method determines functional group content as a sum parameter, as well as functional group profiles in relation to the molecular weight of the cellulose fibers. Both the CHO and COOH profiles, as well as molecular weight alterations, were analyzed. A significant decrease in the average molecular weight was obtained during the first hour of TEMPO-mediated oxidation, but prolonged oxidation time resulted in no strong additional chain scission. Significant amounts of COOH groups were introduced in the high molecular weight fractions by the oxidation with higher concentrations of NaClO (2.42-9.67 mmol NaClO/g fiber) after modification times of 1h or longer.

  14. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, Kathrin; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, Michael D.

    2015-04-03

    In this paper, to have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can bemore » utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr n +1Ti n O3 n +1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. Finally, this method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.« less

  15. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, Kathrin; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, Michael D.

    2015-04-03

    In this paper, to have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr n +1Ti n O3 n +1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. Finally, this method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  16. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, K.; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Srn+1TinO3n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  17. Stoichiometry control of complex oxides by sequential pulsed-laser deposition from binary-oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Herklotz, A.; Dörr, K.; Ward, T. Z.; Eres, G.; Christen, H. M.; Biegalski, M. D.

    2015-03-30

    To have precise atomic layer control over interfaces, we examine the growth of complex oxides through the sequential deposition from binary targets by pulsed laser deposition. In situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) is used to control the growth and achieve films with excellent structural quality. The growth from binary oxide targets is fundamentally different from single target growth modes and shows more similarities to shuttered growth by molecular beam epitaxy. The RHEED intensity oscillations of non-stoichiometric growth are consistent with a model of island growth and accumulation of excess material on the surface that can be utilized to determine the correct stoichiometry for growth. Correct monolayer doses can be determined through an envelope frequency in the RHEED intensity oscillations. In order to demonstrate the ability of this growth technique to create complex heterostructures, the artificial n = 2 and 3 Sr{sub n+1}Ti{sub n}O{sub 3n+1} Ruddlesden-Popper phases are grown with good long-range order. This method enables the precise unit-cell level control over the structure of perovskite-type oxides, and thus the growth of complex materials with improved structural quality and electronic functionality.

  18. Enhanced strain and temperature sensing by reduced graphene oxide coated etched fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    S, Sridevi; Vasu, K S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2016-06-01

    This Letter reports on an etched fiber Bragg grating (eFBG) sensor coated with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) having enhanced sensitivity for physical parameters such as strain and temperature. The synergetic effect of the changes in grating pitch and refractive index of RGO with change in temperature or strain enhances the shift in Bragg wavelength (λB). The RGO-coated eFBG sensors exhibit a strain sensitivity of 5.5 pm/μϵ (∼5 times that of bare fiber Bragg gratings) and temperature sensitivity of 33 pm/°C (∼3 times that of bare fiber Bragg gratings). The resolutions of ∼1  μϵ and ∼0.3°C have been obtained for strain and temperature respectively, using RGO-coated eFBG sensors. PMID:27244425

  19. Enhanced strain and temperature sensing by reduced graphene oxide coated etched fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    S, Sridevi; Vasu, K S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2016-06-01

    This Letter reports on an etched fiber Bragg grating (eFBG) sensor coated with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) having enhanced sensitivity for physical parameters such as strain and temperature. The synergetic effect of the changes in grating pitch and refractive index of RGO with change in temperature or strain enhances the shift in Bragg wavelength (λB). The RGO-coated eFBG sensors exhibit a strain sensitivity of 5.5 pm/μϵ (∼5 times that of bare fiber Bragg gratings) and temperature sensitivity of 33 pm/°C (∼3 times that of bare fiber Bragg gratings). The resolutions of ∼1  μϵ and ∼0.3°C have been obtained for strain and temperature respectively, using RGO-coated eFBG sensors.

  20. In situ growth of silver nanoparticles on TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers deposited with metallic nanoparticles as one kind of renewable, biocompatible and antimicrobial nanomaterials evoke much interest because of their versatility in various applications. Herein, for the first time, a facile, simple and rapid method was developed to fabricate TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) selectively oxidized jute fibers in situ deposited with silver nanoparticles in the absence of reducing reagents. The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the fibers is 50.0 ± 2.0 nm by microwave heating for 5 min and 90.0 ± 4.7 nm for 10 min heating sample, respectively. The versatile jute-silver nanoparticles nanocomposites with superior thermal stability and high crystallinity would be particularly useful for applications in the public health care and biomedical fields.

  1. In situ growth of silver nanoparticles on TEMPO-oxidized jute fibers by microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinwang; Ding, Bin; Yu, Jianyong; Al-Deyab, Salem S

    2013-01-30

    Cellulose fibers deposited with metallic nanoparticles as one kind of renewable, biocompatible and antimicrobial nanomaterials evoke much interest because of their versatility in various applications. Herein, for the first time, a facile, simple and rapid method was developed to fabricate TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl radical) selectively oxidized jute fibers in situ deposited with silver nanoparticles in the absence of reducing reagents. The average size of silver nanoparticles deposited on the fibers is 50.0 ± 2.0 nm by microwave heating for 5 min and 90.0 ± 4.7 nm for 10 min heating sample, respectively. The versatile jute-silver nanoparticles nanocomposites with superior thermal stability and high crystallinity would be particularly useful for applications in the public health care and biomedical fields. PMID:23218337

  2. Microstructures in oxide eutectic fibers grown by a modified micro-pulling-down method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Akira; Epelbaum, Boris M.; Hasegawa, Kenji; Durbin, Stephen D.; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    1999-09-01

    The micro-pulling-down method has been adapted to grow fibers with diameters as small as 150 μm. We describe the use of this method to grow fibers of the oxide eutectic materials Al 2O 3/Y 3Al 5O 12 and Al 2O 3/GdAlO 3, which have exceptional mechanical properties at high temperature. The "Chinese script" microstructure of Al 2O 3/Y 3Al 5O 12 is stable and uniform, and varies with the pulling rate in the same way as the conventional lamellar eutectics. The microstructure of Al 2O 3/GdAlO 3 is finer, but less stable and homogeneous, particularly at high pulling rate. Fibers produced at low growth rate exhibited self-cladding by the sapphire phase.

  3. Laser ablation of Drosophila embryonic motoneurons causes ectopic innervation of target muscle fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Keshishian, H.

    1996-01-01

    We have tested the effects of neuromuscular denervation in Drosophila by laser-ablating the RP motoneurons in intact embryos before synaptogenesis. We examined the consequences of this ablation on local synaptic connectivity in both 1st and 3rd instar larvae. We find that the partial or complete loss of native innervation correlates with the appearance of alternate inputs from neighboring motor endings and axons. These collateral inputs are found at ectopic sites on the denervated target muscle fibers. The foreign motor endings are electrophysiologically functional and are observed on the denervated muscle fibers by the 1st instar larval stage. Our data are consistent with the existence of a local signal from the target environment, which is regulated by innervation and influences synaptic connectivity. Our results show that, despite the stereotypy of Drosophila neuromuscular connections, denervation can induce local changes in connectivity in wild-type Drosophila, suggesting that mechanisms of synaptic plasticity may also be involved in normal Drosophila neuromuscular development.

  4. Selected attributes of polyphenols in targeting oxidative stress in cancer.

    PubMed

    Stepanic, Visnja; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Troselj, Koraljka Gall; Amic, Dragan; Zarkovic, Neven

    2015-01-01

    Various plant polyphenols have been recognized as redox active molecules. This review discusses some aspects of polyphenols' modes of redox action, corresponding structure-activity relationships and their potential to be applied as adjuvants to conventional cytostatic drugs. Polyphenols' antioxidative capacity has been discussed as the basis for targeting oxidative stress and, consequently, for their chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory activities, which may alleviate side-effects on normal cells arising from oxidative stress caused by cytostatics. Some polyphenols may scavenge various free radicals directly, and some of them are found to suppress free radical production through inhibiting NADPH oxidases and xanthine oxidase. Additionally, polyphenols may increase antioxidative defense in normal cells by increasing the activity of NRF2, transcription factor for many protective proteins. The activation of the NRF2-mediated signaling pathways in cancer cells results in chemoresistance. Luteolin, apigenin and chrysin reduce NRF2 expression and increase the chemosensitivity of cancer cells to cytostatic drugs. Their common 5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one moiety, may represent a starting pharmacophore model for designing novel, non-toxic compounds for overcoming chemoresistance. However, prooxidative activity of some polyphenols (quercetin, EGCG) may also provide a basis for their use as chemotherapeutic adjuvants since they may enhance cytotoxic effects of cytostatics selectively on cancer cells. However, considerable caution is needed in applying polyphenols to anticancer therapy, since their effects greatly depend on the applied dose, the cell type, exposure time and environmental conditions.

  5. Rapid oxidation/stabilization technique for carbon foams, carbon fibers and C/C composites

    DOEpatents

    Tan, Seng; Tan, Cher-Dip

    2004-05-11

    An enhanced method for the post processing, i.e. oxidation or stabilization, of carbon materials including, but not limited to, carbon foams, carbon fibers, dense carbon-carbon composites, carbon/ceramic and carbon/metal composites, which method requires relatively very short and more effective such processing steps. The introduction of an "oxygen spill over catalyst" into the carbon precursor by blending with the carbon starting material or exposure of the carbon precursor to such a material supplies required oxygen at the atomic level and permits oxidation/stabilization of carbon materials in a fraction of the time and with a fraction of the energy normally required to accomplish such carbon processing steps. Carbon based foams, solids, composites and fiber products made utilizing this method are also described.

  6. Mitochondrial ROS regulate oxidative damage and mitophagy but not age-related muscle fiber atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K.; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P.; Nye, Gareth A.; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I.; Vasilaki, Aphrodite; Griffiths, Richard D.; Jackson, Malcolm J.; McArdle, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and function is a major contributor to morbidity and has a profound effect on the quality of life of older people. The potential role of age-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and cumulative oxidative stress as the underlying cause of muscle aging remains a controversial topic. Here we show that the pharmacological attenuation of age-related mitochondrial redox changes in muscle with SS31 is associated with some improvements in oxidative damage and mitophagy in muscles of old mice. However, this treatment failed to rescue the age-related muscle fiber atrophy associated with muscle atrophy and weakness. Collectively, these data imply that the muscle mitochondrial redox environment is not a key regulator of muscle fiber atrophy during sarcopenia but may play a key role in the decline of mitochondrial organelle integrity that occurs with muscle aging. PMID:27681159

  7. Effect of ammonium-salt solutions on the surface properties of carbon fibers in electrochemical anodic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Wang, Xuefei; Ouyang, Qin; Chen, Yousi; Yan, Qing

    2012-10-01

    The surfaces of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were treated by an electrochemical anodic method. Three different kinds of ammonium-salt solutions namely NH4HCO3, (NH4)2CO3 and (NH4)3PO4 were respectively chosen as the electrolytes. The effect of these electrolytes on the surface structure was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that longitudinal grooves on the fiber surface became more well-defined and much deeper after surface treatment, and the root mean square roughness (RMS) of carbon fiber surface increased from 4.6 nm for untreated fibers to 13.5 nm for treated fibers in (NH4)3PO4 electrolytes. The concentration of oxygen and nitrogen atomic on the fiber surface increased after surface treatment. The tensile strength of oxidized fibers had an obvious decrease, whereas the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) value of corresponding carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) increased in a large extent. The intensity of oxidative reaction varied with the change of ammonium-salt solutions and electrochemical oxidation in (NH4)3PO4 electrolyte was of the most violence. The corresponding mechanism was also discussed and the result showed that the higher the concentration of OH- ions in the electrolytes, the violent the oxidative reaction happened.

  8. Targeted detection of murine colonic dysplasia in vivo with flexible multispectral scanning fiber endoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Bishnu P.; Miller, Sharon J.; Lee, Cameron; Gustad, Adam; Seibel, Eric J.; Wang, Thomas D.

    2012-02-01

    We demonstrate a multi-spectral scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) that collects fluorescence images in vivo from three target peptides that bind specifically to murine colonic adenomas. This ultrathin endoscope was demonstrated in a genetically engineered mouse model of spontaneous colorectal adenomas based on somatic Apc (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene inactivation. The SFE delivers excitation at 440, 532, 635 nm with <2 mW per channel. The target 7-mer peptides were conjugated to visible organic dyes, including 7-Diethylaminocoumarin-3-carboxylic acid (DEAC) (λex=432 nm, λem=472 nm), 5-Carboxytetramethylrhodamine (5-TAMRA) (λex=535 nm, λem=568 nm), and CF-633 (λex=633 nm, λem=650 nm). Target peptides were first validated using techniques of pfu counting, flow cytometry and previously established methods of fluorescence endoscopy. Peptides were applied individually or in combination and detected with fluorescence imaging. The ability to image multiple channels of fluorescence concurrently was successful for all three channels in vitro, while two channels were resolved simultaneously in vivo. Selective binding of the peptide was evident to adenomas and not to adjacent normal-appearing mucosa. Multispectral wide-field fluorescence detection using the SFE is achievable, and this technology has potential to advance early cancer detection and image-guided therapy in human patients by simultaneously visualizing multiple over expressed molecular targets unique to dysplasia.

  9. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  10. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Softwood Lignin in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-10-06

    We investigate the oxidative, thermal conversion of softwood lignin by performing molecular dynamics simulations based on a reactive force field (ReaxFF). The lignin samples are constructed from coniferyl alcohol units, which are connected through linkages that are randomly selected from a natural distribution of linkages in softwood. The goal of this work is to simulate the oxidative stabilization step during carbon fiber production from lignin precursor. We find that at simulation conditions where stabilization reactions occur, the lignin fragments have already undergone extensive degradation. The 5-5 linkage shows the highest reactivity towards cyclization and dehydrogenation.

  11. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  12. System simulation method for fiber-based homodyne multiple target interferometers using short coherence length laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Maik; Beuth, Thorsten; Streck, Andreas; Stork, Wilhelm

    2015-09-01

    Homodyne laser interferometers for velocimetry are well-known optical systems used in many applications. While the detector power output signal of such a system, using a long coherence length laser and a single target, is easily modelled using the Doppler shift, scenarios with a short coherence length source, e.g. an unstabilized semiconductor laser, and multiple weak targets demand a more elaborated approach for simulation. Especially when using fiber components, the actual setup is an important factor for system performance as effects like return losses and multiple way propagation have to be taken into account. If the power received from the targets is in the same region as stray light created in the fiber setup, a complete system simulation becomes a necessity. In previous work, a phasor based signal simulation approach for interferometers based on short coherence length laser sources has been evaluated. To facilitate the use of the signal simulation, a fiber component ray tracer has since been developed that allows the creation of input files for the signal simulation environment. The software uses object oriented MATLAB code, simplifying the entry of different fiber setups and the extension of the ray tracer. Thus, a seamless way from a system description based on arbitrarily interconnected fiber components to a signal simulation for different target scenarios has been established. The ray tracer and signal simulation are being used for the evaluation of interferometer concepts incorporating delay lines to compensate for short coherence length.

  13. Comparison of adenovirus fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres as scaffolds for vector purification and cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Campos, Samuel K.; Barry, Michael A. . E-mail: mab@bcm.edu

    2006-06-05

    The direct genetic modification of adenoviral capsid proteins with new ligands is an attractive means to confer targeted tropism to adenoviral vectors. Although several capsid proteins have been reported to tolerate the genetic fusion of foreign peptides and proteins, direct comparison of cell targeting efficiencies through the different capsomeres has been lacking. Likewise, direct comparison of with one or multiple ligands has not been performed due to a lack of capsid-compatible ligands available for retargeting. Here we utilize a panel of metabolically biotinylated Ad vectors to directly compare targeted transduction through the fiber, protein IX, and hexon capsomeres using a variety of biotinylated ligands including antibodies, transferrin, EGF, and cholera toxin B. These results clearly demonstrate that cell targeting with a variety of high affinity receptor-binding ligands is only effective when transduction is redirected through the fiber protein. In contrast, protein IX and hexon-mediated targeting by the same set of ligands failed to mediate robust vector targeting, perhaps due to aberrant trafficking at the cell surface or inside targeted cells. These data suggest that vector targeting by genetic incorporation of high affinity ligands will likely be most efficient through modification of the adenovirus fiber rather than the protein IX and hexon capsomeres. In contrast, single-step monomeric avidin affinity purification of Ad vectors using the metabolic biotinylation system is most effective through capsomeres like protein IX and hexon.

  14. Chemoprevention with phytochemicals targeting inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2009-01-01

    A regulated low level of nitric oxide (NO) production in the body is essential for maintaining homeostasis (neuroprotection, vasorelaxation, etc.), though certain pathophysiological conditions associated with inflammation involve de novo synthesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in immune cells, including macrophages. A large body of evidence indicates that many inflammatory diseases, such as colitis and gastritis, as well as many types of cancer, occur through sustained and elevated activation of this particular enzyme. The biochemical process of iNOS protein expression is tightly regulated and complex, in which the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide selectively binds to toll-like receptor 4 and thereby activates its adaptor protein MyD88, which in turn targets downstream proteins such as IRAK and TRAF6. This leads to functional activation of key protein kinases, including IkB kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, and ERK1/2, all of which are involved in activating key transcription factors, including nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1. In addition, the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma and interleukin-12 potentiates iNOS induction in autocrine fashions. Meanwhile, an LPS-stimulated p38 MAPK pathway plays a pivotal role in the stabilization of iNOS mRNA, which has the AU-rich element in its 3'-untranslated region, for rapid NO production. Thus, suppression and/or inhibition of the above-mentioned signaling molecules may have a great potential for the prevention and treatment of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In fact, there have been numerous reports of phytochemicals found capable of targeting NO production by unique mechanisms, including polyphenols, terpenoids, and others. This review article briefly highlights the molecular mechanisms underlying endotoxin-induced iNOS expression in macrophages, and also focuses on promising natural agents that may be useful for anti

  15. Adsorption of SO2 onto oxidized and heat-treated activated carbon fibers (ACFS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daley, M.A.; Mangun, C.L.; DeBarr, J.A.; Riha, S.; Lizzio, A.A.; Donnals, G.L.; Economy, J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of activated carbon fibers (ACFs) and heat-treated oxidized ACFs prepared from phenolic fiber precursors have been studied to elucidate the role of pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume for the adsorption of SO2 and its catalytic conversion to H2SO4. For untreated ACFs, the initial rate of SO2 adsorption from flue gas was shown to be inversely related to pore size. At longer times, the amount of SO2 adsorbed from flue gas was dependent on both the pore size and pore volume. Oxidation of the ACFs, using an aqueous oxidant, decreased their adsorption capacity for SO2 from flue gas due to a decrease in pore volume and repulsion of the SO2 from acidic surface groups. If these samples were heat-treated to desorb the oxygen containing function groups, the amount of SO2 adsorption increased. This increase in adsorption capacity was directly correlated to the amount of CO2 evolved during heat-treatment of the oxidized ACFs. The amount of SO2 adsorbed for these samples was related to the pore size, pore surface chemistry and pore volume. This analysis is explained in more detail in this paper. ?? 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermo-Oxidative Stability of Graphite/PMR-15 Composites: Effect of Fiber Surface Modification on Composite Shear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhukar, Madhu S.; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Papadopolous, Demetrios S.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to establish a correlation between the weight loss of a polyimide (PMR- 15) matrix and graphite fibers and the in-plane shear properties of their unidirectional composites subjected to different isothermal aging times up to 1000 hr at 316 C. The role of fiber surface treatment on the composite degradation during the thermo-oxidative aging was investigated by using A4 graphite fibers with three surface modifications: untreated (AU-4), surface treated (AS-4), and surface treated and sized with an epoxy-compatible sizing (AS-4G). The weight loss of the matrix fibers, and composites was determined during the aging. The effect of thermal aging was seen in all the fiber samples in terms of weight loss and reduction in fiber diameter. Calculated values of weight loss fluxes for different surfaces of rectangular unidirectional composite plates showed that the largest weight loss occurred at those cut surfaces where fibers were perpendicular to the surface. Consequently, the largest amount of damage was also noted on these cut surfaces. Optical observation of the neat matrix and composite plates subjected to different aging times revealed that the degradation (such as matrix microcracking and void growth) occurred in a thin surface layer near the specimen edges. The in-plane shear modulus of the composites was unaffected by the fiber surface treatment and the thermal aging. The shear strength of the composites with the untreated fibers was the lowest and it decreased with aging. A fracture surface examination of the composites with untreated fibers suggested that the weak interface allowed the oxidation reaction to proceed along the interface and thus expose the inner material to further oxidation. The results indicated that the fiber-matrix interface affected the composite degradation process during its thermal aging and that the the weak interface accelerated the composite degradation.

  17. Composite polymer/oxide hollow fiber contactors: versatile and scalable flow reactors for heterogeneous catalytic reactions in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Eric G; Negretti, Solymar; Chepiga, Kathryn M; Brunelli, Nicholas A; Labreche, Ying; Feng, Yan; Rezaei, Fateme; Lively, Ryan P; Koros, William J; Davies, Huw M L; Jones, Christopher W

    2015-05-26

    Flexible composite polymer/oxide hollow fibers are used as flow reactors for heterogeneously catalyzed reactions in organic synthesis. The fiber synthesis allows for a variety of supported catalysts to be embedded in the walls of the fibers, thus leading to a diverse set of reactions that can be catalyzed in flow. Additionally, the fiber synthesis is scalable (e.g. several reactor beds containing many fibers in a module may be used) and thus they could potentially be used for the large-scale production of organic compounds. Incorporating heterogeneous catalysts in the walls of the fibers presents an alternative to a traditional packed-bed reactor and avoids large pressure drops, which is a crucial challenge when employing microreactors.

  18. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by /sup 31/P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.H.; Brown, R.L.; Park, C.R.; McCully, K.; Cohn, M.; Haselgrove, J.; Chance, B.

    1987-12-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct P/sub i/ peaks were observed and identified with P/sub i/ pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of P/sub i/ at low pH. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of P/sub i/ were still apparent. The potential of magnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize oxidative and glycolytic fibers, predict capacity for aerobic performance, and signal the presence of muscle pathology is discussed.

  19. Oxidation-resistant interfacial coatings for fiber-reinforced ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; More, Karren L.; Lee, Woo Y.

    1999-04-22

    A ceramic-matrix composite having a multilayered interfacial coating adapted to protect the reinforcing fibers from long-term oxidation, while allowing these to bridge the wake of advancing cracks in the matrix, is provided by selectively mismatching materials within adjacent layers of the interfacial coating, the materials having different coefficients of thermal expansion so that a low toughness interface region is created to promote crack deflection either within an interior layer of the mismatched interfacial coating or between adjacent layers of the mismatched interfacial coating.

  20. The effect of oxidation treatment with supercritical water/hydrogen peroxide system on intersurface performance for polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; Zhang, Chunhua; Jiang, Zaixing; Huang, Yudong

    2013-05-01

    In order to improve the interfacial properties between carbon fibers and epoxy matrix, supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide were used as oxidation medium for the oxidation treatment for carbon fibers. Analysis results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy suggest that the oxygen content on the carbon fibers' surfaces increases by these oxidation treatments. Scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the surface appearance of oxidized carbon fibers obviously changed. The maximal interlaminar shear strength and interface shear strength of carbon fiber/epoxy resin composite in which the fibers were treated by the supercritical water and hydrogen peroxide systems reaches 70.46 MPa and 106.66 MPa, increases by 13.4% and 29.6% respectively compared with untreated carbon fibers.

  1. Graphite Sheet Coating for Improved Thermal Oxidative Stability of Carbon Fiber Reinforced/PMR-15 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Sandi; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Heimann, Paula; Inghram, Linda; McCorkle, Linda

    2005-01-01

    Expanded graphite was compressed into graphite sheets and used as a coating for carbon fiber reinforced PMR-15 composites. BET analysis of the graphite indicated an increase in graphite pore size on compression, however the material was proven to be an effective barrier to oxygen when prepegged with PMR-15 resin. Oxygen permeability of the PMR-15/graphite was an order of magnitude lower than the compressed graphite sheet. By providing a barrier to oxygen permeation, the rate of oxidative degradation of PMR-15 was decreased. As a result, the composite thermo-oxidative stability increased by up to 25%. The addition of a graphite sheet as a top ply on the composites yielded little change in the material's flexural strength or interlaminar shear strength.

  2. From beads-to-wires-to-fibers of tungsten oxide: electrochromic response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadam, P. M.; Tarwal, N. L.; Shinde, P. S.; Patil, R. S.; Deshmukh, H. P.; Patil, P. S.

    2009-11-01

    Suitable host lattice and morphology for easy intercalation and deintercalation process are crucial requirements for electrochromic device. In this investigation, the evolution of structural and morphological changes and their effect on electrochromic (EC) properties of spray-deposited WO3 thin films are studied. Films of different morphologies were deposited from an ammonium tungstate precursor solution using a novel pulsed spray pyrolysis technique (PSPT) on tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates by varying quantity of spraying solution. Interesting morphological transition from beads-to-wires-to-fibers as a function of quantity of sprayed solution has been demonstrated. The porosity, crystallinity and “open” structures in the films consisting of beads, wires, and fiber-like morphology enabled us to correlate these aspects to their EC performance. WO3 films comprising wire-like morphology (20 cc spraying quantity) exhibited better EC properties both in terms of coloration efficiency (42.7 cm2/C) and electrochemical stability (103 colored/bleached cycles) owing to their adequate open structure, porosity, and amorphicity, compared with the films having bead/fiber-like morphology.

  3. Fiber optic humidity sensor based on the graphene oxide/PVA composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Youqing; Shen, Changyu; Lou, Weimin; Shentu, Fengying

    2016-08-01

    Fiber optic humidity sensor based on an in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) coated with graphene oxide (GO)/PVA composite film was investigated. The MZI is constructed of two waist-enlarged tapers. The length between two waist-enlarged tapers is 20 mm. By comparing the experiment results of MZI coated with different GO/PVA composite films, composite film formed by the ratio of 0.3 g PVA mixed with 10 ml GO dispersion shows a better performance of relative humidity sensing. By using the molecular structure model of the composited GO/PVA, the operation mechanism between GO/PVA composite film and water molecules was illustrated. The sensitivity of 0.193 dB/%RH with a linear correlation coefficient of 99.1% and good stability under the relative humidity range of 25-80% was obtained. Temperature effect on the proposed fiber optic humidity sensor was also considered and analyzed. According to the repetitive experimental results, the proposed humidity sensor shows a good repeatability.

  4. Identification and Analyses of AUX-IAA target genes controlling multiple pathways in developing fiber cells of Gossypium hirsutum L.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Deepti; Sawant, Samir V

    2013-01-01

    Technological development led to an increased interest in systems biological approaches in plants to characterize developmental mechanism and candidate genes relevant to specific tissue or cell morphology. AUX-IAA proteins are important plant-specific putative transcription factors. There are several reports on physiological response of this family in Arabidopsis but in cotton fiber the transcriptional network through which AUX-IAA regulated its target genes is still unknown. in-silico modelling of cotton fiber development specific gene expression data (108 microarrays and 22,737 genes) using Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNe) reveals 3690 putative AUX-IAA target genes of which 139 genes were known to be AUX-IAA co-regulated within Arabidopsis. Further AUX-IAA targeted gene regulatory network (GRN) had substantial impact on the transcriptional dynamics of cotton fiber, as showed by, altered TF networks, and Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes and metabolic pathway associated with its target genes. Analysis of the AUX-IAA-correlated gene network reveals multiple functions for AUX-IAA target genes such as unidimensional cell growth, cellular nitrogen compound metabolic process, nucleosome organization, DNA-protein complex and process related to cell wall. These candidate networks/pathways have a variety of profound impacts on such cellular functions as stress response, cell proliferation, and cell differentiation. While these functions are fairly broad, their underlying TF networks may provide a global view of AUX-IAA regulated gene expression and a GRN that guides future studies in understanding role of AUX-IAA box protein and its targets regulating fiber development.

  5. Titanium-Dioxide Nano-Fiber-Cotton Targets for Efficient Multi-keV X-Ray Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, M; Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S; Nagai, K; Yamamoto, N; Gu, Z; Pan, C; Girard, F; Primout, M; Villette, B; Brebion, D; Fournier, K B; Fujishima, A; Mima, K

    2008-06-12

    Multi-keV x-ray generation from low-density (27 {+-} 7 mg/cc) nano-fiber-cotton targets composed of titanium-dioxide has been investigated. The cotton targets were heated volumetrically and supersonically to a peak electron temperature of 2.3 keV, which is optimal to yield Ti K-shell x rays. Considerable enhancement of conversion efficiency (3.7 {+-} 0.5%) from incident laser energy into Ti K-shell x rays (4-6 keV band) was attained in comparison with that (1.4 {+-} 0.9%) for a planar Ti-foil target.

  6. Graphene oxide decorated with silver nanoparticles as a coating on a stainless-steel fiber for solid-phase microextraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Licheng; Hou, Xiudan; Li, Jubai; Liu, Shujuan; Guo, Yong

    2015-07-01

    A novel graphene oxide decorated with silver nanoparticles coating on a stainless-steel fiber for solid-phase microextraction was prepared. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to characterize the coating surface and showed that silver nanoparticles were dispersed on the wrinkled graphene oxide surface. Coupled to gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, the extraction abilities of the fiber for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were examined in the headspace solid-phase microextraction mode. The extraction parameters including adsorption time, adsorption temperature, salt concentration, desorption time and desorption temperature were investigated. Under the optimized condition, wide linearity with low limits of detection from 2 to 10 ng/L was obtained. The relative standard deviations for single-fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were less than 10.6 and 17.5%, respectively. The enrichment factors were from 1712.5 to 4503.7, showing the fiber has good extraction abilities. Moreover, the fiber exhibited a good stability and could be reused for more than 120 times. The established method was also applied for determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two real water samples and the recoveries of analytes ranged from 84.4-116.3% with relative standard deviations less than 16.2%.

  7. Cyclic nucleotide-mediated regulation of hippocampal mossy fiber development: a target-specific guidance.

    PubMed

    Mizuhashi, S; Nishiyama, N; Matsuki, N; Ikegaya, Y

    2001-08-15

    The mossy fibers (MFs) arising from dentate granule cells project primarily onto a narrow segment of the proximal dendrites of hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells. The mechanisms underlying this specific MF target selection are not fully understood. To investigate the cellular basis for development of the stereotyped MF trajectories, we have arranged the fascia dentata and hippocampal Ammon's horn tissues in diverse topographical patterns in organotypic explant coculture systems. Here we show that cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways regulate the MF pathfinding. When the dentate gyrus explants were ectopically placed facing the CA3 stratum oriens of hippocampal slices, MFs crossed the border between cocultures and reached their appropriate target area in the Ammon's horn, as assessed by membrane tracer labeling, Timm staining, electrophysiological recording of synaptic responses, and optical analyses using a voltage-sensitive dye. This lamina-specific MF innervation was disrupted by pharmacological blockade of cGMP pathway. Similar apposition of the dentate grafts near the CA1 region of host slices rarely resulted in MF ingrowth into the Ammon's horn. Under blockade of cAMP pathway, however, the MFs were capable of making allopatric synapses with CA1 neurons. These data were further supported by the pharmacological data obtained from granule cells dispersed over hippocampal slice cultures. Thus, our findings suggest that the stereotyped MF extension is mediated by at least two distinct factors, i.e., an attractant derived from the CA3 region and a repellent from the CA1 region. These factors may be regulated differently by cAMP and cGMP signaling pathways.

  8. Reduced graphene oxide coated optical fiber for methanol and ethanol vapor detection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavinkumar, T.; Sastikumar, D.; Manivannan, S.

    2014-10-01

    Successful isolation of single layer of graphene from graphite by mechanical exfoliation method, attracted a great attention due to its unique structural, optical, mechanical and electronic properties. This makes the graphene as a promising material in many possible applications such as energy-storage, sensing, electronic, optical devices and polymer composite materials. High quality of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) material was prepared by chemical reduction method at 100°C. The structural and optical properties of the rGO sheets were characterized by FT-IR, micro Raman, powder XRD and UV-vis-NIR techniques. FT-IR reveals the absence of oxygen functional groups on rGO due to the reduction process. Powder XRD shows the broad peak at 2θ=24.3° corresponding to interlayer spacing 3.66Å which is smaller than the graphene oxide (GO). UV-vis-NIR of rGO displays the absorption peak at 271 nm indicates the reduction of GO and the restoration of C=C bonds in the rGO sheets. The cladding removed and rGO coated poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) optical fiber is used for methanol and ethanol vapors detection in the concentration ranging from 0 to 500 ppm at room temperature. The spectral characteristics along with output intensity modulation of cladding removed and rGO coated fiber optic sensor reveal the potential of methanol and ethanol vapor sensing properties.

  9. In situ synthesis of manganese oxides on polyester fiber for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinlong; Yunus, Rizwangul; Li, Jinge; Li, Peilin; Zhang, Pengyi; Kim, Jeonghyun

    2015-12-01

    Removal of low-level formaldehyde (HCHO) is of great interest for indoor air quality improvement. Supported materials especially those with low air pressure drop are of necessity for air purification. Manganese oxides (MnOx) was in situ deposited on the surface of fibers of a non-woven fabric made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). As-synthesized MnOx/PET were characterized by SEM, XRD, TEM, ATR-FTIR and XPS analysis. The growth of MnOx layer on PET is thought to start with partial hydrolysis of PET, followed by surface oxidation by KMnO4 and then surface-deposition of MnOx particles from the bulk phase. The MnOx particles assembled with nanosheets were uniformly coated on the PET fibers. MnOx/PET showed good activity for HCHO decomposition at room temperature which followed the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism. The removal of HCHO was kept over 94% after 10 h continuous reaction under the conditions of inlet HCHO concentration ∼0.6 mg/m3, space velocity ∼17,000 h-1 and relative humidity∼50%. This research provides a facile method to deposit active MnOx onto polymers with low air resistance, and composite MnOx/PET material is promising for indoor air purification.

  10. Fabrication and application of zinc-zinc oxide nanosheets coating on an etched stainless steel wire as a selective solid-phase microextraction fiber.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenlan; Guo, Mei; Zhang, Yida; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Du, Xinzhen

    2015-03-01

    A novel zinc-zinc oxide (Zn-ZnO) nanosheets coating was directly fabricated on an etched stainless steel wire substrate as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber via previous electrodeposition of robust Zn coating. The scanning electron micrograph of the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coated fiber exhibits a flower-like nanostructure with high surface area. The SPME performance of as-fabricated fiber was investigated for the concentration and determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phthalates and ultraviolet (UV) filters coupled to high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV). It was found that the Zn-ZnO nanosheets coating exhibited high extraction capability, good selectivity and rapid mass transfer for some UV filters. The main parameters affecting extraction performance were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the calibration graphs were linear over the range of 0.1-200μgL(-1). The limits of detection of the proposed method were 0.052-0.084μgL(-1) (S/N=3). The single fiber repeatability varied from 5.18% to 7.56% and the fiber-to-fiber reproducibility ranged from 6.74% to 8.83% for the extraction of spiked water with 50μgL(-1) UV filters (n=5). The established SPME-HPLC-UV method was successfully applied to the selective concentration and sensitive determination of target UV filters from real environmental water samples with recoveries from 85.8% to 105% at the spiking level of 10μgL(-1) and 30μgL(-1). The relative standard deviations were below 9.7%.

  11. Cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and genotoxicity induced by glass fibers on human alveolar epithelial cell line A549.

    PubMed

    Rapisarda, Venerando; Loreto, Carla; Ledda, Caterina; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Bracci, Massimo; Santarelli, Lory; Renis, Marcella; Ferrante, Margherita; Cardile, Venera

    2015-04-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers have been widely used as insulation material as asbestos substitutes; however their morphology and composition raises concerns. In 1988 the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified fiberglass, rock wool, slag wool, and ceramic fibers as Group 2B, i.e. possibly carcinogenic to humans. In 2002 it reassigned fiberglass, rock and slag wool, and continuous glass filaments to Group 3, not classifiable as carcinogenic to humans. The aim of this study was to verify the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and oxidative stress production induced by in vitro exposure of human alveolar epithelial cells A549 to glass fibers with a predominant diameter <3 μm (97%) and length >5 μm (93%). A549 cells were incubated with 5, 50, or 100 μg/ml (2.1, 21, and 42 μg/cm(2), respectively) of glass fibers for 72 h. Cytotoxicity and DNA damage were tested by the MTT and the Comet assay, respectively. Oxidative stress was determined by measuring inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blotting, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent, and concentration of reactive oxygen species by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). The results showed that glass fiber exposure significantly reduced cell viability and increased DNA damage and oxidative stress production in a concentration-dependent manner, demonstrating that glass fibers exert cytotoxic and genotoxic effects related to increased oxidative stress on the human alveolar cell line A549.

  12. Role of surface chemistry in modified ACF (activated carbon fiber)-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zheng, Di; Zhang, Yitao

    2016-10-01

    A commercial activated carbon fiber (ACF-0) was modified by three different methods: nitration treatment (ACF-N), heat treatment (ACF-H) and heat treatment after nitration (ACF-NH), and the effects of textural and chemical properties on the ability of the metal-free ACF-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), an azo dye being difficultly adsorbed onto ACF, in aqueous solution were investigated in this work. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes, surface morphology and the chemical state inside ACF samples were characterized by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy in couple with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. XPS spectra deconvolution was applied to figure out the importance of surface nitrogen-containing function groups. We found that π-π, pyridine and amine have promoting effect on the catalytic oxidation while the -NO2 has inhibitory effect on the ACF/PMS systems for RB5 destroy. Sustainability and renewability of the typical ACF-NH for catalytic oxidation of RB5 were also discussed in detail. Information about our conclusions are useful to control and improve the performance of ACF-catalyzed PMS oxidation for organic pollutants in wastewater treatment.

  13. [The development of therapeutics targeting oxidative stress in prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Naito, Seiji

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress is caused by increased reactive-oxygen species (ROS) due to augmented ROS production and impaired anti-oxidative capacity. Recently, oxidative stress has been revealed to promote castration resistance via androgen receptor(AR)-dependent pathway such as AR overexpression, AR cofactor, and AR post-translational modification as well as AR-independent pathway, leading to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Therefore, antioxidants therapy using natural and chemical ROS scavengers and inhibitors of ROS production seems to be a promising therapy for CRPC as well as preventing castration resistance. However, at present, the application to therapeutics is limited. Therefore, further research on oxidative stress in prostate cancer, as well as on the development for clinical application would be needed.

  14. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  15. Carob pulp preparation rich in insoluble dietary fiber and polyphenols enhances lipid oxidation and lowers postprandial acylated ghrelin in humans.

    PubMed

    Gruendel, Sindy; Garcia, Ada L; Otto, Baerbel; Mueller, Corinna; Steiniger, Jochen; Weickert, Martin O; Speth, Maria; Katz, Norbert; Koebnick, Corinna

    2006-06-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone that may affect substrate utilization in humans. Ghrelin is influenced by macronutrients, but the effects of insoluble dietary fiber and polyphenols are unknown. We investigated the effects of a polyphenol-rich insoluble dietary fiber preparation from carob pulp (carob fiber) on postprandial ghrelin responses and substrate utilization. Dose-dependent effects of the consumption of carob fiber were investigated in a randomized, single-blind, crossover study in 20 healthy subjects, aged 22-62 y. Plasma total and acylated ghrelin, triglycerides, and serum insulin and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) levels were repeatedly assessed before and after ingestion of an isocaloric standardized liquid meal with 0, 5, 10, or 20 g of carob fiber over a 300-min period. The respiratory quotient (RQ) was determined after consumption of 0 or 20 g of carob fiber. Carob fiber intake lowered acylated ghrelin to 49.1%, triglycerides to 97.2%, and NEFA to 67.2% compared with the control meal (P < 0.001). Total ghrelin and insulin concentrations were not affected by consumption of a carob fiber-enriched liquid meal. Postprandial energy expenditure was increased by 42.3% and RQ was reduced by 99.9% after a liquid meal with carob fiber compared with a control meal (P < 0.001). We showed that the consumption of a carob pulp preparation, an insoluble dietary fiber rich in polyphenols, decreases postprandial responses of acylated ghrelin, triglycerides, and NEFA and alters RQ, suggesting a change toward increased fatty acid oxidation. These results indicate that carob fiber might exert beneficial effects in energy intake and body weight.

  16. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Lorin, Julie; Zeller, Marianne; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Lorgis, Luc; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthetized enzymatically from l-arginine (l-Arg) by three NO synthase isoforms, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS. The synthesis of NO is selectively inhibited by guanidino-substituted analogs of l-Arg or methylarginines such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), which results from protein degradation in cells. Many disease states, including cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, are associated with increased plasma levels of ADMA. The N-terminal catalytic domain of these NOS isoforms binds the heme prosthetic group as well as the redox cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) associated with a regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM). The enzymatic activity of NOS depends on substrate and cofactor availability. The importance of BH(4) as a critical regulator of eNOS function suggests that BH(4) may be a rational therapeutic target in vascular disease states. BH(4) oxidation appears to be a major contributor to vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases as it leads to the increased formation of oxygen-derived radicals due to NOS uncoupling rather than NO. Accordingly, abnormalities in vascular NO production and transport result in endothelial dysfunction leading to various cardiovascular disorders. However, some disorders including a wide range of functions in the neuronal, immune and cardiovascular system were associated with the over-production of NO. Inhibition of the enzyme should be a useful approach to treat these pathologies. Therefore, it appears that both a lack and excess of NO production in diseases can have various important pathological implications. In this context, NOS modulators (exogenous and endogenous) and their therapeutic effects are discussed.

  17. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Lorin, Julie; Zeller, Marianne; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Lorgis, Luc; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthetized enzymatically from l-arginine (l-Arg) by three NO synthase isoforms, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS. The synthesis of NO is selectively inhibited by guanidino-substituted analogs of l-Arg or methylarginines such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), which results from protein degradation in cells. Many disease states, including cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, are associated with increased plasma levels of ADMA. The N-terminal catalytic domain of these NOS isoforms binds the heme prosthetic group as well as the redox cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) associated with a regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM). The enzymatic activity of NOS depends on substrate and cofactor availability. The importance of BH(4) as a critical regulator of eNOS function suggests that BH(4) may be a rational therapeutic target in vascular disease states. BH(4) oxidation appears to be a major contributor to vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases as it leads to the increased formation of oxygen-derived radicals due to NOS uncoupling rather than NO. Accordingly, abnormalities in vascular NO production and transport result in endothelial dysfunction leading to various cardiovascular disorders. However, some disorders including a wide range of functions in the neuronal, immune and cardiovascular system were associated with the over-production of NO. Inhibition of the enzyme should be a useful approach to treat these pathologies. Therefore, it appears that both a lack and excess of NO production in diseases can have various important pathological implications. In this context, NOS modulators (exogenous and endogenous) and their therapeutic effects are discussed. PMID:23859953

  18. Functional pools of oxidative and glycolytic fibers in human muscle observed by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy during exercise.

    PubMed

    Park, J H; Brown, R L; Park, C R; McCully, K; Cohn, M; Haselgrove, J; Chance, B

    1987-12-01

    Quantitative probing of heterogeneous regions in muscle is feasible with phosphorus-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy because of the differentiation of metabolic patterns of glycolytic and oxidative fibers. A differential recruitment of oxidative and glycolytic fibers during exercise was demonstrated in 4 of 10 untrained young men by following changes in phosphate metabolites. Concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphocreatine, and ATP were estimated in the wrist flexor muscles of the forearm at rest, during two cycles of three grades of exercise, and in recovery. At high work levels (40% of maximum strength), two distinct Pi peaks were observed and identified with Pi pools at pH 6.9 and pH 5.9-6.4, respectively. These could be accounted for as follows. At the lowest level of work (using 20% of maximum strength), early recruitment primarily of oxidative (type I) and possibly some intermediate (type IIA) muscle fibers occurs with relatively little net lactate production and consequently little decrease in pH. At higher work loads, however, primarily glycolytic (type IIB) muscle fibers are recruited, which have relatively high net lactate production and therefore generate a second pool of Pi at low pH. ATP depletion (35-54%) and Pi losses accompanied the reduction in ability to perform during the first exercise cycle. When the cycle of graded exercise was repeated immediately, the total Pi remained high but gave rise to only one peak at pH 6.8-7.0. These observations indicated exhaustion of glycolytic type IIB fibers, removal of lactate by high local blood flow, and sustained contractions largely by oxidative type I and IIA fibers. A functional differentiation of fiber types could also be demonstrated during recovery if exercise was stopped while two pools of Pi were still apparent. In the first 3 min of recovery, the Pi peak at pH 6.8-6.9 disappeared almost entirely, whereas the Pi peak at pH 6.0 remained unaltered, reflecting the faster recovery of

  19. Targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for the enhancement of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Anastasia K; Mitov, Mihail I; Daley, Emily F; McGarry, Ronald C; Anderson, Kimberly W; Hilt, J Zach

    2016-10-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiation, iron oxide nanoparticles can be utilized for their ability to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Radiation therapy promotes leakage of electrons from the electron transport chain and leads to an increase in mitochondrial production of the superoxide anion which is converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase. Iron oxide nanoparticles can then catalyze the reaction from hydrogen peroxide to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical. Therefore, the overall aim of this project was to utilize iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to a cell penetrating peptide, TAT, to escape lysosomal encapsulation after internalization by cancer cells and catalyze hydroxyl radical formation. It was determined that TAT functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and uncoated iron oxide nanoparticles resulted in permeabilization of the lysosomal membranes. Additionally, mitochondrial integrity was compromised when A549 cells were treated with both TAT-functionalized nanoparticles and radiation. Pre-treatment with TAT-functionalized nanoparticles also significantly increased the ROS generation associated with radiation. A long term viability study showed that TAT-functionalized nanoparticles combined with radiation resulted in a synergistic combination treatment. This is likely due to the TAT-functionalized nanoparticles sensitizing the cells to subsequent radiation therapy, because the nanoparticles alone did not result in significant toxicities. PMID:27521615

  20. Plant mitochondria: source and target for nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Ratcliffe, R George; Gupta, Kapuganti J

    2014-11-01

    Plant mitochondria generate nitric oxide (NO) under anoxia through the action of cytochrome c oxidase and other electron transport chain components on nitrite. This reductive mechanism operates under aerobic conditions at high electron transport rates. Indirect evidence also indicates that the oxidative pathway of NO production may be associated with mitochondria. We review the consequences of mitochondrial NO production, including the inhibition of oxygen uptake by cytochrome c oxidase, the inhibition of aconitase and succinate dehydrogenase, the induction of alternative oxidase, and the nitrosylation of several proteins, including glycine decarboxylase. The importance of these events in adaptation to abiotic and biotic stresses is discussed.

  1. Product characteristics from the torrefaction of oil palm fiber pellets in inert and oxidative atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hsin; Zhuang, Yi-Qing; Liu, Shih-Hsien; Juang, Tarng-Tzuen; Tsai, Chi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the characteristics of solid and liquid products from the torrefaction of oil palm fiber pellets (OPFP) in inert and oxidative environments. The torrefaction temperature and O2 concentration in the carrier gas were in the ranges of 275-350°C and 0-10 vol%, respectively, while the torrefaction duration was 30 min. The oxidative torrefaction of OPFP at 275°C drastically intensified the HHV of the biomass when compared to the non-oxidative torrefaction. OPFP torrefied at 300°C is recommended to upgrade the biomass, irrespective of the atmosphere. The HHV of condensed liquid was between 10.1 and 13.2 MJ kg(-)(1), and was promoted to 23.2-28.7 MJ kg(-)(1) following dewatering. This accounts for 92-139% improvement in the calorific value of the liquid. This reveals that the recovery of condensed liquid with dewatering is able to enhance the energy efficiency of a torrefaction system.

  2. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1987-10-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Active Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs, and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  3. A monitor and control system for high voltage, gating, and triggering of a scintillating fiber active target

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, B.; Bishop, J.; Gardner, R.W.; Mountain, R.J.; Ruchti, R.; Baumbaugh, A.; Knickerbocker, K.

    1988-02-01

    A monitor and control system has been designed, constructed and tested at Notre Dame for the purpose of controlling all aspects of a Scintillating Fiber Acxtive Target system used in High Energy Physics Experimentation. The SFT Active Target system requires control of high voltages, gating, trigger counters, and monitoring. In addition, it resides in a radioactive area with very limited access. The control system uses a Leading Edge microcomputer, two specialized Z80-based processors, associated DACs, ADCs, discrete semiconductors, linear ICs and TTL and MECL logic. All of the hardware and software is custom-built; its design and performance is discussed.

  4. Nickel oxide and molybdenum oxide thin films for infrared imaging prepared by biased target ion-beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yao; Saint John, David; Jackson, Tom N.; Horn, Mark W.

    2014-06-01

    Vanadium oxide (VOx) thin films have been intensively used as sensing materials for microbolometers. VOx thin films have good bolometric properties such as low resistivity, high negative temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR) and low 1/f noise. However, the processing controllability of VOx fabrication is difficult due to the multiple valence states of vanadium. In this study, metal oxides such as nickel oxide (NiOx) and molybdenum oxide (MoOx) thin films have been investigated as possible new microbolometer sensing materials with improved process controllability. Nickel oxide and molybdenum oxide thin films were prepared by reactive sputtering of nickel and molybdenum metal targets in a biased target ion beam deposition tool. In this deposition system, the Ar+ ion energy (typically lower than 25 eV) and the target bias voltage can be independently controlled since ions are remotely generated. A residual gas analyzer (RGA) is used to precisely control the oxygen partial pressure. A real-time spectroscopic ellipsometry is used to monitor the evolution of microstructure and properties of deposited oxides during growth and post-deposition. The properties of deposited oxide thin films depend on processing parameters. The resistivity of the NiOx thin films is in the range of 0.5 to approximately 100 ohm-cm with a TCR from -2%/K to -3.3%/K, where the resistivity of MoOx is between 3 and 2000 ohm-cm with TCR from -2.1%/K to -3.2%/K. We also report on the thermal stability of these deposited oxide thin films.

  5. Thermal Infrared Reflective Metal Oxide Sol-Gel Coatings for Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richard, Brandon Demar

    Recent trends in composite research include the development of structural materials with multiple functionalities. In new studies, novel materials are being designed, developed, modified, and implemented into composite designs. Typically, an increase in functionality requires additional material phases within one system. The presence of excessive phases can result in deterioration of individual or overall properties. True multi-functional materials must maintain all properties at or above the minimum operating limit. In this project, samples of antimony and cobalt-doped tin oxide (ATO(Co2O 3)) sol-gel solutions are used to coat carbon fibers and are heat treated at a temperature range of 200 - 500 °C. Results from this research are used to model the implementation of sol-gel coatings into carbon fiber reinforced multifunctional composite systems. This research presents a novel thermo-responsive sol-gel/ (dopant) combination and evaluation of the actuating responses (reflectivity and surface heat dissipation) due to various heat treatment temperatures. While ATO is a well-known transparent conductive material, the implementation of ATO on carbon fibers for infrared thermal reflectivity has not been examined. These coatings serve as actuators capable of reflecting thermal infrared radiation in the near infrared wavelengths of 0.7-1.2 μm. By altering the level of Co2O3 and heat treatment temperatures, optimal optical properties are obtained. While scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used for imaging, electron diffraction spectroscopy (EDS) is used to verify the compounds present in the coatings. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was performed to analyze the chemical bonds and reflectivity in the infrared spectra after the heat treatments. Total reflection and angle-dependent reflectivity measurements were performed on the coatings in the wavelengths of 0.7-2 μm. Laser induced damage threshold testing was done to investigate the dielectric breakdown

  6. Thermo-oxidative degradation assessment in quasi-isotropic carbon fiber/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, Connor; Barnard, Dan J.; Jones, Roger W.; McClelland, John F.; Bowler, Nicola

    2015-03-01

    Components made from polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are finding increasing use in armored vehicles for the purpose of weight savings and fuel efficiency. Often times, these PMC components are installed next to engines, or in other high-temperature environments within the vehicle. The present work investigates the change in surface chemistry and its correlation with changes in the interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) due to accelerated thermo-oxidative aging of a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced epoxy laminate. Samples are aged isothermally at various temperatures whose selection is guided by degradation steps revealed by thermo-gravimetric analysis. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) photoacoustic spectroscopy is utilized to identify the chemical changes due to aging, and compression-test results reveal a non-linear decrease in ILSS with increasing aging temperature. A correlation between the FTIR and ILSS data sets suggests that nondestructive FTIR techniques may be used for assessing ILSS of PMCs.

  7. Oxidation of alloys targeted for advanced steam turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, D.E.

    2006-03-12

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on applications in high- and intermediate-pressure turbines.

  8. Fiber-based Coherent Lidar for Target Ranging, Velocimetry, and Atmospheric Wind Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amzajerdian, Farzin; Pierrottet, Diego

    2006-01-01

    By employing a combination of optical heterodyne and linear frequency modulation techniques and utilizing state-of-the-art fiber optic technologies, highly efficient, compact and reliable lidar suitable for operation in a space environment is being developed.

  9. Oxidation of SiC Fiber-Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites with a BN Interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Boyd, Meredith K.

    2010-01-01

    SiC-fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites with a BN interphase were oxidized in reduced oxygen partial pressures of oxygen to simulate the environment for hypersonic vehicle leading edge applications. The constituent fibers as well as composite coupons were oxidized in oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1000 ppm O2 to 5% O2 balance argon. Exposure temperatures ranged from 816 C to 1353 C (1500 F to 2450 F). The oxidation kinetics of the coated fibers were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). An initial rapid transient weight gain was observed followed by parabolic kinetics. Possible mechanisms for the transient oxidation are discussed. One edge of the composite coupon seal coat was ground off to simulate damage to the composite which allowed oxygen ingress to the interior of the composite. Oxidation kinetics of the coupons were characterized by scanning electron microscopy since the weight changes were minimal. It was found that sealing of the coupon edge by silica formation occurred. Differences in the amount and morphology of the sealing silica as a function of time, temperature and oxygen partial pressure are discussed. Implications for use of these materials for hypersonic vehicle leading edge materials are summarized.

  10. Amikacin Optimal Exposure Targets in the Hollow-Fiber System Model of Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Modongo, Chawanga; Siyambalapitiyage Dona, Chandima W; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Deshpande, Devyani; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-10-01

    Aminoglycosides such as amikacin are currently used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). However, formal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies to identify amikacin exposures and dosing schedules that optimize Mycobacterium tuberculosis killing have not been performed. It is believed that aminoglycosides do not work well under acidic conditions, which, if true, would mean poor sterilizing activity against semidormant bacilli at low pH. We performed time-kill studies to compare the bactericidal effect of amikacin in log-phase-growth bacilli with the sterilizing effect in semidormant bacilli at pH 5.8 in broth. In log-phase M. tuberculosis at normal pH versus semidormant M. tuberculosis at pH 5.8, the maximal kill (Emax) estimate and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 5.39 (95% CI, 4.91 to 5.63) versus 4.88 (CI, 4.46 to 5.22) log10 CFU/ml, while the concentration mediating 50% of Emax (EC50) was 1.0 (CI, 0. 0.86 to 1.12) versus 0.60 (CI, 0.50 to 0.66) times the MIC, respectively. Thus, the optimal exposures and kill rates identified for log-phase M. tuberculosis will be optimal even for semidormant bacilli. Next, we performed exposure-response and dose-scheduling studies in the hollow-fiber system model of tuberculosis using log-phase M. tuberculosis We recapitulated the amikacin concentration-time profiles observed in lungs of patients treated over 28 days. The PK/PD index linked to M. tuberculosis kill was the peak concentration (Cmax)-to-MIC ratio (r(2) > 0.99), closely followed by the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24)-to-MIC ratio (r(2) = 0.98). The EC90 was a Cmax/MIC ratio of 10.13 (95% CI, 7.73 to 12.48). The EC90 is the dosing target for intermittent therapy that optimizes cure in TB programs for MDR-TB patients. PMID:27458215

  11. Amikacin Optimal Exposure Targets in the Hollow-Fiber System Model of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shashikant; Modongo, Chawanga; Siyambalapitiyage Dona, Chandima W.; Pasipanodya, Jotam G.; Deshpande, Devyani

    2016-01-01

    Aminoglycosides such as amikacin are currently used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). However, formal pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies to identify amikacin exposures and dosing schedules that optimize Mycobacterium tuberculosis killing have not been performed. It is believed that aminoglycosides do not work well under acidic conditions, which, if true, would mean poor sterilizing activity against semidormant bacilli at low pH. We performed time-kill studies to compare the bactericidal effect of amikacin in log-phase-growth bacilli with the sterilizing effect in semidormant bacilli at pH 5.8 in broth. In log-phase M. tuberculosis at normal pH versus semidormant M. tuberculosis at pH 5.8, the maximal kill (Emax) estimate and 95% confidence interval (CI) were 5.39 (95% CI, 4.91 to 5.63) versus 4.88 (CI, 4.46 to 5.22) log10 CFU/ml, while the concentration mediating 50% of Emax (EC50) was 1.0 (CI, 0. 0.86 to 1.12) versus 0.60 (CI, 0.50 to 0.66) times the MIC, respectively. Thus, the optimal exposures and kill rates identified for log-phase M. tuberculosis will be optimal even for semidormant bacilli. Next, we performed exposure-response and dose-scheduling studies in the hollow-fiber system model of tuberculosis using log-phase M. tuberculosis. We recapitulated the amikacin concentration-time profiles observed in lungs of patients treated over 28 days. The PK/PD index linked to M. tuberculosis kill was the peak concentration (Cmax)-to-MIC ratio (r2 > 0.99), closely followed by the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0–24)-to-MIC ratio (r2 = 0.98). The EC90 was a Cmax/MIC ratio of 10.13 (95% CI, 7.73 to 12.48). The EC90 is the dosing target for intermittent therapy that optimizes cure in TB programs for MDR-TB patients. PMID:27458215

  12. Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide saturable absorber and singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Zulkifli, A. Z.; Yasin, M.; Thambiratnam, K.

    2016-10-01

    A Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide-based saturable absorber to generate the desired output pulses is proposed and demonstrated. The system utilizes a singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure to control the net losses in the cavity so that only two dominant wavelengths are allowed to oscillate. The proposed system is capable of generating an output with a high repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a narrow pulse width of 4.03 µs. The output pulses also have average output power and pulse energy of up to 0.5 mW and 18.5 nJ, respectively. The 1st harmonic obtained has a high signal-to-noise ratio of 33.2 dB, indicating a highly stable pulse output with minimum mode hopping.

  13. Adhesive force measurement between HOPG and zinc oxide as an indicator for interfacial bonding of carbon fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Brendan A; Galan, Ulises; Sodano, Henry A

    2015-07-22

    Vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires have recently been utilized as an interphase to increase the interfacial strength of carbon fiber composites. It was shown that the interaction between the carbon fiber and the ZnO nanowires was a critical parameter in adhesion; however, fiber based testing techniques are dominated by local defects and cannot be used to effectively study the bonding interaction directly. Here, the strength of the interface between ZnO and graphitic carbon is directly measured with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using oxygen plasma treated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and an AFM tip coated with ZnO nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis is used to compare the surface chemistry of HOPG and carbon fiber and to quantify the presence of various oxygen functional groups. An indirect measurement of the interfacial strength is then performed through single fiber fragmentation testing (SFF) on functionalized carbon fibers coated with ZnO nanowires to validate the AFM measurements. The SFF and AFM methods showed the same correlation, demonstrating the capacity of the AFM method to study the interfacial properties in composite materials. Additionally, the chemical interactions between oxygen functional groups and the ionic structure of ZnO suggest that intermolecular forces at the interface are responsible for the strong interface.

  14. Comparison of infiltrated ceramic fiber paper and mica base compressive seals for planar solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Shiru; Sun, Kening; Zhang, Naiqing; Shao, Yanbin; An, Maozhong; Fu, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaodong

    Solid oxide fuel cells using non-glass sealants have become increasingly common. In this paper, fumed silica infiltrated ceramic fiber paper with pre-compression was compared with plain and pre-compressed at 10 MPa hybrid mica as compressive seals. Leakage tests were measured under a 0.1-1.0 MPa compressive load with the pressure gradient varying from 2 to 15 kPa. The results demonstrated that the leakage rate of infiltrated fiber paper was 0.04 sccm cm -1 for a 10 kPa gradient, under 1.0 MPa compressive load, while for mica it was 0.60 and 0.63 sccm cm -1 which indicated that the infiltrated ceramic fiber paper showed a much lower leakage than mica. Long-term thermal cycling tests demonstrated that although the leakage of fumed silica infiltrated fiber paper was slightly higher than that of hybrid mica, it remained stable after 20 thermal cycles and no interlayer was needed. The mass loss of the fiber paper was 1.7 × 10 -2 mg cm -2 h -1 in a hydrogen environment at 1073 K for 200 h. The leakage of infiltrated fiber paper remained about 0.06 sccm cm -1 after reduction.

  15. Biodistribution of antibody-targeted and non-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles in a breast cancer mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Jennifer A.; Kett, Warren; NDong, Christian; Griswold, Karl E.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) hyperthermia is a novel therapeutic strategy currently under consideration for the treatment of various cancer types. Systemic delivery of IONP followed by non-invasive activation via a local alternating magnetic field (AMF) results in site-specific energy deposition in the IONP-containing tumor. Targeting IONP to the tumor using an antibody or antibody fragment conjugated to the surface may enhance the intratumoral deposition of IONP and is currently being pursued by many nanoparticle researchers. This strategy, however, is subject to a variety of restrictions in the in vivo environment, where other aspects of IONP design will strongly influence the biodistribution. In these studies, various targeted IONP are compared to non-targeted controls. IONP were injected into BT-474 tumor-bearing NSG mice and tissues harvested 24hrs post-injection. Results indicate no significant difference between the various targeted IONP and the non-targeted controls, suggesting the IONP were prohibitively-sized to incur tumor penetration. Additional strategies are currently being pursued in conjuncture with targeted particles to increase the intratumoral deposition.

  16. Free radical activity of industrial fibers: role of iron in oxidative stress and activation of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, P S; Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; MacNee, W; Rahman, I; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied asbestos, vitreous fiber (MMVF10), and refractory ceramic fiber (RCF1) from the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers' Association fiber repository regarding the following: free radical damage to plasmid DNA, iron release, ability to deplete glutathione (GSH), and activate redox-sensitive transcription factors in macrophages. Asbestos had much more free radical activity than any of the man-made vitreous fibers. More Fe3+ was released than Fe2+ and more of both was released at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.2. Release of iron from the different fibers was generally not a good correlate of ability to cause free radical injury to the plasmid DNA. All fiber types caused some degree of oxidative stress, as revealed by depletion of intracellular GSH. Amosite asbestos upregulated nuclear binding of activator protein 1 transcription factor to a greater level than MMVF10 and RCF1; long-fiber amosite was the only fiber to enhance activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B). The use of cysteine methyl ester and buthionine sulfoximine to modulate GSH suggested that GSH homeostasis was important in leading to activation of transcription factors. We conclude that the intrinsic free radical activity is the major determinant of transcription factor activation and therefore gene expression in alveolar macrophages. Although this was not related to iron release or ability to deplete macrophage GSH at 4 hr, GSH does play a role in activation of NF kappa B. Images Figure 1. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:9400744

  17. Fatty acid oxidation and carnitine palmitoyltransferase I: emerging therapeutic targets in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Q; Zeng, F; Liu, X; Wang, Q J; Deng, F

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit unique metabolic adaptations that are increasingly viewed as potential targets for novel and specific cancer therapies. Among these targets, the carnitine palmitoyltransferase system is responsible for delivering the long-chain fatty acid (FA) from cytoplasm into mitochondria for oxidation, where carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (CPTI) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). With increasing understanding of the crucial role had by fatty acid oxidation in cancer, CPTI has received renewed attention as a pivotal mediator in cancer metabolic mechanism. CPTI activates FAO and fuels cancer growth via ATP and NADPH production, constituting an essential part of cancer metabolism adaptation. Moreover, CPTI also functionally intertwines with other key pathways and factors to regulate gene expression and apoptosis of cancer cell. Here, we summarize recent findings and update the current understanding of FAO and CPTI in cancer and provide theoretical basis for this enzyme as an emerging potential molecular target in cancer therapeutic intervention. PMID:27195673

  18. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Kong, E.Y.; Yeung, W.K.; Chan, T.K.Y.; Cheng, S.H.; Yu, K.N.

    2016-01-01

    The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) revealed through acridine orange (AO) staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies. PMID:27529238

  19. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Kong, E Y; Yeung, W K; Chan, T K Y; Cheng, S H; Yu, K N

    2016-01-01

    The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio), as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO) on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf) revealed through acridine orange (AO) staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies. PMID:27529238

  20. Ablation of oxide materials and production of nanopowders by ytterbium fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, Vladimir V.; Lisenkov, Vasily V.; Platonov, Vladislav V.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, laser radiation action on Nd3+:Y2O3 targets having the absorption 13-1.7 × 103 cm-1 is studied. During the experiment, we used the ytterbium fiber laser, which can operate both in continuous and pulse mode with the pulse duration time 0.1-1.9 ms. Laser radiation power was 200-700 W, and power density was (0.2-1.2) × 106 W/cm2. We found out the spike behavior of laser plume luminescence, large statistical variability of delay time of laser plume appearance, and spallation of front surface of the target. Aiming to explain these facts, we developed the numeric model of radiation impact on substance with non-uniform absorption coefficient. We found out the optimal laser oblation mode for nanopowder production. At laser power of 700 W, we received Nd3+:Y2O3 nanopowder with productivity up to 27 g/h. Average size of nanoparticles is 13.6 nm, and their phase is monoclinic.

  1. Drug Targets for Oxidative Podocyte Injury in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Usman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one the most prevalent chronic complications of diabetes mellitus that affects as much as one-third of diabetic patients irrespective of the type of diabetes. Hyperglycemia is the key trigger for DN that initiates a number of microscopic and ultramicroscopic changes in kidney architecture. Microscopic changes include thickening of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM), tubular basement membrane (TBM), mesangial proliferation, arteriosclerosis, and glomerulotubular junction abnormalities (GTJA). Among the ultramicroscopic changes, effacement of podocytes and decrease in their density seem to be the centerpiece of DN pathogenesis. These changes in kidney architecture then produce functional deficits, such as microalbuminuria and decreased glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Among several mechanisms involved in inflicting damage to podocytes, injuries sustained by increased oxidative stress turns out to be the most important mechanism. Different variables that are included in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) include a hyperglycemia-induced reduction in glutathione (GSH), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activation via hyperglycemia, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), protein kinase C (PKC), and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Unfortunately, control of podocyte injury hasn’t received much attention as a treatment approach for DN. Therefore, this review article is mainly concerned with the exploration of various treatment options that might help in decreasing the podocyte injury, mainly by reducing the level of NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of ROS. This article concludes with a view that certain NADPH oxidase inhibitors, RAAS inhibitors, statins, antidiabetic drugs, and antioxidant vitamins might be useful in decreasing podocyte injury and resultant structural and functional kidney impairments in DN. PMID:26798569

  2. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Fang, David D; Zeng, Linghe; Song, Xianliang; Delhom, Christopher D; Condon, Tracy L; Li, Ping; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-06-01

    Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes.

  3. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    PubMed Central

    Thyssen, Gregory N.; Fang, David D.; Zeng, Linghe; Song, Xianliang; Delhom, Christopher D.; Condon, Tracy L.; Li, Ping; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum. Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes. PMID:27172184

  4. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) Is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-Shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene.

    PubMed

    Thyssen, Gregory N; Fang, David D; Zeng, Linghe; Song, Xianliang; Delhom, Christopher D; Condon, Tracy L; Li, Ping; Kim, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cotton seed trichomes are the most important source of natural fibers globally. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material, and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process that was previously shown to involve mitochondrial function in allotetraploid Gossypium hirsutum Here, we present the fine genetic mapping of the im locus, gene expression analysis of annotated proteins near the locus, and association analysis of the linked markers. Mapping-by-sequencing identified a 22-bp deletion in a pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene that is completely linked to the immature fiber phenotype in 2837 F2 plants, and is absent from all 163 cultivated varieties tested, although other closely linked marker polymorphisms are prevalent in the diversity panel. This frame-shift mutation results in a transcript with two long open reading frames: one containing the N-terminal transit peptide that targets mitochondria, the other containing only the RNA-binding PPR domains, suggesting that a functional PPR protein cannot be targeted to mitochondria in the im mutant. Taken together, these results suggest that PPR gene Gh_A03G0489 is involved in the cotton fiber wall thickening process, and is a promising candidate gene at the im locus. Our findings expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that modulate cotton fiber fineness and maturity, and may facilitate the development of cotton varieties with superior fiber attributes. PMID:27172184

  5. Oxidized ethyl linoleate induces mucosal hypertrophy of the large intestine and affects cecal fermentation of dietary fiber in rats.

    PubMed

    Hara, H; Miyashita, K; Ito, S; Kasai, T

    1996-04-01

    Oxidized ethyl linoleate (OEL) was prepared by aeration at low temperature. Peroxide value (POV, mEq/kg lipid) of OEL was 1400; the major oxidized compounds were 9-hydroperoxy-cis, trans- and 13-hydroperoxy-trans, cis-octadecadienoate. Rats fed fiber-free or sugar-beet fiber (SBF, 100g/kg diet) diets were divided into three groups for each diet, and administered OEL (high OEL group), OEL diluted with ethyl linoleate (low OEL group, POV 700) and nonoxidized ethyl linoleate (EL group) through gastric tubes each day at 1400-1600 h (2.5 g/kg body wt) for 16 d. The relative wet weight, and DNA and protein contents of the cecal mucosa were higher in the high OEL groups than in the low OEL and EL groups in rats fed the fiber-free diet and in rats fed the SBF diet except for mucosal protein content. Spermidine concentration in cecal mucosa of rats fed the fiber-free diet was greater in the high OEL group than in the EL group. These results suggest that metabolism related to mucosal proliferation of the cecum was affected by the high dose of OEL. The total short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration in the cecal contents of SBF-fed rats was 100% higher than the concentration in rats fed the fiber-free diet in the EL group, but the administration of low dose and high dose OEL lowered the SCFA concentration in fiber-fed rats to that of rats fed the fiber-free diet. Butyric acid concentration was markedly lowered by ingestion of OEL in a dose-dependent manner in rats fed the SBF diet. In contrast, the isobutyric acid concentration was higher in the OEL-treated groups than in the EL groups. We conclude that a low dose of OEL depresses cecal fermentation of dietary fiber with changes in SCFA composition, and that a high dose of OEL induces mucosal hypertrophy in the cecum. These data show that dietary oxidized lipids affect cecal metabolism and may be associated with colon cancer.

  6. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite Modeled as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Cawley, James D.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation model simulates the oxidation of the reinforcing carbon fibers within a ceramic matrix composite material containing as-fabricated microcracks. The physics-based oxidation model uses theoretically and experimentally determined variables as input for the model. The model simulates the ingress of oxygen through microcracks into a two-dimensional plane within the composite material. Model input includes temperature, oxygen concentration, the reaction rate constant, the diffusion coefficient, and the crack opening width as a function of the mechanical and thermal loads. The model is run in an iterative process for a two-dimensional grid system in which oxygen diffuses through the porous and cracked regions of the material and reacts with carbon in short time steps. The model allows the local oxygen concentrations and carbon volumes from the edge to the interior of the composite to be determined over time. Oxidation damage predicted by the model was compared with that observed from microstructural analysis of experimentally tested composite material to validate the model for two temperatures of interest. When the model is run for low-temperature conditions, the kinetics are reaction controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur relatively slowly. Therefore, oxygen can bypass the carbon near the outer edge and diffuse into the interior so that it saturates the entire composite at relatively high concentrations. The kinetics are limited by the reaction rate between carbon and oxygen. This results in an interior that has high local concentrations of oxygen and a similar amount of consumed carbon throughout the cross section. When the model is run for high-temperature conditions, the kinetics are diffusion controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur very quickly. The carbon consumes oxygen as soon as it is supplied. The kinetics are limited by the relatively slow rate at which oxygen is supplied in comparison to the relatively fast rate at which carbon and

  7. Targeting oxidant-dependent mechanisms for the treatment of COPD and its comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Ivan; Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross

    2015-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an incurable global health burden and is characterised by progressive airflow limitation and loss of lung function. In addition to the pulmonary impact of the disease, COPD patients often develop comorbid diseases such as cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle wasting, lung cancer and osteoporosis. One key feature of COPD, yet often underappreciated, is the contribution of oxidative stress in the onset and development of the disease. Patients experience an increased burden of oxidative stress due to the combined effects of excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) generation, antioxidant depletion and reduced antioxidant enzyme activity. Currently, there is a lack of effective treatments for COPD, and an even greater lack of research regarding interventions that treat both COPD and its comorbidities. Due to the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of COPD and many of its comorbidities, a unique therapeutic opportunity arises where the treatment of a multitude of diseases may be possible with only one therapeutic target. In this review, oxidative stress and the roles of ROS/RNS in the context of COPD and comorbid cardiovascular disease, skeletal muscle wasting, lung cancer, and osteoporosis are discussed and the potential for therapeutic benefit of anti-oxidative treatment in these conditions is outlined. Because of the unique interplay between oxidative stress and these diseases, oxidative stress represents a novel target for the treatment of COPD and its comorbidities. PMID:26297673

  8. Suppressing iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity by vascular targeted antioxidant polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cochran, David B; Wattamwar, Paritosh P; Wydra, Robert; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W; Eitel, Richard E; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    The biomedical use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been of continued interest in the literature and clinic. Their ability to be used as contrast agents for imaging and/or responsive agents for remote actuation makes them exciting materials for a wide range of clinical applications. Recently, however, concern has arisen regarding the potential health effects of these particles. Iron oxide toxicity has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models, with oxidative stress being implicated as playing a key role in this pathology. One of the key cell types implicated in this injury is the vascular endothelial cells. Here, we report on the development of a targeted polymeric antioxidant, poly(trolox ester), nanoparticle that can suppress oxidative damage. As the polymer undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis, active trolox is locally released, providing a long term protection against pro-oxidant agents. In this work, poly(trolox) nanoparticles are targeted to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecules (PECAM-1), which are able to bind to and internalize in endothelial cells and provide localized protection against the cytotoxicity caused by iron oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate the potential of using poly(trolox ester) as a means of mitigating iron oxide toxicity, potentially expanding the clinical use and relevance of these exciting systems.

  9. Effects of working pressure on physical properties of tungsten-oxide thin films sputtered from oxide target

    SciTech Connect

    Riech, I.; Acosta, M.; Pena, J. L.; Bartolo-Perez, P.

    2010-03-15

    Tungsten-oxide films were deposited on glass substrates from a metal-oxide target by nonreactive radio-frequency sputtering. The authors have studied the effect that changing Ar gas pressure has on the electrical, optical, and chemical composition in the thin films. Resistivity of WO{sub 3} changed ten orders of magnitude with working gas pressure values from 20 to 80 mTorr. Thin films deposited at 20 mTorr of Ar sputtering pressure showed lower resistivity and optical transmittance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements revealed similar chemical composition for all samples irrespective of Ar pressure used. However, XPS analyses of the evolution of W 4f and O 1s peaks indicated a mixture of oxides dependent on the Ar pressure used during deposition.

  10. Effect of nickel impregnated hollow fiber anode for micro tubular solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Beibei; Ling, Yihan; Xu, Jianmei; Zhao, Ling; Cheng, Jigui

    2014-07-01

    A micro tubular solid oxide fuel cells (MT-SOFCs) with a cell configuration of Ni impregnated Ni-Gd0.1Ce0.9O1.95 (GDC)/GDC/La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF)-GDC has been prepared by the phase inversion and impregnation technique. A special asymmetrical structure consisting of a sponge-like layer and a finger-like porous layer for hollow fiber anode is obtained by the phase inversion. Fine Ni specie particles are then coated on the surface of anode using impregnation method. The enhancement in electronic conductivity of anode by Ni modification is beneficial to current collection of MT-SOFCs. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of anode is also improved due to the introduction of Ni nano-particles. Thus, the Ni modified MT-SOFCs exhibit high power densities, such as 0.69 W cm-2 at 600 °C. The encouraging results demonstrate that the Ni impregnation is an effective way to improve anode microstructure of MT-SOFCs.

  11. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO32-) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl62- ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m2 g-1), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg-1), high current density (20.0 mA cm-2), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  12. Maximal oxygen uptake is proportional to muscle fiber oxidative capacity, from chronic heart failure patients to professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; de Ruiter, Jo C; Noordhof, Dionne A; Sterrenburg, Renske; Bloemers, Frank W; de Koning, Jos J; Jaspers, Richard T; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2016-09-01

    V̇o2 max during whole body exercise is presumably constrained by oxygen delivery to mitochondria rather than by mitochondria's ability to consume oxygen. Humans and animals have been reported to exploit only 60-80% of their mitochondrial oxidative capacity at maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max). However, ex vivo quantification of mitochondrial overcapacity is complicated by isolation or permeabilization procedures. An alternative method for estimating mitochondrial oxidative capacity is via enzyme histochemical quantification of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. We determined to what extent V̇o2 max attained during cycling exercise differs from mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity of vastus lateralis muscle in chronic heart failure patients, healthy controls, and cyclists. V̇o2 max was assessed in 20 healthy subjects and 28 cyclists, and SDH activity was determined from biopsy cryosections of vastus lateralis using quantitative histochemistry. Similar data from our laboratory of 14 chronic heart failure patients and 6 controls were included. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity was predicted from SDH activity using estimated skeletal muscle mass and the relationship between ex vivo fiber V̇o2 max and SDH activity of isolated single muscle fibers and myocardial trabecula under hyperoxic conditions. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity was related (r(2) = 0.89, P < 0.001) to V̇o2 max measured during cycling in subjects with V̇o2 max ranging from 9.8 to 79.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) V̇o2 max measured during cycling was on average 90 ± 14% of mitochondrial oxidative capacity. We conclude that human V̇o2 max is related to mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from skeletal muscle SDH activity. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity is likely marginally limited by oxygen supply to mitochondria. PMID:27445298

  13. Maximal oxygen uptake is proportional to muscle fiber oxidative capacity, from chronic heart failure patients to professional cyclists.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; de Ruiter, C Jo; Noordhof, Dionne A; Sterrenburg, Renske; Bloemers, Frank W; de Koning, Jos J; Jaspers, Richard T; van der Laarse, Willem J

    2016-09-01

    V̇o2 max during whole body exercise is presumably constrained by oxygen delivery to mitochondria rather than by mitochondria's ability to consume oxygen. Humans and animals have been reported to exploit only 60-80% of their mitochondrial oxidative capacity at maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2 max). However, ex vivo quantification of mitochondrial overcapacity is complicated by isolation or permeabilization procedures. An alternative method for estimating mitochondrial oxidative capacity is via enzyme histochemical quantification of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. We determined to what extent V̇o2 max attained during cycling exercise differs from mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity of vastus lateralis muscle in chronic heart failure patients, healthy controls, and cyclists. V̇o2 max was assessed in 20 healthy subjects and 28 cyclists, and SDH activity was determined from biopsy cryosections of vastus lateralis using quantitative histochemistry. Similar data from our laboratory of 14 chronic heart failure patients and 6 controls were included. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity was predicted from SDH activity using estimated skeletal muscle mass and the relationship between ex vivo fiber V̇o2 max and SDH activity of isolated single muscle fibers and myocardial trabecula under hyperoxic conditions. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from SDH activity was related (r(2) = 0.89, P < 0.001) to V̇o2 max measured during cycling in subjects with V̇o2 max ranging from 9.8 to 79.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) V̇o2 max measured during cycling was on average 90 ± 14% of mitochondrial oxidative capacity. We conclude that human V̇o2 max is related to mitochondrial oxidative capacity predicted from skeletal muscle SDH activity. Mitochondrial oxidative capacity is likely marginally limited by oxygen supply to mitochondria.

  14. Targeting multiple types of tumors using NKG2D-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ru; Cook, W James; Zhang, Tong; Sentman, Charles L

    2014-11-28

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) hold great potential for cancer therapy. Actively targeting IONPs to tumor cells can further increase therapeutic efficacy and decrease off-target side effects. To target tumor cells, a natural killer (NK) cell activating receptor, NKG2D, was utilized to develop pan-tumor targeting IONPs. NKG2D ligands are expressed on many tumor types and its ligands are not found on most normal tissues under steady state conditions. The data showed that mouse and human fragment crystallizable (Fc)-fusion NKG2D (Fc-NKG2D) coated IONPs (NKG2D/NPs) can target multiple NKG2D ligand positive tumor types in vitro in a dose dependent manner by magnetic cell sorting. Tumor targeting effect was robust even under a very low tumor cell to normal cell ratio and targeting efficiency correlated with NKG2D ligand expression level on tumor cells. Furthermore, the magnetic separation platform utilized to test NKG2D/NP specificity has the potential to be developed into high throughput screening strategies to identify ideal fusion proteins or antibodies for targeting IONPs. In conclusion, NKG2D/NPs can be used to target multiple tumor types and magnetic separation platform can facilitate the proof-of-concept phase of tumor targeting IONP development.

  15. Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

    2014-01-01

    Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system.

  16. microRNAs: Emerging Targets Regulating Oxidative Stress in the Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yangmei; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. This chronic, progressive disease is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions called Lewy bodies (LBs) in surviving neurons. PD is attributed to a combination of environment and genetic factors, but the precise underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Oxidative stress is generally recognized as one of the main causes of PD, and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to DA neuron vulnerability and eventual death. Several studies have demonstrated that small non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo models of PD. Relevant miRNAs involved in oxidative stress can prevent ROS-mediated damage to DA neurons, suggesting that specific miRNAs may be putative targets for novel therapeutic targets in PD. PMID:27445669

  17. microRNAs: Emerging Targets Regulating Oxidative Stress in the Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangmei; Chen, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. This chronic, progressive disease is characterized by loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the presence of cytoplasmic inclusions called Lewy bodies (LBs) in surviving neurons. PD is attributed to a combination of environment and genetic factors, but the precise underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Oxidative stress is generally recognized as one of the main causes of PD, and excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to DA neuron vulnerability and eventual death. Several studies have demonstrated that small non-coding RNAs termed microRNAs (miRNAs) can regulate oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo models of PD. Relevant miRNAs involved in oxidative stress can prevent ROS-mediated damage to DA neurons, suggesting that specific miRNAs may be putative targets for novel therapeutic targets in PD. PMID:27445669

  18. Induced Clustered Nanoconfinement of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhances Transverse Relaxivity for Targeted Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ragheb, Ragy R. T.; Kim, Dongin; Bandyopadhyay, Arunima; Chahboune, Halima; Bulutoglu, Beyza; Ezaldein, Harib; Criscione, Jason M.; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Combined therapeutic and diagnostic agents, “theranostics” are emerging valuable tools for noninvasive imaging and drug delivery. Here, we report on a solid biodegradable multifunctional nanoparticle that combines both features. Methods Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles were engineered to confine superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast for magnetic resonance imaging while enabling controlled drug delivery and targeting to specific cells. To achieve this dual modality, fatty acids were used as anchors for surface ligands and for encapsulated iron oxide in the polymer matrix. Results We demonstrate that fatty acid modified iron oxide prolonged retention of the contrast agent in the polymer matrix during degradative release of drug. Antibody-fatty acid surface modification facilitated cellular targeting and subsequent internalization in cells while inducing clustering of encapsulated fatty-acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide during particle formulation. This induced clustered confinement led to an aggregation within the nanoparticle and, hence, higher transverse relaxivity, r2, (294 mM−1 s−1) compared with nanoparticles without fatty-acid ligands (160 mM−1 s−1) and higher than commercially available superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (89 mM−1 s−1). Conclusion Clustering of superparamagnetic iron oxide in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) did not affect the controlled release of encapsulated drugs such as methotrexate or clodronate and their subsequent pharmacological activity, thus highlighting the full theranostic capability of our system. PMID:23401099

  19. Glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch and mTOR signaling activation are early-onset features of SBMA muscle modified by high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Rocchi, Anna; Milioto, Carmelo; Parodi, Sara; Armirotti, Andrea; Borgia, Doriana; Pellegrini, Matteo; Urciuolo, Anna; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Marabita, Manuela; Romanello, Vanina; Gatto, Pamela; Blaauw, Bert; Bonaldo, Paolo; Sambataro, Fabio; Robins, Diane M; Lieberman, Andrew P; Sorarù, Gianni; Vergani, Lodovica; Sandri, Marco; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neuromuscular disease caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanism by which expansion of polyglutamine in AR causes muscle atrophy is unknown. Here, we investigated pathological pathways underlying muscle atrophy in SBMA knock-in mice and patients. We show that glycolytic muscles were more severely affected than oxidative muscles in SBMA knock-in mice. Muscle atrophy was associated with early-onset, progressive glycolytic-to-oxidative fiber-type switch. Whole genome microarray and untargeted lipidomic analyses revealed enhanced lipid metabolism and impaired glycolysis selectively in muscle. These metabolic changes occurred before denervation and were associated with a concurrent enhancement of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, which induced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) expression. At later stages of disease, we detected mitochondrial membrane depolarization, enhanced transcription factor EB (TFEB) expression and autophagy, and mTOR-induced protein synthesis. Several of these abnormalities were detected in the muscle of SBMA patients. Feeding knock-in mice a high-fat diet (HFD) restored mTOR activation, decreased the expression of PGC1α, TFEB, and genes involved in oxidative metabolism, reduced mitochondrial abnormalities, ameliorated muscle pathology, and extended survival. These findings show early-onset and intrinsic metabolic alterations in SBMA muscle and link lipid/glucose metabolism to pathogenesis. Moreover, our results highlight an HFD regime as a promising approach to support SBMA patients. PMID:26971100

  20. Incorporation of Peptides Targeting EGFR and FGFR1 into the Adenoviral Fiber Knob Domain and Their Evaluation as Targeted Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Uusi-Kerttula, Hanni; Legut, Mateusz; Davies, James; Jones, Rachel; Hudson, Emma; Hanna, Louise; Stanton, Richard J.; Chester, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Oncolytic virotherapies based on adenovirus 5 (Ad5) hold promise as adjunctive cancer therapies; however, their efficacy when delivered systemically is hampered by poor target cell specificity and preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity. Ovarian cancer represents a promising target for virotherapy, since the virus can be delivered locally into the peritoneal cavity. Both epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) are overexpressed in the majority of human tumors, including ovarian cancer. To generate adenoviral vectors with improved tumor specificity, we generated a panel of Ad5 vectors with altered tropism for EGFR and FGFR, rather than the natural Ad5 receptor, hCAR. We have included mutations within AB loop of the viral fiber knob (KO1 mutation) to preclude interaction with hCAR, combined with insertions in the HI loop to incorporate peptides that bind either EGFR (peptide YHWYGYTPQNVI, GE11) or FGFR1 (peptides MQLPLAT, M*, and LSPPRYP, LS). Viruses were produced to high titers, and the integrity of the fiber protein was validated by Western blotting. The KO1 mutation efficiently ablated hCAR interactions, and significantly increased transduction was observed in hCARlow/EGFRhigh cell lines using Ad5.GE11, while transduction levels using Ad5.M* or Ad5.LS were not increased. In the presence of physiological concentrations of human blood clotting factor X (hFX), significantly increased levels of transduction via the hFX-mediated pathway were observed in cell lines, but not in primary tumor cells derived from epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) ascites samples. Ad5-mediated transduction of EOC cells was completely abolished by the presence of 2.5% serum from patients, while, surprisingly, incorporation of the GE11 peptide resulted in significant evasion of neutralization in the same samples. We thus speculate that incorporation of the YHWYGYTPQNVI dodecapeptide within the fiber knob domain may provide a novel means of

  1. Meat quality, oxidative stability and blood parameters from Graylag geese offered alternative fiber sources in growing period.

    PubMed

    He, L W; Meng, Q X; Li, D Y; Zhang, Y W; Ren, L P

    2015-04-01

    The effects of dietary fiber sources on the meat quality, oxidative stability, and blood parameters of growing Graylag geese (28-112d) were investigated. The birds were randomly allocated into 4 treatments, of which dietary fiber was mainly from corn straw silage (CSS), steam-exploded corn straw (SECS), steam-exploded wheat straw (SEWS), and steam-exploded rice straw (SERS). No influence (P>0.05) on the basic chemical components, oxidative stability, or organoleptic traits of muscle were observed, except that birds fed SECS had a higher (P<0.05) protein proportion than those fed CSS or SERS, and CSS increased (P<0.01) the cholesterol content when compared to SEWS or SERS. Regarding fatty acid profile in meat, CSS and SECS increased (P<0.01) the proportion of C18:2n6t and decreased that of C21:0 and C22:0 when compared to the others. The birds fed SERS had a higher (P<0.05) proportion of C20:0 and C22:0 than the others, a higher proportion of C20:5n3, n-3 fatty acids, Δ-9 desaturase (18) index compared to those fed CSS or SECS, and a lower (P<0.01) proportion of C20:1n9 than those fed SECS or SEWS. Additionally, SEWS resulted in a higher (P<0.01) proportion of C20:2 when compared to the others. In conclusion, these fibers affect just the protein proportion, cholesterol content, and fatty acid profile of breast muscle, along with the concentration of TG and MDA in blood, but not the other characteristics. No superior fiber source exists with respect to meat quality, suggesting that Graylag geese feeding should make the most economically of the convenient fiber source with appropriate pretreatment. PMID:25717090

  2. Meat quality, oxidative stability and blood parameters from Graylag geese offered alternative fiber sources in growing period.

    PubMed

    He, L W; Meng, Q X; Li, D Y; Zhang, Y W; Ren, L P

    2015-04-01

    The effects of dietary fiber sources on the meat quality, oxidative stability, and blood parameters of growing Graylag geese (28-112d) were investigated. The birds were randomly allocated into 4 treatments, of which dietary fiber was mainly from corn straw silage (CSS), steam-exploded corn straw (SECS), steam-exploded wheat straw (SEWS), and steam-exploded rice straw (SERS). No influence (P>0.05) on the basic chemical components, oxidative stability, or organoleptic traits of muscle were observed, except that birds fed SECS had a higher (P<0.05) protein proportion than those fed CSS or SERS, and CSS increased (P<0.01) the cholesterol content when compared to SEWS or SERS. Regarding fatty acid profile in meat, CSS and SECS increased (P<0.01) the proportion of C18:2n6t and decreased that of C21:0 and C22:0 when compared to the others. The birds fed SERS had a higher (P<0.05) proportion of C20:0 and C22:0 than the others, a higher proportion of C20:5n3, n-3 fatty acids, Δ-9 desaturase (18) index compared to those fed CSS or SECS, and a lower (P<0.01) proportion of C20:1n9 than those fed SECS or SEWS. Additionally, SEWS resulted in a higher (P<0.01) proportion of C20:2 when compared to the others. In conclusion, these fibers affect just the protein proportion, cholesterol content, and fatty acid profile of breast muscle, along with the concentration of TG and MDA in blood, but not the other characteristics. No superior fiber source exists with respect to meat quality, suggesting that Graylag geese feeding should make the most economically of the convenient fiber source with appropriate pretreatment.

  3. Method of producing superconducting fibers of bismuth strontium calcium copper oxide (Bi(2212) and Bi(2223))

    DOEpatents

    Schwartzkopf, Louis A.

    1991-10-01

    Fibers of Bi(2212) have been produce by pendant drop melt extraction. This technique involves the end of a rod of Bi(2212) melted with a hydrogen-oxygen torch, followed by lowering onto the edge of a spinning wheel. The fibers are up to 15 cm in length with the usual lateral dimensions, ranging from 20 um to 30 um. The fibers require a heat treatment to make them superconducting.

  4. Long circulating reduced graphene oxide-iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient tumor targeting and multimodality imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Cheng; Shi, Sixiang; Feng, Liangzhu; Chen, Feng; Graves, Stephen A.; Ehlerding, Emily B.; Goel, Shreya; Sun, Haiyan; England, Christopher G.; Nickles, Robert J.; Liu, Zhuang; Wang, Taihong; Cai, Weibo

    2016-06-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) surface modification is one of the most widely used approaches to improve the solubility of inorganic nanoparticles, prevent their aggregation and prolong their in vivo blood circulation half-life. Herein, we developed double-PEGylated biocompatible reduced graphene oxide nanosheets anchored with iron oxide nanoparticles (RGO-IONP-1stPEG-2ndPEG). The nanoconjugates exhibited a prolonged blood circulation half-life (~27.7 h) and remarkable tumor accumulation (>11 %ID g-1) via an enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Due to the strong near-infrared absorbance and superparamagnetism of RGO-IONP-1stPEG-2ndPEG, multimodality imaging combining positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic (PA) imaging was successfully achieved. The promising results suggest the great potential of these nanoconjugates for multi-dimensional and more accurate tumor diagnosis and therapy in the future.

  5. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-06-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dye-labeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection.

  6. Multiple Hits, Including Oxidative Stress, as Pathogenesis and Treatment Target in Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH)

    PubMed Central

    Takaki, Akinobu; Kawai, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2013-01-01

    Multiple parallel hits, including genetic differences, insulin resistance and intestinal microbiota, account for the progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Multiple hits induce adipokine secretion, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress at the cellular level that subsequently induce hepatic steatosis, inflammation and fibrosis, among which oxidative stress is considered a key contributor to progression from simple fatty liver to NASH. Although several clinical trials have shown that anti-oxidative therapy can effectively control hepatitis activities in the short term, the long-term effect remains obscure. Several trials of long-term anti-oxidant protocols aimed at treating cerebrovascular diseases or cancer development have failed to produce a benefit. This might be explained by the non-selective anti-oxidative properties of these drugs. Molecular hydrogen is an effective antioxidant that reduces only cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) and several diseases associated with oxidative stress are sensitive to hydrogen. The progress of NASH to hepatocellular carcinoma can be controlled using hydrogen-rich water. Thus, targeting mitochondrial oxidative stress might be a good candidate for NASH treatment. Long term clinical intervention is needed to control this complex lifestyle-related disease. PMID:24132155

  7. Characterization of Niobium Oxide Films Deposited by High Target Utilization Sputter Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, R; Ellis, A D; Loomis, G E; Rana, S I

    2007-01-29

    High quality, refractory metal, oxide coatings are required in a variety of applications such as laser optics, micro-electronic insulating layers, nano-device structures, electro-optic multilayers, sensors and corrosion barriers. A common oxide deposition technique is reactive sputtering because the kinetic mechanism vaporizes almost any solid material in vacuum. Also, the sputtered molecules have higher energies than those generated from thermal evaporation, and so the condensates are smoother and denser than those from thermally-evaporated films. In the typical sputtering system, target erosion is a factor that drives machine availability. In some situations such as nano-layered capacitors, where the device's performance characteristics depends on thick layers, target life becomes a limiting factor on the maximizing device functionality. The keen interest to increase target utilization in sputtering has been addressed in a variety of ways such as target geometry, rotating magnets, and/or shaped magnet arrays. Also, a recent sputtering system has been developed that generates a high density plasma, directs the plasma beam towards the target in a uniform fashion, and erodes the target in a uniform fashion. The purpose of this paper is to characterize and compare niobia films deposited by two types of high target utilization sputtering sources, a rotating magnetron and a high density plasma source. The oxide of interest in this study is niobia because of its high refractive index. The quality of the niobia films were characterized spectroscopically in optical transmission, ellipsometrically, and chemical stoichiometry with X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy. The refractive index, extinction coefficients, Cauchy constants were derived from the ellipsometric modeling. The mechanical properties of coating density and stress are also determined.

  8. Preparation of silica-sustained electrospun polyvinylpyrrolidone fibers with uniform mesopores via oxidative removal of template molecules by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Haigang; Zhu, Yihua; Shen, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoling; Chen, Cheng; Cao, Huimin; Li, Chungzhong

    2010-07-15

    Silica-sustained electrospun PVP fibers with uniform mesopores were synthesized via facile oxidative removal of template molecules by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} extraction. Tetraethyl orthosilicate, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and triblock poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymer pluronic P{sub 123} compose the electrospinning sol to fabricate the silica-sustained PVP hybrid fibers. The effect of different post-treatment methods on the pore size distribution was investigated by calcination and extraction, respectively. Experimental results showed that oxidative removal of structure-directing agent P{sub 123} in the hybrid fibers by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment can easily form narrow pore size distribution, and the incorporation of 3D silica skeleton built by hot steam aging facilitated preserving the original cylindrical morphology of fibers. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherm, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR spectra and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to characterize the hybrid fibers. The hybrid fibers can be expected to have potential applications in drug release or tissue engineering because of their suitable pore size, large surface area and good biocompatibility.

  9. MiR-25 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by targeting the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Pan, Lei; Huang, Bi-Jun; Ma, Xiu-E; Wang, Shi-Yi; Feng, Jing; Lv, Fei; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yi; Li, Chang-Ming; Liang, Dan-Dan; Li, Jun; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-03-10

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNAs, whose expression levels vary in different cell types and tissues. Emerging evidence indicates that tissue-specific and -enriched miRNAs are closely associated with cellular development and stress responses in their tissues. MiR-25 has been documented to be abundant in cardiomyocytes, but its function in the heart remains unknown. Here, we report that miR-25 can protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by down-regulating mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). MiR-25 was markedly elevated in response to oxidative stimulation in cardiomyocytes. Further overexpression of miR-25 protected cardiomyocytes against oxidative damage by inactivating the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. MCU was identified as a potential target of miR-25 by bioinformatical analysis. MCU mRNA level was reversely correlated with miR-25 under the exposure of H2O2, and MCU protein level was largely decreased by miR-25 overexpression. The luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-25 bound directly to the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of MCU mRNA. MiR-25 significantly decreased H2O2-induced elevation of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration, which is likely to be the result of decreased activity of MCU. We conclude that miR-25 targets MCU to protect cardiomyocytes against oxidative damages. This finding provides novel insights into the involvement of miRNAs in oxidative stress in cardiomyocytes.

  10. Protective Effects of Melatonin and Mitochondria-targeted Antioxidants Against Oxidative Stress: A Review.

    PubMed

    Ramis, M R; Esteban, S; Miralles, A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, R J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage is related to aging and a wide range of human disorders. Mitochondria are in large part responsible for free radical production and they are also main targets of the attack of these toxic molecules. The resulting deleterious effects of the damage to mitochondria can be prevented by antioxidants. Melatonin is an endogenously-produced indoleamine that modulates numerous functions, including mitochondria-related functions; this result from its capacity to penetrate all morphophysiological barriers and to enter all subcellular compartments due to its amphiphilic nature. Furthermore, this indoleamine and its metabolites are powerful antioxidants and scavengers of free radicals, protecting cellular membranes, the electron transport chain and mitochondrial DNA from oxidative damage. These properties may make melatonin a potent protector against a variety of free radical-related diseases. By comparison, other conventional antioxidants have less efficacy due to their limited access to the mitochondria. In recent years, research has focused on the advancement of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ (composed by the lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation conjugated to the endogenous antioxidant coenzyme Q10) and MitoE (composed by the triphenylphosphonium cation attached to the antioxidant α-tocopherol). Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants accumulate in several hundred-fold greater concentrations within mitochondria and protect these critical organelles from oxidative damage. Melatonin also seems to be a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and has similar protective actions as the synthetic antioxidants. Further work is required to determine the therapeutic properties of these antioxidants in ameliorating diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  11. Targeting the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null phenotype in chronic lymphocytic leukemia with pro-oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Agathanggelou, Angelo; Weston, Victoria J.; Perry, Tracey; Davies, Nicholas J.; Skowronska, Anna; Payne, Daniel T.; Fossey, John S.; Oldreive, Ceri E.; Wei, Wenbin; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Oscier, David; Coles, Steve J.; Hole, Paul S.; Darley, Richard L.; McMahon, Michael; Hayes, John D.; Moss, Paul; Stewart, Grant S.; Taylor, A. Malcolm R.; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated gene in chronic lymphocytic leukemia results in resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis and inferior responses to treatment with DNA damaging agents. Hence, p53-independent strategies are required to target Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-deficient chronic lymphocytic leukemia. As Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated has been implicated in redox homeostasis, we investigated the effect of the Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia genotype on cellular responses to oxidative stress with a view to therapeutic targeting. We found that in comparison to Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-wild type chronic lymphocytic leukemia, pro-oxidant treatment of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null cells led to reduced binding of NF-E2 p45-related factor-2 to antioxidant response elements and thus decreased expression of target genes. Furthermore, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells contained lower levels of antioxidants and elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Consequently, Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but not tumors with 11q deletion or TP53 mutations, exhibited differentially increased sensitivity to pro-oxidants both in vitro and in vivo. We found that cell death was mediated by a p53- and caspase-independent mechanism associated with apoptosis inducing factor activity. Together, these data suggest that defective redox-homeostasis represents an attractive therapeutic target for Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-null chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:25840602

  12. Gel spinning of PVA composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yizhe; Lai, Dengpan; Zou, Liming; Ling, Xinlong; Lu, Hongwei; Xu, Yongjing

    2015-07-01

    In this report, poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) composite fibers with high content of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide (MWCNTs-GO) hybrids were prepared by gel spinning, and were characterized by TGA, DSC, SEM, XL-2 yarn strength tester and electrical conductivity measurement. The total content of MWCNTs-GO hybrids in the PVA composite fibers, which is up to 25 wt%, was confirmed by TGA analysis. The DSC measurement shows that the melting and crystallization peaks decreased after the addition of nano-fillers. This is due to the reason that the motion of PVA chains is completely confined by strong hydrogen bonding interaction between PVA and nano-fillers. After the addtion of GO, the dispersibility of MWCNTs in composite fibers improved slightly. And the tensile strength and Young's modulus increased by 38% and 67%, respectively. This is caused by the increased hydrogen bonding interaction and synergistic effect through hybridization of MWCNTs and GO. More significantly, the electrical conductivity of PVA/MWCNTs/GO composite fibers enhanced by three orders of magnitude with the addition of GO.

  13. Novel method for fabrication of metal- or oxide-nanoparticle doped silica-based specialty optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenardič, Borut; Kveder, Miha; Lisjak, Darja; Guillon, Herve; Bonnafous, Samuel

    2011-03-01

    Nanoparticle-doped optical fibers are causing significant scientific interest in different application fields. Nanoparticle-doping of silica glass layers during optical fiber preform fabrication was so far reported by sol-gel and solution doping processes, by flame hydrolysis spraying and by pulling hollow cylinders from nanoparticle suspensions. A new method for fabrication of high quality nanoparticle-doped fibers is suggested. Proposed method is based on "flash vaporization" deposition process, previously reported as method to fabricate rare earth- and metal ion-doped specialty optical fibers. Experiments were made where SiO2 layers were deposited using "flash vaporization"-equipped MCVD system, adding vapors carrying metal or oxide nanoparticles into deposition zone. Analysis of produced preforms confirms presence of nanoparticles in deposited layers, albeit with low deposition rate due to weak thermophoretic forces acting on very small particles or agglomerations. Based on results, a number of improvements were suggested and implemented in fabrication process, device design and choice of precursor materials. "Flash vaporization" method was demonstrated as suitable method for deposition of nanoparticles in silica layers, permitting in-situ fabrication of complete preforms, providing easy upgrade path for existing MCVD and OVD deposition systems and allowing simultaneous co-doping by a wide range of other co-dopants.

  14. Effect of Cattle Breed on Meat Quality, Muscle Fiber Characteristics, Lipid Oxidation and Fatty Acids in China

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiangxue; Meng, Qingxiang; Cui, Zhenliang; Ren, Liping

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to compare meat quality, muscle fiber characteristics, lipid oxidation and fatty acids of Limousin (LIM), Simmtental (SIM), Luxi (LX), Qinchuan (QC) and Jinnan (JN) offered the same diet in China. After finishing, eight bulls from each breed were randomly selected for slaughter at 18.5 months old. Longissimus dorsi (ld) muscle was taken from the carcass for meat quality evaluations. Breed had little effect on most of meat and fat color parameters except for Hue and b* in which QC had lower values. LIM showed higher pH (24 h) and better water holding capacity than other breeds. LIM showed the lowest dry matter content but the highest crude protein. LX and LIM had higher percentage and density of red muscle fiber than other breeds. Lipid oxidations were significantly lower in LIM than in QC, with the LX, SIM and JN having the intermediate values. Compared to other four breeds, QC provided the highest values of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), n-6 fatty acids and n-3 fatty acids. In conclusion, LIM scored better on most of meat quality characteristics; however, local breeds such as LX and QC also had better muscle fiber characteristics and better fatty acids composition. PMID:25049633

  15. The intellectual disability gene Kirrel3 regulates target-specific mossy fiber synapse development in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Martin, E Anne; Muralidhar, Shruti; Wang, Zhirong; Cervantes, Diégo Cordero; Basu, Raunak; Taylor, Matthew R; Hunter, Jennifer; Cutforth, Tyler; Wilke, Scott A; Ghosh, Anirvan; Williams, Megan E

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic target specificity, whereby neurons make distinct types of synapses with different target cells, is critical for brain function, yet the mechanisms driving it are poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate Kirrel3 regulates target-specific synapse formation at hippocampal mossy fiber (MF) synapses, which connect dentate granule (DG) neurons to both CA3 and GABAergic neurons. Here, we show Kirrel3 is required for formation of MF filopodia; the structures that give rise to DG-GABA synapses and that regulate feed-forward inhibition of CA3 neurons. Consequently, loss of Kirrel3 robustly increases CA3 neuron activity in developing mice. Alterations in the Kirrel3 gene are repeatedly associated with intellectual disabilities, but the role of Kirrel3 at synapses remained largely unknown. Our findings demonstrate that subtle synaptic changes during development impact circuit function and provide the first insight toward understanding the cellular basis of Kirrel3-dependent neurodevelopmental disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09395.001 PMID:26575286

  16. Transcellular targeting of fiber- and hexon-modified adenovirus vectors across the brain microvascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, Johanna P; Engler, Tatjana; Romero, Ignacio A; Weksler, Babette; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In central nervous system (CNS)-directed gene therapy, efficient targeting of brain parenchyma through the vascular route is prevented by the endothelium and the epithelium of the blood-brain and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barriers, respectively. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of the combined genetic and chemical adenovirus capsid modification technology to enable transcellular delivery of targeted adenovirus (Ad) vectors across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vitro models. As a proof-of-principle ligand, maleimide-activated full-length human transferrin (hTf) was covalently attached to cysteine-modified Ad serotype 5 vectors either to its fiber or hexon protein. In transcytosis experiments, hTf-coupled vectors were shown to be redirected across the BBB models, the transcytosis activity of the vectors being dependent on the location of the capsid modification and the in vitro model used. The transduction efficiency of hTf-targeted vectors decreased significantly in confluent, polarized cells, indicating that the intracellular route of the vectors differed between unpolarized and polarized cells. After transcellular delivery the majority of the hTf-modified vectors remained intact and partly capable of gene transfer. Altogether, our results demonstrate that i) covalent attachment of a ligand to Ad capsid can mediate transcellular targeting across the cerebral endothelium in vitro, ii) the attachment site of the ligand influences its transcytosis efficiency and iii) combined genetic/chemical modification of Ad vector can be used as a versatile platform for the development of Ad vectors for transcellular targeting. PMID:23029348

  17. Identifying initial molecular targets of PDT: protein and lipid oxidation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Kim, Junhwan; Rodriguez, Myriam E.; Xue, Liang-yan; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Anderson, Vernon E.

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) generates singlet oxygen (1O2) which oxidizes biomolecules in the immediate vicinity of its formation. The phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4 localizes to mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and the primary targets of Pc 4-PDT are expected to be lipids and proteins of those membranes. The initial damage then causes apoptosis in cancer cells via the release of cytochrome c (Cyt-c) from mitochondria into the cytosol, followed by the activation of caspases. That damage also triggers the induction of autophagy, an attempt by the cells to eliminate damaged organelles, or when damage is too extensive, to promote cell death. Cyt-c is bound to the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial inner membrane through association with cardiolipin (CL), a phospholipid containing four unsaturated fatty acids and thus easily oxidized by 1O2 or by other oxidizing agents. Increasing evidence suggests that oxidation of CL loosens its association with Cyt-c, and that the peroxidase activity of Cyt-c can oxidize CL. In earlier studies of Cyt-c in homogeneous medium by MALDI-TOF-MS and LC-ESI-MS, we showed that 1O2 generated by Pc 4-PDT oxidized histidine, methionine, tryptophan, and unexpectedly phenylalanine but not tyrosine. Most of the oxidation products were known to be formed by other oxidizing agents, such as hydroxyl radical, superoxide radical anion, and peroxynitrite. However, two products of histidine were unique to 1O2 and may be useful for reporting the action of 1O2 in cells and tissues. These products, as well as CL oxidation products, have now been identified in liposomes and mitochondria after Pc 4-PDT. In mitochondria, the PDT dose-dependent oxidations can be related to specific changes in mitochondrial function, Bcl-2 photodamage, and Cyt-c release. Thus, the role of PDT-generated 1O2 in oxidizing Cyt-c and CL and the interplay between protein and lipid targets may be highly relevant to understanding one mechanism for cell killing by PDT.

  18. CHIRON TOOLS: Integrated Target Submission, Scheduling and Observing Systems for a High-Resolution Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewer, John M.; Giguere, Matthew; Fischer, Debra A.

    2014-01-01

    The CHIRON spectrometer is a new high-resolution, fiber-fed instrument on the 1.5 m telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-America Observatory (CTIO). To optimize use of the instrument and limited human resources, we have designed an integrated set of Web applications allowing target submission, observing script planning, nightly script execution and logging, and access to reduced data by multiple users. The unified and easy-to-use interface has dramatically reduced the time needed to submit and schedule observations and improved the efficiency and accuracy of nightly operations. We present our experience to help astronomers and project managers who need to plan for the scope of effort required to commission a queue-scheduled facility instrument.

  19. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  20. Periodontitis in Rats Induces Systemic Oxidative Stress That Is Controlled by Bone-Targeted Antiresorptives

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Sehkar; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F.; Velsko, Irina M.; Holliday, L. Shannon; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic, polymicrobial inflammatory disease that degrades connective tissue and alveolar bone and results in tooth loss. Oxidative stress has been linked to the onset of periodontal tissue breakdown and systemic inflammation, and the success of antiresorptive treatments will rely on how effectively they can ameliorate periodontal disease–induced oxidative stress during oral infection. Methods Rats were infected with polybacterial inoculum consisting of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, as an oral lavage every other week for 12 weeks. Daily subcutaneous injections of enoxacin, bisenoxacin, alendronate, or doxycycline were administered for 6 weeks after 6 weeks of polybacterial infection in rats. The serum levels of oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, were evaluated in each of the infected, treated, and sham-infected rats. Results Rats infected with the periodontal pathogens displayed a five-fold increase in the oxidative stress index compared with controls as a result of increased levels of serum oxidants and decreases in total antioxidant activity. The overall decrease in antioxidant activity occurred despite increases in three important antioxidant enzymes, suggesting an imbalance between antioxidant macromolecules/small molecules production and antioxidant enzyme levels. Surprisingly, the bone-targeted antiresorptives bis-enoxacin and alendronate inhibited increases in oxidative stress caused by periodontitis. Bis-enoxacin, which has both antiresorptive and antibiotic activities, was more effective than alendronate, which acts only as an antiresorptive. Conclusion To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the increased oxidative stress induced by periodontal infection in rats can be ameliorated by bone-targeted antiresorptives. PMID:25101489

  1. Curcumin targeting the thioredoxin system elevates oxidative stress in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Wenqing; Zhang, Baoxin; Duan, Dongzhu; Wu, Jincai; Fang, Jianguo

    2012-08-01

    The thioredoxin system, composed of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), thioredoxin (Trx), and NADPH, is ubiquitous in all cells and involved in many redox-dependent signaling pathways. Curcumin, a naturally occurring pigment that gives a specific yellow color in curry food, is consumed in normal diet up to 100 mg per day. This molecule has also been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a variety of diseases. Curcumin has numerous biological functions, and many of these functions are related to induction of oxidative stress. However, how curcumin elicits oxidative stress in cells is unclear. Our previous work has demonstrated the way by which curcumin interacts with recombinant TrxR1 and alters the antioxidant enzyme into a reactive oxygen species (ROS) generator in vitro. Herein we reported that curcumin can target the cytosolic/nuclear thioredoxin system to eventually elevate oxidative stress in HeLa cells. Curcumin-modified TrxR1 dose-dependently and quantitatively transfers electrons from NADPH to oxygen with the production of ROS. Also, curcumin can drastically down-regulate Trx1 protein level as well as its enzyme activity in HeLa cells, which in turn remarkably decreases intracellular free thiols, shifting the intracellular redox balance to a more oxidative state, and subsequently induces DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, curcumin-pretreated HeLa cells are more sensitive to oxidative stress. Knockdown of TrxR1 sensitizes HeLa cells to curcumin cytotoxicity, highlighting the physiological significance of targeting TrxR1 by curcumin. Taken together, our data disclose a previously unrecognized prooxidant mechanism of curcumin in cells, and provide a deep insight in understanding how curcumin works in vivo. -- Highlights: ► Curcumin induces oxidative stress by targeting the thioredoxin system. ► Curcumin-modified TrxR quantitatively oxidizes NADPH to generate ROS. ► Knockdown of TrxR1 augments curcumin's cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. ► Curcumin

  2. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A.; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  3. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  4. Arginase: The Emerging Therapeutic Target for Vascular Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhihong; Ming, Xiu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation in the vascular wall are essential mechanisms of atherosclerosis and vascular dysfunctions associated with risk factors such as metabolic diseases, aging, hypertension, etc. Evidence has been provided that activation of the vascular endothelial cells in the presence of the risk factors promotes oxidative stress and vascular inflammatory responses, leading to acceleration of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Increasing number of studies from recent years demonstrates that uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), whereby the enzyme eNOS produces detrimental amount of superoxide anion O2− instead the vasoprotective nitric oxide (NO⋅), plays a critical role in vascular dysfunction under various pathophysiological conditions and in aging. The mechanisms of eNOS-uncoupling seem multiple and complex. Recent research provides emerging evidence supporting an essential role of increased activity of arginases including arginase-I and arginase-II in causing eNOS-uncoupling, which results in vascular oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, and ultimately leading to vascular diseases. This review article will summarize the most recent findings on the functional roles of arginases in vascular diseases and/or dysfunctions and the underlying mechanisms in relation to oxidative stress and inflammations. Moreover, regulatory mechanisms of arginases in the vasculature are reviewed and the future perspectives of targeting arginases as therapeutic options in vascular diseases are discussed. PMID:23781221

  5. Experimental and theoretical studies on localized surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using graphene oxide coated silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Jeeban Kumar; Parhi, Purnendu; Jha, Rajan

    2016-07-01

    An optical fiber based refractive index sensor using graphene oxide (GO) encapsulated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is reported. The AgNPs are encapsulated with a very thin layer of GO as it controls the inter-particle distance thereby preventing aggregation. The encapsulation also enhances the colloidal stability and prevents the oxidation of the AgNPs by separating them from direct contact with the aqueous medium. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy results support the formation of 1 nm thick GO around AgNPs of an average size of 35 nm. A Raman spectrometer and a UV-VIS spectrometer have been used to characterize and study the synthesized nanoparticles along with GO. Further, Raman spectra support a 64.72% increase in D-peak intensity and a 52.91% increase in G-peak intensity of the GO-encapsulated AgNPs (GOE-AgNPs) with respect to GO. Further, the GOE-AgNPs are immobilized on the core of functionalized plastic-cladded silica fiber. FESEM confirms the immobilization of the GOE-AgNPs on the fiber core. We observed that the peak absorbance changes by 87.55% with a 0.05 change in the refractive index. The sensitivity of the proposed fiber sensor is found to be 0.9406 ΔA/RIU along with a resolution of 12.8  ×  {{10}-4} RIU. MATLAB is used to calculate the absorbance of the AgNPs by considering the bound and free electron contribution along with the size-dependent dispersion of the nanoparticles. We found that the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  6. Experimental and theoretical studies on localized surface plasmon resonance based fiber optic sensor using graphene oxide coated silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Jeeban Kumar; Parhi, Purnendu; Jha, Rajan

    2016-07-01

    An optical fiber based refractive index sensor using graphene oxide (GO) encapsulated silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is reported. The AgNPs are encapsulated with a very thin layer of GO as it controls the inter-particle distance thereby preventing aggregation. The encapsulation also enhances the colloidal stability and prevents the oxidation of the AgNPs by separating them from direct contact with the aqueous medium. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy results support the formation of 1 nm thick GO around AgNPs of an average size of 35 nm. A Raman spectrometer and a UV–VIS spectrometer have been used to characterize and study the synthesized nanoparticles along with GO. Further, Raman spectra support a 64.72% increase in D-peak intensity and a 52.91% increase in G-peak intensity of the GO-encapsulated AgNPs (GOE-AgNPs) with respect to GO. Further, the GOE-AgNPs are immobilized on the core of functionalized plastic-cladded silica fiber. FESEM confirms the immobilization of the GOE-AgNPs on the fiber core. We observed that the peak absorbance changes by 87.55% with a 0.05 change in the refractive index. The sensitivity of the proposed fiber sensor is found to be 0.9406 ΔA/RIU along with a resolution of 12.8  ×  {{10}-4} RIU. MATLAB is used to calculate the absorbance of the AgNPs by considering the bound and free electron contribution along with the size-dependent dispersion of the nanoparticles. We found that the simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Daunomycin-loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Preparation, magnetic targeting, cell cytotoxicity, and protein delivery research.

    PubMed

    Liu, Min-Chao; Jin, Shu-Fang; Zheng, Min; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Peng-Liang; Tang, Ding-Tong; Chen, Jiong; Lin, Jia-Qi; Wang, Xia-Hong; Zhao, Ping

    2016-08-01

    The clinical use of daunomycin is restricted by dose-dependent toxicity and low specificity against cancer cells. In the present study, modified superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were employed to load daunomycin and the drug-loaded nanospheres exhibited satisfactory size and smart pH-responsive release. The cellular uptake efficiency, targeted cell accumulation, and cell cytotoxicity experimental results proved that the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-loading process brings high drug targeting without decreasing the cytotoxicity of daunomycin. Moreover, a new concern for the evaluation of nanophase drug delivery's effects was considered, with monitoring the interactions between human serum albumin and the drug-loaded nanospheres. Results from the multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling calculation elucidate that the drug delivery has detectable deleterious effects on the frame conformation of protein, which may affect its physiological function. PMID:27288463

  8. 1,4-Dihydropyridine Derivatives: Dihydronicotinamide Analogues—Model Compounds Targeting Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Velena, Astrida; Zarkovic, Neven; Gall Troselj, Koraljka; Bisenieks, Egils; Krauze, Aivars; Poikans, Janis; Duburs, Gunars

    2016-01-01

    Many 1,4-dihydropyridines (DHPs) possess redox properties. In this review DHPs are surveyed as protectors against oxidative stress (OS) and related disorders, considering the DHPs as specific group of potential antioxidants with bioprotective capacities. They have several peculiarities related to antioxidant activity (AOA). Several commercially available calcium antagonist, 1,4-DHP drugs, their metabolites, and calcium agonists were shown to express AOA. Synthesis, hydrogen donor properties, AOA, and methods and approaches used to reveal biological activities of various groups of 1,4-DHPs are presented. Examples of DHPs antioxidant activities and protective effects of DHPs against OS induced damage in low density lipoproteins (LDL), mitochondria, microsomes, isolated cells, and cell cultures are highlighted. Comparison of the AOA of different DHPs and other antioxidants is also given. According to the data presented, the DHPs might be considered as bellwether among synthetic compounds targeting OS and potential pharmacological model compounds targeting oxidative stress important for medicinal chemistry. PMID:26881016

  9. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake () response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min−1 kg−1) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ∼65% -max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ∼85% -max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P < 0.05) and COX-4 (P < 0.01) was lower, whereas PFK was higher (P < 0.001) than in slow-twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW−1 min−1) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW−1) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW−1) at 6 min of INT (P < 0.05) after compared to before HIT. A period of intensified training with a volume reduction did not increase the content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change kinetics. PMID:26152692

  10. The effect of ligand density on in vivo tumor targeting of nanographene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Jang, Cheol; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-07-10

    Recently, the application of nanographene oxide (nGO) as a drug delivery system has significantly increased. But, the rational engineering of nGO surface to improve its in vivo targeting and biodistribution remains mostly unexplored. In this study, we have prepared folic acid conjugated Pluronic for non-covalent functionalization of nanographene oxide (nGO) sheets and active tumor targeting. To modulate the ligand density on the nGO surface, different ratios of folate conjugated Pluronic and unmodified Pluronic were combined and used for coating nGO sheets. The surface density of targeting ligand linearly increased as the relative amount of folate conjugated Pluronic was increased. The association of functionalized nGOs with folate receptor overexpressing human epithelial mouth carcinoma cells (KB cells) was evaluated by flow cytometry. Cellular uptake of nGO by KB cells increased steadily with the increase in ligand density. In contrast, the in vivo experiment in mouse xenograft model did not show the steady increase in tumor targeting by increasing ligand density. Upon intravenous administration into KB tumor-bearing mice, tumor accumulation of nGO did not show a significant targeting effect up to 25% of ligand coating density. However, a strong and similar tumor accumulation of nGO was observed for both 50% and 100% folate coatings. Thus, a significant difference in tumor accumulation of nGO was observed between the low folate density groups and high folate density groups, suggesting the existence of a critical ligand density for tumor targeting. The significant difference of tumor targeting of nGO depending on ligand density also resulted in the dramatic change in photothermal tumor ablation by the irradiation of NIR laser. PMID:25937319

  11. Targeting Transporters: Promoting Blood-Brain Barrier Repair in Response to Oxidative Stress Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T.; Davis, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physical and biochemical barrier that precisely regulates the ability of endogenous and exogenous substances to accumulate within brain tissue. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight junction and adherens junction protein complexes, influx and efflux transporters) that work in concert to control solute permeation. Oxidative stress, a critical component of several diseases including cerebral hypoxia/ischemia and peripheral inflammatory pain, can cause considerable injury to the BBB and lead to significant CNS pathology. This suggests a critical need for novel therapeutic approaches that can protect the BBB in diseases with an oxidative stress component. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters, intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of endothelial drug delivery or for control of transport of endogenous substrates such as the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In particular, targeting transporters offers a unique approach to protect BBB integrity by promoting repair of cell-cell interactions at the level of the brain microvascular endothelium. This review summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present considerable opportunity for providing BBB protection and/or promoting BBB repair in the setting of oxidative stress. PMID:25796436

  12. Elevated copper and oxidative stress in cancer cells as a target for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gupte, Anshul; Mumper, Russell J

    2009-02-01

    As we gain a better understanding of the factors affecting cancer etiology, we can design improved treatment strategies. Over the past three to four decades, there have been numerous successful efforts in recognizing important cellular proteins essential in cancer growth and therefore these proteins have been targeted for cancer treatment. However, studies have shown that targeting one or two proteins in the complex cancer cascade may not be sufficient in controlling and/or inhibiting cancer growth. Therefore, there is a need to examine features which are potentially involved in multiple facets of cancer development. In this review we discuss the targeting of the elevated copper (both in serum and tumor) and oxidative stress levels in cancer with the aid of a copper chelator d-penicillamine (d-pen) for potential cancer treatment. Numerous studies in the literature have reported that both the serum and tumor copper levels are elevated in a variety of malignancies, including both solid tumor and blood cancer. Further, the elevated copper levels have been shown to be directly correlated to cancer progression. Enhanced levels of intrinsic oxidative stress has been shown in variety of tumors, possibly due to the combination of factors such as elevated active metabolism, mitochondrial mutation, cytokines, and inflammation. The cancer cells under sustained ROS stress tend to heavily utilize adaptation mechanisms and may exhaust cellular ROS-buffering capacity. Therefore, the elevated copper levels and increased oxidative stress in cancer cells provide for a prospect of selective cancer treatment.

  13. Synthesis and Evaluation of Folate-Conjugated Phenanthraquinones for Tumor-Targeted Oxidative Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Sakkarapalayam, Mahalingam; Li, Guo; Sanchez-Cruz, Pedro; Piñero, Natasha S.; Low, Philip S.; Alegria, Antonio E.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all cells are easily killed by exposure to potent oxidants. Indeed, major pathogen defense mechanisms in both animal and plant kingdoms involve production of an oxidative burst, where host defense cells show an invading pathogen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although cancer cells can be similarly killed by ROS, development of oxidant-producing chemotherapies has been limited by their inherent nonspecificity and potential toxicity to healthy cells. In this paper, we describe the targeting of an ROS-generating molecule selectively to tumor cells using folate as the tumor-targeting ligand. For this purpose, we exploit the ability of 9,10-phenanthraquinone (PHQ) to enhance the continuous generation of H2O2 in the presence of ascorbic acid to establish a constitutive source of ROS within the tumor mass. We report here that incubation of folate receptor-expressing KB cells in culture with folate-PHQ plus ascorbate results in the death of the cancer cells with an IC50 of ~10 nM (folate-PHQ). We also demonstrate that a cleavable spacer linking folate to PHQ is significantly inferior to a noncleavable spacer, in contrast to most other folate-targeted therapeutic agents. Unfortunately, no evidence for folate-PHQ mediated tumor regression in murine tumor models is obtained, suggesting that unanticipated impediments to generation of cytotoxic quantities of ROS in vivo are encountered. Possible mechanisms and potential solutions to these unanticipated results are offered. PMID:27066312

  14. Pathogenesis of Target Organ Damage in Hypertension: Role of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rubattu, Speranza; Pagliaro, Beniamino; Pierelli, Giorgia; Santolamazza, Caterina; Di Castro, Sara; Mennuni, Silvia; Volpe, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension causes target organ damage (TOD) that involves vasculature, heart, brain and kidneys. Complex biochemical, hormonal and hemodynamic mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of TOD. Common to all these processes is an increased bioavailability of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both in vitro and in vivo studies explored the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress as a mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of TOD in hypertension, especially focusing on atherosclerosis, heart disease, renal failure, cerebrovascular disease. Both dysfunction of mitochondrial proteins, such as uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2), superoxide dismutase (SOD) 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1-α (PGC-1α), calcium channels, and the interaction between mitochondria and other sources of ROS, such as NADPH oxidase, play an important role in the development of endothelial dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy, renal and cerebral damage in hypertension. Commonly used anti-hypertensive drugs have shown protective effects against mitochondrial-dependent oxidative stress. Notably, few mitochondrial proteins can be considered therapeutic targets on their own. In fact, antioxidant therapies specifically targeted at mitochondria represent promising strategies to reduce mitochondrial dysfunction and related hypertensive TOD. In the present article, we discuss the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress as a contributing factor to hypertensive TOD development. We also provide an overview of mitochondria-based treatment strategies that may reveal useful to prevent TOD and reduce its progression. PMID:25561233

  15. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Conti, Valeria; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine; Carrizzo, Albino

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases. PMID:27651855

  16. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Maurizio; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases. PMID:27651855

  17. Targeting Nitric Oxide with Natural Derived Compounds as a Therapeutic Strategy in Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Forte, Maurizio; Damato, Antonio; Ambrosio, Mariateresa; Puca, Annibale A.; Sciarretta, Sebastiano; Frati, Giacomo; Vecchione, Carmine

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of endogenous gasotransmitters, nitric oxide (NO) is the smallest gaseous intercellular messenger involved in the modulation of several processes, such as blood flow and platelet aggregation control, essential to maintain vascular homeostasis. NO is produced by nitric oxide synthases (NOS) and its effects are mediated by cGMP-dependent or cGMP-independent mechanisms. Growing evidence suggests a crosstalk between the NO signaling and the occurrence of oxidative stress in the onset and progression of vascular diseases, such as hypertension, heart failure, ischemia, and stroke. For these reasons, NO is considered as an emerging molecular target for developing therapeutic strategies for cardio- and cerebrovascular pathologies. Several natural derived compounds, such as polyphenols, are now proposed as modulators of NO-mediated pathways. The aim of this review is to highlight the experimental evidence on the involvement of nitric oxide in vascular homeostasis focusing on the therapeutic potential of targeting NO with some natural compounds in patients with vascular diseases.

  18. Mathematical model of thermal spikes in microwave heating of ceramic oxide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.R. Jr.; Unruh, W.P.; Vogt, G.J.

    1994-04-01

    Experiments on microwave sintering of ceramic fibers in a single-mode cavity have revealed the presence of thermal spikes and `hot spots` which sometimes travel along the fiber and eventually disappear. They are triggered by relatively small increases in microwave power, and thus have obvious implications for the development of practical microwave-based fiber processing systems. These hot spots are conjectured to originate at slight irregularities in the tow morphology, and propagate as the result of solid phase transitions which take place at elevated temperatures and reduce the dielectric loss coefficient {epsilon}{double_prime}. An elementary mathematical model of the heat transfer process was developed which reproduces the essential features of the observed phenomena, thus lending support to the conjecture. This model is based on the assumption of one-dimensional heat conduction along the axis of the fiber tow, and radiation losses at the surface.

  19. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC)

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Wagner

    2002-12-18

    This report summarizes work to develop CFCC's for various applications in the Industries of the Future (IOF) and power generation areas. Performance requirements range from relatively modest for hot gas filters to severe for turbine combustor liners and infrared burners. The McDermott Technology Inc. (MTI) CFCC program focused on oxide/oxide composite systems because they are known to be stable in the application environments of interest. The work is broadly focused on dense and porous composite systems depending on the specific application. Dense composites were targeted at corrosion resistant components, molten aluminum handling components and gas turbine combustor liners. The development work on dense composites led to significant advances in fiber coatings for oxide fibers and matrix densification. Additionally, a one-step fabrication process was developed to produce low cost composite components. The program also supported key developments in advanced oxide fibers that resulted in an improved version of Nextel 610 fiber (commercially available as Nextel 650) and significant progress in the development of a YAG/alumina fiber. Porous composite development focused on the vacuum winding process used to produce hot gas filters and infrared burner components.

  20. Zinc oxide nanowire interphase for enhanced interfacial strength in lightweight polymer fiber composites.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Gregory J; Sodano, Henry A

    2009-08-01

    A novel functionalization method for aramid fibers is developed to enhance the bonding of a ZnO nanowire interphase grown on the fiber surface for interfacial strength enhancement. The nanowire interphase functionally grades the typically discrete interface and reduces the stress concentration between the fiber and matrix. The functionalization process is developed to improve the bonding between the ZnO nanowires and the aramid fiber and is validated through Fourier transform IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. Mechanical testing shows significant improvement in the interfacial shear strength with no decrease in the base fiber strength. This is the only technique found in the literature for the growth of a nanowire interphase on polymer fibers for structural enhancement without degrading the in-plane properties of the bulk composite. Furthermore, it is firmly shown that the functionalization process is a necessary condition for enhanced interfacial strength, demonstrating that ZnO nanowires strongly interact with carboxylic acid functional groups. PMID:20355800

  1. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment.

  2. ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated PLGA-b-PEG nanoparticles against vascular oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sari, Ece; Tunc-Sarisozen, Yeliz; Mutlu, Hulya; Shahbazi, Reza; Ucar, Gulberk; Ulubayram, Kezban

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is the favourable idea, whereas it is possible to distribute the therapeutically active drug molecule only to the site of action. For this purpose, in this study, catalase encapsulated poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) nanoparticles were developed and an endothelial target molecule (anti-ICAM-1) was conjugated to this carrier system in order to decrease the oxidative stress level in the target site. According to the enzymatic activity results, initial catalase activity of nanoparticles was increased from 27.39 U/mg to up to 45.66 U/mg by adding 5 mg/mL bovine serum albumin (BSA). After 4 h, initial catalase activity was preserved up to 46.98% while free catalase retained less than 4% of its activity in proteolytic environment. Furthermore, FITC labelled anti-ICAM-1 targeted catalase encapsulated nanoparticles (anti-ICAM-1/CatNPs) were rapidly taken up by cultured endothelial cells and concomitantly endothelial cells were resistant to H2O2 induced oxidative impairment. PMID:26471402

  3. Endothelial targeting of nanocarriers loaded with antioxidant enzymes for protection against vascular oxidative stress and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Elizabeth D.; Chorny, Michael; Greineder, Colin F.; Alferiev, Ivan; Levy, Robert J.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial-targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes, catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD), is promising strategy for protecting organs and tissues from inflammation and oxidative stress. Here we describe Protective Antioxidant Carriers for Endothelial Targeting (PACkET), the first carriers capable of targeted endothelial delivery of both catalase and SOD. PACkET formed through controlled precipitation loaded ~30% enzyme and protected it from proteolytic degradation, whereas attachment of PECAM monoclonal antibodies to surface of the enzyme-loaded carriers, achieved without adversely affecting their stability and functionality, provided targeting. Isotope tracing and microscopy showed that PACkET exhibited specific endothelial binding and internalization in vitro. Endothelial targeting of PACkET was validated in vivo by specific (vs IgG-control) accumulation in the pulmonary vasculature after intravenous injection achieving 33% of injected dose at 30 min. Catalase loaded PACkET protects endothelial cells from killing by H2O2 and alleviated the pulmonary edema and leukocyte infiltration in mouse model of endotoxin-induced lung injury, whereas SOD-loaded PACkET mitigated cytokine-induced endothelial pro-inflammatory activation and endotoxin-induced lung inflammation. These studies indicate that PACkET offers a modular approach for vascular targeting of therapeutic enzymes. PMID:24480537

  4. Oxidative stress, DNA damage, and the telomeric complex as therapeutic targets in acute neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua A.; Park, Sookyoung; Krause, James S.; Banik, Naren L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been identified as an important contributor to neurodegeneration associated with acute CNS injuries and diseases such as spinal cord injury (SCI), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ischemic stroke. In this review, we briefly detail the damaging effects of oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, etc.) with a particular emphasis on DNA damage. Evidence for DNA damage in acute CNS injuries is presented along with its downstream effects on neuronal viability. In particular, unchecked oxidative DNA damage initiates a series of signaling events (e.g. activation of p53 and PARP-1, cell cycle re-activation) which have been shown to promote neuronal loss following CNS injury. These findings suggest that preventing DNA damage might be an effective way to promote neuronal survival and enhance neurological recovery in these conditions. Finally, we identify the telomere and telomere-associated proteins (e.g. telomerase) as novel therapeutic targets in the treatment of neurodegeneration due to their ability to modulate the neuronal response to both oxidative stress and DNA damage. PMID:23422879

  5. Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Meng-Yun; Fogelstrand, Linda; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F.; Woelkers, Douglas; Shaw, Peter X.; Choi, Jeomil; Perkmann, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Miller, Yury I.; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L.; Binder, Christoph J.

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and apoptotic cells. Adaptive immune responses to various oxidation-specific epitopes play an important role in atherogenesis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these epitopes are also recognized by innate receptors, such as scavenger receptors on macrophages, and plasma proteins, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). Here, we provide multiple lines of evidence that oxidation-specific epitopes constitute a dominant, previously unrecognized target of natural Abs (NAbs) in both mice and humans. Using reconstituted mice expressing solely IgM NAbs, we have shown that approximately 30% of all NAbs bound to model oxidation-specific epitopes, as well as to atherosclerotic lesions and apoptotic cells. Because oxidative processes are ubiquitous, we hypothesized that these epitopes exert selective pressure to expand NAbs, which in turn play an important role in mediating homeostatic functions consequent to inflammation and cell death, as demonstrated by their ability to facilitate apoptotic cell clearance. These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis. PMID:19363291

  6. Oxidation-specific epitopes are dominant targets of innate natural antibodies in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Chou, Meng-Yun; Fogelstrand, Linda; Hartvigsen, Karsten; Hansen, Lotte F; Woelkers, Douglas; Shaw, Peter X; Choi, Jeomil; Perkmann, Thomas; Bäckhed, Fredrik; Miller, Yury I; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Corr, Maripat; Witztum, Joseph L; Binder, Christoph J

    2009-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease characterized by the accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins and apoptotic cells. Adaptive immune responses to various oxidation-specific epitopes play an important role in atherogenesis. However, accumulating evidence suggests that these epitopes are also recognized by innate receptors, such as scavenger receptors on macrophages, and plasma proteins, such as C-reactive protein (CRP). Here, we provide multiple lines of evidence that oxidation-specific epitopes constitute a dominant, previously unrecognized target of natural Abs (NAbs) in both mice and humans. Using reconstituted mice expressing solely IgM NAbs, we have shown that approximately 30% of all NAbs bound to model oxidation-specific epitopes, as well as to atherosclerotic lesions and apoptotic cells. Because oxidative processes are ubiquitous, we hypothesized that these epitopes exert selective pressure to expand NAbs, which in turn play an important role in mediating homeostatic functions consequent to inflammation and cell death, as demonstrated by their ability to facilitate apoptotic cell clearance. These findings provide novel insights into the functions of NAbs in mediating host homeostasis and into their roles in health and diseases, such as chronic inflammatory diseases and atherosclerosis.

  7. Targeting the transcription factor Nrf2 to ameliorate oxidative stress and inflammation in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Stacey; Pergola, Pablo E; Zager, Richard A; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2013-06-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are mediators in the development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and its complications, and they are inseparably linked as each begets and amplifies the other. CKD-associated oxidative stress is due to increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and diminished antioxidant capacity. The latter is largely caused by impaired activation of Nrf2, the transcription factor that regulates genes encoding antioxidant and detoxifying molecules. Protective effects of Nrf2 are evidenced by amelioration of oxidative stress, inflammation, and kidney disease in response to natural Nrf2 activators in animal models, while Nrf2 deletion amplifies these pathogenic pathways and leads to autoimmune nephritis. Given the role of impaired Nrf2 activity in CKD-induced oxidative stress and inflammation, interventions aimed at restoring Nrf2 may be effective in retarding CKD progression. Clinical trials of the potent Nrf2 activator bardoxolone methyl showed significant improvement in renal function in CKD patients with type 2 diabetes. However, due to unforeseen complications the BEACON trial, which was designed to investigate the effect of this drug on time to end-stage renal disease or cardiovascular death in patients with advanced CKD, was prematurely terminated. This article provides an overview of the role of impaired Nrf2 activity in the pathogenesis of CKD-associated oxidative stress and inflammation and the potential utility of targeting Nrf2 in the treatment of CKD.

  8. Identification of oxidatively modified proteins in salt-stressed Arabidopsis: a carbonyl-targeted proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Mano, Jun'ichi; Nagata, Mitsuaki; Okamura, Shoutarou; Shiraya, Takeshi; Mitsui, Toshiaki

    2014-07-01

    In plants, environmental stresses cause an increase in the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to tissue injury. To obtain biochemical insights into this damage process, we investigated the protein carbonyls formed by ROS or by the lipid peroxide-derived α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones (i.e. reactive carbonyl species, or RCS) in the leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana under salt stress. A. thaliana Col-0 plants that we treated with 300 mM NaCl for 72 h under continuous illumination suffered irreversible leaf damage. Several RCS such as 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-nonenal (HNE) were increased within 12 h of this salt treatment. Immunoblotting using distinct antibodies against five different RCS, i.e. HNE, 4-hydroxy-(E)-2-hexenal, acrolein, crotonaldehyde and malondialdehyde, revealed that RCS-modified proteins accumulated in leaves with the progress of the salt stress treatment. The band pattern of Western blotting suggested that these different RCS targeted a common set of proteins. To identify the RCS targets, we collected HNE-modified proteins via an anti-HNE antiserum affinity trap and performed an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation, as a quantitative proteomics approach. Seventeen types of protein, modified by 2-fold more in the stressed plants than in the non-stressed plants, were identified as sensitive RCS targets. With aldehyde-reactive probe-based affinity trapping, we collected the oxidized proteins and identified 22 additional types of protein as sensitive ROS targets. These RCS and ROS target proteins were distributed in the cytosol and apoplast, as well as in the ROS-generating organelles the peroxisome, chloroplast and mitochondrion, suggesting the participation of plasma membrane oxidation in the cellular injury. Possible mechanisms by which these modified targets cause cell death are discussed.

  9. Molecular photoacoustic tomography of breast cancer using receptor targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as contrast agents

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lei; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Zhou, Guangyin; Qian, Weiping; Yang, Lily; Jiang, Huabei

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we present a breast imaging technique combining high-resolution near-infrared (NIR) light induced photoacoustic tomography (PAT) with NIR dyelabeled amino-terminal fragments of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) targeted magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NIR830-ATF-IONP) for breast cancer imaging using an orthotopic mouse mammary tumor model. We show that accumulation of the targeted nanoparticles in the tumor led to photoacoustic contrast enhancement due to the high absorption of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP). NIR fluorescence images were used to validate specific delivery of NIR830-ATF-IONP to mouse mammary tumors. We found that systemic delivery of the targeted IONP produced 4- and 10-fold enhancement in photoacoustic signals in the tumor, compared to the tumor of the mice that received non-targeted IONP or control mice. The use of targeted nanoparticles allowed imaging of tumors located as deep as 3.1 cm beneath the normal tissues. Our study indicates the potential of the combination of photoacoustic tomography and receptor-targeted NIR830-ATF-IONP as a clinical tool that can provide improved specificity and sensitivity for breast cancer detection. In vivo photoacoustic MAP and fluorescence images before and after injection. Micrographs were merged with fluorescence images taken 24 hours post injection with indicated agent (a, e, i). Panels b thru 1. Photoacoustic MAP images were merged with images of blood vessels before injection (b, f, j), and at 5 hours (c, g, k) and 24 hours (d, h, l) post injection. PMID:23125139

  10. ReaxFF Study of the Oxidation of Lignin Model Compounds for the Most Common Linkages in Softwood in View of Carbon Fiber Production

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an underused but major component of biomass. One possible area of utilization is the production of carbon fiber. A necessary processing step is the stabilization of lignin fiber (typically in an oxygen environment) before high temperature treatment. We investigate oxidative, thermal conversion of lignin using computational methods. Dilignol model compounds for the most common (seven) linkages in softwood are chosen to represent the diverse structure of lignin. We perform molecular dynamics simulation where the potential energy surface is described by a reactive force field (ReaxFF). We calculate overall activation energies for model conversion and reveal initial mechanisms of formaldehyde formation. We record fragmentation patterns and average carbon oxidation numbers at various temperatures. Most importantly, we identify mechanisms for stabilizing reactions that result in cyclic, and rigid connections in softwood lignin fibers that are necessary for further processing into carbon fibers.

  11. ReaxFF study of the oxidation of lignin model compounds for the most common linkages in softwood in view of carbon fiber production.

    PubMed

    Beste, Ariana

    2014-02-01

    Lignin is an underused but major component of biomass. One possible area of utilization is the production of carbon fiber. A necessary processing step is the stabilization of lignin fiber (typically in an oxygen environment) before high temperature treatment. We investigate oxidative, thermal conversion of lignin using computational methods. Dilignol model compounds for the most common (seven) linkages in softwood are chosen to represent the diverse structure of lignin. We perform molecular dynamics simulation where the potential energy surface is described by a reactive force field (ReaxFF). We calculate overall activation energies for model conversion and reveal initial mechanisms of formaldehyde formation. We record fragmentation patterns and average carbon oxidation numbers at various temperatures. Most importantly, we identify mechanisms for stabilizing reactions that result in cyclic and rigid connections in softwood lignin fibers that are necessary for further processing into carbon fibers.

  12. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200mgpyrazole/kg/day for 3days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. PMID:25478736

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase gene expressions might be oxidative stress targets in gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Salih; Cebeci, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is linked to increased risk of gastric cancer and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer. We aimed to analyze the effect of the accumulation of oxidative stress in the gastric cancer MKN-45 and 23132/87 cells following hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure on the expression patterns of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-11, MMP-12, MMP-14, MMP-15, MMP-17, MMP-23, MMP-28, and β-catenin genes. Methods The mRNA transcripts in the cells were determined by RT-PCR. Following H2O2 exposure, oxidative stress in the viable cells was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was used to eliminate oxidative stress and the consequence of H2O2 exposure and its removal on the expressions of the genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results The expressions of MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-14, MMP-15, MMP-17 and β-catenin in MKN-45 cells and only the expression of MMP-15 in 23132/87 cells were increased. Removal of the oxidative stress resulted in decrease in the expressions of MMP genes of which the expressions were increased after H2O2 exposure. β-catenin, a transcription factor for many genes including MMPs, also displayed decreased levels of expression in both of the cell lines following CAPE treatment. Conclusions Our data suggest that there is a remarkable link between the accumulation of oxidative stress and the increased expressions of MMP genes in the gastric cancer cells and MMPs should be considered as potential targets of therapy in gastric cancers due to its continuous exposure to oxidative stress. PMID:23825909

  14. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200mgpyrazole/kg/day for 3days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection.

  15. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  16. Targeting NADPH Oxidase Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Liu, Tongyun; Sezen, Sena F.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a state of chronic vasculopathy characterized by endothelial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress, but the sources and mechanisms responsible for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the penis are unknown. Aims We evaluated whether SCD activates NADPH oxidase, induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) uncoupling, and decreases antioxidants in the SCD mouse penis. We further tested the hypothesis that targeting NADPH oxidase decreases oxidative stress in the SCD mouse penis. Methods SCD transgenic (sickle) mice were used as an animal model of SCD. Hemizygous (hemi) mice served as controls. Mice received an NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (10 mM in drinking water) or vehicle. Penes were excised at baseline for molecular studies. Markers of oxidative stress (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [HNE]), sources of ROS (eNOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox), and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase [SOD]1, SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase-1 [GPx1]) were measured by Western blot in penes. Main Outcome Measures Sources of ROS, oxidative stress, and enzymatic antioxidants in the SCD penis. Results Relative to hemi mice, SCD increased (P < 0.05) protein expression of NADPH oxidase subunits p67phox, p47phox, and gp91phox, 4-HNE-modified proteins, induced eNOS uncoupling, and reduced Gpx1 expression in the penis. Apocynin treatment of sickle mice reversed (P < 0.05) the abnormalities in protein expressions of p47phox, gp91phox (but not p67phox) and 4-HNE, but only slightly (P > 0.05) prevented eNOS uncoupling in the penis. Apocynin treatment of hemi mice did not affect any of these parameters. Conclusion NADPH oxidase and eNOS uncoupling are sources of oxidative stress in the SCD penis; decreased GPx1 further contributes to oxidative stress. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase upregulation decreases oxidative stress, implying a major role for NADPH oxidase as a ROS source and a

  17. Microstructure tailoring of the nickel oxide-Yttria-stabilized zirconia hollow fibers toward high-performance microtubular solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Ren, Cong; Fang, Shumin; Wang, Yao; Chen, Fanglin

    2014-11-12

    NiO-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) hollow fiber anode support with different microstructures was prepared using a phase-inversion method. The effect of the solid loading of the phase-inversion suspensions on the microstructure development of the NiO-YSZ anode support was investigated. Solid loading in the suspension was found to have an important influence on the microstructure of the NiO-YSZ anode support and viscosity-related viscous fingering mechanism can be adopted to explain the pore formation mechanism of the as-prepared hollow fibers. NiO-YSZ anode-supported microtubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with different anode microstructures were fabricated and tested, and the correlation between the anode support microstructures, porosity, gas permeability, electrical conductivity, and the cell electrochemical performance was discussed. Microtubular SOFCs with a cell configuration of Ni-YSZ/YSZ/YSZ-LSM (LSM = (La(0.8)Sr(0.2))(0.95)MnO(3-x)) and optimized anode microstructure show cell output power density of 833.9 mW cm(-2) at 750 °C using humidified H2 as fuel and ambient air as oxidant.

  18. Mitochondria are targets for peroxisome-derived oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Brees, Chantal; Rubio, Noemí; Nordgren, Marcus; Apanasets, Oksana; Kunze, Markus; Baes, Myriam; Agostinis, Patrizia; Fransen, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Many cellular processes are driven by spatially and temporally regulated redox-dependent signaling events. Although mounting evidence indicates that organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can function as signaling platforms for oxidative stress-regulated pathways, little is known about the role of peroxisomes in these processes. In this study, we employ targeted variants of the genetically encoded photosensitizer KillerRed to gain a better insight into the interplay between peroxisomes and cellular oxidative stress. We show that the phototoxic effects of peroxisomal KillerRed induce mitochondria-mediated cell death and that this process can be counteracted by targeted overexpression of a select set of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxisomal glutathione S-transferase kappa 1, superoxide dismutase 1, and mitochondrial catalase. We also present evidence that peroxisomal disease cell lines deficient in plasmalogen biosynthesis or peroxisome assembly are more sensitive to KillerRed-induced oxidative stress than control cells. Collectively, these findings confirm and extend previous observations suggesting that disturbances in peroxisomal redox control and metabolism can sensitize cells to oxidative stress. In addition, they lend strong support to the ideas that peroxisomes and mitochondria share a redox-sensitive relationship and that the redox communication between these organelles is not only mediated by diffusion of reactive oxygen species from one compartment to the other. Finally, these findings indicate that mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress, and this may have profound implications for our views on cellular aging and age-related diseases.

  19. Small RNA sequencing and degradome analysis of developing fibers of short fiber mutants Ligon-lintles-1 (Li1) and -2 (Li2) revealed a role for miRNAs and their targets in cotton fiber elongation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The length of cotton fiber is an important agronomic trait that directly affects the quality of yarn and fabric. Understanding the molecular basis of fiber elongation would provide a means for improvement of fiber length. Ligon-lintless-1 (Li1) and -2 (Li2) are monogenic and dominant mutations that ...

  20. Targeted Nitric Oxide Delivery by Supramolecular Nanofibers for the Prevention of Restenosis After Arterial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bahnson, Edward S.M.; Kassam, Hussein A.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Jiang, Wulin; Morgan, Courtney E.; Vercammen, Janet M.; Jiang, Qun; Flynn, Megan E.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cardiovascular interventions continue to fail as a result of arterial restenosis secondary to neointimal hyperplasia. We sought to develop and evaluate a systemically delivered nanostructure targeted to the site of arterial injury to prevent neointimal hyperplasia. Nanostructures were based on self-assembling biodegradable molecules known as peptide amphiphiles. The targeting motif was a collagen-binding peptide, and the therapeutic moiety was added by S-nitrosylation of cysteine residues. Results: Structure of the nanofibers was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering. S-nitrosylation was confirmed by mass spectrometry, and nitric oxide (NO) release was assessed electrochemically and by chemiluminescent detection. The balloon carotid artery injury model was performed on 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Immediately after injury, nanofibers were administered systemically via tail vein injection. S-nitrosylated (S-nitrosyl [SNO])-targeted nanofibers significantly reduced neointimal hyperplasia 2 weeks and 7 months following balloon angioplasty, with no change in inflammation. Innovation: This is the first time that an S-nitrosothiol (RSNO)-based therapeutic was shown to have targeted local effects after systemic administration. This approach, combining supramolecular nanostructures with a therapeutic NO-based payload and a targeting moiety, overcomes the limitations of delivering NO to a site of interest, avoiding undesirable systemic side effects. Conclusion: We successfully synthesized and characterized an RSNO-based therapy that when administered systemically, targets directly to the site of vascular injury. By integrating therapeutic and targeting chemistries, these targeted SNO nanofibers provided durable inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia in vivo and show great potential as a platform to treat cardiovascular diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 401–418. PMID:26593400

  1. The Influence of Interfacial Roughness on Fiber Sliding in Oxide Composites with La-Monazite Interphases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. B.; Hay, R. S.; Marshall, D. B.; Morgan, P. E. D.; Sayir, A.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor); Farmer, Serene C. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Room temperature debonding and sliding of La-Monazite coated fibers is assessed using a composite with a polycrystalline alumina matrix and fibers of several different single crystal (mullite, sapphire) and directionally solidified eutectic (Al2O3/Y3Al5O12 and Al2O3/Y-ZrO2) compositions. These fibers provide a range of residual stresses and interfacial roughnesses. Sliding occurred over a debond crack at the fiber-coating interface when the sliding displacement and surface roughness were relatively small. At large sliding displacements with relatively rough interfaces, the monazite coatings were deformed extensively by fracture, dislocations and occasional twinning, whereas the fibers were undamaged. Dense, fine-grained (10 nm) microstructures suggestive of dynamic recrystallization were also observed in the coatings. Frictional heating during sliding is assessed. The possibility of low temperature recrystallization is discussed in the light of the known resistance of monazite to radiation damage. The ability of La-Monazite to undergo plastic deformation relatively easily at low temperatures may be enabling for its use as a composite interface.

  2. Nrf2-ARE pathway: An emerging target against oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Buendia, Izaskun; Michalska, Patrycja; Navarro, Elisa; Gameiro, Isabel; Egea, Javier; León, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases (NDDs) are predicted to be the biggest health concern in this century and the second leading cause of death by 2050. The main risk factor of these diseases is aging, and as the aging population in Western societies is increasing, the prevalence of these diseases is augmenting exponentially. Despite the great efforts to find a cure, current treatments remain ineffective or have low efficacy. Increasing lines of evidence point to exacerbated oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and chronic neuroinflammation as common pathological mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. We will address the role of the nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as a potential target for the treatment of NDDs. The Nrf2-ARE pathway is an intrinsic mechanism of defence against oxidative stress. Nrf2 is a transcription factor that induces the expression of a great number of cytoprotective and detoxificant genes. There are many evidences that highlight the protective role of the Nrf2-ARE pathway in neurodegenerative conditions, as it reduces oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Therefore, the Nrf2 pathway is being increasingly considered a therapeutic target for NDDs. Herein we will review the deregulation of the Nrf2 pathway in different NDDs and the recent studies with Nrf2 inducers as "proof-of-concept" for the treatment of those devastating pathologies.

  3. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  4. The protein targeting factor Get3 functions as ATP-independent chaperone under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Voth, Wilhelm; Schick, Markus; Gates, Stephanie; Li, Sheng; Vilardi, Fabio; Gostimskaya, Irina; Southworth, Daniel R; Schwappach, Blanche; Jakob, Ursula

    2014-10-01

    Exposure of cells to reactive oxygen species (ROS) causes a rapid and significant drop in intracellular ATP levels. This energy depletion negatively affects ATP-dependent chaperone systems, making ROS-mediated protein unfolding and aggregation a potentially very challenging problem. Here we show that Get3, a protein involved in ATP-dependent targeting of tail-anchored (TA) proteins under nonstress conditions, turns into an effective ATP-independent chaperone when oxidized. Activation of Get3's chaperone function, which is a fully reversible process, involves disulfide bond formation, metal release, and its conversion into distinct, higher oligomeric structures. Mutational studies demonstrate that the chaperone activity of Get3 is functionally distinct from and likely mutually exclusive with its targeting function, and responsible for the oxidative stress-sensitive phenotype that has long been noted for yeast cells lacking functional Get3. These results provide convincing evidence that Get3 functions as a redox-regulated chaperone, effectively protecting eukaryotic cells against oxidative protein damage.

  5. PSMA targeted docetaxel-loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nagesh, Prashanth K B; Johnson, Nia R; Boya, Vijaya K N; Chowdhury, Pallabita; Othman, Shadi F; Khalilzad-Sharghi, Vahid; Hafeez, Bilal B; Ganju, Aditya; Khan, Sheema; Behrman, Stephen W; Zafar, Nadeem; Chauhan, Subhash C; Jaggi, Meena; Yallapu, Murali M

    2016-08-01

    Docetaxel (Dtxl) is currently the most common therapeutic option for prostate cancer (PC). However, adverse side effects and problems associated with chemo-resistance limit its therapeutic outcome in clinical settings. A targeted nanoparticle system to improve its delivery to and activity at the tumor site could be an attractive strategy for PC therapy. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and determine the anti-cancer efficacy of a novel docetaxel loaded, prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) (J591-SPION-Dtxl) formulation for PC therapy. Our results showed the SPION-Dtxl formulation exhibits an optimal particle size and zeta potential, which can efficiently be internalized in PC cells. SPION-Dtxl exhibited potent anti-cancer efficacy via induction of the expression of apoptosis associated proteins, downregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins, and inhibition of chemo-resistance associated protein in PC cell lines. J591-SPION-Dtxl exhibited a profound uptake in C4-2 (PSMA(+)) cells compared to PC-3 (PSMA(-)) cells. A similar targeting potential was observed in ex-vivo studies in C4-2 tumors but not in PC-3 tumors, suggesting its tumor specific targeting. Overall, this study suggests that a PSMA antibody functionalized SPION-Dtxl formulation can be highly useful for targeted PC therapy. PMID:27058278

  6. Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets Prepared by Polymer-Assisted Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, Mitch A.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Chang, Noel N.; Parsons-Moss, Tashi; Ashby, Paul D.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Stavsetra, Liv; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Nitsche, Heino

    2008-09-15

    Thulium(III) oxide (Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) targets prepared by the polymer-assisted deposition (PAD) method were irradiated by heavy-ion beams to test the method's feasibility for nuclear science applications. Targets were prepared on silicon nitride backings (thickness of 1000 nm, 344 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) and were irradiated with an {sup 40}Ar beam at laboratory frame energy of {approx}210 MeV (50 particle nA). The root mean squared (RMS) roughness prior to irradiation is 1.1 nm for a {approx}250 nm ({approx}220 {micro}g/cm{sup 2}) Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} target, and an RMS roughness of 2.0 nm after irradiation was measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Scanning electron microscopy of the irradiated target reveals no significant differences in surface homogeneity when compared to imaging prior to irradiation. Target flaking was not observed from monitoring Rutherford scattered particles as a function of time.

  7. Refinement of adsorptive coatings for fluorescent riboflavin-receptor-targeted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, Yoanna; Beztsinna, Nataliia; Jayapaul, Jabadurai; Weiler, Marek; Arns, Susanne; Shi, Yang; Lammers, Twan; Kiessling, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Flavin mononucleotide (FMN) is a riboflavin derivative that can be exploited to target the riboflavin transporters (RFTs) and the riboflavin carrier protein (RCP) in cells with high metabolic activity. In this study we present the synthesis of different FMN-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIOs) and their efficiency as targeting contrast agents. Since FMN alone cannot stabilize the nanoparticles, we used adenosine phosphates--AMP, ADP and ATP--as spacers to obtain colloidally stable nanoparticles. Nucleotides with di- and triphosphate groups were intended to increase the USPIO charge and thus improve zeta potential and stability. However, all nanoparticles formed negatively charged clusters with similar properties in terms of zeta potential (-28 ± 2 mV), relaxivity (228-259 mM(-1) s(-1) at 3 T) and hydrodynamic radius (53-85 nm). Molecules with a higher number of phosphate groups, such as ADP and ATP, have a higher adsorption affinity towards iron oxide, which, instead of providing more charge, led to partial desorption and replacement of FMN. Hence, we obtained USPIOs carrying different amounts of targeting agent, which significantly influenced the nanoparticles' uptake. The nanoparticles' uptake by different cancer cells and HUVECs was evaluated photometrically and with MR relaxometry, showing that the cellular uptake of the USPIOs increases with the FMN amount on their surface. Thus, for USPIOs targeted with riboflavin derivatives the use of spacers with increasing numbers of phosphate groups does not improve either zeta potential or the particles' stability, but rather detaches the targeting moieties from their surface, leading to lower cellular uptake.

  8. Expression of receptors for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands in sacral spinal cord reveals separate targets of pelvic afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Shelley L; Keast, Janet R

    2008-02-20

    Nerve growth factor has been proposed to mediate many structural and chemical changes in bladder sensory neurons after injury or inflammation. We have examined the expression of receptors for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family within sensory terminals located in the sacral spinal cord and in bladder-projecting sacral dorsal root ganglion neurons of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Nerve fibers immunolabelled for GFRalpha1 (GDNF receptor), GFRalpha2 (neurturin receptor), or GFRalpha3 (artemin receptor) showed distinct distribution patterns in the spinal cord, suggesting separate populations of sensory fibers with different functions: GFRalpha1-labeled fibers were in outer lamina II and the lateral-collateral pathway and associated with autonomic interneurons and preganglionic neurons; GFRalpha2-labeled fibers were only in inner lamina II; GFRalpha3-labeled fibers were in lamina I, the lateral-collateral pathway, and areas surrounding dorsal groups of preganglionic neurons and associated interneurons. Immunofluorescence studies of retrogradely labelled bladder-projecting neurons in sacral dorsal root ganglia showed that approximately 25% expressed GFRalpha1 or GFRalpha3 immunoreactivity, the preferred receptors for GDNF and artemin, respectively. After cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation, fluorescence intensity of GFRalpha1-positive fibers increased within the dorsal horn, but there was no change in the GFRalpha2- or GFRalpha3-positive fibers. These studies have shown that GDNF and artemin may target bladder sensory neurons and potentially mediate plasticity of sacral visceral afferent neurons following inflammation. Our results have also revealed three distinct subpopulations of sensory fibers within the sacral spinal cord, which have not been identified previously using other markers.

  9. Linker-free conjugation and specific cell targeting of antibody functionalized iron-oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yaolin; Baiu, Dana C.; Sherwood, Jennifer A.; McElreath, Meghan R.; Qin, Ying; Lackey, Kimberly H.; Otto, Mario; Bao, Yuping

    2015-01-01

    Specific targeting is a key step to realize the full potential of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications, especially tumor-associated diagnosis and therapy. Here, we developed anti-GD2 antibody conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for highly efficient neuroblastoma cell targeting. The antibody conjugation was achieved through an easy, linker-free method based on catechol reactions. The targeting efficiency and specificity of the antibody-conjugated nanoparticles to GD2-positive neuroblastoma cells were confirmed by flow cytometry, fluorescence microscopy, Prussian blue staining and transmission electron microscopy. These detailed studies indicated that the receptor-recognition capability of the antibody was fully retained after conjugation and the conjugated nanoparticles quickly attached to GD2-positive cells within four hours. Interestingly, longer treatment (12 h) led the cell membrane-bound nanoparticles to be internalized into cytosol, either by directly penetrating the cell membrane or escaping from the endosomes. Last but importantly, the uniquely designed functional surfaces of the nanoparticles allow easy conjugation of other bioactive molecules. PMID:26660881

  10. Treatment-Resistant Major Depression: Rationale for NMDA Receptors as Targets and Nitrous Oxide as Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Nagele, Peter; Mennerick, Steven; Conway, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) remains a huge personal and societal encumbrance. Particularly burdensome is a virulent subtype of MDD, treatment resistant major depression (TMRD), which afflicts 15–30% of MDD patients. There has been recent interest in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) as targets for treatment of MDD and perhaps TMRD. To date, most pre-clinical and clinical studies have focused on ketamine, although psychotomimetic and other side effects may limit ketamine’s utility. These considerations prompted a recent promising pilot clinical trial of nitrous oxide, an NMDAR antagonist that acts through a mechanism distinct from that of ketamine, in patients with severe TRMD. In this paper, we review the clinical picture of TRMD as a subtype of MDD, the evolution of ketamine as a fast-acting antidepressant, and clinical and basic science studies supporting the possible use of nitrous oxide as a rapid antidepressant. PMID:26696909

  11. [Application and advancement of magnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles in tumor-targeted therapy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yue; Chen, Bao-An

    2010-01-01

    Recently, nanometer-sized magnetic particles have been intensively concerned and investigated due to their particularly large surface-to-volume ratio, quantum-size effect, magnetic character as well as their potential application in the area of bioscience and medicine. The most promising nanoparticles are magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with appropriate surface modification, which have been widely used experimentally for numerous in vivo applications such as magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement, tissue repair, immunoassay, detoxification of biological fluids, drug delivery, hyperthermia and cell separation. To focus on one of the most important and fascinating subjects in nanobiotechnology, this review describes the current situation and development of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their applications in drug delivery and hyperthermia in tumor-targeted therapy. The possible perspectives and some challenges to further development of these nanoparticles are also analyzed and discussed. PMID:20038325

  12. Targeted delivery and controlled release of doxorubicin into cancer cells using a multifunctional graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yao; Tao, Lei; Annie Bligh, S W; Yang, Huihui; Pan, Qixia; Zhu, Limin

    2016-02-01

    We have synthesized a new multifunctional graphene oxide as a drug carrier targeting to hepatocarcinoma cells. Surface modified graphene oxide with polyethyleneimine (PEI) sequentially derivatised with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked lactobionic acid (LA), and acetylation of remaining terminal amines of the PEI produced a new multifunctional graphene oxide drug carrier (GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA). Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, was encapsulated in GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA to give GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX, with a drug loading percentage of 85%. We showed that both GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA and GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX were water soluble and stable between pH 5.0 and 9.0. In vitro release studies indicated that the release rate of DOX from GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX complexes were significantly higher at pH5.8 than that of the physiological pH. Another important feature of this carrier is its good cell viability in the tested concentration range (0-4μM), and the GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing asialoglycoprotein (ASGPR) receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The enhanced target specificity and the substantial improvement in pH responsive controlled release have made this new carrier a potential choice for non-covalent encapsulation of drugs in GO, and a delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:26652419

  13. Mitochondria-targeted heme oxygenase-1 decreases oxidative stress in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Traylor, Amie; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Johnson, Michelle S; Benavides, Gloria A; Ricart, Karina; Boddu, Ravindra; Moore, Ray D; Landar, Aimee; Barnes, Stephen; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Agarwal, Anupam

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria are both a source and target of the actions of reactive oxygen species and possess a complex system of inter-related antioxidants that control redox signaling and protect against oxidative stress. Interestingly, the antioxidant enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is not present in the mitochondria despite the fact that the organelle is the site of heme synthesis and contains multiple heme proteins. Detoxification of heme is an important protective mechanism since the reaction of heme with hydrogen peroxide generates pro-oxidant ferryl species capable of propagating oxidative stress and ultimately cell death. We therefore hypothesized that a mitochondrially localized HO-1 would be cytoprotective. To test this, we generated a mitochondria-targeted HO-1 cell line by transfecting HEK293 cells with a plasmid construct containing the manganese superoxide dismutase mitochondria leader sequence fused to HO-1 cDNA (Mito-HO-1). Nontargeted HO-1-overexpressing cells were generated by transfecting HO-1 cDNA (HO-1) or empty vector (Vector). Mitochondrial localization of HO-1 with increased HO activity in the mitochondrial fraction of Mito-HO-1 cells was observed, but a significant decrease in the expression of heme-containing proteins occurred in these cells. Both cytosolic HO-1- and Mito-HO-1-expressing cells were protected against hypoxia-dependent cell death and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, but these effects were more pronounced with Mito-HO-1. Furthermore, decrement in production of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates following hypoxia was significantly mitigated in Mito-HO-1 cells. These data suggest that specific mitochondrially targeted HO-1 under acute pathological conditions may have beneficial effects, but the selective advantage of long-term expression is constrained by a negative impact on the synthesis of heme-containing mitochondrial proteins.

  14. Graphene oxide based sol-gel stainless steel fiber for the headspace solid-phase microextraction of organophosphate ester flame retardants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tingting; Cheng, Jing; Cai, Cuicui; Cheng, Min; Wu, Shiju; Zhou, Hongbin

    2016-07-29

    In this paper, graphene oxide was coated onto a stainless steel wire through sol-gel technique and it was used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The prepared fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which displayed that the fiber had crinkled surface and porous structure The application of the fiber was evaluated through the headspace SPME of nine organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs) with different characteristics in water samples followed by gas chromatography and nitrogen-phosphorous detector (GC/NPD). The major factors influencing the extraction efficiency, including the extraction and desorption conditions, were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of organophosphate ester flame retardants in real environmental water samples. The results demonstrated the HS-SPME method based on GO sol-gel fiber had good linearity (R>0.9928), and limits of detection (1.4-135.6ngL(-1)), high repeatability (RSD<9.8%) and good recovery (76.4-112.4%). The GO based sol-gel fiber displayed bigger extraction capability than the commercial PDMS fiber and the pure sol-gel fiber for both polar and apolar organophosphate esters, especially for the OPFRs containing benzene rings. PMID:27371020

  15. Graphene oxide based sol-gel stainless steel fiber for the headspace solid-phase microextraction of organophosphate ester flame retardants in water samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tingting; Cheng, Jing; Cai, Cuicui; Cheng, Min; Wu, Shiju; Zhou, Hongbin

    2016-07-29

    In this paper, graphene oxide was coated onto a stainless steel wire through sol-gel technique and it was used as a solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber. The prepared fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which displayed that the fiber had crinkled surface and porous structure The application of the fiber was evaluated through the headspace SPME of nine organophosphate ester flame retardants (OPFRs) with different characteristics in water samples followed by gas chromatography and nitrogen-phosphorous detector (GC/NPD). The major factors influencing the extraction efficiency, including the extraction and desorption conditions, were studied and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the proposed method was evaluated, and applied to the analysis of organophosphate ester flame retardants in real environmental water samples. The results demonstrated the HS-SPME method based on GO sol-gel fiber had good linearity (R>0.9928), and limits of detection (1.4-135.6ngL(-1)), high repeatability (RSD<9.8%) and good recovery (76.4-112.4%). The GO based sol-gel fiber displayed bigger extraction capability than the commercial PDMS fiber and the pure sol-gel fiber for both polar and apolar organophosphate esters, especially for the OPFRs containing benzene rings.

  16. Experimental observations of thermal spikes in microwave processing of ceramic oxide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, G.J.; Unruh, W.P.; Thomas, J.R. Jr.

    1994-04-01

    Microwave heating of alumina/silica fiber tows in a single-mode microwave cavity at 2.45 GHz have produced a surprising thermal spike behavior on the fiber bundles. During a thermal spike, a ``hot spot`` on the tow brightens rapidly, persists for a few seconds, and rapidly extinguishs. A hot spot can encompass the entire tow in the cavity or just a localized portion of the tow. Some local hot spots propagate along the fiber. Thermal spikes are triggered by relatively small (<15%) increases in power, thus having obvious implications for the development of practical microwave fiber processing systems. A tow can be heated through several successive thermal spikes, after which the tow is left substantially cooler than it was originally, although the applied microwave electric field is much larger. X-ray diffraction studies show that after each temperature spike there is a partial phase transformation of the tow material into mullite. After several excursions the tow has been largely transformed to the new, less lossy phase and is more difficult to heat. Heating experiments with Nextel 550 tows are examined for a pausible explanation of this microwave heating behavior.

  17. Dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase: a new therapeutic target for the modulation of nitric oxide and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jai Pal

    2007-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has a key role in promoting angiogenesis by increasing vasodilation, vascular permeability, endothelial cell proliferation and migration, and by modifying the activities of angiogenic mediators. NO is also critical for the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells from the bone marrow which promotes vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. Studies have shown that the enzymes catalyzing NO synthesis are inhibited by the endogenously generated inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA). Pharmacological agents targeted to modulate dimethyl-arginine dimethylaminohydrolase, the key enzyme metabolizing ADMA, may offer a potential strategy for developing novel pro- and anti-angiogenic therapies. PMID:17729185

  18. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for targeting hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shih-Hsiang; Liu, Chia-Hung; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chang, Yung; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Lin, Feng-Huei; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is one of the promising treatments for cancer therapy. However, the development of a magnetic fluid agent that can selectively target a tumor and efficiently elevate temperature while exhibiting excellent biocompatibility still remains challenging. Here a new core-shell nanostructure consisting of inorganic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as the core, organic alginate as the shell, and cell-targeting ligands (ie, D-galactosamine) decorated on the outer surface (denoted as Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles) was prepared using a combination of a pre-gel method and coprecipitation in aqueous solution. After treatment with an AC magnetic field, the results indicate that Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles had excellent hyperthermic efficacy in a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) owing to enhanced cellular uptake, and show great potential as therapeutic agents for future in vivo drug delivery systems. PMID:26005343

  19. Laser plume spectroscopy. 2. Graphite yttrium-stabilised and zirconium oxide targets

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, V V; Solomonov, V I; Platonov, V V; Snigireva, O A; Ivanov, M G; Lisenkov, V V

    2005-07-31

    Spectral and kinetic properties of a plume formed in the vicinity of a graphite and a pressed yttrium-stabilised zirconium oxide (YSZ) powder targets irradiated in air by a 10.6-{mu}m pulsed CO{sub 2} laser with a peak power of 1.5-9 kW at room temperature are studied. The plume propagated at right angles to the target surface and at an angle of 45{sup 0} to the laser radiation. The spectral and kinetic characteristics of its luminescence were measured discretely along the entire length of the plume. It is shown that the YSZ plume as well as the graphite plume is a flux of nonequilibrium gaseous plasma at a temperature of about 4.7-3.1 kK, in which a luminescence of YO and ZrO radicals is excited. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Targeted diazeniumdiolates: localized nitric oxide release from glioma-specific peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Safdar, Shahana; Taite, Lakeshia J

    2012-01-17

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small yet important biological messenger, which at sufficient concentrations has been shown to induce apoptosis as well as increase radiosensitization in tumor cells. However, the short half-life of NO gas itself has limited its utility as a therapeutic agent. The objective of this study was the development of targeted NO donors and we illustrate their utility as a potential therapeutic for treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in adults. We have synthesized two diazeniumdiolate NO donors by reacting NO gas with glioma-specific targeting sequences, VTWTPQAWFQWVGGGSKKKKK (VTW) and chlorotoxin (CTX), and achieved repeatable NO release from both donors. FITC-labeled biomolecules, when incubated with glioma and control cells preferentially bound to the glioma cells and showed only minimal binding to the control cells. Additionally, tumor cell viability was significantly decreased when cells were incubated with the NO donors whereas control cell viability was not affected.

  1. Functionalized magnetic iron oxide/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for targeting hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shih-Hsiang; Liu, Chia-Hung; Bastakoti, Bishnu Prasad; Suzuki, Norihiro; Chang, Yung; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Lin, Feng-Huei; Wu, Kevin C-W

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthermia is one of the promising treatments for cancer therapy. However, the development of a magnetic fluid agent that can selectively target a tumor and efficiently elevate temperature while exhibiting excellent biocompatibility still remains challenging. Here a new core-shell nanostructure consisting of inorganic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles as the core, organic alginate as the shell, and cell-targeting ligands (ie, D-galactosamine) decorated on the outer surface (denoted as Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles) was prepared using a combination of a pre-gel method and coprecipitation in aqueous solution. After treatment with an AC magnetic field, the results indicate that Fe3O4@Alg-GA nanoparticles had excellent hyperthermic efficacy in a human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) owing to enhanced cellular uptake, and show great potential as therapeutic agents for future in vivo drug delivery systems. PMID:26005343

  2. Facile synthesis and functionalization of manganese oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted tumor MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Li, Jingchao; Yu, Zhibo; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang; Shen, Mingwu

    2015-12-01

    We report the polyethyleneimine (PEI)-enabled synthesis and functionalization of manganese oxide (Mn3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted tumor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in vivo. In this work, monodispersed PEI-coated Mn3O4 NPs were formed by decomposition of acetylacetone manganese via a solvothermal approach. The Mn3O4 NPs with PEI coating were sequentially conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate, folic acid (FA)-linked polyethylene glycol (PEG), and PEG monomethyl ether. Followed by final acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines, multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs were formed and well characterized. We show that the formed multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs with a mean diameter of 8.0 nm possess good water-dispersibility, colloidal stability, and cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility in the given concentration range. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopic observation reveal that the multifunctional Mn3O4 NPs are able to target FA receptor-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro. Importantly, the FA-targeted Mn3O4 NPs can be used as a nanoprobe for efficient T1-weighted MR imaging of cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active FA-mediated targeting pathway. With the facile PEI-enabled formation and functionalization, the developed PEI-coated Mn3O4 NPs may be modified with other biomolecules for different biomedical imaging applications. PMID:26454057

  3. Targeted gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for CD163 detection in atherosclerosis by MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, Carlos; Carril, Monica; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Markuerkiaga, Irati; Padro, Daniel; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Moreno, Juan Antonio; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Plaza-Garcia, Sandra; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Penades, Soledad; Egido, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    CD163 is a membrane receptor expressed by macrophage lineage. Studies performed in atherosclerosis have shown that CD163 expression is increased at inflammatory sites, pointing at the presence of intraplaque hemorrhagic sites or asymptomatic plaques. Hence, imaging of CD163 expressing macrophages is an interesting strategy in order to detect atherosclerotic plaques. We have prepared a targeted probe based on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody for the specific detection of CD163 by MRI. Firstly, the specificity of the targeted probe was validated in vitro by incubation of the probe with CD163(+) or (−) macrophages. The probe was able to selectively detect CD163(+) macrophages both in human and murine cells. Subsequently, the targeted probe was injected in 16 weeks old apoE deficient mice developing atherosclerotic lesions and the pararenal abdominal aorta was imaged by MRI. The accumulation of probe in the site of interest increased over time and the signal intensity decreased significantly 48 hours after the injection. Hence, we have developed a highly sensitive targeted probe capable of detecting CD163-expressing macrophages that could provide useful information about the state of the atheromatous lesions. PMID:26616677

  4. Targeted Lipidomics Studies Reveal that Linolenic Acid Promotes Cotton Fiber Elongation by Activating Phosphatidylinositol and Phosphatidylinositol Monophosphate Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gao-Jun; Xiao, Guang-Hui; Liu, Ning-Jing; Liu, Dan; Chen, Pei-Shuang; Qin, Yong-Mei; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2015-06-01

    The membrane lipids from fast-elongating wild-type cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) fibers at 10 days post-anthesis, wild-type ovules with fiber cells removed, and ovules from the fuzzless-lintless mutant harvested at the same age, were extracted, separated, and quantified. Fiber cells contained significantly higher amounts of phosphatidylinositol (PI) than both ovule samples with PI 34:3 being the most predominant species. The genes encoding fatty acid desaturases (Δ(15)GhFAD), PI synthase (PIS) and PI kinase (PIK) were expressed in a fiber-preferential manner. Further analysis of phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) indicated that elongating fibers contained four- to five-fold higher amounts of PIP 34:3 than the ovules. Exogenously applied linolenic acid (C18:3), soybean L-α-PI, and PIPs containing PIP 34:3 promoted significant fiber growth, whereas a liver PI lacking the C18:3 moiety, linoleic acid, and PIP 36:2 were completely ineffective. The growth inhibitory effects of carbenoxolone, 5-hydroxytryptamine, and wortmannin were reverted by C18:3, PI, or PIP, respectively, suggesting that PIP signaling is essential for fiber cell growth. Furthermore, cotton plants expressing virus-induced gene-silencing constructs that specifically suppressed GhΔ(15)FAD, GhPIS, or GhPIK expression, resulted in significantly short-fibered phenotypes. Our data provide the basis for in-depth studies on the roles of PI and PIP in mediating cotton fiber growth.

  5. Polyethylene Glycol Modified, Cross-Linked Starch Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Enhanced Magnetic Tumor Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Adam J.; David, Allan E.; Wang, Jianxin; Galbán, Craig J.; Hill, Hannah L.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    While successful magnetic tumor targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles has been achieved in a number of models, the rapid blood clearance of magnetically suitable particles by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) limits their availability for targeting. This work aimed to develop a long-circulating magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (MNP) platform capable of sustained tumor exposure via the circulation and, thus, enhanced magnetic tumor targeting. Aminated, cross-linked starch (DN) and aminosilane (A) coated MNPs were successfully modified with 5 kDa (A5, D5) or 20 kDa (A20, D20) polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains using simple N-Hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) chemistry and characterized. Identical PEG-weight analogues between platforms (A5 & D5, A20 & D20) were similar in size (140–190 nm) and relative PEG labeling (1.5% of surface amines – A5/D5, 0.4% – A20/D20), with all PEG-MNPs possessing magnetization properties suitable for magnetic targeting. Candidate PEG-MNPs were studied in RES simulations in vitro to predict long-circulating character. D5 and D20 performed best showing sustained size stability in cell culture medium at 37°C and 7 (D20) to 10 (D5) fold less uptake in RAW264.7 macrophages when compared to previously targeted, unmodified starch MNPs (D). Observations in vitro were validated in vivo, with D5 (7.29 hr) and D20 (11.75 hr) showing much longer half-lives than D (0.12 hr). Improved plasma stability enhanced tumor MNP exposure 100 (D5) to 150 (D20) fold as measured by plasma AUC0-∞ Sustained tumor exposure over 24 hours was visually confirmed in a 9L-glioma rat model (12 mg Fe/kg) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Findings indicate that both D5 and D20 are promising MNP platforms for enhanced magnetic tumor targeting, warranting further study in tumor models. PMID:21176955

  6. Cyclodextrin-functionalized reduced graphene oxide as a fiber coating material for the solid-phase microextraction of some volatile aromatic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Li, Zhi; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2015-05-01

    A novel solid phase microextraction fiber was prepared for the first time by using a sol-gel technique with hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin-functionalized reduced graphene oxide as the fiber coating material. The results verified that the β-cyclodextrin was successfully grafted onto the surface of reduced graphene oxide and the coating possessed a uniform folded and wrinkled structure. The performance of the solid phase microextraction fiber was evaluated by using it to extract nine volatile aromatic compounds from water samples before determination with gas chromatography and flame ionization detection. Some important experimental parameters that could affect the extraction efficiency such as the extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption temperature, desorption time, the volume of water sample solution, stirring rate, as well as ionic strength were optimized. The new method was validated to be effective for the trace analysis of some volatile aromatic compounds, with the limits of detection ranging from 2.0 to 8.0 ng/L. Single fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility were in the range of 2.5-9.4 and 5.4-12.9%, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the analysis of three different water samples, and the recoveries of the method were in the range from 77.9 to 113.6% at spiking levels of 10, 100, and 1000 ng/L, respectively.

  7. Study of uranium oxide milling in order to obtain nanostructured UCx target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillot, Julien; Tusseau-Nenez, Sandrine; Roussière, Brigitte; Barré-Boscher, Nicole; Brisset, François; Mhamed, Maher Cheikh; Lau, Christophe; Nowak, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    A R&D program is developed at the ALTO facility to provide new beams of exotic neutron-rich nuclei, as intense as possible. In the framework of European projects, it has been shown that the use of refractory targets with nanometric structure allows us to obtain beams of nuclei unreachable until now. The first parameter to be controlled in the processing to obtain targets with a homogeneous nanostructure is the grinding of uranium dioxide, down to 100 nm grain size. In this study, dry and wet grinding routes are studied and the powders are analyzed in terms of phase stabilization, specific surface area and grain morphology. It appears that the grinding, as well dry as wet, leads to the decrease of the particle size. The oxidation of UO2 is observed whatever the grinding. However, the dry grinding is the most efficient and leads to the oxidation of UO2 into U4O9 and U3O7 whose quantities increase with the grinding time while crystallite sizes decrease.

  8. Increased resistance to oxidative stress in transgenic plants by targeting mannitol biosynthesis to chloroplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, B; Jensen, R G; Bohnert, H J

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the potential role of a polyol, mannitol, in oxidative stress protection, a bacterial mannitol-1-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was targeted to chloroplasts by the addition of an amino-terminal transit peptide. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) lines accumulate mannitol at concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 7 mumol/g fresh weight. Line BS1-31 accumulated approximately 100 mM mannitol in chloroplasts and was identical to the wild type in phenotype and photosynthetic performance. The presence of mannitol in chloroplasts resulted in an increased resistance to methyl viologen (MV)-induced oxidative stress, documented by the increased retention of chlorophyll in transgenic leaf tissue following MV treatment. In the presence of MV, isolated mesophyll cells of BS1-31 exhibited higher CO2 fixation than the wild type. When the hydroxyl radical probe dimethyl sulfoxide was introduced into cells, the initial formation rate of methane sulfinic acid was significantly lower in cells containing mannitol in the chloroplast compartment than in wild-type cells, indicating an increased hydroxyl radical-scavenging capacity in BS1-31 tobacco. We suggest that the chloroplast location of mannitol can supplement endogenous radical-scavenging mechanisms and reduce oxidative damage of cells by hydroxyl radicals. PMID:9112772

  9. Mitochondrial metabolism contributes to oxidative stress and reveals therapeutic targets in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jitschin, Regina; Hofmann, Andreas D; Bruns, Heiko; Giessl, Andreas; Bricks, Juliane; Berger, Jana; Saul, Domenica; Eckart, Michael J; Mackensen, Andreas; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios

    2014-04-24

    Alterations of cellular metabolism represent a hallmark of cancer. Numerous metabolic changes are required for malignant transformation, and they render malignant cells more prone to disturbances in the metabolic framework. Despite the high incidence of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), metabolism of CLL cells remains a relatively unexplored area. The examined untreated CLL patients displayed a metabolic condition known as oxidative stress, which was linked to alterations in their lymphoid compartment. Our studies identified mitochondrial metabolism as the key source for abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS). Unlike in other malignant cells, we found increased oxidative phosphorylation in CLL cells but not increased aerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, CLL cells adapted to intrinsic oxidative stress by upregulating the stress-responsive heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Our data implicate that HO-1 was, beyond its function as an antioxidant, involved in promoting mitochondrial biogenesis. Thus ROS, adaptation to ROS, and mitochondrial biogenesis appear to form a self-amplifying feedback loop in CLL cells. Taking advantage of the altered metabolic profile, we were able to selectively target CLL cells by PK11195. This benzodiazepine derivate blocks the mitochondrial F1F0-ATPase, leads to a surplus production of mitochondrial superoxide, and thereby induces cell death in CLL cells. Taken together, our findings depict how bioenergetics and redox characteristics could be therapeutically exploited in CLL.

  10. MicroRNAs: New players in cancer prevention targeting Nrf2, oxidative stress and inflammatory pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chengyue; Shu, Limin; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are endogenous small non-coding RNAs of 20-22 nucleotides that repress gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. There is growing interest in the role of miRNAs in cancer chemoprevention, and several naturally occurring chemopreventive agents have been found to be modulators of miRNA expression both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, these chemopreventive phytochemicals commonly possess anti-oxidative and/or anti-inflammatory properties, and Nrf2 has been extensively studied as a molecular target in cancer prevention. The crosstalk between miRNAs and the traditional cellular signaling pathways of chemoprevention remain to be fully elucidated. This review summarizes the data regarding the potential interactions between miRNAs and anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory pathways. Cellular redox homeostasis can affect the biogenesis and processing of miRNAs, which in turn regulate the Nrf2 pathway of detoxifying/anti-oxidative genes. We also discuss the miRNA regulatory mechanisms in relation to inflammation-related cancer signaling pathways. PMID:26618104

  11. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene

    2013-09-15

    The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8M HNO₃ to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents.

  12. Enhanced microbial decolorization of methyl red with oxidized carbon fiber as redox mediator.

    PubMed

    Emilia Rios-Del Toro, E; Celis, Lourdes B; Cervantes, Francisco J; Rangel-Mendez, J Rene

    2013-09-15

    The anaerobic degradation of azo dyes under anaerobic conditions is possible but at a slow rate. Redox mediators (quinones, activated carbon) are used to improve the reduction rate. The aim of this work was to use activated carbon fiber (ACF) as a redox mediator for the anaerobic reduction of the azo dye methyl red. ACF was chemically modified with 8M HNO₃ to increase its redox-mediating capacity and used in chemical and anaerobic biological batch assays for the reduction of methyl red. ACF increased its redox-mediating capacity up to 3-fold in chemical assays; in biological assays ACF increased the reduction rate up to 8-fold compared to controls without ACF. However, since the ACF served as support for biomass, a biofilm formed on the fiber significantly reduced its redox-mediating capacity; substrate consumption suggested that the electron transport from ACF to methyl red was the rate-limiting step in the process. These results are the first evidence of the role of ACF as a redox mediator in the reductive decolorization of methyl red, in addition to the effect of biofilm attached to ACF on methyl red reduction. Due to the versatile characteristics of ACF and its redox-mediating capacity, carbon fibers could be used in biological wastewater treatment systems to accelerate the reductive transformation of pollutants commonly found in industrial effluents. PMID:23892163

  13. Targeted Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle for Photodynamic Therapy and Imaging of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a highly specific anticancer treatment modality for various cancers, particularly for recurrent cancers that no longer respond to conventional anticancer therapies. PDT has been under development for decades, but light-associated toxicity limits its clinical applications. To reduce the toxicity of PDT, we recently developed a targeted nanoparticle (NP) platform that combines a second-generation PDT drug, Pc 4, with a cancer targeting ligand, and iron oxide (IO) NPs. Carboxyl functionalized IO NPs were first conjugated with a fibronectin-mimetic peptide (Fmp), which binds integrin β1. Then the PDT drug Pc 4 was successfully encapsulated into the ligand-conjugated IO NPs to generate Fmp-IO-Pc 4. Our study indicated that both nontargeted IO-Pc 4 and targeted Fmp-IO-Pc 4 NPs accumulated in xenograft tumors with higher concentrations than nonformulated Pc 4. As expected, both IO-Pc 4 and Fmp-IO-Pc 4 reduced the size of HNSCC xenograft tumors more effectively than free Pc 4. Using a 10-fold lower dose of Pc 4 than that reported in the literature, the targeted Fmp-IO-Pc 4 NPs demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth than nontargeted IO-Pc 4 NPs. These results suggest that the delivery of a PDT agent Pc 4 by IO NPs can enhance treatment efficacy and reduce PDT drug dose. The targeted IO-Pc 4 NPs have great potential to serve as both a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent and PDT drug in the clinic. PMID:24923902

  14. Folatereceptor targeted, carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles: a novel ultradispersed nanoconjugates for bimodal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Das, Manasmita; Mishra, Debashis; Banerjee, Indranil; Sahu, Sumanta K.; Maiti, Tapas K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-04-01

    This article delineates the design and synthesis of a novel, bio-functionalized, magneto-fluorescent multifunctional nanoparticles suitable for cancer-specific targeting, detection and imaging. Biocompatible, hydrophilic, magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles with surface-pendant amine, carboxyl and aldehyde groups were designed using o-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMC). The free aminegroups of OCMC stabilized magnetite nanoparticles on the surface allow for the covalent attachment of a fluorescent dye such as rhodamine isothiocyanate (RITC) with the aim to develop a magneto-fluorescent nanoprobe for optical imaging. In order to impart specific cancer cell targeting properties, folic acid and its aminated derivative was conjugated onto these magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles using different pendant groups (-NH2, -COOH, -CHO). These newly synthesized iron-oxide folate nanoconjugates (FA-RITC-OCMC-SPIONs) showed excellent dispersibility, biocompatibility and good hydrodynamic sizes under physiological conditions which were extensively studied by a variety of complementary techniques. The cellular internalization efficacy of these folate-targeted and its non-targeted counterparts were studied using a folate-overexpressed (HeLa) and a normal (L929fibroblast) cells by fluorescence microscopy and magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS). Cell-uptake behaviors of nanoparticles clearly demonstrate that cancer cells over-expressing the human folatereceptor internalized a higher level of these nanoparticle-folate conjugates than normal cells. These folate targeted nanoparticles possess specific magnetic properties in the presence of an external magnetic field and the potential of these nanoconjugates as T2-weighted negative contrast MR imaging agent were evaluated in folate-overexpressed HeLa and normal L929fibroblastcells.

  15. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  16. Photocatalytic oxidation of H2S in the gas phase over TiO2-coated glass fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Brancher, Marlon; Franco, Davide; de Melo Lisboa, Henrique

    2016-11-01

    To promote the photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in the gas phase, TiO2-coated glass fiber filters were packed in an annular photoreactor. Glass fibers coated with TiO2 thin films were characterized structurally and morphologically by field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). Flow rate and H2S inlet concentration were evaluated to determine the performance of the reactor. Removal efficiencies up to 99% were achieved for flow rate of 25 L h(-1) (residence time of 121 s) and H2S inlet concentration from 12 to 14 ppmv. The long-term experiment presented H2S removal of 89% for 16 h. After 28 h of continuous use, H2S degradation was observed at 64%, which suggests that the photocatalyst was losing activity due to deactivation. Moreover, the kinetics of the PCO of H2S according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (L-H) approach along with the mass balance of a plug-flow reactor was modeled. The reaction constant (k) was calculated at approximately 10.5 μmol m(-3) s(-1) and the adsorption constant (K) of approximately 5263 m(-3) mol with linearity (R2) of 0.98.

  17. Microwave-assisted combustion synthesis of nano iron oxide/iron-coated activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber, and silica, with arsenic adsorption studies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combustion synthesis of iron oxide/iron coated carbons such as activated carbon, anthracite, cellulose fiber and silica is described. The reactions were carried out in alumina crucibles using a Panasonic kitchen microwave with inverter technology, and the reaction process was com...

  18. Experimental investigation on laser milling of aluminium oxide using a 30 W Q-switched Yb:YAG fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, C.; Genna, S.; Tagliaferri, F.; Palumbo, B.; Dix, M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, laser milling tests were carried out on aluminium oxide (Al2O3) plate, 3 mm in thickness, using a Q-Switched 30 W Yb:YAG fiber laser. A systematic approach based on Design of Experiment (DoE) has been successfully adopted with the aim to detect which and how the process parameters affect the laser beam-material interaction, and to explain the effect of the process parameters on the material removal rate and surface quality. The examined process parameters were the laser beam scan speed, the pulse frequency, the total energy released for surface unit, the distance between two consecutive scan lines and the scanning strategy. A full factorial design and ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) were applied for the results analysis. Finally, the various effects of the process parameters on the material removal rate and surface roughness have been analysed and discussed.

  19. Tissue distribution and real-time fluorescence measurement of a tumor-targeted nanodevice by a two photon optical fiber fluorescence probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Thommey P.; Ye, Jing Yong; Yang, Chu-Sheng; Myaing, Monthiri; Majoros, Istvan J.; Kotlyar, Alina; Cao, Zhengyi; Norris, Theodore B.; Baker, James R., Jr.

    2006-02-01

    Real-time fluorescence measurement in deep tumors in live animals (or humans) by conventional methods has significant challenges. We have developed a two-photon optical fiber fluorescence (TPOFF) probe as a minimally invasive technique for quantifying fluorescence in solid tumors in live mice. Here we demonstrate TPOFF for real-time measurements of targeted drug delivery dynamics to tumors in live mice. 50-femtosecond laser pulses at 800 nm were coupled into a single mode optical fiber and delivered into the tumor through a 27-gauge needle. Fluorescence was collected back through the same fiber, filtered, and detected with photon counting. Biocompatible dendrimer-based nanoparticles were used for targeted delivery of fluorescent materials into tumors. Dendrimers with targeting agent folic acid and fluorescent reporter 6-TAMRA (G5-6T-FA) were synthesized. KB cell tumors expressing high levels of FA receptors were developed in SCID mice. We initially demonstrated the specific uptake of the targeted conjugates into tumor, kidney and liver, using the TPOFF probe. The tumor fluorescence was then taken in live mice at 30 min, 2 h and 24 h with the TPOFF probe. G5-6T-FA accumulated in the tumor with maximum mean levels reaching 673 +/- 67 nM at the 2 h time point. In contrast, the levels of a control, non-targeted conjugate (G5-6T) at 2 h reached a level of only 136 +/- 28 nM in tumors, and decrease quickly. This indicates that the TPOFF probe can be used as a minimally invasive detection system for quantifying the specific targeting of a fluorescent nanodevice on a real-time basis.

  20. Recent Advances in Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Therapy Research

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Xiang J.; Xuan, Shouhu; Port, Marc; Idee, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Advances of nanotechnology have led to the development of nanomaterials with both potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Among them, superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles have received particular attention. Over the past decade, various SPIOs with unique physicochemical and biological properties have been designed by modifying the particle structure, size and coating. This article reviews the recent advances in preparing SPIOs with novel properties, the way these physicochemical properties of SPIOs influence their interaction with cells, and the development of SPIOs in liver and lymph nodes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast. Cellular uptake of SPIO can be exploited in a variety of potential clinical applications, including stem cell and inflammation cell tracking and intra-cellular drug delivery to cancerous cells which offers higher intra-cellular concentration. When SPIOs are used as carrier vehicle, additional advantages can be achieved including magnetic targeting and hyperthermia options, as well as monitoring with MRI. Other potential applications of SPIO include magnetofection and gene delivery, targeted retention of labeled stem cells, sentinel lymph nodes mapping, and magnetic force targeting and cell orientation for tissue engineering. PMID:23621536

  1. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M.; Kant, Rajeev J.; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular

  2. Mineralized iron oxidizing bacteria from hydrothermal vents: targeting biosignatures on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leveille, R. J.

    2010-12-01

    formation of an iron oxyhydroxide precipitate, either in direct association with the cells or within the growth medium, were observed. Preliminary analyses suggest that these precipitates are different from abiotic precipitates. Continuing work includes high-resolution TEM observations of cultured organisms and biogenic iron minerals, Raman and reflectance spectroscopy of precipitates, examination of seafloor incubation experiments, and bioreactor silicification experiments in order to better understand the Fe-Si fossilization process. Microaerophilic iron oxidation could have existed on the early Earth in environments containing small amounts of oxygen produced either by locally-concentrated photosynthetic microorganisms (e.g., cyanobacteria) or by chemical reactions. By analogy, similar subsurface or near-surface microaerophilic environments could have existed on Mars in the past, including in low-temperature hydrothermal systems. The distinctive morphologies and Fe-Si mineralization patterns of iron oxidizing bacteria could be a useful biosignature to search for on Mars. Deposits and features similar to those described here could be identified on Mars with existing technologies, and thus hydrothermal systems represent an attractive target for future surface and sample return missions.

  3. Optimization of substrate-target distance for pulsed laser deposition of tungsten oxide thin films using Langmuir probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, A. Kumar; Singh, A.; Thirumurugesan, R.; Kuppusami, P.; Mohandas, E.

    2015-09-01

    The paper investigates the spatial and temporal variation of laser produced plasma of tungsten oxide using a Langmuir probe. The plasma was produced by laser ablation of tungsten oxide target using an Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm. Our experimental studies confirmed that oxygen partial pressure (P) of 2× 10-2 mbar is sufficient enough to get stoichiometric tungsten oxide thin films and the plume dynamics was diagnosed for their spatial and temporal behaviour at the above optimised oxygen pressure. Spatial distribution was recorded with the target to substrate distance (D) ranging from the target position to a distance of 75 mm away from the target, whereas the temporal variation was taken in the range of 0-50 μ S with an interval of 0.5 μ S. The average electron densities were found to be maximum at 30 mm from the target position. However, ion density was constant beyond the probe distance of 45 mm from the target. The plasma current was found to be maximum at 28 μ S. The target to substrate distance was optimized for homogenous adherent good quality thin films using plasma parameters such as ion density and average electron density obtained at different oxygen pressure. The target distance and background gas pressure were correlated as PD scaling law and fitted as PD3 in the model.

  4. Conjugation of iron oxide nanoparticles with RGD-modified dendrimers for targeted tumor MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia; Luo, Yu; Xu, Yanhong; Li, Jingchao; Zhang, Zaixian; Wang, Han; Shen, Mingwu; Shi, Xiangyang; Zhang, Guixiang

    2015-03-11

    This article reports a new approach for the synthesis of ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) conjugated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified dendrimers (G5.NHAc-RGD-Fe3O4 NPs) as a platform for targeted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of C6 glioma cells. Ultrasmall Fe3O4 NPs synthesized via a solvothermal route were conjugated with RGD peptide-modified generation-5 poly(amidoamine) dendrimers (G5.NH2-RGD). The final G5.NHAc-RGD-Fe3O4 NPs were formed following the acetylation of the remaining dendrimer terminal amines. The as-prepared multifunctional Fe3O4 NPs were characterized using various techniques. The results of a cell viability assay, cell morphological observation, and hemolysis assay indicated that the G5.NHAc-RGD-Fe3O4 NPs exhibit excellent cytocompatibility and hemocompatibility over the studied concentration range. In addition, RGD conjugated onto the Fe3O4 NPs allows for the efficient targeting of the particles to C6 cells that overexpress αvβ3 receptors, which was confirmed via in vitro cell MR imaging and cellular uptake. Finally, the G5.NHAc-RGD-Fe3O4 NPs were used in the targeted MR imaging of C6 glioma cells in mice. The results obtained from the current study indicate that the developed G5.NHAc-RGD-Fe3O4 NPs offer significant potential for use as contrast agents in the targeted MR imaging of different types of tumors.

  5. Receptor-targeted, drug-loaded, functionalized graphene oxides for chemotherapy and photothermal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Choi, Ju Yeon; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although different chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to treat cancers, their use can be limited by low cellular uptake, drug resistance, and side effects. Hence, targeted drug delivery systems are continually being developed in order to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The main aim of this study was to prepare folic acid (FA)-conjugated polyvinyl pyrrolidone-functionalized graphene oxides (GO) (FA-GO) for targeted delivery of sorafenib (SF). GO were prepared using a modified Hummer’s method and subsequently altered to prepare FA-GO and SF-loaded FA-GO (FA-GO/SF). Characterization of GO derivatives was done using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and determination of in vitro drug release. Hemolytic toxicity, in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptotic effects of FA-GO/SF were also investigated. The results revealed that GO was successfully synthesized and that further transformation to FA-GO improved the stability and SF drug-loading capacity. In addition, the enhanced SF release under acidic conditions suggested possible benefits for cancer treatment. Conjugation of FA within the FA-GO/SF delivery system enabled targeted delivery of SF to cancer cells expressing high levels of FA receptors, thus increasing the cellular uptake and apoptotic effects of SF. Furthermore, the photothermal effect achieved by exposure of GO to near-infrared irradiation enhanced the anticancer effects of FA-GO/SF. Taken together, FA-GO/SF is a potential carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer. PMID:27358565

  6. Receptor-targeted, drug-loaded, functionalized graphene oxides for chemotherapy and photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Choi, Ju Yeon; Poudel, Bijay Kumar; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although different chemotherapeutic agents have been developed to treat cancers, their use can be limited by low cellular uptake, drug resistance, and side effects. Hence, targeted drug delivery systems are continually being developed in order to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. The main aim of this study was to prepare folic acid (FA)-conjugated polyvinyl pyrrolidone-functionalized graphene oxides (GO) (FA-GO) for targeted delivery of sorafenib (SF). GO were prepared using a modified Hummer's method and subsequently altered to prepare FA-GO and SF-loaded FA-GO (FA-GO/SF). Characterization of GO derivatives was done using ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, zeta potential measurements, and determination of in vitro drug release. Hemolytic toxicity, in vitro cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, and apoptotic effects of FA-GO/SF were also investigated. The results revealed that GO was successfully synthesized and that further transformation to FA-GO improved the stability and SF drug-loading capacity. In addition, the enhanced SF release under acidic conditions suggested possible benefits for cancer treatment. Conjugation of FA within the FA-GO/SF delivery system enabled targeted delivery of SF to cancer cells expressing high levels of FA receptors, thus increasing the cellular uptake and apoptotic effects of SF. Furthermore, the photothermal effect achieved by exposure of GO to near-infrared irradiation enhanced the anticancer effects of FA-GO/SF. Taken together, FA-GO/SF is a potential carrier for targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in cancer.

  7. Influence of carbon nanotubes coatings onto carbon fiber by oxidative treatments combined with electrophoretic deposition on interfacial properties of carbon fiber composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chao; Jiang, Jianjun; Liu, Fa; Fang, Liangchao; Wang, Junbiao; Li, Dejia; Wu, Jianjun

    2015-12-01

    To improve the interfacial performance of carbon fiber (CF) and epoxy resin, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) coatings were utilized to achieve this purpose through coating onto CF by the treatment with hydrogen peroxide and concentrated nitric acid combined with electrophoretic deposition (EPD) process. The influence of electrophoretically deposited CNTs coatings on the surface properties of CFs were investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and dynamic contact angle analysis. The results indicated that the deposition of carbon nanotubes introduced some polar groups to carbon fiber surfaces, enhanced surface roughness and changed surface morphologies of carbon fibers. Surface wettability of carbon fibers may be significantly improved by increasing surface free energy of the fibers due to the deposition of CNTs. The thickness and density of the coatings increases with the introduction of pretreatment of the CF during the EPD process. Short beam shear test was performed to examine the effect of carbon fiber functionalization on mechanical properties of the carbon fiber/epoxy resin composites. The interfacial adhesion of CNTs/CF reinforced epoxy composites showed obvious enhancement of interlaminar shear strength by 60.2% and scanning electron microscope photographs showed that the failure mode of composites was changed after the carbon fibers were coated with CNTs.

  8. Solvent-Free Click-Mechanochemistry for the Preparation of Cancer Cell Targeting Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene glycol-functionalized nanographene oxide (PEGylated n-GO) was synthesized from alkyne-modified n-GO, using solvent-free click-mechanochemistry, i.e., copper(I)-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The modified n-GO was subsequently conjugated to a mucin 1 receptor immunoglobulin G antibody (anti-MUC1 IgG) via thiol–ene coupling reaction. n-GO derivatives were characterized with Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Bradford assay, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell targeting was confirmed in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cells, either expressing or lacking MUC1 receptors, using flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and multiphoton (MP) fluorescence microscopy. Biocompatibility was assessed using the modified lactate dehydrongenase (mLDH) assay. PMID:26278410

  9. Solvent-Free Click-Mechanochemistry for the Preparation of Cancer Cell Targeting Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Noelia; Mei, Kuo-Ching; Klippstein, Rebecca; Costa, Pedro M; Hodgins, Naomi; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Festy, Frederic; Abbate, Vincenzo; Hider, Robert C; Chan, Ka Lung Andrew; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2015-09-01

    Polyethylene glycol-functionalized nanographene oxide (PEGylated n-GO) was synthesized from alkyne-modified n-GO, using solvent-free click-mechanochemistry, i.e., copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The modified n-GO was subsequently conjugated to a mucin 1 receptor immunoglobulin G antibody (anti-MUC1 IgG) via thiol-ene coupling reaction. n-GO derivatives were characterized with Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Bradford assay, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cell targeting was confirmed in vitro in MDA-MB-231 cells, either expressing or lacking MUC1 receptors, using flow cytometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and multiphoton (MP) fluorescence microscopy. Biocompatibility was assessed using the modified lactate dehydrongenase (mLDH) assay. PMID:26278410

  10. Pharmaceutical formulation of HSA hybrid coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Zaloga, Jan; Pöttler, Marina; Leitinger, Gerd; Friedrich, Ralf P; Almer, Gunter; Lyer, Stefan; Baum, Eva; Tietze, Rainer; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Mangge, Harald; Dörje, Frank; Lee, Geoffrey; Alexiou, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a new formulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for magnetic drug targeting. The particles were reproducibly synthesized from current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) - grade substances. They were surface coated using fatty acids as anchoring molecules for human serum albumin. We comprehensively characterized the physicochemical core-shell structure of the particles using sophisticated methods. We investigated biocompatibility and cellular uptake of the particles using an established flow cytometric method in combination with microwave-plasma assisted atomic emission spectroscopy (MP-AES). The cytotoxic drug mitoxantrone was adsorbed on the protein shell and we showed that even in complex media it is slowly released with a close to zero order kinetics. We also describe an in vitro proof-of-concept assay in which we clearly showed that local enrichment of this SPION-drug conjugate with a magnet allows site-specific therapeutic effects. PMID:26854862

  11. Water based suspensions of iron oxide obtained by laser target evaporation for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselova, I. P.; Safronov, A. P.; Samatov, O. M.; Beketov, I. V.; Medvedev, A. I.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.

    2016-10-01

    In this work spherical magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) of iron oxide were obtained by laser target evaporation technique (LTE). Water based suspensions were prepared on the basis of obtained MNPs and their properties were also studied including inductive heat capacity. Their structure and properties were studied by a number of techniques including magnetometry and heat capacity measurements. Magnetic induction heating experiment show the specific loss power (SLP) value in the narrow range from 1.30 to 1.45 W/g for all samples under consideration when using alternating magnetic field of 1.7 kA/m and frequency of 210 kHz. These parameters insure that LTE MNPs are interesting materials promising for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

  12. Characterization of PMR-15 polyimide composition in thermo-oxidatively exposed graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, W. B.

    1980-01-01

    The contributions of individual resin components to total resin weight loss in 600 F air aged Celion 6000/PMR-15 polyimide composites were determined from the overall resin weight loss in the composite by chemically separating the PMR-15 matrix resin into its monomeric components. The individual resin components were also analyzed by spectroscopic techniques in order to elucidate curing and degradation mechanisms of the PMR-15 matrix resin. The isothermal weight loss of the individual resin components during prolonged 600 F thermo-oxidative aging of the composite was correlated to the changes observed in the Fourier Transform infrared spectra and Fourier Transform nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the individual resin components. The correlation was used to identify the molecular site of the thermo-oxidative changes in PMR-15 polyimide matrix resin during 600 F curing the prolonged 600 F thermo-oxidative aging.

  13. Oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns as sorbent for porous hollow fiber direct immersion solid-phase microextraction for the determination of triazines in waters.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Soto, Juan Manuel; Cárdenas, Soledad; Valcárcel, Miguel

    2013-03-01

    This paper evaluates the potential of oxidized single-walled carbon nanohorns (o-SWNHs) immobilized on the pores of a hollow fiber (HF) for the direct immersion solid-phase microextraction of triazines from waters. The fabrication of the device requires the oxidation of the nanoparticles by means of microwave irradiation in order to obtain a homogeneous dispersion in methanol. Then, a porous hollow fiber is immersed in the methanolic dispersion of the o-SWNHs under ultrasound stirring. This procedure permits the immobilization of the o-SWNHs in the pores of the hollow fiber. For the extraction, a stainless steel wire was introduced inside the fiber to allow the vertical immersion of the o-SWNHs-HF in the aqueous standard/water sample. The triazines were preconcentrated on the immobilized o-SWNHs and further eluted using 150 μL of methanol. The solvent was evaporated and the residue reconstituted in 10 μL of methanol for sensitivity enhancement. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was selected as instrumental technique. The limits of detection were between 0.05 and 0.1 μg L(-1) with an excellent precision (expressed as relative standard deviation) between runs (below 10.2 %) and between fibers (below 12.8 %). Finally, the method was applied to the determination of the triazines in fortified waters, an average recovery value of 90 % being obtained. PMID:23371529

  14. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles inhibit the growth and metastasis of melanoma by targeting mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Yang, F; Zhang, H-X; Zi, X-Y; Pan, X-H; Chen, F; Luo, W-D; Li, J-X; Zhu, H-Y; Hu, Y-P

    2013-01-01

    Metal and its oxide nanoparticles show ideal pharmacological activity, especially in anti-tumor therapy. Our previous study demonstrated that cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs) selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells in vitro. To explore the anti-tumor properties of CONPs in vivo, we used the particles to treat mouse subcutaneous melanoma and metastatic lung tumors, based on B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells, by intratumoral and systemic injections, respectively. The results showed that CONPs significantly reduced the growth of melanoma, inhibited the metastasis of B16-F10 cells and increased the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice. Importantly, the results also indicated that CONPs were rapidly cleared from the organs and that these particles exhibited little systemic toxicity. Furthermore, we observed that CONPs targeted the mitochondria, which resulted in the release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria and the activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 after the CONPs entered the cells. In conclusion, CONPs can induce the apoptosis of cancer cells through a mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis pathway, which raises the possibility that CONPs could be used to cure melanoma and other cancers. PMID:23990023

  15. Indazole, Pyrazole, and Oxazole Derivatives Targeting Nitric Oxide Synthases and Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Maccallini, Cristina; Di Matteo, Mauro; Vullo, Daniela; Ammazzalorso, Alessandra; Carradori, Simone; De Filippis, Barbara; Fantacuzzi, Marialuigia; Giampietro, Letizia; Pandolfi, Assunta; Supuran, Claudiu T; Amoroso, Rosa

    2016-08-19

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an essential endogenous mediator with a physiological role in the central nervous system as neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. A growing number of studies have demonstrated that abnormal nitrergic signaling is a crucial event in the development of neurodegeneration. In particular, the uncontrolled production of NO by neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is observed in several neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, it is well recognized that specific isoforms of human carbonic anhydrase (hCA) physiologically modulate crucial pathways of signal processing and that low expression of CA affects cognition, leading to mental retardation, Alzheimer's disease, and aging-related cognitive impairments. In light of this, dual agents that are able to target both NOS (inhibition) and CA (activation) could be useful drug candidates for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, aging, and other neurodegenerative diseases. In the present work, we show the design, synthesis, and in vitro biological evaluation of new nitrogen-based heterocyclic compounds. Among the tested molecules, 2-amino-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1H-indazol-5-yl)propanamide hydrochloride (10 b) was revealed to be a potent dual agent, able to act as a selective nNOS inhibitor and activator of the hCA I isoform. PMID:27377568

  16. In vivo target bio-imaging of Alzheimer's disease by fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lanmei; Zhao, Chunqiu; Su, Meina; Li, Xiaoqi; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Hui; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-07-21

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible neurodegenerative disease which is difficult to cure. When Alzheimer's disease occurs, the level of zinc ions in the brain changes, and the relevant amount of zinc ions continue decreasing in the cerebrospinal fluid and plasma of Alzheimer's patients with disease exacerbation. In view of these considerations, we have explored a new strategy for the in vivo rapid fluorescence imaging of Alzheimer's disease through target bio-labeling of zinc oxide nanoclusters which were biosynthesized in vivo in the Alzheimer's brain via intravenous injection of zinc gluconate solution. By using three-month-old and six-month-old Alzheimer's model mice as models, our observations demonstrate that biocompatible zinc ions could pass through the blood-brain barrier of the Alzheimer's disease mice and generate fluorescent zinc oxide nanoclusters (ZnO NCs) through biosynthesis, and then the bio-synthesized ZnO NCs could readily accumulate in situ on the hippocampus specific region for the in vivo fluorescent labeling of the affected sites. This study provides a new way for the rapid diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and may have promising prospects in the effective diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Targeted Deletion of Nrf2 Impairs Lung Development and Oxidant Injury in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    van Houten, Bennett; Wang, Xuting; Miller-DeGraff, Laura; Fostel, Jennifer; Gladwell, Wesley; Perrow, Ligon; Panduri, Vijayalakshmi; Kobzik, Lester; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Bell, Douglas A.; Kleeberger, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Nrf2 is an essential transcription factor for protection against oxidant disorders. However, its role in organ development and neonatal disease has received little attention. Therapeutically administered oxygen has been considered to contribute to bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in prematurity. The current study was performed to determine Nrf2-mediated molecular events during saccular-to-alveolar lung maturation, and the role of Nrf2 in the pathogenesis of hyperoxic lung injury using newborn Nrf2-deficient (Nrf2−/−) and wild-type (Nrf2+/+) mice. Results: Pulmonary basal expression of cell cycle, redox balance, and lipid/carbohydrate metabolism genes was lower while lymphocyte immunity genes were more highly expressed in Nrf2−/− neonates than in Nrf2+/+ neonates. Hyperoxia-induced phenotypes, including mortality, arrest of saccular-to-alveolar transition, and lung edema, and inflammation accompanying DNA damage and tissue oxidation were significantly more severe in Nrf2−/− neonates than in Nrf2+/+ neonates. During lung injury pathogenesis, Nrf2 orchestrated expression of lung genes involved in organ injury and morphology, cellular growth/proliferation, vasculature development, immune response, and cell–cell interaction. Bioinformatic identification of Nrf2 binding motifs and augmented hyperoxia-induced inflammation in genetically deficient neonates supported Gpx2 and Marco as Nrf2 effectors. Innovation: This investigation used lung transcriptomics and gene targeted mice to identify novel molecular events during saccular-to-alveolar stage transition and to elucidate Nrf2 downstream mechanisms in protection from hyperoxia-induced injury in neonate mouse lungs. Conclusion: Nrf2 deficiency augmented lung injury and arrest of alveolarization caused by hyperoxia during the newborn period. Results suggest a therapeutic potential of specific Nrf2 activators for oxidative stress-associated neonatal disorders including BPD. Antioxid. Redox Signal

  18. Hyaluronic Acid Modified Tantalum Oxide Nanoparticles Conjugating Doxorubicin for Targeted Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yushen; Ma, Xibo; Feng, Shanshan; Liang, Xiao; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie; Yue, Xiuli

    2015-12-16

    Theranostic tantalum oxide nanoparticles (TaOxNPs) of about 40 nm were successfully developed by conjugating functional molecules including polyethylene glycol (PEG), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye, doxorubicin (DOX), and hyaluronic acid (HA) onto the surface of the nanoparticles (TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs) for actively targeting delivery, pH-responsive drug release, and NIR fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging. The obtained nanoagent exhibits good biocompatibility, high cumulative release rate in the acidic microenvironments, long blood circulation time, and superior tumor-targeting ability. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments show that it can serve as an excellent contrast agent to simultaneously enhance fluorescence imaging and CT imaging greatly. Most importantly, such a nanoagent could enhance the therapeutic efficacy of the tumor greatly and the tumor growth inhibition was evaluated to be 87.5%. In a word, multifunctional TaOx@Cy7-DOX-PEG-HA NPs can serve as a theranostic nanomedicine for fluorescence/X-ray CT bimodal imaging, remote-controlled therapeutics, enabling personalized detection, and treatment of cancer with high efficacy.

  19. Inhaled Cadmium Oxide Nanoparticles: Their in Vivo Fate and Effect on Target Organs

    PubMed Central

    Dumkova, Jana; Vrlikova, Lucie; Vecera, Zbynek; Putnova, Barbora; Docekal, Bohumil; Mikuska, Pavel; Fictum, Petr; Hampl, Ales; Buchtova, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    The increasing amount of heavy metals used in manufacturing equivalently increases hazards of environmental pollution by industrial products such as cadmium oxide (CdO) nanoparticles. Here, we aimed to unravel the CdO nanoparticle destiny upon their entry into lungs by inhalations, with the main focus on the ultrastructural changes that the nanoparticles may cause to tissues of the primary and secondary target organs. We indeed found the CdO nanoparticles to be transported from the lungs into secondary target organs by blood. In lungs, inhaled CdO nanoparticles caused significant alterations in parenchyma tissue including hyperemia, enlarged pulmonary septa, congested capillaries, alveolar emphysema and small areas of atelectasis. Nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of cells lining bronchioles, in the alveolar spaces as well as inside the membranous pneumocytes and in phagosomes of lung macrophages. Nanoparticles even penetrated through the membrane into some organelles including mitochondria and they also accumulated in the cytoplasmic vesicles. In livers, inhalation caused periportal inflammation and local hepatic necrosis. Only minor changes such as diffusely thickened filtration membrane with intramembranous electron dense deposits were observed in kidney. Taken together, inhaled CdO nanoparticles not only accumulated in lungs but they were also transported to other organs causing serious damage at tissue as well as cellular level. PMID:27271611

  20. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated with epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF) for targeting brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shevtsov, Maxim A; Nikolaev, Boris P; Yakovleva, Ludmila Y; Marchenko, Yaroslav Y; Dobrodumov, Anatolii V; Mikhrina, Anastasiya L; Martynova, Marina G; Bystrova, Olga A; Yakovenko, Igor V; Ischenko, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) conjugated with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (SPION–EGF) were studied as a potential agent for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement of malignant brain tumors. Synthesized conjugates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry. The interaction of SPION–EGF conjugates with cells was analyzed in a C6 glioma cell culture. The distribution of the nanoparticles and their accumulation in tumors were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in an orthotopic model of C6 gliomas. SPION–EGF nanosuspensions had the properties of a negative contrast agent with high coefficients of relaxation efficiency. In vitro studies of SPION–EGF nanoparticles showed high intracellular incorporation and the absence of a toxic influence on C6 cell viability and proliferation. Intravenous administration of SPION–EGF conjugates in animals provided receptor-mediated targeted delivery across the blood–brain barrier and tumor retention of the nanoparticles; this was more efficient than with unconjugated SPIONs. The accumulation of conjugates in the glioma was revealed as hypotensive zones on T2-weighted images with a twofold reduction in T2 relaxation time in comparison to unconjugated SPIONs (P<0.001). SPION–EGF conjugates provide targeted delivery and efficient magnetic resonance contrast enhancement of EGFR-overexpressing C6 gliomas. PMID:24421639

  1. Lactobionic acid and carboxymethyl chitosan functionalized graphene oxide nanocomposites as targeted anticancer drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qixia; Lv, Yao; Williams, Gareth R; Tao, Lei; Yang, Huihui; Li, Heyu; Zhu, Limin

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we report a targeted drug delivery system built by functionalizing graphene oxide (GO) with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), fluorescein isothiocyanate and lactobionic acid (LA). Analogous systems without LA were prepared as controls. Doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded onto the composites through adsorption. The release behavior from both the LA-functionalized and the LA-free material is markedly pH sensitive. The modified GOs have high biocompatibility with the liver cancer cell line SMMC-7721, but can induce cell death after 24h incubation if loaded with DOX. Tests with shorter (2h) incubation times were undertaken to investigate the selectivity of the GO composites: under these conditions, neither DOX-loaded system was found to be toxic to the non-cancerous L929 cell line, but the LA-containing composite showed the ability to selectively induce cell death in cancerous (SMMC-7721) cells while the LA-free analogue was inactive here also. These findings show that the modified GO materials are strong potential candidates for targeted anticancer drug delivery systems. PMID:27474628

  2. A graphene oxide based smart drug delivery system for tumor mitochondria-targeting photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yanchun; Zhou, Feifan; Zhang, Da; Chen, Qun; Xing, Da

    2016-02-01

    Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in organic and aqueous environments, respectively. The PPa-NGO-mAb assembly is able to effectively target the αvβ3-positive tumor cells with surface ligand and receptor recognition; once endocytosized by the cells, they are observed escaping from lysosomes and subsequently transferring to the mitochondria. In the mitochondria, the `on' state PPa-NGO-mAb performs its effective phototoxicity to kill cells. The biological and physical dual selections and on/off control of PPa-NGO-mAb significantly enhance mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of PDT. This smart system offers a potential alternative to drug delivery systems for cancer therapy.Subcellular organelles play critical roles in cell survival. In this work, a novel photodynamic therapy (PDT) drug delivery and phototoxicity on/off nano-system based on graphene oxide (NGO) as the carrier is developed to implement subcellular targeting and attacking. To construct the nanodrug (PPa-NGO-mAb), NGO is modified with the integrin αvβ3 monoclonal antibody (mAb) for tumor targeting. Pyropheophorbide-a (PPa) conjugated with polyethylene-glycol is used to cover the surface of the NGO to induce phototoxicity. Polyethylene-glycol phospholipid is loaded to enhance water solubility. The results show that the phototoxicity of PPa on NGO can be switched on and off in

  3. Nitric Oxide Improves Molecular Imaging of Inflammatory Atheroma using Targeted Echogenic Immunoliposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunggun; Kee, Patrick H.; Rim, Yonghoon; Moody, Melanie R.; Klegerman, Melvin E.; Vela, Deborah; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Laing, Susan T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to demonstrate whether pretreatment with nitric oxide (NO) loaded into echogenic immunoliposomes (ELIP) plus ultrasound, applied before injection of molecularly targeted ELIP can promote penetration of the targeted contrast agent and improve visualization of atheroma components. Methods: ELIP were prepared using the pressurization-freeze method. Atherosclerosis was induced in Yucatan miniswine by balloon denudation and a hyperlipidemic diet. The animals were randomized to receive anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) ELIP or immunoglobulin (IgG)-ELIP, and were subdivided to receive pretreatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound, NO-loaded ELIP, or NO-loaded ELIP plus ultrasound. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) data were collected before and after treatment. Results: Pretreatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound or NO-loaded ELIP without ultrasound resulted in 9.2 ± 0.7% and 9.2 ± 0.8% increase in mean gray scale values, respectively, compared to baseline (p<0.001 vs. control). Pretreatment with NO-loaded ELIP plus ultrasound activation resulted in a further increase in highlighting with a change in mean gray scale value to 14.7 ± 1.0% compared to baseline (p<0.001 vs. control). These differences were best appreciated when acoustic backscatter data values (RF signal) were used [22.7 ± 2.0% and 22.4 ± 2.2% increase in RF signals for pretreatment with standard ELIP plus ultrasound and NO-loaded ELIP without ultrasound respectively (p<0.001 vs. control), and 40.0 ± 2.9% increase in RF signal for pretreatment with NO-loaded ELIP plus ultrasound (p<0.001 vs. control)]. Conclusion: NO-loaded ELIP plus ultrasound activation can facilitate anti-ICAM-1 conjugated ELIP delivery to inflammatory components in the arterial wall. This NO pretreatment strategy has potential to improve targeted molecular imaging of atheroma for eventual true tailored and personalized management of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24267236

  4. Metal-organic framework-199/graphite oxide hybrid composites coated solid-phase microextraction fibers coupled with gas chromatography for determination of organochlorine pesticides from complicated samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2013-10-15

    The hybrid material of a copper-based metal-organic framework (MOF-199) and graphite oxide (GO) was explored as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coating for the first time. This fiber was fabricated by using 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as the cross-linking agent, which enhanced its durability and allowed more than 140 replicate extractions. With the incorporation of GO, the MOF-199/GO fibers with GO contents ranging from 5 to 15 wt% exhibited enhanced adsorption affinity to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) compared to MOF or GO individually. This improvement was linked to the enhanced dispersive forces (increased volume of small pores) that provided by the dense carbon layers of GO. Combining the superior properties of high porosity of MOFs and the unique layered character of GO, the MOF-199/GO (10 wt%) fiber exhibited higher adsorption affinity to some OCPs than commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibers. This new fiber was developed for headspace (HS) SPME of eight OCPs followed by GC/ECD analysis. The limits of detection were 2.3-6.9 ng/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate extractions using one fiber ranged from 5.3% to 8.8%. The fiber-to-fiber reproducibility was 5.2-12.8%. This method was successfully used for simultaneous determination of eight OCPs from river water, soil, water convolvulus and longan with satisfactory recoveries of 90.6-104.4%, 82.7-96.8%, 72.2-107.7% and 82.8-94.3%, respectively. These results indicated the MOF-199/GO composite provided a promising alternative in sample pretreatment. PMID:24054558

  5. Metal-organic framework-199/graphite oxide hybrid composites coated solid-phase microextraction fibers coupled with gas chromatography for determination of organochlorine pesticides from complicated samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suling; Du, Zhuo; Li, Gongke

    2013-10-15

    The hybrid material of a copper-based metal-organic framework (MOF-199) and graphite oxide (GO) was explored as the solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coating for the first time. This fiber was fabricated by using 3-amino-propyltriethoxysilane (APTES) as the cross-linking agent, which enhanced its durability and allowed more than 140 replicate extractions. With the incorporation of GO, the MOF-199/GO fibers with GO contents ranging from 5 to 15 wt% exhibited enhanced adsorption affinity to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) compared to MOF or GO individually. This improvement was linked to the enhanced dispersive forces (increased volume of small pores) that provided by the dense carbon layers of GO. Combining the superior properties of high porosity of MOFs and the unique layered character of GO, the MOF-199/GO (10 wt%) fiber exhibited higher adsorption affinity to some OCPs than commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane/divinylbenzene (PDMS/DVB) fibers. This new fiber was developed for headspace (HS) SPME of eight OCPs followed by GC/ECD analysis. The limits of detection were 2.3-6.9 ng/L. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for five replicate extractions using one fiber ranged from 5.3% to 8.8%. The fiber-to-fiber reproducibility was 5.2-12.8%. This method was successfully used for simultaneous determination of eight OCPs from river water, soil, water convolvulus and longan with satisfactory recoveries of 90.6-104.4%, 82.7-96.8%, 72.2-107.7% and 82.8-94.3%, respectively. These results indicated the MOF-199/GO composite provided a promising alternative in sample pretreatment.

  6. A study of optically stimulated luminescence in aluminum oxide fibers for the development of a real-time, fiber optic dosimetry system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polf, Jerimy Clifford

    Scope and method of study. OSL fiber dosimeters show enormous potential for the remote monitoring of radiation doses in a variety of different environments. In particular, the ability for a fiber dosimeter to read the dose received by a patient during radiotherapy in real time during the irradiation procedure is an attractive application for the medical community. Currently the dose received by a patient is measured by dosimeters placed outside the body and the dosimeters are read out after the treatment. Therefore any information about the radiation dose received by the patient is only known after the treatment. Also, many times the dose is calculated from models developed through the irradiation of phantoms used to mimic the human body. Therefore, no actual dose to the patient is ever measured. The radiation exposure that the patient receives is based on what exposure time was needed to deliver the desired dose to a human phantom. In light of this, a method of measuring the actual dose received by a patient while the patient is being exposed is a very desirable tool. Findings and conclusions. For this project, Al 2O3:C in fiber form was used for the purpose of attachment to a fiber optical cable in order to produce an OSL fiber dosimeter. The excitation/emission properties and radiation-induced luminescence of the Al2O 3:C fibers were studied to determine the most desirable properties for development of an OSL fiber dosimeter. Also, the real-time luminescence signal produced from the fibers during irradiation was measured. This included the characterization of both the radioluminescence and the real-time OSL. Methods of coupling the Al2O3:C fiber to fused silica fiber optic cables in order to maximize transmission of both the stimulation light and the luminescence signal were studied. Next, a real-time readout system for the dosimeters was developed. The readout system was developed to be portable and capable of measuring the absorbed dose and dose rate from the

  7. Polyethylene glycol/graphene oxide coated solid-phase microextraction fiber for analysis of phenols and phthalate esters coupled with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiudan; Yu, Hui; Guo, Yong; Liang, Xiaojing; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Licheng; Liu, Xia

    2015-08-01

    A new polyethylene glycol/graphene oxide composite material bonded on the surface of a stainless-steel wire was used for solid-phase microextraction. The layer-by-layer structure increased the adsorption sites of the novel fiber, which could facilitate the extraction of trace compounds. The polyethylene glycol/graphene oxide was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis, which verified that polyethylene glycol was successfully grafted onto the surface of graphene oxide. The performance of the polyethylene glycol/graphene oxide coated fiber was investigated for phenols and phthalate esters coupled with gas chromatography with flame ionization detection under the optimal extraction and desorption conditions, and the proposed method exhibited an excellent extraction capacity and high thermal stability. Wide linear ranges were obtained for the analytes with good correlation coefficients in the range of 0.9966-0.9994, and the detection limits of model compounds ranged from 0.003 to 0.025 μg/L. Furthermore, the as-prepared fiber was used to determine the model compounds in the water and soil samples and satisfactory results were obtained.

  8. Targeting of Adenovirus Serotype 5 Pseudotyped with Short Fiber from Serotype 41 to c-erbB2-Positive Cells Using Bispecific Single-Chain Diabody

    PubMed Central

    Kashentseva, Elena A.; Douglas, Joanne T.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Curiel, David T.; Dmitriev, Igor P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The purpose of the current study was to alter the broad native tropism of human adenovirus for virus targeting to c-erbB2-positive cancer cells. First, we engineered a single-chain antibody (scFv) against the c-erbB2 oncoprotein into minor capsid protein IX (pIX) of adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) in a manner commensurate with virion integrity and binding to the soluble extracellular c-erbB2 domain. To ablate native viral tropism and facilitate binding of the pIX-incorporated scFv to cellular c-erbB2 we replaced the Ad5 fiber with the Ad41 short (41s) fiber devoid of all known cell-binding determinants. The resultant Ad5F41sIX6.5 vector demonstrated increased cell binding and gene transfer as compared to the Ad5F41s control, however, this augmentation of virus infectivity was not c-erbB2-specific. Incorporation of a six histidine (His6) peptide into the C-terminus of the 41s fiber protein resulted in markedly increased Ad5F41s6H infectivity in 293AR cells, which express a membrane-anchored scFv against the C-terminal oligo-histidine tag, as compared to the Ad5F41s vector and the parental 293 cells. These data suggested that a 41s fiber-incorporated His6 tag could serve for attachment of an adapter protein designed to guide Ad5F41s6H infection in a c-erbB2-specific manner. We therefore engineered a bispecific scFv diabody (scDb) combining affinities for both c-erbB2 and the His6 tag and showed its ability to provide up to 25-fold increase of Ad5F41s6H infectivity in c-erbB2-positive cells. Thus, Ad5 fiber replacement by a His6–tagged 41s fiber coupled with virus targeting mediated by an scDb adapter represents a promising strategy to confer Ad5 vector tropism for c-erbB2-positive cancer cells. PMID:19285990

  9. Rational Design of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as Targeted Nanomedicines for Cancer Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kievit, Forrest M.

    2011-07-01

    Nanotechnology provides a flexible platform for the development of effective therapeutic nanomaterials that can interact specifically with a target in a biological system and provoke a desired biological response. Of the nanomaterials studied, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have emerged as one of top candidates for cancer therapy due to their intrinsic superparamagnetism that enables non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and biodegradability favorable for in vivo application. This dissertation is aimed at development of SPION-based nanomedicines to overcome the current limitations in cancer therapy. These limitations include non-specificity of therapy which can harm healthy tissue, the difficulty in delivering nucleic acids for gene therapy, the formation of drug resistance, and the inability to detect and treat micrometastases. First, a SPION-based non-viral gene delivery vehicle was developed through functionalization of the SPION core with a co-polymer designed to provide stable binding of DNA and low toxicity which showed excellent gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. This SPION-based non-viral gene delivery vehicle was then activated with a targeting agent to improve gene delivery throughout a xenograft tumor of brain cancer. It was found that targeting did not promote the accumulation of SPIONs at the tumor site, but rather improved the distribution of SPIONs throughout the tumor so a higher proportion of cells received treatment. Next, the high surface area of SPIONs was utilized for loading large amounts of drug which was shown to overcome the multidrug resistance acquired by many cancer cells. Drug bound to SPIONs showed significantly higher multidrug resistant cell uptake as compared to free drug which translated into improved cell kill. Also, an antibody activated SPION was developed and was shown to be able to target micrometastases in a transgenic animal model of metastatic breast cancer. These SPION-based nanomedicines

  10. Demethyleneberberine, a natural mitochondria-targeted antioxidant, inhibits mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and steatosis in alcoholic liver disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengcheng; Qiang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Miao; Ma, Dongshen; Zhao, Zheng; Zhou, Cuisong; Liu, Xie; Li, Ruiyan; Chen, Huan; Zhang, Yubin

    2015-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption induces oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in the liver. Mitochondria have long been recognized as the key target for alcoholic liver disease (ALD). Recently, the artificial mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ has been used to treat ALD effectively in mice. Here, we introduce the natural mitochondria-targeted antioxidant demethyleneberberine (DMB), which has been found in Chinese herb Cortex Phellodendri chinensis. The protective effect of DMB on ALD was evaluated with HepG2 cells and acutely/chronically ethanol-fed mice, mimicking two common patterns of drinking in human. The results showed that DMB, which is composed of a potential antioxidant structure, could penetrate the membrane of mitochondria and accumulate in mitochondria either in vitro or in vivo. Consequently, the acute drinking-caused oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were significantly ameliorated by DMB. Moreover, we also found that DMB suppressed CYP2E1, hypoxia inducible factor α, and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which contributed to oxidative stress and restored sirtuin 1/AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α pathway-associated fatty acid oxidation in chronic ethanol-fed mice, which in turn ameliorated lipid peroxidation and macrosteatosis in the liver. Taking these findings together, DMB could serve as a novel and potential therapy for ALD in human beings.

  11. Targeted fluorescence imaging enhanced by 2D materials: a comparison between 2D MoS2 and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Xie, Donghao; Ji, Ding-Kun; Zhang, Yue; Cao, Jun; Zheng, Hu; Liu, Lin; Zang, Yi; Li, Jia; Chen, Guo-Rong; James, Tony D; He, Xiao-Peng

    2016-08-01

    Here we demonstrate that 2D MoS2 can enhance the receptor-targeting and imaging ability of a fluorophore-labelled ligand. The 2D MoS2 has an enhanced working concentration range when compared with graphene oxide, resulting in the improved imaging of both cell and tissue samples.

  12. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-03-22

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  13. The lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1: a new potential molecular target in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murdocca, Michela; Mango, Ruggiero; Pucci, Sabina; Biocca, Silvia; Testa, Barbara; Capuano, Rosamaria; Paolesse, Roberto; Sanchez, Massimo; Orlandi, Augusto; di Natale, Corrado; Novelli, Giuseppe; Sangiuolo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The identification of new biomarkers and targets for tailored therapy in human colorectal cancer (CRC) onset and progression is an interesting challenge. CRC tissue produces an excess of ox-LDL, suggesting a close correlation between lipid dysfunction and malignant transformation. Lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1) is involved in several mechanisms closely linked to tumorigenesis. Here we report a tumor specific LOX-1 overexpression in human colon cancers: LOX-1 results strongly increased in the 72% of carcinomas (P<0.001), and strongly overexpressed in 90% of highly aggressive and metastatic tumours (P<0.001), as compared to normal mucosa. Moreover LOX-1 results modulated since the early stage of the disease (adenomas vs normal mucosa; P<0.001) suggesting an involvement in tumor insurgence and progression. The in vitro knockdown of LOX-1 in DLD-1 and HCT-8 colon cancer cells by siRNA and anti-LOX-1 antibody triggers to an impaired proliferation rate and affects the maintenance of cell growth and tumorigenicity. The wound-healing assay reveals an evident impairment in closing the scratch. Lastly knockdown of LOX-1 delineates a specific pattern of volatile compounds characterized by the presence of a butyrate derivative, suggesting a potential role of LOX-1 in tumor-specific epigenetic regulation in neoplastic cells. The role of LOX-1 as a novel biomarker and molecular target represents a concrete opportunity to improve current therapeutic strategies for CRC. In addition, the innovative application of a technology focused to the identification of LOX-1 driven volatiles specific to colorectal cancer provides a promising diagnostic tool for CRC screening and for monitoring the response to therapy. PMID:26895376

  14. Use of sodium butyrate as an alternative to dietary fiber: effects on the embryonic development and anti-oxidative capacity of rats.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Fang, Zheng-feng; Che, Lian-qiang; Xu, Sheng-yu; Wu, De; Wu, Cai-mei; Wu, Xiu-qun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of replacing dietary fiber with sodium butyrate on reproductive performance and antioxidant defense in a high fat diet during pregnancy by using a rat model. Eighty virgin female Sprague Dawley rats were fed one of four diets--(1) control diet (C group), (2) high fat + high fiber diet (HF group), (3) high-fat +5% sodium butyrate diet (SB group), and (4) HF diet + α-cyano-4-hydroxy cinnamic acid (CHC group)--intraperitoneally on days 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 of gestation. SB and dietary fiber had similar effects on improving fetal number and reducing the abortion rate; however, the anti-oxidant capacity of maternal serum, placenta, and fetus was superior in the HF group than in the SB group. In comparison, CHC injection decreased reproductive performance and antioxidant defense. Both dietary fiber (DF) and SB supplementation had a major but different effect on the expression of anti-oxidant related genes and nutrient transporters genes. In summary, our data indicate that SB and DF showed similar effect on reproductive performance, but SB cannot completely replace the DF towards with respect to redox regulation in high-fat diet; and SB might influence offspring metabolism and health differently to DF.

  15. Electrochemical Oxidation of Cysteine at a Film Gold Modified Carbon Fiber Microelectrode Its Application in a Flow—Through Voltammetric Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Huang, Wen-Shiuan

    2012-01-01

    A flow-electrolytical cell containing a strand of micro Au modified carbon fiber electrodes (CFE) has been designedand characterized for use in a voltammatric detector for detecting cysteine using high-performance liquid chromatography. Cysteine is more efficiently electrochemical oxidized on a Au /CFE than a bare gold and carbon fiber electrode. The possible reaction mechanism of the oxidation process is described from the relations to scan rate, peak potentials and currents. For the pulse mode, and measurements with suitable experimental parameters, a linear concentration from 0.5 to 5.0 mg·L−1 was found. The limit of quantification for cysteine was below 60 ng·mL−1. PMID:22737024

  16. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  17. Application of hollow fiber membrane mediated with titanium dioxide nanowire/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite in preconcentration of clotrimazole and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Sehati, Negar; Dalali, Nasser; Soltanpour, Shahla; Seyed Dorraji, Mir Saeed

    2015-11-13

    In this paper, TiO2 nanowires and TiO2 nanoparticles have been successfully anchored on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets by a facile one-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized TiO2 NWs/RGO and TiO2 NPs/RGO nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. After comparatively studying of the as-made nanocomposites, TiO2 NWs/RGO nanocomposite showed the best adsorbing performance and applied as an attractive efficient sorbent reinforced with microporous hollow fiber membrane through the sol-gel technology. In the following, the selected nanocomposite was utilized for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of clotrimazole and tylosin using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection, respectively. In order to optimize the extraction conditions through affecting parameters (pH, stirring rate, salt addition, extraction time and volume of donor phase), response surface methodology (RSM) was employed as a powerful statistical technique. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (S/N=3) of proposed HFSPME method, was 0.67 μg L(-1) for clotrimazole and 0.91 μg L(-1) for tylosin with good linear ranges of 1.7-8000.0 μg L(-1) and 4.0-6000.0 μg L(-1). The inter-day and intra-day relative standard deviations (RSD%) at 100 μg L(-1) concentration level were in the ranges of 2.10-3.58% for clotrimazole and 3.45-7.80% for tylosin (n=5), respectively. The proposed microextraction device was extended for determination of ultra trace amounts of target analytes in milk and urine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:26477522

  18. Application of hollow fiber membrane mediated with titanium dioxide nanowire/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite in preconcentration of clotrimazole and tylosin.

    PubMed

    Sehati, Negar; Dalali, Nasser; Soltanpour, Shahla; Seyed Dorraji, Mir Saeed

    2015-11-13

    In this paper, TiO2 nanowires and TiO2 nanoparticles have been successfully anchored on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets by a facile one-step hydrothermal method. The synthesized TiO2 NWs/RGO and TiO2 NPs/RGO nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. After comparatively studying of the as-made nanocomposites, TiO2 NWs/RGO nanocomposite showed the best adsorbing performance and applied as an attractive efficient sorbent reinforced with microporous hollow fiber membrane through the sol-gel technology. In the following, the selected nanocomposite was utilized for simultaneous preconcentration and determination of clotrimazole and tylosin using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-UV detection, respectively. In order to optimize the extraction conditions through affecting parameters (pH, stirring rate, salt addition, extraction time and volume of donor phase), response surface methodology (RSM) was employed as a powerful statistical technique. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (S/N=3) of proposed HFSPME method, was 0.67 μg L(-1) for clotrimazole and 0.91 μg L(-1) for tylosin with good linear ranges of 1.7-8000.0 μg L(-1) and 4.0-6000.0 μg L(-1). The inter-day and intra-day relative standard deviations (RSD%) at 100 μg L(-1) concentration level were in the ranges of 2.10-3.58% for clotrimazole and 3.45-7.80% for tylosin (n=5), respectively. The proposed microextraction device was extended for determination of ultra trace amounts of target analytes in milk and urine samples with satisfactory results.

  19. Optical detection of glucose and glycated hemoglobin using etched fiber Bragg gratings coated with functionalized reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, S; Vasu, K S; Sampath, S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2016-07-01

    An enhanced optical detection of D-glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ) has been established in this study using etched fiber Bragg gratings (eFBG) coated with aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The read out, namely the shift in Bragg wavelength (ΔλB ) is highly sensitive to changes that occur due to the adsorption of glucose (or HbA1c ) molecules on the eFBG sensor coated with APBA-RGO complex through a five-membered cyclic ester bond formation between glucose and APBA molecules. A limit of detection of 1 nM is achieved with a linear range of detection from 1 nM to 10 mM in the case of D-glucose detection experiments. For HbA1c , a linear range of detection varying from 86 nM to 0.23 mM is achieved. The observation of only 4 pm (picometer) change in ΔλB even for the 10 mM lactose solution confirms the specificity of the APBA-RGO complex coated eFBG sensors to glucose molecules.

  20. Carbon fiber ultramicrodic electrode electrodeposited with over-oxidized polypyrrole for amperometric detection of vesicular exocytosis from pheochromocytoma cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 µm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 µA·µM(-1)·µm(-2) using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ~562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research.

  1. Optical detection of glucose and glycated hemoglobin using etched fiber Bragg gratings coated with functionalized reduced graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Sridevi, S; Vasu, K S; Sampath, S; Asokan, S; Sood, A K

    2016-07-01

    An enhanced optical detection of D-glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ) has been established in this study using etched fiber Bragg gratings (eFBG) coated with aminophenylboronic acid (APBA)-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The read out, namely the shift in Bragg wavelength (ΔλB ) is highly sensitive to changes that occur due to the adsorption of glucose (or HbA1c ) molecules on the eFBG sensor coated with APBA-RGO complex through a five-membered cyclic ester bond formation between glucose and APBA molecules. A limit of detection of 1 nM is achieved with a linear range of detection from 1 nM to 10 mM in the case of D-glucose detection experiments. For HbA1c , a linear range of detection varying from 86 nM to 0.23 mM is achieved. The observation of only 4 pm (picometer) change in ΔλB even for the 10 mM lactose solution confirms the specificity of the APBA-RGO complex coated eFBG sensors to glucose molecules. PMID:26266873

  2. Carbon Fiber Ultramicrodic Electrode Electrodeposited with Over-Oxidized Polypyrrole for Amperometric Detection of Vesicular Exocytosis from Pheochromocytoma Cell

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Xu, Shengwei; Zhang, Song; Liu, Juntao; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-01-01

    Vesicular exocytosis is ubiquitous, but it is difficult to detect within the cells' communication mechanism. For this purpose, a 2 μm ultramicrodic carbon fiber electrode was fabricated in this work based on electrodeposition with over-oxidized polypyrrole nanoparticle (PPyox-CFE), which was applied successfully for real-time monitoring of quantal exocytosis from individual pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PPyox-CFE was evaluated by dopamine (DA) solutions through cyclic voltammetry and amperometry electrochemical methods, and results revealed that PPyox-CFE improved the detection limit of DA. In particular, the sensitivity of DA was improved to 24.55 μA·μM−1·μm−2 using the PPyox-CFE. The ultramicrodic electrode combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect vesicular exocytosis of DA from individual PC12 cells with 60 mM K+ stimulation. A total of 287 spikes released from 7 PC12 cells were statistically analyzed. The current amplitude (Imax) and the released charge (Q) of the amperometric spikes from the DA release by a stimulated PC12 cell is 45.1 ± 12.5 pA and 0.18 ± 0.04 pC, respectively. Furthermore, on average ∼562,000 molecules were released in each vesicular exocytosis. PPyox-CFE, with its capability of detecting vesicular exocytosis, has potential application in neuron communication research. PMID:25569759

  3. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects.

    PubMed

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g(-1). The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  4. PEGylated fullerene/iron oxide nanocomposites for photodynamic therapy, targeted drug delivery and MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jinjin; Yu, Xiaoyuan; Wang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jun; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Rou; Liu, Ruiyuan; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2013-12-01

    Recently, fullerene and fullerene derivatives owning to their highly enriched physical and chemical properties have been widely explored for applications in many different fields including biomedicine. In this study, iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) were decorated onto the surface of fullerene (C60), and then PEGylation was performed to improve the solubility and biocompatibility of C60-IONP, obtaining a multi-functional C60-IONP-PEG nanocomposite with strong superparamagnetism and powerful photodynamic therapy capacity. Hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME), a new photodynamic anti-cancer drug, was conjugated to C60-IONP-PEG, forming a C60-IONP-PEG/HMME drug delivery system, which demonstrated an excellent magnetic targeting ability in cancer therapy. Compared with free HMME, remarkably enhanced photodynamic cancer cell killing effect using C60-IONP-PEG/HMME was realized not only in a cultured B16-F10 cells in vitro but also in an in vivo murine tumor model due to 23-fold higher HMME uptake of tumor and strong photodynamic activity of C60-IONP-PEG. Moreover, C60-IONP-PEG could be further used as a T2-contrast agent for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging. Our work showed C60-IONP-PEG/HMME had a great potential for cancer theranostic applications.

  5. Review of transcranial photobiomodulation for major depressive disorder: targeting brain metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cassano, Paolo; Petrie, Samuel R; Hamblin, Michael R; Henderson, Theodore A; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2016-07-01

    We examined the use of near-infrared and red radiation (photobiomodulation, PBM) for treating major depressive disorder (MDD). While still experimental, preliminary data on the use of PBM for brain disorders are promising. PBM is low-cost with potential for wide dissemination; further research on PBM is sorely needed. We found clinical and preclinical studies via PubMed search (2015), using the following keywords: "near-infrared radiation," "NIR," "low-level light therapy," "low-level laser therapy," or "LLLT" plus "depression." We chose clinically focused studies and excluded studies involving near-infrared spectroscopy. In addition, we used PubMed to find articles that examine the link between PBM and relevant biological processes including metabolism, inflammation, oxidative stress, and neurogenesis. Studies suggest the processes aforementioned are potentially effective targets for PBM to treat depression. There is also clinical preliminary evidence suggesting the efficacy of PBM in treating MDD, and comorbid anxiety disorders, suicidal ideation, and traumatic brain injury. Based on the data collected to date, PBM appears to be a promising treatment for depression that is safe and well-tolerated. However, large randomized controlled trials are still needed to establish the safety and effectiveness of this new treatment for MDD.

  6. MiR-590-5p Inhibits Oxidized- LDL Induced Angiogenesis by Targeting LOX-1.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yao; Zhang, Zhigao; Cao, Yongxiang; Mehta, Jawahar L; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is, at least in part, responsible for angiogenesis in atherosclerotic regions. This effect of ox-LDL has been shown to be mediated through a specific receptor LOX-1. Here we describe the effect of miR-590-5p on ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo settings. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with miR-590-5p mimic or inhibitor followed by treatment with ox-LDL. In other experiments, Marigel plugs were inserted in the mice subcutaneous space. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that miR-590-5p mimic (100 nM) inhibited the ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis (capillary tube formation, cell proliferation and migration as well as pro-angiogenic signals- ROS, MAPKs, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion-related proteins). Of note, miR-590-5p inhibitor (200 nM) had the opposite effects. The inhibitory effect of miR-590-5p on angiogenesis was mediated by inhibition of LOX-1 at translational level. The inhibition of LOX-1 by miR-590-5p was confirmed by luciferase assay. In conclusion, we show that MiR-590-5p inhibits angiogenesis by targeting LOX-1 and suppressing redox-sensitive signals. PMID:26932825

  7. MiR-590-5p Inhibits Oxidized- LDL Induced Angiogenesis by Targeting LOX-1

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yao; Zhang, Zhigao; Cao, Yongxiang; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is, at least in part, responsible for angiogenesis in atherosclerotic regions. This effect of ox-LDL has been shown to be mediated through a specific receptor LOX-1. Here we describe the effect of miR-590-5p on ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo settings. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were transfected with miR-590-5p mimic or inhibitor followed by treatment with ox-LDL. In other experiments, Marigel plugs were inserted in the mice subcutaneous space. Both in vitro and in vivo studies showed that miR-590-5p mimic (100 nM) inhibited the ox-LDL-mediated angiogenesis (capillary tube formation, cell proliferation and migration as well as pro-angiogenic signals- ROS, MAPKs, pro-inflammatory cytokines and adhesion-related proteins). Of note, miR-590-5p inhibitor (200 nM) had the opposite effects. The inhibitory effect of miR-590-5p on angiogenesis was mediated by inhibition of LOX-1 at translational level. The inhibition of LOX-1 by miR-590-5p was confirmed by luciferase assay. In conclusion, we show that MiR-590-5p inhibits angiogenesis by targeting LOX-1 and suppressing redox-sensitive signals. PMID:26932825

  8. Female resistance to pneumonia identifies lung macrophage nitric oxide synthase-3 as a therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiping; Huang, Yuh-Chin T; Koziel, Henry; de Crom, Rini; Ruetten, Hartmut; Wohlfart, Paulus; Thomsen, Reimar W; Kahlert, Johnny A; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Jozefowski, Szczepan; Colby, Amy; Kobzik, Lester

    2014-01-01

    To identify new approaches to enhance innate immunity to bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the natural experiment of gender differences in resistance to infections. Female and estrogen-treated male mice show greater resistance to pneumococcal pneumonia, seen as greater bacterial clearance, diminished lung inflammation, and better survival. In vitro, lung macrophages from female mice and humans show better killing of ingested bacteria. Inhibitors and genetically altered mice identify a critical role for estrogen-mediated activation of lung macrophage nitric oxide synthase-3 (NOS3). Epidemiologic data show decreased hospitalization for pneumonia in women receiving estrogen or statins (known to activate NOS3). Pharmacologic targeting of NOS3 with statins or another small-molecule compound (AVE3085) enhanced macrophage bacterial killing, improved bacterial clearance, and increased host survival in both primary and secondary (post-influenza) pneumonia. The data identify a novel mechanism for host defense via NOS3 and suggest a potential therapeutic strategy to reduce secondary bacterial pneumonia after influenza. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03711.001 PMID:25317947

  9. A versatile fluorescent biosensor based on target-responsive graphene oxide hydrogel for antibiotic detection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bing; Zhao, Huimin; Du, Lei; Gan, Xiaorong; Quan, Xie

    2016-09-15

    A fluorescent sensing platform based on graphene oxide (GO) hydrogel was developed through a fast and facile gelation, immersion and fluorescence determination process, in which the adenosine and aptamer worked as the co-crosslinkers to connect the GO sheets and then form the three-dimensional (3D) macrostructures. The as-prepared hydrogel showed high mechanical strength and thermal stability. The optimal hydrogel had a linear response for oxytetracycline (OTC) of 25-1000μg/L and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 25μg/L. Moreover, together with the high affinity of the aptamer for its target, this assay exhibited excellent sensitivity and selectivity. According to its design principle, the as-designed hydrogel was also tested to possess the generic detection function for other molecules by simply replacing its recognition element, which is expected to lay a foundation to realize the assembly of functionalized hierarchical graphene-based materials for practical applications in analytical field. PMID:27132000

  10. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Coated with Galactose-Carrying Polymer for Hepatocyte Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Mi Kyong; Kim, In Yong; Kim, Eun Mi; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Lee, Chang-Moon; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Akaike, Toshihiro; Cho, Chong Su

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to develop the functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) demonstrating the capacities to be delivered in liver specifically and to be dispersed in physiological environment stably. For this purpose, SPIONs were coated with polyvinylbenzyl-O-β-D-galactopyranosyl-D-gluconamide (PVLA) having galactose moieties to be recognized by asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-R) on hepatocytes. For use as a control, we also prepared SPIONs coordinated with 2-pyrrolidone. The sizes, size distribution, structure, and coating of the nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrophoretic light scattering spectrophotometer (ELS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), respectively. Intracellular uptake of the PVLA-coated SPIONs was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and their hepatocyte-specific delivery was also investigated through magnetic resonance (MR) images of rat liver. MRI experimental results indicated that the PVLA-coated SPIONs possess the more specific accumulation property in liver compared with control, which suggests their potential utility as liver-targeting MRI contrast agent. PMID:18317519

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Atherosclerosis Using CD81-Targeted Microparticles of Iron Oxide in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Yang, Wei; Li, Xiang; Liu, Hongmei; Nan, Xiang; Xie, Lisi; Zhou, Dongliang; Xie, Guoxi; Wu, Junru; Qiu, Bensheng; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using CD81- (Cluster of Differentiation 81 protein-) targeted microparticles of iron oxide (CD81-MPIO) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the murine atherosclerosis. CD81-MPIO and IgG- (Immunoglobulin G-) MPIO were prepared by covalently conjugating, respectively, with anti-CD81 monoclonal and IgG antibodies to the surface of the tosyl activated MPIO. The relevant binding capability of the MPIO was examined by incubating them with murine bEnd.3 cells stimulated with phenazine methosulfate (PMS) and its effect in shortening T2 relaxation time was also examined. MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice was studied in vivo. Our results show that CD81-MPIO, but not IgG-MPIO, can bind to the PMS-stimulated bEnd.3 cells. The T2 relaxation time was significantly shortened for stimulated bEnd.3 cells when compared with IgG-MPIO. In vivo MRI in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice showed highly conspicuous areas of low signal after CD81-MPIO injection. Quantitative analysis of the area of CD81-MPIO contrast effects showed 8.96- and 6.98-fold increase in comparison with IgG-MPIO or plain MPIO, respectively (P < 0.01). Histological assay confirmed the expression of CD81 and CD81-MPIO binding onto atherosclerotic lesions. In conclusion, CD81-MPIO allows molecular assessment of murine atherosclerotic lesions by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:26266263

  12. Facile synthesis of manganese ferrite/graphene oxide nanocomposites for controlled targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guangshuo; Ma, Yingying; Zhang, Lina; Mu, Jingbo; Zhang, Zhixiao; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Che, Hongwei; Bai, Yongmei; Hou, Junxian

    2016-03-01

    In this study, manganese ferrite/graphene oxide (MnFe2O4/GO) nanocomposites as controlled targeted drug delivery were prepared by a facile sonochemical method. It was found that GO nanosheets were fully exfoliated and decorated with MnFe2O4 nanoparticles having diameters of 5-13 nm. The field-dependent magnetization curve indicated superparamagnetic behavior of the obtained MnFe2O4/GO with saturation magnetization of 34.9 emu/g at room temperature. The in vitro cytotoxicity testing exhibited negligible cytotoxicity of as-prepared MnFe2O4/GO even at the concentration as high as 150 μg/mL. Doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) as an anti-tumor model drug was utilized to explore the application potential of MnFe2O4/GO for controlled drug delivery. The drug loading capacity of this nanocarrier was as high as 0.97 mg/mg and the drug release behavior showed a sustained and pH-responsive way.

  13. Polymer encapsulated upconversion nanoparticle/iron oxide nanocomposites for multimodal imaging and magnetic targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Huan; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Chao; Ma, Xinxing; Li, Yonggang; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-12-01

    Multimodal imaging and imaging-guided therapies have become a new trend in the current development of cancer theranostics. In this work, we encapsulate hydrophobic upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) together with iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) by using an amphiphilic block copolymer, poly (styrene-block-allyl alcohol) (PS(16)-b-PAA(10)), via a microemulsion method, obtaining an UC-IO@Polymer multi-functional nanocomposite system. Fluorescent dye and anti-cancer drug molecules can be further loaded inside the UC-IO@Polymer nanocomposite for additional functionalities. Utilizing the Squaraine (SQ) dye loaded nanocomposite (UC-IO@Polymer-SQ), triple-modal upconversion luminescence (UCL)/down-conversion fluorescence (FL)/magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, and also applied for in vivo cancer cell tracking in mice. On the other hand, a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin, is also loaded into the nanocomposite, forming an UC-IO@Polymer-DOX complex, which enables novel imaging-guided and magnetic targeted drug delivery. Our work provides a method to fabricate a nanocomposite system with highly integrated functionalities for multimodal biomedical imaging and cancer therapy.

  14. Dual drug loaded superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Dilnawaz, Fahima; Singh, Abhalaxmi; Mohanty, Chandana; Sahoo, Sanjeeb K

    2010-05-01

    The primary inadequacy of chemotherapeutic drugs is their relative non-specificity and potential side effects to the healthy tissues. To overcome this, drug loaded multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles are conceptualized. We report here an aqueous based formulation of glycerol monooleate coated magnetic nanoparticles (GMO-MNPs) devoid of any surfactant capable of carrying high payload hydrophobic anticancer drugs. The biocompatibility was confirmed by tumor necrosis factor alpha assay, confocal microscopy. High entrapment efficiency approximately 95% and sustained release of encapsulated drugs for more than two weeks under in vitro conditions was achieved for different anticancer drugs (paclitaxel, rapamycin, alone or combination). Drug loaded GMO-MNPs did not affect the magnetization properties of the iron oxide core as confirmed by magnetization study. Additionally the MNPs were functionalized with carboxylic groups by coating with DMSA (Dimercaptosuccinic acid) for the supplementary conjugation of amines. For targeted therapy, HER2 antibody was conjugated to GMO-MNPs and showed enhanced uptake in human breast carcinoma cell line (MCF-7). The IC(50) doses revealed potential antiproliferative effect in MCF-7. Therefore, antibody conjugated GMO-MNPs could be used as potential drug carrier for the active therapeutic aspects in cancer therapy.

  15. Nitric oxide pretreatment enhances atheroma component highlighting in vivo with intercellular adhesion molecule-1-targeted echogenic liposomes.

    PubMed

    Kee, Patrick H; Kim, Hyunggun; Huang, Shaoling; Laing, Susan T; Moody, Melanie R; Vela, Deborah; Klegerman, Melvin E; McPherson, David D

    2014-06-01

    We present an ultrasound technique for the detection of inflammatory changes in developing atheromas. We used contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging with (i) microbubbles targeted to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a molecule of adhesion involved in inflammatory processes in lesions of atheromas in New Zealand White rabbits, and (ii) pretreatment with nitric oxide-loaded microbubbles and ultrasound activation at the site of the endothelium to enhance the permeability of the arterial wall and the penetration of ICAM-1-targeted microbubbles. This procedure increases acoustic enhancement 1.2-fold. Pretreatment with nitric oxide-loaded echogenic liposomes and ultrasound activation can potentially facilitate the subsequent penetration of targeted echogenic liposomes into the arterial wall, thus allowing improved detection of inflammatory changes in developing atheromas.

  16. Acoustoelectric current saturation in {ital c}-axis fiber-textured polycrystalline zinc oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Pompe, T.; Srikant, V.; Clarke, D.R.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustoelectric current saturation, which until now has only been observed in piezoelectric single crystals, is observed in thin polycrystalline zinc oxide films. Epitaxial ZnO films on {ital c}-plane sapphire and textured ZnO polycrystalline films on fused silica both exhibit current saturation phenomenon. The values of the saturation current densities are in the range 10{sup 5}{endash}10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}, depending on the carrier concentration in the film, with corresponding saturation electric fields of 3{endash}5{times}10{sup 3} V/cm. In addition to the current saturation, the electrical properties of the films degraded with the onset of the acoustoelectric effect but could be restored by annealing at 250{degree}C in a vacuum for 30 min. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Application of a solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with a graphene oxide-poly(dimethylsiloxane) composite for the extraction of triazoles from water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Ma, Ruiyang; Zhang, Guijiang; Zhang, Shuaihua; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    A solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared by mixing graphene oxide and hydroxyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane together and then coating the mixture on the surface of etched stainless-steel wire by sol-gel technology. After aging by heating, the graphene oxide-polydimethylsiloxane composite coated fiber was used for the direct solid phase microextraction of triazole fungicides from water samples. The properties of the graphene oxide-polydimethylsiloxane coating were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. And the chemical stability of the coating was tested as well. Several important experimental parameters that could influence the extraction efficiency such as desorption temperature and time, extraction temperature and time, sample pH and stirring rate, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were in the range from 0.01 to 0.03 μg/L. The results indicated that the homemade fiber had the advantages of good thermal and chemical stability and high extraction efficiency, which was successfully applied to the analysis of triazoles in water samples.

  18. Application of a solid-phase microextraction fiber coated with a graphene oxide-poly(dimethylsiloxane) composite for the extraction of triazoles from water.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Ma, Ruiyang; Zhang, Guijiang; Zhang, Shuaihua; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2016-08-01

    A solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared by mixing graphene oxide and hydroxyl-terminated polydimethylsiloxane together and then coating the mixture on the surface of etched stainless-steel wire by sol-gel technology. After aging by heating, the graphene oxide-polydimethylsiloxane composite coated fiber was used for the direct solid phase microextraction of triazole fungicides from water samples. The properties of the graphene oxide-polydimethylsiloxane coating were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. And the chemical stability of the coating was tested as well. Several important experimental parameters that could influence the extraction efficiency such as desorption temperature and time, extraction temperature and time, sample pH and stirring rate, were investigated and optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the limits of detection were in the range from 0.01 to 0.03 μg/L. The results indicated that the homemade fiber had the advantages of good thermal and chemical stability and high extraction efficiency, which was successfully applied to the analysis of triazoles in water samples. PMID:27306964

  19. Composite Random Fiber Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picu, Catalin; Shahsavari, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Systems made from fibers are common in the biological and engineering worlds. In many instances, as for example in skin, where elastin and collagen fibers are present, the fiber network is composite, in the sense that it contains fibers of very different properties. The relationship between microstructural parameters and the elastic moduli of random fiber networks containing a single type of fiber is understood. In this work we address a similar target for the composite networks. We show that linear superposition of the contributions to stiffness of individual sub-networks does not apply and interesting non-linear effects are observed. A physical basis of these effects is proposed.

  20. A new biomarker of protein oxidation degree and site using angiotensin as the target by MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Yanmin; Liu, Rutao; Zong, Wansong; Sun, Feng; Wang, Meijie; Zhang, Pengjun

    2010-02-01

    Hydroxyl radicals generated from Fenton reaction were used to damage the angiotensin. The oxidative damage degree and sites of peptides were measured by HPLC-MS and MS/MS. Experimental results proved that the oxidative damage degree increased with longer reaction time. The results also showed that the side chains of phenylalanine and tyrosine in angiotension can be attacked by hydroxyl radicals to form the oxidative products. A new strategy was established to monitor the oxidative degree and sites of peptides and laid the foundation for protein oxidation. This method can be used to investigate the mechanism of protein oxidative damage caused by oxidative stress which is induced by environmental pollutants and physiological activities. There will also be a wide application in the research of pathogenesis of some disease related to oxidative stress.

  1. Oxidative targets in the stratum corneum. A new basis for antioxidative strategies.

    PubMed

    Thiele, J J

    2001-01-01

    As the outermost layer of skin, the stratum corneum (SC) is continuously exposed to an oxidative environment, including air pollutants, ultraviolet radiation, chemical oxidants, and aerobic microorganisms. Human SC reveals characteristic antioxidant and protein oxidation gradients with increasing antioxidant depletion and protein oxidation towards the outer layers. SC antioxidants, lipids, and proteins are oxidatively modified upon treatments with ultraviolet A/ultraviolet B, ozone, and benzoyl peroxide. alpha-Tocopherol represents the predominating SC antioxidant with respect to its concentration and its unique susceptibility to the various oxidative challenges tested. In sites rich in sebaceous glands, alpha-tocopherol is physiologically delivered to the surface via secretion of sebum. Oxidative damage in the human SC represents an early pathophysiological event preceding barrier disruption and inflammation in environmentally challenged skin. Furthermore, oxidative gradients in SC proteins may have implications for the process of desquamation in human skin.

  2. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g-1. The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  3. Glioma-targeted superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug-carrying vehicles for theranostic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, He-Lin; Mao, Kai-Li; Huang, Yin-Ping; Yang, Jing-Jing; Xu, Jie; Chen, Pian-Pian; Fan, Zi-Liang; Zou, Shuang; Gao, Zheng-Zheng; Yin, Jia-Yu; Xiao, Jian; Lu, Cui-Tao; Zhang, Bao-Lin; Zhao, Ying-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles capable of the specific delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells and the real-time imaging of these sites have the potential to improve cancer treatment through personalized therapy. In this study, we have proposed a multifunctional nanoparticle that integrate magnetic targeting, drug-carrier functionality and real-time MRI imaging capabilities in one platform for the theranostic treatment of tumors. The multifunctional nanoparticle was designed with a superparamagnetic iron oxide core and a multifunctional shell composed of PEG/PEI/polysorbate 80 (Ps 80) and was used to encapsulate DOX. DOX-loaded multifunctional nanoparticles (DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs) with a Dh of 58.0 nm, a zeta potential of 28.0 mV, and a drug loading content of 29.3% presented superior superparamagnetic properties with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of 24.1 emu g-1. The cellular uptake of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs by C6 cells under a magnetic field was significantly enhanced over that of free DOX in solution, resulting in stronger in vitro cytotoxicity. The real-time therapeutic outcome of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs was easily monitored by MRI. Furthermore, the negative contrast enhancement effect of the nanoparticles was confirmed in glioma-bearing rats. Prussian blue staining and ex vivo DOX fluorescence assays showed that the magnetic Ps 80-SPIONs and encapsulated DOX were delivered to gliomas by imposing external magnetic fields, indicating effective magnetic targeting. Due to magnetic targeting and Ps 80-mediated endocytosis, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs in the presence of a magnetic field led to the complete suppression of glioma growth in vivo at 28 days after treatment. The therapeutic mechanism of DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs acted by inducing apoptosis through the caspase-3 pathway. Finally, DOX@Ps 80-SPIONs' safety at therapeutic dosage was verified using pathological HE assays of the heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney. Multifunctional SPIONs could be used as potential carriers for the

  4. Graphitized-carbon fiber/carbon char fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, John F.

    2007-08-28

    A method for recovery of intact graphitic fibers from fiber/polymer composites is described. The method comprises first pyrolyzing the graphite fiber/polymer composite mixture and then separating the graphite fibers by molten salt electrochemical oxidation.

  5. Roles of inorganic oxide nanoparticles on extraction efficiency of electrospun polyethylene terephthalate nanocomposite as an unbreakable fiber coating.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Habib; Roostaie, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the roles of inorganic oxide nanoparticles on the extraction efficiency of polyethylene terephthalate-based nanocomposites were extensively studied. Four fiber coatings based on polyethylene terephthalate nanocomposites containing different types of nanoparticles along with a pristine polyethylene terephthalate polymer were conveniently electrospun on stainless steel wires. The applicability of new fiber coatings were examined by headspace-solid phase microextraction of some environmentally important volatile organic compound such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), as model compounds, from aqueous samples. Subsequently, the extracted analytes were transferred into a gas chromatography by thermal desorption. Parameters affecting the morphology and capability of the prepared nanocomposites including the type of nanoparticles and their doping levels along with the coating time were optimized. Four types of nanoparticles including Fe3O4, SiO2, CoO and NiO were examined as the doping agents and among them the presence of SiO2 in the prepared nanocomposite was prominent. The homogeneity and the porous surface structure of the SiO2-polyethylene terephthalate nanocomposite were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy indicating that the nanofibers diameters were lower than 300 nm. In addition, important parameters influencing the extraction and desorption process such as temperature and extraction time, ionic strength and desorption conditions were optimized. Eventually, the developed method was validated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Under optimized conditions, the relative standard deviation values for a double distilled water spiked with the selected volatile organic compounds at 50 ng L(-1) were 2-7% (n=3) while the limits of detection were between 0.7 and 0.9 ng L(-1). The method was linear in the concentration range of 10 to 1,000 ng L(-1) (R(2)>0.9992). Finally, the developed method was applied to the analysis of

  6. Ion-enhanced oxidation of aluminum as a fundamental surface process during target poisoning in reactive magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect

    Kuschel, Thomas; Keudell, Achim von

    2010-05-15

    Plasma deposition of aluminum oxide by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS) using an aluminum target and argon and oxygen as working gases is an important technological process. The undesired oxidation of the target itself, however, causes the so-called target poisoning, which leads to strong hysteresis effects during RMS operation. The oxidation occurs by chemisorption of oxygen atoms and molecules with a simultaneous ion bombardment being present. This heterogenous surface reaction is studied in a quantified particle beam experiment employing beams of oxygen molecules and argon ions impinging onto an aluminum-coated quartz microbalance. The oxidation and/or sputtering rates are measured with this microbalance and the resulting oxide layers are analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The sticking coefficient of oxygen molecules is determined to 0.015 in the zero coverage limit. The sputtering yields of pure aluminum by argon ions are determined to 0.4, 0.62, and 0.8 at 200, 300, and 400 eV. The variation in the effective sticking coefficient and sputtering yield during the combined impact of argon ions and oxygen molecules is modeled with a set of rate equations. A good agreement is achieved if one postulates an ion-induced surface activation process, which facilitates oxygen chemisorption. This process may be identified with knock-on implantation of surface-bonded oxygen, with an electric-field-driven in-diffusion of oxygen or with an ion-enhanced surface activation process. Based on these fundamental processes, a robust set of balance equations is proposed to describe target poisoning effects in RMS.

  7. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis Probe Targets Plasmodium falciparum Cytochrome b Ubiquinone Reduction Site and Synergizes With Oxidation Site Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lukens, Amanda K.; Heidebrecht, Richard W.; Mulrooney, Carol; Beaudoin, Jennifer A.; Comer, Eamon; Duvall, Jeremy R.; Fitzgerald, Mark E.; Masi, Daniela; Galinsky, Kevin; Scherer, Christina A.; Palmer, Michelle; Munoz, Benito; Foley, Michael; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The emergence and spread of drug resistance to current antimalarial therapies remains a pressing concern, escalating the need for compounds that demonstrate novel modes of action. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS) libraries bridge the gap between conventional small molecule and natural product libraries, allowing the interrogation of more diverse chemical space in efforts to identify probes of novel parasite pathways. Methods. We screened and optimized a probe from a DOS library using whole-cell phenotypic assays. Resistance selection and whole-genome sequencing approaches were employed to identify the cellular target of the compounds. Results. We identified a novel macrocyclic inhibitor of Plasmodium falciparum with nanomolar potency and identified the reduction site of cytochrome b as its cellular target. Combination experiments with reduction and oxidation site inhibitors showed synergistic inhibition of the parasite. Conclusions. The cytochrome b oxidation center is a validated antimalarial target. We show that the reduction site of cytochrome b is also a druggable target. Our results demonstrating a synergistic relationship between oxidation and reduction site inhibitors suggests a future strategy for new combination therapies in the treatment of malaria. PMID:25336726

  8. The synergistic effect of folate and RGD dual ligand of nanographene oxide on tumor targeting and photothermal therapy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Cheol; Lee, Jong Hyun; Sahu, Abhishek; Tae, Giyoong

    2015-11-01

    Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a co-operative effect of individual ligands. In this study, a dual ligand targeting nanographene oxide (nGO) was developed by non-covalent interaction with folate and cRGD functionalized pluronic, which allowed precise control of ligand number on the nGO surface and ensured stability under physiological conditions. The tumor targeting abilities of single and dual ligand decorated nGOs were evaluated in vitro by using KB cells, over-expressing folate and integrin αvβ3 receptors. In vitro cellular uptake analysis by flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy showed enhanced uptake of dual ligand modified nGO compared to any of the single ligand modified nGOs. The cellular uptake of dual targeted cRGD-FA-nGO was increased by 1.9 and 2.4 folds compared to single targeted cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution experiment in a mouse xenograft model also confirmed the synergistic targeting effect of cRGD and folate dual functionalized nGO. A significantly higher tumor accumulation of cRGD-FA-nGO was observed compared to cRGD-nGO or FA-nGO. The higher tumor accumulation of dual targeted nGO resulted in complete ablation of tumor tissue through an enhanced photothermal effect by NIR laser irradiation. Therefore, co-functionalization of a nanoparticle by cRGD and folate is a potentially useful way to enhance the tumor targeting efficacy.Effective delivery of nanoparticles to the target site is necessary for successful biomedical applications. Inefficient targeting is a major concern for nanomedicines in cancer therapy. Conjugation of multiple targeting ligands to the nanoparticle surface might further enhance the targeting efficiency by a

  9. Tumor Cell Targeting by Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Is Dominated by Different Factors In Vitro versus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    NDong, Christian; Tate, Jennifer A.; Kett, Warren C.; Batra, Jaya; Demidenko, Eugene; Lewis, Lionel D.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Gerngross, Tillman U.; Griswold, Karl E.

    2015-01-01

    Realizing the full potential of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) for cancer diagnosis and therapy requires selective tumor cell accumulation. Here, we report a systematic analysis of two key determinants for IONP homing to human breast cancers: (i) particle size and (ii) active vs passive targeting. In vitro, molecular targeting to the HER2 receptor was the dominant factor driving cancer cell association. In contrast, size was found to be the key determinant of tumor accumulation in vivo, where molecular targeting increased tumor tissue concentrations for 30 nm but not 100 nm IONP. Similar to the in vitro results, PEGylation did not influence in vivo IONP biodistribution. Thus, the results reported here indicate that the in vitro advantages of molecular targeting may not consistently extend to pre-clinical in vivo settings. These observations may have important implications for the design and clinical translation of advanced, multifunctional, IONP platforms. PMID:25695795

  10. Intracellular repair of oxidation-damaged α-synuclein fails to target C-terminal modification sites

    PubMed Central

    Binolfi, Andres; Limatola, Antonio; Verzini, Silvia; Kosten, Jonas; Theillet, Francois-Xavier; May Rose, Honor; Bekei, Beata; Stuiver, Marchel; van Rossum, Marleen; Selenko, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Cellular oxidative stress serves as a common denominator in many neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease. Here we use in-cell NMR spectroscopy to study the fate of the oxidation-damaged Parkinson's disease protein alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) in non-neuronal and neuronal mammalian cells. Specifically, we deliver methionine-oxidized, isotope-enriched α-Syn into cultured cells and follow intracellular protein repair by endogenous enzymes at atomic resolution. We show that N-terminal α-Syn methionines Met1 and Met5 are processed in a stepwise manner, with Met5 being exclusively repaired before Met1. By contrast, C-terminal methionines Met116 and Met127 remain oxidized and are not targeted by cellular enzymes. In turn, persisting oxidative damage in the C-terminus of α-Syn diminishes phosphorylation of Tyr125 by Fyn kinase, which ablates the necessary priming event for Ser129 modification by CK1. These results establish that oxidative stress can lead to the accumulation of chemically and functionally altered α-Syn in cells. PMID:26807843

  11. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-01-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers. PMID:27126900

  12. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-29

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  13. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-04-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers.

  14. Single-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene oxide-based saturable absorbers for low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohui; Wu, Kan; Sun, Zhipei; Meng, Bo; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Yishan; Yu, Xuechao; Yu, Xia; Zhang, Ying; Shum, Perry Ping; Wang, Qi Jie

    2016-01-01

    Low phase noise mode-locked fiber laser finds important applications in telecommunication, ultrafast sciences, material science, and biology, etc. In this paper, two types of carbon nano-materials, i.e. single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) and graphene oxide (GO), are investigated as efficient saturable absorbers (SAs) to achieve low phase noise mode-locked fiber lasers. Various properties of these wall-paper SAs, such as saturable intensity, optical absorption and degree of purity, are found to be key factors determining the performance of the ultrafast pulses. Reduced-noise femtosecond fiber lasers based on such carbon-based SAs are experimentally demonstrated, for which the phase noise has been reduced by more than 10 dB for SWNT SAs and 8 dB for GO SAs at 10 kHz. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the relationship between different carbon material based SAs and the phase noise of mode-locked lasers. This work paves the way to generate high-quality low phase noise ultrashort pulses in passively mode-locked fiber lasers. PMID:27126900

  15. Nitric oxide as a target of complementary and alternative medicines to prevent and treat inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and associated reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are involved in many physiological functions. There has been an ongoing debate to whether RNS can inhibit or perpetuate chronic inflammation and associated carcinogenesis. Although the final outcome depends on the genetic make-up of its target, the surrounding microenvironment, the activity and localization of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoforms, and overall levels of NO/RNS, evidence is accumulating that in general, RNS drive inflammation and cancers associated with inflammation. To this end, many complementary and alternative medicines (CAMs) that work in chemoprevention associated with chronic inflammation, are inhibitors of excessive NO observed in inflammatory conditions. Here we review recent literature outlining a role of NO/RNS in chronic inflammation and cancer, and point toward NO as one of several targets for the success of CAMs in treating chronic inflammation and cancer associated with this inflammation. PMID:18440130

  16. Cardiac-Oxidized Antigens Are Targets of Immune Recognition by Antibodies and Potential Molecular Determinants in Chagas Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Zago, Maria Paola; Nunez, Sonia; Amoroso, Alejandro; Rementeria, Hugo; Dousset, Pierre; Burgos, Federico Nunez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) of inflammatory and mitochondrial origin in infected hosts. In this study, we examined ROS-induced oxidative modifications in the heart and determined whether the resultant oxidized cardiac proteins are targets of immune response and of pathological significance in Chagas disease. Heart biopsies from chagasic mice, rats and human patients exhibited, when compared to those from normal controls, a substantial increase in protein 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) adducts. To evaluate whether oxidized proteins gain antigenic properties, heart homogenates or isolated cardiomyocytes were oxidized in vitro and one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE)/Western blotting (WB) was performed to investigate the proteomic oxidative changes and recognition of oxidized proteins by sera antibodies in chagasic rodents (mice, rats) and human patients. Human cardiomyocytes exhibited LD50 sensitivity to 30 µM 4-HNE and 100 µM H2O2 at 6 h and 12 h, respectively. In vitro oxidation with 4-HNE or H2O2 resulted in a substantial increase in 4-HNE- and carbonyl-modified proteins that correlated with increased recognition of cardiac (cardiomyocytes) proteins by sera antibodies of chagasic rodents and human patients. 2D-GE/Western blotting followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis to identify cardiac proteins that were oxidized and recognized by human chagasic sera yielded 82 unique proteins. We validated the 2D-GE results by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and WB and demonstrated that oxidation of recombinant titin enhanced its immunogenicity and recognition by sera antibodies from chagasic hosts (rats and humans). Treatment of infected rats with phenyl-α-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) resulted in normalized immune detection of cardiac proteins associated with control of cardiac pathology and preservation of heart contractile function in chagasic rats. We

  17. Application of inhibitor titrations for the detection of oxidative phosphorylation defects in saponin-skinned muscle fibers of patients with mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A V; Winkler, K; Kirches, E; Lins, H; Feistner, H; Kunz, W S

    1997-04-12

    Inhibitor titrations were applied to characterize functional changes in mitochondrial energy metabolism in the skeletal muscle of patients with mitochondrial diseases. For this we titrated the maximal mitochondrial respiration rate of saponin-skinned muscle fibers isolated from the skeletal muscle biopsy with the specific inhibitors of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes I, IV and V-rotenone, azide and oligomycin. For three patients with deletions of mitochondrial DNA and one patient with a complex I deficiency the titrations revealed at rather normal respiration activities of saponin-skinned fibers significant differences to healthy controls: (i) The inhibitor titration curves of the affected enzyme were much steeper and (ii) for almost complete inhibition of respiration a smaller amount of the inhibitor is necessary. The detailed analysis of the titration curves within the framework of metabolic control theory indicated elevated flux control coefficients of the respective complex of respiratory chain. On the other hand, for one patient with a mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, decreased respiration activities of skinned fibers but no redistribution of flux control was observed. We conclude, therefore, that application of inhibitor titrations and the quantitative description of the titration curve can be a valuable approach to elucidate functional defects of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

  18. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverri, Elizabeth J; Randolph, Jody M; Steinberg, Francene M; Kappagoda, C Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M

    2015-08-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity. PMID:26225995

  19. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Reverri, Elizabeth J.; Randolph, Jody M.; Steinberg, Francene M.; Kappagoda, C. Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M.

    2015-01-01

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity. PMID:26225995

  20. Black Beans, Fiber, and Antioxidant Capacity Pilot Study: Examination of Whole Foods vs. Functional Components on Postprandial Metabolic, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation in Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reverri, Elizabeth J; Randolph, Jody M; Steinberg, Francene M; Kappagoda, C Tissa; Edirisinghe, Indika; Burton-Freeman, Britt M

    2015-07-27

    Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) contain bioactive components with functional properties that may modify cardiovascular risk. The aims of this pilot study were to evaluate the ability of black beans to attenuate postprandial metabolic, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses and determine relative contribution of dietary fiber and antioxidant capacity of beans to the overall effect. In this randomized, controlled, crossover trial, 12 adults with metabolic syndrome (MetS) consumed one of three meals (black bean (BB), fiber matched (FM), and antioxidant capacity matched (AM)) on three occasions that included blood collection before (fasting) and five hours postprandially. Insulin was lower after the BB meal, compared to the FM or AM meals (p < 0.0001). A significant meal × time interaction was observed for plasma antioxidant capacity (p = 0.002) revealing differences over time: AM > BB > FM. Oxidized LDL (oxLDL) was not different by meal, although a trend for declining oxLDL was observed after the BB and AM meals at five hours compared to the FM meal. Triglycerides and interleukin-6 (IL-6) increased in response to meals (p < 0.0001). Inclusion of black beans with a typical Western-style meal attenuates postprandial insulin and moderately enhances postprandial antioxidant endpoints in adults with MetS, which could only be partly explained by fiber content and properties of antioxidant capacity.

  1. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Ge; Sauler, Maor; Lee, Patty J.

    2013-01-01

    The lung endothelium is a major target for inflammatory and oxidative stress. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction is a crucial defense mechanism during oxidant challenges, such as hyperoxia. The role of lung endothelial HO-1during hyperoxia in vivo is not well defined. We engineered lentiviral vectors with microRNA (miRNA) sequences controlled by vascular endothelium cadherin (VE-cad) to study the specific role of lung endothelial HO-1. Wild-type (WT) murine lung endothelial cells (MLECs) or WT mice were treated with lentivirus and exposed to hyperoxia (95% oxygen). We detected HO-1 knockdown (∼55%) specifically in the lung endothelium. MLECs and lungs showed approximately a 2-fold increase in apoptosis and ROS generation after HO-1 silencing. We also demonstrate for the first time that silencing endothelial HO-1 has the same effect on lung injury and survival as silencing HO-1 in multiple lung cell types and that HO-1 regulates caspase 3 activation and autophagy in endothelium during hyperoxia. These studies demonstrate the utility of endothelial-targeted gene silencing in vivo using lentiviral miRNA constructs to assess gene function and that endothelial HO-1 is an important determinant of survival during hyperoxia.—Zhang, Y., Jiang, G., Sauler, M., Lee, P. J. Lung endothelial HO-1 targeting in vivo using lentiviral miRNA regulates apoptosis and autophagy during oxidant injury. PMID:23771928

  2. The Immature Fiber Mutant Phenotype of Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) is Linked to a 22-bp Frame-shift Deletion in a Mitochondria Targeted Pentatricopeptide Repeat Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton seed trichomes are the globally most important source of natural fibers. The major fiber thickness properties influence the price of the raw material and the quality of the finished product. The recessive immature fiber (im) gene reduces the degree of fiber cell wall thickening by a process...

  3. Effect of endurance and/or strength training on muscle fiber size, oxidative capacity, and capillarity in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Michael I; Fournier, Mario; Wang, Huiyuan; Storer, Thomas W; Casaburi, Richard; Kopple, Joel D

    2015-10-15

    We previously reported reduced limb muscle fiber succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity and capillarity density and increased cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of all fiber types in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients compared with matched controls that may contribute to their effort intolerance and muscle weakness. This study evaluated whether endurance training (ET), strength training (ST), or their combination (EST) alters these metabolic and morphometric aberrations as a mechanism for functional improvement. Five groups were evaluated: 1) controls; 2) MHD/no training; 3) MHD/ET; 4) MHD/ST; and 5) MHD/EST. Training duration was 21.5 ± 0.7 wk. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies were obtained after HD at baseline and at study end. Muscle fibers were classified immunohistochemically, and fiber CSAs were computed. Individual fiber SDH activity was determined by a microdensitometric assay. Capillaries were identified using antibodies against endothelial cells. Type I and IIA fiber CSAs decreased significantly (10%) with EST. In the ET group, SDH activity increased 16.3% in type IIA and 19.6% in type IIX fibers. Capillary density increased significantly by 28% in the EST group and 14.3% with ET. The number of capillaries surrounding individual fiber type increased significantly in EST and ET groups. Capillary-to-fiber ratio increased significantly by 11 and 9.6% in EST and ET groups, respectively. We conclude that increments in capillarity and possibly SDH activity in part underlie improvements in endurance of MHD patients posttraining. We speculate that improved specific force and/or neural adaptations to exercise underlie improvements in limb muscle strength of MHD patients.

  4. Magnetic Targeting of Novel Heparinized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Evaluated in a 9L-glioma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Shin, Meong Cheol; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A novel PEGylated and heparinized magnetic iron oxide nano-platform (DNPH) was synthesized for simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and tumor targeting. Methods Starch-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (“D”) were crosslinked, aminated (DN) and then simultaneously PEGylated and heparinized with different feed ratios of PEG and heparin (DNPH1-4). DNPH products were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The magentic targeting of DNPH3, with appropriate amounts of conjugated PEG and heparin, in a mouse 9L-glioma subcutaneous tumor model was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/electron spin resonance (ESR). Results DNPH3 showed long circulating properties in vivo (half-life > 8 h, more than 60-fold longer than that of parent D) and low reticuloendothelial system (RES) recognition in liver and spleen. Protamine, a model cationic protein, was efficiently loaded onto DNPH3 with a maxium loading content of 26.4 μg/mg Fe. Magnetic capture of DNPH3 in tumor site with optimized conditions (I.D. of 12 mg/kg, targeting time of 45 min) was up to 29.42 μg Fe/g tissue (12.26% I.D./g tissue). Conclusion DNPH3 showed the potential to be used as a platform for cationic proteins for simultaneous tumor targeting and imaging. PMID:24065589

  5. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for MR imaging of pancreatic cancer: Potential for early diagnosis through targeted strategies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chongjie; Yan, Yuzhong; Zou, Qi; Chen, Jie; Li, Chunsheng

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)-based magnetic resonance imaging is a powerful, noninvasive tool in biomedical imaging. The recent embedding of SPIO in nanoencapsulations that had different controllable surface properties has now made it possible to use SPIO in the imaging of metabolic processes. The two major issues to realize maximized and selective SPIO cancer targeting are the minimization of macrophage uptake and the preferential binding to cancerous cells over healthy neighbor cells. The utility of SPIO has been shown in clinical applications using a series of marketed SPION-based contrast agents. Applications have ranged from detecting inflammatory diseases to the specific identification of cell surface markers expressed on tumors. This review focuses on iron-oxide-based nanoparticles, to include the physiochemical properties of SPION surface engineering and its synthetic methods as well as SPIO imaging applications and specifically targeted SPIO conjugates (e.g. targeted probes) for labeling cancerous, cell-surface molecules. As a specific application of this technology, we discuss its use in the imaging of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma in addition to its potential for use in early diagnosis through targeted strategies. PMID:26663873

  6. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate

  7. Graphene oxide-silica composite coating hollow fiber solid phase microextraction online coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for the determination of trace heavy metals in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Su, Shaowei; Chen, Beibei; He, Man; Hu, Bin

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a novel graphene oxide-silica (GO-silica) composite coating was prepared for hollow fiber solid phase microextraction (HF-SPME) of trace Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb followed by on-line inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The structure of the prepared graphene oxide and GO-silica composite was studied and elucidated by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The GO-silica composite coated hollow fiber was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the results show that the GO-silica composite coating possessed a homogeneous and wrinkled structure. Various experimental parameters affecting the extraction of the target metal ions by GO-silica composite coated HF-SPME have been investigated carefully. Under the optimum conditions, the limits of detection (LODs, 3σ) for Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Cd and Pb were 7.5, 0.39, 20, 23, 6.7 and 28 ng L(-1) and the relative standard deviations (RSDs, c(Mn, Co, Cd)=0.05 μg L(-1), c(Ni, Cu, Pb)=0.2 μg L(-1), n=7) were 7.2, 7.0, 5.6, 7.3, 7.8 and 4.6%, respectively. The accuracy of the proposed method was validated by the analysis of Certified Reference Material of GSBZ 50009-88 environmental water and the determined values were in a good agreement with the certified values. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the determination of trace metals in real environmental water samples with recoveries ranging from 85 to 119%.

  8. Melanin as a target for melanoma chemotherapy: pro-oxidant effect of oxygen and metals on melanoma viability.

    PubMed

    Farmer, Patrick J; Gidanian, Shirley; Shahandeh, Babbak; Di Bilio, Angel J; Tohidian, Nilou; Meyskens, Frank L

    2003-06-01

    Melanoma cells have a poor ability to mediate oxidative stress, which may be attributed to constitutive abnormalities in their melanosomes. We hypothesize that disorganization of the melanosomes will allow chemical targeting of the melanin within. Chemical studies show that under oxidative conditions, synthetic melanins demonstrate increased metal affinity and a susceptibility to redox cycling with oxygen to form reactive oxygen species. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-active 5,5'-dimethyl-pyrollidine N-oxide spin adduct was used to show that binding of divalent Zn or Cu to melanin induces a pro-oxidant response under oxygen, generating superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. A similar pro-oxidant behaviour is seen in melanoma cell lines under external peroxide stress. Melanoma cultures grown under 95% O2/5% CO2 atmospheres show markedly reduced viability as compared with normal melanocytes. Cu- and Zn-dithiocarbamate complexes, which induce passive uptake of the metal ions into cells, show significant antimelanoma activity. The antimelanoma effect of metal- and oxygen-induced stress appears additive rather than synergistic; both treatments are shown to be significantly less toxic to melanocytes.

  9. The rationale for preventing cancer cachexia: targeting excessive fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Chao-Nan

    2016-07-21

    Cachexia commonly occurs at the terminal stage of cancer and has largely unclear molecular mechanisms. A recent study published in Nature Medicine, entitled "Excessive fatty acid oxidation induces muscle atrophy in cancer cachexia," reveals that cachectic cancer cells can secrete multiple cytokines that induce excessive fatty acid oxidation, which is responsible for muscle loss in cancer cachexia. Inhibition of fatty acid oxidation using etomoxir can increase muscle mass and body weight in cancer cachexia animal models. The usage of stable cachexia animal models is also discussed in this research highlight.

  10. Health Risks of Space Exploration: Targeted and Nontargeted Oxidative Injury by High-Charge and High-Energy Particles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Gonon, Géraldine; Buonanno, Manuela; Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; de Toledo, Sonia M.; Pain, Debkumar

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: During deep space travel, astronauts are often exposed to high atomic number (Z) and high-energy (E) (high charge and high energy [HZE]) particles. On interaction with cells, these particles cause severe oxidative injury and result in unique biological responses. When cell populations are exposed to low fluences of HZE particles, a significant fraction of the cells are not traversed by a primary radiation track, and yet, oxidative stress induced in the targeted cells may spread to nearby bystander cells. The long-term effects are more complex because the oxidative effects persist in progeny of the targeted and affected bystander cells, which promote genomic instability and may increase the risk of age-related cancer and degenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Greater understanding of the spatial and temporal features of reactive oxygen species bursts along the tracks of HZE particles, and the availability of facilities that can simulate exposure to space radiations have supported the characterization of oxidative stress from targeted and nontargeted effects. Critical Issues: The significance of secondary radiations generated from the interaction of the primary HZE particles with biological material and the mitigating effects of antioxidants on various cellular injuries are central to understanding nontargeted effects and alleviating tissue injury. Future Directions: Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the cellular responses to HZE particles, particularly under reduced gravity and situations of exposure to additional radiations, such as protons, should be useful in reducing the uncertainty associated with current models for predicting long-term health risks of space radiation. These studies are also relevant to hadron therapy of cancer. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1501–1523. PMID:24111926

  11. Oxidative stress-induced posttranslational modification of proteins as a target of functional food.

    PubMed

    Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2009-01-01

    In lifestyle-related diseases including metabolic syndrome, atherosclerosis, and cancer, oxidative stress is indicated by several markers, among which are lipid peroxides, aldehydes, and nitrotyrosine. We hypothesized that identification of proteins that are posttranslationally modified due to oxidative stress would lead to a greater understanding of some of the potential molecular mechanisms involved in degeneration and inflammation in these disorders. Proteomics is an emerging method for identification of proteins and their modification residues, and its application to food factor science is just beginning. Especially, we can obtain several monoclonal antibodies to detect specifically oxidized proteins, which can be applied to analysis by immunostaining or immunoblot. In this review, we present the use of these monoclonal antibodies in several diseases, from which new insights have emerged into mechanisms of metabolism and inflammation in these disorders that are associated with oxidative stress.

  12. Analysis of cellular responses of macrophages to zinc ions and zinc oxide nanoparticles: a combined targeted and proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Triboulet, Sarah; Aude-Garcia, Catherine; Armand, Lucie; Gerdil, Adèle; Diemer, Hélène; Proamer, Fabienne; Collin-Faure, Véronique; Habert, Aurélie; Strub, Jean-Marc; Hanau, Daniel; Herlin, Nathalie; Carrière, Marie; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rabilloud, Thierry

    2014-06-01

    Two different zinc oxide nanoparticles, as well as zinc ions, are used to study the cellular responses of the RAW 264 macrophage cell line. A proteomic screen is used to provide a wide view of the molecular effects of zinc, and the most prominent results are cross-validated by targeted studies. Furthermore, the alteration of important macrophage functions (e.g. phagocytosis) by zinc is also investigated. The intracellular dissolution/uptake of zinc is also studied to further characterize zinc toxicity. Zinc oxide nanoparticles dissolve readily in the cells, leading to high intracellular zinc concentrations, mostly as protein-bound zinc. The proteomic screen reveals a rather weak response in the oxidative stress response pathway, but a strong response both in the central metabolism and in the proteasomal protein degradation pathway. Targeted experiments confirm that carbohydrate catabolism and proteasome are critical determinants of sensitivity to zinc, which also induces DNA damage. Conversely, glutathione levels and phagocytosis appear unaffected at moderately toxic zinc concentrations.

  13. Targeted mass spectrometry methods for detecting oxidative post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Tveen-Jensen, Karina; Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M; Pitt, Andrew R

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) can alter the function of proteins, and are important in the redox regulation of cell behaviour. The most informative technique to detect and locate oxPTMs within proteins is mass spectrometry (MS). However, proteomic MS data are usually searched against theoretical databases using statistical search engines, and the occurrence of unspecified or multiple modifications, or other unexpected features, can lead to failure to detect the modifications and erroneous identifications of oxPTMs. We have developed a new approach for mining data from accurate mass instruments that allows multiple modifications to be examined. Accurate mass extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) for specific reporter ions from peptides containing oxPTMs were generated from standard LC-MSMS data acquired on a rapid-scanning high-resolution mass spectrometer (ABSciex 5600 Triple TOF). The method was tested using proteins from human plasma or isolated LDL. A variety of modifications including chlorotyrosine, nitrotyrosine, kynurenine, oxidation of lysine, and oxidized phospholipid adducts were detected. For example, the use of a reporter ion at 184.074Da/e, corresponding to phosphocholine, was used to identify for the first time intact oxidized phosphatidylcholine adducts on LDL. In all cases the modifications were confirmed by manual sequencing. ApoB-100 containing oxidized lipid adducts was detected even in healthy human samples, as well as LDL from patients with chronic kidney disease. The accurate mass XIC method gave a lower false positive rate than normal database searching using statistical search engines, and identified more oxidatively modified peptides. A major advantage was that additional modifications could be searched after data collection, and multiple modifications on a single peptide identified. The oxPTMs present on albumin and ApoB-100 have potential as indicators of oxidative damage in ageing or inflammatory diseases. PMID:26461406

  14. High electrical resistivity carbon/graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogel, F. L.; Forsman, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon/graphite fibers were chemically oxidized in the liquid phase to fibers of graphite oxide. Resistivity increases as high as 10,000 times were obtained, the oxidized fiber decomposed on exposure to atmosphere. A factor of 1,000 remained as a stable increment. The largest change observed was 1,000,000 times. Best results were obtained on the most highly graphitized fibers. Electrochemical oxidation yielded a lower increase--about 10 times, but provided a controllable method of synthesis and insight to the mechanism of reaction. Tensile tests indicated that the strength of the fiber on oxidation was decreased by no more than 25 percent.

  15. Inhibition of nitric oxide is a good therapeutic target for bladder tumors that express iNOS.

    PubMed

    Belgorosky, Denise; Langle, Yanina; Prack Mc Cormick, Bárbara; Colombo, Lucas; Sandes, Eduardo; Eiján, Ana María

    2014-01-30

    Bladder cancer is the second cause of death for urological tumors in man. When the tumor is nonmuscle invasive, transurethral resection is curative. On the other hand, radical cystectomy is the treatment chosen for patients with invasive tumors, but still under treatment, these patients have high risk of dying, by the development of metastatic disease within 5 years. It is therefore important to identify a new therapeutic target to avoid tumor recurrences and tumor progression. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important biological messenger known to influence several types of cancers. In bladder cancer, production of NO and expression and activity of inducible NO synthase was associated to recurrence and progression. The objective of this work was to analyze if inhibition of nitric oxide production could be considered a therapeutic target for bladder tumors expressing iNOS. Using a bladder cancer murine model with different invasiveness grade we have demonstrated that NO inhibition was able to inhibit growth of bladder tumors expressing iNOS. Furthermore, invasive properties of MB49-I orthotopic growth was inhibited using NO inhibitors. This paper also shows that levels of NO in urine can be correlated with tumor size. In conclusion, inhibition of NO could be considered as a therapeutic target that prevents tumor growth and progression. Also, urine NO levels may be useful for measuring tumor growth.

  16. Methodology for use of mitochondria-targeted cations in the field of oxidative stress-related research.

    PubMed

    Vyssokikh, Mikhail Y; Antonenko, Yury N; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    For many pathological conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated in mitochondria are considered to have a role as a trigger. When mitochondrial ROS (mROS) are formed in the inner mitochondrial membrane, they initiate free radical-mediated chain reactions of lipid peroxidation and are thus especially damaging. The consequences of membrane damage are decreased electrical resistance of the membrane, oxidative damage to cardiolipin (a mitochondria specific lipid essential for functioning of respiratory chain proteins and H(+)-ATP synthase), and damage to mitochondrial DNA localized in close vicinity to the inner membrane, with consequent mitochondrial dysfunction and induction of apoptotic cascade and cell death. To target the starting point of such undesirable events, antioxidants conjugated with mitochondria-targeted, membrane-penetrating cations can be used to scavenge ROS inside mitochondria. The most demonstrative indications favoring this conclusion originate from recent discoveries of the in vivo effects of such cations belonging to the MitoQ and SkQ groups. Here we describe some essential methodological aspects of the application of mitochondria-targeted cations promising in treating oxidative stress-related pathologies.

  17. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using ``off-on'' graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the ``off-on'' photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer.We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon

  18. Application of poly(dimethylsiloxane) fiber sol-gel coated onto NiTi alloy electrodeposited with zirconium oxide for the determination of organochlorine pesticides in herbal infusions.

    PubMed

    Budziak, Dilma; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2008-08-01

    A PDMS fiber sol-gel coated onto an NiTi alloy previously electrodeposited with zirconium oxide (named NiTi-ZrO(2)-PDMS) was applied to the determination of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in infusions of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.), lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus Stapf), chamomile (Matricaria recutita L.), lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L.), and anise seeds (Pimpinella anisum L.). Salting-out effect, extraction time, and extraction temperature were optimized firstly by means of a full-factorial design and then using a Doehlert matrix. No salt addition and 50 min of extraction at 70 degrees C were the optimum conditions. Satisfactory LODs in the range of 2-17 ng/L, as well as good correlation coefficients (at least 0.9981) in the linear range studied, were obtained. Calibration was successfully applied using an infusion of M. recutita L. and recovery tests were performed to ensure the accuracy of the method, with values in the range of 77-120%. Comparison of the NiTi-ZrO(2)-PDMS with commercially available PDMS fibers showed that the proposed fiber has an extraction efficiency comparable to that of PDMS 30 microm for the compounds evaluated, demonstrating its potential applicability. PMID:18666186

  19. The Oxidation Kinetics of Continuous Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite. Degree awarded by Case Western Reserve Univ., May 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.

    2001-01-01

    Experimental observations and results suggest two primary regimes as a function of temperature, i.e., diffusion and reaction controlled kinetics. Thermogravimetric analysis of carbon fiber in flowing oxygen gave an activation energy of 64.1 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 500 to 600 C and an apparent activation energy of 7.6 kJ/mol for temperatures from 600 to 1400 C. When C/SiC composite material was unstressed, matrix effects at temperatures from 900 to 1400 C protected the internal fibers. When under stress, self-protection was not observed. Increasing the stress from 10 to 25 ksi caused a 67 to 82 percent reduction in times to failure at temperatures from 750 to 1500 C. Based on experimental results, observation, and theory, a finite difference model was developed, which simulates the diffusion of oxygen into a matrix crack that is bridged by carbon fibers. The model allows the influence of important variables on oxidation kinetics to be studied systematically, i.e., temperature, reaction rate constant, diffusion coefficient, environment, and sample geometry.

  20. Crystal structures of human Ero1α reveal the mechanisms of regulated and targeted oxidation of PDI

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Kenji; Masui, Shoji; Iida, Hiroka; Vavassori, Stefano; Sitia, Roberto; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2010-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of eukaryotic cells, Ero1 flavoenzymes promote oxidative protein folding through protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), generating reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) as byproducts. Therefore, Ero1 activity must be strictly regulated to avoid futile oxidation cycles in the ER. Although regulatory mechanisms restraining Ero1α activity ensure that not all PDIs are oxidized, its specificity towards PDI could allow other resident oxidoreductases to remain reduced and competent to carry out isomerization and reduction of protein substrates. In this study, crystal structures of human Ero1α were solved in its hyperactive and inactive forms. Our findings reveal that human Ero1α modulates its oxidative activity by properly positioning regulatory cysteines within an intrinsically flexible loop, and by fine-tuning the electron shuttle ability of the loop through disulphide rearrangements. Specific PDI targeting is guaranteed by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of Ero1α with the PDI b′-domain through its substrate-binding pocket. These results reveal the molecular basis of the regulation and specificity of protein disulphide formation in human cells. PMID:20834232

  1. The Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Regulates Nitric Oxide-Mediated Apoptosis of Neurons Induced by Target Deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lee J.; Adams, Neal A.; Pan, Yan; Price, Ann; Wong, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Ablation of mouse occipital cortex induces precisely timed and uniform p53-modulated and Bax-dependent apoptosis of thalamocortical projection neurons in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) by 7 days postlesion. We tested the hypothesis that this neuronal apoptosis is initiated by oxidative stress and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Pre-apoptotic LGN neurons accumulate mitochondria, Zn2+ and Ca2+, and generate higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite, than LGN neurons with an intact cortical target. Pre-apoptosis of LGN neurons is associated with increased formation of protein carbonyls, protein nitration, and protein S-nitrosylation. Genetic deletion of nitric oxide synthase 1 (nos1) and inhibition of NOS1 with nitroindazole protected LGN neurons from apoptosis, revealing NO as a mediator. Putative components of the mPTP are expressed in mouse LGN, including the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), and cyclophilin D (CyPD). Nitration of CyPD and ANT in LGN mitochondria occurs by 2 days after cortical injury. Chemical cross-linking showed that LGN neuron pre-apoptosis is associated with formation of CyPD and VDAC oligomers, consistent with mPTP formation. Mice without CyPD are rescued from neuron apoptosis as are mice treated with the mPTP inhibitors TRO-19622 and TAT-Bcl-XL-BH4. Manipulation of the mPTP markedly attenuated the early pre-apoptotic production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in target-deprived neurons. Our results demonstrate in adult mouse brain neurons that the mPTP functions to enhance ROS production and the mPTP and NO trigger apoptosis; thus, the mPTP is a target for neuroprotection in vivo. PMID:21209222

  2. VEGF-loaded graphene oxide as theranostics for multi-modality imaging-monitored targeting therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhongchan; Huang, Peng; Tong, Guang; Lin, Jing; Jin, Albert; Rong, Pengfei; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Liming; Niu, Gang; Cao, Feng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2013-07-01

    Herein we report the design and synthesis of multifunctional VEGF-loaded IR800-conjugated graphene oxide (GO-IR800-VEGF) for multi-modality imaging-monitored therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. The as-prepared GO-IR800-VEGF positively targets VEGF receptors, maintains an elevated level of VEGF in ischemic tissues for a prolonged time, and finally leads to remarkable therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. Although more efforts are required to further understand the in vivo behaviors and the long-term toxicology of GO, our work demonstrates the success of using GO for efficient VEGF delivery in vivo by intravenous administration and suggests the great promise of using graphene oxide in theranostic applications for treating ischemic disease.Herein we report the design and synthesis of multifunctional VEGF-loaded IR800-conjugated graphene oxide (GO-IR800-VEGF) for multi-modality imaging-monitored therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. The as-prepared GO-IR800-VEGF positively targets VEGF receptors, maintains an elevated level of VEGF in ischemic tissues for a prolonged time, and finally leads to remarkable therapeutic angiogenesis of ischemic muscle. Although more efforts are required to further understand the in vivo behaviors and the long-term toxicology of GO, our work demonstrates the success of using GO for efficient VEGF delivery in vivo by intravenous administration and suggests the great promise of using graphene oxide in theranostic applications for treating ischemic disease. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr01573d

  3. Oxadiazole 2-oxides are toxic to the human hookworm, Ancylostoma ceylanicum, however glutathione reductase is not the primary target

    PubMed Central

    Treger, Rebecca S.; Cook, Aaron; Rai, Ganesha; Maloney, David J.; Simeonov, Anton; Jadhav, Ajit; Thomas, Craig J.; Williams, David L.; Cappello, Michael; Vermeire, Jon J.

    2012-01-01

    Hookworm disease, characterized by severe anemia and cognitive and growth delays, currently affects an estimated 740 million people worldwide. Despite the prevalence of this parasitic disease, few effective drug therapies are in use today, and the heavy reliance upon benzimidazoles highlights the need for the development of novel chemotherapies. Recent work with the trematode parasite Schistosoma mansoni has identified oxadiazole 2-oxides as effective antischistosomal compounds that function by targeting and inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme, thioredoxin glutathione reductase. In this study, a related enzyme, glutathione reductase, from the human hookworm Ancylostoma ceylanicum was identified and characterized, and its in vitro activity in the presence of the oxadiazole 2-oxides was analyzed. Ex vivo worm killing assays were also conducted to establish the relationship between a given compound’s effect upon worm survival and inhibition of recombinant glutathione reductase (rAceGR). Finally, the in vivo anthelminthic efficacy of furoxan (Fx) was assessed in the hamster model of hookworm infection. The predicted amino acid sequence of AceGR contained a prototypical glutathione reductase active site sequence, but no thioredoxin reductase consensus sequences, suggesting that the glutathione and thioredoxin pathways of A. ceylanicum are distinct. Although 10 of the 42 oxadiazole 2-oxides tested inhibited rAceGR activity by at least 50%, and 15 compounds were toxic to parasites ex vivo, little overlap existed between these two results. We therefore suggest that AceGR is not the primary target of the oxadiazole 2-oxides in effecting parasite death. Lastly, oral treatment of A. ceylanicum infected hamsters with furoxan resulted in significantly improved weight gains and reduced intestinal worm burdens compared to vehicle treated controls, supporting continued development of this molecule as a novel anthelminthic. PMID:22844653

  4. Highly efficient colorimetric detection of target cancer cells utilizing superior catalytic activity of graphene oxide-magnetic-platinum nanohybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Moon Il; Kim, Min Su; Woo, Min-Ah; Ye, Youngjin; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have most widely been applied in immunoassays for several decades. However, several unavoidable limitations (e.g., instability caused by structural unfolding) of natural enzymes have hindered their widespread applications. Here, we describe a new nanohybrid consisting of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs), simultaneously immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide (GO). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically active Pt NPs and MNPs on GO whose frameworks possess high substrate affinity, the nanohybrid is able to achieve up to a 30-fold higher maximal reaction velocity (Vmax) compared to that of free GO for the colorimetric reaction of the peroxidase substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and enable rapid detection of target cancer cells. Specifically, using this new assay system, clinically important breast cancer cells are detected in a 5 min time period at room temperature with high specificity and sensitivity. The remarkably high capability to catalyze oxidation reactions could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based immunoassay systems as part of new, rapid, robust and convenient assay systems which can be widely utilized for the identification of important target molecules.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have most widely been applied in immunoassays for several decades. However, several unavoidable limitations (e.g., instability caused by structural unfolding) of natural enzymes have hindered their widespread applications. Here, we describe a new nanohybrid consisting of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs), simultaneously immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide (GO). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically active Pt NPs and MNPs on GO whose frameworks possess high substrate affinity, the nanohybrid is able to achieve up to a 30-fold higher maximal reaction velocity (Vmax

  5. Correlation of the structure and the luminescence properties of Eu 3+-doped Gd 2O 3 oxide between fiber single crystal and the nano-size powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, C.; Lebbou, K.; Flores-Gonzalez, M. A.; Bazzi, R.; Hautefeuille, B.; Mercier, B.; Roux, S.; Perriat, P.; Olagnon, C.; Tillement, O.

    2004-05-01

    Gd 2- xEu xO 3 powder materials doped with Eu 3+ using different concentration from x=0 to 2 were prepared by a new sol-lyophilization synthesis and fiber single crystal (Gd 2O 3-Gd 2O 3/Eu 3+) oxides were grown using laser-heated pedestal growth (LHPG) technique. X-ray powder diffraction performed at room temperature showed that the materials obtained by lyophilization technique are cubic, lies in the nanometer range and different from bulk materials. The materials are a continued solid solution and the lattice parameter a-axis increases with Eu 3+ concentration. The fibers grown by LHPG technique were single crystal, transparent, red in color when Eu 3+ concentration is high, and the structure is monoclinic for Eu 3+<15%. The luminescence of Eu 3+ from C 2 crystallographic site was been detected. In the case of nano-particles oxide, an additional peak in emission spectral is obtained at λ=610 nm. The influence of Eu 3+, particles sizes and the structure on the luminescence spectral of Eu 3+ ions was been described.

  6. Divergent targets of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation result in additive effects of metformin and starvation in colon and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Marini, Cecilia; Bianchi, Giovanna; Buschiazzo, Ambra; Ravera, Silvia; Martella, Roberto; Bottoni, Gianluca; Petretto, Andrea; Emionite, Laura; Monteverde, Elena; Capitanio, Selene; Inglese, Elvira; Fabbi, Marina; Bongioanni, Francesca; Garaboldi, Lucia; Bruzzi, Paolo; Orengo, Anna Maria; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Sambuceti, Gianmario

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence demonstrates that targeting energy metabolism is a promising strategy to fight cancer. Here we show that combining metformin and short-term starvation markedly impairs metabolism and growth of colon and breast cancer. The impairment in glycolytic flux caused by starvation is enhanced by metformin through its interference with hexokinase II activity, as documented by measurement of 18F-fluorodeoxyglycose uptake. Oxidative phosphorylation is additively compromised by combined treatment: metformin virtually abolishes Complex I function; starvation determines an uncoupled status of OXPHOS and amplifies the activity of respiratory Complexes II and IV thus combining a massive ATP depletion with a significant increase in reactive oxygen species. More importantly, the combined treatment profoundly impairs cancer glucose metabolism and virtually abolishes lesion growth in experimental models of breast and colon carcinoma. Our results strongly suggest that energy metabolism is a promising target to reduce cancer progression. PMID:26794854

  7. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  8. Selective transduction of mature DC in human skin and lymph nodes by CD80/CD86-targeted fiber-modified Adenovirus-5/3

    PubMed Central

    van de Ven, Rieneke; Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; van den Tol, M. Petrousjka; Rosalia, Rodney A.; Murakami, Miho; Everts, Maaike; Scheffer, George L.; Scheper, Rik J.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; Curiel, David T.

    2009-01-01

    In vivo targeting of dendritic cells (DC) represents an attractive alternative to currently applied ex vivo DC-based genetic tumor vaccination protocols. Finding the optimal vector for in vivo targeting of DC is important for such strategies. We therefore tested a panel of subgroup C/B chimeric and fiber-modified adenoviruses (Ad) for their relative capacity to transduce human DC. We made use of in vitro generated Langerhans Cells (LC) as well as of ex vivo human skin and melanoma-draining lymph node (LN) derived DC. Of the tested viruses the C/B-chimeric Ad5/3 virus most efficiently transduced in vitro generated LC. In addition, Ad5/3 preferentially targeted mature myeloid DC from human skin and draining LN and transduced them at significantly higher frequencies than Ad5. In addition, Ad5/3 was more specific for mature human skin-derived CD1a+ CD83+ DC than the previously reported DC-transducing C/B-chimeric vector Ad5/35, infecting less bystander cells. It was previously reported that Ad5/3 transduced human monocyte-derived DC by binding to the B7 molecules CD80 and CD86. High-efficiency transduction of mature skin-derived DC was similarly shown to be mediated through binding to CD80/CD86 and not to interfere with subsequent T cell priming. We conclude that Ad5/3, in combination with DC-activating adjuvants, represents a promising therapeutic tool for the in vivo transduction of mature DC, and may be less likely to induce unwanted side effects such as immune tolerance through the infection of non-professional antigen-presenting cells. PMID:19816192

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase-vascular endothelial growth factor axis: a potential target to inhibit tumor angiogenesis by dietary agents.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2007-08-01

    Human solid tumors remain latent in the absence of angiogenesis since it is a critical process for their further growth and progression. Experimental evidence suggests that targeting tumor angiogenesis may be a novel strategy to check tumor growth and metastases. Recent studies suggest that several bioactive food components can suppress tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. This suppression occurs because of a direct effect on the tumor, as well as a direct effect on vascular endothelial cells. These food components can target epigenetic processes and thereby suppress the pro-angiogenic tumor microenvironment. One likely epigenetic target is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). iNOS is known to regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and thereby tumor angiogenesis. The ability of food components to influence the inducible form of cyclooxygenase, COX-2 may also contribute to their impact on tumor growth and angiogenesis. This review focuses on recent developments related to the angiogenic role of the iNOS-VEGF axis and how dietary components may target this axis. Overall, studies suggest that the anti-angiogenic potential of physiologically concentrations of relevant food components could be used as a practical approach for cancer prevention and intervention. PMID:17691907

  10. Modulation of Methuselah Expression Targeted to Drosophila Insulin-producing Cells Extends Life and Enhances Oxidative Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gimenez, Luis E. D.; Ghildyal, Parakashtha; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Hu, Hongxiang; Ja, William W.; Eaton, Benjamin A.; Wu, Yimin; Austad, Steven N.; Ranjan, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitously reduced signaling via Methuselah (MTH), a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) required for neurosecretion, has previously been reported to extend life and enhance stress resistance in flies. Whether these effects are due to reduced MTH signaling only in specific tissue(s) and through with signaling effects reduced MTH might produce these phenotypes remains unknown. We determined that reduced expression of mth targeted only to the insulin-producing cells (IPCs) of the fly brain was sufficient to extend life and enhance oxidative stress resistance. Paradoxically, we discovered that overexpression of mth targeted to the same cells has similar phenotypic effects to reduced expression due to MTH’s interaction with β-arrestin, which uncouples GPCRs from their G-proteins. We confirmed the functional relationship between MTH and β-arrestin by finding that IPC-targeted overexpression of β-arrestin alone mimics the longevity phenotype of reduced MTH signaling. As reduced MTH signaling also inhibits insulin secretion from the IPCs, the most parsimonious mechanistic explanation for its longevity and stress resistance enhancement might be through reduced insulin/IGF signaling (IIS). However, examination of phenotypic features of long-lived IPC-mth modulated flies as well as several downstream IIS targets implicates enhanced activity of the JNK stress resistance pathway more directly than insulin signaling in the longevity and stress resistance phenotypes. PMID:23121290

  11. Protein S-thiolation targets glycolysis and protein synthesis in response to oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Shenton, Daniel; Grant, Chris M

    2003-01-01

    The irreversible oxidation of cysteine residues can be prevented by protein S-thiolation, a process by which protein SH groups form mixed disulphides with low-molecular-mass thiols such as glutathione. We report here the target proteins which are modified in yeast cells in response to H(2)O(2). In particular, a range of glycolytic and related enzymes (Tdh3, Eno2, Adh1, Tpi1, Ald6 and Fba1), as well as translation factors (Tef2, Tef5, Nip1 and Rps5) are identified. The oxidative stress conditions used to induce S-thiolation are shown to inhibit GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), enolase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, whereas they have no effect on aldolase, triose phosphate isomerase or aldehyde dehydrogenase activities. The inhibition of GAPDH, enolase and alcohol dehydrogenase is readily reversible once the oxidant is removed. In addition, we show that peroxide stress has little or no effect on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, the enzymes that catalyse NADPH production via the pentose phosphate pathway. Thus the inhibition of glycolytic flux is proposed to result in glucose equivalents entering the pentose phosphate pathway for the generation of NADPH. Radiolabelling is used to confirm that peroxide stress results in a rapid and reversible inhibition of protein synthesis. Furthermore, we show that glycolytic enzyme activities and protein synthesis are irreversibly inhibited in a mutant that lacks glutathione, and hence cannot modify proteins by S-thiolation. In summary, protein S-thiolation appears to serve an adaptive function during exposure to an oxidative stress by reprogramming metabolism and protecting protein synthesis against irreversible oxidation. PMID:12755685

  12. Protective efficacy of mitochondrial targeted antioxidant MitoQ against dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and cell death in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Gudup, Satish; Sunkaria, Aditya; Bal, Amanjit; Singh, Parvinder Pal; Kandimalla, Ramesh J L; Sharma, Deep Raj; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-12-01

    Dichlorvos is a synthetic insecticide that belongs to the family of chemically related organophosphate (OP) pesticides. It can be released into the environment as a major degradation product of other OPs, such as trichlorfon, naled, and metrifonate. Dichlorvos exerts its toxic effects in humans and animals by inhibiting neural acetylcholinesterase. Chronic low-level exposure to dichlorvos has been shown to result in inhibition of the mitochondrial complex I and cytochrome oxidase in rat brain, resulting in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Enhanced ROS production leads to disruption of cellular antioxidant defense systems and release of cytochrome c (cyt c) from mitochondria to cytosol resulting in apoptotic cell death. MitoQ is an antioxidant, selectively targeted to mitochondria and protects it from oxidative damage and has been shown to decrease mitochondrial damage in various animal models of oxidative stress. We hypothesized that if oxidative damage to mitochondria does play a significant role in dichlorvos induced neurodegeneration, then MitoQ should ameliorate neuronal apoptosis. Administration of MitoQ (100 μmol/kg body wt/day) reduced dichlorvos (6 mg/kg body wt/day) induced oxidative stress (decreased ROS production, increased MnSOD activity and glutathione levels) with decreased lipid peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation. In addition, MitoQ also suppressed DNA fragmentation, cyt c release and caspase-3 activity in dichlorvos treated rats compared to the control group. Further electron microscopic studies revealed that MitoQ attenuates dichlorvos induced mitochondrial swelling, loss of cristae and chromatin condensation. These results indicate that MitoQ may be beneficial against OP (dichlorvos) induced neurodegeneration. PMID:21784090

  13. Molecular composition of iron oxide nanoparticles, precursors for magnetic drug targeting, as characterized by confocal Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chourpa, Igor; Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Ngaboni-Okassa, Lazare; Fouquenet, Jean-François; Cohen-Jonathan, Simone; Soucé, Martin; Marchais, Hervé; Dubois, Pierre

    2005-10-01

    The chemical and structural properties of ferrite-based nanoparticles, precursors for magnetic drug targeting, have been studied by Raman confocal multispectral imaging. The nanoparticles were synthesised as aqueous magnetic fluids by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts. Dehydrated particles corresponding to co-precipitation (CP) and oxidation (OX) steps of the magnetic fluid preparation have been compared in order to establish oxidation-related Raman features. These are discussed in correlation with the spectra of bulk iron oxides (magnetite, maghemite and hematite) recorded under the same experimental conditions. Considering a risk of laser-induced conversion of magnetite into hematite, this reaction was studied as a function of laser power and exposure to oxygen. Under hematite-free conditions, the Raman data indicated that nanoparticles consisted of magnetite and maghemite, and no oxyhydroxide species were detected. The relative maghemite/magnetite spectral contributions were quantified via fitting of their characteristic bands with Lorentzian profiles. Another quality parameter, contamination of the samples with carbon-related species, was assessed via a broad Raman band at 1580 cm(-1). The optimised Raman parameters permitted assessment of the homogeneity and stability of the solid phase of prepared magnetic fluids using chemical imaging by Raman multispectral mapping. These data were statistically averaged over each image and over six independently prepared lots of each of the CP and OX nanoparticles. The reproducibility of oxidation rates of the particles was satisfactory: the maghemite spectral fraction varied from 27.8 +/- 3.6% for the CP to 43.5 +/- 5.6% for the OX samples. These values were used to speculate about the layered structure of isolated particles. Our data were in agreement with a model with maghemite core and magnetite nucleus. The overall oxidation state of the particles remained nearly unchanged for at least one month.

  14. The impact of oxidative stress in thiamine deficiency: a multifactorial targeting issue.

    PubMed

    Hazell, Alan S; Faim, Samantha; Wertheimer, Guilherme; Silva, Vinicius R; Marques, Cleiton S

    2013-04-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency, the underlying cause of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, is associated with the development of focal neuronal loss in vulnerable areas of the brain. Although the actual mechanism(s) that lead to the selective histological lesions characteristic of this disorder remain unresolved, oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in its pathophysiology. In this review, the multifactorial influence of oxidative stress on a variety of processes known to take part in the development of structural lesions in TD including excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier integrity, mitochondrial integrity, apoptosis, nucleic acid function, and neural stem cells will be discussed, and therapeutic strategies undertaken for treating neurodegeneration examined which may have an impact on the future treatment of this important vitamin deficiency.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptors as targets of neuromodulatory influence of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Ryzhova, I V; Nozdrachev, A D; Tobias, T V; Orlov, I V; Chikhman, V N; Solnushkin, S D

    2016-07-01

    A possible effect of nitric oxide (NO) on metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) function in the amino acid afferent synapse was investigated in the isolated labyrinth of the frog Rana temporaria. The modification of the amplitude of responses of metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist trans-ACPD was analyzed during bath applied NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine SNAP (0.1-100 μM) or nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME. It was shown that NO donor SNAP (1 μM) inhibited mGluR induced responses, and the inhibitor of NO-synthase L-NAME (100 μM) increased the amplitude of trans-ACPD evoked answers. The results suggest that NO can depress mGluR function due to modulation of functions of the endoplasmic reticulum channels. PMID:27595818

  16. Fabrication of self-supported oxide targets by cationic adsorption in cellulosic membranes and thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Quinby, T.C.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques for producing relatively durable oxide films of various elements will be described. Areal densities of films produced to date have ranged from 150 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/ to 2.5 mg/cm/sup 2/, and are virtually transparent. Films produced by this technique were weighed directly and mounted on frames. General parameters for use of this technique will be described.

  17. Cerebral Small Vessel Disease: Targeting Oxidative Stress as a Novel Therapeutic Strategy?

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T. Michael; Miller, Alyson A.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is a major contributor to stroke, and a leading cause of cognitive impairment and dementia. Despite the devastating effects of cerebral SVD, the pathogenesis of cerebral SVD is still not completely understood. Moreover, there are no specific pharmacological strategies for its prevention or treatment. Cerebral SVD is characterized by marked functional and structural abnormalities of the cerebral microcirculation. The clinical manifestations of these pathological changes include lacunar infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and cerebral microbleeds. The main purpose of this review is to discuss evidence implicating oxidative stress in the arteriopathy of both non-amyloid and amyloid (cerebral amyloid angiopathy) forms of cerebral SVD and its most important risk factors (hypertension and aging), as well as its contribution to cerebral SVD-related brain injury and cognitive impairment. We also highlight current evidence of the involvement of the NADPH oxidases in the development of oxidative stress, enzymes that are a major source of reactive oxygen species in the cerebral vasculature. Lastly, we discuss potential pharmacological strategies for oxidative stress in cerebral SVD, including some of the historical and emerging NADPH oxidase inhibitors. PMID:27014073

  18. Oxidative Stress Is a Central Target for Physical Exercise Neuroprotection Against Pathological Brain Aging.

    PubMed

    García-Mesa, Yoelvis; Colie, Sandra; Corpas, Rubén; Cristòfol, Rosa; Comellas, Francesc; Nebreda, Angel R; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Sanfeliu, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is suggested for preventing or delaying senescence and Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have examined its therapeutic value in the advanced stage of AD-like pathology in 3xTg-AD female mice through voluntary wheel running from 12 to 15 months of age. Mice submitted to exercise showed improved body fitness, immunorejuvenation, improvement of behavior and cognition, and reduced amyloid and tau pathology. Brain tissue analysis of aged 3xTg-AD mice showed high levels of oxidative damage. However, this damage was decreased by physical exercise through regulation of redox homeostasis. Network analyses showed that oxidative stress was a central event, which correlated with AD-like pathology and the AD-related behaviors of anxiety, apathy, and cognitive loss. This study corroborates the importance of redox mechanisms in the neuroprotective effect of physical exercise, and supports the theory of the crucial role of oxidative stress in the switch from normal brain aging to pathological aging and AD.

  19. Chronic bladder ischemia and oxidative stress: new pharmacotherapeutic targets for lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nomiya, Masanori; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Yamaguchi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bladder ischemia is potentially a common cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in the elderly. Epidemiological studies have shown a close association between lower urinary tract symptoms and vascular risk factors for atherosclerosis, and investigations using transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography have shown a negative correlation between decreased lower urinary tract perfusion and International Prostate Symptom Score in elderly patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bladder blood flow is also known to decrease in men with bladder outlet obstruction as a result of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Studies in animal models suggest that chronic bladder ischemia and repeated ischemia/reperfusion during a micturition cycle might produce oxidative stress, leading to denervation of the bladder and the expression of tissue-damaging molecules in the bladder wall, which could be responsible for the development of bladder hyperactivity progressing to bladder underactivity. The effects of drugs with different mechanisms of action; for example, α1-adrenoceptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors, free radical scavengers and β3-adrenoceptor agonist, have been studied in animal models of chronic bladder ischemia. The drugs, representing different treatment principles for increasing blood flow and decreasing oxidative stress, showed protective effects not only on urodynamic parameters, but also on negative effects on muscle contractility and on detrimental structural bladder wall changes. Improvement of lower urinary tract perfusion and control of oxidative stress can be considered new therapeutic strategies for treatment of bladder dysfunction induced by chronic ischemia.

  20. Protein Phosphatase 2A Holoenzyme Is Targeted to Peroxisomes by Piggybacking and Positively Affects Peroxisomal β-Oxidation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kataya, Amr R.A.; Heidari, Behzad; Hagen, Lars; Kommedal, Roald; Slupphaug, Geir; Lillo, Cathrine

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic, highly conserved serine (Ser)/threonine-specific protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) functions as a heterotrimeric complex composed of a catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunit. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), five, three, and 17 genes encode different C, A, and B subunits, respectively. We previously found that a B subunit, B′θ, localized to peroxisomes due to its C-terminal targeting signal Ser-Ser-leucine. This work shows that PP2A C2, C5, andA2 subunits interact and colocalize with B′θ in peroxisomes. C and A subunits lack peroxisomal targeting signals, and their peroxisomal import depends on B′θ and appears to occur by piggybacking transport. B′θ knockout mutants were impaired in peroxisomal β-oxidation as shown by developmental arrest of seedlings germinated without sucrose, accumulation of eicosenoic acid, and resistance to protoauxins indole-butyric acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxybutyric acid. All of these observations strongly substantiate that a full PP2A complex is present in peroxisomes and positively affects β-oxidation of fatty acids and protoauxins. PMID:25489022

  1. Interaction of periodate-oxidized target cells and cytolytic T lymphocytes: a model system of "polyclonal MHC recognition".

    PubMed

    Keren, Z; Berke, G

    1986-09-01

    In oxidation-dependent cytotoxicity (ODCC), cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) non-specifically recognize, bind to and lyse oxidized target cells (O-TC) but the precise mechanism whereby CTL react with O-TC is far from clear (Berke, G., Immunol. Rev. 1983. 72:5). Here we present evidence that CTL/O-TC interactions are blocked by aldehyde-reactive reagents such as hydroxylamine, adipic acid dihydrazide and thiocarbohydrazide and that preformed CTL/O-TC conjugates dissociate upon reduction with NaBH4, suggesting that active aldehyde groups of O-TC rather than intercellular Schiff bases are involved in the recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL in ODCC. The aldehydes are bound to trypsin-sensitive, non-H-2 glycoproteins that appear to be different and unique in the three different target cell lines so far examined (EL4, L1210, R1.1). In view of these and previous findings we would like to suggest that in ODCC, active aldehydes react with adjacent major histocompatibility complex and perhaps other cell-surface molecules to create a multitude of modified conformations, responsible for the "polyclonal" (nonspecific) MHC recognition and lysis of O-TC by CTL, as well as for an altered pattern of H-2 antibody binding to O-TC. PMID:3019706

  2. Highly efficient colorimetric detection of target cancer cells utilizing superior catalytic activity of graphene oxide-magnetic-platinum nanohybrids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Il; Kim, Min Su; Woo, Min-Ah; Ye, Youngjin; Kang, Kyoung Suk; Lee, Jinwoo; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have most widely been applied in immunoassays for several decades. However, several unavoidable limitations (e.g., instability caused by structural unfolding) of natural enzymes have hindered their widespread applications. Here, we describe a new nanohybrid consisting of Fe₃O₄ magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs), simultaneously immobilized on the surface of graphene oxide (GO). By synergistically integrating highly catalytically active Pt NPs and MNPs on GO whose frameworks possess high substrate affinity, the nanohybrid is able to achieve up to a 30-fold higher maximal reaction velocity (V(max)) compared to that of free GO for the colorimetric reaction of the peroxidase substrate, 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), and enable rapid detection of target cancer cells. Specifically, using this new assay system, clinically important breast cancer cells are detected in a 5 min time period at room temperature with high specificity and sensitivity. The remarkably high capability to catalyze oxidation reactions could allow the nanohybrid to replace conventional peroxidase-based immunoassay systems as part of new, rapid, robust and convenient assay systems which can be widely utilized for the identification of important target molecules.

  3. Facing-target mid-frequency magnetron reactive sputtered hafnium oxide film: Morphology and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Xu, Jun; Wang, You-Nian; Choi, Chi Kyu; Zhou, Da-Yu

    2016-03-01

    Amorphous hafnium dioxide (HfO2) film was prepared on Si (100) by facing-target mid-frequency reactive magnetron sputtering under different oxygen/argon gas ratio at room temperature with high purity Hf target. 3D surface profiler results showed that the deposition rates of HfO2 thin film under different O2/Ar gas ratio remain unchanged, indicating that the facing target midfrequency magnetron sputtering system provides effective approach to eliminate target poisoning phenomenon which is generally occurred in reactive sputtering procedure. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated that the gradual reduction of oxygen vacancy concentration and the densification of deposited film structure with the increase of oxygen/argon (O2/Ar) gas flow ratio. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis suggested that the surface of the as-deposited HfO2 thin film tends to be smoother, the root-meansquare roughness (RMS) reduced from 0.876 nm to 0.333 nm while O2/Ar gas flow ratio increased from 1/4 to 1/1. Current-Voltage measurements of MOS capacitor based on Au/HfO2/Si structure indicated that the leakage current density of HfO2 thin films decreased by increasing of oxygen partial pressure, which resulted in the variations of pore size and oxygen vacancy concentration in deposited thin films. Based on the above characterization results the leakage current mechanism for all samples was discussed systematically.

  4. Förster resonance energy transfer-based sensor targeting endoplasmic reticulum reveals highly oxidative environment

    PubMed Central

    Kolossov, Vladimir L; Leslie, Matthew T; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Sheehan, Bridget M; Kenis, Paul J A; Gaskins, H Rex

    2012-01-01

    The glutathione thiol/disulfide couple is the major redox buffer in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); however, mechanisms by which it contributes to the tightly regulated redox environment of this intracellular organelle are poorly understood. The recent development of genetically encoded, ratiometric, single green fluorescent protein-based redox-sensitive (roGFP) sensors adjusted for more oxidative environments enables non-invasive measurement of the ER redox environment in living cells. In turn, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) sensors based on two fluorophore probes represent an alternative strategy for ratiometric signal acquisition. In previous work, we described the FRET-based redox sensor CY-RL7 with a relatively high midpoint redox potential of −143 mV, which is required for monitoring glutathione potentials in the comparatively high oxidative environment of the ER. Here, the efficacy of the CY-RL7 probe was ascertained in the cytosol and ER of live cells with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The sensor was found to be fully reduced at steady state in the cytosol and became fully oxidized in response to treatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, a depletor of reduced glutathione (GSH). In contrast, the probe was strongly oxidized (88%) upon expression in the ER of cultured cells. We also examined the responsiveness of the ER sensor to perturbations in cellular glutathione homeostasis. We observed that the reductive level of the FRET sensor was increased two-fold to about 28% in cells pretreated with N-acetylcysteine, a substrate for GSH synthesis. Finally, we evaluated the responsiveness of CY-RL7 and roGFP1-iL to various perturbations of cellular glutathione homeostasis to address the divergence in the specificity of these two probes. Together, the present data generated with genetically encoded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based glutathione probes highlight the complexity of the ER redox environment and indicate that the ER

  5. Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mayara Klimuk; Toma, Sergio Hiroshi; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Cervantes Rodríguez, Hernán Joel; Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Luz, Maciel Santos; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Toma, Henrique Eisi; Poliselli Farsky, Sandra Helena; Araki, Koiti

    2015-01-01

    Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM(-1)s(-1) in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics.

  6. Imaging of oxidation-specific epitopes with targeted nanoparticles to detect high-risk atherosclerotic lesions: progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Briley-Saebo, Karen; Yeang, Calvin; Witztum, Joseph L; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2014-11-01

    Oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE) within developing atherosclerotic lesions are key antigens that drive innate and adaptive immune responses in atherosclerosis, leading to chronic inflammation. Oxidized phospholipids and malondialdehyde-lysine epitopes are well-characterized OSE present in human atherosclerotic lesions, particularly in pathologically defined vulnerable plaques. Using murine and human OSE-specific antibodies as targeting agents, we have developed radionuclide and magnetic resonance based nanoparticles, containing gadolinium, manganese or lipid-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide, to non-invasively image OSE within experimental atherosclerotic lesions. These methods quantitate plaque burden, allow detection of lesion progression and regression, plaque stabilization, and accumulation of OSE within macrophage-rich areas of the artery wall, suggesting they detect the most active lesions. Future studies will focus on using "natural" antibodies, lipopeptides, and mimotopes for imaging applications. These approaches should enhance the clinical translation of this technique to image, monitor, evaluate efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, and guide optimal therapy of high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:25297940

  7. Ultrasmall cationic superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as nontoxic and efficient MRI contrast agent and magnetic-targeting tool

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Mayara Klimuk; Toma, Sergio Hiroshi; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes; Shimada, Ana Lucia Borges; Loiola, Rodrigo Azevedo; Cervantes Rodríguez, Hernán Joel; Oliveira, Pedro Vitoriano; Luz, Maciel Santos; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Toma, Henrique Eisi; Poliselli Farsky, Sandra Helena; Araki, Koiti

    2015-01-01

    Fully dispersible, cationic ultrasmall (7 nm diameter) superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, exhibiting high relaxivity (178 mM−1s−1 in 0.47 T) and no acute or subchronic toxicity in Wistar rats, were studied and their suitability as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and material for development of new diagnostic and treatment tools demonstrated. After intravenous injection (10 mg/kg body weight), they circulated throughout the vascular system causing no microhemorrhage or thrombus, neither inflammatory processes at the mesentery vascular bed and hepatic sinusoids (leukocyte rolling, adhesion, or migration as evaluated by intravital microscopy), but having been spontaneously concentrated in the liver, spleen, and kidneys, they caused strong negative contrast. The nanoparticles are cleared from kidneys and bladder in few days, whereas the complete elimination from liver and spleen occurred only after 4 weeks. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles caused no effects on hepatic and renal enzymes dosage as well as on leukocyte count. In addition, they were readily concentrated in rat thigh by a magnet showing its potential as magnetically targeted carriers of therapeutic and diagnostic agents. Summarizing, cationic ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are nontoxic and efficient magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents useful as platform for the development of new materials for application in theranostics. PMID:26251595

  8. Shotgun redox proteomics in sub-proteomes trapped on functionalised beads: Identification of proteins targeted by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wentao; Tedesco, Sara; McDonagh, Brian; Sheehan, David

    2010-01-01

    If reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels exceed antioxidant defences, oxidative stress occurs; a common response to environmental pollutants. Proteins absorb ∼70% of ROS, altering amino acid side-chains. Cys (-SH) oxidises to sulphenic (-SOH), sulphinic (-SO(2)H), cysteic (-SO(3)H) acids and disulphide bridges (-S-S-). Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) under-selects certain protein categories (e.g. extreme pI, small proteins) so activated thiol sepharose (ATS) was used to select sub-proteomes of thiol-containing proteins in menadione-exposed Escherichia coli. ATS bound thiol-containing proteins (but not oxidised thiols) via mixed disulphides. Tryptic digestion of bead-bound proteins was followed by LC-tandem MS. Many proteins were identified in controls with significantly fewer in menadione-treated cells (e.g. chaperonins, transcription/translation-related and ribosomal proteins; aminoacyl tRNA synthetases and metabolic enzymes. Non-denaturing ATS capture (followed by reduction) demonstrated lower specific activities of key enzymes which is attributed to thiol oxidation. This method may be generally useful in ecotoxicology for identification of oxidative stress targets.

  9. Arsenite Targets the Zinc Finger Domains of Tet Proteins and Inhibits Tet-Mediated Oxidation of 5-Methylcytosine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Jiang, Ji; Li, Lin; Amato, Nicholas J; Wang, Zi; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-01

    Arsenic toxicity is a serious public health problem worldwide that brings more than 100 million people into the risk of arsenic exposure from groundwater and food contamination. Although there is accumulating evidence linking arsenic exposure with aberrant cytosine methylation in the global genome or at specific genomic loci, very few have investigated the impact of arsenic on the oxidation of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) mediated by the Ten-eleven translocation (Tet) family of proteins. Owing to the high binding affinity of As(III) toward cysteine residues, we reasoned that the highly conserved C3H-type zinc fingers situated in Tet proteins may constitute potential targets for arsenic binding. Herein, we found that arsenite could bind directly to the zinc fingers of Tet proteins in vitro and in cells, and this interaction substantially impaired the catalytic efficiency of Tet proteins in oxidizing 5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5-foC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5-caC). Treatments with arsenite also led to a dose-dependent decrease in the level of 5-hmC, but not 5-mC, in DNA isolated from HEK293T cells overexpressing the catalytic domain of any of the three Tet proteins and from mouse embryonic stem cells. Together, our study unveiled, for the first time, that arsenite could alter epigenetic signaling by targeting the zinc fingers of Tet proteins and perturbing the Tet-mediated oxidation of 5-mC in vitro and in cells. Our results offer important mechanistic understanding of arsenic epigenotoxicity and carcinogenesis in mammalian systems and may lead to novel approaches for the chemoprevention of arsenic toxicity.

  10. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  11. High strength high modulus ceramic fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterolf, R. N.

    1972-01-01

    Low cost method was developed for producing high strength, high modulus, continuous ceramic oxide fibers. Process transforms inexpensive metallic salts into syrup-like liquids that can be fiberized at room temperatures. Resulting salt fibers are then converted to oxides by calcination at relatively low temperatures.

  12. RGD-functionalized ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of gliomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yu; Yang, Jia; Yan, Yu; Li, Jingchao; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Mignani, Serge; Shi, Xiangyang

    2015-08-01

    We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration range, and display targeting specificity to glioma cells overexpressing αvβ3 integrin in vitro. With the relatively high r1 relaxivity (r1 = 1.4 mM-1 s-1), the Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles can be used as an efficient nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted positive MR imaging of glioma cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo via an active RGD-mediated targeting pathway. The developed RGD-functionalized Fe3O4 NPs may hold great promise to be used as a nanoprobe for targeted T1-weighted MR imaging of different αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells or biological systems.We report a convenient approach to prepare ultrasmall Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with an arginylglycylaspartic acid (RGD) peptide for in vitro and in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of gliomas. In our work, stable sodium citrate-stabilized Fe3O4 NPs were prepared by a solvothermal route. Then, the carboxylated Fe3O4 NPs stabilized with sodium citrate were conjugated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked RGD. The formed ultrasmall RGD-functionalized nanoprobe (Fe3O4-PEG-RGD) was fully characterized using different techniques. We show that these Fe3O4-PEG-RGD particles with a size of 2.7 nm are water-dispersible, stable, cytocompatible and hemocompatible in a given concentration

  13. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  14. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  15. Highly conductive indium zinc oxide prepared by reactive magnetron cosputtering technique using indium and zinc metallic targets

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, T. K.; Chen, H. C.; Lee, J. H.; Huang, Y. Y.; Fang, J. S.

    2010-05-15

    Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film is frequently deposited from an oxide target; but the use of metallic target is increasingly expected as preparing the film with comparable properties. This work aimed to prepare a highly conductive and transparent Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin film on Corning Eagle{sup 2000} glass substrate by magnetron cosputtering method using indium and zinc targets. Structural characterization was performed using x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The film had an amorphous structure when the film was prepared on an unheated substrate, but had an In{sub 2}O{sub 3} polycrystalline structure when the film was deposited on 150 and 300 deg. C substrates. The electrical properties of the film were greatly affected by annealing; the Zn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film had a low resistivity of 6.1x10{sup -4} {Omega} cm and an average transmittance of 81.7% when the film was deposited without substrate heating and followed a 600 deg. C annealing.

  16. Remote magnetic targeting of iron oxide nanoparticles for cardiovascular diagnosis and therapeutic drug delivery: where are we now?

    PubMed Central

    Bietenbeck, Michael; Florian, Anca; Faber, Cornelius; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows for an accurate assessment of both functional and structural cardiac parameters, and thereby appropriate diagnosis and validation of cardiovascular diseases. The diagnostic yield of cardiovascular MRI examinations is often increased by the use of contrast agents that are almost exclusively based on gadolinium compounds. Another clinically approved contrast medium is composed of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs). These particles may expand the field of contrast-enhanced cardiovascular MRI as recently shown in clinical studies focusing on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and atherosclerosis. Furthermore, IONs open up new research opportunities such as remote magnetic drug targeting (MDT). The approach of MDT relies on the coupling of bioactive molecules and magnetic nanoparticles to form an injectable complex. This complex, in turn, can be attracted to and retained at a desired target inside the body with the help of applied magnetic fields. In comparison to common systemic drug applications, MDT techniques promise both higher concentrations at the target site and lower concentrations elsewhere in the body. Moreover, concurrent or subsequent MRI can be used for noninvasive monitoring of drug distribution and successful delivery to the desired organ in vivo. This review does not only illustrate the basic conceptual and biophysical principles of IONs, but also focuses on new research activities and achievements in the cardiovascular field, mainly in the management of AMI. Based on the presentation of successful MDT applications in preclinical models of AMI, novel approaches and the translational potential of MDT are discussed. PMID:27486321

  17. Deposition and characterization of titania-silica optical multilayers by asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc sputtering of oxide targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagdeo, P. R.; Shinde, D. D.; Misal, J. S.; Kamble, N. M.; Tokas, R. B.; Biswas, A.; Poswal, A. K.; Thakur, S.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Sahoo, N. K.; Sabharwal, S. C.

    2010-02-01

    Titania-silica (TiO2/SiO2) optical multilayer structures have been conventionally deposited by reactive sputtering of metallic targets. In order to overcome the problems of arcing, target poisoning and low deposition rates encountered there, the application of oxide targets was investigated in this work with asymmetric bipolar pulsed dc magnetron sputtering. In order to evaluate the usefulness of this deposition methodology, an electric field optimized Fabry Perot mirror for He-Cd laser (λ = 441.6 nm) spectroscopy was deposited and characterized. For comparison, this mirror was also deposited by the reactive electron beam (EB) evaporation technique. The mirrors developed by the two complementary techniques were investigated for their microstructural and optical reflection properties invoking atomic force microscopy, ellipsometry, grazing incidence reflectometry and spectrophotometry. From these measurements the layer geometry, optical constants, mass density, topography, surface and interface roughness and disorder parameters were evaluated. The microstructural properties and spectral functional characteristics of the pulsed dc sputtered multilayer mirror were found to be distinctively superior to the EB deposited mirror. The knowledge gathered during this study has been utilized to develop a 21-layer high-pass edge filter for radio photoluminescence dosimetry.

  18. Design of multifunctional magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles/mitoxantrone-loaded liposomes for both magnetic resonance imaging and targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingna; Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Song, Cunxian

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-targeting multifunctional liposomes simultaneously loaded with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs) as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent and anticancer drug, mitoxantrone (Mit), were developed for targeted cancer therapy and ultrasensitive MRI. The gonadorelin-functionalized MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-GML) showed significantly increased uptake in luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing MCF-7 (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7) breast cancer cells over a gonadorelin-free MION/Mit-loaded liposome (Mit-ML) control, as well as in an LHRH receptor low-expressing Sloan-Kettering HER2 3+ Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) cell control, thereby leading to high cytotoxicity against the MCF-7 human breast tumor cell line. The Mit-GML formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free Mit or Mit-ML in the treatment of LHRH receptors overexpressing MCF-7 breast cancer xenografts in mice. Furthermore, the Mit-GML demonstrated much higher T2 enhancement than did Mit-ML controls in vivo. Collectively, the study indicates that the integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of Mit-GML nanomedicine potentially allows for the image-guided, target-specific treatment of cancer. PMID:25187709

  19. High molecular weight chitosan derivative polymeric micelles encapsulating superparamagnetic iron oxide for tumor-targeted magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yunbin; Lin, Zuan Tao; Chen, Yanmei; Wang, He; Deng, Ya Li; Le, D Elizabeth; Bin, Jianguo; Li, Meiyu; Liao, Yulin; Liu, Yili; Jiang, Gangbiao; Bin, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents based on chitosan derivatives have great potential for diagnosing diseases. However, stable tumor-targeted MRI contrast agents using micelles prepared from high molecular weight chitosan derivatives are seldom reported. In this study, we developed a novel tumor-targeted MRI vehicle via superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) encapsulated in self-aggregating polymeric folate-conjugated N-palmitoyl chitosan (FAPLCS) micelles. The tumor-targeting ability of FAPLCS/SPIONs was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. The results of dynamic light scattering experiments showed that the micelles had a relatively narrow size distribution (136.60±3.90 nm) and excellent stability. FAPLCS/SPIONs showed low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility in cellular toxicity tests. Both in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated that FAPLCS/SPIONs bound specifically to folate receptor-positive HeLa cells, and that FAPLCS/SPIONs accumulated predominantly in established HeLa-derived tumors in mice. The signal intensities of T2-weighted images in established HeLa-derived tumors were reduced dramatically after intravenous micelle administration. Our study indicates that FAPLCS/SPION micelles can potentially serve as safe and effective MRI contrast agents for detecting tumors that overexpress folate receptors. PMID:25709439

  20. Nanoimmunoliposome Delivery of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Markedly Enhances Targeting and Uptake in Human Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengli; Rait, Antonina; Pirollo, Kathleen F.; Dagata, John A.; Farkas, Natalia; Chang, Esther H.

    2008-01-01

    To circumvent the problem of reduction of the supermagnetic properties of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles after chemical modification to conjugate targeting molecules, we have adapted a tumor-targeting nanoimmunoliposome platform technology (scL) to encapsulate and deliver SPIO (scL-SPIO) in vitro and in vivo without chemical modification. Scanning probe microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Prussian blue staining were employed to analyze the scL-SPIO nanoparticles and assess intracellular uptake and distribution of SPIO in vitro. In vivo targeting and tumor-specific uptake of scL-SPIO was examined using fluorescent-labeled SPIO. We demonstrated that SPIO encapsulation in the scL complex results in approximately an 11 fold increase in SPIO uptake in human cancer cells in vitro, with distribution to cytoplasm and nucleus. Moreover, the scL nanocomplex specifically and efficiently delivered SPIO into tumor cells after systemic administration, demonstrating the potential of this approach to enhance local tumor concentration and the utility of SPIO for clinical applications. PMID:18676207

  1. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  2. Enzymatic modification of flaxseed fibers.

    PubMed

    Maijala, Pekka; Mäkinen, Marliina; Galkin, Sari; Fagerstedt, Kurt; Härkäsalmi, Tiina; Viikari, Liisa

    2012-11-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum L.) fibers were modified by oxidoreductive and cellulolytic enzymes. The lignin amount and intrinsic plant peroxidase activity was evaluated by histochemical and spectrophotometric assays. Peroxidase activity was not found from bast fibers. The flaxseed fibers were further separated and treated with laccase to conjugate the model compounds, that is, the hydrophobic gallate molecules on fiber surfaces. Laccase was able to slowly oxidize fiber-conjugated phenolics, but no fundamental changes in fiber cell surface structure or notable coupling of the applied hydrophobic gallate molecules onto the fibers occurred, as revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of the mature fibers was further investigated using cellulolytic enzymes. Cellobiohydrolase (CBH) and endoglucanase (EG)-rich enzyme preparations were applied to reach a hydrolysis degree of 1-6% (of the fiber dry matter) using a standard enzyme dosage. The CBH mixture altered the fiber surface morphology distinctly, and SEM images illustrated fibers in which the cellulose fibrils seemed to be loosened and partially hydrolyzed. In contrast, the effect of the EG-rich preparation without CBH activity was notable on the fiber surface, polishing the surfaces. The cellulolytic treatments were potentially interesting for specific enzymatic modifications of flax fiber surfaces, whereas the approach to use oxidoreductive enzyme treatments on mature linseed fibers offered little potential, obviously due to the low lignin content of the fibers.

  3. Targets of red grapes: oxidative damage of DNA and leukaemia cells.

    PubMed

    Anter, Jaouad; de Abreu-Abreu, Noriluz; Fernández-Bedmar, Zahira; Villatoro-Pulido, Myriam; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles; Muñoz-Serrano, Andrés

    2011-01-01

    Vitis vinifera is a widespread crop all over the world. The biophenols present in grapes have a remarkable influence on wine quality and also confer potential health-protecting properties to this fruit. The aim of the present work was to assess the beneficial properties of skin, seeds and pulp of red table grapes (RTG) (Vitis vinifera, Palieri Cadiz variety). Two potential beneficial activities of red table grapes (RTG) were analyzed: (i) The maintenance of genomic stability studying their genotoxic/antigenotoxic effects, and (ii) the in vitro cytotoxic effect against tumor cells of RTG components. The genotoxic and/or antigenotoxic effect was measured applying the somatic mutation and recombination test on wing imaginal discs of Drosophila melanogaster. The cytotoxic effect was monitored using the HL60 human leukemia model to evaluate the antiproliferative potential of the different parts of RTG. The three major parts (skin, seeds and pulp) are not genotoxic. When antigenotoxicity assays were performed using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidative genotoxin, skin, seed and pulp exerted a desmutagenic effect, with seeds and skin showing the most potent effect. The cytotoxicity tests using HL60 cells indicated that only skin and pulp fractions are able to inhibit the tumor growth, with skin having the lowest IC50 (1.8 mg/mL versus 8 mg/mL of pulp). These results suggest that RTG are potent anti-mutagens that protect DNA from oxidative damage as well as being cytotoxic toward the HL60 tumor cell line. PMID:21366047

  4. Magnetic tumor targeting of β-glucosidase immobilized iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jian; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2013-09-01

    Directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (DEPT) has promising application for cancer therapy. However, most current DEPT strategies face shortcomings such as the loss of enzyme activity during preparation, low delivery and transduction efficiency in vivo and difficultly of monitoring. In this study, a novel magnetic directed enzyme/prodrug therapy (MDEPT) was set up by conjugating β-glucosidase (β-Glu) to aminated, starch-coated, iron oxide magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs), abbreviated as β-Glu-MNP, using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinker. This β-Glu-MNP was then characterized in detail by size distribution, zeta potential, FTIR spectra, TEM, SQUID and magnetophoretic mobility analysis. Compared to free enzyme, the conjugated β-Glu on MNPs retained 85.54% ± 6.9% relative activity and showed much better temperature stability. The animal study results showed that β-Glu-MNP displays preferable pharmacokinetics characteristics in relation to MNPs. With an adscititious magnetic field on the surface of a tumor, a significant quantity of β-Glu-MNP was selectively delivered into a subcutaneous tumor of a glioma-bearing mouse. Remarkably, the enzyme activity of the delivered β-Glu in tumor lesions showed as high as 20.123±5.022 mU g-1 tissue with 2.14 of tumor/non-tumor β-Glu activity.

  5. Effect of electrochemical oxidation of activated carbon fiber on competitive and noncompetitive sorption of trace toxic metal ions from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Harry, I D; Saha, B; Cumming, I W

    2006-12-01

    A viscose-rayon-based activated carbon cloth (ACC) was electrochemically oxidized to enhance its cation sorption capacity for comparison with as-received ACC. The ACCs were characterized by sodium capacity measurement, pH titration, zeta potential measurement, elemental analysis, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller surface area, and pore size distribution. Batch sorption experiments showed that electrochemically oxidized ACC (EO) is more effective for the removal of lead and copper ions compared to unoxidized ACC (UO) for both competitive and noncompetitive sorption. For electrochemically oxidized fibers the copper and lead sorption capacities of ACC increased 17 and 4 times, respectively, for noncompetitive sorption and 8.8 and 8.6 times, respectively, for competitive sorption. However, reduction in the sorption capacities for both metals was observed for the competitive sorption. The sorption of lead and copper onto EO was by ion exchange, while that onto UO was likely to be due to surface complex formation. The affinity order of the two metal ions sorbed by UO and EO is Pb(2+)>Cu(2+). The effect of pH on sorption isotherms indicated that metal uptake increased with an increase in solution pH.

  6. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  7. In vivo targeting of metastatic breast cancer via tumor vasculature-specific nano-graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongzhi; Feng, Liangzhu; Dougherty, Casey A; Luker, Kathryn E; Chen, Daiqin; Cauble, Meagan A; Banaszak Holl, Mark M; Luker, Gary D; Ross, Brian D; Liu, Zhuang; Hong, Hao

    2016-10-01

    Angiogenesis, i.e. the formation of neovasculatures, is a critical process during cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis. Targeting of angiogenic markers on the tumor vasculature can result in more efficient delivery of nanomaterials into tumor since no extravasation is required. Herein we demonstrated efficient targeting of breast cancer metastasis in an experimental murine model with nano-graphene oxide (GO), which was conjugated to a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR). FSHR has been confirmed to be a highly selective tumor vasculature marker, which is abundant in both primary and metastatic tumors. These functionalized GO nano-conjugates had diameters of ∼120 nm based on atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM, and dynamic laser scattering (DLS) measurement. (64)Cu was incorporated as a radiolabel which enabled the visualization of these GO conjugates by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Breast cancer lung metastasis model was established by intravenous injection of click beetle green luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 (denoted as cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells into female nude mice and the tumor growth was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Systematic in vitro and in vivo studies have been performed to investigate the stability, targeting efficacy and specificity, and tissue distribution of GO conjugates. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy examination confirmed the targeting specificity of FSHR-mAb attached GO conjugates against cellular FSHR. More potent and persistent uptake of (64)Cu-NOTA-GO-FSHR-mAb in cbgLuc-MDA-MB-231 nodules inside the lung was witnessed when compared with that of non-targeted GO conjugates ((64)Cu-NOTA-GO). Histology evaluation also confirmed the vasculature accumulation of GO-FSHR-mAb conjugates in tumor at early time points while they were non-specifically captured in liver and spleen. In addition, these GO conjugates can serve as good drug carriers

  8. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  9. Features of the synthesis of nanocolloid oxides by laser ablation of bulk metal targets in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapin, Ivan N.; Svetlichnyi, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Laser ablation of bulk targets in a fluid -- a promising new method for the synthesis of "pure" nanocolloids. Nanocrystalline materials produced by laser ablation are widely used in biology, medicine, and catalysis. High local temperature during ablation and large surface area of the particles promote chemical reactions and the formation of a complex composition of nanoparticles. In this paper the characteristics of the process of ablation and the obtaining of nanoparticles in a liquid by laser ablation of active materials (Zn, Ce, Ti, Si) were studied. Ways of increasing the productivity of laser ablation were discussed. Characterization of nanocolloids and nanocrystalline powders were performed.

  10. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ADHD: possible causes and the potential of antioxidant-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2015-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a complex aetiology although theories associated with disturbances in dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity are most commonly cited. The importance of these catecholamines in ADHD is supported by its effective treatment utilising stimulant and non-stimulant medications that modify their activity. Recently, there has been interest in oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) in ADHD and its potential to contribute to this condition. In this article, research investigating O&NS in ADHD is reviewed and its impact on catecholaminergic activity and neurological structure is discussed. Lifestyle, environmental, psychological and nutritional influences on O&NS in people with ADHD are reviewed, and evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of antioxidant-related therapies is assessed. A selection of interventions with antioxidant mechanisms is presented as potential options for the treatment of ADHD. However, further research is required to help elucidate the role of O&NS and antioxidants for the prevention and management of ADHD.

  11. Targets of nitric oxide in a mouse model of liver inflammation by Corynebacterium parvum.

    PubMed

    Chamulitrat, W; Jordan, S J; Mason, R P; Litton, A L; Wilson, J G; Wood, E R; Wolberg, G; Molina y Vedia, L

    1995-01-10

    Treatment of mice with Corynebacterium parvum induces chronic inflammation. This treatment followed by an injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) produces hepatic necrosis and death. We examined liver tissue by using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and found that, in addition to the previously reported nonheme nitrosyl complexes, heme nitrosyl complexes were also formed. Hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes measured in the whole blood of mice treated with C. parvum were not increased after additional LPS treatment. However, this treatment significantly increased the heme nitrosyl complexes in the liver, whereas the nonheme nitrosyl complex concentration was unaffected. EPR signals from whole blood and liver tissues from mice treated with C. parvum and C. parvum + LPS were inhibited by prolonged treatment with NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMA). Nitric oxide (.NO) is known to bind to cytochrome P450 heme, and we consistently found a suppression of EPR signals attributable to ferric low-spin cytochrome P450/P420 peaks in the livers of mice treated with C. parvum and C. parvum + LPS. By performing analyses of EPR spectra obtained from hepatocytes exposed to .NO, we were able to unambiguously identify EPR signals attributable to cytochrome P420 and nonheme nitrosyl complexes in the livers of both treatments. Deconvolution of the composite in vivo EPR spectra indicated that hemoglobin nitrosyl complexes contributed weakly in the C. parvum livers, but threefold more in the C. parvum + LPS livers, suggesting that hemorrhage may have occurred. Experiments with L-NMA treatment revealed that this additional .NO production did not correlate with hepatic necrosis and onset of death. Immunoprecipitation of liver cytosols from C. parvum- and (C. parvum + LPS)-treated mice using an antibody against mouse inducible nitric oxide synthase showed that this enzyme was indeed present in the cytosolic fractions and was absent in those from control livers. Our novel detection of

  12. Facile synthesis of RGD peptide-modified iron oxide nanoparticles with ultrahigh relaxivity for targeted MR imaging of tumors.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yong; Li, Jingchao; Yang, Jia; Wei, Ping; Luo, Yu; Ding, Ling; Sun, Wenjie; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang; Shen, Mingwu

    2015-05-01

    We report the facile synthesis of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) peptide-targeted iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) with ultrahigh relaxivity for in vivo tumor magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In this study, stable polyethyleneimine (PEI)-coated Fe3O4 NPs were first prepared by a mild reduction route. The formed aminated Fe3O4 NPs with PEI coating were sequentially conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-RGD segment, followed by acetylation of the remaining PEI surface amines. The thus-formed Fe3O4@PEI·NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD NPs were characterized via different techniques. We show that the multifunctional RGD-targeted Fe3O4 NPs with a mean size of 9.1 nm are water-dispersible, colloidally stable, and hemocompatible and cytocompatible in the given concentration range. With the displayed ultrahigh r2 relaxivity (550.04 mM(-1) s(-1)) and RGD-mediated targeting specificity to αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells as confirmed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, the developed multifunctional Fe3O4@PEI·NHAc-FI-PEG-RGD NPs are able to be used as a highly efficient nanoprobe for targeted MR imaging of αvβ3 integrin-overexpressing cancer cells in vitro and the xenografted tumor model in vivo. Given the versatile PEI amine-enabled conjugation chemistry, the developed PEI-coated Fe3O4 NPs may be functionalized with other biological ligands or drugs for various biomedical applications, in particular, the diagnosis and therapy of different types of cancer. PMID:26222591

  13. Hyaluronic acid-decorated graphene oxide nanohybrids as nanocarriers for targeted and pH-responsive anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Erqun; Han, Weiye; Li, Cheng; Cheng, Dan; Li, Lingrui; Liu, Lichao; Zhu, Guizhi; Song, Yang; Tan, Weihong

    2014-08-13

    A novel nanohybrid of hyaluronic acid (HA)-decorated graphene oxide (GO) was fabricated as a targeted and pH-responsive drug delivery system for controlling the release of anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for tumor therapy. For the preparation, DOX was first loaded onto GO nanocarriers via π-π stacking and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and then it was decorated with HA to produce HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids via H-bonding interactions. In this strategy, HA served as both a targeting moiety and a hydrophilic group, making the as-prepared nanohybrids targeting, stable, and disperse. A high loading efficiency (42.9%) of DOX on the nanohybrids was also obtained. Cumulative DOX release from HA-GO-DOX was faster in pH 5.3 phosphate-buffered saline solution than that in pH 7.4, providing the basis for pH-response DOX release in the slightly acidic environment of tumor cells, while the much-slower DOX release from HA-GO-DOX than DOX showed the sustained drug-release capability of the nanohybrids. Fluorescent images of cellular uptake and cell viability analysis studies illustrated that these HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids significantly enhanced DOX accumulation in HA-targeted HepG2 cancer cells compared to HA-nontargeted RBMEC cells and subsequently induced selective cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells. In vivo antitumor efficiency of HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids showed obviously enhanced tumor inhibition rate for H22 hepatic cancer cell-bearing mice compared with free DOX and the GO-DOX formulation. These studies suggest that the HA-GO-DOX nanohybrids have potential clinical applications for anticancer drug delivery.

  14. Species Differences in Microsomal Oxidation and Glucuronidation of 4-Ipomeanol: Relationship to Target Organ Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Oliver T; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Whittington, Dale; Kelly, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E

    2016-10-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a model pulmonary toxicant that undergoes P450-mediated metabolism to reactive electrophilic intermediates that bind to tissue macromolecules and can be trapped in vitro as the NAC/NAL adduct. Pronounced species and tissue differences in IPO toxicity are well documented, as is the enzymological component of phase I bioactivation. However, IPO also undergoes phase II glucuronidation, which may compete with bioactivation in target tissues. To better understand the organ toxicity of IPO, we synthesized IPO-glucuronide and developed a new quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay for IPO glucuronidation. Microsomal rates of glucuronidation and P450-dependent NAC/NAL adduct formation were compared in lung, kidney, and liver microsomes from seven species with different target organ toxicities to IPO. Bioactivation rates were highest in pulmonary and renal microsomes from all animal species (except dog) known to be highly susceptible to the extrahepatic toxicities induced by IPO. In a complementary fashion, pulmonary and renal IPO glucuronidation rates were uniformly low in all experimental animals and primates, but hepatic glucuronidation rates were high, as expected. Therefore, with the exception of the dog, the balance between microsomal NAC/NAL adduct and glucuronide formation correlate well with the risk for IPO-induced pulmonary, renal, and hepatic toxicities across species. PMID:27468999

  15. Species Differences in Microsomal Oxidation and Glucuronidation of 4-Ipomeanol: Relationship to Target Organ Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Oliver T; Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Whittington, Dale; Kelly, Edward J; Rettie, Allan E

    2016-10-01

    4-Ipomeanol (IPO) is a model pulmonary toxicant that undergoes P450-mediated metabolism to reactive electrophilic intermediates that bind to tissue macromolecules and can be trapped in vitro as the NAC/NAL adduct. Pronounced species and tissue differences in IPO toxicity are well documented, as is the enzymological component of phase I bioactivation. However, IPO also undergoes phase II glucuronidation, which may compete with bioactivation in target tissues. To better understand the organ toxicity of IPO, we synthesized IPO-glucuronide and developed a new quantitative mass spectrometry-based assay for IPO glucuronidation. Microsomal rates of glucuronidation and P450-dependent NAC/NAL adduct formation were compared in lung, kidney, and liver microsomes from seven species with different target organ toxicities to IPO. Bioactivation rates were highest in pulmonary and renal microsomes from all animal species (except dog) known to be highly susceptible to the extrahepatic toxicities induced by IPO. In a complementary fashion, pulmonary and renal IPO glucuronidation rates were uniformly low in all experimental animals and primates, but hepatic glucuronidation rates were high, as expected. Therefore, with the exception of the dog, the balance between microsomal NAC/NAL adduct and glucuronide formation correlate well with the risk for IPO-induced pulmonary, renal, and hepatic toxicities across species.

  16. Towards low timing phase noise operation in fiber lasers mode locked by graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes at 1.5 µm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kan; Li, Xiaohui; Wang, Yonggang; Wang, Qi Jie; Shum, Perry Ping; Chen, Jianping

    2015-01-12

    We investigate the timing phase noise of fiber lasers mode locked by graphene oxide (GO) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), respectively, integrated in a linear cavity fiber laser in the reflecting operation. Due to the shorter decay time of the GO and CNTs, weaker slow saturable absorber effects are expected and mode-locked lasers based on these two saturable absorbers exhibit low excess timing phase noise coupled from the laser intensity noise. Compared with a reference laser mode locked by semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), GO based laser obtains a timing phase noise reduction of 7 dB at 1 kHz and a timing jitter reduction of 45% experimentally whereas CNTs based laser obtains a timing phase noise reduction of 3 dB and a timing jitter reduction of 29%. This finding suggests that saturable absorbers with short decay time have the potential for achieving mode locking operation with low timing phase noise, which is important for applications including frequency metrology, high-precision optical sampling, clock distribution and optical sensing.

  17. Covalent Bonding of Metal-Organic Framework-5/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite to Stainless Steel Fiber for Solid-Phase Microextraction of Triazole Fungicides from Fruit and Vegetable Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Wenchang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid material of the zinc-based metal-organic framework-5 and graphene oxide (metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide) was prepared as a novel fiber coating material for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The SPME fibers were fabricated by covalent bonding via chemical cross-linking between the coating material metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide and stainless steel wire. The prepared fiber was used for the extraction of five triazole fungicides from fruit and vegetable samples. Gas chromatography coupled with microelectron capture detector (GC-μECD) was used for quantification. The developed method gave a low limit of detection (0.05-1.58 ng g(-1)) and good linearity (0.17-100 ng g(-1)) for the determination of the triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicate extractions of the triazole fungicides ranged from 3.7 to 8.9%. The method recoveries for spiked fungicides (5, 20, and 50 ng g(-1)) in grape, apple, cucumber, celery cabbage, pear, cabbage, and tomato samples were in the range of 85.6-105.8% with the RSDs ranging from 3.6 to 11.4%, respectively, depending on both the analytes and samples. The metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide coated fiber was stable enough for 120 extraction cycles without a significant loss of extraction efficiency. The method was suitable for the determination of triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. PMID:26998567

  18. Covalent Bonding of Metal-Organic Framework-5/Graphene Oxide Hybrid Composite to Stainless Steel Fiber for Solid-Phase Microextraction of Triazole Fungicides from Fruit and Vegetable Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuaihua; Yang, Qian; Wang, Wenchang; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2016-04-01

    A hybrid material of the zinc-based metal-organic framework-5 and graphene oxide (metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide) was prepared as a novel fiber coating material for solid-phase microextraction (SPME). The SPME fibers were fabricated by covalent bonding via chemical cross-linking between the coating material metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide and stainless steel wire. The prepared fiber was used for the extraction of five triazole fungicides from fruit and vegetable samples. Gas chromatography coupled with microelectron capture detector (GC-μECD) was used for quantification. The developed method gave a low limit of detection (0.05-1.58 ng g(-1)) and good linearity (0.17-100 ng g(-1)) for the determination of the triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for five replicate extractions of the triazole fungicides ranged from 3.7 to 8.9%. The method recoveries for spiked fungicides (5, 20, and 50 ng g(-1)) in grape, apple, cucumber, celery cabbage, pear, cabbage, and tomato samples were in the range of 85.6-105.8% with the RSDs ranging from 3.6 to 11.4%, respectively, depending on both the analytes and samples. The metal-organic framework-5/graphene oxide coated fiber was stable enough for 120 extraction cycles without a significant loss of extraction efficiency. The method was suitable for the determination of triazole fungicides in fruit and vegetable samples.

  19. Ultra-long Pt nanolawns supported on TiO2-coated carbon fibers as 3D hybrid catalyst for methanol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In this study, TiO2 thin film photocatalyst on carbon fibers was used to synthesize ultra-long single crystalline Pt nanowires via a simple photoreduction route (thermally activated photoreduction). It also acted as a co-catalytic material with Pt. Taking advantage of the high-aspect ratio of the Pt nanostructure as well as the excellent catalytic activity of TiO2, this hybrid structure has the great potential as the active anode in direct methanol fuel cells. The electrochemical results indicate that TiO2 is capable of transforming CO-like poisoning species on the Pt surface during methanol oxidation and contributes to a high CO tolerance of this Pt nanowire/TiO2 hybrid structure. PMID:22546416

  20. Iron oxide core oil-in-water emulsions as a multifunctional nanoparticle platform for tumor targeting and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jarzyna, Peter A.; Skajaa, Torjus; Gianella, Anita; Cormode, David P.; Samber, Dan D.; Dickson, Stephen D.; Chen, Wei; Griffioen, Arjan W.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoemulsions are increasingly investigated for the delivery of hydrophobic drugs to improve their bioavailability or make their administration possible. In the current study, oil-in-water emulsions with three different mean diameters (30, 60, and 95 nm) were developed as a new multimodality nanoparticle platform for tumor targeting and imaging. To that aim, hydrophobically coated iron oxide particles were included in the soybean oil core of the nanoemulsions to enable their detection with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), while the conjugation of a near infrared fluorophore allowed optical imaging. The accumulation of this novel nanocomposite in subcutaneous human tumors in nude mice was demonstrated with MRI and fluorescence imaging in vivo, and with Perl’s staining of histological tumor sections ex vivo. PMID:19783295

  1. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  2. Bimodal-hybrid heterocyclic amine targeting oxidative pathways and copper mis-regulation in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Paulina; da Costa, Viviana C.P.; Hyde, Kimberly; Wu, Qiong; Annunziata, Onofrio; Rizo, Josep; Akkaraju, Giridhar; Green, Kayla N.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from metal-ion misregulation plays a role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This process includes the production of tissue-damaging reactive oxygen species and amyloid aggregates. Herein we describe the synthesis, characterization and protective capacity of the small molecule, lipoic cyclen, which has been designed to target molecular features of AD. This construct utilizes the biologically compatible and naturally occurring lipoic acid as a foundation for engendering low cellular toxicity in multiple cell lines, radical scavenging capacity, tuning the metal affinity of the parent cyclen, and results in an unexpected affinity for amyloid without inducing aggregation. The hybrid construct thereby shows protection against cell death induced by amyloid aggregates and copper ions. These results provide evidence for the rational design methods used to produce this fused molecule as a potential strategy for the development of lead compounds for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25144522

  3. Autotract: automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets.

  4. Autotract: Automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets. PMID:27065227

  5. Multifunctional nanosheets based on folic acid modified manganese oxide for tumor-targeting theranostic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Yongwei; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Bingxiang; Zhao, Hongjuan; Niu, Mengya; Hu, Yujie; Zheng, Cuixia; Zhang, Hongling; Chang, Junbiao; Zhang, Zhenzhong; Zhang, Yun

    2016-01-01

    It is highly desirable to develop smart nanocarriers with stimuli-responsive drug-releasing and diagnostic-imaging functions for cancer theranostics. Herein, we develop a reduction and pH dual-responsive tumor theranostic platform based on degradable manganese dioxide (MnO2) nanosheets. The MnO2 nanosheets with a size of 20-60 nm were first synthesized and modified with (3-Aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS) to get amine-functionalized MnO2, and then functionalized by NH2-PEG2000-COOH (PEG). The tumor-targeting group, folic acid (FA), was finally conjugated with the PEGylated MnO2 nanosheets. Then, doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapeutic agent, was loaded onto the modified nanosheets through a physical adsorption, which was designated as MnO2-PEG-FA/DOX. The prepared MnO2-PEG-FA/DOX nanosheets with good biocompatibility can not only efficiently deliver DOX to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, leading to enhanced anti-tumor efficiency, but can also respond to a slightly acidic environment and high concentration of reduced glutathione (GSH), which caused degradation of MnO2 into manganese ions enabling magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The longitudinal relaxation rate r 1 was 2.26 mM-1 s-1 at pH 5.0 containing 2 mM GSH. These reduction and pH dual-responsive biodegradable nanosheets combining efficient MRI and chemotherapy provide a novel and promising platform for tumor-targeting theranostic application.

  6. NRF2 Is a Key Target for Prevention of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Reducing Oxidative Damage of Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Honkura, Yohei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Murakami, Shohei; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Shiotani, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Morita, Ichiro; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most common sensorineural hearing deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that the pathogenesis of NIHL is closely related to ischemia-reperfusion injury of cochlea, which is caused by blood flow decrease and free radical production due to excessive noise. This suggests that protecting the cochlea from oxidative stress is an effective therapeutic approach for NIHL. NRF2 is a transcriptional activator playing an essential role in the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. To clarify the contribution of NRF2 to cochlear protection, we examined Nrf2–/– mice for susceptibility to NIHL. Threshold shifts of the auditory brainstem response at 7 days post-exposure were significantly larger in Nrf2–/– mice than wild-type mice. Treatment with CDDO-Im, a potent NRF2-activating drug, before but not after the noise exposure preserved the integrity of hair cells and improved post-exposure hearing levels in wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2–/– mice. Therefore, NRF2 activation is effective for NIHL prevention. Consistently, a human NRF2 SNP was significantly associated with impaired sensorineural hearing levels in a cohort subjected to occupational noise exposure. Thus, high NRF2 activity is advantageous for cochlear protection from noise-induced injury, and NRF2 is a promising target for NIHL prevention. PMID:26776972

  7. The Magnetophoretic Mobility and Superparamagnetism of Core-Shell Iron Oxide Nanoparticles with Dual Targeting and Imaging Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Faquan; Zhang, Lei; Huang, Yongzhuo; Sun, Kai; David, Allan E.; Yang, Victor C.

    2010-01-01

    With the goal to achieve highly efficacious MRI-monitored magnetic targeting, a novel drug carrier with dual nature of superior magnetophoretic mobility and superparamagnetism was synthesized. This carrier was specially designed in a core-shell structure. The core was achieved by utilizing a strategy of self-assembly of oppositely charged ultrafine superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles previously prepared. The final particles were formed by coating such cores with carboxymethyldextran (CMD) polymer. By exclusion of non-magnetic materials from the interior part of the particles, this structure maximized the amount of magnetic material and thus yielded a superior magnetophoretic mobility. Such a strategy avoids the challenge of superparamagnetism loss, which would be caused by cores exceeding a critical domain size. Coating the self-assembled core enables the magnetic carrier to be stable upon usage and storage and to be readily linked with drug molecules for therapeutic applications. In vitro characterization showed that these nanoparticles displayed a 3- to 4-fold enhancement in magnetophoretic mobility, and a markedly improved stability when stored in 50% serum as a comparison of conventional iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that the nanoparticles alsofunction well as a contrast enhancer for MR imaging of brain glioma. This technology could lead to the development of a new paradigm of magnetic carriers that meet with the needs of various clinical applications. PMID:20434209

  8. NRF2 Is a Key Target for Prevention of Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Reducing Oxidative Damage of Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Honkura, Yohei; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Murakami, Shohei; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Mizutari, Kunio; Shiotani, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Morita, Ichiro; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Kawase, Tetsuaki; Katori, Yukio; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2016-01-18

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the most common sensorineural hearing deficits. Recent studies have demonstrated that the pathogenesis of NIHL is closely related to ischemia-reperfusion injury of cochlea, which is caused by blood flow decrease and free radical production due to excessive noise. This suggests that protecting the cochlea from oxidative stress is an effective therapeutic approach for NIHL. NRF2 is a transcriptional activator playing an essential role in the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. To clarify the contribution of NRF2 to cochlear protection, we examined Nrf2(-/-) mice for susceptibility to NIHL. Threshold shifts of the auditory brainstem response at 7 days post-exposure were significantly larger in Nrf2(-/-) mice than wild-type mice. Treatment with CDDO-Im, a potent NRF2-activating drug, before but not after the noise exposure preserved the integrity of hair cells and improved post-exposure hearing levels in wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2(-/-) mice. Therefore, NRF2 activation is effective for NIHL prevention. Consistently, a human NRF2 SNP was significantly associated with impaired sensorineural hearing levels in a cohort subjected to occupational noise exposure. Thus, high NRF2 activity is advantageous for cochlear protection from noise-induced injury, and NRF2 is a promising target for NIHL prevention.

  9. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential. PMID:26578342

  10. Oxidative and nitrosative stress in ADHD: possible causes and the potential of antioxidant-targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2015-12-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a complex aetiology although theories associated with disturbances in dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity are most commonly cited. The importance of these catecholamines in ADHD is supported by its effective treatment utilising stimulant and non-stimulant medications that modify their activity. Recently, there has been interest in oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) in ADHD and its potential to contribute to this condition. In this article, research investigating O&NS in ADHD is reviewed and its impact on catecholaminergic activity and neurological structure is discussed. Lifestyle, environmental, psychological and nutritional influences on O&NS in people with ADHD are reviewed, and evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of antioxidant-related therapies is assessed. A selection of interventions with antioxidant mechanisms is presented as potential options for the treatment of ADHD. However, further research is required to help elucidate the role of O&NS and antioxidants for the prevention and management of ADHD. PMID:25894292

  11. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L; Varughese, Kottayil I

    2015-11-18

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  12. Structure-based Design Targeted at LOX-1, a Receptor for Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakkar, Shraddha; Wang, Xianwei; Khaidakov, Magomed; Dai, Yao; Gokulan, Kuppan; Mehta, Jawahar L.; Varughese, Kottayil I.

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerosis related cardiovascular diseases continue to be the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. The elevated level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is generally considered to be the driver of atherosclerosis, but recent years have seen a shift in this perception in that the vascular plaque buildup is mainly caused by oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) rather than native-LDL. The scavenger receptor LOX-1 found in endothelial cells binds and internalizes ox-LDL which leads to the initiation of plaque formation in arteries. Using virtual screening techniques, we identified a few potential small molecule inhibitors of LOX-1 and tested their inhibitory potential using differential scanning fluorimetry and various cellular assays. Two of these molecules significantly reduced the uptake of ox-LDL by human endothelial cells, LOX-1 transcription and the activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs in human endothelial cells. In addition, these molecules suppressed ox-LDL-induced VCAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion onto human endothelial cells demonstrating their therapeutic potential.

  13. One-pot synthesis of dextran decorated reduced graphene oxide nanoparticles for targeted photo-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfang; He, Liang; Ding, Jianxun; Sun, Diankui; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-25

    Graphene-based nanocarriers show great potential in photo-chemotherapy, however, to prepare desired reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoparticles in a facile way is still a challenge. Herein, a novel strategy has been presented to prepare rGO nanoparticle using dextran (Dex) as a reducing agent. In this strategy, Dex was directly conjugated on rGO by hydrogen bond and then self-assemble to form rGO/Dex nanoparticles. After decorated by dextran, rGO-based nanoparticles not only show excellent biocompatibility but also can load anticancer drug for photo-chemotherapy. The data of fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, Raman spectrum analysis, thermos-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the transmission electron microscope (TEM) image and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements powerfully proved that the stable rGO-based nanoparticles with desired nanosize have been successfully prepared. To verify the photo-chemotherapy, anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), has been loaded on rGO/Dex nanoparticles (rGO/DOX/Dex). And RGD, a kind of oligopeptide which can improve the intracellular uptake by αvβ3 recognition, also has been introduced (rGO/DOX/RDex). Compared with single chemotherapy, rGO/DOX/Dex and rGO/DOX/RDex combining the local specific chemotherapy and external near-infrared (NIR) photo-thermal therapy show higher therapeutic efficacy, endowing the desired rGO-based nanoparticle with great potential for cancer treatments. PMID:27083812

  14. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction across Broad-Ranging Pathologies: Toward Mitochondria-Targeted Clinical Strategies

    PubMed Central

    d'Ischia, Marco; Gadaleta, Maria Nicola; Pallardó, Federico V.; Petrović, Sandra; Tiano, Luca; Zatterale, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Beyond the disorders recognized as mitochondrial diseases, abnormalities in function and/or ultrastructure of mitochondria have been reported in several unrelated pathologies. These encompass ageing, malformations, and a number of genetic or acquired diseases, as diabetes and cardiologic, haematologic, organ-specific (e.g., eye or liver), neurologic and psychiatric, autoimmune, and dermatologic disorders. The mechanistic grounds for mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF) along with the occurrence of oxidative stress (OS) have been investigated within the pathogenesis of individual disorders or in groups of interrelated disorders. We attempt to review broad-ranging pathologies that involve mitochondrial-specific deficiencies or rely on cytosol-derived prooxidant states or on autoimmune-induced mitochondrial damage. The established knowledge in these subjects warrants studies aimed at elucidating several open questions that are highlighted in the present review. The relevance of OS and MDF in different pathologies may establish the grounds for chemoprevention trials aimed at compensating OS/MDF by means of antioxidants and mitochondrial nutrients. PMID:24876913

  15. One-pot synthesis of dextran decorated reduced graphene oxide nanoparticles for targeted photo-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfang; He, Liang; Ding, Jianxun; Sun, Diankui; Chen, Li; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-25

    Graphene-based nanocarriers show great potential in photo-chemotherapy, however, to prepare desired reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanoparticles in a facile way is still a challenge. Herein, a novel strategy has been presented to prepare rGO nanoparticle using dextran (Dex) as a reducing agent. In this strategy, Dex was directly conjugated on rGO by hydrogen bond and then self-assemble to form rGO/Dex nanoparticles. After decorated by dextran, rGO-based nanoparticles not only show excellent biocompatibility but also can load anticancer drug for photo-chemotherapy. The data of fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, Raman spectrum analysis, thermos-gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the transmission electron microscope (TEM) image and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements powerfully proved that the stable rGO-based nanoparticles with desired nanosize have been successfully prepared. To verify the photo-chemotherapy, anticancer drug, doxorubicin (DOX), has been loaded on rGO/Dex nanoparticles (rGO/DOX/Dex). And RGD, a kind of oligopeptide which can improve the intracellular uptake by αvβ3 recognition, also has been introduced (rGO/DOX/RDex). Compared with single chemotherapy, rGO/DOX/Dex and rGO/DOX/RDex combining the local specific chemotherapy and external near-infrared (NIR) photo-thermal therapy show higher therapeutic efficacy, endowing the desired rGO-based nanoparticle with great potential for cancer treatments.

  16. Targeted Herceptin-dextran iron oxide nanoparticles for noninvasive imaging of HER2/neu receptors using MRI.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ting-Jung; Cheng, Tsan-Hwang; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Hsu, Sodio C N; Cheng, Tian-Lu; Liu, Gin-Chung; Wang, Yun-Ming

    2009-02-01

    A novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent containing Herceptin is reported. The surfaces of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were modified with dextran and conjugated with Herceptin (Herceptin-nanoparticles) to improve their dispersion, magnetization, and targeting of the specific receptors on cells. From analytical results, we found that Herceptin-nanoparticles were well dispersed in solutions of various pH range, and had no hysteresis, high saturation magnetization (80 emu/g), and low cytotoxicity to a variety of cells. Notably, the magnetic resonance enhancements for the different breast cancer cell lines (BT-474, SKBR-3, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7) are proportional to the HER2/neu expression level in vitro. When Herceptin-nanoparticles were administered to mice bearing breast tumor allograft by intravenous injection, the tumor site was detected in T (2)-weighted magnetic resonance images as a 45% enhancement drop, indicating a high level of accumulation of the contrast agent within the tumor sites. Therefore, targeting of cancer cells was observed by in vitro and in vivo MRI studies using Herceptin-nanoparticles contrast agent. In addition, Herceptin-nanoparticles enhancing the magnetic resonance signal intensity were sufficient to detect the cell lines with a low level of HER2/neu expression.

  17. Nanostructured europium oxide thin films deposited by pulsed laser ablation of a metallic target in a He buffer atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Luna, H.; Franceschini, D. F.; Prioli, R.; Guimaraes, R. B.; Sanchez, C. M.; Canal, G. P.; Barbosa, M. D. L.; Galvao, R. M. O.

    2010-09-15

    Nanostrucured europium oxide and hydroxide films were obtained by pulsed Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser ablation of a europium metallic target, in the presence of a 1 mbar helium buffer atmosphere. Both the produced film and the ambient plasma were characterized. The plasma was monitored by an electrostatic probe, for plume expansion in vacuum or in the presence of the buffer atmosphere. The time evolution of the ion saturation current was obtained for several probe to substrate distances. The results show the splitting of the plume into two velocity groups, being the lower velocity profile associated with metal cluster formation within the plume. The films were obtained in the presence of helium atmosphere, for several target-to-substrate distances. They were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, x-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy, for as-deposited and 600 deg. C treated-in-air samples. The results show that the as-deposited samples are amorphous and have chemical composition compatible with europium hydroxide. The thermally treated samples show x-ray diffraction peaks of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with chemical composition showing excess oxygen. Film nanostructuring was shown to be strongly correlated with cluster formation, as shown by velocity splitting in probe current versus time plots.

  18. Underestimation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria abundance by amplification bias in amoA-targeted qPCR.

    PubMed

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Musovic, Sanin; Palomo, Alejandro; Diwan, Vaibhav; Smets, Barth F

    2016-07-01

    Molecular methods to investigate functional groups in microbial communities rely on the specificity and selectivity of the primer set towards the target. Here, using rapid sand filters for drinking water production as model environment, we investigated the consistency of two commonly used quantitative PCR methods to enumerate ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB): one targeting the phylogenetic gene 16S rRNA and the other, the functional gene amoA. Cloning-sequencing with both primer sets on DNA from two waterworks revealed contrasting images of AOB diversity. The amoA-based approach preferentially recovered sequences belonging to Nitrosomonas Cluster 7 over Cluster 6A ones, while the 16S rRNA one yielded more diverse sequences belonging to three AOB clusters, but also a few non-AOB sequences, suggesting broader, but partly unspecific, primer coverage. This was confirmed by an in silico coverage analysis against sequences of AOB (both isolates and high-quality environmental sequences). The difference in primer coverage significantly impacted the estimation of AOB abundance at the waterworks with high Cluster 6A prevalence, with estimates up to 50-fold smaller for amoA than for 16S rRNA. In contrast, both approaches performed very similarly at waterworks with high Cluster 7 prevalence. Our results highlight that caution is warranted when comparing AOB abundances obtained using different qPCR primer sets. PMID:27166579

  19. Targeted Mesoporous Iron Oxide Nanoparticles-Encapsulated Perfluorohexane and a Hydrophobic Drug for Deep Tumor Penetration and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yu-Lin; Fang, Jen-Hung; Liao, Chia-Ying; Lin, Chein-Ting; Li, Yun-Ting; Hu, Shang-Hsiu

    2015-01-01

    A magneto-responsive energy/drug carrier that enhances deep tumor penetration with a porous nano-composite is constructed by using a tumor-targeted lactoferrin (Lf) bio-gate as a cap on mesoporous iron oxide nanoparticles (MIONs). With a large payload of a gas-generated molecule, perfluorohexane (PFH), and a hydrophobic anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), Lf-MIONs can simultaneously perform bursting gas generation and on-demand drug release upon high-frequency magnetic field (MF) exposure. Biocompatible PFH was chosen and encapsulated in MIONs due to its favorable phase transition temperature (56 °C) and its hydrophobicity. After a short-duration MF treatment induces heat generation, the local pressure increase via the gasifying of the PFH embedded in MION can substantially rupture the three-dimensional tumor spheroids in vitro as well as enhance drug and carrier penetration. As the MF treatment duration increases, Lf-MIONs entering the tumor spheroids provide an intense heat and burst-like drug release, leading to superior drug delivery and deep tumor thermo-chemo-therapy. With their high efficiency for targeting tumors, Lf-MIONs/PTX-PFH suppressed subcutaneous tumors in 16 days after a single MF exposure. This work presents the first study of using MF-induced PFH gasification as a deep tumor-penetrating agent for drug delivery. PMID:26379789

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria-targeted

  1. Goat red blood cells as precursor for iron oxide nanocrystal synthesis to develop nuclear targeted lung cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sreevani, Vellingiri; Shanthi, Krishnamurthy; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Molecular approach of synthesis of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC using goat blood as a bio-precursor. • The method is simple, efficient and environment friendly. • Synthesized nanocrystals were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, XRD, SEM, TEM, DLS and EDS. • Nanocrystals exhibited potent cytotoxicity against A549 cancer cell. • Nuclear targeting with expression of caspase-3, caspase-7 and Bcl-2 in A549 cancer cells. - Abstract: In this study, we synthesised iron oxide nanocrystals (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC) from goat blood (bio-precursor) using red blood cells (RBC) lysis method (a molecular level approach) for the first time. The formation of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC was achieved through a single-phase chemical reduction method. The size distribution of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC falls between 20–30 nm for pellet and 100–200 nm for lysate and were found to be crystalline. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC demonstrated significant cytotoxicity on A549. We report the direct visualization of interactions between Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC and the cancer cell nucleus. The active transport of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC to the nucleus induces major changes to nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations. We further examined the root cause for the involvement of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC on the expression of caspase-3, caspase-7 and Bcl-2 in A549 cancer cells. This functional proteomic analysis clearly implies that the lung cancer cell proliferation is perfectly targeted by the biosynthesised Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NC which could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy.

  2. In vitro targeted magnetic delivery and tracking of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles labeled stem cells for articular cartilage defect repair.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Jin, Xuhong; Dai, Gang; Liu, Jun; Chen, Jiarong; Yang, Liu

    2011-04-01

    To assess a novel cell manipulation technique of tissue engineering with respect to its ability to augment superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) density at a localized cartilage defect site in an in vitro phantom by applying magnetic force. Meanwhile, non-invasive imaging techniques were use to track SPIO-labeled MSCs by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Human bone marrow MSCs were cultured and labeled with SPIO. Fresh degenerated human osteochondral fragments were obtained during total knee arthroplasty and a cartilage defect was created at the center. Then, the osteochondral fragments were attached to the sidewalls of culture flasks filled with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) to mimic the human joint cavity. The SPIO-labeled MSCs were injected into the culture flasks in the presence of a 0.57 Tesla (T) magnetic force. Before and 90 min after cell targeting, the specimens underwent T2-weighted turbo spin-echo (SET2WI) sequence of 3.0 T MRI. MRI results were compared with histological findings. Macroscopic observation showed that SPIO-labeled MSCs were steered to the target region of cartilage defect. MRI revealed significant changes in signal intensity (P<0.01). HE staining exibited that a great number of MSCs formed a three-dimensional (3D) cell "sheet" structure at the chondral defect site. It was concluded that 0.57 T magnetic force permits spatial delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs to the target region in vitro. High-field MRI can serve as an very sensitive non-invasive technique for the visualization of SPIO-labeled MSCs.

  3. Polyacrylic acid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting drug resistance in mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Padwal, Priyanka; Bandyopadhyaya, Rajdip; Mehra, Sarika

    2014-12-23

    The emergence of drug resistance is a major problem faced in current tuberculosis (TB) therapy, representing a global health concern. Mycobacterium is naturally resistant to most drugs due to export of the latter outside bacterial cells by active efflux pumps, resulting in a low intracellular drug concentration. Thus, development of agents that can enhance the effectiveness of drugs used in TB treatment and bypass the efflux mechanism is crucial. In this study, we present a new nanoparticle-based strategy for enhancing the efficacy of existing drugs. To that end, we have developed poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated iron oxide (magnetite) nanoparticles (PAA-MNPs) as efflux inhibitors and used it together with rifampicin (a first line anti-TB drug) on Mycobacterium smegmatis. PAA-MNPs of mean diameter 9 nm interact with bacterial cells via surface attachment and are then internalized by cells. Although PAA-MNP alone does not inhibit cell growth, treatment of cells with a combination of PAA-MNP and rifampicin exhibits a synergistic 4-fold-higher growth inhibition compared to rifampicin alone. This is because the combination of PAA-MNP and rifampicin results in up to a 3-fold-increased accumulation of rifampicin inside the cells. This enhanced intracellular drug concentration has been explained by real-time transport studies on a common efflux pump substrate, ethidium bromide (EtBr). It is seen that PAA-MNP increases the accumulation of EtBr significantly and also minimizes the EtBr efflux in direct proportion to the PAA-MNP concentration. Our results thus illustrate that the addition of PAA-MNP with rifampicin may bypass the innate drug resistance mechanism of M. smegmatis. This generic strategy is also found to be successful for other anti-TB drugs, such as isoniazid and fluoroquinolones (e.g., norfloxacin), only when stabilized, coated nanoparticles (such as PAA-MNP) are used, not PAA or MNP alone. We hence establish coated nanoparticles as a new class of efflux

  4. Glass-clad semiconductor core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Stephanie Lynn

    Glass-clad optical fibers comprising a crystalline semiconductor core have garnered considerable recent attention for their potential utility as novel waveguides for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing, power delivery, and biomedicine. As research into these fibers has progressed, it has become evident that excessive losses are limiting performance and so greater understanding of the underlying materials science, coupled with advances in fiber processing, is needed. More specifically, the semiconductor core fibers possess three performance-limiting characteristics that need to be addressed: (a) thermal expansion mismatches between crystalline core and glass cladding that lead to cracks, (b) the precipitation of oxide<