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Sample records for oxide induces bradyzoite

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT AND BIOLOGY OF BRADYZOITES OF TOXOPLASMA GONDII

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite of mammals and birds that is an important human pathogen. Infection with this Apicomplexan parasite results in its dissemination throughout its host via the tachyzoite life-stage. After dissemination these tachyzoites differentiate into bradyzoites within cysts that remain latent. These bradyzoites can transform back into tachyzoites and in immunosupressed individuals this often results in symptomatic disease. Both tachyzoites and bradyzoites develop in tissue culture and thus this crucial differentiation event can be studied. Recent advances in the genetic manipulation of T. gondii have expanded the molecular tools that can be applied to studies on bradyzoite differentiation. Evidence is accumulating that this differentiation event is stress mediated and may share common pathways with other stress-induced differentiation events in other eukaryotic organisms. Study of the stress response and signaling pathways are areas of active research in this organism. In addition, characterization of unique bradyzoite-specific structures, such as the cyst wall, should lead to a further understanding of T. gondii biology. This review focuses on the biology and development of bradyzoites and current approaches to the study of the tachyzoite to bradyzoite differentiation process. PMID:10762601

  2. Toxoplasma gondii: a bradyzoite-specific DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Akio; Dautu, George; Haga, Kaori; Munyaka, Biscah; Carmen, Gabriella; Kobayashi, Yoshiyasu; Igarashi, Makoto

    2011-04-01

    The DnaK-tetratricopeptide repeat (DnaK-TPR) gene (ToxoDB ID, TGME49_002020) is expressed predominantly at the bradyzoite stage. DnaK-TPR protein has a heat shock protein (DnaK) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains with amino acid sequence similarity to the counterparts of other organisms (40.2-43.7% to DnaK domain and 41.1-66.0% to TPR domain). These findings allowed us to infer that DnaK-TPR protein is important in the tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite development or maintenance of cyst structure although the function of this gene is still unknown. An immunofluorescence assay (IFA) revealed that DnaK-TPR protein was expressed in Toxoplasma gondii-encysted and in vitro-induced bradyzoites and distributed in the whole part of parasite cells. We conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to identify proteins interacting with DnaK-TPR protein, and demonstrated that DnaK-TPR protein interacts with p23 co-chaperone protein (Tgp23). It was expected that DnaK-TPR protein would have a function as a molecular chaperon in bradyzoite cells associated with Tgp23. Possible mechanisms for this gene are discussed.

  3. Comparative infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii for intermediate (mice) and definitive (cats) hosts.

    PubMed

    Dubey, J P

    2006-08-31

    Tachyzoites, bradyzoites (in tissue cysts), and sporozoites (in oocysts) are the three infectious stages of Toxoplasma gondii. The prepatent period (time to shedding of oocysts after primary infection) varies with the stage of T. gondii ingested by the cat. The prepatent period (pp) after ingesting bradyzoites is short (3-10 days) while it is long (18 days or longer) after ingesting oocysts or tachyzoites. The conversion of bradyzoites to tachyzoites and tachyzoites to bradyzoites is biologically important in the life cycle of T. gondii and it has been proposed that the pp can be used to study stage conversion. In the present study, infectivity of oocysts and bradyzoites released from tissue cysts of a recent isolate of T. gondii, TgCkAr23, to cats and mice was compared. Ten-fold dilutions of oocysts or bradyzoites were administered orally to cats, and orally and subcutaneously to mice. Of the 29 cats each fed 1-10 million oocysts only one cat shed oocysts and the pp was 23 days; all cats remained asymptomatic. In contrast, all mice administered the same 10-fold dilutions of oocysts either orally or subcutaneously died of toxoplasmosis. The results confirm that infectivity of the oocysts to cats is lower than for mice and that oocysts are non-pathogenic for cats. Of the 41 cats each fed 1-1,000 free bradyzoites, 15 shed oocysts with a short pp of 4-9 days, and all remained asymptomatic. The infectivity of bradyzoites to mice by the oral route was approximately 100 times lower than that by the subcutaneous route. The results confirm the hypothesis that the pp in cats is stage and not dose dependent, and that transmission of T. gondii is most efficient when cats consume tissue cysts (carnivory) or when intermediate hosts consume oocysts (fecal-oral transmission).

  4. Analysis of Structures and Epitopes of Surface Antigen Glycoproteins Expressed in Bradyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Hua; Zhang, Min; Zhang, Qingli; Gong, Jing; Cong, Haizi; Xin, Qing; He, Shenyi

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite capable of infecting humans and animals. Surface antigen glycoproteins, SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y, are expressed on the surface of bradyzoites. These antigens have been shown to protect bradyzoites against immune responses during chronic infections. We studied structures of SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y proteins using bioinformatics methods. The protein sequence alignment was performed by T-Coffee method. Secondary structural and functional domains were predicted using software PSIPRED v3.0 and SMART software, and 3D models of proteins were constructed and compared using the I-TASSER server, VMD, and SWISS-spdbv. Our results showed that SAG2C, -2D, -2X, and -2Y are highly homologous proteins. They share the same conserved peptides and HLA-I restricted epitopes. The similarity in structure and domains indicated putative common functions that might stimulate similar immune response in hosts. The conserved peptides and HLA-restricted epitopes could provide important insights on vaccine study and the diagnosis of this disease. PMID:23586017

  5. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, Jiapeng; Mouveaux, Thomas; Light, Samuel H.; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F.; Tomavo, Stanislas; Ngô, Huân M.

    2015-03-01

    The second crystal structure of a parasite protein preferentially enriched in the brain cyst of T. gondii has been solved at 2.75 Å resolution. Bradyzoite enolase 1 is reported to have differential functions as a glycolytic enzyme and a transcriptional regulator in bradyzoites. In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts.

  6. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  7. The structure of bradyzoite-specific enolase from Toxoplasma gondii reveals insights into its dual cytoplasmic and nuclear functions.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Jiapeng; Mouveaux, Thomas; Light, Samuel H; Minasov, George; Anderson, Wayne F; Tomavo, Stanislas; Ngô, Huân M

    2015-03-01

    In addition to catalyzing a central step in glycolysis, enolase assumes a remarkably diverse set of secondary functions in different organisms, including transcription regulation as documented for the oncogene c-Myc promoter-binding protein 1. The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii differentially expresses two nuclear-localized, plant-like enolases: enolase 1 (TgENO1) in the latent bradyzoite cyst stage and enolase 2 (TgENO2) in the rapidly replicative tachyzoite stage. A 2.75 Å resolution crystal structure of bradyzoite enolase 1, the second structure to be reported of a bradyzoite-specific protein in Toxoplasma, captures an open conformational state and reveals that distinctive plant-like insertions are located on surface loops. The enolase 1 structure reveals that a unique residue, Glu164, in catalytic loop 2 may account for the lower activity of this cyst-stage isozyme. Recombinant TgENO1 specifically binds to a TTTTCT DNA motif present in the cyst matrix antigen 1 (TgMAG1) gene promoter as demonstrated by gel retardation. Furthermore, direct physical interactions of both nuclear TgENO1 and TgENO2 with the TgMAG1 gene promoter are demonstrated in vivo using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. Structural and biochemical studies reveal that T. gondii enolase functions are multifaceted, including the coordination of gene regulation in parasitic stage development. Enolase 1 provides a potential lead in the design of drugs against Toxoplasma brain cysts. PMID:25760592

  8. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of β-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and β-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while β-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, β-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing β-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1 week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of β-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of β-glucan in aqueous food systems where β-glucan and lipids co-exist.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Subunit 3 Is Involved in the Switch from Tachyzoite to Bradyzoite Development

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Tatsuki; Ma, Yan Fen; Tomita, Tadakimi; Murakoshi, Fumi; Eaton, Michael S.; Yakubu, Rama; Han, Bing; Tu, Vincent; Kato, Kentaro; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Gupta, Nishith; Suvorova, Elena S.; White, Michael W.; Kim, Kami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Asexual reproduction in T. gondii allows it to switch between the rapidly replicating tachyzoite and quiescent bradyzoite life cycle stages. A transient cyclic AMP (cAMP) pulse promotes bradyzoite differentiation, whereas a prolonged elevation of cAMP inhibits this process. We investigated the mechanism(s) by which differential modulation of cAMP exerts a bidirectional effect on parasite differentiation. There are three protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits (TgPKAc1 to -3) expressed in T. gondii. Unlike TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2, which are conserved in the phylum Apicomplexa, TgPKAc3 appears evolutionarily divergent and specific to coccidian parasites. TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2 are distributed in the cytomembranes, whereas TgPKAc3 resides in the cytosol. TgPKAc3 was genetically ablated in a type II cyst-forming strain of T. gondii (PruΔku80Δhxgprt) and in a type I strain (RHΔku80Δhxgprt), which typically does not form cysts. The Δpkac3 mutant exhibited slower growth than the parental and complemented strains, which correlated with a higher basal rate of tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) treatment, which elevates cAMP levels, maintained wild-type parasites as tachyzoites under bradyzoite induction culture conditions (pH 8.2/low CO2), whereas the Δpkac3 mutant failed to respond to the treatment. This suggests that TgPKAc3 is the factor responsible for the cAMP-dependent tachyzoite maintenance. In addition, the Δpkac3 mutant had a defect in the production of brain cysts in vivo, suggesting that a substrate of TgPKAc3 is probably involved in the persistence of this parasite in the intermediate host animals. PMID:27247232

  10. The Toxoplasma gondii cyst wall protein CST1 is critical for cyst wall integrity and promotes bradyzoite persistence

    SciTech Connect

    Tomita, Tadakimi; Bzik, David J.; Ma, Yan Fen; Fox, Barbara A.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Taylor, Ronald C.; Kim, Kami; Weiss, Louis M.

    2013-12-26

    Toxoplasma gondii infects up to one third of the world’s population. A key to the success of T.gondii is its ability to persist for the life of its host as bradyzoites within tissue cysts. The glycosylated cyst wall is the key structural feature that facilitates persistence and oral transmission of this parasite. We have identified CST1 (TGME49_064660) as a 250 kDa SRS (SAG1 related sequence) domain protein with a large mucin-like domain. CST1 is responsible for the Dolichos biflorus Agglutinin (DBA) lectin binding characteristic of T. gondii cysts. Deletion of CST1 results in a fragile brain cyst phenotype revealed by a thinning and disruption of the underlying region of the cyst wall. These defects are reversed by complementation of CST1. Additional complementation experiments demonstrate that the CST1-mucin domain is necessary for the formation of a normal cyst wall structure, the ability of the cyst to resist mechanical stress and binding of DBA to the cyst wall. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis demonstrated dysregulation of bradyzoite genes within the various cst1 mutants. These results indicate that CST1 functions as a key structural component that reinforces the cyst wall structure and confers essential sturdiness to the T. gondii tissue cyst.

  11. Safrole oxide inhibits angiogenesis by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Miao, Junying; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli; Yin, Deling

    2005-06-01

    Our previous studies indicate that 3, 4-(methylenedioxy)-1-(2', 3'-epoxypropyl)-benzene (safrole oxide), a newly synthesized compound, induces apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and A549 lung cancer cells. To our knowledge, the inhibition of angiogenesis by safrole oxide has not been reported yet. We report here that cultured rat aorta treated with safrole oxide exhibited a significant microvessel reduction as determined by counting the number of microvessels in a phase contrast microscope. There were more microvessels formed in the presence of A549 lung cancer cells in rat aorta model, while a dramatic inhibition of angiogenesis was obtained by adding 220-450 micromol l(-1) of safrole oxide to the growth medium (P<.01). The culture of rat aorta treated with safrole oxide produced only some abortive endothelial cells but not microvessels. Furthermore, safrole oxide induced antiangiogenic effect in the chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) as a dose dependent manner. Eggs treated with 2-11 micromol 100 microl(-1) per egg of the safrole oxide for 48 h exhibited a significant reduction in blood vessel area of the CAM, a process likely mediated by apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation. Our results suggest that safrole oxide has antiangiogenic activity and this effect might occur by induction of cellular apoptosis.

  12. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  13. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  14. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields. PMID:24503715

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. Facile Access to Graphene Oxide from Ferro-Induced Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Methods allowing the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) are vital important for the production of graphene from GO. This oxidation reaction has mainly relied on strong acid strategy for 174 years, which circumvents issues associated with toxicity of reagent and product, complex post-treatment, high cost and waste generation. Here, we report a green route for performing this oxidization reaction via a ferro-induced strategy, with use of water, potassium ferrate (Fe(VI)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as reagents, to produce about 65% yield of GO (vs. 40% for Hummers’ method, the most commonly used concentrated acid strategy) and non-toxic by-products. Moreover, GO produced from this new method shows equivalent performance to those reported previously. This H2SO4-free strategy makes it possible to process graphite into GO in a safe, low-cost, time-saving, energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway, opening a promising avenue for the large-scale production of GO and GO-based materials.

  17. In vitro cultivation of Hammondia heydorni: Generation of tachyzoites, stage conversion into bradyzoites, and evaluation of serologic cross-reaction with Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Gondim, L F P; Meyer, J; Peters, M; Rezende-Gondim, M M; Vrhovec, M G; Pantchev, N; Bauer, C; Conraths, F J; Schares, G

    2015-06-15

    Hammondia heydorni was in vitro isolated from oocysts shed by three dogs using a finite cell line from embryonal bovine heart (KH-R). The oocysts were purified and suspended in 2% potassium dichromate or 2% sulphuric acid for sporulation for 2-5 days at room temperature. The parasites were confirmed as H. heydorni by PCR using specific primers (JS4/JS5) and by negative reaction for Neospora caninum employing the primers Np6+/Np21+. H. heydorni sporulated oocysts (1 × 10(6)) from each dog were initially treated with sodium hypochlorite. For excystation of sporozoites, oocysts from one dog were lysed by ultrasound followed by incubation with 0.75% taurocholate. Excystation of sporozoites from the other two dogs was achieved by oocyst fragmentation with glass beads with no further chemical treatment. Tachyzoites were clearly seen in the cultures at three days post inoculation (dpi). Bradyzoite conversion and cyst formation were evaluated at different time points by using a polyclonal rabbit serum against a bradyzoite-specific antigen (anti-BAG1), and a rat monoclonal antibody (mAbCC2) against a cyst wall protein. Bradyzoites were firstly detected at 7 dpi. Between 18 and 21 dpi most of cultured parasites consisted of encysted bradyzoites. The H. heydorni cysts increased in size during cultivation and reached a length of up to 135 μm. The parasite was maintained in the bovine heart cells up to 4.5months. Sera from mice and sheep experimentally infected with H. heydorni oocysts reacted with H. heydorni by IFAT, but did not cross-react with N. caninum antigens using IFAT or immunoblot. These findings suggest that serological cross-reactivity between H. heydorni and N. caninum seems to be of minor importance.

  18. Development of dual fluorescent stage specific reporter strain of Toxoplasma gondii to follow tachyzoite and bradyzoite development in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Paredes-Santos, T C; Tomita, T; Yan Fen, M; de Souza, W; Attias, M; Vommaro, R C; Weiss, L M

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan that infects 30% of humans as intermediate hosts. T Sexual reproduction can occur only within the intestinal tract of felines, however, infection in other mammals and birds is associated with asexual replication and interconversion between the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages. Bradyzoites are slow growing forms found in tissue cysts in latent infection. Recently, our group described the biological behavior of the EGS strain that forms thick walled cysts spontaneously in tissue culture, constituting a useful tool for examining the developmental biology of T. gondii. To further improve the usefulness of this model, we constructed genetically modified EGS parasites that express fluorescent tags under the control of stage specific promoters. The promoter regions for SAG-1 (tachyzoite specific), BAG-1 and LDH-2 (bradyzoite specific) were amplified by PCR and plasmids were constructed with mCherry (redT) and sfGFP (greenB) sequences, respectively. Strains of parasites were selected using FACS to arrive at single fluorescent and dual fluorescent strains of EGS expressing tags in a stage specific manner. In cell cultures, vacuoles labeled by immunofluorescence assay using anti-CST-1 a marker for T. gondii cyst wall contained parasites that were positive for BAG1-GFP and negative for SAG1-mCherry. Tachyzoites and bradyzoites harvested from the mice expressed stage specific mCherry and GFP proteins, respectively. These new dual fluorescent transgenic EGS strains are a promising tool to elucidate the mechanisms of T. gondii differentiation both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26432517

  19. Insect-cell expression, crystallization and X-ray data collection of the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 from Toxoplasma gondii

    SciTech Connect

    Grujic, Ognjen; Grigg, Michael E.; Boulanger, Martin J.

    2008-05-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the bradyzoite-specific surface antigen BSR4 from T. gondii are described. Toxoplasma gondii is an important global pathogen that infects nearly one third of the world’s adult population. A family of developmentally expressed structurally related surface-glycoprotein adhesins (SRSs) mediate attachment to and are utilized for entry into host cells. The latent bradyzoite form of T. gondii persists for the life of the host and expresses a distinct family of SRS proteins, of which the bradyzoite-specific antigen BSR4 is a prototypical member. Structural studies of BSR4 were initiated by first recombinantly expressing BSR4 in insect cells, which was followed by crystallization and preliminary X-ray data collection to 1.95 Å resolution. Data processing showed that BSR4 crystallized with one molecule in the asymmetric unit of the P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 or P4{sub 3}2{sub 1}2 space group, with a solvent content of 60% and a corresponding Matthews coefficient of 2.98 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}.

  20. Acrolein induces oxidative stress in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Shi, Riyi

    2005-02-01

    Acrolein, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation, has been shown to inflict significant structural and functional damage to isolated guinea pig spinal cord. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to mediate such detrimental effects. The current study demonstrates that acrolein can directly stimulate mitochondrial oxidative stress. Specifically, exposure of purified brain mitochondria to acrolein resulted in a dose-dependent increase of ROS and decreases in glutathione content and aconitase activity. This effect was not accompanied by significant intramitochondrial calcium influx or mitochondrial permeability transition, but rather by impaired function of the mitochondrial electron transport system. As well, we detected a significant inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in the presence of acrolein. This inhibition of ANT likely contributes to acrolein-induced ROS elevation since application of atractyloside, a specific ANT inhibitor, induced significant increase of ROS. We hypothesize that inhibition of ANT may mediate, in part, the acrolein-induced ROS increase in mitochondria.

  1. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  2. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  3. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host. PMID:15634847

  4. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host.

  5. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  6. Oxidant-induced apoptosis is mediated by oxidation of the actin-regulatory protein cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Klamt, Fábio; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Levine, Rodney L.; Pariser, Ashley; Zhang, Yaqin; Zhang, Baolin; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Shacter, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Physiological oxidants that are generated by activated phagocytes comprise the main source of oxidative stress during inflammation1,2. Oxidants such as taurine chloramine (TnCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can damage proteins and induce apoptosis, but the role of specific protein oxidation in this process has not been defined. We found that the actin-binding protein cofilin is a key target of oxidation. When oxidation of this single regulatory protein is prevented, oxidant-induced apoptosis is inhibited. Oxidation of cofilin causes it to lose its affinity for actin and to translocate to the mitochondria, where it induces swelling and cytochrome c release by mediating opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This occurs independently of Bax activation and requires both oxidation of cofilin Cys residues and dephosphorylation at Ser 3. Knockdown of endogenous cofilin using targeted siRNA inhibits oxidant-induced apoptosis, which is restored by re-expression of wild-type cofilin but not by cofilin containing Cys to Ala mutations. Exposure of cofilin to TnCl results in intramolecular disulphide bonding and oxidation of Met residues to Met sulphoxide, but only Cys oxidation causes cofilin to induce mitochondrial damage. PMID:19734890

  7. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood.

  8. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes.

  9. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  10. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  11. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  12. NaCl-induced accelerated oxidation of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Shinata, Y.; Nishi, Y.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes new phenomena about chloride-induced ;accelerated oxidation of chromium. Thermal analysis was adopted to examine the oxidation, which was studied particularly in the case of NaCl. The presence of NaCl remarkably accelerates the oxidation of chromium. The process occurs below the melting point of NaCl, and the main reaction product is Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. In the accelerated oxidation NaCl plays a catalytic role because it is not consumed significantly in the process. DTA analysis reveals that the heat of reaction also accelerates the rate of oxidation, especially at an early stage of the reaction. The accelerated oxidation takes place similarly under the presence of chlorides other than NaCl, but the oxidation rate depends on the kind of salt. Therefore the Cl/sup -/ anion plays an important role in the process, while the nature of the cation affects the rate of acceleration.

  13. Nitroxides protect against peroxynitrite-induced nitration and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Skolimowski, Janusz; Szewczyk, Rafał; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    Nitroxides are promising compounds for prevention of undesired protein modifications. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of 11 nitroxides, derivatives of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxide (TEMPO) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethylpirrolidine-1-oxyl (PROXYL) in prevention of nitration and oxidation of model compounds and human serum albumin (HSA). Most nitroxides were very efficient in preventing loss of fluorescein fluorescence induced by peroxynitrite (PN) (IC50 in the nanomolar range) and preventing HSA nitration. The loss of fluorescein fluorescence was demonstrated to be due to nitration. Nitroxides were more effective in prevention nitration than oxidation reactions. They showed a concentration window for preventing dihydrorhodamine (DHR) 123 oxidation but exerted a prooxidant effect at both high and low concentrations. No prooxidant effect of nitroxides was seen in prevention of DHR123 oxidation induced by SIN-1. In all essays hydrophobic nitroxides (especially 4-nonylamido-TEMPO and 3-carbamolyl-dehydroPROXYL) showed the lowest efficiency. An exception was the prevention of thiol group oxidation by PN and SIN-1 where hydrophobic nitroxides were the most effective, apparently due to binding to the protein. Nitroxides showed low toxicity to MCF-7 cells. Most nitroxides, except for the most hydrophobic ones, protected cells from the cytotoxic action of SIN-1 and SIN-1-induced protein nitration. These results point to potential usefulness of nitroxides for prevention of PN-induced oxidation and, especially, nitration.

  14. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  15. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy.

    PubMed

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  16. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  17. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  18. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  19. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  20. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, Joao B.T.

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  1. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  2. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  3. Role of Oxidative Stress in Transformation Induced by Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity. PMID:22191014

  4. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  5. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, William A; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-03-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  6. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, Jr., William A.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  7. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes. PMID:27251462

  8. Ovariectomy exacerbates oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan Rafael; Muntané, Jordi; Herencia, Carmen; Muñoz, Maria C; Bujalance, Inmaculada; Montilla, Pedro; Túnez, Issac

    2006-02-01

    Ovarian hormone depletion in ovariectomized experimental animals is a useful model with which to study the physiopathological consequences of menopause in women. It has been suggested that menopause is a risk factor for the induction of several cardiovascular disorders. In the present study we analyzed the effects of ovarian hormone depletion by ovariectomy (OVX) in a model of oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin (AD). To evaluate these effects, we measured parameters related to cardiac damage (creatinine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide and carbonyl proteins) in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes. OVX was found to alter all markers of oxidative stress and cell damage in cardiac tissue. Similarly, the OVX-derived loss of ovarian hormones enhanced cardiac damage and oxidative stress induced by AD. Our results suggest that antioxidant status in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes is seriously compromised by OVX during the cardiomyopathy induced by AD in experimental animals. In conclusion, the absence of hormones caused by OVX or menopause may induce or accelerate pre-existing cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  9. [Inhibition of bacterial lypopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by oxidized lipids].

    PubMed

    Korotaeva, A A; Samokhodskaia, L M; Bochkov, V N

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine inhibits inflammatory effects of the bacterial lipopolisacharide (LPS, endotoxin). In this work we have characterized the anti-endotoxin activity of other classes of oxidized phospholipids with different polar head groups and fatty acid residues. LPS-induced expression of E-selectin on human endothelial cells was inhibited by oxidized phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidic acids. The anti-endotoxin effect insignificantly depended on the type of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unoxidized phospholipids did not suppress effects of LPS. Thus, the anti-endotoxin activity of oxidized phospholipids crucially depends on the presence of oxidatively modified fatty acid residue. PMID:17436686

  10. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  11. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  12. Quinonediimine-induced oxidative coupling of organomagnesium reagents.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Toru; Suzuki, Riyo; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2014-01-13

    N,N'-Diphenyl-p-benzoquinonediimine, a redox-active unit of polyaniline, efficiently induced the oxidative homocoupling of various aryl- and vinylmagnesium reagents in suppressing the side reactions, such as 1,2- or 1,4-addition reaction. PMID:24339200

  13. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  14. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed

    Kacprzak, Dorota; Pawliczak, Rafał

    2015-06-19

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism.

  15. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  16. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Is Responsible for TRPV4-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Yuan, Yibiao; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been reported to be responsible for neuronal injury in pathological conditions. Excessive oxidative stress can lead to neuronal damage, and activation of TRPV4 increases the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in many types of cells. The present study explored whether TRPV4-induced neuronal injury is mediated through enhancing oxidative stress. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A increased the content of methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and NO in the hippocampus, which was blocked by administration of the TRPV4 specific antagonist HC-067047. The activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were decreased by GSK1016790A, whereas the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) remained unchanged. Moreover, the protein level and activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were increased by GSK1016790A, and the GSK1016790A-induced increase in NO content was blocked by an nNOS specific antagonist ARL-17477. The GSK1016790A-induced modulations of CAT, GSH-Px and nNOS activities and the protein level of nNOS were significantly inhibited by HC-067047. Finally, GSK1016790A-induced neuronal death and apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 area were markedly attenuated by administration of a ROS scavenger Trolox or ARL-17477. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 enhances oxidative stress by inhibiting CAT and GSH-Px and increasing nNOS, which is responsible, at least in part, for TRPV4-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27799895

  17. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  18. Arsenic-induced oxidative cerebral disorders: protection by taurine.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2009-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether the conditionally essential amino acid, taurine, could play any protective role against the potent neurotoxin arsenic (As)-induced oxidative impairment in the rat brain. Administration in the form of NaAsO(2) (at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days, orally), As increased the intracellular accumulation of metallic As, reactive oxygen species, and super oxide radicals. The toxin also augmented the extent of lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and the levels of glutathione disulphide. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, membrane-bound enzymes, acetylcholinesterase, and the levels of reduced glutathione, as well as total thiols, have been significantly decreased due to As exposure. Oral administration of taurine (at a dose of 100 mg/kg/body weight for 5 days) was found to be very effective in the prevention of As-induced oxidative impairment in the brain tissue of the experimental rats. To validate the experimental results, a well-known water-soluble antioxidant, vitamin C, was used as the positive control in the study. Combining all, results suggest that taurine plays a beneficial role against As-induced cerebral oxidative stress.

  19. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  20. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer.

  1. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer. PMID:26550986

  2. Oxidative stress-induced calcium signalling in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Greene, Vilma; Cao, Hong; Schanne, Francis A X; Bartelt, Diana C

    2002-05-01

    The effects of oxidative stress on levels of calcium ion (Ca(2+)) in Aspergillus nidulans were measured using strains expressing aequorin in the cytoplasm (Aeq(cyt)) and mitochondria (Aeq(mt)). When oxidative stress was induced by exposure to 10-mM H(2)O(2), the mitochondrial calcium response (Ca(mt)(2+)) was greater than the change in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(c)(2+)). The Ca(mt)(2+) response to H(2)O(2) was dose dependent, while the increase in [Ca(c)(2+)] did not change with increasing H(2)O(2). The increase in both [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] in response to oxidative stress was enhanced by exposure of cells to Ca(2+). The presence of chelator in the external medium only partially inhibited the Ca(mt)(2+) and Ca(c)(2+) responses to oxidative stress. Reagents that alter calcium fluxes had varied effects on the Ca(mt)(2+) response to peroxide. Ruthenium red blocked the increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)], while neomycin caused an even greater increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)]. Treatment with ruthenium red and neomycin had no effect on the Ca(c)(2+) response. Bafilomycin A and oligomycin had no effect on either the mitochondrial or cytoplasmic response. Inhibitors of both voltage-regulated calcium channels and intracellular calcium release channels inhibited the Ca(2+)-dependent component of the Ca(mt)(2+) response to oxidative stress. We conclude that the more significant Ca(2+) response to oxidative stress occurs in the mitochondria and that both intracellular and extracellular calcium pools can contribute to the increases in [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] induced by oxidative stress.

  3. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  4. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  5. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence.

  6. Light-induced oxidation in semihard cheeses. Evaluation of methods used to determine levels of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Grith; Sørensen, John; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2002-07-17

    Light-induced oxidation in Havarti cheese (38% fat) stored in the dark and exposed to fluorescent light was evaluated by an array of chemical, physical, and spectroscopic methods. Light-induced changes were noticeable already after short exposure times (<12 h). A clear differentiation between samples stored in the dark and samples exposed to 1000 lx fluorescent light was obtained by means of the following methods: color measurements (a values), peroxide value determinations, and evaluations of volatile oxidation products by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC). The expected changes in peroxide values in relation to storage time were not evident. Measuring free radicals by electron spin resonance spectrometry could not be done to distinguish between samples, possibly due to the conversion of radicals during sample preparation. However, significant light-exposure effects on secondary oxidation products, detected by SPME-GC, were noted for 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, nonanal, and benzaldehyde. PMID:12105971

  7. Increased Oxidative Stress Induces Apoptosis in Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Tual-Chalot, Simon; Mostefai, H. Ahmed; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, María Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress results in deleterious cell function in pathologies associated with inflammation. Here, we investigated the generation of superoxide anion as well as the anti-oxidant defense systems related to the isoforms of superoxide dismutases (SOD) in cystic fibrosis (CF) cells. Pro-apoptotic agents induced apoptosis in CF but not in control cells that was reduced by treatment with SOD mimetic. These effects were associated with increased superoxide anion production, sensitive to the inhibition of IκB-α phosphorylation, in pancreatic but not tracheal CF cells, and reduced upon inhibition of either mitochondrial complex I or NADPH oxidase. CF cells exhibited reduced expression, but not activity, of both Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD when compared to control cells. Although, expression of EC-SOD was similar in normal and CF cells, its activity was reduced in CF cells. We provide evidence that high levels of oxidative stress are associated with increased apoptosis in CFTR-mutated cells, the sources being different depending on the cell type. These observations underscore a reduced anti-oxidant defense mechanism, at least in part, via diminished EC-SOD activity and regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expressions. These data point to new therapeutic possibilities in targeting anti-oxidant pathways to reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis in CF cells. PMID:21931865

  8. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  9. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  10. Increasing mitochondrial muscle fatty acid oxidation induces skeletal muscle remodeling toward an oxidative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hénique, Carole; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Vavrova, Eliska; Lenoir, Véronique; Ferry, Arnaud; Esnous, Catherine; Ramond, Elodie; Girard, Jean; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Prip-Buus, Carina; Cohen, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Adult skeletal muscle is a dynamic, remarkably plastic tissue, which allows myofibers to switch from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative types and to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (mFAO) capacity and vascularization in response to exercise training. mFAO is the main muscle energy source during endurance exercise, with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) being the key regulatory enzyme. Whether increasing muscle mFAO affects skeletal muscle physiology in adulthood actually remains unknown. To investigate this, we used in vivo electrotransfer technology to express in mouse tibialis anterior (TA), a fast/glycolytic muscle, a mutated CPT1 form (CPT1mt) that is active but insensitive to malonyl-CoA, its physiologic inhibitor. In young (2-mo-old) adult mice, muscle CPT1mt expression enhanced mFAO (+40%), but also increased the percentage of oxidative fibers (+28%), glycogen content, and capillary-to-fiber density (+45%). This CPT1mt-induced muscle remodeling, which mimicked exercise-induced oxidative phenotype, led to a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. In the context of aging, characterized by sarcopenia and reduced oxidative capacity, CPT1mt expression in TAs from aged (20-mo-old) mice partially reversed aging-associated sarcopenia and fiber-type transition, and increased muscle capillarity. These findings provide evidence that mFAO regulates muscle phenotype and may be a potential target to combat age-related decline in muscle function. PMID:25713059

  11. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induced morphological changes, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in Chinook salmon (CHSE-214) cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Mahajan, Amit; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando Costa; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala

    2015-10-01

    Aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 NPs) are increasingly used in diverse applications that has raised concern about their safety. Recent studies suggested that Al2 O3 NPs induced oxidative stress may be the cause of toxicity in algae, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Caenorhabditis elegans and Danio rerio. However, there is paucity on the toxicity of Al2 O3 NPs on fish cell lines. The current study was aimed to investigate Al2 O3 NPs induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and morphological abnormality of Chinnok salmon cells (CHSE-214). A dose-dependent decline in cell viability was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs. Oxidative stress induced by Al2 O3 NPs in CHSE-214 cells has resulted in the significant reduction of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione in a dose-dependent manner. However, a significant increase in glutathione sulfo-transferase and lipid peroxidation was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner. Significant morphological changes in CHSE-214 cells were observed when exposed to Al2 O3 NPs at 6, 12 and 24 h. The cells started to detach and appear spherical at 6 h followed by loss of cellular contents resulting in the shrinking of the cells. At 24 h, the cells started to disintegrate and resulted in cell death. Our data demonstrate that Al2 O3 NPs induce cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner in CHSE-214 cells. Thus, our current work may serve as a base-line study for future evaluation of toxicity studies using CHSE-214 cells. PMID:25875951

  12. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  13. Losartan abolishes oxidative stress induced by intermittent hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Pialoux, Vincent; Foster, Glen E; Ahmed, Sofia B; Beaudin, Andrew E; Hanly, Patrick J; Poulin, Marc J

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of the type 1 angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor in the increase of oxidative stress and NO metabolism during a single 6 h exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH). Nine healthy young men were exposed, while awake, to sham IH, IH with placebo medication, and IH with the AT(1) receptor antagonist, losartan, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study design. In addition to blood pressure, oxidative stress, peroxynitrite activity, uric acid, global antioxidant status and the end-products of NO (NOx) metabolism were measured in plasma before and after 6 h of IH. Oxidative stress and peroxynitrite activity increased and NOx decreased during IH with placebo. In contrast, neither sham IH nor IH with losartan affected these parameters. With respect to each condition, blood pressure had the same profile as oxidative stress. These results demonstrate that blockade of AT(1) receptors prevented the increase in oxidative stress and peroxynitrite activity and the decrease in NO metabolism induced by IH. Finally, this study suggests that the renin-angiotensin system may participate in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species associated with IH by upregulation of the actions of angiotensin II.

  14. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described.

  15. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described. PMID:26607273

  16. Influence of a thiazole derivative on ethanol and thermally oxidized sunflower oil-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kode, Aruna; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani; Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Menon, Venugopal P

    2004-10-01

    The present work describes the protective influence of the dendrodoine analogue (DA) [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenylamino) thiazole] on thermally oxidized sunflower oil and ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Ethanol was fed to animals at a level of 20% [(7.9 g/kg body weight (bw)] and thermally oxidized sunflower oil at a level of 15% (15 mL/100 g feed). Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring the activity of plasma aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), which were elevated in thermally oxidized oil, and ethanol fed rats when compared with normal control rats. Tissue damage was associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption in the antioxidant defence mechanism in thermally oxidized oil- and ethanol-fed groups when compared with normal control group. The activity of liver marker enzymes (AST, ALP and GGT) and the level of lipid peroxidation decreased when DA was administered along with ethanol and thermally oxidized oil. The antioxidant status was near normal in DA-administered groups. Thus we propose that DA exerts antioxidant properties by modulating the activity of hepatic marker enzymes, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status.

  17. Spaceflight environment induces mitochondrial oxidative damage in ocular tissue.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao W; Pecaut, Michael J; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Bouxsein, Mary; Jones, Tamako A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Chieu, Jenny; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-10-01

    A recent report shows that more than 30% of the astronauts returning from Space Shuttle missions or the International Space Station (ISS) were diagnosed with eye problems that can cause reduced visual acuity. We investigate here whether spaceflight environment-associated retinal damage might be related to oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-135), and within 3-5 h of landing, the spaceflight and ground-control mice, similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEMs) were euthanized and their eyes were removed for analysis. Changes in expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, mitochondrial and endothelial cell biology were examined. Apoptosis in the retina was analyzed by caspase-3 immunocytochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation were also measured. Evaluation of spaceflight mice and AEM ground-control mice showed that expression of several genes playing central roles in regulating the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathway were significantly altered in mouse ocular tissue after spaceflight compared to AEM ground-control mice. In addition, the mRNA levels of several genes, which are responsible for regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were also significantly up-regulated in spaceflight samples compared to AEM ground-control mice. Further more, the level of HNE protein was significantly elevated in the retina after spaceflight compared to controls. Our results also revealed that spaceflight conditions induced significant apoptosis in the retina especially inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) compared to AEM ground controls. The data provided the first evidence that spaceflight conditions induce oxidative damage that results in mitochondrial apoptosis in the retina. This data suggest

  18. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces FGF21 in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Wicks, Shawna E.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Salbaum, J. Michael; Burk, David; Dubuisson, Olga S.; Mendoza, Tamra M.; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acids are the primary fuel source for skeletal muscle during most of our daily activities and impaired fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is associated with insulin resistance. We have developed a mouse model of impaired FAO by deleting carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1b specifically in skeletal muscle (Cpt1bm−/−). Cpt1bm−/− mice have increased glucose utilization and are resistant to diet induced obesity. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial FAO induces FGF21 expression specifically in skeletal muscle. The induction of FGF21 in Cpt1b-deficient muscle is dependent on AMPK and Akt1 signaling but independent on the stress signaling pathways. FGF21 appears to act in a paracrine manner to increase glucose uptake under low insulin conditions, but does not contribute to the resistance to diet induced obesity. PMID:27184848

  19. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  20. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  1. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  2. Analysis of oxidative signalling induced by ozone in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Jambunathan, Niranjani; Gunjan, Samir Kumar; Faustin, Enock; Weng, Hua; Ayoubi, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    We are using acute ozone as an elicitor of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) to understand oxidative signalling in Arabidopsis. Temporal patterns of ROS following a 6 h exposure to 300 nL L(-1) of ozone in ozone-sensitive Wassilewskija (Ws-0) ecotype showed a biphasic ROS burst with a smaller peak at 4 h and a larger peak at 16 h. This was accompanied by a nitric oxide (NO) burst that peaked at 9 h. An analysis of antioxidant levels showed that both ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) were at their lowest levels, when ROS levels were high in ozone-stressed plants. Whole genome expression profiling analysis at 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h after initiation of ozone treatment identified 371 differentially expressed genes. Early induction of proteolysis and hormone-responsive genes indicated that an oxidative cell death pathway was triggered rapidly. Down-regulation of genes involved in carbon utilization, energy pathways and signalling suggested an inefficient defense response. Comparisons with other large-scale expression profiling studies indicated some overlap between genes induced by ethylene and ozone, and a significant overlap between genes repressed by ozone and methyl jasmonate treatment. Further, analysis of cis elements in the promoters of ozone-responsive genes also supports the view that phytohormones play a significant role in ozone-induced cell death. PMID:17080957

  3. Cordycepin prevents oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Yin, Peipei; Lu, Ye; Zhou, Zubin; Jiang, Chaolai; Liu, Yingjie; Yu, Xiaowei

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in impairment of osteogenesis and age-related osteoporosis. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there are few reports available regarding the effects of cordycepin on osteogenesis and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated the potential osteoprotective effects of cordycepin and its mechanism systematically using both in vitro model as well as in vivo mouse models. We discovered that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenesis which was rescued by cordycepin treatment in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Cordycepin exerted its protective effects partially by increasing or decreasing expression of osteogenic and osteoclastogenesis marker genes. Treatment with cordycepin increased Wnt-related genes' expression whereas supplementation of Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed its protective effects. In addition, administration of cordycepin promoted osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs by reducing oxidative stress in both ovariectomized and aged animal models. Taken together, these results support the protective effects of cordycepin on oxidative stress induced inhibition of osteogenesis by activation of Wnt pathway. PMID:26462178

  4. Cordycepin prevents oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Yin, Peipei; Lu, Ye; Zhou, Zubin; Jiang, Chaolai; Liu, Yingjie; Yu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in impairment of osteogenesis and age-related osteoporosis. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there are few reports available regarding the effects of cordycepin on osteogenesis and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated the potential osteoprotective effects of cordycepin and its mechanism systematically using both in vitro model as well as in vivo mouse models. We discovered that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced inhibition of osteogenesis which was rescued by cordycepin treatment in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Cordycepin exerted its protective effects partially by increasing or decreasing expression of osteogenic and osteoclastogenesis marker genes. Treatment with cordycepin increased Wnt-related genes' expression whereas supplementation of Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed its protective effects. In addition, administration of cordycepin promoted osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs by reducing oxidative stress in both ovariectomized and aged animal models. Taken together, these results support the protective effects of cordycepin on oxidative stress induced inhibition of osteogenesis by activation of Wnt pathway. PMID:26462178

  5. Electrotransport-induced unmixing and decomposition of ternary oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jakyu; Yoo, Han-Ill; Martin, Manfred

    2015-03-28

    A general expectation is that in a uniform oxygen activity atmosphere, cation electrotransport induces a ternary or higher oxide, e.g., AB{sub 1+ξ}O{sub 3+δ}, to kinetically unmix unless the electrochemical mobilities of, say, A{sup 2+}and B{sup 4+} cations are identically equal, and eventually to decompose into the component oxides AO and BO{sub 2} once the extent of unmixing exceeds the stability range of its nonmolecularity ξ. It has, however, earlier been reported [Yoo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 252103 (2008)] that even a massive cation electrotransport induces BaTiO{sub 3} to neither unmix nor decompose even at a voltage far exceeding the so-called decomposition voltage U{sub d}, a measure of the standard formation free energy of the oxide (|ΔG{sub f}{sup o}| = nFU{sub d}). Here, we report that as expected, NiTiO{sub 3} unmixes at any voltage and even decomposes if the voltage applied exceeds seemingly a threshold value larger than U{sub d}. We demonstrate experimentally that the electrochemical mobilities of Ni{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} should be necessarily unequal for unmixing. Also, we show theoretically that equal cation mobilities appear to be a sufficiency for BaTiO{sub 3} only for a thermodynamic reason.

  6. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles against lead-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Asieh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Najafi, Rezvan; Baeeri, Maryam; Rayegan, Samira; Cheshmehnour, Jamshid; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Bayrami, Zahra; Safa, Majid

    2015-03-01

    Due to numerous industrial applications, lead has caused widespread pollution in the environment; it seems that the central nervous system (CNS) is the main target for lead in the human body. Oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the CNS have been assumed as two mechanisms related to neurotoxicity of lead. Cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles have recently shown antioxidant effects, particularly when used together, through scavenging the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) required for cell apoptosis. We looked into the neuroprotective effects of the combinations of these nanoparticles against acute lead-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus. We used five groups in this study: control, lead, CeO2 nanoparticles + lead, Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead, and CeO2 and Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead. Nanoparticles of CeO2 (1000 mg/kg) and Y2O3 (230 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during 2 days prior to intraperitoneal injection of the lead (25 mg/kg for 3 days). At the end of the treatments, oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes activity, and apoptosis indexes were investigated. The results demonstrated that pretreatments with CeO2 and/or Y2O3 nanoparticles recovered lead-caused oxidative stress markers (ROS, lipid peroxidation, and total thiol molecules) and apoptosis indexes (Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3 protein expression). Besides, these nanoparticles reduced the activities of lead-induced superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as the ADP/ATP ratio. Interestingly, the best recovery resulted from the compound of these nanoparticles. Based on these outcomes, it appears that this combination may potentially be beneficial for protection against lead-caused acute toxicity in the brain through improving the oxidative stress-mediated programmed cell death pathway.

  7. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions.

  8. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions. PMID:26770919

  9. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  10. Controllably Inducing and Modeling Optical Response from Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Naumov, Anton

    Graphene, a novel 2-dimensional sp2-hybridized allotrope of Carbon, has unique electrical and mechanical properties. While it is naturally a highly conductive zero band gap semiconductor, graphene does not exhibit optical emission. It has been shown that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups elicits an opening of band gap in graphene. In this work, we aim to induce an optical response in graphene via controlled oxidation, and then explore potential origins of its photoluminescence through mathematical modeling. We employ timed ozone treatment of initially non-fluorescent reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to produce graphene oxide (GO) with specific optical properties. Oxidized material exhibits substantial changes in the absorption spectra and a broad photoluminescence feature, centered at 532 nm, which suggests the appearance of a band gap. We then explore a number of possible mechanisms for the origin of GO photoluminescence via PM3 and ab initio calculations on a functionalized single sheet of graphene. By adjusting modeling parameters to fit experimentally obtained optical transition energies we estimate the size of the sp2 graphitic regions in GO and the arrangement of functional groups that could be responsible for the observed emission.

  11. Inducible beta-oxidation pathway in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Kionka, C; Kunau, W H

    1985-01-01

    An inducible beta-oxidation system was demonstrated in a particulate fraction from Neurospora crassa. The activities of all individual beta-oxidation enzymes were enhanced in cells after a shift from a sucrose to an acetate medium. The induction was even more pronounced in transfer to a medium containing oleate as sole carbon and energy source. Since an acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase was detected instead of acyl-CoA oxidase, the former enzyme seems to catalyze the first step of the beta-oxidation sequence in N. crassa. After isopycnic centrifugation in a linear sucrose gradient, the intracellular organelles housing the fatty acid degradation pathway cosedimented (1.21 g/cm3) with the glyoxylate bypass enzymes isocitrate lyase and malate synthase and were clearly resolved from both mitochondrial marker enzymes (1.19 g/cm3) and catalase (1.26 g/cm3). On the basis of biochemical as well as morphological properties, these particles from N. crassa have recently been designated as glyoxysome-like particles (G. Wanner and T. Theimer, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 386:269-284, 1982). The failure to detect catalase, urate oxidase, and acyl-CoA oxidase indicate that these glyoxysome-like microbodies in N. crassa lack peroxisomal function and thus are clearly different from the various microbodies reported so far to contain a beta-oxidation pathway. PMID:3155714

  12. Carbofuran-induced oxidative stress in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Rai, Devendra K; Sharma, Bechan

    2007-09-01

    Chronic exposure to carbofuran, a carbamate pesticide, via oral administration has been reported to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat brain. However, information regarding the effect of short-term intraperitoneal (i.p.) carbofuran intoxication on oxidative stress is lacking. In the present study, the effect of carbofuran on oxidative indices in brain of Wistar rats has been determined by exposing the animals to three subacute concentrations (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight) equivalent to 10, 20, and 40%, respectively, of its LD50 (i.p.) for 24 h. Rat liver has been used as a positive control. The results demonstrated that carbofuran treatment at the 3 concentrations tested caused significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) by 12.50, 34.38, and 59.38%, respectively. The increased oxidative stress at same pesticide concentrations significantly induced activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in rat brain; the impact on catalase being more marked only at high-pesticide doses (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight). Carbofuran also caused reduction in protein content of rat tissues tested. Rat brain was more severely affected by carbofuran than liver. The results clearly demonstrated that i.p. administration of carbofuran accelerated oxidative stress in rat brain in a dose-dependent manner.

  13. Dietary vanadium induces oxidative stress in the intestine of broilers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuanxin; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Wang, Kangping; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine oxidative stress induced by dietary vanadium in the mucosa of different parts of intestine including duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and cecal tonsil. A total of 420 1-day-old avian broilers were divided into six groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 mg/kg vanadium as ammonium metavanadate. During the experimental period of 42 days, oxidative stress parameters were determined for both control and experimental groups. The results showed that malondialdehyde content was significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in 30, 45, and 60 mg/kg groups than in control group. In contrast, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and glutathione hormone content were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) mainly in 45 and 60 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of control group. However, the abovementioned oxidative stress parameters were not significantly changed (p > 0.05) in 5 and 15 mg/kg groups. It was concluded that dietary vanadium in excess of 30 mg/kg could cause obvious oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa, which could impact the antioxidant function of intestinal tract in broilers.

  14. Nitric oxide ameliorates zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced phytotoxicity in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Chao; Yin, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiu-Ling; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Xiao, Qiang; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-10-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been found to function in enhancing plant tolerance to various environmental stresses. However, role of NO in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. Here, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) was used to investigate the possible roles and the regulatory mechanisms of NO in counteracting ZnO NPs toxicity in rice seedlings. Our results showed that 10 μM SNP significantly inhibited the appearance of ZnO NP toxicity symptoms. SNP addition significantly reduced Zn accumulation, reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation caused by ZnO NPs. The protective role of SNP in reducing ZnO NPs-induced oxidative damage is closely related to NO-mediated antioxidant system. A decrease in superoxide dismutase activity, as well as an increase in reduced glutathione content and peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity was observed under SNP and ZnO NPs combined treatments, compared to ZnO NPs treatment alone. The relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes exhibited a similar change. The role of NO in enhancing ZnO NPs tolerance was further confirmed by genetic analysis using a NO excess mutant (noe1) and an OsNOA1-silenced plant (noa1) of rice. Together, this study provides the first evidence indicating that NO functions in ameliorating ZnO NPs-induced phytotoxicity.

  15. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  16. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A. |; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.; Ghidini, G.

    1998-12-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices.

  17. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Shawna E.; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Fuller, Scott E.; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2015-01-01

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity. PMID:26056297

  18. Nitric oxide mediates caerulein-induced suppression of locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Volke, V; Soosaar, A; Kõks, S; Bourin, M; Männistö, P T; Vasar, E

    1996-08-01

    Caerulein, a non-selective agonist of cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, is shown to suppress locomotor activity in rodents via stimulation of CCK(A) receptors. In the present study we examined the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in caerulein-induced hypolocomotion in rats. Caerulein (10 microg/kg) markedly decreased the horizontal and vertical components of locomotor activity in rats measured in dark motility boxes. Pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), at 5 mg/kg i.p., abolished the inhibiting action of caerulein on the horizontal activity, but did not affect the reduced frequency of rearing. The other doses of L-NAME (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective against caerulein. As L-NAME at this dose range does not stimulate locomotor activity, it is likely that NO is involved in the motor suppressant effect of systemically administered caerulein.

  19. Oxidation-induced contraction and strengthening of boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Wagner, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to measure and understand the physical and mechanical effects that occur in boron fibers during and after thermal treatment in a controlled oxygen argon gaseous mixture. Of principal concern was the optimization of this treatment as a secondary processing method for significantly improving fiber tensile strength. Strengthening was accomplished by an oxidation induced axial contraction of the fiber and a resulting axial compression of strength limiting flaws within the fiber's tungsten boride core. Various physical observations were used to develop mechanistic models for oxidation, contraction, and flow formation. Processing guidelines are discussed for possibly exceeding the 5.5 GN/sq m strength limit and also for achieving fiber strengthening during application of boron containing diffusion barrier coatings.

  20. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  1. Hyperoside Induces Endogenous Antioxidant System to Alleviate Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Oh, Min Chang; Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyperoside, a flavonoid which is mainly found in Hypericum perforatum L., has many biological effects. One of the most important effects is to prevent the oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its effect are not fully understood. Oxidative stress is implicated in the occurrence of various physical diseases. A wide array of enzymatic antioxidant defense systems include NADH: quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In the present study, the protective effects of hyperoside against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells, HLE-B3, were investigated in terms of HO-1 induction. Methods: The protein and mRNA expressions of HO-1 were examined by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR assays, respectively. To evaluate the ability of hyperoside to activate nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay were performed with nuclear extracts prepared from HLE-B3 cells treated with hyperoside. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the upstream kinase of Nrf2 signaling, was monitored by Western blot analysis. The protective effect of hyperoside in HLE-B3 cells against hydrogen peroxide was performed by MTT assay. Results: Hyperoside increased both the mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, hyperoside elevated the level of of Nrf2 and its antioxidant response element-binding activity, which was modulated by upstream of ERK. Moreover, it activated ERK and restored cell viability which was decreased by hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions: Hyperoside is an effective compound to protect cells against oxidative stress via HO-1 induction. PMID:27051648

  2. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  3. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  4. Secondhand smoke exposure induces acutely airway acidification and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Minas, Markos; Nikolaou, Eftychia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Liakos, Panagiotis; Gougoura, Sofia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Dinas, Petros C; Metsios, Giorgos S; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Flouris, Andreas D; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that secondhand smoke induces lung function impairment and increases proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of secondhand smoke on airway acidification and airway oxidative stress in never-smokers. In a randomized controlled cross-over trial, 18 young healthy never-smokers were assessed at baseline and 0, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min after one-hour secondhand smoke exposure at bar/restaurant levels. Exhaled NO and CO measurements, exhaled breath condensate collection (for pH, H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) measurements) and spirometry were performed at all time-points. Secondhand smoke exposure induced increases in serum cotinine and exhaled CO that persisted until 240 min. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreased immediately after exposure (p < 0.001) and returned to baseline by 180 min, whereas H(2)O(2) increased at 120 min and remained increased at 240 min (p = 0.001). No changes in exhaled NO and NO(2)/NO(3) were observed, while decreases in FEV(1) (p < 0.001) and FEV(1)/FVC (p < 0.001) were observed after exposure and returned to baseline by 180 min. A 1-h exposure to secondhand smoke induced airway acidification and increased airway oxidative stress, accompanied by significant impairment of lung function. Despite the reversal in EBC pH and lung function, airway oxidative stress remained increased 4 h after the exposure. Clinical trial registration number (EudraCT): 2009-013545-28.

  5. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 hours following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 µM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F2-IsoPs and PGE2 in adult mouse brain 24 hours following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19607852

  6. Absorption of nicotine induces oxidative stress among bidi workers.

    PubMed

    Swami, S; Suryakar, A N; Katkam, R V; Kumbar, K M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic exposure to tobacco dust causes nasal inhalation and cutaneous absorption of tobacco alkaloids especially nicotine, therefore the considerable evidences showed that workers employed in bidi industries are at risk of cancer, lung diseases and other many health related common problems. Many references revealed that tobacco dust exposure induces mutations, damage to DNA etc. which are supposed to be the consequences of free radical generation. In present study attempt have been made to evaluate the status of oxidants and antioxidants and their relation with nicotine. 90 bidi workers were screened for serum lipid peroxide (MDA) and serum nitric oxide (NO*) as oxidant and erythrocytic-Superoxide Dismutase (RBC-SOD), Vitamin-C as antioxidant. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and urinary cotinine were also measured. These bidi workers were further divided in 3 groups, Group 1, 11 and III exposed to tobacco dust for about 10 to 14 yrs, 15 to 19 yrs and 20 to 24 yrs of exposure respectively. Highly significant excretion of Urinary cotinine was found in all groups of bidi workers as compared with control (p < 0.001). The levels of MDA, and NO* were found to be significantly elevated in all the three groups with progression of exposure, than the control (p < 0.001), where as the levels of RBC-SOD, Vitamin-C and TAC were significantly decreased in all the three groups as compared with controls (p < 0.001). From our findings it is evident that nicotine absorption might contribute to the disturbed oxidant and antioxidant balance leading to oxidative stress. PMID:17444052

  7. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism of the heart from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Amanda Caroline; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Amado, Ciomar Aparecida Bersani; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate, in a more extensive way, the oxidative state and parameters related to energy metabolism of the heart tissue of rats using the model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The latter is a model for the human arthritic disease. Measurements were done in the total tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria and cytosolic fraction. The adjuvant-induced arthritis caused several modifications in the oxidative state of the heart which, in general, indicate an increased oxidative stress (+80% reactive oxygen species), protein damage (+53% protein carbonyls) and lipid damage (+63% peroxidation) in the whole tissue. The distribution of these changes over the various cell compartments was frequently unequal. For example, protein carbonyls were increased in the whole tissue and in the cytosol, but not in the mitochondria. No changes in GSH content of the whole tissue were found, but it was increased in the mitochondria (+33%) and decreased in the cytosol (-19%). The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was 77% stimulated by arthritis; the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were diminished by 31, 25 and 35.3%, respectively. In spite of these alterations, no changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity and in the efficiency of energy transduction were found. It can be concluded that the adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats causes oxidative damage to the heart with an unequal intracellular distribution. Compared to the liver and brain the modifications caused by arthritis in the heart are less pronounced on variables such as GSH levels and protein integrity. Possibly this occurs because the antioxidant system of the heart is less impaired by arthritis than that reported for the former tissues. Even so, the modifications caused by arthritis represent an imbalanced situation that probably contributes to the cardiac symptoms of the arthritis disease. PMID:27032477

  8. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, and renal sodium handling in leptin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Beltowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Marciniak, Andrzej; Jamroz, Anna

    2004-04-30

    Chronic hyperleptinemia induces arterial hypertension in experimental animals and may contribute to the development of hypertension in obese humans; however, the mechanism of hypertensive effect of leptin is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of leptin on whole-body oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, and renal sodium handling. The study was performed on male Wistar rats divided into 3 groups: 1) control, fed standard chow ad libitum, 2) leptin-treated group, receiving leptin injections (0.25 mg/kg twice daily s.c. for 7 days), 3) pair-fed group, in which food intake was adjusted to the leptin group. Leptin caused 30.5% increase in systolic blood pressure. Plasma concentration and urinary excretion of 8-isoprostanes in animals receiving leptin was 46.4% and 49.2% higher, respectively. The level of lipid peroxidation products, malonyldialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals, increased by 52.5% in the renal cortex and by 48.4% in the renal medulla following leptin treatment, whereas aconitase activity decreased in these regions of the kidney by 45.3% and 39.2%, respectively. Urinary excretion of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) was 55.0% lower, and fractional excretion of NOx was 55.8% lower in the leptin-treated group. Urinary excretion of cGMP decreased in leptin-treated rats by 26.3%. Following leptin treatment, absolute and fractional sodium excretion decreased by 35.0% and 41.2%, respectively. These results indicate that hyperleptinemia induces systemic and intrarenal oxidative stress, decreases the amount of bioactive NO possibly due to its degradation by reactive oxygen species, and causes renal sodium retention by stimulating tubular sodium reabsorption. NO deficiency and abnormal renal Na+ handling may contribute to leptin-induced hypertension.

  9. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  10. Assessment of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by titanium oxide nanoparticles on Chinook salmon cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rao, Janapala Venkateswara

    2015-10-01

    Titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have received wide attention in diverse application, but the potential impact of these nanomaterials on the environment, aquatic life and especially on fish cell lines is lacking. The present study aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by TiO2 NPs on Chinook salmon cells derived from Oncorhynchus tshawytscha embryos (CHSE-214). The The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] and neutral red (NR) assays in CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect in the range of 10 to 60 μg/ml for 24 h. CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs (10-60 μg/ml) exhibited significant decline in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) content and increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in a concentration-dependent manner. TiO2 NPs induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in CHSE-214 cells which serve as a base line studies for future studies. PMID:26013742

  11. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  12. Hyperglycemia-induced diaphragm weakness is mediated by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A major consequence of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is diaphragm weakness, which prolongs the duration of mechanical ventilation. Hyperglycemia (HG) is a risk factor for ICUAW. However, the mechanisms underlying HG-induced respiratory muscle weakness are not known. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) injure multiple tissues during HG, but only one study suggests that excessive ROS generation may be linked to HG-induced diaphragm weakness. We hypothesized that HG-induced diaphragm dysfunction is mediated by excessive superoxide generation and that administration of a specific superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), would ameliorate these effects. Methods HG was induced in rats using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg intravenously) and the following groups assessed at two weeks: controls, HG, HG + PEG-SOD (2,000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days), and HG + denatured (dn)PEG-SOD (2000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days). PEG-SOD and dnPEG-SOD were administered on day 8, we measured diaphragm specific force generation in muscle strips, force-pCa relationships in single permeabilized fibers, contractile protein content and indices of oxidative stress. Results HG reduced diaphragm specific force generation, altered single fiber force-pCa relationships, depleted troponin T, and increased oxidative stress. PEG-SOD prevented HG-induced reductions in diaphragm specific force generation (for example 80 Hz force was 26.4 ± 0.9, 15.4 ± 0.9, 24.0 ± 1.5 and 14.9 ± 0.9 N/cm2 for control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). PEG-SOD also restored HG-induced reductions in diaphragm single fiber force generation (for example, Fmax was 182.9 ± 1.8, 85.7 ± 2.0, 148.6 ± 2.4 and 90.9 ± 1.5 kPa in control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). HG-induced troponin T depletion, protein nitrotyrosine formation

  13. Taurine treatment protects against chronic nicotine-induced oxidative changes.

    PubMed

    Sener, Göksel; Ozer Sehirli, A; Ipçi, Yeşim; Cetinel, Sule; Cikler, Esra; Gedik, Nursal; Alican, Inci

    2005-04-01

    Experiments have shown that chronic nicotine administration caused oxidative damage in various organs by increasing lipid peroxidation products and decreasing the activity of endogenous antioxidants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of taurine treatment on nicotine-induced oxidative changes in rat thoracic aorta and heart and to explore the possible mechanisms of action. Male Wistar albino rats (200-250 g) were injected with nicotine hydrogen bitartrate (0.6 mg/kg; i.p.) or saline for 21 days. Taurine was administered (50 mg/kg; i.p.) alone or along with nicotine injections. After decapitation, the thoracic aorta and heart tissues were excised. The aorta was used for in vitro contractility studies or stored along with the heart samples for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and collagen content. Tissue samples were also examined histologically. Serum samples were stored for the measurement of MDA, GSH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Chronic nicotine treatment impaired both the contraction and relaxation responses of the aortic rings to phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. It increased lipid peroxidation, MPO levels and tissue collagen content of both aorta and heart samples. Taurine supplementation to nicotine-treated animals reversed the contractile dysfunction and restored the endogenous GSH levels and decreased high lipid peroxidation and MPO activities in both tissues. These data suggest that taurine supplementation effectively attenuates the oxidative damage because of chronic nicotine administration possibly by its antioxidant effects.

  14. Dietary nickel chloride induces oxidative intestinal damage in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  15. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. Results: It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Conclusions: Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes. PMID:25883776

  16. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities.

  17. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities. PMID:17387501

  18. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  19. Garlic provides protection to mice heart against isoproterenol-induced oxidative damage: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Tarak Nath; Padiya, Raju; Karnewar, Santosh; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Agawane, Sachin B; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-06-30

    Garlic has been widely recognized as a cardioprotective agent. However, the molecular mechanism of its cardioprotective effects is not well established. Here we hypothesized that aqueous garlic homogenate may mediate cardioprotection via nitric oxide (NO). Mice were fed with saline and aqueous garlic homogenate (250 and 500 mgkg(-1)day(-1) orally) for 30 days. In another set of experiment, mice were pre-treated with saline, aqueous garlic homogenate (AGH) (250 mgkg(-1)day(-1) for 30 days), and AGH (30 days) along with L-NAME (20 mgkg(-1)day(-1) i.p. for last 7 days) before inducing acute myocardial infarction by isoproterenol (s.c. injection of isoproterenol 150 mgkg(-1)day(-1) for 2 days) and sacrificed after 48 h. Dose dependent increase in serum NO level was observed after garlic 250 and 500 mgkg(-1) dose feeding. While no change in serum SGPT and SGOT level, a significant decrease in serum LDH level was observed after garlic feeding. Garlic-induced NO formation was further confirmed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Administration of isoproterenol caused a significant decrease in endogenous antioxidants i.e., myocardial catalase, GSH and GPx activity, and mitochondrial enzyme activities like citrate synthase and β hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase. All those deleterious cardiac changes induced by isoproterenol were significantly attenuated by garlic homogenate. However this beneficial effect of garlic was blunted when garlic was administered with L-NAME, a nonspecific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Further, a significant increase in myocardial TBARS and decrease in total antioxidant activity was observed in L-NAME treated group compared to isoproterenol treated group. Administration of L-NAME in mice from control group lowered serum and cardiac NO levels without any change of oxidative stress parameters. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence that garlic homogenate is protective in myocardial infarction via NO-signaling pathway in mice.

  20. Requirement of the inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway for IL-1-induced osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    van't Hof, R. J.; Armour, K. J.; Smith, L. M.; Armour, K. E.; Wei, X. Q.; Liew, F. Y.; Ralston, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of bone turnover, especially in pathological conditions characterized by release of bone-resorbing cytokines. The cytokine IL-1 is thought to act as a mediator of periarticular bone loss and tissue damage in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. IL-1 is a potent stimulator of both osteoclastic bone resorption and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in bone cells and other cell types. In this study, we investigated the role that the iNOS pathway plays in mediating the bone-resorbing effects of IL-1 by studying mice with targeted disruption of the iNOS gene. Studies in vitro and in vivo showed that iNOS-deficient mice exhibited profound defects of IL-1-induced osteoclastic bone resorption but responded normally to calciotropic hormones such as 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone. Immunohistochemical studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays performed on bone marrow cocultures from iNOS-deficient mice showed abnormalities in IL-1-induced nuclear translocation of the p65 component of NFκB and in NFκB-DNA binding, which were reversed by treatment with the NO donor S-nitroso-acetyl penicillamine. These results show that the iNOS pathway is essential for IL-1-induced bone resorption and suggest that the effects of NO may be mediated by modulating IL-1-induced nuclear activation of NFκB in osteoclast precursors. PMID:10869429

  1. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  2. Wound-induced Oxidative Responses in Mountain Birch Leaves

    PubMed Central

    RUUHOLA, TEIJA; YANG, SHIYONG

    2006-01-01

    • Aims The aim of the study was to examine oxidative responses in subarctic mountain birch, Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii, induced by herbivory and manual wounding. • Methods Herbivory-induced changes in polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in birch leaves were determined. A cytochemical dye, 3,3-diaminobenzidine, was used for the in situ and in vivo detection of H2O2 accumulation as a response to herbivory and wounding. To localize peroxidase activity in leaves, 10 mm H2O2 was applied to the dye reagent. • Key Results Feeding by autumnal moth, Epirrita autumnata, larvae caused an induction in polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activities within 24 h, and a concomitant decrease in the activity of antioxidative catalases in wounded leaves. Wounding also induced H2O2 accumulation, which may have both direct and indirect defensive properties against herbivores. Wound sites and guard cells showed a high level of peroxidase activity, which may efficiently restrict invasion by micro-organisms. • Conclusion Birch oxidases together with their substrates may form an important front line in defence against herbivores and pathogens. PMID:16254021

  3. Senescence-Induced Oxidative Stress Causes Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhayadia, Raj; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Melk, Anette; Hömme, Meike

    2016-02-01

    Age is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, suggesting a causal relationship between age-related changes and vascular damage. Endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Senescence, the cellular equivalent of aging, was proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction, but functional data showing a causal relationship are missing.Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was measured in aortic rings ex vivo. We investigated aortas from aged C57Bl/6 mice (24-28 months), in which p16 (INK4a) and p19 (ARF) expression, markers of stress-induced senescence, were significantly induced compared to young controls (4-6 months). To reflect telomere shortening in human aging, we investigated aortas from telomerase deficient (Terc(-/-)) mice of generation 3 (G3). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and in Terc(-/-) G3 mice was impaired. A combination of the superoxide dismutase mimetic 1-Oxyl-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor apocynin significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and Terc(-/-) G3 mice compared to untreated controls. We show that both, aging and senescence induced by telomere shortening, cause endothelial dysfunction that can be restored by antioxidants, indicating a role for oxidative stress. The observation that cellular senescence is a direct signalling event leading to endothelial dysfunction holds the potential to develop new targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  4. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Glück, B; Merkle, I; Dornberger, G; Stelzner, A

    2000-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important bioactive molecule with regulatory, cytotoxic or cytoprotective properties. In virus-induced myocarditis, NO mediates host defense mechanisms against the infection or causes cardiac dysfunctions. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The expression of the inducible form of the nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is regulated by cytokines, involved in the complex myocardial immune response to enterovirus infections. The present study was undertaken to characterize the role of iNOS and NO in the murine model of viral myocarditis induced by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). In response to CVB3 infection we investigated the time course of iNOS induction in correlation with cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta) in the heart of NMRI mice by RT-PCR. Positive PCR signals for viral RNA were found in the acute and chronic stage of disease by seminested PCR, indicating the persistence of viral genome. We found distinct expression of iNOS at all time points (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 28, 56, 98 days post infection [p.i.]). Higher iNOS mRNA levels were identified between days 4 until 28 p.i. in comparison to day 56 and 98 p.i. using densitometric values. The mRNA of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma appeared at days 1, 4, and 7 p.i., peaked at day 7 p.i. and persisted until day 98 p.i. Similar like the iNOS mRNA pattern was the expression profile of TGF-beta. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry iNOS was localized in infiltrates, vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, myocytes and throughout the interstitial spaces between myocardial fibers in the heart sections of NMRI mice. Increased levels of NO were measured as total nitrate/nitrite concentration in the sera of mice from day 7 until day 28 p.i.

  5. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  6. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect endothelial cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hou, Yingjian; Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Cuimiao; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress is well documented to cause injury to endothelial cells (ECs), which in turn trigger cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies revealed that cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) had antioxidant property, but the protective effect of nanoceria on ROS injury to ECs and cardiovascular diseases has not been reported. In the current study, we investigated the protective effect and underlying mechanisms of nanoceria on oxidative injury to ECs. The cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, cellular uptake, intracellular localization and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, endocytosis mechanism, cell apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential were performed. The results indicated that nanoceria had no cytotoxicity on ECs but had the ability to prevent injury by H2O2. Nanoceria could be uptaken into ECs through caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis and distributed throughout the cytoplasma. The internalized nanoceria effectively attenuated ROS overproduction induced by H2O2. Apoptosis was also alleviated greatly by nanoceria pretreatment. These results may be helpful for more rational application of nanoceria in biomedical fields in the future.

  8. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin induces nitric oxide synthesis via oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    We have recently shown that apocynin elicits an oxidative stress in N11 mouse glial cells and other cell types. Here we report that apocynin increased the accumulation of nitrite, the stable derivative of nitric oxide (NO), in the extracellular medium of N11 cell cultures, and the NO synthase (NOS) activity in cell lysates. The increased synthesis of NO was associated with increased expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA, increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and decreased intracellular level of its inhibitor IkB{alpha}. These effects, accompanied by increased production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, were very similar to those observed after incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and were inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that apocynin, similarly to LPS, induces increased NO synthesis by eliciting a generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes NF-{kappa}B activation and increased expression of iNOS. Therefore, the increased bioavailability of NO reported in the literature after in vivo or in vitro treatments with apocynin might depend, at least partly, on the drug-elicited induction of iNOS, and not only on the inhibition of NADPH oxidase and the subsequent decreased scavenging of NO by oxidase-derived ROS, as it is often supposed.

  9. Nitrous oxide-induced hypothermia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, R.M.; Panek, R.W.; Kouchich, F.J.; Rosenthal, M.A.

    1987-08-10

    Exposure of rats to high levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen reduced body temperature in a concentration-related manner. The hypothermia was partly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. But in rats rendered tolerant to morphine by pellet implantation, exposure to 75% N2O/25% O2 evoked a marked hypothermia similar to that observed in morphine-naive animals. In another experiment, the hypothermic effect of chloral hydrate was also sensitive to antagonism by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. These observations lead the authors to suspect that N2O-induced hypothermia in rats is possibly not mediated by opiate receptors. The thermotropic activity of N2O may result from some non-opioid action of N2O. Its selective antagonism by naloxone (but not naltrexone) may be due to a unique non-opioid analeptic action of naloxone. 32 references, 4 figures.

  10. Curcumin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Layasadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Jozi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NZnO) are increasingly used in modern life. Most metal nanoparticles have adverse effects on the liver. Aims: To explore the protective action of curcumin (Cur) against hepatotoxicity induced by NZnO in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Control group animals received normal saline, while the Cur group animals were treated with 200 mg/kg of Cur orally for 21 days. NZnO-intoxicated rats received 50 mg/kg of NZnO for 14 days by gavage method. In the NZnO+Cur group, rats were pretreated with Cur for 7 days before NZnO administration. Plasma activities of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured for detection of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological changes and apoptosis in liver tissue were studied by using Hematoxylin-eosin staining and the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results: NZnO induced a significant increase in plasma AST (2.8-fold), ALT (2.7-fold) and ALP (1.97-fold) activity in comparison to the control group (p<0.01). NZnO increased MDA content and reduced SOD and GPx activities. NZnO caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis and microvesicular steatosis. The percentage of apoptosis in hepatocytes was increased in NZnO-treated rats (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of Cur significantly reduced lipid peroxidation (39%), increased SOD (156%) and GPx (26%) activities, and attenuated ALT (47%), AST (41%) and ALP (30%) activities. Pre-treatment with Cur also decreased the histology changes and apoptotic index of hepatocytes (p<0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that Cur effectively protects against NZnO-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. However, future studies are required to propose Cur as a potential protective agent against hepatotoxicity

  11. Strain-induced topological quantum phase transition in phosphorene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Park, Jejune; Woo, Sungjong; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    Using ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the structural stability and electronic properties of phosphorene oxides (POx) with different oxygen compositions x. A variety of configurations are modeled and optimized geometrically to search for the equilibrium structure for each x value. Our electronic structure calculations on the equilibrium configuration obtained for each x reveal that the band gap tends to increase with the oxygen composition of x < 0.5, and then to decrease with x > 0.5. We further explore the strain effect on the electronic structure of the fully oxidized phosphorene, PO, with x = 1. At a particular strain without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is observed a band gap closure near the Γ point in the k space. We further find the strain in tandem with SOC induces an interesting band inversion with a reopened very small band gap (5 meV), and thus gives rise to a topological quantum phase transition from a normal insulator to a topological insulator. Such a topological phase transition is confirmed by the wave function analysis and the band topology identified by the Z2 invariant calculation.

  12. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  13. Oxide nanoparticles synthesis via laser-induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Weihs, Hansel; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kulinich, Sergei; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2014-10-01

    Laser ablation in fluids has recently attracted a lot of attention as one of synthetic techniques to prepare new attractive nanomaterials, with the ability to control both product chemistry and morphology in many systems. In this study, we generated laser-induced plasma in H2O - ethanol mixtures, while ablating metal targets to produce oxide nanoparticles and to study the effect of the medium on their properties. The ablated targets used in this study were Zn or Sn plates. A nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm (10 Hz, 20--30 mJ/pulse) was applied to irradiate the targets. The liquid media were maintained at 0.1 to 30 MPa to study the effect of pressure. We found that the H2O/ethanol ratio (at atmospheric pressure) can control the properties of the produced ZnO nanoparticles, such as defects and oxidation degree. The properties were examined by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies, and so on. More details will be presented at the symposium.

  14. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  15. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  16. Urea-induced oxidative damage in Elodea densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Prasad, M N V

    2015-09-01

    Urea being a fertilizer is expected to be less toxic to plants. However, it was found that urea at 100 mg L(-1) caused the oxidative stress in Elodea leaves due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation that are known to stimulate antioxidant pathway. Urea at a concentration of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1) decreased low-molecular-weight antioxidants. In this case, the antioxidant status of plants was supported by the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. A significant increase in the soluble proteins and -SH groups was observed with high concentrations of urea (30-60 % of control). Thus, the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants, and induced soluble protein thiols are implicated in plant resistance to oxidative stress imposed by urea. We found that guaiacol peroxidase plays an important role in the removal of the peroxide in Elodea leaves exposed to 1000 mg L(-1)of urea.

  17. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  18. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  19. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G.; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress (WSS)-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell (EC). The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins and G-protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphoryaltion of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an EC subjected to a step increase of WSS from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1 to 5 minutes) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases.

  20. Transparent conducting oxide induced by liquid electrolyte gating

    PubMed Central

    ViolBarbosa, Carlos; Karel, Julie; Kiss, Janos; Gordan, Ovidiu-dorin; Altendorf, Simone G.; Utsumi, Yuki; Samant, Mahesh G.; Wu, Yu-Han; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Optically transparent conducting materials are essential in modern technology. These materials are used as electrodes in displays, photovoltaic cells, and touchscreens; they are also used in energy-conserving windows to reflect the infrared spectrum. The most ubiquitous transparent conducting material is tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), a wide-gap oxide whose conductivity is ascribed to n-type chemical doping. Recently, it has been shown that ionic liquid gating can induce a reversible, nonvolatile metallic phase in initially insulating films of WO3. Here, we use hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to show that the metallic phase produced by the electrolyte gating does not result from a significant change in the bandgap but rather originates from new in-gap states. These states produce strong absorption below ∼1 eV, outside the visible spectrum, consistent with the formation of a narrow electronic conduction band. Thus WO3 is metallic but remains colorless, unlike other methods to realize tunable electrical conductivity in this material. Core-level photoemission spectra show that the gating reversibly modifies the atomic coordination of W and O atoms without a substantial change of the stoichiometry; we propose a simple model relating these structural changes to the modifications in the electronic structure. Thus we show that ionic liquid gating can tune the conductivity over orders of magnitude while maintaining transparency in the visible range, suggesting the use of ionic liquid gating for many applications. PMID:27647884

  1. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (rs = 0.31, P = 0.02 and rs = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  2. Haptoglobin alters oxygenation and oxidation of hemoglobin and decreases propagation of peroxide-induced oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Jia, Yiping; Siburt, Claire J Parker; Abraham, Bindu; Wood, Francine; Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Alayash, Abdu I

    2012-09-15

    We compared oxygenation and anaerobic oxidation reactions of a purified complex of human hemoglobin (Hb) and haptoglobin (Hb-Hp) to those of uncomplexed Hb. Under equilibrium conditions, Hb-Hp exhibited active-site heterogeneity and noncooperative, high-affinity O(2) binding (n(1/2)=0.88, P(1/2)=0.33 mm Hg in inorganic phosphate buffer at pH 7 and 25 °C). Rapid-reaction kinetics also exhibited active-site heterogeneity, with a slower process of O(2) dissociation and a faster process of CO binding relative to uncomplexed Hb. Deoxygenated Hb-Hp had significantly reduced absorption at the λ(max) of 430 nm relative to uncomplexed Hb, as occurs for isolated Hb subunits that lack T-state stabilization. Under comparable experimental conditions, the redox potential (E(1/2)) of Hb-Hp was found to be +54 mV, showing that it is much more easily oxidized than uncomplexed Hb (E(1/2)=+125 mV). The Nernst plots for Hb-Hp oxidation showed no cooperativity and slopes less than unity indicated active-site heterogeneity. The redox potential of Hb-Hp was unchanged by pH over the range of 6.4-8.3. Exposure of Hb-Hp to excess hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced ferryl heme, which was found to be more kinetically inert in the Hb-Hp complex than in uncomplexed Hb. The negative shift in the redox potential of Hb-Hp and its stabilized ferryl state may be central elements in the protection against Hb-induced oxidative damage afforded by formation of the Hb-Hp complex. PMID:22841869

  3. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  4. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. PMID:26387449

  5. Neurobiology of nitrous oxide-induced antinociceptive effects.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Masahiko; Maze, Mervyn

    2002-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), or laughing gas, has been used for clinical anesthesia for more than a century and is still commonly used. While the anesthetic/hypnotic mechanisms of N2O remain largely unknown, the underlying mechanisms of its analgesic/antinociceptive effects have been elucidated during the last several decades. Evidence to date indicate that N2O induces opioid peptide release in the periaqueductal gray area of the midbrain leading to the activation of the descending inhibitory pathways, which results in modulation of the pain/nociceptive processing in the spinal cord. The types of opioid peptide induced by N2O and the subtypes of opioid receptors that mediate the antinociceptive effects of N2O appear to depend on various factors including the species and/or strain, the regions of the brain, and the paradigms of behavior testing used for the experiments. Among three types of descending inhibitory pathways, the descending noradrenergic inhibitory pathway seems to play the most prominent role. The specific elements involved are now being resolved. PMID:11936558

  6. Modulation of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress by capsaicin.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Abdel-Rahman, Rehab Fawzy; Sleem, Amany A; Farrag, Abdel Razik

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of capsaicin (the active principle of hot red pepper and a sensory excitotoxin) on oxidative stress after systemic administration of the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (100 μg/kg, i.p.) in rats. Capsaicin (15, 150 or 1,500 μg/kg; 10, 100 or 400 μg/mL) was given via intragastric (i.g.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) routes at time of endotoxin administration. Rats were killed 4 h later. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured in brain, liver, and lungs. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), nitric oxide, and glucose were measured in serum. In addition, histopathological examination of liver tissue was performed. In LPS-treated rats, hepatic GSH increased significantly by 40.8% after i.p. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg. Liver MDA increased significantly by 32.9% after the administration of i.g. capsaicin at 1,500 μg/kg and by 27.8 and 37.6% after the administration of i.p. capsaicin at 150 and 1,500 μg/kg, respectively. In lung tissue, both MDA and GSH were decreased by capsaicin administration. MDA decreased by 19-20.8% after i.g. capsaicin and by 17.5-23.2% after i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. GSH decreased by 39.3-64.3% and by 35.7-41.1% after i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (150-1,500 μg/kg), respectively. Brain GSH increased significantly after the highest dose of i.g. or i.p. capsaicin (by 20.6 and 15.9%, respectively). The increase in serum ALT and ALP after endotoxin administration was decreased by oral or i.p. capsaicin. Serum nitric oxide showed marked increase after LPS injection, but was markedly decreased after capsaicin (1,500 μg/kg, i.p.). Serum glucose increased markedly after the administration of LPS, and was normalized by capsaicin treatment. It is suggested that in the presence of mild systemic inflammation, acute capsaicin administration might alter oxidative status in some tissues and exert an anti-inflammatory effect

  7. Nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, H; Kohsaka, H; Liu, M F; Higashiyama, H; Hirata, Y; Kanno, K; Saito, I; Miyasaka, N

    1995-01-01

    In this study, we have identified the source of nitric oxide (NO) produced in the human inflammatory joints by analyzing expression of inducible NO synthase. In ex vivo organ cultures, both inflammatory synovium and cartilage from patients with rheumatoid arthritis produced NO. The NO production was suppressed by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine, an inhibitor of NO synthase. The amount of NO produced by the synovium correlated with the proportion of CD14+ cells in the corresponding tissue (r = 0.8, P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis as well as in situ hybridization showed that inducible NO synthase was predominantly expressed in synovial lining cells, endothelial cells, chondrocytes, and to a lesser extent, in infiltrating mononuclear cells and synovial fibroblasts. The synovial lining cells and the infiltrating cells expressing inducible NO synthase were identified where CD14+ cells were located. Together with morphological features, this suggests that they are type A synoviocytes. NO production from freshly isolated synoviocytes and chondrocytes was up-regulated by in vitro stimulation with a combination of IL-TNF-beta, TNF-alpha, and LPS. In summary, the present results suggest that NO is produced primarily by CD14+ synoviocytes, chondrocytes, and endothelial cells in inflammatory joints of arthritides. NO production can be upregulated by cytokines present in inflamed joints. The increased NO production may thus contribute to the pathological features in inflammatory arthritides. Images PMID:7593623

  8. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: Oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo . E-mail: jouilo@ajou.ac.kr

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  9. Oxidized low density lipoprotein suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in microglia: oxidative stress acts through control of inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ohn Soon; Lee, Chang Seok; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2006-03-31

    Low density lipoprotein (LDL) is readily oxidized under certain conditions, resulting in the formation of oxidized LDL (oxLDL). Despite numerous in vitro reports that reveal the pathogenic role of oxidative stress, anti-oxidative strategies have underperformed in the clinic. In this study, we examine the role of oxLDL in brain inflammatory responses using cultured rat brain microglia. We demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory responses in these cells. It also decreases LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and production of nitric oxide, and reduces LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Oxysterols, known components of oxLDL and endogenous agonists of liver X receptor, can simulate the inhibitory effects of oxLDL in LPS-activated microglia. In addition, their inhibitory effects were mimicked by liver X receptor (LXR) agonists and potentiated by a retinoid X receptor agonist, suggesting these molecules heterodimerize to function as oxysterol receptors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that oxLDL inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in brain microglia and that these inhibitory effects are mediated by oxysterols and, at least in part, by the nuclear receptor LXR. Our results suggest an additional mechanism of action for oxidative stress that acts indirectly via modulation of inflammatory responses. Although further studies are needed, these results answer in part the question of why anti-oxidative strategies have not been successful in clinical situations. Moreover, as brain inflammation participates in the initiation and progression of several neurodegenerative disorders, the present data provide information that should prove a useful guide for designing therapeutic strategies to combat oxidative brain diseases.

  10. Nitric oxide is involved in heat-induced HSP70 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Malyshev IYu; Manukhina, E B; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Vanin, A F

    1995-08-21

    Heat shock potentiated the nitric oxide production (EPR assay) in the liver, kidney, heart, spleen, intestine, and brain. The heat shock-induced sharp transient increase in the rate of nitric oxide production preceded the accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSP70) (Western blot analysis) as measured in the heart and liver. In all organs the nitric oxide formation was completely blocked by the NO-synthase inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). L-NNA also markedly attenuated the heat shock-induced accumulation of HSP70. The results suggests that nitric oxide is involved in the heat shock-induced activation of HSP70 synthesis. PMID:7544743

  11. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Attenuates Monosodium Urate-induced Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Tae-Jin; Dan, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Young-Je

    2011-01-01

    The present study elucidated the effect of the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine (L-NIL) on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet. L-NIL (5 or 10 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally 4 h before injection of MSU (4 mg) into the soles of mice hindlimb feet. Twenty-four hours after MSU injection, foot thickness was increased by 160% and L-NIL pretreatment reduced food pad swelling in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of 10 mg/kg/day L-NIL significantly suppressed the foot pad swelling by MSU. Plasma level of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites and gene expression and protein level of iNOS in feet were increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. Similar pattern of change was observed in nitrotyrosine level. MSU increased the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and L-NIL pretreatment suppressed MSU-induced cytokines expression. The mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase1 were increased by MSU and L-NIL pretreatment normalized the gene expression. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 was increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. The mRNA levels of iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-1β were increased by MSU in human dermal fibroblasts, C2C12 myoblasts, and human fetal osteoblasts in vitro, which was attenuated by L-NIL in a dose dependent manner. This study shows that L-NIL inhibits MSU-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet suggesting that iNOS might be involved in MSU-induced inflammation. PMID:22359474

  12. Electrochemically induced oxidative precipitation of Fe(II) for As(III) oxidation and removal in synthetic groundwater.

    PubMed

    Tong, Man; Yuan, Songhu; Zhang, Peng; Liao, Peng; Alshawabkeh, Akram N; Xie, Xianjun; Wang, Yanxin

    2014-05-01

    Mobilization of Arsenic in groundwater is primarily induced by reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe(III) oxyhydroxides under anoxic conditions. Creating a well-controlled artificial environment that favors oxidative precipitation of Fe(II) and subsequent oxidation and uptake of aqueous As can serve as a remediation strategy. We reported a proof of concept study of a novel iron-based dual anode system for As(III) oxidation and removal in synthetic groundwater. An iron anode was used to produce Fe(II) under iron-deficient conditions, and another inert anode was used to generate O2 for oxidative precipitation of Fe(II). For 30 min's treatment, 6.67 μM (500 μg/L) of As(III) was completely oxidized and removed from the solution during the oxidative precipitation process when a total current of 60 mA was equally partitioned between the two anodes. The current on the inert anode determined the rate of O2 generation and was linearly related to the rates of Fe(II) oxidation and of As oxidation and removal, suggesting that the process could be manipulated electrochemically. The composition of Fe precipitates transformed from carbonate green rust to amorphous iron oxyhydroxide as the inert anode current increased. A conceptual model was proposed for the in situ application of the electrochemically induced oxidative precipitation process for As(III) remediation.

  13. The influence of β-alanine supplementation on markers of exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Fukuda, David H; Stout, Jeffrey R; Kendall, Kristina L

    2014-01-01

    β-Alanine (BA) has been linked with oxidative protection. This study evaluated antioxidant properties of BA. Twenty-five men consumed BA or placebo for 4 weeks, and completed a 40-min run to induce oxidative stress. Blood draws were taken to measure 8-isoprostane, total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione. BA had no significant influence on reducing exercise-induced oxidative stress. Confidence intervals suggest a reduction in lipid peroxidation. BA supplementation may have little influence as an antioxidant.

  14. Hypergravity upregulates renal inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and nitric oxide production

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Gun; Oh, Choong Sik; Kim, Hyun-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to hypergravity severely decreases renal blood flow, potentially causing renal dysfunction. Nitric oxide (NO), which is endogenously synthesized by inducible NO synthase (iNOS), plays an important role in the regulation of renal function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of hypergravity exposure on the production of NO in kidneys. To determine whether hypergravity induces renal hypoxia and alters renal iNOS expression and NO production, mice were exposed to short-term hypergravity at +3Gz for 1 h. The time course of iNOS mRNA expression, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α expression, and NO production was examined. Renal HIF-1α levels were significantly elevated immediately after centrifugation, and this increase was sustained for 3 h post-exposure. iNOS mRNA levels were also significantly increased immediately after exposure and were maintained during the reoxygenation period. Immunohistochemical staining for iNOS revealed that the cortical tubular epithelium exhibited moderate to strong cytoplasmic iNOS immunoreactivity immediately after hypergravity exposure and during the reoxygenation period. The time course of NO production was similar to that of iNOS expression. Our results suggest that both hypoxia and reoxygenation might be involved in the upregulation of HIF-1α in the kidneys of mice exposed to hypergravity. Significant increases in renocortical iNOS expression immediately after centrifugation and during the reoxygenation period suggest that iNOS expression induced by hypergravity exposure might play a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in the renal cortex. Further investigations are necessary to clarify the role of iNOS and NO in kidneys exposed to hypergravity. PMID:27174912

  15. Basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by scanning probe microscope tip-induced nano-oxidation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoshitaka; Iuchi, Yoshimasa; Kawabe, Mitsuo; Harris, James S.

    2000-07-01

    The basic properties of GaAs oxide generated by atomic force microscope (AFM) tip-induced nano-oxidation process have been investigated. The chemical analysis of the AFM tip-generated GaAs oxide was performed by using scanning microprobe x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the main constituents of GaAs anodic oxide were determined to be Ga2O3 and As2O3. The electrical characterization showed that the electron transport across a GaAs oxide nanodot of ˜5.7 nm thickness, from a doped n+-Si tip into the n+-GaAs substrate follows the Fowler-Nordheim tunneling mechanism over a range of applied bias. Further, the tip-generated GaAs oxide nanodots were found to withstand moderate thermal treatments, but some volume reduction was observed.

  16. Water-induced thermogenesis and fat oxidation: a reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Charrière, N; Miles-Chan, J L; Montani, J-P; Dulloo, A G

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Drinking large amounts of water is often recommended for weight control. Whether water intake stimulates energy and fat metabolism is, however, controversial with some studies reporting that drinking half a litre or more of water increases resting energy expenditure (REE) by 10–30% and decreases respiratory quotient (RQ), whereas others report no significant changes in REE or RQ. The aim here was to reassess the concept of water-induced thermogenesis and fat oxidation in humans, with particular focus on interindividual variability in REE and RQ responses, comparison with a time-control Sham drink, and on the potential impact of gender, body composition and abdominal adiposity. Subjects/Methods: REE and RQ were measured in healthy young adults (n=27; body mass index range: 18.5–33.9 kg m−2), by ventilated hood indirect calorimetry for at least 30 min before and 130 min after ingesting 500 ml of purified (distilled) water at 21–22 °C or after Sham drinking, in a randomized cross-over design. Body composition and abdominal fat were assessed by bioimpedance techniques. Results: Drinking 500 ml of distilled water led to marginal increases in REE (<3% above baseline), independently of gender, but which were not significantly different from Sham drinking. RQ was found to fall after the water drink, independently of gender, but it also diminished to a similar extent in response to sham drinking. Interindividual variability in REE and RQ responses was not associated with body fatness, central adiposity or fat-free mass. Conclusions: This study conducted in young men and women varying widely in adiposity, comparing the ingestion of distilled water to Sham drinking, suggests that ingestion of purified water per se does not result in the stimulation of thermogenesis or fat oxidation. PMID:26690288

  17. Role of inducer binding in cytochrome P-450 IA2-mediated uroporphyrinogen oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, J M; Sinclair, P R; Lambrecht, R W; Sinclair, J F; Jacobs, N J

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation of uroporphyrinogen, an intermediate of the heme biosynthetic pathway, by methylcholanthrene-inducible isozymes(s) of cytochrome P-450 has been proposed to play a role in the development of chemically induced uroporphyria. Prior work from this laboratory indicated that although addition of 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl is required for uroporphyrinogen oxidation by methylcholanthrene-induced chick embryo liver microsomes, this biphenyl is not required for the oxidation catalyzed by hepatic microsomes from methylcholanthrene-induced rodents. Here we investigated whether rodent microsomes catalyze uroporphyrinogen oxidation without addition of 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl because the chemical used as an inducer remains bound to cytochrome P-450. Hepatic microsomes containing almost no residual inducer were isolated from rats treated with a low dose of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). These microsomes oxidized uroporphyrinogen at high rates without addition of 3,4,3',4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl. Inducer-free microsomal cytochrome P-450 was also obtained by inducing cytochrome P-450 in rats and mice with isosafrole, which was then removed from the isolated microsomes by butanol treatment. This procedure resulted in microsomes with high activity for uroporphyrinogen oxidation. Furthermore, addition of chlorobiphenyl to these inducer-free microsomes was inhibitory. Hepatic microsomes from isosafrole-induced C57BL/6 and DBA mice, rendered inducer-free by butanol treatment, oxidized uroporphyrinogen at the same rate even though these two strains differ markedly in their susceptibility to chemically induced uroporphyria. We conclude that uroporphyrinogen oxidation is catalyzed by cytochrome P-450 that is free of inducer.

  18. A neurovascular transmission model for acupuncture-induced nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Sheng-Hsiung; Tsai, Li-Jen

    2008-09-01

    Acupuncture is the practice of inserting needles into the body to reduce pain or induce anesthesia. More broadly, acupuncture is a family of procedures involving the stimulation of anatomical locations on or in the skin by a variety of techniques. Employing acupuncture to treat human disease or maintain bodily condition has been practiced for thousands of years. However, the mechanism(s) of action of acupuncture at the various meridians are poorly understood. Most studies have indicated that acupuncture is able to increase blood flow. The acupuncture points have high electrical conductance and a relationship of the acupuncture points and meridians with the connective tissue planes and the perivascular space has also been suggested. Several studies employing the human and animal models have shown that acupuncture enhances the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and increases local circulation. Specifically, electroacupuncture (EA) seems to prevent the reduction in NO production from endothelial NO synthetase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) that is associated with hypertension and this process involves a stomach-meridian organ but not a non-stomach-meridian organ such as the liver. How can we explain the phenomena of EA and meridian effect? Here, we proposed a neurovascular transmission model for acupuncture induced NO. In this proposed model, the acupuncture stimulus is able to influence connective tissue via mechanical force transfer to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Through the ECM, the mechanotransduction stimulus can be translated or travel from the acupuncture points, which involve local tissue and cells. Cells in the local tissue that have received mechanotransduction induce different types of NO production that can induce changes in blood flow and local circulation. The local mechanical stress produced is coupled to a cyclic strain of the blood vessels and this could then change the frequency of resonance. According to the resonance theory, an oscillatory

  19. Indium and indium tin oxide induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Christen, Verena; Furrer, Gerhard; Fent, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Indium and indium tin oxide (ITO) are extensively used in electronic technologies. They may be introduced into the environment during production, use, and leaching from electronic devices at the end of their life. At present, surprisingly little is known about potential ecotoxicological implications of indium contamination. Here, molecular effects of indium nitrate (In(NO3)3) and ITO nanoparticles were investigated in vitro in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) cells and in zebrafish embryos and novel insights into their molecular effects are provided. In(NO3)3 led to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of transcripts of pro-apoptotic genes and TNF-α in vitro at a concentration of 247 μg/L. In(NO3)3 induced the ER stress key gene BiP at mRNA and protein level, as well as atf6, which ultimately led to induction of the important pro-apoptotic marker gene chop. The activity of In(NO3)3 on ER stress induction was much stronger than that of ITO, which is explained by differences in soluble free indium ion concentrations. The effect was also stronger in ZFL cells than in zebrafish embryos. Our study provides first evidence of ER stress and oxidative stress induction by In(NO3)3 and ITO indicating a critical toxicological profile that needs further investigation.

  20. Acidosis induces reprogramming of cellular metabolism to mitigate oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of oncogenic and environmental factors alter tumor metabolism to serve the distinct cellular biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs present during oncogenesis. Extracellular acidosis is a common microenvironmental stress in solid tumors, but little is known about its metabolic influence, particularly when present in the absence of hypoxia. In order to characterize the extent of tumor cell metabolic adaptations to acidosis, we employed stable isotope tracers to examine how acidosis impacts glucose, glutamine, and palmitate metabolism in breast cancer cells exposed to extracellular acidosis. Results Acidosis increased both glutaminolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, which contribute metabolic intermediates to drive the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) and ATP generation. Acidosis also led to a decoupling of glutaminolysis and novel glutathione (GSH) synthesis by repressing GCLC/GCLM expression. We further found that acidosis redirects glucose away from lactate production and towards the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). These changes all serve to increase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production and counter the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) present under acidosis. The reduced novel GSH synthesis under acidosis may explain the increased demand for NADPH to recycle existing pools of GSH. Interestingly, acidosis also disconnected novel ribose synthesis from the oxidative PPP, seemingly to reroute PPP metabolites to the TCA cycle. Finally, we found that acidosis activates p53, which contributes to both the enhanced PPP and increased glutaminolysis, at least in part, through the induction of G6PD and GLS2 genes. Conclusions Acidosis alters the cellular metabolism of several major metabolites, which induces a significant degree of metabolic inflexibility. Cells exposed to acidosis largely rely upon mitochondrial metabolism for energy generation to the extent that metabolic intermediates are

  1. Nitric oxide-induced oxidative stress impairs pacemaker function of murine interstitial cells of Cajal during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Noriyuki; Horiguchi, Kazuhide; Iino, Satoshi; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Otani, Yuko; Firman; Murata, Takahisa; Sanders, Kenton M; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    The pacemaker function of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is impaired during intestinal inflammation. The aim of this study is to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms of ICC dysfunction during inflammatory condition by using intestinal cell clusters. Cell clusters were prepared from smooth muscle layer of murine jejunum and treated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide (IFN-γ+LPS) for 24h to induce inflammation. Pacemaker function of ICC was monitored by measuring cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillation in the presence of nifedipine. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS impaired the pacemaker activity of ICC with increasing mRNA level of interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in cell clusters; however, treatment with these cytokines individually had little effect on pacemaker activity of ICC. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS also induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in smooth muscle cells and resident macrophages, but not in ICC. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitor, L-NAME or iNOS inhibitor, 1400W ameliorated IFN-γ+LPS-induced pacemaker dysfunction of ICC. Pretreatment with guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ did not, but antioxidant, apocynin, to suppress NO-induced oxidative stress, significantly suppressed the impairment of ICC function induced by IFN-γ+LPS. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS also decreased c-Kit-positive ICC, which was prevented by pretreatment with L-NAME. However, apoptotic ICC were not detected in IFN-γ+LPS-treated clusters, suggesting IFN-γ+LPS stimulation just changed the phenotype of ICC but not induced cell death. Moreover, ultrastructure of ICC was not disturbed by IFN-γ+LPS. In conclusion, ICC dysfunction during inflammation is induced by NO-induced oxidative stress rather than NO/cGMP signaling. NO-induced oxidative stress might be the main factor to induce phenotypic changes of ICC. PMID:27468647

  2. Nitric oxide-induced oxidative stress impairs pacemaker function of murine interstitial cells of Cajal during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kaji, Noriyuki; Horiguchi, Kazuhide; Iino, Satoshi; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Otani, Yuko; Firman; Murata, Takahisa; Sanders, Kenton M; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2016-09-01

    The pacemaker function of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) is impaired during intestinal inflammation. The aim of this study is to clarify the pathophysiological mechanisms of ICC dysfunction during inflammatory condition by using intestinal cell clusters. Cell clusters were prepared from smooth muscle layer of murine jejunum and treated with interferon-gamma and lipopolysaccharide (IFN-γ+LPS) for 24h to induce inflammation. Pacemaker function of ICC was monitored by measuring cytosolic Ca(2+) oscillation in the presence of nifedipine. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS impaired the pacemaker activity of ICC with increasing mRNA level of interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 in cell clusters; however, treatment with these cytokines individually had little effect on pacemaker activity of ICC. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS also induced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in smooth muscle cells and resident macrophages, but not in ICC. Pretreatment with NOS inhibitor, L-NAME or iNOS inhibitor, 1400W ameliorated IFN-γ+LPS-induced pacemaker dysfunction of ICC. Pretreatment with guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ did not, but antioxidant, apocynin, to suppress NO-induced oxidative stress, significantly suppressed the impairment of ICC function induced by IFN-γ+LPS. Treatment with IFN-γ+LPS also decreased c-Kit-positive ICC, which was prevented by pretreatment with L-NAME. However, apoptotic ICC were not detected in IFN-γ+LPS-treated clusters, suggesting IFN-γ+LPS stimulation just changed the phenotype of ICC but not induced cell death. Moreover, ultrastructure of ICC was not disturbed by IFN-γ+LPS. In conclusion, ICC dysfunction during inflammation is induced by NO-induced oxidative stress rather than NO/cGMP signaling. NO-induced oxidative stress might be the main factor to induce phenotypic changes of ICC.

  3. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  4. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  5. Fatty Acid Composition as a Predictor for the Oxidation Stability of Korean Vegetable Oils with or without Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jung-Mi; Surh, Jeonghee

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether the fatty acid composition could make a significant contribution to the oxidation stability of vegetable oils marketed in Korea. Ten kinds, 97 items of vegetable oils that were produced in either an industrialized or a traditional way were collected and analyzed for their fatty acid compositions and lipid oxidation products, in the absence or presence of oxidative stress. Peroxidability index (PI) calculations based on the fatty acid composition ranged from 7.10 to 111.87 with the lowest value found in olive oils and the highest in perilla oils. In the absence of induced oxidative stress, malondialdehyde (MDA), the secondary lipid oxidation product, was generated more in the oils with higher PI (r=0.890), while the tendency was not observed when the oils were subjected to an oxidation-accelerating system. In the presence of the oxidative stress, the perilla oils produced in an industrialized manner generated appreciably higher amounts of MDA than those produced in a traditional way, although both types of oils presented similar PIs. The results implicate that the fatty acid compositions could be a predictor for the oxidation stability of the vegetable oils at the early stage of oil oxidation, but not for those at a later stage of oxidation. PMID:24471078

  6. UVA and UVB radiation-induced oxidation products of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Fahlman, Brian M; Krol, Ed S

    2009-12-01

    The flavonol quercetin is believed to provide protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced damage in plants. As part of our investigations into the potential for quercetin to protect skin against UV radiation-induced damage we have investigated the products of quercetin exposed to UV radiation in vitro. UVA (740 microW cm(-2) at 365 nm) or UVB (1300 microW cm(-2) at 310 nm) irradiation of quercetin in methanol results in a small conversion (less than 20%) to C-ring breakdown products over 11 h. When the triplet sensitizer benzophenone is added, greater than 90% conversion by UVA or UVB occurs within 1h. The major photoproducts from either UVA or UVB radiation are 2,4,6-trihydroxybenzaldehyde (1), 2-(3',4'-dihydroxybenzoyloxy)-4,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (3). Product 2 has previously been observed as a product of oxidative metabolism of quercetin, however products 1 and 3 appear to be the result of a unique UV-dependent pathway. In conclusion we have determined that quercetin undergoes slow decomposition to a mixture of C-ring-opened products, two of which to our knowledge have not been previously observed for quercetin decomposition, and that the presence of a triplet sensitizer greatly increases UV radiation-mediated quercetin decomposition. The presence of endogenous photosensitizers in the skin could potentially affect the UV stability of quercetin, suggesting that further study of quercetin for both its photoprotective properties and photostabilty in skin are warranted.

  7. Chemoprevention with phytochemicals targeting inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Akira

    2009-01-01

    A regulated low level of nitric oxide (NO) production in the body is essential for maintaining homeostasis (neuroprotection, vasorelaxation, etc.), though certain pathophysiological conditions associated with inflammation involve de novo synthesis of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) in immune cells, including macrophages. A large body of evidence indicates that many inflammatory diseases, such as colitis and gastritis, as well as many types of cancer, occur through sustained and elevated activation of this particular enzyme. The biochemical process of iNOS protein expression is tightly regulated and complex, in which the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide selectively binds to toll-like receptor 4 and thereby activates its adaptor protein MyD88, which in turn targets downstream proteins such as IRAK and TRAF6. This leads to functional activation of key protein kinases, including IkB kinases and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as p38 MAPK, JNK1/2, and ERK1/2, all of which are involved in activating key transcription factors, including nuclear factor-kappaB and activator protein-1. In addition, the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as interferon-gamma and interleukin-12 potentiates iNOS induction in autocrine fashions. Meanwhile, an LPS-stimulated p38 MAPK pathway plays a pivotal role in the stabilization of iNOS mRNA, which has the AU-rich element in its 3'-untranslated region, for rapid NO production. Thus, suppression and/or inhibition of the above-mentioned signaling molecules may have a great potential for the prevention and treatment of inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In fact, there have been numerous reports of phytochemicals found capable of targeting NO production by unique mechanisms, including polyphenols, terpenoids, and others. This review article briefly highlights the molecular mechanisms underlying endotoxin-induced iNOS expression in macrophages, and also focuses on promising natural agents that may be useful for anti

  8. Role of oxidative stress in thuringiensin-induced pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, S.-F. . E-mail: sftsai@tactri.gov.tw; Yang Chi; Liu, B.-L.; Hwang, J.-S.; Ho, S.-P. . E-mail: spho@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

    2006-10-15

    To understand the effect of thuringiensin on the lungs tissues, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administrated with thuringiensin by intratracheal instillation at doses 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg of body weight, respectively. The rats were sacrificed 4 h after treatment, and lungs were isolated and examined. Subsequently, an effective dose of 1.6 mg/kg was selected for the time course study (4, 8, 12, and 24 h). Intratracheal instillation of thuringiensin resulted in lung damage, as evidenced by increase in lung weight and decrease in alkaline phosphatase (10-54%), an enzyme localized primarily in pulmonary alveolar type II epithelial cells. Furthermore, the administration of thuringiensin caused increases in lipid peroxidation (21-105%), the indices of lung injury. In addition, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities of lung tissue extracts were measured to evaluate the effect of thuringiensin on antioxidant defense system. The SOD activity and GSH content in lung showed significant decreases in a dose-related manner with 11-21% and 15-37%, respectively. Those were further supported by the release of proinflammatory cytokines, as indicated by increases in IL-1{beta} (229-1017%) and TNF-{alpha} (234%) levels. Therefore, the results demonstrated that changes in the pulmonary oxidative-antioxidative status might play an important role in the thuringiensin-induced lung injury.

  9. Nitric oxide induces caspase activity in boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Moran, J M; Madejón, L; Ortega Ferrusola, C; Peña, F J

    2008-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly reactive free radical that plays a key role in intra- and intercellular signaling. Production of radical oxygen species and an apoptotic-like phenomenon have recently been implicated in cryodamage during sperm cryopreservation. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor, on boar sperm viability. Semen samples were pooled from four boars that were routinely used for artificial insemination. Flow cytometry was used to compare semen incubated with SNP to control semen. Specifically, NO production was measured using the NO indicator dye diaminofluorescein diacetate, and caspase activity was determined using the permeable pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD linked to FITC. SNP induced a significant increase in the percentage of sperm cells showing caspase activity, from 9.3% in control samples to 76.2% in SNP-incubated samples (P<0.01). This study suggests that NO is a major free radical involved in boar sperm damage. PMID:18433854

  10. GAPDH regulates cellular heme insertion into inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Ritu; Aulak, Kulwant S.; Fox, Paul L.; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2010-01-01

    Heme proteins play essential roles in biology, but little is known about heme transport inside mammalian cells or how heme is inserted into soluble proteins. We recently found that nitric oxide (NO) blocks cells from inserting heme into several proteins, including cytochrome P450s, hemoglobin, NO synthases, and catalase. This finding led us to explore the basis for NO inhibition and to identify cytosolic proteins that may be involved, using inducible NO synthase (iNOS) as a model target. Surprisingly, we found that GAPDH plays a key role. GAPDH was associated with iNOS in cells. Pure GAPDH bound tightly to heme or to iNOS in an NO-sensitive manner. GAPDH knockdown inhibited heme insertion into iNOS and a GAPDH mutant with defective heme binding acted as a dominant negative inhibitor of iNOS heme insertion. Exposing cells to NO either from a chemical donor or by iNOS induction caused GAPDH to become S-nitrosylated at Cys152. Expressing a GAPDH C152S mutant in cells or providing a drug to selectively block GAPDH S-nitrosylation both made heme insertion into iNOS resistant to the NO inhibition. We propose that GAPDH delivers heme to iNOS through a process that is regulated by its S-nitrosylation. Our findings may uncover a fundamental step in intracellular heme trafficking, and reveal a mechanism whereby NO can govern the process. PMID:20921417

  11. Brain most susceptible to cadmium induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Sandeep K; Agrawal, Usha; Ghosh, Ilora

    2015-04-01

    Accumulated evidence over the years indicate that cadmium (Cd) may be a possible etiological factor for neurodegenerative diseases. This may possibly be linked to excessive generation of free radicals that damages the organs in the body depending on their defence mechanism. Since Cd is a toxic agent that affect several cell types, the aim of this study was to shed light on the effect of Cd and its consequences on different organs of the mice body. To test the hypothesis of concentration dependent Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation and DNA damage, observations were done in the serum of 4-5 weeks old male Swiss albino mice by treating with cadmium chloride (CdCl2) in drinking water for 30 days. The expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) an apoptotic marker protein was two times higher in brain compared to liver at an exposure level of 0.5mgL(-1) CdCl2. Furthermore the correlation and linkage data analysis of antioxidant defence system revealed a rapid alteration in the brain, compared to any other organs considered in this study. We report that even at low dose of Cd, it impaired the brain due to lipid peroxidase sensitivity which favoured the Cd-induced oxidative injury in the brain.

  12. Platinum-induced structural collapse in layered oxide polycrystalline films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jianlin; Liu, Changhui; Huang, Haoliang; Fu, Zhengping; Peng, Ranran E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn; Zhai, Xiaofang; Lu, Yalin E-mail: yllu@ustc.edu.cn

    2015-03-30

    Effect of a platinum bottom electrode on the SrBi{sub 5}Fe{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 18} layered oxide polycrystalline films was systematically studied. The doped cobalt ions react with the platinum to form a secondary phase of PtCoO{sub 2}, which has a typical Delafossite structure with a weak antiferromagnetism and an exceptionally high in-plane electrical conductivity. Formation of PtCoO{sub 2} at the interface partially consumes the cobalt dopant and leads to the structural collapsing from 5 to 4 layers, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurements. Considering the weak magnetic contribution from PtCoO{sub 2}, the observed ferromagnetism should be intrinsic of the Aurivillius compounds. Ferroelectric properties were also indicated by the piezoresponse force microscopy. In this work, the platinum induced secondary phase at the interface was observed, which has a strong impact on Aurivillius structural configuration and thus the ferromagnetic and ferroelectric properties.

  13. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  14. Lycopene inhibits LPS-induced proinflammatory mediator inducible nitric oxide synthase in mouse macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohamed M; Yadav, Prem Narayan; Reyes, Marynell

    2007-01-01

    Lycopene is a fat-soluble red-orange carotenoid found primarily in tomatoes and tomato-derived products, including tomato sauce, tomato paste, and ketchup, and other dietary sources, including dried apricots, guava, watermelon, papaya, and pink grapefruit. In this study, we have demonstrated the molecular mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory properties of lycopene using a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW 264.7). Treatment with lycopene (10 microM) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated nitric oxide (NO) production (40% compared with the control). Western blotting and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that lycopene treatment decreased LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) protein and mRNA expression in RAW 264.7 cells, respectively. These results suggest that lycopene has anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting iNOS proteins and mRNA expressions in mouse macrophage cell lines. Furthermore, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and mRNA expression were not affected by treatment with lycopene. PMID:17995901

  15. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs. PMID:26726416

  16. Improved Photo-Induced Stability in Amorphous Metal-Oxide Based TFTs for Transparent Displays.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sang-Mo; Ha, Tae-Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the origin of photo-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin-film transistors (oxide-TFTs) by exploring threshold voltage (Vth) shift in transfer characteristics. The combination of photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress enhanced the shift in Vth in amorphous hafnium-indium-zinc-oxide (a-HfIZO) TFTs. Such results stem from the extended trapped charges at the localized defect states related to oxygen vacancy which play a role in a screening effect on the electric field induced by gate voltage. We also demonstrate the chemically clean interface in oxide-TFTs by employing oxygen annealing which reduces the density of trap states, thereby resulting in improved photo-induced stability. We believe that this work stimulates the research society of transparent electronics by providing a promising approach to suppress photo-induced instability in metal-oxide TFTs.

  17. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  18. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

  19. A chemiluminescence study of UVA-induced oxidative stress in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ou-Yang, Hao; Stamatas, Georgios; Saliou, Claude; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2004-04-01

    Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of pro-oxidants. Photon emission (also called chemiluminescence) has been widely used to study oxidative stress in biological systems in vitro. In vivo chemiluminescence has been proposed as a non-invasive method to assess oxidative stress in the skin. UVA (320-400 nm part of the ultraviolet radiation) exposure is generally accepted as a source of oxidative stress in the skin. In this study, UVA-induced oxidative stress was studied by using an in vivo chemiluminescence detection method. First, the dose response and the fluence rate response of the UVA-induced oxidative stress in human skin were investigated by examining the decay kinetics of the chemiluminescence signal following UVA exposure. A kinetic model was proposed to help differentiate these two responses. We found that the initial burst of the chemiluminescence signal depended on the UVA fluence rate, whereas the decay of the signal following exposure can be related to the UVA dose involved. Second, a significant reduction of UVA-induced chemiluminescence signal was observed after tape-stripping, indicating that stratum corneum is a major source of UVA-induced oxidative stress in the skin. Furthermore, the oxygen dependence of UVA-induced chemiluminescence signal was also confirmed by application of a pressure cuff, implying that some of the oxidative stress occurs in the deeper layers of the skin. Finally, topical application of vitamin C before exposure significantly reduced the UVA-induced chemiluminescence signal. We thus conclude that chemiluminescence is an effective method to assess the oxidative stress induced by UVA in human skin in vivo.

  20. Effect of L-arginine-nitric oxide system on chemical-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mohan, I K; Das, U N

    1998-11-01

    Several in vitro studies have suggested that nitric oxide may be the mediator of cytokine-induced beta-cell destruction. On the other hand, in vivo studies have given conflicting results: some studies suggesting that nitric oxide synthase inhibitors do not suppress streptozotocin-induced diabetes in mice, while others revealed that nitric oxide synthase inhibitors can reduce the incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in rats. The results of the present study indicate that alloxan-induced diabetes in the male Wistar rats can be abrogated to a large extent by prior and simultaneous administration of the precursor of nitric oxide, L-arginine, where as NG-monomethy-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, can completely block the beneficial action of L-arginine. Sodium nitroprusside, a nitric oxide donor, also showed significant inhibitory effect on the severity of diabetes induced by alloxan. Alloxan treatment reduced nitric oxide generation, whereas L-arginine and sodium nitroprusside, when given along with alloxan, enhanced nitric oxide production to control values. Induction of diabetes by alloxan in the experimental animals was associated with a marked elevation in plasma lactate, ketone body, and lipid peroxide levels with a simultaneous fall in plasma insulin and nitric oxide levels. Alloxan-induced diabetes also induced a fall in the levels of anti-oxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and total glutathione, and antioxidants: vitamin E and ceruloplasmin, and an increase in glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. All these biochemical abnormalities and antioxidant levels have improved to near normal levels in animals treated with insulin, L-arginine, and sodium nitroprusside. From the results of the present study, it is apparent that L-arginine and nitric oxide can prevent alloxan-induced beta-cell damage, and the development of diabetes, and restore the antioxidant status to near

  1. Unraveling oxidation-induced modifications in proteins by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress-driven modifications can occur in lipids, proteins, and DNA and form the basis of several chronic pathologies. The metabolites generated during oxidative responses consist of very reactive substances that result in oxidative damage and modulation of redox signaling as the main outcomes. Oxidative modifications occurring in proteins are poorly understood; among the several methods employed to study such modifications, the most promising strategies are based on proteomics approaches. Proteomics has emerged as one of the most powerful and sensitive analytical tools for mapping the oxidative changes present in proteins in a wide range of sample types and disease models. This chapter addresses the main aspects of redox processes, including an overview of oxidative stress and its biological consequences on proteins. Moreover, major proteomic strategies that can be employed as powerful tools for understanding protein oxidative modifications detected in chronic pathologies are discussed, highlighting cancer research as a model. PMID:24629184

  2. Castration Induces Parkinson Disease Pathologies in Young Male Mice via Inducible Nitric-oxide Synthase*

    PubMed Central

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-01-01

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, available animal models do not exhibit irreversible neurodegeneration, and this is a major obstacle in finding out an effective drug against this disease. Here we delineate a new irreversible model to study PD pathogenesis. The model is based on simple castration of young male mice. Levels of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD11b), and α-synuclein were higher in nigra of castrated male mice than normal male mice. On the other hand, after castration, the level of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) markedly decreased in the nigra of male mice. Accordingly, castration also induced the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the nigra and decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers and neurotransmitters in the striatum. Reversal of nigrostriatal pathologies in castrated male mice by subcutaneous implantation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets validates an important role of male sex hormone in castration-induced nigrostriatal pathology. Interestingly, castration was unable to cause glial activation, decrease nigral GDNF, augment the death of nigral dopaminergic neurons, induce the loss of striatal fibers, and impair neurotransmitters in iNOS−/− male mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is responsible for decreased expression of GDNF in activated astrocytes. Together, our results suggest that castration induces nigrostriatal pathologies via iNOS-mediated decrease in GDNF. These results are important because castrated young male mice may be used as a simple, toxin-free, and nontransgenic animal model to study PD-related nigrostriatal pathologies, paving the way for easy drug screening against PD. PMID:23744073

  3. Castration induces Parkinson disease pathologies in young male mice via inducible nitric-oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Khasnavis, Saurabh; Ghosh, Anamitra; Roy, Avik; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-07-19

    Although Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, available animal models do not exhibit irreversible neurodegeneration, and this is a major obstacle in finding out an effective drug against this disease. Here we delineate a new irreversible model to study PD pathogenesis. The model is based on simple castration of young male mice. Levels of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), glial markers (glial fibrillary acidic protein and CD11b), and α-synuclein were higher in nigra of castrated male mice than normal male mice. On the other hand, after castration, the level of glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) markedly decreased in the nigra of male mice. Accordingly, castration also induced the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the nigra and decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers and neurotransmitters in the striatum. Reversal of nigrostriatal pathologies in castrated male mice by subcutaneous implantation of 5α-dihydrotestosterone pellets validates an important role of male sex hormone in castration-induced nigrostriatal pathology. Interestingly, castration was unable to cause glial activation, decrease nigral GDNF, augment the death of nigral dopaminergic neurons, induce the loss of striatal fibers, and impair neurotransmitters in iNOS(-/-) male mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that iNOS-derived NO is responsible for decreased expression of GDNF in activated astrocytes. Together, our results suggest that castration induces nigrostriatal pathologies via iNOS-mediated decrease in GDNF. These results are important because castrated young male mice may be used as a simple, toxin-free, and nontransgenic animal model to study PD-related nigrostriatal pathologies, paving the way for easy drug screening against PD.

  4. DISSECTING STRUCTURAL AND ELECTRONIC EFFECTS IN INDUCIBLE NITRIC OXIDE SYNTHASE

    PubMed Central

    Hannibal, Luciana; Page, Richard C.; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bolisetty, Karthik; Yu, Zhihao; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOS) are haem-thiolate enzymes that catalyse the conversion of L-Arginine (LArg) into NO and citrulline. Inducible NOS (iNOS) is responsible for delivery of NO in response to stressors during inflammation. The catalytic performance of iNOS is proposed to rely mainly on the haem midpoint potential and the ability of the substrate L-Arg to provide an H-bond for oxygen activation (O-O scission). We present a comparative study of native iNOS versus iNOS-mesohaem, and investigate the formation of a low-spin ferric haem-aquo or -hydroxo species (P) in iNOS mutant W188H substituted with mesohaem. iNOS-mesohaem and W188H-mesohaem were stable and dimeric, and presented substrate-binding affinities comparable to their native counterparts. Single turnover reactions catalysed by iNOSoxy with LArg (first reaction step) or N-hydroxyarginine (second reaction step) showed that mesohaem substitution triggered faster rates of FeIIO2 conversion and altered other key kinetic parameters. We elucidated the first crystal structure of a NOS substituted with mesohaem and found essentially identical features compared to the structure of iNOS carrying native haem. This facilitated the dissection of structural and electronic effects. Mesohaem substitution substantially reduced the build-up of species P in W188H iNOS during catalysis, thus increasing its proficiency toward NO synthesis. The marked structural similarities of iNOSoxy containing native haem or mesohaem indicate that the kinetic behaviour observed in mesohaem-substituted iNOS is most heavily influenced by electronic effects rather than structural alterations. PMID:25608846

  5. Dissecting structural and electronic effects in inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Luciana; Page, Richard C; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Bolisetty, Karthik; Yu, Zhihao; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J

    2015-04-01

    Nitric oxide synthases (NOSs) are haem-thiolate enzymes that catalyse the conversion of L-arginine (L-Arg) into NO and citrulline. Inducible NOS (iNOS) is responsible for delivery of NO in response to stressors during inflammation. The catalytic performance of iNOS is proposed to rely mainly on the haem midpoint potential and the ability of the substrate L-Arg to provide a hydrogen bond for oxygen activation (O-O scission). We present a study of native iNOS compared with iNOS-mesohaem, and investigate the formation of a low-spin ferric haem-aquo or -hydroxo species (P) in iNOS mutant W188H substituted with mesohaem. iNOS-mesohaem and W188H-mesohaem were stable and dimeric, and presented substrate-binding affinities comparable to those of their native counterparts. Single turnover reactions catalysed by iNOSoxy with L-Arg (first reaction step) or N-hydroxy-L-arginine (second reaction step) showed that mesohaem substitution triggered higher rates of Fe(II)O₂ conversion and altered other key kinetic parameters. We elucidated the first crystal structure of a NOS substituted with mesohaem and found essentially identical features compared with the structure of iNOS carrying native haem. This facilitated the dissection of structural and electronic effects. Mesohaem substitution substantially reduced the build-up of species P in W188H iNOS during catalysis, thus increasing its proficiency towards NO synthesis. The marked structural similarities of iNOSoxy containing native haem or mesohaem indicate that the kinetic behaviour observed in mesohaem-substituted iNOS is most heavily influenced by electronic effects rather than structural alterations.

  6. Inducible nitric oxide synthase haplotype associated with migraine and aura.

    PubMed

    de O S Mansur, Thiago; Gonçalves, Flavia M; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Speciali, Jose G; Dach, Fabiola; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2012-05-01

    Migraine is a complex neurological disorder with a clear neurogenic inflammatory component apparently including enhanced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Excessive NO amounts possibly contributing to migraine are derived from increased expression and activity of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We tested the hypothesis that two functional, clinically relevant iNOS genetic polymorphisms (C(-1026)A-rs2779249 and G2087A-rs2297518) are associated with migraine with or without aura. We studied 142 healthy women without migraine (control group) and 200 women with migraine divided into two groups: 148 with migraine without aura (MWA) and 52 with aura (MA). Genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction using the Taqman(®) allele discrimination assays. The PHASE 2.1 software was used to estimate the haplotypes. The A allele for the G2087A polymorphism was more commonly found in the MA group than in the MWA group (28 vs. 18%; P < 0.05). No other significant differences in the alleles or genotypes distributions were found (P > 0.05). The haplotype combining both A alleles for the two polymorphisms was more commonly found in the MA group than in the control group or in the MWA group (19 vs. 10 or 8%; P = 0.0245 or 0.0027, respectively). Our findings indicate that the G2087A and the C(-1026)A polymorphism in the iNOS gene affect the susceptibility to migraine with aura when their effects are combined within haplotypes, whereas the G2087A affects the susceptibility to aura in migraine patients. These finding may have therapeutic implications when examining the effects of selective iNOS inhibitors.

  7. Resveratrol-loaded Nanoparticles Induce Antioxidant Activity against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Eun-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Jo, Chan-Mi; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol acts as a free radical scavenger and a potent antioxidant in the inhibition of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS). The function of resveratrol and resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles in protecting human lung cancer cells (A549) against hydrogen peroxide was investigated in this study. The 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay was performed to evaluate the antioxidant properties. Resveratrol had substantially high antioxidant capacity (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value) compared to trolox and vitamin E since the concentration of resveratrol was more than 50 μM. Nanoparticles prepared from β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were successfully developed. The β-lg nanoparticle showed 60 to 146 nm diameter in size with negatively charged surface. Non-cytotoxicity was observed in Caco-2 cells treated with β-lg nanoparticles. Fluorescein isothiocynate-conjugated β-lg nanoparticles were identified into the cell membrane of Caco-2 cells, indicating that nanoparticles can be used as a delivery system. Hydrogen peroxide caused accumulation of ROS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles restored H2O2-induced ROS levels by induction of cellular uptake of resveratrol in A549 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Nrf2-Keap1) signaling in A549 cells, thereby accumulation of Nrf2 abundance, as demonstrated by western blotting approach. Overall, these results may have implications for improvement of oxidative stress in treatment with nanoparticles as a biodegradable and non-toxic delivery carrier of bioactive compounds. PMID:26732454

  8. Cerium oxide nanoparticle treatment ameliorates peritonitis-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Shinichi; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Manne, Nandini DPK; Maheshwari, Mani; Ma, Bing; Rice, Kevin M; Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Blough, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    The severe inflammation observed during sepsis is thought to cause diaphragm dysfunction, which is associated with poor patient prognosis. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been posited to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities suggesting that these particles may be of potential use for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. To investigate this possibility, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham control, CeO2 nanoparticle treatment only (0.5 mg/kg iv), sepsis, and sepsis+CeO2 nanoparticles. Sepsis was induced by the introduction of cecal material (600 mg/kg) directly into the peritoneal cavity. Nanoparticle treatment decreased sepsis-associated impairments in diaphragmatic contractile (Po) function (sham: 25.6±1.6 N/cm2 vs CeO2: 23.4±0.8 N/cm2 vs Sep: 15.9±1.0 N/cm2 vs Sep+CeO2: 20.0±1.0 N/cm2, P<0.05). These improvements in diaphragm contractile function were accompanied by a normalization of protein translation signaling (Akt, FOXO-1, and 4EBP1), diminished proteolysis (caspase 8 and ubiquitin levels), and decreased inflammatory signaling (Stat3 and iNOS). Histological analysis suggested that nanoparticle treatment was associated with diminished sarcolemma damage and diminished inflammatory cell infiltration. These data indicate CeO2 nanoparticles may improve diaphragmatic function in the septic laboratory rat. PMID:26491293

  9. 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide induced experimental oral carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kanojia, Deepak; Vaidya, Milind M

    2006-08-01

    Human oral cancer is the sixth largest group of malignancies worldwide and single largest group of malignancies in the Indian subcontinent. Seventy percent of premalignant cancers appear from premalignant lesions. Only 8-10% of these lesions finally turn into malignancy. The appearance of these premalignant lesions is one distinct feature of human oral cancer. At present there is dearth of biomarkers to identify which of these lesions will turn into malignancy. Regional lymph node metastasis and locoregional recurrence are the major factors responsible for the limited survival of patients with oral cancer. Paucity of early diagnostic and prognostic markers is one of the contributory factors for higher mortality rates. Cancer is a multistep process and because of constrain in availability of human tissues from multiple stages of oral carcinogenesis including normal tissues, animal models are being widely used, aiming for the development of diagnostic and prognostic markers. A number of chemical carcinogens like coal tar, 20 methyl cholanthrene (20MC), 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA) and 4-nitroquinoline-1-oxide (4NQO) have been used in experimental oral carcinogenesis. However, 4NQO is the preferred carcinogen apart from DMBA in the development of experimental oral carcinogenesis. 4NQO is a water soluble carcinogen, which induces tumors predominantly in the oral cavity. It produces all the stages of oral carcinogenesis and several lines of evidences suggest that similar histological as well as molecular changes are observed in the human system. In the present review an attempt has been made to collate the information available on mechanisms of action of 4NQO, studies carried out for the development of biomarkers and chemopreventives agents using 4NQO animal models. PMID:16448841

  10. Cadmium-Induced Pathologies: Where Is the Oxidative Balance Lost (or Not)?

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ambily Ravindran; DeGheselle, Olivier; Smeets, Karen; Van Kerkhove, Emmy; Cuypers, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, anthropogenic factors have led to cadmium (Cd) accumulation in the environment causing various health problems in humans. Although Cd is not a Fenton-like metal, it induces oxidative stress in various animal models via indirect mechanisms. The degree of Cd-induced oxidative stress depends on the dose, duration and frequency of Cd exposure. Also the presence or absence of serum in experimental conditions, type of cells and their antioxidant capacity, as well as the speciation of Cd are important determinants. At the cellular level, the Cd-induced oxidative stress either leads to oxidative damage or activates signal transduction pathways to initiate defence responses. This balance is important on how different organ systems respond to Cd stress and ultimately define the pathological outcome. In this review, we highlight the Cd-induced oxidant/antioxidant status as well as the damage versus signalling scenario in relation to Cd toxicity. Emphasis is addressed to Cd-induced pathologies of major target organs, including a section on cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, attention is paid to Cd-induced oxidative stress in undifferentiated stem cells, which can provide information for future therapies in preventing Cd-induced pathologies. PMID:23507750

  11. H2S protects against methionine-induced oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Moshal, Karni S; Sen, Utpal; Vacek, Thomas P; Kumar, Munish; Hughes, William M; Kundu, Soumi; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2009-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. However, to date, there are no strategies to prevent Hcy-induced oxidative damage. Hcy is an H2S precursor formed from methionine (Met) metabolism. We aimed to investigate whether H2S ameliorated Met-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3). The bEnd3 cells were exposed to Met treatment in the presence or absence of NaHS (donor of H2S). Met-induced cell toxicity increased the levels of free radicals in a concentration-dependent manner. Met increased NADPH-oxidase-4 (NOX-4) expression and mitigated thioredxion-1(Trx-1) expression. Pretreatment of bEnd3 with NaHS (0.05 mM) attenuated the production of free radicals in the presence of Met and protected the cells from oxidative damage. Furthermore, NaHS enhanced inhibitory effects of apocynin, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on ROS production and redox enzymes levels induced by Met. In conclusion, the administration of H2S protected the cells from oxidative stress induced by hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), which suggested that NaHS/H2S may have therapeutic potential against Met-induced oxidative stress.

  12. H2S protects against methionine-induced oxidative stress in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Neetu; Moshal, Karni S; Sen, Utpal; Vacek, Thomas P; Kumar, Munish; Hughes, William M; Kundu, Soumi; Tyagi, Suresh C

    2009-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) causes cerebrovascular dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. However, to date, there are no strategies to prevent Hcy-induced oxidative damage. Hcy is an H2S precursor formed from methionine (Met) metabolism. We aimed to investigate whether H2S ameliorated Met-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3). The bEnd3 cells were exposed to Met treatment in the presence or absence of NaHS (donor of H2S). Met-induced cell toxicity increased the levels of free radicals in a concentration-dependent manner. Met increased NADPH-oxidase-4 (NOX-4) expression and mitigated thioredxion-1(Trx-1) expression. Pretreatment of bEnd3 with NaHS (0.05 mM) attenuated the production of free radicals in the presence of Met and protected the cells from oxidative damage. Furthermore, NaHS enhanced inhibitory effects of apocynin, N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), reduced glutathione (GSH), catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), Nomega-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) on ROS production and redox enzymes levels induced by Met. In conclusion, the administration of H2S protected the cells from oxidative stress induced by hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy), which suggested that NaHS/H2S may have therapeutic potential against Met-induced oxidative stress. PMID:18837652

  13. Caryocar brasiliense camb protects against genomic and oxidative damage in urethane-induced lung carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, N.B.R.; Rangel, M.P.; Martins, V.; Hage, M.; Gelain, D.P.; Barbeiro, D.F.; Grisolia, C.K.; Parra, E.R.; Capelozzi, V.L.

    2015-01-01

    The antioxidant effects of Caryocar brasiliense Camb, commonly known as the pequi fruit, have not been evaluated to determine their protective effects against oxidative damage in lung carcinogenesis. In the present study, we evaluated the role of pequi fruit against urethane-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress in forty 8-12 week old male BALB/C mice. An in vivo comet assay was performed to assess DNA damage in lung tissues and changes in lipid peroxidation and redox cycle antioxidants were monitored for oxidative stress. Prior supplementation with pequi oil or its extract (15 µL, 60 days) significantly reduced urethane-induced oxidative stress. A protective effect against DNA damage was associated with the modulation of lipid peroxidation and low protein and gene expression of nitric oxide synthase. These findings suggest that the intake of pequi fruit might protect against in vivo genotoxicity and oxidative stress. PMID:26200231

  14. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter protein MCU is involved in oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yajin; Hao, Yumin; Chen, Hong; He, Qing; Yuan, Zengqiang; Cheng, Jinbo

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) is a conserved Ca(2+) transporter at mitochondrial in eukaryotic cells. However, the role of MCU protein in oxidative stress-induced cell death remains unclear. Here, we showed that ectopically expressed MCU is mitochondrial localized in both HeLa and primary cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Knockdown of endogenous MCU decreases mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake following histamine stimulation and attenuates cell death induced by oxidative stress in both HeLa cells and CGNs. We also found MCU interacts with VDAC1 and mediates VDAC1 overexpression-induced cell death in CGNs. This finding demonstrates that MCU-VDAC1 complex regulates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, which might represent therapeutic targets for oxidative stress related diseases.

  15. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  16. Contribution of oxidative metabolism to cocaine-induced liver and kidney damage.

    PubMed

    Valente, M J; Carvalho, F; Bastos, M d L; de Pinho, P G; Carvalho, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent psychoactive illicit substance and its abuse represents a major health burden worldwide. The pharmacodynamics and toxicity of cocaine have been extensively documented, and are generally associated to its affinity towards neurotransmitters transporters and several receptors. However, drug-related formation of reactive compounds, as is the case of pro-oxidant reactive species, and interaction at molecular level is still an understudied matter. The involvement of oxidative stress (OS) in cocaine-induced toxicity has been reported in both human and animal models, in several organs and systems, including heart, liver, kidney, and central nervous system (CNS). Cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated cocaine metabolism yields the reactive pro-oxidant compound norcocaine (NCOC) and further oxidative metabolites. Special emphasis should be given to the stable radical norcocaine nitroxide (NCOC-NO·), which plays a key role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, either by entering a futile redox cycle with an N-oxidative metabolite, or by being further oxidized to a highly reactive ion. In fact, cocaine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and consequent OS has been postulated based on the reactivity of cocaine N-oxidative metabolites. Depletion of cellular antioxidant defenses and impairment of mitochondrial respiration have also been considered important causes of ROS production, and subsequent cell death mediated by cocaine. The present review provides a thorough description of the current knowledge on cocaine oxidative metabolism and its role on drug-induced liver and kidney damage.

  17. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  18. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent. PMID:25730806

  19. Effect of methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus Willd. on lipopolysaccharide induced-oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Parwez; Hussain, Arshad; Siddiqui, Hefazat Hussain; Wahab, Shadma; Adak, Manoranjan

    2015-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress and impairment of normal physiological function generally categorized by increased anxiety and reduced mobility. Therefore, the present study was to find out the effect Methanolic extract of Asparagus racemosus (MEAR ) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress in rats . LPS-induced oxidative stress in rats was measured by locomotor activity by photoactometer test, anxiety with elevated plus maze test and also studied the oxidative stress markers, nitric oxide and cytokines. The obtained data shows that LPS markedly exhausted (p<0.001) brain- reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) significantly increased (p<0.001) the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide and the activity of cytokines in the brain. MEAR supplementation resulted in normalization of brain GSH and CAT and SOD and decreases in the levels of MDA with reduction of nitric oxide and cytokines in the brain. The action of the extract at dose of 200 mg/kg was almost similar to the standard drug, quercetin (100mg/kg, p.o.). These present study conclude that MEAR administration significantly (P<0.05) reduced LPS- induced oxidative-stress and intensely suggest that Asparagus racemosus Willd. is a functionally newer type of cerebroprotective agent.

  20. Romo1 expression contributes to oxidative stress-induced death of lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jung Ar; Chung, Jin Sil; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Hyung Jung; Yoo, Young Do

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Romo1 mediates oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial ROS production. •Romo1 induction by oxidative stress plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. •Romo1 overexpression correlates with epithelial cell death in patients with IPF. -- Abstract: Oxidant-mediated death of lung epithelial cells due to cigarette smoking plays an important role in pathogenesis in lung diseases such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the exact mechanism by which oxidants induce epithelial cell death is not fully understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulator 1 (Romo1) is localized in the mitochondria and mediates mitochondrial ROS production through complex III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Here, we show that Romo1 mediates mitochondrial ROS production and apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) treatment increased Romo1 expression, and Romo1 knockdown suppressed the cellular ROS levels and cell death triggered by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. In immunohistochemical staining of lung tissues from patients with IPF, Romo1 was mainly localized in hyperplastic alveolar and bronchial epithelial cells. Romo1 overexpression was detected in 14 of 18 patients with IPF. TUNEL-positive alveolar epithelial cells were also detected in most patients with IPF but not in normal controls. These findings suggest that Romo1 mediates apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in lung epithelial cells.

  1. Radiation-induced deposition of transparent conductive tin oxide coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umnov, S.; Asainov, O.; Temenkov, V.

    2016-04-01

    The study of tin oxide films is stimulated by the search for an alternative replacement of indium-tin oxide (ITO) films used as transparent conductors, oxidation catalysts, material gas sensors, etc. This work was aimed at studying the influence of argon ions irradiation on optical and electrical characteristics of tin oxide films. Thin films of tin oxide (without dopants) were deposited on glass substrates at room temperature using reactive magnetron sputtering. After deposition, the films were irradiated with an argon ion beam. The current density of the beam was (were) 2.5 mA/cm2, and the particles energy was 300-400 eV. The change of the optical and electrical properties of the films depending on the irradiation time was studied. Films optical properties were investigated by photometry in the range of 300-1100 nm. Films structural properties were studied using X-ray diffraction. The diffractometric research showed that the films, deposited on a substrate, had a crystal structure, and after argon ions irradiation they became quasi-crystalline (amorphous). It has been found that the transmission increases proportionally with the irradiation time, however the sheet resistance increases disproportionally. Tin oxide films (thickness ~30 nm) with ~100% transmittance and sheet resistance of ~100 kOhm/sq. were obtained. The study has proved to be prospective in the use of ion beams to improve the properties of transparent conducting oxides.

  2. Functional Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Variants Associate With Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nikkari, Seppo T.; Määttä, Kirsi M.; Kunnas, Tarja A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and expression has been associated with hypertension, but less is known whether the 2 known functional polymorphic sites in the iNOS gene (g.–1026 C/A (rs2779249), g.2087 G/A (rs2297518)) affect susceptibility to hypertension. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the genetic variants of iNOS and diagnosed hypertension in a Finnish cohort. This study included 320 hypertensive cases and 439 healthy controls. All participants were 50-year-old men and women and the data were collected from the Tampere adult population cardiovascular risk study (TAMRISK). DNA was extracted from buccal swabs and iNOS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed using KASP genotyping PCR. Data analysis was done by logistic regression. At the age of 50 years, the SNP rs2779249 (C/A) associated significantly with hypertension (P = 0.009); specifically, subjects carrying the A-allele had higher risk of hypertension compared to those carrying the CC genotype (OR = 1.47; CI = 1.08–2.01; P = 0.015). In addition, a 15-year follow-up period (35, 40, and 45 years) of the same individuals showed that carriers of the A-allele had more often hypertension in all of the studied age-groups. The highest risk for developing hypertension was obtained among 35-year-old subjects (odds ratio [OR] 3.83; confidence interval [CI] = 1.20–12.27; P = 0.024). Those carrying variant A had also significantly higher readings of both systolic (P = 0.047) and diastolic (P = 0.048) blood pressure during the follow-up. No significant associations between rs2297518 (G/A) variants alone and hypertension were found. However, haplotype analysis of rs2779249 and rs2297518 revealed that individuals having haplotype H3 which combines both A alleles (CA–GA, 19.7% of individuals) was more commonly found in the hypertensive group than in the normotensive group (OR = 2.01; CI = 1

  3. Grape seed and skin extract protects kidney from doxorubicin-induced oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Mokni, Meherzia; Hamlaoui, Sonia; Kadri, Safwen; Limam, Ferid; Amri, Mohamed; Marzouki, Lamjed; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2016-05-01

    The study investigated the protective effect of grape seed and skin extract (GSSE) against doxorubicin-induced renal toxicity in healthy rats. Animals were treated with GSSE or not (control), for 8 days, administered with doxorubicin (20mg/kg) in the 4th day, and renal function as well as oxidative stress parameters were evaluated. Data showed that doxorubicin induced renal toxicity by affecting renal architecture and plasma creatinine. Doxorubicin also induced an oxidative stress characterized by an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA), calcium and H(2)O(2) and a decrease in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Unexpectedly doxorubicin increased peroxidase (POD) and decreased carbonyl protein and plasma urea. Treatment with GSSE counteracted almost all adverse effects induced by doxorubicin. Data suggest that doxorubicin induced an oxidative stress into rat kidney and GSSE exerted antioxidant properties, which seem to be mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. PMID:27166540

  4. Grape seed and skin extract protects kidney from doxorubicin-induced oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Mokni, Meherzia; Hamlaoui, Sonia; Kadri, Safwen; Limam, Ferid; Amri, Mohamed; Marzouki, Lamjed; Aouani, Ezzedine

    2016-05-01

    The study investigated the protective effect of grape seed and skin extract (GSSE) against doxorubicin-induced renal toxicity in healthy rats. Animals were treated with GSSE or not (control), for 8 days, administered with doxorubicin (20mg/kg) in the 4th day, and renal function as well as oxidative stress parameters were evaluated. Data showed that doxorubicin induced renal toxicity by affecting renal architecture and plasma creatinine. Doxorubicin also induced an oxidative stress characterized by an increase in malondialdehyde (MDA), calcium and H(2)O(2) and a decrease in catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Unexpectedly doxorubicin increased peroxidase (POD) and decreased carbonyl protein and plasma urea. Treatment with GSSE counteracted almost all adverse effects induced by doxorubicin. Data suggest that doxorubicin induced an oxidative stress into rat kidney and GSSE exerted antioxidant properties, which seem to be mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium.

  5. Inflammation, gene mutation and photoimmunosuppression in response to UVR-induced oxidative damage contributes to photocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Halliday, Gary M

    2005-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression in the skin. These biological changes are responsible for photocarcinogenesis. UV radiation in sunlight is divided into two wavebands, UVB and UVA, both of which contribute to these biological changes, and therefore probably to skin cancer in humans and animal models. Oxidative damage caused by UV contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. This article reviews evidence for the hypothesis that UV oxidative damage to these processes contributes to photocarcinogenesis. UVA makes a larger impact on oxidative stress in the skin than UVB by inducing reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which damage DNA, protein and lipids and which also lead to NAD+ depletion, and therefore energy loss from the cell. Lipid peroxidation induces prostaglandin production that in association with UV-induced nitric oxide production causes inflammation. Inflammation drives benign human solar keratosis (SK) to undergo malignant conversion into squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) probably because the inflammatory cells produce reactive oxygen species, thus increasing oxidative damage to DNA and the immune system. Reactive oxygen or nitrogen appears to cause the increase in mutational burden as SK progress into SCC in humans. UVA is particularly important in causing immunosuppression in both humans and mice, and UV lipid peroxidation induced prostaglandin production and UV activation of nitric oxide synthase is important mediators of this event. Other immunosuppressive events are likely to be initiated by UV oxidative stress. Antioxidants have also been shown to reduce photocarcinogenesis. While most of this evidence comes from studies in mice, there is supporting evidence in humans that UV-induced oxidative damage contributes to inflammation, gene mutation and immunosuppression. Available evidence implicates oxidative damage as an important contributor to sunlight-induced carcinogenesis in humans.

  6. Protective Effect of Wheat Peptides against Indomethacin-Induced Oxidative Stress in IEC-6 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Hong; Pan, Xingchang; Song, Zhixiu; Wang, Shaokang; Yang, Ligang; Sun, Guiju

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that wheat peptides protected rats against non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs-induced small intestinal epithelial cells damage, but the mechanism of action is unclear. In the present study, an indomethacin-induced oxidative stress model was used to investigate the effect of wheat peptides on the nuclear factor-κB(NF-κB)-inducible nitric oxide synthase-nitric oxide signal pathway in intestinal epithelial cells-6 cells. IEC-6 cells were treated with wheat peptides (0, 125, 500 and 2000 mg/L) for 24 h, followed by 90 mg/L indomethacin for 12 h. Wheat peptides significantly attenuated the indomethacin-induced decrease in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity. Wheat peptides at 2000 mg/L markedly decreased the expression of the NF-κB in response to indomethacin-induced oxidative stress. This study demonstrated that the addition of wheat peptides to a culture medium significantly inhibited the indomethacin-induced release of malondialdehyde and nitrogen monoxide, and increased antioxidant enzyme activity in IEC-6 cells, thereby providing a possible explanation for the protective effect proposed for wheat peptides in the prevention of indomethacin-induced oxidative stress in small intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:24481130

  7. Taurine chloramine-induced inactivation of cofilin protein through methionine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shen; Uehara, Hiroshi; Shacter, Emily

    2014-10-01

    Cofilin regulates reorganization of actin filaments (F-actin) in eukaryotes. A recent finding has demonstrated that oxidation of cofilin by taurine chloramine (TnCl), a physiological oxidant derived from neutrophils, causes cofilin to translocate to the mitochondria inducing apoptosis (F. Klamt et al. Nat. Cell Biol.11:1241-1246; 2009). Here we investigated the effect of TnCl on biological activities of cofilin in vitro. Our data show that TnCl-induced oxidation of recombinant human cofilin-1 inhibits its F-actin-binding and depolymerization activities. Native cofilin contains four free Cys and three Met residues. Incubation of oxidized cofilin with DTT does not lead to its reactivation. A double Cys to Ala mutation on the two C-terminal Cys shows similar biological activities as the wild type, but does not prevent the TnCl-induced inactivation. In contrast, incubation of oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases results in its reactivation. Phosphorylation is known to inhibit cofilin activities. We found that Met oxidation also prevents phosphorylation of cofilin, which is reversed by incubating oxidized cofilin with methionine sulfoxide reductases. Interestingly, intact protein mass spectrometry of the oxidized mutant indicated one major oxidation product with an additional mass of 16 Da, consistent with oxidation of one specific Met residue. This residue was identified as Met-115 by peptide mapping and tandem mass spectrometry. It is adjacent to Lys-114, a known residue on globular-actin-binding site, implying that oxidation of Met-115 disrupts the globular-actin-binding site of cofilin, which causes TnCl-induced inactivation. The findings identify Met-115 as a redox switch on cofilin that regulates its biological activity.

  8. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-01-01

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu–20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm2, with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented. PMID:23471205

  9. Initial oxidation of brass induced by humidified air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Ping; Leygraf, Christofer

    2011-11-01

    Complementary surface and near-surface analytical techniques have been used to explore a brass (Cu-20Zn) surface before, during, and after exposure in air at 90% relative humidity. Volta potential variations along the unexposed surface are attributed to variations in surface composition and resulted in an accelerated localized growth of ZnO and a retarded more uniform growth of an amorphous Cu2O-like oxide. After 3 days the duplex oxide has a total mass of 1.3 μg/cm2, with improved corrosion protective properties compared to the oxides grown on pure Cu or Zn. A schematic model for the duplex oxide growth on brass is presented.

  10. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY PROJECT BULLETIN: LASER INDUCED PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDATIVE DESTRUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The process developed by Energy and Environmental Engineering, Incorporated, is designed to photochemically oxidize organic compounds in wastewater by applying ultraviolet radiation using an Excimer laser. The photochemical reactor can destroy low to moderate concentrations...

  11. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  12. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  13. Involvement of Inositol Biosynthesis and Nitric Oxide in the Mediation of UV-B Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lytvyn, Dmytro I.; Raynaud, Cécile; Yemets, Alla I.; Bergounioux, Catherine; Blume, Yaroslav B.

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of NO-signaling in ultraviolet B (UV-B) induced oxidative stress (OS) in plants is an open question. Inositol biosynthesis contributes to numerous cellular functions, including the regulation of plants tolerance to stress. This work reveals the involvement of inositol-3-phosphate synthase 1 (IPS1), a key enzyme for biosynthesis of myo-inositol and its derivatives, in the response to NO-dependent OS in Arabidopsis. Homozygous mutants deficient for IPS1 (atips1) and wild-type plants were transformed with a reduction- grx1-rogfp2 and used for the dynamic measurement of UV-B-induced and SNP (sodium nitroprusside)-mediated oxidative stresses by confocal microscopy. atips1 mutants displayed greater tissue-specific resistance to the action of UV-B than the wild type. SNP can act both as an oxidant or repairer depending on the applied concentration, but mutant plants were more tolerant than the wild type to nitrosative effects of high concentration of SNP. Additionally, pretreatment with low concentrations of SNP (10, 100 μM) before UV-B irradiation resulted in a tissue-specific protective effect that was enhanced in atips1. We conclude that the interplay between nitric oxide and inositol signaling can be involved in the mediation of UV-B-initiated oxidative stress in the plant cell. PMID:27148278

  14. Renal Oxidative Stress Induced by Long-Term Hyperuricemia Alters Mitochondrial Function and Maintains Systemic Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E.; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S.; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J.; Sánchez Lozada, Laura-Gabriela

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident. PMID:25918583

  15. Renal oxidative stress induced by long-term hyperuricemia alters mitochondrial function and maintains systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cristóbal-García, Magdalena; García-Arroyo, Fernando E; Tapia, Edilia; Osorio, Horacio; Arellano-Buendía, Abraham S; Madero, Magdalena; Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Correa, Francisco; Zazueta, Cecilia; Johnson, Richard J; Lozada, Laura-Gabriela Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    We addressed if oxidative stress in the renal cortex plays a role in the induction of hypertension and mitochondrial alterations in hyperuricemia. A second objective was to evaluate whether the long-term treatment with the antioxidant Tempol prevents renal oxidative stress, mitochondrial alterations, and systemic hypertension in this model. Long-term (11-12 weeks) and short-term (3 weeks) effects of oxonic acid induced hyperuricemia were studied in rats (OA, 750 mg/kg BW), OA+Allopurinol (AP, 150 mg/L drinking water), OA+Tempol (T, 15 mg/kg BW), or vehicle. Systolic blood pressure, renal blood flow, and vascular resistance were measured. Tubular damage (urine N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase) and oxidative stress markers (lipid and protein oxidation) along with ATP levels were determined in kidney tissue. Oxygen consumption, aconitase activity, and uric acid were evaluated in isolated mitochondria from renal cortex. Short-term hyperuricemia resulted in hypertension without demonstrable renal oxidative stress or mitochondrial dysfunction. Long-term hyperuricemia induced hypertension, renal vasoconstriction, tubular damage, renal cortex oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction and decreased ATP levels. Treatments with Tempol and allopurinol prevented these alterations. Renal oxidative stress induced by hyperuricemia promoted mitochondrial functional disturbances and decreased ATP content, which represent an additional pathogenic mechanism induced by chronic hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia-related hypertension occurs before these changes are evident.

  16. Plasma levels of oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP) in rats subjected to physicochemical oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Takako; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Murayama, Kimie; Seko, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of various disorders including atherosclerosis, aging and especially ischaemia/reperfusion injury. It causes cell damage that leads to apoptosis. However, the precise mechanism has been uncertain. Recently, we identified an apoptosis-inducing humoral factor in a hypoxia/reoxygenated medium of cardiac myocytes. We named this novel post-translationally modified secreted form of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (eIF5A) as oxidative stress-responsive apoptosis inducing protein (ORAIP). We developed a sandwich ELISA and confirmed that myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion markedly increased plasma levels of ORAIP. To investigate whether the role of ORAIP is common to various types of oxidative stress, we measured plasma ORAIP levels in rats subjected to three physicochemical models of oxidative stress including N2/O2 inhalation, cold/warm-stress (heat shock) and blood acidification. In all three models, plasma ORAIP levels significantly increased and reached a peak level at 10–30 min after stimulation, then decreased within 60 min. The (mean±S.E.M.) plasma ORAIP levels before and after (peak) stimulation were (16.4±9.6) and (55.2±34.2) ng/ml in N2/O2 inhalation, (14.1±12.4) and (34.3±14.6) ng/ml in cold/warm-stress, and (18.9±14.3) and (134.0±67.2) ng/ml in blood acidification study. These data strongly suggest that secretion of ORAIP in response to oxidative stress is universal mechanism and plays an essential role. ORAIP will be an important novel biomarker as well as a specific therapeutic target of these oxidative stress-induced cell injuries. PMID:26934977

  17. Comparison of oxide leakage currents induced by ion implantation and high field electric stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goguenheim, D.; Bravaix, A.; Monserie, C.; Moragues, J. M.; Lambert, P.; Boivin, P.

    2001-08-01

    We compare in this work the electrical properties of gate leakage currents induced through the thin SiO2 oxide layer of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures by high-energy ion implantation (Boron B2+) and high field electrical stresses where electrons are injected from the gate in the Fowler-Nordheim regime. Even if the high-frequency capacitance-voltage characteristics are very different after both treatments, comparable increases and similar shapes are found at low field in static gate current-voltage curves, typical of equivalent oxide damage. Moreover, these stress or implantation induced leakage currents are both removed in a similar way by a thermal anneal under forming gas at 430°C. We conclude that similar defects could be induced through the oxide by both processes and generate those excess currents by a defect assisted tunneling mechanism.

  18. Betanin inhibits the myeloperoxidase/nitrite-induced oxidation of human low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Allegra, Mario; Tesoriere, Luisa; Livrea, Maria A

    2007-03-01

    Production of nitrogen dioxide by the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the presence of nitrite is now considered a key step in the pathophysiology of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation. This study shows that betanin, a phytochemical of the betalain class, inhibits the production of lipid hydroperoxides in human LDL submitted to a MPO/nitrite-induced oxidation. Kinetic measurements including time-course of particle oxidation and betanin consumption, either in the presence or in the absence of nitrite, suggest that the antioxidant effect is possibly the result of various actions. Betanin scavenges the initiator radical nitrogen dioxide and can also act as a lipoperoxyl radical-scavenger. In addition, unidentified oxidation product(s) of betanin by MPO/nitrite inhibit(s) the MPO/nitrite-induced LDL oxidation as effectively as the parent compound. In the light of betanin bioavailability and post-absorbtion distribution in humans, present findings may suggest favourable in vivo activity of this phytochemical.

  19. Acetyl-L-carnitine protects neuronal function from alcohol-induced oxidative damage in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rump, Travis J.; Muneer, P.M. Abdul; Szlachetka, Adam M.; Lamb, Allyson; Haorei, Catherine; Alikunju, Saleena; Xiong, Huangui; Keblesh, James; Liu, Jianuo; Zimmerman, Matthew C.; Jones, Jocelyn; Donohue, Terrence M.; Persidsky, Yuri; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    The studies presented here demonstrate the protective effect of acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC) against alcohol-induced oxidative neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, and impaired neurotransmission. Our findings reveal the cellular and biochemical mechanisms of alcohol-induced oxidative damage in various types of brain cells. Chronic ethanol administration to mice caused an increase in inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 3-nitrotyrosine adduct formation in frontal cortical neurons but not in astrocytes from brains of these animals. Interestingly, alcohol administration caused a rather selective activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which, in turn, enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-hydroxynonenal, but these were predominantly localized in astrocytes and microglia. Oxidative damage in glial cells was accompanied by their pronounced activation (astrogliosis) and coincident neuronal loss, suggesting that inflammation in glial cells caused neuronal degeneration. Immunohistochemistry studies indicated that alcohol consumption induced different oxidative mediators in different brain cell types. Thus, nitric oxide was mostly detected in iNOS-expressing neurons, whereas ROS were predominantly generated in NOX-expressing glial cells after alcohol ingestion. Assessment of neuronal activity in ex vivo frontal cortical brain tissue slices from ethanol-fed mice showed a reduction in long-term potentiation synaptic transmission compared with slices from controls. Coadministration of ALC with alcohol showed a significant reduction in oxidative damage and neuronal loss and a restoration of synaptic neurotransmission in this brain region, suggesting that ALC protects brain cells from ethanol-induced oxidative injury. These findings suggest the potential clinical utility of ALC as a neuroprotective agent that prevents alcohol-induced brain damage and development of neurological disorders. PMID:20708681

  20. Changes in magmatic oxidation state induced by degassing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brounce, M. N.; Stolper, E. M.; Eiler, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Temporal variations in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the mantle may have been transmitted to Earth's atmosphere and oceans by volcanic degassing. However, it is unclear how redox states of volatiles relate to their source magmas because degassing and assimilation can impact fO2 before or during eruption. To explore this, we present µ-XANES measurements of the oxidation states of Fe and S and laser fluorination measurements of 18O/16O ratios in submarine glasses from two settings where degassing is recorded: 1) submarine glasses from the Reykjanes Ridge as it shoals to Iceland, including subglacial glasses from the Reykjanes Peninsula; and 2) submarine glasses from Mauna Kea recovered by the Hawaii Shield Drilling Program (HSDP). Glasses from both settings are basalts with 5.5-9.9 wt% MgO and 350-1790 ppm S. Submarine Reykjanes glasses are sulfide saturated. Subglacial Reykjanes and HSDP glasses are not sulfide saturated, and S and H2O contents are consistent with S+H2O degassing. Submarine Reykjanes glasses have 18O/16O indistinguishable from MORB and become progressively 18O-depleted as MgO decreases. Subglacial glasses have lower 18O/16O than submarine glasses at a given MgO, but both sample types project to a common 18O/16O near 10 wt% MgO, suggesting that 18O-depletion in these lavas is generated by fractional crystallization and assimilation of an 18O-depleted crustal component. The oxidation state of Fe increases only slightly as 18O/16O decrease, suggesting that the assimilant is not oxidized enough to change magmatic fO2. Fe and S do not oxidize or reduce with decreasing S or H2O, suggesting that relatively reduced magmas at depth degassed S+H2O without changing magmatic fO2, and that the fO2 of these lavas reflect the fO2of their mantle source. The oxidation states of Fe and S in HSDP glasses are broadly correlated and samples with the highest S concentrations are the most oxidized. Both Fe and S reduce with decreasing S and H2O contents. This suggests

  1. Cr(OH)₃(s) Oxidation Induced by Surface Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, M.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Gie Hyeon

    2014-09-16

    This study examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)₃(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7 – 9 under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the absence of Cr(OH)₃(s), homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O₂ was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 d. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 d and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)₃(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Our results suggest that Cr(OH)₃(s) was readily oxidized by a newly formed Mn oxide as a result of Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)₃(s) surface. XANES analysis of the residual solids after the reaction between 1.0 g/L Cr(OH)₃(s) and 204 μM Mn(II) at pH 9.0 for 22 d revealed that the product of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation resembled birnessite. The rate and extent of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation was likely controlled by those of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation as the production of Cr(VI) increased with increasing pH and initial Mn(II) concentrations. This study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)₃(s) that can be a source of Cr(VI) in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  2. Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation induced by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, Man Jae; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Lee, Giehyeon

    2014-09-16

    We examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)3(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7.0-9.0 under oxic or anoxic conditions. Homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 days. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 days and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)3(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Production of Cr(VI) was attributed to Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation by a newly formed Mn oxide via Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)3(s) surface. XANES results indicated that this surface-catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation produced a mixed valence Mn(III/IV) solid phase. Our results suggest that toxic Cr(VI) can be naturally produced via Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation coupled with the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). In addition, this study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)3(s), which has been considered the most common and a stable remediation product of Cr(VI) contamination.

  3. Progesterone modulates the LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone-receptor independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Schander, Julieta Aylen; Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2015-12-15

    Genital tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria induce miscarriage and are one of the most common complications of human pregnancy. LPS administration to 7-day pregnant mice induces embryo resorption after 24h, with nitric oxide playing a fundamental role in this process. We have previously shown that progesterone exerts protective effects on the embryo by modulating the inflammatory reaction triggered by LPS. Here we sought to investigate whether the in vivo administration of progesterone modulated the LPS-induced nitric oxide production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We found that progesterone downregulated LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone receptor-independent mechanism. Moreover, our results suggest a possible participation of glucocorticoid receptors in at least some of the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone.

  4. NOX2 Antisense Attenuates Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Cardiomyocyte

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bo; Meng, Fanbo; Yang, Yushuang; Liu, Dongna; Shi, Kaiyao

    2016-01-01

    Heart ischemia is a hypoxia related disease. NOX2 and HIF-1α proteins were increased in cardiomyocytes after acute myocardial infarction. However, the relationship of the hypoxia-induced HIF-1α. NOX2-derived oxidative stress and apoptosis in cardiomyocyte remains unclear. In the current study, we use NOX2 antisense strategy to investigate the role of NOX2 in hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat cardiomyocytes. Here, we show that transduction of ADV-NOX2-AS induces potent silencing of NOX2 in cardiomyocytes, and resulting in attenuation of hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. This study indicates the potential of antisense-based therapies and validates NOX2 as a potent therapeutic candidate for heart ischemia. PMID:27499697

  5. Modeling Oxidation Induced Stresses in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, B. L.; Freborg, A. M.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, William J.

    1998-01-01

    The use of thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) in gas turbines has increased dramatically in recent years, due mainly to the need for component protection from ever increasing service temperatures. Oxidation of the bond coat has been identified as an important contributing factor to spallation of the ceramic top coat during service. Additional variables found to influence TBC thermal cycle life include bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers, and modulus of elasticity. The purpose of this work was to characterize the effects of oxidation on the stress states within the TBC system, as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with other factors affecting TBC life.

  6. Monolayer expansion induces an oxidative metabolism and ROS in chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heywood, H.K. Lee, D.A.

    2008-08-22

    This study tests the hypothesis that articular chondrocytes shift from a characteristically glycolytic to an oxidative energy metabolism during population expansion in monolayer. Bovine articular chondrocytes were cultured in monolayer under standard incubator conditions for up to 14 days. Cellular proliferation, oxygen consumption, lactate production, protein content, ROS generation and mitochondrial morphology were examined. Lactate release increased {approx}5-fold within 1 week, but this was limited to {approx}2-fold increase when normalized to cellular protein content. By contrast, per cell oxidative phosphorylation increased 98-fold in 1 week. The increase in oxidative phosphorylation was evident within 24 h, preceding cell proliferation and was associated with augmented reactive oxygen species generation. The autologous chondrocyte implantation procedure requires 14-21 days for population expansion. The alterations in metabolic phenotype we report within 7 days in vitro are thus pertinent to autologous chondrocyte implantation with significant implications for the chondrocyte functionality.

  7. Cadmium-induced oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Muthukumar, Kannan; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2010-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the effect of cadmium (Cd) on the antioxidant status of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae serves as a good eukaryotic model system for the study of the molecular mechanisms of oxidative stress. We investigated the adaptative response of S. cerevisiae exposed to Cd. Yeast cells could tolerate up to 100 microM Cd and an inhibition in the growth and viability was observed. Exposure of yeast cells to Cd showed an increase in malondialdehyde and glutathione. The activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase were also high in Cd-exposed cells. The incorporation of Cd led to significant increase in iron, zinc and inversely the calcium, copper levels were reduced. The results suggest that antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumably, these enzymes are essential for counteracting the pro-oxidant effects of Cd. PMID:21355423

  8. Uncovering the polymerase-induced cytotoxicity of an oxidized nucleotide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Perera, Lalith; Shock, David D.; Kim, Taejin; Schlick, Tamar; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress promotes genomic instability and human diseases. A common oxidized nucleoside is 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, which is found both in DNA (8-oxo-G) and as a free nucleotide (8-oxo-dGTP). Nucleotide pools are especially vulnerable to oxidative damage. Therefore cells encode an enzyme (MutT/MTH1) that removes free oxidized nucleotides. This cleansing function is required for cancer cell survival and to modulate Escherichia coli antibiotic sensitivity in a DNA polymerase (pol)-dependent manner. How polymerases discriminate between damaged and non-damaged nucleotides is not well understood. This analysis is essential given the role of oxidized nucleotides in mutagenesis, cancer therapeutics, and bacterial antibiotics. Even with cellular sanitizing activities, nucleotide pools contain enough 8-oxo-dGTP to promote mutagenesis. This arises from the dual coding potential where 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) base pairs with cytosine and 8-oxo-dGTP(syn) uses its Hoogsteen edge to base pair with adenine. Here we use time-lapse crystallography to follow 8-oxo-dGTP insertion opposite adenine or cytosine with human pol β, to reveal that insertion is accommodated in either the syn- or anti-conformation, respectively. For 8-oxo-dGTP(anti) insertion, a novel divalent metal relieves repulsive interactions between the adducted guanine base and the triphosphate of the oxidized nucleotide. With either templating base, hydrogen-bonding interactions between the bases are lost as the enzyme reopens after catalysis, leading to a cytotoxic nicked DNA repair intermediate. Combining structural snapshots with kinetic and computational analysis reveals how 8-oxo-dGTP uses charge modulation during insertion that can lead to a blocked DNA repair intermediate.

  9. Periodontal Disease-Induced Atherosclerosis and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Jia, Ru; Cai, Yu; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a highly prevalent disorder affecting up to 80% of the global population. Recent epidemiological studies have shown an association between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease, as oxidative stress plays an important role in chronic inflammatory diseases such as periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease. In this review, we focus on the mechanisms by which periodontopathic bacteria cause chronic inflammation through the enhancement of oxidative stress and accelerate cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, we comment on the antioxidative activity of catechin in atherosclerosis accelerated by periodontitis. PMID:26783845

  10. Trypanosoma cruzi: Oxidative stress induces arginine kinase expression.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Mariana R; Canepa, Gaspar E; Bouvier, Leon A; Pereira, Claudio A

    2006-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi arginine kinase is a key enzyme in cell energy management and is also involved in pH and nutritional stress response mechanisms. T. cruzi epimastigotes treated with hydrogen peroxide presented a time-dependent increase in arginine kinase expression, up to 10-fold, when compared with untreated parasites. Among other oxidative stress-generating compounds tested, only nifurtimox produced more than 2-fold increase in arginine kinase expression. Moreover, parasites overexpressing arginine kinase showed significantly increased survival capability during hydrogen peroxide exposure. These findings suggest the participation of arginine kinase in oxidative stress response systems. PMID:16725140

  11. Electron Beam Induced Damage of MOS Gate Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konishi, Morikazu; Kubota, Michitaka; Koike, Kaoru

    1998-03-01

    Threshold voltage (Vth) shift of a metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) system due to electron beam (EB) exposure can be expressed quantitatively as a function of the EB dosage which was derived easily as a solution of a differential equation based on the hole capturing model in the gate oxide. The theoretical model assumes two steps for hole capturing. First is the hole capturing by intrinsic hole traps leading to steep Vth shift with EB dosage at early exposure stages. The second is the hole capturing by newborn hole traps due to the EB injection, leading to a rather slow Vth variation at a higher EB dosage. The model shows good agreement with the experimental result over a wide range of electron beam dosages. Moreover, hole injection efficiency in the gate oxide is found to be higher for the third Aluminum interconnection layer exposure than for the first Al layer, corresponding to higher deposition energy around the gate oxide obtained by the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN INDUCED OXIDENT GENERATION AND ASTHMA SEVERITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of oxygen radicals is implicated in many disease processes, including asthma. There is evidence that elevated oxidant status is associated with airway hyper responsiveness, however it is less clear whether increased levels of circulating reactive oxygen species are assoc...

  13. Major depression induces oxidative stress and platelet hyperaggregability.

    PubMed

    Ormonde do Carmo, Monique B O; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Matsuura, Cristiane; Pinto, Vivian L; Mury, Wanda V; Pinto, Nathalia O; Moss, Monique B; Ferraz, Marcos Rochedo; Brunini, Tatiana M C

    2015-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated an impairment of intraplatelet L-arginine-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in major depression (MD) associated to platelet dysfunction. Here, we evaluated arginase pathway and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) expression in platelets, systemic and intraplatelet oxidative status in untreated MD patients, and their effects on platelet aggregation. Blood samples were collected from 22 treatment naive MD patients (31 ± 2 yr) and 27 healthy subjects (33 ± 2 yr). MD patients presented with an activation of platelet arginase II, which competes with L-arginine for the production of nitric oxide (NO). An increase in protein carbonylation, overexpression of NADPH oxidase and PDE5, an enzyme that inactivates cGMP, was observed in platelets from MD patients compared to controls. In this context, platelet hyperaggregability was found in MD patients. On the other hand, antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in serum and in platelets did not differ between groups. The increased activation of intraplatelet arginase and platelet aggregability, in addition to an overexpression of PDE5 and oxidative stress may contribute to alterations in L-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and in platelet function, and consequently to the increased thrombotic risk in MD. PMID:25560770

  14. Inducing mitophagy in diabetic platelets protects against severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hee; Du, Jing; Stitham, Jeremiah; Atteya, Gourg; Lee, Suho; Xiang, Yaozu; Wang, Dandan; Jin, Yu; Leslie, Kristen L; Spollett, Geralyn; Srivastava, Anup; Mannam, Praveen; Ostriker, Allison; Martin, Kathleen A; Tang, Wai Ho; Hwa, John

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a growing international concern. Considerable mortality and morbidity associated with diabetes mellitus arise predominantly from thrombotic cardiovascular events. Oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage contributes significantly to enhanced thrombosis in DM A basal autophagy process has recently been described as playing an important role in normal platelet activation. We now report a substantial mitophagy induction (above basal autophagy levels) in diabetic platelets, suggesting alternative roles for autophagy in platelet pathology. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and imaging studies on human DM platelets, we report that platelet mitophagy induction serves as a platelet protective mechanism that responds to oxidative stress through JNK activation. By removing damaged mitochondria (mitophagy), phosphorylated p53 is reduced, preventing progression to apoptosis, and preserving platelet function. The absence of mitophagy in DM platelets results in failure to protect against oxidative stress, leading to increased thrombosis. Surprisingly, this removal of damaged mitochondria does not require contributions from transcription, as platelets lack a nucleus. The considerable energy and resources expended in "prepackaging" the complex mitophagy machinery in a short-lived normal platelet support a critical role, in anticipation of exposure to oxidative stress. PMID:27221050

  15. Eosinophils generate brominating oxidants in allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weijia; Samoszuk, Michael K.; Comhair, Suzy A.A.; Thomassen, Mary Jane; Farver, Carol F.; Dweik, Raed A.; Kavuru, Mani S.; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils promote tissue injury and contribute to the pathogenesis of allergen-triggered diseases like asthma, but the chemical basis of damage to eosinophil targets is unknown. We now demonstrate that eosinophil activation in vivo results in oxidative damage of proteins through bromination of tyrosine residues, a heretofore unrecognized pathway for covalent modification of biologic targets in human tissues. Mass spectrometric studies demonstrated that 3-bromotyrosine serves as a specific “molecular fingerprint” for proteins modified through the eosinophil peroxidase-H2O2 system in the presence of plasma levels of halides. We applied a localized allergen challenge to model the effects of eosinophils and brominating oxidants in human lung injury. Endobronchial biopsy specimens from allergen-challenged lung segments of asthmatic, but not healthy control, subjects demonstrated significant enrichments in eosinophils and eosinophil peroxidase. Baseline levels of 3-bromotyrosine in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) proteins from mildly allergic asthmatic individuals were modestly but not statistically significantly elevated over those in control subjects. After exposure to segmental allergen challenge, lung segments of asthmatics, but not healthy control subjects, exhibited a >10-fold increase in BAL 3-bromotyrosine content, but only two- to threefold increases in 3-chlorotyrosine, a specific oxidation product formed by neutrophil- and monocyte-derived myeloperoxidase. These results identify reactive brominating species produced by eosinophils as a distinct class of oxidants formed in vivo. They also reveal eosinophil peroxidase as a potential therapeutic target for allergen-triggered inflammatory tissue injury in humans. PMID:10811853

  16. Allicin protects spinal cord neurons from glutamate-induced oxidative stress through regulating the heat shock protein 70/inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Guang; Ren, Peng-Yu; Wang, Guo-Yu; Yao, Shu-Xin; He, Xi-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Allicin, the main biologically active compound derived from garlic, exerts a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities and is considered to have therapeutic potential in many neurological disorders. Using an in vitro spinal cord injury model induced by glutamate treatment, we sought to investigate the neuroprotective effects of allicin in primary cultured spinal cord neurons. We found that allicin treatment significantly attenuated glutamate-induced lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, loss of cell viability and apoptotic neuronal death. This protection was associated with reduced oxidative stress, as evidenced by decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, reduced lipid peroxidation and preservation of antioxidant enzyme activities. The results of western blot analysis showed that allicin decreased the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), but had no effects on the expression of neuronal NOS (nNOS) following glutamate exposure. Moreover, allicin treatment significantly increased the expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) at both mRNA and protein levels. Knockdown of HSP70 by specific targeted small interfere RNA (siRNA) not only mitigated allicin-induced protective activity, but also partially nullified its effects on the regulation of iNOS. Collectively, these data demonstrate that allicin treatment may be an effective therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury, and that the potential underlying mechanism involves HSP70/iNOS pathway-mediated inhibition of oxidative stress. PMID:25473931

  17. Protein Phosphatase 2A Mediates Oxidative Stress Induced Apoptosis in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chong-xin; Lv, Bo; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most common bone diseases, which is characterized by a systemic impairment of bone mass and fragility fractures. Age-related oxidative stress is highly associated with impaired osteoblastic dysfunctions and subsequent osteoporosis. In osteoblasts (bone formation cells), reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated and further cause lipid peroxidation, protein damage, and DNA lesions, leading to osteoblastic dysfunctions, dysdifferentiations, and apoptosis. Although much progress has been made, the mechanism responsible for oxidative stress induced cellular alternations and osteoblastic toxicity is still not fully elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a major protein phosphatase in mammalian cells, mediates oxidative stress induced apoptosis in osteoblasts. Our results showed that lipid peroxidation products (4-HNE) may induce dramatic oxidative stress, inflammatory reactions, and apoptosis in osteoblasts. These oxidative stress responses may ectopically activate PP2A phosphatase activity, which may be mediated by inactivation of AKT/mTOR pathway. Moreover, inhibition of PP2A activity by okadaic acid might partly prevent osteoblastic apoptosis under oxidative conditions. These findings may reveal a novel mechanism to clarify the role of oxidative stress for osteoblastic apoptosis and provide new possibilities for the treatment of related bone diseases, such as osteoporosis. PMID:26538836

  18. Permethrin-induced oxidative stress and toxicity and metabolism. A review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Martínez, María-Aránzazu; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Ares, Irma; Romero, Alejandro; Castellano, Victor; Martínez, Marta; Rodríguez, José Luis; Martínez-Larrañaga, María-Rosa; Anadón, Arturo; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-08-01

    Permethrin (PER), the most frequently used synthetic Type I pyrethroid insecticide, is widely used in the world because of its high activity as an insecticide and its low mammalian toxicity. It was originally believed that PER exhibited low toxicity on untargeted animals. However, as its use became more extensive worldwide, increasing evidence suggested that PER might have a variety of toxic effects on animals and humans alike, such as neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, reproductive, genotoxic, and haematotoxic effects, digestive system toxicity, and cytotoxicity. A growing number of studies indicate that oxidative stress played critical roles in the various toxicities associated with PER. To date, almost no review has addressed the toxicity of PER correlated with oxidative stress. The focus of this article is primarily to summarise advances in the research associated with oxidative stress as a potential mechanism for PER-induced toxicity as well as its metabolism. This review summarises the research conducted over the past decade into the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and oxidative stress as a consequence of PER treatments, and ultimately their correlation with the toxicity and the metabolism of PER. The metabolism of PER involves various CYP450 enzymes, alcohol or aldehyde dehydrogenases for oxidation and the carboxylesterases for hydrolysis, through which oxidative stress might occur, and such metabolic factors are also reviewed. The protection of a variety of antioxidants against PER-induced toxicity is also discussed, in order to further understand the role of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity. This review will throw new light on the critical roles of oxidative stress in PER-induced toxicity, as well as on the blind spots that still exist in the understanding of PER metabolism, the cellular effects in terms of apoptosis and cell signaling pathways, and finally strategies to help to protect against its oxidative

  19. Evidence That the Capacity of Nongenotoxic Carcinogens to Induce Oxidative Stress Is Subject to Marked Variability

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Colin J.; Cameron, Amy R.; Chatham, Lynsey; Stanley, Lesley A.; Wolf, Charles Roland

    2015-01-01

    Many drugs and environmental chemicals which are not directly mutagenic have the capacity to increase the incidence of tumors in the liver and other tissues. For this reason, such compounds are known as nongenotoxic carcinogens. The mechanisms underlying their effects remain unclear; however, their capacity to induce oxidative stress is considered to be a critical step in the carcinogenic process, although the evidence that this is actually the case remains equivocal and sparse. We have exploited a novel heme oxygenase-1 reporter mouse to evaluate the capacity of nongenotoxic carcinogens with different mechanisms of action to induce oxidative stress in the liver in vivo. When these compounds were administered at doses reported to cause liver tumors, marked differences in activation of the reporter were observed. 1,4-Dichlorobenzene and nafenopin were strong inducers of oxidative stress, whereas phenobarbital, piperonyl butoxide, cyproterone acetate, and WY14,643 were, at best, only very weak inducers. In the case of phenobarbital and thioacetamide, the number of LacZ-positive hepatocytes increased with time, and for the latter also with dose. The data obtained demonstrate that although some nongenotoxic carcinogens can induce oxidative stress, it is not a dominant feature of the response to these compounds. Therefore in contrast to the current models, these data suggest that oxidative stress is not a key determinant in the mechanism of nongenotoxic carcinogenesis but may contribute to the effects in a compound-specific manner. PMID:25690736

  20. The effect of HDL-bound and free PON1 on copper-induced LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Ahmet; Bayrak, Tülin; Bodur, Ebru; Kılınç, Kamer; Demirpençe, Ediz

    2016-09-25

    Oxidative modification of LDL plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) confers protection against atherosclerosis and the antioxidative properties of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been suggested to contribute to this effect of HDL. The PON1 exist in two major polymorphic forms (Q and R), which regulate the concentration and activity of the enzyme and alter its ability to prevent lipid oxidation. However, the association of Q192R polymorphism with PON1's capacity to protect against LDL lipoperoxidation is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the purified PON1 Q192R and the partially purified HDL-bound PON1 Q192R isoenzymes (HDL-PON1 Q192R) on LDL oxidation, with respect to their arylesterase/homocysteine thiolactonase (HTLase) activities. Cupric ion-induced LDL oxidation was reduced up to 48% by purified PON1 Q192, but only 33% by an equivalent activity of PON1 R192. HDL-PON1 Q192 isoenzyme caused a 65% reduction, whereas HDL-PON1 R192 isoenzyme caused only 46% reduction in copper ion-induced LDL oxidation. These findings reflect the fact that PON1 Q and PON1 R allozymes may have different protective characteristics against LDL oxidation. The protection against LDL oxidation provided by HDL-PON1 Q192R isoenzymes is more prominent than the purified soluble enzymes. Inhibition of the Ca(+2)-dependent PON1 Q192R arylesterase/HTLase by the metal chelator EDTA, did not alter PON1's ability to inhibit LDL oxidation. These studies indicate that the active site involvement of the purified enzyme is not similar to the HDL-bound one, in terms of both PON1 arylesterase/HTLase activity and the protection of LDL from copper ion-induced oxidation. Moreover, PON1's ability to protect LDL from oxidation does not seem to require calcium.

  1. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent.

  2. Textile industrial effluent induces mutagenicity and oxidative DNA damage and exploits oxidative stress biomarkers in rats.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Muhammad Furqan; Ashraf, Muhammad; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Javeed, Aqeel; Sharif, Ali; Saleem, Ammara; Akhtar, Bushra

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to complex mixtures like textile effluent poses risks to animal and human health such as mutations, genotoxicity and oxidative damage. Aim of the present study was to quantify metals in industrial effluent and to determine its mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic potential and effects on oxidative stress biomarkers in effluent exposed rats. Metal analysis revealed presence of high amounts of zinc, copper, chromium, iron, arsenic and mercury in industrial effluent. Ames test with/without enzyme activation and MTT assay showed strong association of industrial effluent with mutagenicity and cytotoxicity respectively. In-vitro comet assay revealed evidence of high oxidative DNA damage. When Wistar rats were exposed to industrial effluent in different dilutions for 60 days, then activities of total superoxide dismutase and catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration were found to be significantly lower in kidney, liver and blood/plasma of effluent exposed rats than control. Vitamin C in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day significantly reduced oxidative effects of effluent in rats. On the basis of this study it is concluded that industrial effluent may cause mutagenicity, in-vitro oxidative stress-related DNA damage and cytotoxicity and may be associated with oxidative stress in rats. Vitamin C may have ameliorating effect when exposed to effluent. PMID:26710178

  3. Persistent ion beam induced conductivity in zinc oxide nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Johannes, Andreas; Niepelt, Raphael; Gnauck, Martin; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-12-19

    We report persistently increased conduction in ZnO nanowires irradiated by ion beam with various ion energies and species. This effect is shown to be related to the already known persistent photo conduction in ZnO and dubbed persistent ion beam induced conduction. Both effects show similar excitation efficiency, decay rates, and chemical sensitivity. Persistent ion beam induced conduction will potentially allow countable (i.e., single dopant) implantation in ZnO nanostructures and other materials showing persistent photo conduction.

  4. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Duong, Chu Xuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (-/-) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (-/-) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (-/-) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (–/–) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (–/–) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (–/–) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22512859

  6. Molecular basis for arsenic-induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi, Jingbo

    2004-08-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed.

  7. Plasma sprayed cerium oxide coating inhibits H2O2-induced oxidative stress and supports cell viability.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xie, Youtao; You, Mingyu; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress is a risk factor in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, and plays a major role in bone regeneration of osteoporotic patients. Cerium oxide (CeO2) ceramics have the unique ability to protect various types of cells from oxidative damage, making them attractive for biomedical applications. In this study, we developed a plasma sprayed CeO2 coating with a hierarchical topography where ceria nanoparticles were superimposed in the micro-rough coating surface. The protective effects of the CeO2 coating on the response of osteoblasts to H2O2-induced oxidative stress have been demonstrated in terms of cell viability, apoptosis and differentiation. The CeO2 coating reversed the reduced superoxide dismutase activity, decreased reactive oxygen species production and suppressed malondialdehyde formation in H2O2-treated osteoblasts. It indicated that the CeO2 coating can preserve the intracellular antioxidant defense system. The cytocompatibility of the CeO2 coating was further assessed in vitro by cell viability assay and scanning electron microscopy analysis. Taken together, the CeO2 coating could provide an opportunity to be utilized as a potential candidate for bone regeneration under oxidative stress.

  8. The endogenous nitric oxide mediates selenium-induced phytotoxicity by promoting ROS generation in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Mo, Hai-Zhen; Hu, Liang-Bin; Li, You-Qin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV)-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR)- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV)-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV)-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV) stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants.

  9. The Endogenous Nitric Oxide Mediates Selenium-Induced Phytotoxicity by Promoting ROS Generation in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Liang-Bin; Li, You-Qin; Chen, Jian; Yang, Li-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is suggested as an emerging pollutant in agricultural environment because of the increasing anthropogenic release of Se, which in turn results in phytotoxicity. The most common consequence of Se-induced toxicity in plants is oxidative injury, but how Se induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) burst remains unclear. In this work, histofluorescent staining was applied to monitor the dynamics of ROS and nitric oxide (NO) in the root of Brassica rapa under Se(IV) stress. Se(IV)-induced faster accumulation of NO than ROS. Both NO and ROS accumulation were positively correlated with Se(IV)-induced inhibition of root growth. The NO accumulation was nitrate reductase (NR)- and nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent while ROS accumulation was NADPH oxidase-dependent. The removal of NO by NR inhibitor, NOS inhibitor, and NO scavenger could alleviate Se(IV)-induced expression of Br_Rbohs coding for NADPH oxidase and the following ROS accumulation in roots, which further resulted in the amelioration of Se(IV)-induced oxidative injury and growth inhibition. Thus, we proposed that the endogenous NO played a toxic role in B. rapa under Se(IV) stress by triggering ROS burst. Such findings can be used to evaluate the toxic effects of Se contamination on crop plants. PMID:25333984

  10. Oxidative stress–dependent phosphorylation activates ZNRF1 to induce neuronal/axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Shuji; Furuno, Akiko; Ohshima, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known inducer of neuronal apoptosis and axonal degeneration. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF1 promotes Wallerian degeneration by degrading AKT to induce GSK3B activation. We now demonstrate that oxidative stress serves as an activator of the ubiquitin ligase activity of ZNRF1 by inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mediated phosphorylation at the 103rd tyrosine residue and that the up-regulation of ZNRF1 activity by oxidative stress leads to neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. We also show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced oxidase activity is required for the EGFR-dependent phosphorylation-induced activation of ZNRF1 and resultant AKT degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system to induce Wallerian degeneration. These results indicate the pathophysiological significance of the EGFR–ZNRF1 pathway induced by oxidative stress in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. A deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanism for ZNRF1 catalytic activity via phosphorylation will provide a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegeneration. PMID:26572622

  11. Diacylglycerol kinase regulation of protein kinase D during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury

    SciTech Connect

    Song Jun; Li Jing; Mourot, Joshua M.; Mark Evers, B.; Chung, Dai H.

    2008-10-17

    We recently demonstrated that protein kinase D (PKD) exerts a protective function during oxidative stress-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury; however, the exact role of DAG kinase (DGK){zeta}, an isoform expressed in intestine, during this process is unknown. We sought to determine the role of DGK during oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury and whether DGK acts as an upstream regulator of PKD. Inhibition of DGK with R59022 compound or DGK{zeta} siRNA transfection decreased H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced RIE-1 cell apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation and increased PKD phosphorylation. Overexpression of kinase-dead DGK{zeta} also significantly increased PKD phosphorylation. Additionally, endogenous nuclear DGK{zeta} rapidly translocated to the cytoplasm following H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment. Our findings demonstrate that DGK is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress-induced intestinal cell injury. PKD activation is induced by DGK{zeta}, suggesting DGK is an upstream regulator of oxidative stress-induced activation of the PKD signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells.

  12. Oxidation Degradation of Aqueous Carbofuran Induced by Low Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Lumei; Gao, Jinzhang; Hu, Yusen; Liang, Huiguang; Xiao, Wen; Wang, Xingmin

    2008-06-01

    The oxidative degradation of aqueous carbofuran, a heavily used toxic carbamate insecticide by low temperature plasma, was investigated. The results show that the treatment efficiency increases with the increase in initial concentration. Raising the treatment temperature and changing the pH value can result in enhanced degradation of carbofuran in solution. The results also show that low temperature plasma treatment can effectively remove chemical oxygen demand (COD) of carbofuran in the solution.

  13. Anti-Oxidative Defences Are Modulated Differentially in Three Freshwater Teleosts in Response to Ammonia-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Giblen, Terri; Zinta, Gaurav; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA) were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h–48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h–180 h); which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant

  14. Anti-oxidative defences are modulated differentially in three freshwater teleosts in response to ammonia-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Giblen, Terri; Zinta, Gaurav; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA) were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h-48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h-180 h); which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant

  15. Therapeutic role of Cuminum cyminum on ethanol and thermally oxidized sunflower oil induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Aruna, K; Rukkumani, R; Varma, P Suresh; Menon, Venugopal P

    2005-05-01

    Ethanol is one of the most widely used and abused drugs, increasing lipid levels in humans and experimental animals. Heating of oil rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) produces various lipid peroxidative end products that can aggravate the pathological changes produced by ethanol. In the present communication, the effect of Cuminum cyminum was investigated on alcohol and thermally oxidized oil induced hyperlipidaemia. The results showed increased activity of aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) and increased levels of cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipids in the plasma of rats given alcohol, thermally oxidized oil and alcohol+thermally oxidized oil when compared with the normal control group. The levels of tissue (liver and kidney) cholesterol and triglycerides were increased significantly in rats groups given alcohol, thermally oxidized oil and alcohol+thermally oxidized oil when compared with the normal control rats. The levels were decreased when cumin was given along with alcohol and thermally oxidized oil. The level of phospholipids decreased significantly in the liver and kidney of groups given alcohol, thermally oxidized oil and alcohol+thermally oridized oil when compared with the normal control rats. The level increased when cumin was administered along with alcohol and thermally oxidized oil. The activity of phospholipase A and C increased significantly in the liver of groups given alcohol, thermally oxidized oil and alcohol+thermally oxidized oil when compared with the normal control rats, whereas the activity was decreased with the cumin treatment. The results obtained indicate that cumin can decrease the lipid levels in alcohol and thermally oxidized oil induced hepatotoxicity.

  16. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  17. Cranberries inhibit LDL oxidation and induce LDL receptor expression in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Liu, Rui Hai

    2005-08-26

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in most industrialized countries. Cranberries were evaluated for their potential roles in dietary prevention of CVD. Cranberry extracts were found to have potent antioxidant capacity preventing in vitro LDL oxidation with increasing delay and suppression of LDL oxidation in a dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant activity of 100 g cranberries against LDL oxidation was equivalent to 1000 mg vitamin C or 3700 mg vitamin E. Cranberry extracts also significantly induced expression of hepatic LDL receptors and increased intracellular uptake of cholesterol in HepG2 cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. This suggests that cranberries could enhance clearance of excessive plasma cholesterol in circulation. We propose that additive or synergistic effects of phytochemicals in cranberries are responsible for the inhibition of LDL oxidation, the induced expression of LDL receptors, and the increased uptake of cholesterol in hepatocytes.

  18. Lipids and Oxidative Stress Associated with Ethanol-Induced Neurological Damage

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The excessive intake of alcohol is a serious public health problem, especially given the severe damage provoked by chronic or prenatal exposure to alcohol that affects many physiological processes, such as memory, motor function, and cognitive abilities. This damage is related to the ethanol oxidation in the brain. The metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde and then to acetate is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species that accentuate the oxidative state of cells. This metabolism of ethanol can induce the oxidation of the fatty acids in phospholipids, and the bioactive aldehydes produced are known to be associated with neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. As such, here we will review the role of lipids in the neuronal damage induced by ethanol-related oxidative stress and the role that lipids play in the related compensatory or defense mechanisms. PMID:26949445

  19. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines.

  20. Lewis acid catalysis and Green oxidations: sequential tandem oxidation processes induced by Mn-hyperaccumulating plants.

    PubMed

    Escande, Vincent; Renard, Brice-Loïc; Grison, Claude

    2015-04-01

    Among the phytotechnologies used for the reclamation of degraded mining sites, phytoextraction aims to diminish the concentration of polluting elements in contaminated soils. However, the biomass resulting from the phytoextraction processes (highly enriched in polluting elements) is too often considered as a problematic waste. The manganese-enriched biomass derived from native Mn-hyperaccumulating plants of New Caledonia was presented here as a valuable source of metallic elements of high interest in chemical catalysis. The preparation of the catalyst Eco-Mn1 and reagent Eco-Mn2 derived from Grevillea exul exul and Grevillea exul rubiginosa was investigated. Their unusual polymetallic compositions allowed to explore new reactivity of low oxidative state of manganese-Mn(II) for Eco-Mn1 and Mn(IV) for Eco-Mn2. Eco-Mn1 was used as a Lewis acid to catalyze the acetalization/elimination of aldehydes into enol ethers with high yields; a new green and stereoselective synthesis of (-)-isopulegol via the carbonyl-ene cyclization of (+)-citronellal was also performed with Eco-Mn1. Eco-Mn2 was used as a mild oxidative reagent and controlled the oxidation of aliphatic alcohols into aldehydes with quantitative yields. Oxidative cleavage was interestingly noticed when Eco-Mn2 was used in the presence of a polyol. Eco-Mn2 allowed direct oxidative iodination of ketones without using iodine, which is strongly discouraged by new environmental legislations. Finally, the combination of the properties in the Eco-Mn catalysts and reagents gave them an unprecedented potential to perform sequential tandem oxidation processes through new green syntheses of p-cymene from (-)-isopulegol and (+)-citronellal; and a new green synthesis of functionalized pyridines by in situ oxidation of 1,4-dihydropyridines. PMID:25263417

  1. Mechanisms of Sb(III) oxidation by pyrite-induced hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kong, Linghao; Hu, Xingyun; He, Mengchang

    2015-03-17

    Antimony (Sb) is an element of growing interest, and its toxicity and mobility are strongly influenced by redox processes. Sb(III) oxidation mechanisms in pyrite suspensions were comprehensively investigated by kinetic measurements in oxic and anoxic conditions and simulated sunlight. Sb(III) was oxidized to Sb(V) in both solution and on pyrite surfaces in oxic conditions; the oxidation efficiency of Sb(III) was gradually enhanced with the increase of pH. The pyrite-induced hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are the oxidants for Sb(III) oxidation. ·OH is the oxidant for Sb(III) oxidation in acidic solutions, and H2O2 becomes the main oxidant in neutral and alkaline solutions. ·OH and H2O2 can be generated by the reaction of previously existing FeIII(pyrite) and H2O on pyrite in anoxic conditions. The oxygen molecule is the crucial factor in continuously producing ·OH and H2O2 for Sb(III) oxidation. The efficiency of Sb(III) oxidation was enhanced in surface-oxidized pyrite (SOP) suspension, more ·OH formed through Fenton reaction in acidic solutions, but Fe(IV) and H2O2 were formed in neutral and alkaline solutions. Under the illumination of simulated sunlight, more ·OH and H2O2 were produced in the pyrite suspension, and the oxidation efficiency of Sb(III) was remarkably enhanced. In conclusion, Sb(III) can be oxidized to Sb(V) in the presence of pyrite, which will greatly influence the fate of Sb(III) in the environment.

  2. Modulation of Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Oxidative/Nitrative Stress in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Sárközy, Márta; Pipicz, Márton; Dux, László; Csont, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a frequent metabolic disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition to its well-known proatherogenic effect, hypercholesterolemia may exert direct effects on the myocardium resulting in contractile dysfunction, aggravated ischemia/reperfusion injury, and diminished stress adaptation. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggested that elevated oxidative and/or nitrative stress plays a key role in cardiac complications induced by hypercholesterolemia. Therefore, modulation of hypercholesterolemia-induced myocardial oxidative/nitrative stress is a feasible approach to prevent or treat deleterious cardiac consequences. In this review, we discuss the effects of various pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, some novel potential pharmacological approaches, and physical exercise on hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative/nitrative stress and subsequent cardiac dysfunction as well as impaired ischemic stress adaptation of the heart in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26788247

  3. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  4. Gypenosides protects dopaminergic neurons in primary culture against MPP(+)-induced oxidative injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Niu, Le; Guo, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Li; Li, Wei-Xin; Jia, Dong; Wang, Xue-Lian; Ma, Lian-Ting; Gao, Guo-Dong

    2010-10-30

    Oxidative injury has been implicated in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Gypenosides (GPs), the saponins extract derived from the Gynostemma pentaphyllum, has various bioactivities. In this study, GPs was investigated for its neuroprotective effects on the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-induced oxidative injury of dopaminergic neurons in primary nigral culture. It was found that GPs pretreatment, cotreatment or posttreatment significantly and dose-dependently attenuated MPP(+)-induced oxidative damage, reduction of dopamine uptake, loss of tyrosine hydrolase (TH)-immunopositive neurons and degeneration of TH-immunopositive neurites. However, the preventive effect of GPs was more potential than its therapeutical effect. Most importantly, the neuroprotective effect of GPs may be attributed to GPs-induced strengthened antioxidation as manifested by significantly increased glutathione content and enhanced activity of glutathione peroxidase, catalyze and superoxide dismutase in nigral culture. The neuroprotective effects of GPs are specific for dopaminergic neurons and it may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of PD.

  5. Electric-Field-Induced Superconductivity on an Organic/Oxide Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazunori

    2013-11-01

    Many superconductors have been developed by inducing charge carriers into a mother insulator compound. Chemical substitution of impurity atoms is usually used for inducing charge carriers, and this method is called “chemical doping”. Another method to tune charge carrier density is the electric field effect, which is widely utilized as a field-effect transistor. Here, we review recent progress in an electric field-effect study for developing a new oxide superconductor with an organic electrolyte gate. We first present a device configuration of an electric double layer transistor with oxide semiconductors, SrTiO3 and KTaO3. We then present the electrochemical interface properties and room-temperature device characteristics with various electrolytes. Finally, we present the superconductivity emerging at an organic/oxide interface, and discuss the phase diagram of electric-field-induced superconductors by comparing with superconductors obtained by chemical doping.

  6. Protective Effect of Bacoside-A against Morphine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, T; Nathiya, V C; Sakthikumar, M

    2011-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day) orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation) and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ATPases) activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine.

  7. Protective Effect of Bacoside-A against Morphine-Induced Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Sumathi, T.; Nathiya, V. C.; Sakthikumar, M.

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of bacoside-A the active principle isolated from the plant Bacopa monniera against oxidative damage induced by morphine in rat brain. Morphine intoxicated rats received 10-160 mg/kg b.w. of morphine hydrochloride intraperitoneally for 21 days. Bacoside-A pretreated rats were administered with bacoside-A (10 mg/kg b.w/day) orally, 2 h before the injection of morphine for 21 days. Pretreatment with bacoside-A has shown to possess a significant protective role against morphine induced brain oxidative damage in the antioxidant status (total reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and lipid peroxidation) and membrane bound ATP-ases(Na+/K+ATPase. Ca2+ and Mg2+ ATPases) activities in rat. The results of the present study indicate that bacoside-A protects the brain from oxidative stress induced by morphine. PMID:22707825

  8. Modulation of Hypercholesterolemia-Induced Oxidative/Nitrative Stress in the Heart.

    PubMed

    Csonka, Csaba; Sárközy, Márta; Pipicz, Márton; Dux, László; Csont, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a frequent metabolic disorder associated with increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In addition to its well-known proatherogenic effect, hypercholesterolemia may exert direct effects on the myocardium resulting in contractile dysfunction, aggravated ischemia/reperfusion injury, and diminished stress adaptation. Both preclinical and clinical studies suggested that elevated oxidative and/or nitrative stress plays a key role in cardiac complications induced by hypercholesterolemia. Therefore, modulation of hypercholesterolemia-induced myocardial oxidative/nitrative stress is a feasible approach to prevent or treat deleterious cardiac consequences. In this review, we discuss the effects of various pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, some novel potential pharmacological approaches, and physical exercise on hypercholesterolemia-induced oxidative/nitrative stress and subsequent cardiac dysfunction as well as impaired ischemic stress adaptation of the heart in hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26788247

  9. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Attenuates the Oxidative Stress-Induced Decrease of CD33 Expression in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Beltrán, Silvia; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Gonzalez-Reyes, Susana; Juarez-Figueroa, Ulises E.; Gonzalez, Yolanda

    2013-01-01

    Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) is a natural lignan with recognized antioxidant and beneficial properties that is isolated from Larrea tridentata. In this study, we evaluated the effect of NDGA on the downregulation of oxidant stress-induced CD33 in human monocytes (MNs). Oxidative stress was induced by iodoacetate (IAA) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and was evaluated using reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and cell viability. NDGA attenuates toxicity, ROS production and the oxidative stress-induced decrease of CD33 expression secondary to IAA or H2O2 in human MNs. It was also shown that NDGA (20 μM) attenuates cell death in the THP-1 cell line that is caused by treatment with either IAA or H2O2. These results suggest that NDGA has a protective effect on CD33 expression, which is associated with its antioxidant activity in human MNs. PMID:23533689

  10. Alpha-tocopherol ameliorates cypermethrin-induced toxicity and oxidative stress in the nematode Caenorhabdtis elegans.

    PubMed

    Shashikumar, Shivaiah; Rajini, P S

    2011-06-01

    Oxidative stress and other effects induced by cypermethrin (CYP, 15 mM) and their amelioration by alpha-tocopherol (400 microM) was studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The worms exposed for 4 h to CYP showed increased levels of reactive oxygen species (46%), H2O2 (37%) and protein carbonyls (29%), accompanied by decreased lifespan and brood size. However, exposure to both CYP and alpha-tocopherol resulted in diminution of above alterations with the worms exhibiting relatively lower levels of ROS (30%), H2O2 (15%), protein carbonyls (14%), altered antioxidant enzyme activities and normal lifespan and brood size. The results suggest that CYP induces oxidative stress in C. elegans and the strategy of intervention with alpha-tocopherol could be exploited to offset this induced oxidative stress.

  11. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern.

  12. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by iron oxide nanoparticles in cultured human umbilical endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Yun; Feng, Wei-Yue; Wang, Bing; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang

    2010-12-01

    Recent epidemiologic researches indicate that exposure to ultrafine particles (nanoparticles) is an independent risk factor for several cardiovascular diseases. The induction of endothelial injuries is hypothesized to be an attractive mechanism involved in these cardiovascular diseases. To investigate this hypothesis, the widely used iron nanomaterials, ferric oxide (Fe2O3) and ferriferrous oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incubated with human umbilical endothelial cells (ECV304 cells) at different concentrations of 2, 20, 100 microg/mL. The cell viability, the rate of apoptosis, the apoptotic nuclear morphology and the mitochondria membrane potential were measured to estimate the cell necrosis and apoptosis caused by the nanoparticle exposure. The stimulation of superoxide anion (O2*-) and nitric oxide (NO) were examined to evaluate the stress responses of endothelial cells. Our results indicated that both the Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 nanoparticles could generate oxidative stress as well as the significant increase of nitric oxide in ECV304 cells. The loss of mitochondria membrane potential and the apoptotic chromatin condensation in the nucleus were observed as the early signs of apoptosis. It is inferred the stress response might be an important mechanism involving in endothelial cells apoptosis and death, and these injuries in endothelial cells might play a key role in downstream cardiovascular diseases such as atheroscelerosis, hypertension and myocardial infarction (MI).

  13. Periostin expression induced by oxidative stress contributes to myocardial fibrosis in a rat model of high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    WU, HAN; CHEN, LIANG; XIE, JUN; LI, RAN; LI, GUAN-NAN; CHEN, QIN-HUA; ZHANG, XIN-LIN; KANG, LI-NA; XU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein involved in fibrosis. The present study investigated the importance of periostin in hypertension-induced myocardial fibrosis. Rats were randomly divided into either the normal group (0.4% NaCl diet; n=8) or hypertension group (8% NaCl diet; n=8). For 36 weeks, the blood pressure and heart rate of the rats were monitored. At week 36, the hearts were extracted for further analysis. Masson's staining and western blotting were performed to determine the levels of periostin protein expression, oxidative stress and fibrosis. In addition, fibroblasts were isolated from adult rats and cultured in vitro, and following treatment with angiotensin II (Ang II) and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), western blotting, immunofluorescence and 2′,7′ dichlorodihydrofluorescin staining were performed to examine reactive oxygen species production, and periostin and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression levels. The results demonstrated that periostin expression and oxidative stress were increased in hypertensive hearts compared with normal hearts. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that Ang II upregulated the expression levels of periostin and α-SMA compared with the control, whereas, pretreatment with NAC inhibited oxidative stress, periostin and α-SMA expression in fibroblasts. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggested that oxidative stress-induced periostin is involved in myocardial fibrosis and hypertension. The present study demonstrated that periostin inhibition may be a promising approach for the inhibition of hypertension-induced cardiac remodeling. PMID:27220372

  14. Metformin protects primary rat hepatocytes against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    de la Rosa, Laura Conde; Vrenken, Titia E; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    2015-01-01

    The majority of chronic liver diseases are accompanied by oxidative stress, which induces apoptosis in hepatocytes and liver injury. Recent studies suggest that oxidative stress and insulin resistance are important in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and the pathophysiology of diabetes complications. Metformin has been shown to be hepatoprotective in the insulin-resistant and leptin-deficient ob/ob mouse model of NAFLD. However, the mechanism involved in the protective effects of metformin has not been elucidated yet. Therefore, we investigated the protective effect of metformin against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Primary rat hepatocytes were exposed to the oxidative stress-generating compound menadione in the presence and absence of metformin. Apoptosis was determined by measuring caspase activity and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-cleavage, and necrosis was measured by Sytox Green nuclear staining. We demonstrate that (1) Metformin inhibits menadione-induced caspase-9,-6,-3 activation and PARP-cleavage in a concentration-dependent manner. (2) Metformin increases menadione-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression and inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-phosphorylation. (3) Metformin does not induce necrosis in primary hepatocytes. Metformin protects hepatocytes against oxidative stress-induced caspase activation, PARP-cleavage and apoptosis. The anti-apoptotic effect of metformin is in part dependent on HO-1 and bcl-xl induction and inhibition of JNK activation and independent of insulin signaling. Our results elucidate novel protective mechanisms of metformin and indicate that metformin could be investigated as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of oxidative stress-related liver diseases. PMID:26038701

  15. Melissa Officinalis L. Extracts Protect Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells against Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeung, In Cheul; Jee, Donghyun; Rho, Chang-Rae; Kang, Seungbum

    2016-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the protective effect of ALS-L1023, an extract of Melissa officinalis L. (Labiatae; lemon balm) against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in human retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19 cells). Methods: ARPE-19 cells were incubated with ALS-L1023 for 24 h and then treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were assessed by flow cytometry. Caspase-3/7 activation and cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) were measured to investigate the protective role of ALS-L1023 against apoptosis. The protective effect of ALS-L1023 against oxidative stress through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Results: ALS-L1023 clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell apoptosis and intracellular production of ROS. H2O2-induced oxidative stress increased caspase-3/7 activity and apoptotic PARP cleavage, which were significantly inhibited by ALS-L1023. Activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway was associated with the protective effect of ALS-L1023 on ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions: ALS-L1023 protected human RPE cells against oxidative damage. This suggests that ALS-L1023 has therapeutic potential for the prevention of dry age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26941573

  16. Modification of radiation-induced oxidative damage in liposomal and microsomal membrane by eugenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Lathika, K. M.; Mishra, K. P.

    2006-03-01

    Radiation-induced membrane oxidative damage, and their modification by eugenol, a natural antioxidant, was investigated in liposomes and microsomes. Liposomes prepared with DPH showed decrease in fluorescence after γ-irradiation, which was prevented significantly by eugenol and correlated with magnitude of oxidation of phospholipids. Presence of eugenol resulted in substantial inhibition in MDA formation in irradiated liposomes/microsomes, which was less effective when added after irradiation. Similarly, the increase in phospholipase C activity observed after irradiation in microsomes was inhibited in samples pre-treated with eugenol. Results suggest association of radio- oxidative membrane damage with alterations in signaling molecules, and eugenol significantly prevented these membrane damaging events.

  17. Nitric oxide mediates interleukin-1-induced cellular cytotoxicity in the rat ovary. A potential role for nitric oxide in the ovulatory process.

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, C; Corbett, J A; Misko, T P; McDaniel, M; Beckerman, K P

    1993-01-01

    Treatment of primary cultures of rat ovarian dispersates with IL-1 beta results in morphologic and cytotoxic changes, thought to reflect tissue remodeling events associated with ovulation. We examined the role that the free radical nitric oxide plays in this process and report that IL-1 beta induces expression of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase in ovarian cells as demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. We show that IL-1 beta treatment results in the formation of nitric oxide (as measured by accumulation of nitrite and cGMP) in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner that is prevented by aminoguanidine, a selective inhibitor of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase. Aminoguanidine also inhibits IL-1-induced ovarian cellular cytotoxicity. These results suggest that nitric oxide is an important mediator of cell death and may act as a physiologically significant mediator of tissue remodeling events that occur in vivo during the ovulatory process. Images PMID:7504698

  18. Schisandrin B protects against solar irradiation-induced oxidative stress in rat skin tissue.

    PubMed

    Lam, Philip Y; Yan, Chung Wai; Chiu, Po Yee; Leung, Hoi Yan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2011-04-01

    Schisandrin B (Sch B) and schisandrin C (Sch C), but not schisandrin A and dimethyl diphenyl bicarboxylate, protected rat skin tissue against solar irradiation-induced oxidative injury, as evidenced by a reversal of solar irradiation-induced changes in cellular reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels, as well as antioxidant enzyme activities and malondialdehyde production. The cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolism of Sch B or Sch C caused ROS production in rat skin microsomes. Taken together, Sch B or Sch C, by virtue of its pro-oxidant action and the subsequent eliciting of a glutathione antioxidant response, may prevent photo-aging of skin.

  19. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Hot-carrier-induced on-resistance degradation of step gate oxide NLDMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Han; Bin, Zhang; Koubao, Ding; Shifeng, Zhang; Chenggong, Han; Jiaxian, Hu; Dazhong, Zhu

    2010-12-01

    The hot-carrier-induced on-resistance degradations of step gate oxide NLDMOS (SG-NLDMOS) transistors are investigated in detail by a DC voltage stress experiment, a TCAD simulation and a charge pumping test. For different stress conditions, degradation behaviors of SG-NLDMOS transistors are analyzed and degradation mechanisms are presented. Then the effect of various doses of n-type drain drift (NDD) region implant on Ron degradation is investigated. Experimental results show that a lower NDD dosage can reduce the hot-carrier induced Ron degradation effectively, which is different from uniform gate oxide NLDMOS (UG-NLDMOS) transistors.

  20. Friction-induced surface activity of some hydrocarbons with clean and oxide-covered iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on a clean and oxide-covered iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and accordingly friction. In contrast with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  1. Superoxide fluxes limit nitric oxide-induced signaling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Douglas D; Ridnour, Lisa A; Espey, Michael Graham; Donzelli, Sonia; Ambs, Stefan; Hussain, S Perwez; Harris, Curtis C; DeGraff, William; Roberts, David D; Mitchell, James B; Wink, David A

    2006-09-01

    Independently, superoxide (O2-) and nitric oxide (NO) are biologically important signaling molecules. When co-generated, these radicals react rapidly to form powerful oxidizing and nitrating intermediates. Although this reaction was once thought to be solely cytotoxic, herein we demonstrate using MCF7, macrophage, and endothelial cells that when nanomolar levels of NO and O2- were produced concomitantly, the effective NO concentration was established by the relative fluxes of these two radicals. Differential regulation of sGC, pERK, HIF-1alpha, and p53 were used as biological dosimeters for NO concentration. Introduction of intracellular- or extracellular-generated O2- during NO generation resulted in a concomitant increase in oxidative intermediates with a decrease in steady-state NO concentrations and a proportional reduction in the levels of sGC, ERK, HIF-1alpha, and p53 regulation. NO responses were restored by addition of SOD. The intermediates formed from the reactions of NO with O2- were non-toxic, did not form 3-nitrotyrosine, nor did they elicit any signal transduction responses. H2O2 in bolus or generated from the dismutation of O2- by SOD, was cytotoxic at high concentrations and activated p53 independent of NO. This effect was completely inhibited by catalase, suppressed by NO, and exacerbated by intracellular catalase inhibition. We conclude that the reaction of O2- with NO is an important regulatory mechanism, which modulates signaling pathways by limiting steady-state levels of NO and preventing H2O2 formation from O2-.

  2. Antioxidative effects of Kimchi under different fermentation stage on radical-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Boh Kyung; Choi, Ji Myung; Kang, Soon Ah; Park, Kun Young

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Kimchi is a traditional Korean fermented vegetable containing several ingredients. We investigated the protective activity of methanol extract of kimchi under different fermentation stages against oxidative damage. MATERIALS/METHODS Fresh kimchi (Fresh), optimally ripened kimchi (OptR), and over ripened kimchi (OvR) were fermented until the pH reached pH 5.6, pH 4.3, and pH 3.8, respectively. The radical scavenging activity and protective activity from oxidative stress of kimchi during fermentation were investigated under in vitro and cellular systems using LLC-PK1 cells. RESULTS Kimchi exhibited strong radical scavenging activities against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, and hydroxyl radical. In addition, the free radical generators led to loss of cell viability and elevated lipid peroxidation, while treatment with kimchi resulted in significantly increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, the protective effect against oxidative stress was related to regulation of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nuclear factor-κB p65, and IκB expression. In particular, OvR showed the strongest protective effect from cellular oxidative stress among other kimchi. CONCLUSION The current study indicated that kimchi, particularly OptR and OvR, played a protective role against free radical-induced oxidative stress. These findings suggest that kimchi is a promising functional food with an antioxidative effect and fermentation of kimchi led to elevation of antioxidative activity. PMID:25489403

  3. [Calcium-induced changes in bilayer membranes from oxidized cholesterol].

    PubMed

    Hianik, T; Miklovichova, J; Foltinova, O; Bajchi, A

    1985-01-01

    Elastic properties of oxidized cholesterol bilayers in n-octane and membrane solvent free were studied by measuring Young modulus E perpendicular in the direction perpendicular to the membrane plane as a function of concentration of calcium ions. Interaction between calcium ions and solvent free bilayers resulted in a significant increases of Young modulus E perpendicular in the concentration range 20-40 mmol/l Ca2+. It is suggested that the hardening of the membrane is caused by some structural changes in the hydrophobic region of the membrane.

  4. Oxidation-reduction induced roughening of platinum (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Platinum (111) single crystal surface was roughened by repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction to study dynamic evolution of surface roughening. The interface roughens progressively upon repeated cycles. The measured width of the interface was fit to an assumed pow law, W {approximately}t{sup {beta}}, with {beta} = 0.38(1). The results are compared with a simulation based on a random growth model. The fraction of the singly stepped surface apparently saturates to 0. 25 monolayer, which explains the apparent saturation to a steady roughness observed in previous studies.

  5. Oxidative stress is involved in Dasatinib-induced apoptosis in rat primary hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Tao; Luo, Peihua; Zhu, Hong; Zhao, Yuqin; Wu, Honghai; Gai, Renhua; Wu, Youping; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiaochun; He, Qiaojun

    2012-06-15

    Dasatinib, a multitargeted inhibitor of BCR–ABL and SRC kinases, exhibits antitumor activity and extends the survival of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, some patients suffer from hepatotoxicity, which occurs through an unknown mechanism. In the present study, we found that Dasatinib could induce hepatotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Dasatinib reduced the cell viability of rat primary hepatocytes, induced the release of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in vitro, and triggered the ballooning degeneration of hepatocytes in Sprague–Dawley rats in vivo. Apoptotic markers (chromatin condensation, cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP) were detected to indicate that the injury induced by Dasatinib in hepatocytes in vitro was mediated by apoptosis. This result was further validated in vivo using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. Here we found that Dasatinib dramatically increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatocytes, reduced the intracellular glutathione (GSH) content, attenuated the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), generated malondialdehyde (MDA), a product of lipid peroxidation, decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, and activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) related to oxidative stress and survival. These results confirm that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in Dasatinib-mediated hepatotoxicity. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a typical antioxidant, can scavenge free radicals, attenuate oxidative stress, and protect hepatocytes against Dasatinib-induced injury. Thus, relieving oxidative stress is a viable strategy for reducing Dasatinib-induced hepatotoxicity. -- Highlights: ►Dasatinib shows potential hepatotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo. ►Apoptosis plays a vital role in Dasatinib-induced

  6. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Salama, Samir A.; Omar, Hany A.; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A.; AlSaeed, Mohammed S.; EL-Tarras, Adel E.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  7. Coenzyme Q10 prevents high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuneki, Hiroshi; Sekizaki, Naoto; Suzuki, Takashi; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Wada, Tsutomu; Okamoto, Tadashi; Kimura, Ikuko; Sasaoka, Toshiyasu

    2007-07-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular complications in diabetes. Although some clinical evidences suggest the use of an antioxidant reagent coenzyme Q10 in diabetes with hypertension, the direct effect of coenzyme Q10 on the endothelial functions has not been examined. In the present study, we therefore investigated the protective effect of coenzyme Q10 against high glucose-induced oxidative stress in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). HUVEC exposed to high glucose (30 mM) exhibited abnormal properties, including the morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis, overproduction of reactive oxygen species, activation of protein kinase Cbeta2, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression. Treatment with coenzyme Q10 strongly inhibited these changes in HUVEC under high glucose condition. In addition, coenzyme Q10 inhibited high glucose-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, an endogenous caspase-3 substrate. These results suggest that coenzyme Q10 prevents reactive oxygen species-induced apoptosis through inhibition of the mitochondria-dependent caspase-3 pathway. Moreover, consistent with previous reports, high glucose caused upregulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1) in HUVEC, and promoted the adhesion of U937 monocytic cells. Coenzyme Q10 displayed potent inhibitory effects against these endothelial abnormalities. Thus, we provide the first evidence that coenzyme Q10 has a beneficial effect in protecting against the endothelial dysfunction by high glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

  8. Nicotine and oxidative stress induced exomic variations are concordant and overrepresented in cancer-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Bavarva, Jasmin H.; Tae, Hongseok; McIver, Lauren; Garner, Harold R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the connection between cancer and cigarette smoke is well established, nicotine is not characterized as a carcinogen. Here, we used exome sequencing to identify nicotine and oxidative stress-induced somatic mutations in normal human epithelial cells and its correlation with cancer. We identified over 6,400 SNVs, indels and microsatellites in each of the stress exposed cells relative to the control, of which, 2,159 were consistently observed at all nicotine doses. These included 429 nsSNVs including 158 novel and 79 cancer-associated. Over 80% of consistently nicotine induced variants overlap with variations detected in oxidative stressed cells, indicating that nicotine induced genomic alterations could be mediated through oxidative stress. Nicotine induced mutations were distributed across 1,585 genes, of which 49% were associated with cancer. MUC family genes were among the top mutated genes. Analysis of 591 lung carcinoma tumor exomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) revealed that 20% of non-small-cell lung cancer tumors in smokers have mutations in at least one of the MUC4, MUC6 or MUC12 genes in contrast to only 6% in non-smokers. These results indicate that nicotine induces genomic variations, promotes instability potentially mediated by oxidative stress, implicating nicotine in carcinogenesis, and establishes MUC genes as potential targets. PMID:24947164

  9. Inducible nitric oxide synthase, anti-oxidant enzymes and Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and gastric precancerous lesions in humans.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, B; Bancel, B; Estève, J; Malaveille, C; Calmels, S; Correa, P; Patricot, L M; Laval, M; Lyandrat, N; Ohshima, H

    1998-12-01

    Chronic inflammation induced by Helicobacter pylori infection has been associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer. We have analysed 167 stomach biopsies from 99 patients for H. pylori infection and immunohistochemically for the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), catalase and superoxide dismutases (SODs) as markers of oxidative stress. Biopsies were graded as follows on the basis of histology: normal, superficial gastritis, variable severity of atrophic gastritis with or without intestinal metaplasia, and dysplasia. iNOS was detected in inflammatory cells in all types of gastritis with or without H. pylori infection and independently of its severity. In foveolar cells, iNOS was observed in approximately 25% of all biopsies showing any type of gastritis, but in a markedly higher proportion of dysplastic samples. Catalase and Mn-type SOD in inflammatory cells and catalase in foveolar cells were more frequently observed in marked atrophic gastritis biopsies than in less severe gastritis. Individual differences were found in the expression of these enzymes within groups with the same severity of gastritis. Prolonged oxidative stress in severe gastritis and dysplasia may play an important role in gastric carcinogenesis, through increased damage of DNA and tissue by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

  10. Light-induced metastable states in ferroelectric oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, G. K.; Vikhnin, V. S.; Kapphan, S. E.

    2007-07-01

    New Raman scattering lines (at 463 cm-1 and at 156 cm-1) induced by strong enough optical pumping in nominally pure KTaO3 crystals are manifested. The model of such effect is proposed. This model is based on the light-induced formation of metastable polar clusters constructed from bi-polaronic excitons - Charge Transfer Vibronic Excitons (CTVEs) with their high degree alignment. The CTVEs are caused by photo-carriers with high local concentration which are trapped to local potential wells related with long-range defect fields. CTVE formation are realized in these potential wells due to significant easing of charge transfer fluctuations induced by photo-carrier screening effects. This model is effective also for explanation of giant dielectric constant inducing by strong illumination which was detected recently in KTaO3 and SrTiO3 by Japanese investigators [M. Takesada, T. Yagi, M. Itoh, S. Koshihara, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 37; T. Hasegawa, S. Mouri, Y. Yamada, K. Tanaka, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 72 (2003) 41; I. Katayama, Y. Ichikawa, K. Tanaka, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003) 100102(R)]. Another aspect of the present study was specific recombination luminescence of CTVEs which was investigated here with respect to the influence of additional IR pumping. The present investigation has led to experimental evidence of new, mainly non-linear CTVE with good defined metastable behavior. Such an essentially anharmonic CTVE with respect to charge transfer and lattice displacements was predicted recently in our work [V.S. Vikhnin, Solid State Commun. 127 (2003) 283]. Here, we present experimental evidence of the existence of a new type of exciton state.

  11. Oxidative Stress Markers Induced by Hyperosmolarity in Primary Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ruzhi; Hua, Xia; Li, Jin; Chi, Wei; Zhang, Zongduan; Lu, Fan; Zhang, Lili; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Li, De-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been known to be involved in pathogenesis of dry eye disease. However, few studies have comprehensively investigated the relationship between hyperosmolarity and oxidative damage in human ocular surface. This study was to explore whether and how hyperosmolarity induces oxidative stress markers in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Primary HCECs were established from donor limbal explants. The hyperosmolarity model was made in HCECs cultured in isosmolar (312 mOsM) or hyperosmotic (350, 400, 450 mOsM) media. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative damage markers, oxygenases and anti-oxidative enzymes were analyzed by DCFDA kit, RT-qPCR, immunofluorescent and immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting. Compared to isosmolar medium, ROS production significantly increased at time- and osmolarity-dependent manner in HCECs exposed to media with increasing osmolarities (350–450 mOsM). Hyperosmolarity significantly induced oxidative damage markers in cell membrane with increased toxic products of lipid peroxidation, 4–hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and in nuclear and mitochondria DNA with increased aconitase-2 and 8-OHdG. Hyperosmotic stress also increased the mRNA expression and protein production of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), but reduced the levels of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), and glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1). In conclusion, our comprehensive findings demonstrate that hyperosmolarity induces oxidative stress in HCECs by stimulating ROS production and disrupting the balance of oxygenases and antioxidant enzymes, which in turn cause cell damage with increased oxidative markers in membrane lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial DNA damage. PMID:26024535

  12. Nanosized zinc oxide particles induce neural stem cell apoptosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiaoyong; Luan, Qixia; Chen, Wenting; Wang, Yanli; Wu, Minghong; Zhang, Haijiao; Jiao, Zheng

    2009-03-01

    Given the intensive application of nanoscale zinc oxide (ZnO) materials in our life, growing concerns have arisen about its unintentional health and environmental impacts. In this study, the neurotoxicity of different sized ZnO nanoparticles in mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) was investigated. A cell viability assay indicated that ZnO nanoparticles manifested dose-dependent, but no size-dependent toxic effects on NSCs. Apoptotic cells were observed and analyzed by confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy examination, and flow cytometry. All the results support the viewpoint that the ZnO nanoparticle toxicity comes from the dissolved Zn2+ in the culture medium or inside cells. Our results highlight the need for caution during the use and disposal of ZnO manufactured nanomaterials to prevent the unintended environmental and health impacts.

  13. Ohr Protects Corynebacterium glutamicum against Organic Hydroperoxide Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiao; Guan, Jingyuan; Zhang, Yaoling; Ding, Wei; Chaudhry, Muhammad Tausif; Wang, Yao; Shen, Xihui

    2015-01-01

    Ohr, a bacterial protein encoded by the Organic Hydroperoxide Resistance (ohr) gene, plays a critical role in resistance to organic hydroperoxides. In the present study, we show that the Cys-based thiol-dependent Ohr of Corynebacterium glutamicum decomposes organic hydroperoxides more efficiently than hydrogen peroxide. Replacement of either of the two Cys residues of Ohr by a Ser residue resulted in drastic loss of activity. The electron donors supporting regeneration of the peroxidase activity of the oxidized Ohr of C. glutamicum were principally lipoylated proteins (LpdA and Lpd/SucB). A Δohr mutant exhibited significantly decreased resistance to organic hydroperoxides and marked accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in vivo; protein carbonylation was also enhanced notably. The resistance to hydrogen peroxide also decreased, but protein carbonylation did not rise to any great extent. Together, the results unequivocally show that Ohr is essential for mediation of organic hydroperoxide resistance by C. glutamicum. PMID:26121694

  14. Ion-induced oxidation of aluminum during reactive magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreiter, Oliver; Grosse-Kreul, Simon; Corbella, Carles; von Keudell, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Particle beam experiments were conducted in an ultra-high-vacuum vessel to mimic target poisoning during reactive magnetron sputtering of aluminum. Aluminum targets were exposed to quantified beams of argon ions, oxygen atoms and molecules, and aluminum vapour. The growth and etch rates were measured in situ by means of an Al-coated quartz crystal microbalance. The chemical state of the target surface was monitored in-situ by real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The surface processes were modelled through a set of balance equations providing sputter yields and sticking coefficients. The results indicate that the oxygen uptake of the aluminum surface is enhanced by a factor 1 to 2 by knock-on implantation and that the deposition of aluminum is not affected by the oxidation state of the surface.

  15. Regulation of Injury-Induced Neurogenesis by Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Bruno P.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2012-01-01

    The finding that neural stem cells (NSCs) are able to divide, migrate, and differentiate into several cellular types in the adult brain raised a new hope for restorative neurology. Nitric oxide (NO), a pleiotropic signaling molecule in the central nervous system (CNS), has been described to be able to modulate neurogenesis, acting as a pro- or antineurogenic agent. Some authors suggest that NO is a physiological inhibitor of neurogenesis, while others described NO to favor neurogenesis, particularly under inflammatory conditions. Thus, targeting the NO system may be a powerful strategy to control the formation of new neurons. However, the exact mechanisms by which NO regulates neural proliferation and differentiation are not yet completely clarified. In this paper we will discuss the potential interest of the modulation of the NO system for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases or other pathological conditions that may affect the CNS. PMID:22997523

  16. Defect induced mobility enhancement: Gadolinium oxide (100) on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Sitaputra, W.; Tsu, R.

    2012-11-26

    Growth of predominantly single crystal (100)-oriented gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on a p-type Si(100) and growth of a polycrystal with a predominant Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100) crystallite on a n-type Si(100) was performed using molecular beam epitaxy. Despite a poorer crystal structure than Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(110), an enhancement in carrier mobility can be found only from the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}(100)/n-type Si(100) interface. The mobility of 1715-1780 cm{sup 2}/V {center_dot} s was observed at room temperature, for carrier concentration >10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. This accumulation of the electrons and the mobility enhancement may arise from the two-dimensional confinement due to charge transfer across the interface similar to transfer doping.

  17. Calmodulin-induced structural changes in endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Persechini, Anthony; Tran, Quang-Kim; Black, D.J.; Gogol, Edward P.

    2013-01-01

    We have derived structures of intact calmodulin(CaM)-free and CaM-bound endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) by reconstruction from cryo-electron micrographs. The CaM-free reconstruction is well fitted by the oxygenase domain dimer, but the reductase domains are not visible, suggesting they are mobile and thus delocalized. Additional protein is visible in the CaM-bound reconstruction, concentrated in volumes near two basic patches on each oxygenase domain. One of these corresponds with a presumptive docking site for the reductase domain FMN-binding module. The other is proposed to correspond with a docking site for CaM. A model is suggested in which CaM binding and docking position the reductase domains near the oxygenase domains and promote docking of the FMN-binding modules required for electron transfer. PMID:23266515

  18. Changes in brain oxidative metabolism induced by water maze training.

    PubMed

    Conejo, N M; González-Pardo, H; Vallejo, G; Arias, J L

    2007-03-16

    Although the hippocampus has been shown to be essential for spatial memory, the contribution of associated brain regions is not well established. Wistar rats were trained to find a hidden escape platform in the water maze during eight days. Following training, the oxidative metabolism in different brain regions was evaluated using cytochrome oxidase histochemistry. Metabolic activations were found in the prelimbic cortex, cornu ammonis (CA) 1 subfield of the dorsal hippocampus and the anterior thalamic nuclei, relative to yoked swim controls and naïve rats. In addition, many cross-correlations in brain metabolism were observed among the latter regions. These results support the implication of a hippocampal-prefrontal-thalamic system to spatial memory in rats. PMID:17222984

  19. Vitamin A deficiency: An oxidative stress marker in sodium fluoride (NaF) induced oxidative damage in developing rat brain.

    PubMed

    Banala, Rajkiran Reddy; Karnati, Pratap Reddy

    2015-12-01

    Fluoride induced oxidative stress through depletion in levels of various anti-oxidants such as glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), fat soluble vitamins (D and E) with increased levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and fluoride aggravate the damage in rodents as well as in humans. Vitamins A, a fat soluble vitamin possess antioxidant property which plays a significant role in scavenging the free radicals species similar to vitamin D and E. Vitamin A is involved in neural tissue development and plasticity. The growing evidence about vitamin A being antioxidant in different biological reactions formed the basis to determine the effect of fluoride on its levels. The present study was conducted in Wistar rat pups. The pregnant wistar rats were dosed with 20 ppm sodium fluoride (NaF) from day one of pregnancy till the pups were aged day 30. The serum was collected from developing rat pups on regular intervals (14th, 21st, 30th day) and vitamin A levels were analyzed by High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Body weights, Behavioural studies and spectrophotometric estimation of SOD, LPO in brain lysates were also performed. The results showed significant decrease (p<0.001) in vitamin A in fluoride induced samples in comparison to the control samples suggesting that decreased levels of vitamin A can be used as another marker in fluoride induced toxicity studies.

  20. Municipal landfill leachate induces hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Farombi, E O; Akintunde, J K; Nzute, N; Adedara, I A; Arojojoye, O

    2012-07-01

    Human beings are more often exposed to complex mixtures of hazardous chemicals than single toxicant. The present study investigated the effects of Olushosun municipal landfill leachate (OMLL) from Ojota in Lagos State of Nigeria on hepatic function and some biomarkers of oxidative stress in adult rats. Physicochemical characteristic analysis of OMLL showed that while total alkalinity, total acidity, total hardness, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand were 3-fold, 2-fold, 4-fold and 1-fold, respectively, concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that copper, lead, cadmium, arsenic, cobalt, chromium and mercury were 9-fold, 4-fold, 21-fold, 1320-fold, 7-fold, 5-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher than acceptable limits by regulatory authorities. The OMLL was administered at 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% concentrations to adult male rats for 14 days. Following exposure, serum was collected for serum biochemistry assays and liver was collected to determine the antioxidant status. Exposure of animals to 10, 20, 30 and 40% OMLL resulted in 3%, 31%, 52% and 83% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 10%, 25%, 30% and 49%, respectively, when compared with the control. While OMLL administration significantly increased catalase activity, a sequential decrease in reduced glutathione level and in superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde level were observed, when compared with the control. Collectively, the hepatotoxicity of OMLL could be due to the induction of oxidative stress and may suggest possible health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure.

  1. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossuin, Y.; Orlando, T.; Basini, M.; Henrard, D.; Lascialfari, A.; Mattea, C.; Stapf, S.; Vuong, Q. L.

    2016-04-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  2. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water.

  3. Municipal landfill leachate induces hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Farombi, E O; Akintunde, J K; Nzute, N; Adedara, I A; Arojojoye, O

    2012-07-01

    Human beings are more often exposed to complex mixtures of hazardous chemicals than single toxicant. The present study investigated the effects of Olushosun municipal landfill leachate (OMLL) from Ojota in Lagos State of Nigeria on hepatic function and some biomarkers of oxidative stress in adult rats. Physicochemical characteristic analysis of OMLL showed that while total alkalinity, total acidity, total hardness, biochemical oxygen demand and chemical oxygen demand were 3-fold, 2-fold, 4-fold and 1-fold, respectively, concentrations of heavy metals analysis showed that copper, lead, cadmium, arsenic, cobalt, chromium and mercury were 9-fold, 4-fold, 21-fold, 1320-fold, 7-fold, 5-fold and 4-fold, respectively, higher than acceptable limits by regulatory authorities. The OMLL was administered at 0, 10, 20, 30 and 40% concentrations to adult male rats for 14 days. Following exposure, serum was collected for serum biochemistry assays and liver was collected to determine the antioxidant status. Exposure of animals to 10, 20, 30 and 40% OMLL resulted in 3%, 31%, 52% and 83% increase in aspartate aminotransferase activity, whereas it elevated alanine aminotransferase activity by 10%, 25%, 30% and 49%, respectively, when compared with the control. While OMLL administration significantly increased catalase activity, a sequential decrease in reduced glutathione level and in superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase activities with concomitant increase in malondialdehyde level were observed, when compared with the control. Collectively, the hepatotoxicity of OMLL could be due to the induction of oxidative stress and may suggest possible health hazards in subjects with occupational or environmental exposure. PMID:21937537

  4. NMR relaxation induced by iron oxide particles: testing theoretical models.

    PubMed

    Gossuin, Y; Orlando, T; Basini, M; Henrard, D; Lascialfari, A; Mattea, C; Stapf, S; Vuong, Q L

    2016-04-15

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles find their main application as contrast agents for cellular and molecular magnetic resonance imaging. The contrast they bring is due to the shortening of the transverse relaxation time T 2 of water protons. In order to understand their influence on proton relaxation, different theoretical relaxation models have been developed, each of them presenting a certain validity domain, which depends on the particle characteristics and proton dynamics. The validation of these models is crucial since they allow for predicting the ideal particle characteristics for obtaining the best contrast but also because the fitting of T 1 experimental data by the theory constitutes an interesting tool for the characterization of the nanoparticles. In this work, T 2 of suspensions of iron oxide particles in different solvents and at different temperatures, corresponding to different proton diffusion properties, were measured and were compared to the three main theoretical models (the motional averaging regime, the static dephasing regime, and the partial refocusing model) with good qualitative agreement. However, a real quantitative agreement was not observed, probably because of the complexity of these nanoparticulate systems. The Roch theory, developed in the motional averaging regime (MAR), was also successfully used to fit T 1 nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles, even outside the MAR validity range, and provided a good estimate of the particle size. On the other hand, the simultaneous fitting of T 1 and T 2 NMRD profiles by the theory was impossible, and this occurrence constitutes a clear limitation of the Roch model. Finally, the theory was shown to satisfactorily fit the deuterium T 1 NMRD profile of superparamagnetic particle suspensions in heavy water. PMID:26933908

  5. Molecular Mechanism of Silver Nanoparticles-Induced Human Osteoblast Cell Death: Protective Effect of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Zielinska, Ewelina; Tukaj, Cecylia; Radomski, Marek Witold; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Background Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) show strong antibacterial properties, making them excellent candidates to be used in orthopaedic repair and regeneration. However, there are concerns regarding the cytotoxicity of AgNPs and molecular mechanisms underlying AgNPs-induced bone cells toxicity have not been elucidated. Therefore, the aim of our study was to explore mechanisms of AgNPs-induced osteoblast cell death with particular emphasis on the role of nitric oxide (NO) generated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Methods and Result Silver nanoparticles used in this study were 18.3±2.6 nm in size, uncoated, spherical, regular shape and their zeta potential was -29.1±2.4 mV as measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zetasizer. The release of silver (Ag) from AgNPs was measured in cell culture medium by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The exposure of human osteoblast cells (hFOB 1.19) to AgNPs at concentration of 30 or 60 μg/mL for 24 or 48 hours, respectively resulted in cellular uptake of AgNPs and changes in cell ultrastructure. These changes were associated with apoptosis and necrosis as shown by flow cytometry and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay as well as increased levels of pro-apoptotic Bax and decreased levels of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 mRNA and protein. Importantly, we have found that AgNPs elevated the levels of nitric oxide (NO) with concomitant upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein. A significant positive correlation was observed between the concentration of AgNPs and iNOS at protein and mRNA level (r = 0.837, r = 0.721, respectively; p<0.001). Finally, preincubation of osteoblast cells with N-iminoethyl-l-lysine (L-NIL), a selective iNOS inhibitor, as well as treating cells with iNOS small interfering RNAs (siRNA) significantly attenuated AgNPs-induced apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, we have found that AgNPs-induced cells death is not related to Ag dissolution is cell culture medium

  6. PGC-1α Induces Human RPE Oxidative Metabolism and Antioxidant Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Iacovelli, Jared; Rowe, Glenn C.; Khadka, Arogya; Diaz-Aguilar, Daniel; Spencer, Carrie; Arany, Zoltan; Saint-Geniez, Magali

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation of the RPE have been implicated in AMD; however, the molecular regulation of RPE metabolism remains unclear. The transcriptional coactivator, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a powerful mediator of mitochondrial function. This study examines the ability of PGC-1α to regulate RPE metabolic program and oxidative stress response. Methods Primary human fetal RPE (hfRPE) and ARPE-19 were matured in vitro using standard culture conditions. Mitochondrial mass of RPE was measured using MitoTracker staining and citrate synthase activity. Expression of PGC-1 isoforms, RPE-specific genes, oxidative metabolism proteins, and antioxidant enzymes was analyzed by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Mitochondrial respiration and fatty-acid oxidation were monitored using the Seahorse extracellular flux analyzer. Expression of PGC-1α was increased using adenoviral delivery. ARPE-19 were exposed to hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species were measured by CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence. Cell death was analyzed by LDH release. Results Maturation of ARPE-19 and hfRPE was associated with significant increase in mitochondrial mass, expression of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) genes, and PGC-1α gene expression. Overexpression of PGC-1α increased expression of OXPHOS and fatty-acid β-oxidation genes, ultimately leading to the potent induction of mitochondrial respiration and fatty-acid oxidation. PGC-1α gain of function also strongly induced numerous antioxidant genes and, importantly, protected RPE from oxidant-mediated cell death without altering RPE functions. Conclusions This study provides important insights into the metabolic changes associated with RPE functional maturation and identifies PGC-1α as a potent driver of RPE mitochondrial function and antioxidant capacity. PMID:26962700

  7. Ceramide-induced intracellular oxidant formation, iron signaling, and apoptosis in endothelial cells: protective role of endogenous nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kalivendi, Shasi V; Dhanasekaran, Anuradha; Joseph, Joy; Kalyanaraman, B

    2004-07-01

    Sphingolipid ceramide (N-acetylsphingosine), a bioactive second messenger lipid, was shown to activate reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial oxidative damage, and apoptosis in neuronal and vascular cells. The proapoptotic effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, hypoxia, and chemotherapeutic drugs were attributed to increased ceramide formation. Here we investigated the protective role of nitric oxide (.NO) during hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-mediated transferrin receptor (TfR)-dependent iron signaling and apoptosis in C(2)-ceramide (C(2)-cer)-treated bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Addition of C(2)-cer (5-20 microm) to BAECs enhanced .NO generation. However, at higher concentrations of C(2)-cer (> or =20 microm), .NO generation did not increase proportionately. C(2)-cer (20-50 microm) also resulted in H(2)O(2)-mediated dichlorodihydrofluorescein oxidation, reduced glutathione depletion, aconitase inactivation, TfR overexpression, TfR-dependent uptake of (55)Fe, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria into cytosol, caspase-3 activation, and DNA fragmentation. N(w)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME), a nonspecific inhibitor of nitricoxide synthases, augmented these effects in BAECs at much lower (i.e. nonapoptotic) concentrations of C(2)-cer. The 26 S proteasomal activity in BAECs was slightly elevated at lower concentrations of C(2)-cer (< or =10 microm) but was greatly suppressed at higher concentrations (>10 microm). Intracellular scavengers of H(2)O(2), cell-permeable iron chelators, anti-TfR receptor antibody, or mitochondria-targeted antioxidant greatly abrogated C(2)-cer- and/or l-NAME-induced oxidative damage, iron signaling, and apoptosis. We conclude that C(2)-cer-induced H(2)O(2) and TfR-dependent iron signaling are responsible for its prooxidant and proapoptotic effects and that .NO exerts an antioxidative and cytoprotective role.

  8. Agmatine attenuates reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in mice: Role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and glutamate NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Andréia S; Matheus, Filipe C; Moretti, Morgana; Sampaio, Tuane B; Poli, Anicleto; Santos, Danúbia B; Colle, Dirleise; Cunha, Mauricio P; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Sandjo, Louis P; Reginatto, Flávio H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-10-01

    Dyskinesia consists in a series of trunk, limbs and orofacial involuntary movements that can be observed following long-term pharmacological treatment in some psychotic and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Agmatine is an endogenous arginine metabolite that emerges as neuromodulator and a promising agent to manage diverse central nervous system disorders by modulating nitric oxide (NO) pathway, glutamate NMDA receptors and oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the effects of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different agmatine doses (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine (1mg/kg,s.c.) in mice by measuring the vacuous chewing movements and tongue protusion frequencies, and the duration of facial twitching. The results showed an orofacial antidyskinetic effect of agmatine (30mg/kg, i.p.) or the combined administration of sub-effective doses of agmatine (10mg/kg, i.p.) with the NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and MK801 (0.01mg/kg, i.p.) or the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Reserpine-treated mice displayed locomotor activity deficits in the open field and agmatine had no effect on this response. Reserpine increased nitrite and nitrate levels in cerebral cortex, but agmatine did not reverse it. Remarkably, agmatine reversed the decrease of dopamine and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels caused by reserpine in the striatum. However, no changes were observed in striatal immunocontent of proteins related to the dopaminergic system including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, pDARPP-32[Thr75], dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. These results indicate that the blockade of NO pathway, NMDAR and oxidative stress are possible mechanisms associated with the protective effects of agmatine against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine in mice.

  9. Ethylene signalling is mediating the early cadmium-induced oxidative challenge in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Schellingen, Kerim; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stimulates ethylene biosynthesis. The phytohormone ethylene is a regulator of many developmental and physiological plant processes as well as stress responses. Previous research indicated various links between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress. Our results support a correlation between the Cd-induced oxidative challenge and ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The effects of 24 or 72 h exposure to 5 μM Cd on plant growth and several oxidative stress-related parameters were compared between wild-type (WT) and ethylene insensitive mutants (etr1-1, ein2-1, ein3-1). Cadmium-induced responses observed in WT plants were mainly affected in etr1-1 and ein2-1 mutants, of which the growth was less inhibited by Cd exposure as compared to WT and ein3-1 mutants. Both etr1-1 and ein2-1 showed a delayed response in the glutathione (GSH) metabolism, including GSH levels and transcript levels of GSH synthesising and recycling enzymes. Furthermore, the expression of different oxidative stress marker genes was significantly lower in Cd-exposed ein2-1 mutants, evidencing that ethylene signalling is involved in early responses to Cd stress. A model for the cross-talk between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress is proposed. PMID:26398798

  10. Therapeutic insight into molsidomine, a nitric oxide donor in streptozotocin-induced diabetic nephropathy in rats

    PubMed Central

    Minaz, Nathani; Razdan, Rema

    2016-01-01

    Background: Diabetes-induced oxidative stress and hypertension play a major role in the development of nephropathy. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effects of molsidomine, a nitric oxide donor in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy (DN) in rats. Materials and Methods: Type 1 diabetes was induced through a single dose of STZ (52 mg/kg, i.p.) in male Wistar rats and then treated with molsidomine (5 and 10 mg/kg; p.o.) for 8 weeks. Physical parameters, vital and renal function test including blood glucose, albuminuria, blood urine nitrogen, serum creatinine, and kidney index were determined. Oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation were assessed in the kidney homogenate by means of antioxidant enzymes and malondialdehyde levels. Results: DN rats exhibited a significant renal dysfunction with a reduction in body weight, excessive oxidative stress, and pathological changes. Molsidomine treatment significantly improved vital sign, renal functions, and oxidative stress in DN rats in a dose-dependent manner. The protective effect of molsidomine was also substantiated by pathological changes in the architect of the kidney. Conclusion: Molsidomine shows a significant beneficial effect in Type 1 DN in rats. PMID:27721541

  11. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A; Graham, Brett H; Bellen, Hugo J

    2015-07-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise. PMID:26176594

  12. Neuromodulatory Effects of Hesperidin in Mitigating Oxidative Stress in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Laxmi; Khan, Mohammad Haaris Ajmal; Salman, Mohd.; Naseem, Mehar; Wajid, Saima

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in pathogenesis of streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes mellitus and its complication in central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies have provided insights on antioxidants and their emergence as potential therapeutic and nutraceutical. The present study examined the hypothesis that hesperidin (HP) ameliorates oxidative stress and may be a limiting factor in the extent of CNS complication following diabetes. To test this hypothesis rats were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, diabetic-HP treated, and vehicle for HP treatment group. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single injection of STZ (65 mg/kg body weight). Three days after STZ injection, HP was given (50 mg/kg b.wt. orally) once daily for four weeks. The results of the present investigation suggest that the significant elevated levels of oxidative stress markers were observed in STZ-treated animals, whereas significant depletion in the activity of nonenzymatic antioxidants and enzymatic antioxidants was witnessed in diabetic rat brain. Neurotoxicity biomarker activity was also altered significantly. HP treatment significantly attenuated the altered levels of oxidative stress and neurotoxicity biomarkers. Our results demonstrate that HP exhibits potent antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on the brain tissue against the diabetic oxidative damage in STZ-induced rodent model. PMID:25050332

  13. DNA damage and oxidative stress induced by acetylsalicylic acid in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo Manuel; Galar-Martínez, Marcela; Islas-Flores, Hariz; García-Medina, Sandra; SanJuan-Reyes, Nely

    2014-08-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory widely used due to its low cost and high effectiveness. This compound has been found in water bodies worldwide and is toxic to aquatic organisms; nevertheless its capacity to induce oxidative stress in bioindicators like Daphnia magna remains unknown. This study aimed to evaluate toxicity in D. magna induced by acetylsalicylic acid in water, using oxidative stress and DNA damage biomarkers. An acute toxicity test was conducted in order to determine the median lethal concentration (48-h LC50) and the concentrations to be used in the subsequent subacute toxicity test in which the following biomarkers were evaluated: lipid peroxidation, oxidized protein content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and level of DNA damage. Lipid peroxidation level and oxidized protein content were significantly increased (p<0.05), and antioxidant enzymes significantly altered with respect to controls; while the DNA damage were significantly increased (p<0.05) too. In conclusion, acetylsalicylic acid induces oxidative stress and DNA damage in D. magna.

  14. Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: Focus on oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Pietroiusti, Antonio; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-06-01

    Nanotechnologies are emerging as highly promising technologies in many sectors in the society. However, the increasing use of engineered nanomaterials also raises concerns about inadvertent exposure to these materials and the potential for adverse effects on human health and the environment. Despite several years of intensive investigations, a common paradigm for the understanding of nanoparticle-induced toxicity remains to be firmly established. Here, the so-called oxidative stress paradigm is scrutinized. Does oxidative stress represent a secondary event resulting inevitably from disruption of biochemical processes and the demise of the cell, or a specific, non-random event that plays a role in the induction of cellular damage e.g. apoptosis? The answer to this question will have important ramifications for the development of strategies for mitigation of adverse effects of nanoparticles. Recent examples of global lipidomics studies of nanoparticle-induced tissue damage are discussed along with proteomics and transcriptomics approaches to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the complex and interrelated molecular changes in cells and tissues exposed to nanoparticles. We also discuss instances of non-oxidative stress-mediated cellular damage resulting from direct physical interference of nanomaterials with cellular structures. -- Highlights: ► CNT induced non-random oxidative stress associated with apoptosis. ► Non-oxidative mechanisms for cellular toxicity of carbon nanotubes. ► Biodegradation of CNT by cells of innate immune system. ► “Omics”-based biomarkers of CNT exposures.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of Citrus reticulata in scopolamine-induced dementia oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    El-Khadragy, Manal F; Al-Olayan, Ebtesam M; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential effects of Citrus reticulate (mandarin) peel methanolic extract (MPME) on memory dysfunction in rats. Memory impairment was produced by scopolamine (1.4 mg/kg, intraperitoneally injected). Brain acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity was measured to assess the central cholinergic activity. This study also investigated the effect of scopolamine on norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin content in rat hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. In addition, the levels of brain lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO) and glutathione (GSH) were estimated to assess the degree of oxidative stress. Scopolamine administration induced a significant impairment of central cholinergic activity in rats, as indicated by a marked increase in AChE activity. The impairment of the cholinergic system was associated with a significant alternation in brain monoamines. Scopolamine administration also caused oxidant damage (elevation in LPO and NO and reduction in GSH levels). Pretreatment of MPME (250 mg/kg, orally administered) significantly reduced scopolamine-induced alternation in brain monoamines with an attenuation of scopolamine-induced rise in brain AChE activity and brain oxidative stress. It is concluded that administration of mandarin peel extract, demonstrating antioxidant activity, may be of value for dementia exhibiting elevated brain oxidative status. PMID:24938777

  16. Naringenin Inhibits UVB Irradiation-Induced Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in the Skin of Hairless Mice.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Renata M; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Steffen, Vinicius S; Caviglione, Carla V; Vignoli, Josiane A; Barbosa, Décio S; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rubia

    2015-07-24

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation may cause inflammation- and oxidative-stress-dependent skin cancer and premature aging. Naringenin (1) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, but its effects and mechanisms on UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative stress are still not known. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate the potential of naringenin to mitigate UVB irradiation-induced inflammation and oxidative damage in the skin of hairless mice. Skin edema, myeloperoxidase (neutrophil marker) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity, and cytokine production were measured after UVB irradiation. Oxidative stress was evaluated by 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS) scavenging ability, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), reduced glutathione levels, catalase activity, lipid peroxidation products, superoxide anion production, and gp91phox (NADPH oxidase subunit) mRNA expression by quantitative PCR. The intraperitoneal treatment with naringenin reduced skin inflammation by inhibiting skin edema, neutrophil recruitment, MMP-9 activity, and pro-inflammatory (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-23) and anti-inflammatory (TGF-β and IL-10) cytokines. Naringenin also inhibited oxidative stress by reducing superoxide anion production and the mRNA expression of gp91phox. Therefore, naringenin inhibits UVB irradiation-induced skin damage and may be a promising therapeutic approach to control skin disease.

  17. Ethylene signalling is mediating the early cadmium-induced oxidative challenge in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Schellingen, Kerim; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Remans, Tony; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Keunen, Els; Cuypers, Ann

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and stimulates ethylene biosynthesis. The phytohormone ethylene is a regulator of many developmental and physiological plant processes as well as stress responses. Previous research indicated various links between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress. Our results support a correlation between the Cd-induced oxidative challenge and ethylene signalling in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves. The effects of 24 or 72 h exposure to 5 μM Cd on plant growth and several oxidative stress-related parameters were compared between wild-type (WT) and ethylene insensitive mutants (etr1-1, ein2-1, ein3-1). Cadmium-induced responses observed in WT plants were mainly affected in etr1-1 and ein2-1 mutants, of which the growth was less inhibited by Cd exposure as compared to WT and ein3-1 mutants. Both etr1-1 and ein2-1 showed a delayed response in the glutathione (GSH) metabolism, including GSH levels and transcript levels of GSH synthesising and recycling enzymes. Furthermore, the expression of different oxidative stress marker genes was significantly lower in Cd-exposed ein2-1 mutants, evidencing that ethylene signalling is involved in early responses to Cd stress. A model for the cross-talk between ethylene signalling and oxidative stress is proposed.

  18. Mechanism of oxidative stress-induced GADD153 gene expression in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jia-Rong; Nakamura, Michitsugu; Okura, Takafumi; Takata, Yasunori; Watanabe, Sanae; Yang, Zhao-Hui; Liu, Jun; Kitami, Yutaka; Hiwada, Kunio

    2002-02-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in normal functioning of cardiac and vascular cells as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), which is upregulated by oxidative stress, regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis. Previously an AP-1 was reported to contribute significantly to GADD153 gene transcriptional activation by oxidative stress. Recently, we have reported that GADD153 gene promoter activity is negatively regulated by nuclear factor 1 (NF1), in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The aim of this study was to elucidate the roles of AP-1 and NF1 in GADD153 gene induction by oxidative stress in VSMCs. H(2)O(2) induced GADD153 mRNA and reduced NF1 mRNA expression. In the electromobility shift assay, H(2)O(2) induced AP-1-binding activity and reduced NF1-binding activity. Overexpression of NF1 significantly suppressed the induction of the GADD153 gene after treatment with H(2)O(2). These results revealed that induction of the GADD153 gene by oxidative stress is regulated mainly by two nuclear factors, NF1 and AP-1.

  19. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Manish; Haelterman, Nele A.; Sandoval, Hector; Xiong, Bo; Donti, Taraka; Kalsotra, Auinash; Yamamoto, Shinya; Cooper, Thomas A.; Graham, Brett H.; Bellen, Hugo J.

    2015-01-01

    Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration—defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise. PMID:26176594

  20. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins induced inflammatory process during atherogenesis with aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larbi, Anis; Khalil, Abdelouahed; Douziech, Nadine; Guérard, Karl-Philippe; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2005-02-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic disease developing through decades with two life-threatening complications: myocardial infarction and stroke. Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) produced by oxidative modifications of LDL in the subendothelial space have been demonstrated to be critically involved in atherogenesis through their intensive pro-inflammatory activity. Recently, it was shown that oxLDL have an apoptosis-inducing effect in T cells depending on time and degree of oxidation. The goal of the current study is to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoptotic-inducing effects of oxLDL on T lymphocytes. T cells of young and elderly subjects were incubated for various periods of time with LDL oxidized to various degrees. The proliferation, the apoptosis, the MAPK ERK1/2 activation and the expression of the Bcl-2 protein family members were measured upon different LDL treatments. Thus, more the LDL are oxidized more they induce apoptosis and this effect is highly accentuated with aging. The oxLDL decrease the activation of the surviving molecule ERK1/2 and modulate the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 towards a pro-apoptotic profile, which is also accentuated with aging. These results partly explain why atherosclerosis is increasing with aging concomitantly to its complications.

  1. Antioxidative effect of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Chen, Y; Zhai, L; Zhang, L; Xu, Y; Wang, S; Hu, S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigation demonstrated that oral administration of ginseng stem-leaf saponins in chickens could enhance the immune response. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginseng stem-leaf saponins on oxidative stress induced by cyclophosphamide in chickens. One hundred and twenty chickens were randomly divided into 5 groups. Groups 1 to 4 received intramuscular injection of cyclophosphamide to induce oxidative stress while group 5 was injected with saline solution and served as control. Following administration of cyclophosphamide, groups 1 to 3 were orally administered ginseng stem-leaf saponins at 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg BW in drinking water for 7 d, respectively. After that, the spleen, thymus, bursa, and serum were collected to measure the indices of the organs and oxidative parameters. The results showed that ginseng stem-leaf saponins significantly inhibited cyclophosphamide-induced oxidative stress by increasing the organ indices, total antioxidant capacity, and the levels of glutathione, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, while elevating the activity of total superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, as well as decreasing the protein carbonyl content and malondialdehyde. Therefore, ginseng stem-leaf saponins could be a promising agent against oxidative stress in the poultry industry. PMID:25713395

  2. Carbon nanotube-induced preparation of vanadium oxide nanorods: Application as a catalyst for the partial oxidation of n-butane

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xiaowei; Zhu Zhenping; Haevecker, Michael; Su Dangsheng . E-mail: dangsheng@fhi-berlin.mpg.de; Schloegl, Robert

    2007-02-15

    A vanadium oxide-carbon nanotube composite was prepared by solution-based hydrolysis of NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} in the presence of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes induce the nucleation of the 1D vanadium oxide nanostructures, with the nuclei growing into long freestanding nanorods. The vanadium oxide nanorods with the lengths up to 20 {mu}m and the widths of 5-15 nm exhibit a well-ordered crystalline structure. Catalytic tests show that the composite with nanostructured vanadium oxide is active for the partial oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride at 300 deg. C.

  3. Induced Clustered Nanoconfinement of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide in Biodegradable Nanoparticles Enhances Transverse Relaxivity for Targeted Theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Ragheb, Ragy R. T.; Kim, Dongin; Bandyopadhyay, Arunima; Chahboune, Halima; Bulutoglu, Beyza; Ezaldein, Harib; Criscione, Jason M.; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Combined therapeutic and diagnostic agents, “theranostics” are emerging valuable tools for noninvasive imaging and drug delivery. Here, we report on a solid biodegradable multifunctional nanoparticle that combines both features. Methods Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles were engineered to confine superparamagnetic iron oxide contrast for magnetic resonance imaging while enabling controlled drug delivery and targeting to specific cells. To achieve this dual modality, fatty acids were used as anchors for surface ligands and for encapsulated iron oxide in the polymer matrix. Results We demonstrate that fatty acid modified iron oxide prolonged retention of the contrast agent in the polymer matrix during degradative release of drug. Antibody-fatty acid surface modification facilitated cellular targeting and subsequent internalization in cells while inducing clustering of encapsulated fatty-acid modified superparamagnetic iron oxide during particle formulation. This induced clustered confinement led to an aggregation within the nanoparticle and, hence, higher transverse relaxivity, r2, (294 mM−1 s−1) compared with nanoparticles without fatty-acid ligands (160 mM−1 s−1) and higher than commercially available superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (89 mM−1 s−1). Conclusion Clustering of superparamagnetic iron oxide in poly(lactide-co-glycolide) did not affect the controlled release of encapsulated drugs such as methotrexate or clodronate and their subsequent pharmacological activity, thus highlighting the full theranostic capability of our system. PMID:23401099

  4. Mechanism of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress regulating viability and biocontrol ability of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-01-16

    The use of antagonistic yeasts to control postharvest pathogens is a promising alternative to fungicides. The effectiveness of the antagonists against fungal pathogens is greatly dependent on their viability, which is usually mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effects of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress on the viability and biocontrol efficacy of Rhodotorula glutinis and, using flow cytometric analysis, observed the changes of ROS accumulation and apoptosis in the yeast cells with or without H₂O₂ treatment. We found that the viability of R. glutinis decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner under H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress. Compared to the control, yeast cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited more accumulation of ROS and higher levels of protein oxidative damage, but showed lower efficacy for biocontrol of Penicillium expansum causing blue mold rot on peach fruit. The results indicate that apoptosis is a main cause of the cell viability loss in R. glutinis, which is attributed to ROS accumulation under oxidative stress. These findings offer a plausible explanation that oxidative stress affects biocontrol efficacy of R. glutinis via regulating its viability and cell apoptosis.

  5. Impaired mitochondrial respiratory functions and oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Raza, Haider; Prabu, Subbuswamy K; John, Annie; Avadhani, Narayan G

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown a tissue-specific increase in oxidative stress in the early stages of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. In this study, we investigated oxidative stress-related long-term complications and mitochondrial dysfunctions in the different tissues of STZ-induced diabetic rats (>15 mM blood glucose for 8 weeks). These animals showed a persistent increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS, respectively) production. Oxidative protein carbonylation was also increased with the maximum effect observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. The activities of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes ubiquinol: cytochrome c oxidoreductase (Complex III) and cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV) were significantly decreased while that of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) and succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex II) were moderately increased in diabetic rats, which was confirmed by the increased expression of the 70 kDa Complex II sub-unit. Mitochondrial matrix aconitase, a ROS sensitive enzyme, was markedly inhibited in the diabetic rat tissues. Increased expression of oxidative stress marker proteins Hsp-70 and HO-1 was also observed along with increased expression of nitric oxide synthase. These results suggest that mitochondrial respiratory complexes may play a critical role in ROS/RNS homeostasis and oxidative stress related changes in type 1 diabetes and may have implications in the etiology of diabetes and its complications.

  6. Laser-Induced Oxidation of Cholesterol Observed During MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAvey, Kevin M.; Guan, Bing; Fortier, Chanel A.; Tarr, Matthew A.; Cole, Richard B.

    2011-04-01

    Conditions for the detection of three odd-electron cholesterol oxidation peaks were determined and these peaks were shown to be artifacts of the matrix-assisted laser desorption time of flight (MALDI-TOF) process. Matrix choice, solvent, laser intensity and cholesterol concentration were systematically varied to characterize the conditions leading to the highest signals of the radical cation peaks, and it was found that initial cholesterol solution concentration and resultant density of solid cholesterol on the MALDI target were important parameters in determining signal intensities. It is proposed that hydroxyl radicals, generated as a result of laser irradiation of the employed 2, 5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHB) matrix, initiate cholesterol oxidation on the MALDI target. An attempt to induce the odd-electron oxidation peaks by means of adding an oxidizing agent succeeded using an acetonitrile solution of DHB, cholesterol, and cumene hydroperoxide. Moreover, addition of free radical scavengers reduced the abundances of some oxidation products under certain conditions. These results are consistent with the mechanism of oxidation proposed herein involving laser-induced hydroxyl radical production followed by attack on neutral cholesterol. Hydroxyl radical production upon irradiation of dithranol matrix may also be responsible for generation of the same radical peaks observed from cholesterol in dithranol by an analogous mechanism.

  7. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors.

  8. Protein carbonyl formation in response to propiconazole-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Maribel; Moore, Tanya; Nesnow, Stephen; Ge, Yue

    2009-04-01

    Propiconazole, a widely used fungicide, is hepatotoxic and hepatotumorigenic in mice. Previous genomic analysis of liver tissues from propiconazole-treated mice identified genes and pathways involved in oxidative stress, suggesting that oxidative stress may play a role in propiconazole-induced toxicity. To understand the contribution of oxidative stress on toxicity at the protein level, we developed an integrated approach for the systematic measurement of protein oxidation in the livers from propiconazole-treated mice. Liver protein carbonylation increased significantly after treatment with propiconazole, demonstrating propiconazole-associated induction of oxidative stress. Utilizing two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry, we identified 17 carbonylated proteins that were altered with varying intensities by propiconazole treatment. The potential effects of protein carbonylation on protein functions and cellular activities in the liver of propiconazole-treated mice were further investigated. A significant negative correlation between protein carbonylation and cytochrome c reductase activity was found. We conclude that glycolysis, mitochondrial respiratory chain, ATP production, amino acid metabolism, CO2 hydration, cellular antioxidant defense and detoxification system, and tetrahydrobiopterin pathways are affected by oxygen radicals in the livers of propiconazole-treated mice. This study suggests a mode of propiconazole-induced toxicity in mouse liver which primarily involves oxidative damage to cellular proteins.

  9. AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION EXPOSURE INDUCES SYSTEMIC OXIDATIVE STRESS IN HEALTHY MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air particulate pollution exposure induces systemic oxidative stress in healthy mice

    Elizabeth S Roberts1 and Kevin L Dreher2. 1 College or Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC , 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC

    Epidemiological s...

  10. Endomembrane Ca2+ -ATPases play significant role in virus-induced adaptation to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In our recently published paper (Plant Cell Environ 34: 406-417) we have reported a phenomenon of Potato Virus X (PVX) - induced cross tolerance to oxidative stress in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and showed a critical role of plasma membrane Ca2+/H+ exchangers in this process. The current study fol...

  11. Squaraine PDT induces oxidative stress in skin tumor of swiss albino mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cibin, T. R.; Gayathri, Devi D.; Ramaiah, D.; Abraham, Annie

    2010-02-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) using a sensitizing drug is recognized as a promising medical technique for cancer treatment. It is a two step process that requires the administration of a photosensitizer followed by light exposure to treat a disease. Following light exposure the photosensitizer is excited to a higher energy state which generates free radicals and singlet oxygen. The present study was carried out to assess the oxidative damage induced by bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6- trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine in skin tumor tissues of mice with/ without light treatment. Skin tumor was induced using 7, 12-Dimethyl Benz(a)anthracene and croton oil. The tumor bearing mice were given an intraperitoneal injection with the squaraine dye. After 24h, the tumor area of a few animals injected with the dye, were exposed to visible light from a 1000 W halogen lamp and others kept away from light. All the mice were sacrificed one week after the PDT treatment and the oxidative profile was analyzed (TBARS, SOD, catalase, GSH, GPx and GR) in tumor/ skin tissues. The dye induces oxidative stress in the tumor site only on illumination and the oxidative status of the tumor tissue was found to be unaltered in the absence of light. The results of the study clearly shows that the tumor destruction mediated by PDT using bis (3, 5-diiodo-2, 4, 6-trihydroxyphenyl) squaraine as a photosensitizer is due to the generation of reactive oxygen species, produced by the light induced changes in the dye.

  12. OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCES CELL DEATH IN CD-1 MOUSE CRANIAL NEURAL CREST CELLS IN VITRO. J.B. Smith, K.K. Sulik, E.S. Hunter III. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.
    The induction of craniofacial defects by ethanol exposure is mediated in part by...

  13. Fast regioselective sulfonylation of pyridine/quinoline N-oxides induced by iodine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruijia; Zeng, Zebing; Chen, Chuang; Yi, Niannian; Jiang, Jun; Cao, Zhong; Deng, Wei; Xiang, Jiannan

    2016-06-21

    Fast sulfonylation of pyridine/quinoline N-oxides induced by iodine is demonstrated herein. The regioselective protocol occurs under metal-free conditions in a short reaction time (10 min), exhibiting high efficiency (up to 92% yield) and good compatibility (up to 33 examples). A gram-scale reaction was conducted with only a slight loss of production. PMID:27219641

  14. Protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress induced-retinal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yuan; Su, Tu; Qiu, Xiaorong; Mao, Pingan; Xu, Yidan; Hu, Zizhong; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Xinhua; Xie, Ping; Liu, Qinghuai

    2016-01-01

    It is known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. Alpha-mangostin is the main xanthone purified from mangosteen known as anti-oxidative properties. The aim of the study was to test the protective effect of alpha-mangostin against oxidative stress both in retina of light-damaged mice model and in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-stressed RPE cells. We observed that alpha-mangostin significantly inhibited light-induced degeneration of photoreceptors and 200 μM H2O2-induced apoptosis of RPE cells. 200 μM H2O2-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and light-induced generation of malondialdehyde (MDA) were suppressed by alpha-mangostin. Alpha-mangostin stimulation resulted in an increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity and glutathione (GSH) content both in vivo and vitro. Furthermore, the mechanism of retinal protection against oxidative stress by alpha-mangostin involves accumulation and the nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor (Nrf2) along with up-regulation the expression of heme oxygenas-1 (HO-1). Meanwhile, alpha-mangostin can activate the expression of PKC-δ and down-regulate the expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), including ERK1/2, JNK, P38. The results suggest that alpha-mangostin could be a new approach to suspend the onset and development of AMD. PMID:26888416

  15. Aralia taibaiensis Protects Cardiac Myocytes against High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Guo, Chao; Cui, Jia; Yan, Jiajia; Yin, Ying; Guan, Yue; Weng, Yan; Zhu, Yanrong; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Yanhua; Xi, Miaomiao; Wen, Aidong

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type 2 diabetes have increased cardiovascular disease risk compared with those without diabetes. Hyperglycemia can induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which contributes to the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. Our previous study has demonstrated that the total saponins of Aralia taibaiensis (sAT), a frequently-used antidiabetic medicine in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), can scavenge free radicals in vitro and have good anti-oxidant ability on lipid peroxidation of rat liver microsomes. This work was designed to investigate whether sAT could protect the heart while it was used in the treatment of diabetes. Oxidative stress was induced in H9c2 cells by high glucose (33 mM) and glucose oxidase (15 mU, G/GO) and the protective effects of sAT were evaluated. Treatment of H9c2 cells with G/GO resulted in an increase in cell death, intracellular ROS level and cell oxidative injury, which were markedly reduced by sAT treatment. Further study revealed that sAT induced the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and expression of its downstream targets. Moreover, Nrf2 siRNA markedly abolished the cytoprotective effects of sAT. sAT exerted cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress induced by hyperglycemia and the cardioprotective effects of sAT might be through the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Thus, sAT might be a promising candidate for the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:26446201

  16. Protection of Quercetin against Triptolide-induced apoptosis by suppressing oxidative stress in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jie; Yu, Qinwei; Zhao, Fang; Ji, Jinzi; Jiang, Zhenzhou; Chen, Xin; Gao, Peng; Ren, Yuran; Shao, Shuai; Zhang, Luyong; Yan, Ming

    2015-10-01

    Triptolide (TP) is a diterpene triepoxide with variety biological activities, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-cancerogenic, immunomodulatory and pro-apoptotic activities. However, its clinical application was limited by potential toxicity. Quercetin (Que) is a member of flavonoids with anti-oxidant effects. In this study, we aimed to demonstrate the protective effect of Que in TP-induced oxidative stress and decrease of testosterone generation in reproductive damage. Leydig cells were treated with TP (20, 40 and 60 nM), which caused obvious oxidative stress increasing intracellular ROS, decreasing activities and expressions of GPx and SOD. Apoptosis was resulted from depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and release of cytochrome C (Cyt-C) showing increase of BAX/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 and caspase-9. Treatment of Que (5 μM) prior to triptolide could restore all the TP-induced alteration in a certain dose range indicating that the oxidative stress might be one reason of TP-induced reproductive toxic effect. These results suggest that the compatibility with Que might reduce the TP-induced reproductive toxicity, which provide a probability to extend the usage of TP. PMID:26277538

  17. Maltol, a Food Flavoring Agent, Attenuates Acute Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Xu, Qi; Hu, Jiang-ning; Han, Xin-yue; Li, Wei; Zhao, Li-chun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hepatoprotective effect of maltol, a food-flavoring agent, on alcohol-induced acute oxidative damage in mice. Maltol used in this study was isolated from red ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A Meyer) and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry. For hepatoprotective activity in vivo, pretreatment with maltol (12.5, 25 and 50 mg/kg; 15 days) drastically prevented the elevated activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and triglyceride (TG) in serum and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in liver tissue (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the levels of hepatic antioxidant, such as catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were elevated by maltol pretreatment, compared to the alcohol group (p < 0.05). Histopathological examination revealed that maltol pretreatment significantly inhibited alcohol-induced hepatocyte apoptosis and fatty degeneration. Interestingly, pretreatment of maltol effectively relieved alcohol-induced oxidative damage in a dose-dependent manner. Maltol appeared to possess promising anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory capacities. It was suggested that the hepatoprotective effect exhibited by maltol on alcohol-induced liver oxidative injury may be due to its potent antioxidant properties. PMID:25608939

  18. Ionizing radiation induced leakage current on ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpa, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Montera, F.; Ghibaudo, G.; Pananakakis, G.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1997-12-01

    MOS capacitors with a 4.4 nm thick gate oxide have been exposed to {gamma} radiation from a Co{sup 60} source. As a result, the authors have measured a stable leakage current at fields lower than those required for Fowler-Nordheim tunneling. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) is similar to the usual Stress Induced Leakage Currents (SILC) observed after electrical stresses of MOS devices. They have verified that these two currents share the same dependence on the oxide field, and the RILC contribution can be normalized to an equivalent injected charge for Constant Current Stresses. They have also considered the dependence of the RILC from the cumulative radiation dose, and from the applied bias during irradiation, suggesting a correlation between RILC and the distribution of trapped holes and neutral levels in the oxide layer.

  19. Hesperetin, a citrus flavonone, protects potentially cadmium induced oxidative testicular dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Shagirtha, Kalist; Pari, Leelavinothan

    2011-10-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the protective effect of hesperetin (Hp) on cadmium (Cd) induced oxidative testicular toxicity in rats. Subcutaneous administration of Cd (3mg/kg body weight) for 21 days significantly elevated the levels of oxidative stress markers, Cd concentration in testis and lowered the levels of enzymatic, non-enzymatic antioxidants and membrane bound enzymes in the testicular tissue. Hp administrated orally along with Cd injection for 21 days, significantly revert back the status of oxidative stress markers, Cd concentration in testis, improved status of antioxidant markers and membrane bound enzymes in the testis to near normal level. The histopathological studies in the testis of rats also supported that Hp (40 mg/kg) markedly reduced the toxicity of Cd and preserved the normal histoarchitecture pattern of the testis. Thus, the results suggest that Hp acts as a potent antioxidative agent against Cd induced testicular toxicity in rats. PMID:21719105

  20. Assessment of benzene induced oxidative impairment in rat isolated pancreatic islets and effect on insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Bahadar, Haji; Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Baeeri, Maryam; Rahimifard, Mahban; Navaei-Nigjeh, Mona; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2015-05-01

    Benzene (C6H6) is an organic compound used in petrochemicals and numerous other industries. It is abundantly released to our environment as a chemical pollutant causing widespread human exposure. This study mainly focused on benzene induced toxicity on rat pancreatic islets with respect to oxidative damage, insulin secretion and glucokinase (GK) activity. Benzene was dissolved in corn oil and administered orally at doses 200, 400 and 800mg/kg/day, for 4 weeks. In rats, benzene significantly raised the concentration of plasma insulin. Also the effect of benzene on the release of glucose-induced insulin was pronounced in isolated islets. Benzene caused oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, and also reduced the cell viability and total thiols groups, in the islets of exposed rats. In conclusion, the current study revealed that pancreatic glucose metabolism is susceptible to benzene toxicity and the resultant oxidative stress could lead to functional abnormalities in the pancreas.

  1. Oxidative stress response of Blakeslea trispora induced by H₂O₂ during β-carotene biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Bo; Luo, Jun; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Lu, Ming-Bo; Yu, Long-Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The cellular response of Blakeslea trispora to oxidative stress induced by H₂O₂ in shake flask culture was investigated in this study. A mild oxidative stress was created by adding 40 μm of H₂O₂ into the medium after 3 days of the fermentation. The production of β-carotene increased nearly 38 % after a 6-day culture. Under the oxidative stress induced by H₂O₂, the expressions of hmgr, ipi, carG, carRA, and carB involving the β-carotene biosynthetic pathway all increased in 3 h. The aerobic metabolism of glucose remarkably accelerated within 24 h. In addition, the specific activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly increased. These changes of B. trispora were responses for reducing cell injury, and the reasons for increasing β-carotene production caused by H₂O₂. PMID:24352432

  2. TIA1 oxidation inhibits stress granule assembly and sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Saito, Haruo; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) are multimolecular aggregates of stalled translation pre-initiation complexes that prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins, and that are formed in response to certain types of stress including ER stress. SG formation contributes to cell survival not only by suppressing translation but also by sequestering some apoptosis regulatory factors. Because cells can be exposed to various stresses simultaneously in vivo, the regulation of SG assembly under multiple stress conditions is important but unknown. Here we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 oxidize the SG-nucleating protein TIA1, thereby inhibiting SG assembly. Thus, when cells are confronted with a SG-inducing stress such as ER stress caused by protein misfolding, together with ROS-induced oxidative stress, they cannot form SGs, resulting in the promotion of apoptosis. We demonstrate that the suppression of SG formation by oxidative stress may underlie the neuronal cell death seen in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26738979

  3. Brassinosteroid Ameliorates Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles-Induced Oxidative Stress by Improving Antioxidant Potential and Redox Homeostasis in Tomato Seedling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqi; Ahammed, Golam J.; Li, Caixia; Bao, Xiao; Yu, Jingquan; Huang, Chunlei; Yin, Hanqin; Zhou, Jie

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades use of metal-based nanoparticles (MNPs) has been increased significantly that eventually contaminating agricultural land and limiting crop production worldwide. Moreover, contamination of food chain with MNPs has appeared as a matter of public concern due to risk of potential health hazard. Brassinosteroid has been shown to play a critical role in alleviating heavy metal stress; however, its function in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the potential role of 24-epibrassinolide (BR) in mitigating ZnO NPs-induced toxicity in tomato seedlings. Seedling growth, biomass production, and root activity gradually decreased, but Zn accumulation increased with increasing ZnO NPs concentration (10–100 mg/L) in growth media (½ MS). The augmentation of BR (5 nM) in media significantly ameliorated 50 mg/L ZnO NPs-induced growth inhibition. Visualization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and quantification of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in tomato roots confirmed that ZnO NPs induced an oxidative stress. However, combined treatment with BR and ZnO NPs remarkably reduced concentration of H2O2 and MDA as compared with ZnO NPs only treatment, indicating that BR supplementation substantially reduced oxidative stress. Furthermore, the activities of key antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase were increased by combined treatment of BR and ZnO NPs compared with ZnO NPs only treatment. BR also increased reduced glutathione (GSH), but decreased oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] and thus improved cellular redox homeostasis by increasing GSH:GSSG ratio. The changes in relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes such as Cu/Zn SOD, CAT1, GSH1, and GR1 were in accordance with the changes in those antioxidants under different treatments. More importantly, combined application of BR and ZnO NPs

  4. Autophagy Attenuates Noise-Induced Hearing Loss by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hu; Wang, Xianren; Hill, Kayla; Chen, Jun; Lemasters, John; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Reactive oxygen species play a dual role in mediating both cell stress and defense pathways. Here, we used pharmacological manipulations and siRNA silencing to investigate the relationship between autophagy and oxidative stress under conditions of noise-induced temporary, permanent, and severe permanent auditory threshold shifts (temporary threshold shift [TTS], permanent threshold shift [PTS], and severe PTS [sPTS], respectively) in adult CBA/J mice. Results: Levels of oxidative stress markers (4-hydroxynonenal [4-HNE] and 3-nitrotyrosine [3-NT]) increased in outer hair cells (OHCs) in a noise-dose-dependent manner, whereas levels of the autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 B (LC3B) were sharply elevated after TTS but rose only slightly in response to PTS and were unaltered by sPTS noise. Furthermore, green fluorescent protein (GFP) intensity increased in GFP-LC3 mice after TTS-noise exposure. Treatment with rapamycin, an autophagy activator, significantly increased LC3B expression, while diminishing 4-HNE and 3-NT levels, reducing noise-induced hair cell loss, and, subsequently, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In contrast, treatment with either the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA) or LC3B siRNA reduced LC3B expression, increased 3-NT and 4-HNE levels, and exacerbated TTS to PTS. Innovation: This study demonstrates a relationship between oxidative stress and autophagy in OHCs and reveals that autophagy is an intrinsic cellular process that protects against NIHL by attenuating oxidative stress. Conclusions: The results suggest that the lower levels of oxidative stress incurred by TTS-noise exposure induce autophagy, which promotes OHC survival. However, excessive oxidative stress under sPTS-noise conditions overwhelms the beneficial potential of autophagy in OHCs and leads to OHC death and NIHL. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1308–1324. PMID:25694169

  5. Zinc oxide nanoparticles induce eosinophilic airway inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Liang; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Hau-Inh; Liao, Huang-Shen; Chiang, Bor-Luen; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2015-10-30

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) have been widely used in industry. The metal composition of PM2.5 might contribute to the higher prevalence of asthma. To investigate the effects of ZnO NPs on allergic airway inflammation, mice were first exposed to different concentrations of ZnO NPs (0.1 mg/kg, 0.5 mg/kg) or to a combination of ZnO NPs and chicken egg ovalbumin (OVA) by oropharyngeal aspiration on day 0 and day 7 and then were sacrificed 5 days later. The subsequent time course of airway inflammation in the mice after ZnO NPs exposure was evaluated on days 1, 7, and 14. To further determine the role of zinc ions, ZnCl2 was also administered. The inflammatory cell count, cytokine levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung histopathology were examined. We found significant neutrophilia after exposure to high-dose ZnO NPs on day 1 and significant eosinophilia in the BALF at 7 days. However, the expression levels of the T helper 2 (Th2) cytokines IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 increased significantly after 24h of exposure to only ZnO NPs and then decreased gradually. These results suggested that ZnO NPs could cause eosinophilic airway inflammation in the absence of allergens.

  6. Natural Sesquiterpene Lactones Induce Oxidative Stress in Leishmania mexicana

    PubMed Central

    Barrera, Patricia; Sülsen, Valeria P.; Lozano, Esteban; Rivera, Mónica; Beer, María Florencia; Tonn, Carlos; Martino, Virginia S.; Sosa, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a worldwide parasitic disease, caused by monoflagellate parasites of the genus Leishmania. In the search for more effective agents against these parasites, the identification of molecular targets has been attempted to ensure the efficiency of drugs and to avoid collateral damages on the host's cells. In this work, we have investigated some of the mechanisms of action of a group of natural sesquiterpene lactones that are effective against Leishmania mexicana mexicana promastigotes. We first observed that the antiproliferative effect of mexicanin I (Mxc), dehydroleucodine (DhL), psilostachyin (Psi), and, at lesser extent, psilostachyin C (Psi C) is blocked by 1.5 mM reduced glutathione. The reducing agent was also able to reverse the early effect of the compounds, suggesting that lactones may react with intracellular sulfhydryl groups. Moreover, we have shown that all the sesquiterpene lactones, except Psi C, significantly decreased the endogenous concentration of glutathione within the parasite. Consistent with these findings, the active sesquiterpene lactones increased between 2.7 and 5.4 times the generation of ROS by parasites. These results indicate that the induction of oxidative stress is at least one of the mechanisms of action of DhL, Mxc, and Psi on parasites while Psi C would act by another mechanism. PMID:23861697

  7. Laser induced oxidation and optical properties of bismuth telluride nanoplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhipeng; Sucharitakul, Sukrit; Keiser, Courtney; Kidd, Tim E.; Gao, Xuan P. A.; He, Rui

    2015-03-01

    Bi-Te nanoplates (NPs) grown by low pressure vapor transport method were studied by Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). We find that the surface of relatively thick (more than tens of nanometers) Bi2Te3 NPs is oxidized in the air and forms a bump under heating with moderate laser power, as revealed by the emergence of Raman lines characteristic of Bi2O3 and TeO2 and characterization by AFM and EDS. Further increase of laser power burns holes on the surface of the NPs. Thin (thicknesses less than 20 nm) NPs with stoichiometry different from Bi2Te3 were also studied. Raman lines from non-stoichiometric NPs are different from those of stoichiometric ones. Thin NPs with the same thickness but different stoichiometries show different color contrast compared to the substrate in the optical image. This indicates that the optical absorption coefficient in thin Bi-Te NPs strongly depends on their stoichiometry. Controlling the stoichiometry in the Bi-Te NP growth is thus very important for their thermoelectric, electronic, and optical device applications. Supported by American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund (Grant 53401-UNI10), NSF (No. DMR-1206530, No. DMR-1410496, DMR-1151534), UNI Faculty Summer Fellowship and a UNI capacity building grant.

  8. Heat-induced formation of nitrogen oxides in water.

    PubMed

    Chernikov, Anatoly V; Bruskov, Vadim I; Gudkov, Sergey V

    2013-09-01

    It was found by the fluorimetric method using 2,3-diaminonaphthalene that moderate heating of water (60-80°C, for up to 4 h) leads to the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen with the formation of nitrite. The kinetic parameters of this process were determined. The energy of activation of [Formula: see text]formation was estimated to be 139 kJ/mol. It was found that the amount of nitrite formed depends on the concentration of dissolved oxygen and nitrogen. It was shown by two independent methods (Griess reagent/VCl3 and 2,3-diaminonaphthalene/nitrate reductase) that heating of water (80°C, 1 h) results in the formation of nitrate; with the use of the fluorescent probe dihydrorhodamine 123, the generation of nitrogen dioxide (peroxynitrite) was revealed. Nitrite, nitrate, and nitrogen dioxide are formed in water upon heating in approximately equal amounts. A scheme of reactions proceeding with bidistilled water by the action of heat with the formation of nitrogen oxides is proposed.

  9. Endothelial dysfunction and inflammation induced by iron oxide nanoparticle exposure: Risk factors for early atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mo-Tao; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yun; Yuan, Lan; Wang, Hua-Jian; Wang, Meng; Ouyang, Hong; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Feng, Wei-Yue; Zhao, Yu-Liang

    2011-06-10

    More recently, the correlation between exposure to nanoparticles and cardiovascular diseases is of particular concern in nanotoxicology related fields. Nanoparticle-triggered endothelial dysfunction is hypothesized to be a dominant mechanism in the development of the diseases. To test this hypothesis, iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe₂O₃ and Fe₃O₄), as two widely used nanomaterials and the main metallic components in particulate matter, were selected to assess their potential risks on human endothelial system. The direct effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and the possible effects mediated by monocyte (U937 cells) phagocytosis and activation were investigated. In the study, HAECs and U937 cells were exposed to 2, 20, 100 μg/mL of 22-nm-Fe₂O₃ and 43-nm-Fe₃O₄ particles. Our results indicate that cytoplasmic vacuolation, mitochondrial swelling and cell death were induced in HAEC. A significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production was induced which coincided with the elevation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in HAECs. Adhesion of monocytes to the HAECs was significantly enhanced as a consequence of the up-regulation of intracellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) expression, all of which are considered as early steps of atheroscelerosis. Phagocytosis and dissolution of nanoparticles by monocytes were found to simultaneously provoke oxidative stress and mediate severe endothelial toxicity. We conclude that intravascular iron oxide nanoparticles may induce endothelial system inflammation and dysfunction by three ways: (1) nanoparticles may escape from phagocytosis that interact directly with the endothelial monolayer; (2) nanoparticles are phagocytized by monocytes and then dissolved, thus impact the endothelial cells as free iron ions; or (3) nanoparticles are phagocytized by monocytes to provoke oxidative stress responses.

  10. Modulation of ischemia-induced NMDAR1 activation by environmental enrichment decreases oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Briones, Teresita L; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Woods, Julie

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we examined whether enriched environment (EE) housing has direct neuroprotective effects on oxidative damage following transient global cerebral ischemia. Fifty-two adult male Wistar rats were included in the study and received either ischemia or sham surgery. Once fully awake, rats in each group were randomly assigned to either: EE housing or socially paired housing (CON). Animals remained in their assigned environment for 7 days, and then were killed. Our data showed that glutamate receptor expression was significantly higher in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group than in the ischemia EE group. Furthermore, the oxidative DNA damage, protein oxidation, and neurodegeneration in the hippocampus of the ischemia CON group were significantly increased compared to the ischemia EE group. These results suggest that EE housing possibly modulated the ischemia-induced glutamate excitotoxicity, which then attenuated the oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in the ischemia EE rats.

  11. Generation of oxidative species from ultraviolet light induced photolysis of fructose.

    PubMed

    Elsinghorst, Aachen; Tikekar, Rohan V

    2014-07-01

    Fructose has shown significant reactivity during ultraviolet light (UV, 254nm) processing of fruit juices that can adversely affect product quality. The present study demonstrates that this reactivity of fructose is due to the oxidative nature of products formed from UV induced photolysis of fructose. This was accomplished using fluorescein, a fluorescent dye that loses fluorescence intensity upon reaction with oxidative species. Fructose caused a concentration dependent decay of fluorescence from fluorescein only in presence of UV, indicating oxidative nature of photolysis products of fructose. The transient oxidative species including free radicals and not one of the final photolysis products, furan, were responsible for fluorescence decay. Addition of an antioxidant and removal of oxygen from solution lowered the rate of fluorescence decay, suggesting strategies that can be employed to lower the deleterious effects of fructose on products. The understanding developed can be used to optimise UV processing of juices. PMID:24518343

  12. Oxidative stress response and morphological changes of Blakeslea trispora induced by butylated hydroxytoluene during carotene production.

    PubMed

    Nanou, Konstadina; Roukas, Triantafyllos

    2010-04-01

    The adaptive response of the fungus Blakeslea trispora to the oxidative stress induced by butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) during carotene production in shake flask culture was investigated. The culture response to oxidative stress was studied by measuring the specific activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and the micromorphology of the fungus using a computerized image analysis system. The addition of exogenous BHT to the medium caused changes of the morphology of microorganism from aggregates with large projected area to aggregates with small projected area. This morphological differentiation of the fungus was associated with high oxidative stress as evidenced by remarkable increase of the specific activities of CAT and SOD. The oxidative stress in B. trispora resulted in a fivefold increase of carotene production. The highest concentration of carotenes (125.0 mg/g dry biomass) was obtained in culture grown in medium supplemented with 20 mM of BHT.

  13. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L.; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B.

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  14. Nitric oxide mediates glial-induced neurodegeneration in Alexander disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liqun; Hagemann, Tracy L; Kalwa, Hermann; Michel, Thomas; Messing, Albee; Feany, Mel B

    2015-01-01

    Glia play critical roles in maintaining the structure and function of the nervous system; however, the specific contribution that astroglia make to neurodegeneration in human disease states remains largely undefined. Here we use Alexander disease, a serious degenerative neurological disorder caused by astrocyte dysfunction, to identify glial-derived NO as a signalling molecule triggering astrocyte-mediated neuronal degeneration. We further find that NO acts through cGMP signalling in neurons to promote cell death. Glial cells themselves also degenerate, via the DNA damage response and p53. Our findings thus define a specific mechanism for glial-induced non-cell autonomous neuronal cell death, and identify a potential therapeutic target for reducing cellular toxicity in Alexander disease, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders with glial dysfunction. PMID:26608817

  15. Strain-induced water dissociation on supported ultrathin oxide films

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhenjun; Fan, Jing; Xu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Controlling the dissociation of single water molecule on an insulating surface plays a crucial role in many catalytic reactions. In this work, we have identified the enhanced chemical reactivity of ultrathin MgO(100) films deposited on Mo(100) substrate that causes water dissociation. We reveal that the ability to split water on insulating surface closely depends on the lattice mismatch between ultrathin films and the underlying substrate, and substrate-induced in-plane tensile strain dramatically results in water dissociation on MgO(100). Three dissociative adsorption configurations of water with lower energy are predicted, and the structural transition going from molecular form to dissociative form is almost barrierless. Our results provide an effective avenue to achieve water dissociation at the single-molecule level and shed light on how to tune the chemical reactions of insulating surfaces by choosing the suitable substrates. PMID:26953105

  16. The smoking-associated oxidant hypothiocyanous acid induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Kwan, Jair; Suryo Rahmanto, Aldwin; Witting, Paul K; Davies, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Considerable evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme MPO (myeloperoxidase) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN (hypothiocyanous acid) formation. We hypothesized that this thiol-specific oxidant may target the Zn(2+)-thiol cluster of eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase), resulting in enzyme dysfunction and reduced formation of the critical signalling molecule NO•. Decreased NO• bioavailability is an early and critical event in atherogenesis, and HOSCN-mediated damage to eNOS may contribute to smoking-associated disease. In the present study it is shown that exposure of isolated eNOS to HOSCN or MPO/H2O2/SCN(-) decreased active dimeric eNOS levels, and increased inactive monomer and Zn(2+) release, compared with controls, HOCl (hypochlorous acid)- or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-treated samples. eNOS activity was increasingly compromised by MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-) concentrations. Exposure of HCAEC (human coronary artery endothelial cell) lysates to pre-formed HOSCN, or MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) with increasing SCN(-), increased eNOS monomerization and Zn(2+) release, and decreased activity. Intact HCAECs exposed to HOCl and HOSCN had decreased eNOS activity and NO2(-)/NO3(-) formation (products of NO• decomposition), and increased free Zn(2+). Exposure of isolated rat aortic rings to HOSCN resulted in thiol loss, and decreased eNOS activity and cGMP levels. Overall these data indicate that high SCN(-) levels, as seen in smokers, can increase HOSCN formation and enhance eNOS dysfunction in human endothelial cells, with this potentially contributing to increased atherogenesis in smokers. PMID:24112082

  17. DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidant enzymes and attenuates hypoxia/re-oxygenation-induced oxidative stress by activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu-Feng; Yang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Qiang; Chen, He-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Shan; Qiu, Ling-Yu; Liao, Zhang-Ping; Huang, Qi-Ren

    2015-09-01

    DJ-1 protein, as a multifunctional intracellular protein, has an important role in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidant stress. A recent study by our group showed that DJ-1 can regulate the expression of certain anti‑oxidant enzymes and attenuate hypoxia/re‑oxygenation (H/R)‑induced oxidative stress in the cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2; however, the detailed molecular mechanisms have remained to be elucidated. Nuclear factor erythroid 2‑like 2 (Nrf2) is an essential transcription factor that regulates the expression of several anti‑oxidant genes via binding to the anti‑oxidant response element (ARE). The present study investigated whether activation of the Nrf2 pathway is responsible for the induction of anti‑oxidative enzymes by DJ‑1 and contributes to the protective functions of DJ‑1 against H/R‑induced oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. The results demonstrated that DJ‑1‑overexpressing H9c2 cells exhibited anti‑oxidant enzymes, including manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, to a greater extent and were more resistant to H/R‑induced oxidative stress compared with native cells, whereas DJ‑1 knockdown suppressed the induction of these enzymes and further augmented the oxidative stress injury. Determination of the importance of Nrf2 in DJ‑1‑mediated anti‑oxidant enzymes induction and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R showed that overexpression of DJ‑1 promoted the dissociation of Nrf2 from its cytoplasmic inhibitor Keap1, resulting in enhanced levels of nuclear translocation, ARE‑binding and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Of note, Nrf2 knockdown abolished the DJ‑1‑mediated induction of anti‑oxidant enzymes and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R. In conclusion, these findings indicated that activation of the Nrf2 pathway is a critical mechanism by which DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidative enzymes and attenuates H/R-induced oxidative stress in H9c2

  18. Comparative study of protective activities of Neospora caninum bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1, NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, in a mouse model of acute parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masaki; Nagashima, Kotomi; Akatsuka, Yui; Murakami, Takashi; Ito, Akira; Imai, Soichi; Ike, Kazunori

    2013-02-01

    Neospora caninum is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite that causes severe neuromuscular diseases, repeated abortion, stillbirth, and congenital infection in livestock and companion animals. The development of an effective vaccine against neosporosis in cattle is an important issue due to the significant worldwide economic impact of this disease. We evaluated the immunogenicity of four bradyzoite antigens, NcBAG1 (first described in this study), NcBSR4, NcMAG1, and NcSAG4, using an acute infection mouse model to determine synergistic effects with the tachyzoite antigen as a candidate for vaccine production. Mice were inoculated with the recombinant vaccines (r-)NcBAG1, rNcBSR4, rNcMAG1, rNcSAG4, or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (adjuvant control group) in an oil-in-water emulsion with bitter gourd extract, a Th1 immune stimulator, or PBS alone as the infection control group. Mice inoculated with each vaccine developed antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies and isolated splenocytes from mice produced high levels of interferon-γ when infected with the N. caninum tachyzoite. The mice inoculated with rNcBAG1, rNcMAG1, or rNcSAG4 developed slight to moderate clinical symptoms but did not succumb to infection. In contrast, rNcBSR4 and both control groups developed severe disease and some mice required euthanasia. The parasitic burden in the brain tissues of vaccinated mice was assessed by N. caninum-specific real-time PCR at 5 weeks after infection. The parasite load in rNcBAG1-, rNcMAG1-, and rNcSAG4-inoculated mice was significantly lower than that in adjuvant and infection control mice. Therefore, these antigens may be useful for the production of a N. caninum-specific vaccination protocol.

  19. Protective Effect of Dimethyl Fumarate on an Oxidative Stress Model Induced by Sodium Nitroprusside in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kume, Toshiaki; Suenaga, Aya; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Akaike, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that dimethyl fumarate (DMF) prevents brain damage induced by intracerebral hemorrhage and this beneficial effect is mediated by the nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor-2-antioxidant response element (Nrf2-ARE) pathway. However, the downstream mechanism underlying the activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway is unclear. Here, we investigated the protective effect of DMF using an in vivo model of oxidative stress induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and rat primary striatal cultures. Oral administration of DMF prevented SNP-induced motor dysfunction. Pre-administration of DMF (60-200 mg/kg) for 24 h dose-dependently protected against brain damage induced by the striatal injection of SNP. Next, we investigated the protective effect and mechanism of DMF against oxidative stress using rat primary striatal cell cultures. Treatment of striatal cells with DMF (10 µM) markedly prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity. The protective effect of DMF against oxidative stress in vitro was inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin IX, an inhibitor of heme oxygenase-1, but not by buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis. These results suggest that the activation of heme oxygenase-1 plays an important role in the protective effect of DMF. PMID:27251510

  20. Geraniol attenuates 2-acetylaminofluorene induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the liver of wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Syed Kazim; Sultana, Sarwat

    2015-01-01

    2-Acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), is a well-known liver toxicant, generally used to induce tumors in laboratory animals. Geraniol (GE), a monoterpene found in essential oils of herbs and fruits, has been known to possess preventive efficacy against chemically induced toxicities. The present study was designed to analyze the protective effect of GE against 2-AAF induced oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperproliferation and apoptotic tissue damage in the liver of female Wistar rats. 2-AAF (0.02% w/w in diet) was administered and subjected to partial hepatectomy, as a mitogenic stimulus for the induction of hyperproliferation of liver tissue. GE was pre-treated orally at two different doses (100 and 200 mg/kg b.wt.) dissolved in corn oil. GE pre-treatment significantly ameliorated 2-AAF induced oxidative damage by diminishing tissue lipid peroxidation accompanied by the increase in enzymatic activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione content. The level of serum toxicity markers (AST, ALT, LDH) was found to be decreased. Pre-treatment with GE downregulated the expression of caspase-3,9, COX-2, NFkB, PCNA, iNOS, VEGF and significantly decreased disintegration of DNA. Histological findings further revealed that GE significantly restores the architecture of liver tissue. In the light of the above observations it may be concluded that GE may be used as preventive agent against 2-AAF induced oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperproliferation and apoptotic damage. PMID:26364502

  1. High temperature induces apoptosis and oxidative stress in pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus) blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chang-Hong; Yang, Fang-Fang; Liao, Shao-An; Miao, Yu-Tao; Ye, Chao-Xia; Wang, An-Li; Tan, Jia-Wen; Chen, Xiao-Yan

    2015-10-01

    Water temperature is an important environmental factor in aquaculture farming that affects the survival and growth of organisms. The change in culture water temperature may not only modify various chemical and biological processes but also affect the status of fish populations. In previous studies, high temperature induced apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the precise mechanism and the pathways that are activated in fish are still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the effects of high temperature (34°C) on the induction of apoptosis and oxidative stress in pufferfish (Takifugu obscurus) blood cells. The data showed that high temperature exposure increased oxygen species (ROS), cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) concentration and cell apoptosis. To test the apoptotic pathway, the expression pattern of some key apoptotic related genes including P53, Bax, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were examined. The results showed that acute high temperature stress induced up-regulation of these genes, suggesting that the p53-Bax pathway and the caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway could be involved in apoptosis induced by high temperature stress. Furthermore, the gene expression of antioxidant enzymes (Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR) and heat shock proteins (HSP90 and HSP70) in the blood cells were induced by high temperature stress. Taken together, our results showed that high temperature-induced oxidative stress may cause pufferfish blood cells apoptosis, and cooperatively activated p53-Bax and caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway.

  2. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate induces oxidative stress responses in human placental cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tetz, Lauren M.; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. - Highlights: ► MEHP increased reactive oxygen species, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase activity. ► MEHP induced expression of PTGS2, a gene

  3. Naringenin Alleviates Cadmium-Induced Toxicity through the Abrogation of Oxidative Stress in Swiss Albino Mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Avratanu; Roy, Amrita; Das, Ruma; Bhattacharya, Sanjib; Haldar, Pallab Kanti

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluates the protective potential of the flavonoid naringenin (NRG) against experimentally induced cadmium (Cd) toxicity in Swiss albino mice. NRG (4 and 8 mg/kg) was orally administered to mice 30 min before oral administration of CdCl2 (12 mg/kg) for 11 consecutive days. On the 12th day, we evaluated body and organ weights, hematological profiles, serum biochemical profiles, and hepatic and renal tissue antioxidative parameters including lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase. Cotreatment with NRG markedly and significantly normalized body and organ weights, hematological profiles, and serum biochemical profiles and significantly modulated all of the hepatic and renal tissue biochemical parameters in Cd-intoxicated mice. The present findings show that NRG possesses a remarkable alleviative effect against Cd-induced toxicity in albino mice, mediated by abrogation of Cd-induced oxidative stress by multiple mechanisms. PMID:27481493

  4. Transforming growth factor beta differentially modulates the inducible nitric oxide synthase gene in distinct cell types.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, R S; Herschman, H R

    1993-08-31

    Nitric oxide is a mediator of paracrine cell signalling. An inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in macrophages and in Swiss 3T3 cells. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) is a cytokine that modulates many cellular functions. We find that TGF-beta cannot induce iNOS mRNA expression, either in macrophage cell lines or in Swiss 3T3 cells. However, TGF-beta attenuates lipopolysaccharide induction of iNOS mRNA in macrophages. In contrast, TGF-beta enhances iNOS induction by phorbol ester, serum or lipopolysaccharide in 3T3 cells. Thus TGF-beta can inhibit or augment iNOS mRNA induction in response to primary inducers, depending on the cell type in question.

  5. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J; Stahl, Shannon S

    2014-11-13

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  6. Zinc oxide nanoparticle induced genotoxicity in primary human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vyom; Singh, Suman K; Anderson, Diana; Tobin, Desmond J; Dhawan, Alok

    2011-05-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used in cosmetics and sunscreens. Human epidermal keratinocytes may serve as the first portal of entry for these nanoparticles either directly through topically applied cosmetics or indirectly through any breaches in the skin integrity. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess the biological interactions of ZnO nanoparticles in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) as they are the most abundant cell type in the human epidermis. Cellular uptake of nanoparticles was investigated by scanning electron microscopy using back scattered electrons imaging as well as transmission electron microscopy. The electron microscopy revealed the internalization of ZnO nanoparticles in primary HEK after 6 h exposure at 14 microg/ml concentration. ZnO nanoparticles exhibited a time (6-24 h) as well as concentration (8-20 microg/ml) dependent inhibition of mitochondrial activity as evident by the MTT assay. A significant (p < 0.05) induction in DNA damage was observed in cells exposed to ZnO nanoparticles for 6 h at 8 and 14 microg/ml concentrations compared to control as evident in the Comet assay. This is the first study providing information on biological interactions of ZnO nanoparticles with primary human epidermal keratinocytes. Our findings demonstrate that ZnO nanoparticles are internalized by the human epidermal keratinocytes and elicit a cytotoxic and genotoxic response. Therefore, caution should be taken while using consumer products containing nanoparticles as any perturbation in the skin barrier could expose the underlying cells to nanoparticles.

  7. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  8. Effects of isoeugenol on oxidative stress pathways in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, F M; Sanders, R A; Watkins, J B

    2001-01-01

    Because some complications of diabetes mellitus may result from oxidative damage, we investigated the effects of subacute treatment (10mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal [ip], for 14 days) with the antioxidant isoeugenol on the oxidant defense system in normal and 30-day streptozotocin-induced diabetic Sprague-Dawley rats. Liver, kidney, brain, and heart were assayed for degree of lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione content, and activities of the free radical-detoxifying enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. All tissues from diabetic animals exhibited disturbances in antioxidant defense when compared with normal controls. Treatment with isoeugenol reversed diabetic effects on hepatic glutathione peroxidase activity and on oxidized glutathione concentration in brain. Treatment with the lipophilic compound isoeugenol also decreased lipid peroxidation in both liver and heart of normal animals and decreased hepatic oxidized glutathione content in both normal and diabetic rats. Some effects of isoeugenol treatment, such as decreased activity of hepatic superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase in diabetic rats, were unrelated to the oxidative effects of diabetes. In heart of diabetic animals, isoeugenol treatment resulted in an exacerbation of already elevated activities of catalase. These results indicate that isoeugenol therapy may not reverse diabetic oxidative stress in an overall sense.

  9. Oxidation Induced Doping of Nanoparticles Revealed by in Situ X-ray Absorption Studies.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon Gu; Chattopadhyay, Soma; Koo, Bonil; Dos Santos Claro, Paula Cecilia; Shibata, Tomohiro; Requejo, Félix G; Giovanetti, Lisandro J; Liu, Yuzi; Johnson, Christopher; Prakapenka, Vitali; Lee, Byeongdu; Shevchenko, Elena V

    2016-06-01

    Doping is a well-known approach to modulate the electronic and optical properties of nanoparticles (NPs). However, doping at nanoscale is still very challenging, and the reasons for that are not well understood. We studied the formation and doping process of iron and iron oxide NPs in real time by in situ synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study revealed that the mass flow of the iron triggered by oxidation is responsible for the internalization of the dopant (molybdenum) adsorbed at the surface of the host iron NPs. The oxidation induced doping allows controlling the doping levels by varying the amount of dopant precursor. Our in situ studies also revealed that the dopant precursor substantially changes the reaction kinetics of formation of iron and iron oxide NPs. Thus, in the presence of dopant precursor we observed significantly faster decomposition rate of iron precursors and substantially higher stability of iron NPs against oxidation. The same doping mechanism and higher stability of host metal NPs against oxidation was observed for cobalt-based systems. Since the internalization of the adsorbed dopant at the surface of the host NPs is driven by the mass transport of the host, this mechanism can be potentially applied to introduce dopants into different oxidized forms of metal and metal alloy NPs providing the extra degree of compositional control in material design. PMID:27152970

  10. Effects of pH on nicotine-induced DNA damage and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Ju; Chi, Chin-Wen; Liu, Tsung-Yun

    2005-09-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that chewing betel quid and smoking have synergistic potential in the development of oral squamous-cell carcinoma in Taiwan. Chewing betel quid produces alkalization of saliva. This study investigated the response of human oral cancer OEC-M1 cells to nicotine in different pH environments (6.5 and 8) by examining its effects on DNA damage as evidenced by single-cell gel electrophoresis. Nicotine (1 and 10 muM) significantly induced DNA strand breakage when cultured at pH 8 for 6 h but did not induce DNA damage at pH 6.5. Nicotine-induced DNA damage was also time dependent. When cells were pretreated with catalase or N-acetylcysteine, a significant reduction in nicotine-induced DNA damage was observed. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the production of 8-oxoguanine was significantly increased following nicotine (10 muM) treatment. Posttreatment of nicotine-damaged DNA by endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase, recognizing oxidized DNA bases, increased the extent of DNA damage. These results suggest that nicotine-induced DNA strand breakage is pH dependent, and oxidative stress might be involved in nicotine-induced DNA damage. Finally, cigarette smoke condensate (equivalent to 8 muM nicotine) induced significant DNA strand breaks in OEC-M1 cells at pH 8 and correlated with the generation of oxidative DNA damage. Thus, alkaline saliva generated by chewing betel quid plays an important role in cigarette-related nicotine-induced DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species may be involved in generating this DNA damage. PMID:16076763

  11. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The potential mechanisms of action of ozone therapy are reviewed in this paper. The therapeutic efficacy of ozone therapy may be partly due the controlled and moderate oxidative stress produced by the reactions of ozone with several biological components. The line between effectiveness and toxicity of ozone may be dependent on the strength of the oxidative stress. As with exercise, it is well known that moderate exercise is good for health, whereas excessive exercise is not. Severe oxidative stress activates nuclear transcriptional factor kappa B (NFκB), resulting in an inflammatory response and tissue injury via the production of COX2, PGE2, and cytokines. However, moderate oxidative stress activates another nuclear transcriptional factor, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Nrf2 then induces the transcription of antioxidant response elements (ARE). Transcription of ARE results in the production of numerous antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, GPx, glutathione-s-transferase(GSTr), catalase (CAT), heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), NADPH-quinone-oxidoreductase (NQO-1), phase II enzymes of drug metabolism and heat shock proteins (HSP). Both free antioxidants and anti-oxidative enzymes not only protect cells from oxidation and inflammation but they may be able to reverse the chronic oxidative stress. Based on these observations, ozone therapy may also activate Nrf2 via moderate oxidative stress, and suppress NFκB and inflammatory responses. Furthermore, activation of Nrf2 results in protection against neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Mild immune responses are induced via other nuclear transcriptional factors, such as nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activated protein-1 (AP-1). Additionally, the effectiveness of ozone therapy in vascular diseases may also be explained by the activation of another nuclear transcriptional factor, hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1a), which is also induced via moderate

  12. Tocopherols inhibit oxidative and nitrosative stress in estrogen-induced early mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Soumyasri; So, Jae Young; Wall, Brian; Wahler, Joseph; Smolarek, Amanda K; Sae-Tan, Sudathip; Soewono, Kelvin Y; Yu, Haixiang; Lee, Mao-Jung; Thomas, Paul E; Yang, Chung S; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a key role in estrogen-induced breast cancer. This study assessed the chemopreventive activity of the naturally occurring γ-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT) in early stages of estrogen-induced mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats. ACI rats provide an established model of rodent mammary carcinogenesis due to their high sensitivity to estrogen. Female rats were implanted with 9 mg of 17β-estradiol (E2) in silastic tubings and fed with control or 0.3% γ-TmT diet for 1, 3, 7, and 14 d. γ-TmT increased the levels of tocopherols and their metabolites in the serum and mammary glands of the rats. Histological analysis revealed mammary hyperplasia in the E2 treated rats fed with control or γ-TmT diet. γ-TmT decreased the levels of E2-induced nitrosative and oxidative stress markers, nitrotyrosine, and 8-oxo-dG, respectively, in the hyperplastic mammary tissues. 8-Isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress in the serum, was also reduced by γ-TmT. Noticeably, γ-TmT stimulated Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in the mammary glands of E2 treated rats, evident from the induced mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Therefore, inhibition of nitrosative/oxidative stress through induction of antioxidant response is the primary effect of γ-TmT in early stages of E2-induced mammary hyperplasia. Due to its cytoprotective activity, γ-TmT could be a potential natural agent for the chemoprevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer.

  13. Hesperidin alleviates acetaminophen induced toxicity in Wistar rats by abrogation of oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shiekh Tanveer; Arjumand, Wani; Nafees, Sana; Seth, Amlesh; Ali, Nemat; Rashid, Summya; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-01-25

    Acetaminophen (APAP) is a widely used analgesic and antipyretic drug, but at high dose it leads to undesirable side effects, such as hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. The present study demonstrates the comparative hepatoprotective and nephroprotective activity of hesperidin (HD), a naturally occurring bioflavonoid against APAP induced toxicity. APAP induces hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity as was evident by abnormal deviation in the levels of antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, APAP induced renal damage by inducing apoptotic death and inflammation in renal tubular cells, manifested by an increase in the expression of caspase-3, caspase-9, NFkB, iNOS, Kim-1 and decrease in Bcl-2 expression. These results were further supported by the histopathological examination of kidney. All these features of APAP toxicity were reversed by the co-administration of HD. Therefore, our study favors the view that HD may be a useful modulator in alleviating APAP induced oxidative stress and toxicity.

  14. Chemotherapy-Induced Cardiotoxicity: Overview of the Roles of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Angsutararux, Paweorn; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Issaragrisil, Surapol

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity is a serious complication that poses a serious threat to life and limits the clinical use of various chemotherapeutic agents, particularly the anthracyclines. Understanding molecular mechanisms of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity is a key to effective preventive strategies and improved chemotherapy regimen. Although no reliable and effective preventive treatment has become available, numerous evidence demonstrates that chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This review provides an overview of the roles of oxidative stress in chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity using doxorubicin, which is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents against a wide range of cancers, as an example. Current understanding in the molecular mechanisms of ROS-mediated cardiotoxicity will be explored and discussed, with emphasis on cardiomyocyte apoptosis leading to cardiomyopathy. The review will conclude with perspectives on model development needed to facilitate further progress and understanding on chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:26491536

  15. The effect of HDL-bound and free PON1 on copper-induced LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Ahmet; Bayrak, Tülin; Bodur, Ebru; Kılınç, Kamer; Demirpençe, Ediz

    2016-09-25

    Oxidative modification of LDL plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. High-density lipoprotein (HDL) confers protection against atherosclerosis and the antioxidative properties of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been suggested to contribute to this effect of HDL. The PON1 exist in two major polymorphic forms (Q and R), which regulate the concentration and activity of the enzyme and alter its ability to prevent lipid oxidation. However, the association of Q192R polymorphism with PON1's capacity to protect against LDL lipoperoxidation is controversial. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the purified PON1 Q192R and the partially purified HDL-bound PON1 Q192R isoenzymes (HDL-PON1 Q192R) on LDL oxidation, with respect to their arylesterase/homocysteine thiolactonase (HTLase) activities. Cupric ion-induced LDL oxidation was reduced up to 48% by purified PON1 Q192, but only 33% by an equivalent activity of PON1 R192. HDL-PON1 Q192 isoenzyme caused a 65% reduction, whereas HDL-PON1 R192 isoenzyme caused only 46% reduction in copper ion-induced LDL oxidation. These findings reflect the fact that PON1 Q and PON1 R allozymes may have different protective characteristics against LDL oxidation. The protection against LDL oxidation provided by HDL-PON1 Q192R isoenzymes is more prominent than the purified soluble enzymes. Inhibition of the Ca(+2)-dependent PON1 Q192R arylesterase/HTLase by the metal chelator EDTA, did not alter PON1's ability to inhibit LDL oxidation. These studies indicate that the active site involvement of the purified enzyme is not similar to the HDL-bound one, in terms of both PON1 arylesterase/HTLase activity and the protection of LDL from copper ion-induced oxidation. Moreover, PON1's ability to protect LDL from oxidation does not seem to require calcium. PMID:27510818

  16. Copper induced oxidative stress in tea (Camellia sinensis) leaves.

    PubMed

    Saha, D; Mandal, S; Saha, A

    2012-09-01

    the leaves resulting in significant lipid peroxidation. Tea plants try to mitigate this oxidative damage through accumulation of phenolic compounds and induction of antioxidant enzymes.

  17. Cannabidiol protects liver from binge alcohol-induced steatosis by mechanisms including inhibition of oxidative stress and increase in autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lili; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Wu, Defeng; Devi, Lakshmi A; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Cederbaum, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Acute alcohol drinking induces steatosis, and effective prevention of steatosis can protect liver from progressive damage caused by alcohol. Increased oxidative stress has been reported as one mechanism underlying alcohol-induced steatosis. We evaluated whether cannabidiol, which has been reported to function as an antioxidant, can protect the liver from alcohol-generated oxidative stress-induced steatosis. Cannabidiol can prevent acute alcohol-induced liver steatosis in mice, possibly by preventing the increase in oxidative stress and the activation of the JNK MAPK pathway. Cannabidiol per se can increase autophagy both in CYP2E1-expressing HepG2 cells and in mouse liver. Importantly, cannabidiol can prevent the decrease in autophagy induced by alcohol. In conclusion, these results show that cannabidiol protects mouse liver from acute alcohol-induced steatosis through multiple mechanisms including attenuation of alcohol-mediated oxidative stress, prevention of JNK MAPK activation, and increasing autophagy.

  18. Contribution of radiation-induced, nitric oxide-mediated bystander effect to radiation-induced adaptive response.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, H.; Ohnishi, T.

    There has been a recent upsurge of interest in radiation-induced adaptive response and bystander effect which are specific modes in stress response to low-dose low-dose rate radiation Recently we found that the accumulation of inducible nitric oxide NO synthase iNOS in wt p53 cells was induced by chronic irradiation with gamma rays followed by acute irradiation with X-rays but not by each one resulting in an increase in nitrite concentrations of medium It is suggested that the accumulation of iNOS may be due to the depression of acute irradiation-induced p53 functions by pre-chronic irradiation In addition we found that the radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells against acute irradiation with X-rays was reduced after chronic irradiation with gamma rays This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells was nearly completely suppressed by the addition of NO scavenger carboxy-PTIO to the medium This reduction of radiosensitivity of wt p53 cells is just radiation-induced adaptive response suggesting that NO-mediated bystander effect may considerably contribute to adaptive response induced by radiation

  19. Involvement of inducible nitric oxide synthase in hydroxyl radical-mediated lipid peroxidation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Krisztian; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Dallas, Shannon; Jiang, JinJie; Radi, Rafael; Mason, Ronald P.; Kadiiska, Maria B.

    2008-01-01

    Free radical production is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus, where several pathways and different mechanisms were suggested in the pathophysiology of the complications. In this study, we used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy combined with in vivo spin-trapping techniques to investigate the sources and mechanisms of free radical formation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Free radical production was directly detected in the diabetic bile, which correlated with lipid peroxidation in the liver and kidney. EPR spectra showed the trapping of a lipid-derived radical. Such radicals were demonstrated to be induced by hydroxyl radical through isotope labeling experiments. Multiple enzymes and metabolic pathways were examined as the potential source of the hydroxyl radicals using specific inhibitors. Neither xanthine oxidase, cytochrome P450s, the Fenton reaction, nor macrophage activation were required for the production of radical adducts. Interestingly, inducible nitric oxide synthase (apparently uncoupled) was identified as the major source of radical generation. The specific iNOS inhibitor 1400W as well as l-arginine pretreatment reduced the EPR signals to baseline levels, implicating peroxynitrite as the source of hydroxyl radical production. Applying immunological techniques, we localized iNOS overexpression in the liver and kidney of diabetic animals, which was closely correlated with the lipid radical generation and 4-hydroxynonenal-adducted protein formation, indicating lipid peroxidation. In addition, protein oxidation to protein free radicals occurred in the diabetic target organs. Taken together, our studies support inducible nitric oxide synthase as a significant source of EPR-detectable reactive intermediates, which leads to lipid peroxidation and may contribute to disease progression as well. PMID:18620046

  20. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells' molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  1. Salidroside Improves Homocysteine-Induced Endothelial Dysfunction by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Sin Bond; Zhang, Huina; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Lin, Zhixiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases through increased oxidative stress. Salidroside is an active ingredient of the root of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative, antihypoxia and neuroprotective properties. However, the vascular benefits of salidroside against endothelial dysfunction have yet to be explored. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the protective effect of salidroside on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. Functional studies on the rat aortas were performed to delineate the vascular effect of salidroside. DHE imaging was used to evaluate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in aortic wall and endothelial cells. Western blotting was performed to assess the protein expression associated with oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Exposure to homocysteine attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortas while salidroside pretreatment rescued it. Salidroside inhibited homocystein-induced elevation in the NOX2 expression and ROS overproduction in both aortas and cultured endothelial cells and increased phosphorylation of eNOS which was diminished by homocysteine. The present study shows that salidroside is effective in preserving the NO bioavailability and thus protects against homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, largely through inhibiting the NOX2 expression and ROS production. Our results indicate a therapeutic potential of salidroside in the management of oxidative-stress-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:23589720

  2. Coumestan inhibits radical-induced oxidation of DNA: is hydroxyl a necessary functional group?

    PubMed

    Xi, Gao-Lei; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2014-06-18

    Coumestan is a natural tetracycle with a C═C bond shared by a coumarin moiety and a benzofuran moiety. In addition to the function of the hydroxyl group on the antioxidant activity of coumestan, it is worth exploring the influence of the oxygen-abundant scaffold on the antioxidant activity as well. In this work, seven coumestans containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups were synthesized to evaluate the abilities to trap 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) cationic radical (ABTS(•+)), 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), and galvinoxyl radical, respectively, and to inhibit the oxidations of DNA mediated by (•)OH, Cu(2+)/glutathione (GSH), and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH), respectively. It was found that all of the coumestans used herein can quench the aforementioned radicals and can inhibit (•)OH-, Cu(2+)/GSH-, and AAPH-induced oxidations of DNA. In particular, substituent-free coumestan exhibits higher ability to quench DPPH and to inhibit AAPH-induced oxidation of DNA than Trolox. In addition, nonsubstituted coumestan shows a similar ability to inhibit (•)OH- and Cu(2+)/GSH-induced oxidations of DNA relative to that of Trolox. The antioxidant effectiveness of the coumestan can be attributed to the lactone in the coumarin moiety and, therefore, a hydroxyl group may not be a necessary functional group for coumestan to be an antioxidant.

  3. Protective effects of gallic acid against spinal cord injury-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong Hong; Wang, Zao; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Ran

    2015-08-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of gallic acid in oxidative stress induced during spinal cord injury (SCI). In order to measure oxidative stress, the levels of lipid peroxide, protein carbonyl, reactive oxygen species and nitrates/nitrites were determined. In addition, the antioxidant status during SCI injury and the protective role of gallic acid were investigated by determining glutathione levels as well as the activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase. Adenosine triphophatase (ATPase) enzyme activities were determined to evaluate the role of gallic acid in SCI-induced deregulation of the activity of enzymes involved in ion homeostasis. The levels of inflammatory markers such as nuclear factor (NF)-κB and cycloxygenase (COX)-2 were determined by western blot analysis. Treatment with gallic acid was observed to significantly mitigate SCI-induced oxidative stress and the inflammatory response by reducing the oxidative stress, decreasing the expression of NF-κB and COX-2 as well as increasing the antioxidant status of cells. In addition, gallic acid modulated the activity of ATPase enzymes. Thus the present study indicated that gallic acid may have a role as a potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent against SCI.

  4. Salidroside improves homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction by reducing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Leung, Sin Bond; Zhang, Huina; Lau, Chi Wai; Huang, Yu; Lin, Zhixiu

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases through increased oxidative stress. Salidroside is an active ingredient of the root of Rhodiola rosea with documented antioxidative, antihypoxia and neuroprotective properties. However, the vascular benefits of salidroside against endothelial dysfunction have yet to be explored. The present study, therefore, aimed to investigate the protective effect of salidroside on homocysteine-induced endothelial dysfunction. Functional studies on the rat aortas were performed to delineate the vascular effect of salidroside. DHE imaging was used to evaluate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in aortic wall and endothelial cells. Western blotting was performed to assess the protein expression associated with oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Exposure to homocysteine attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations in rat aortas while salidroside pretreatment rescued it. Salidroside inhibited homocystein-induced elevation in the NOX2 expression and ROS overproduction in both aortas and cultured endothelial cells and increased phosphorylation of eNOS which was diminished by homocysteine. The present study shows that salidroside is effective in preserving the NO bioavailability and thus protects against homocysteine-induced impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxations, largely through inhibiting the NOX2 expression and ROS production. Our results indicate a therapeutic potential of salidroside in the management of oxidative-stress-associated cardiovascular dysfunction. PMID:23589720

  5. Oxidative Stress Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and a Protective Unfolded Protein Response in RPE cells

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Marisol; Wang, Lei; Wan, Jun; Barnett, Bradley P.; Ebrahimi, Katayoon; Qian, Jiang; Handa, James T.

    2014-01-01

    How cells degenerate from oxidative stress in aging-related disease is incompletely understood. The study’s intent was to identify key cytoprotective pathways activated by oxidative stress, and determine the extent of their protection. Using an unbiased strategy with microarray analysis, retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells treated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) had over-represented genes involved in the antioxidant and unfolded protein response (UPR). Differentially expressed antioxidant genes were predominantly located in the cytoplasm, with no induction of genes that neutralize superoxide and H2O2 in the mitochondria, resulting in accumulation of superoxide and decreased ATP production. Simultaneously, CSE induced the UPR sensors IRE1α, p-PERK, and ATP6, including CHOP, which was cytoprotective because CHOP knockdown decreased cell viability. In mice given intravitreal CSE, the RPE had increased IRE1α and decreased ATP, and developed epithelial-mesenchymal transition, as suggested by decreased LRAT abundance, altered ZO1 immunolabeling, and dysmorphic cell shape. Mildly degenerated RPE from early AMD samples had prominent IRE1α, but minimal mitochondrial TOM20 immunolabeling. While oxidative stress is thought to induce an antioxidant response with cooperation between the mitochondria and ER, herein, we show that mitochondria become impaired sufficiently to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition despite a protective UPR. With similar responses in early AMD samples, these results suggest that mitochondria are vulnerable to oxidative stress despite a protective UPR during early phases of aging-related disease. PMID:24434119

  6. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  7. Protective Effects of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. on Gentamicin-induced Oxidative Stress and Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Changgeun; Lee, Hyungkyoung; Hah, Do-Yun; Heo, Jung Ho; Kim, Chung Hui; Kim, Euikyung; Kim, Jong Shu

    2013-03-01

    Development of a therapy providing protection from, or reversing gentamicin-sulfate (GS)-induced oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity would be of great clinical significance. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HC) against gentamicin sulfate-induced renal damage in rats. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 equal groups as follows: group 1, control; group 2, GS 100 mg/kg/d, intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection; group 3, GS 100 mg/kg/d, i.p. + HC 500 mg/kg/d, oral; and group 4, GS 100 mg/kg/d i.p. + HC 1000 mg/kg/d, oral administration). Treatments were administered once daily for 12 d. After 12 d, biochemical and histopathological analyses were conducted to evaluate oxidative stress and renal nephrotoxicity. Serum levels of creatinine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN), together with renal levels of MDA, glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were quantified to evaluate antioxidant activity. Animals treated with GS alone showed a significant increase in serum levels of creatinine, BUN, and MDA, with decreased renal levels of GSH, SOD, and CAT. Treatment of rats with HC showed significant improvement in renal function, presumably as a result of decreased biochemical indices and oxidative stress parameters associated with GS-induced nephrotoxicity. Histopathological examination of the rat kidneys confirmed these observations. Therefore, the novel natural antioxidant HC may protect against GSinduced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. PMID:24278630

  8. Boron attenuates malathion-induced oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rats.

    PubMed

    Coban, Funda Karabag; Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Demirel, Hasan Huseyin; Hazman, Omer

    2015-10-01

    Organophosphorus compounds cause oxidative stress and lead to alterations in antioxidant status in organisms. In this study, the effects of subchronic exposure to malathion and the protective effects of boron (B) were evaluated in 48 Wistar rats, which were divided equally into six groups. For 28 d, the control group received a normal diet and tap water, the corn oil group received a normal diet and 0.5 mL of corn oil by gastric gavage and the malathion group received a normal diet and malathion (100 mg/kg/d) by gastric gavage. During the same period, each of the three other groups received a different dosage of B (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg/d, respectively) and malathion (100 mg/kg/d) by gastric gavage. Malathion administration during the period increased malondialdehyde, nitric oxide and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels, as well as markers of liver function, yet decreased acetylcholinesterase, reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase activities in blood, liver, kidney and brain tissues. Administration of B in a dose-dependent manner also reversed malathion-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and antioxidant enzyme activity. Moreover, B exhibited protective action against malathion-induced histopathological changes in liver, kidney and brain tissues. These results demonstrate that, if used in a dose-dependent manner, B decreases malathion-induced oxidative stress, enhances the antioxidant defense mechanism and regenerates tissues in rats.

  9. Piroxicam attenuates 3-nitropropionic acid-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice.

    PubMed

    C, Jadiswami; H M, Megha; Dhadde, Shivsharan B; Durg, Sharanbasappa; Potadar, Pandharinath P; B S, Thippeswamy; V P, Veerapur

    2014-12-01

    3-Nitropropionic acid (3-NP) is a fungal toxin that produces Huntington's disease like symptoms in both animals and humans. Piroxicam, a non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor, used as anti-inflammatory agent and also known to decrease free oxygen radical production. In this study, the effect of piroxicam was evaluated against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration in mice. Adult male Swiss albino mice were injected with vehicle/piroxicam (10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before 3-NP challenge (15 mg/kg, i.p.) regularly for 14 days. Body weights of the mice were measured on alternative days of the experiment. At the end of the treatment schedule, mice were evaluated for behavioral alterations (movement analysis, locomotor test, beam walking test and hanging wire test) and brain homogenates were used for the estimation of oxidative stress markers (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione and catalase). Administration of 3-NP significantly altered the behavioral activities and brain antioxidant status in mice. Piroxicam, at both the tested doses, caused a significant reversal of 3-NP-induced behavioral alterations and oxidative stress in mice. These findings suggest piroxicam protects the mice against 3-NP-induced brain oxidative stress and behavioral alteration. The antioxidant properties of piroxicam may be responsible for the observed beneficial actions. PMID:25191831

  10. Oxidative stress and brain mitochondria swelling induced by endosulfan and protective role of quercetin in rat.

    PubMed

    Lakroun, Zhoura; Kebieche, Mohamed; Lahouel, Asma; Zama, Djamila; Desor, Frederique; Soulimani, Rachid

    2015-05-01

    The neurological damages resulted by endosulfan poisoning is not completely elucidated, especially in cellular organelles such as mitochondria. In the present study, the pro-oxidant effect of endosulfan on brain mitochondria was first investigated. Gavages of endosulfan into rats at the dose of 2 mg/kg induced oxidative stress in this organelle since it provokes a significant reduction of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione (GSH) level. In addition, a significant increase in mitochondria swelling and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were observed in neuronal mitochondria, indicating clearly an intense peroxidation within mitochondria. Second, the protective effect of quercetin (QE) (10 mg/kg) against endosulfan-induced oxidative stress in mitochondria was also assessed. Indeed, the pretreatment of rats with QE protects brain mitochondria from oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and mitochondria swelling induced by endosulfan. The activities of antioxidant enzymes and the mitochondrial content of GSH and MDA were returned to control values. Thus, although endosulfan can have neurotoxic effects in brain rats, this toxicity can be prevented by quercetin.

  11. Citrus peel extract attenuates acute cyanide poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E

    2014-01-01

    The primary aimed of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of methanolic extract of citrus peel (MECP) on acute cyanide (KCN) poisoning-induced seizures and oxidative stress in rats. The intraperitoneal LD50 value of KCN (6.3 mg/Kg bwt), based on 24 hrs mortality, was significantly increased by 9, 52 or 113% by oral administration of MECP (500 mg/Kg bwt) pre-administered for 1, 2 and 3 days, respectively, in rats in a time-dependent manner. Intraperitoneal injection of the sublethal dose of KCN (3 mg/Kg bwt) into rats increased, 24 hrs later, lipid peroxidation (LPO), nitric oxide (NO), glutamate levels and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex. KCN also decreased brain glutathione (GSH) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities in these animals. Pre-treatment of rats with MECP inhibited KCN-induced increases in LPO, NO, and glutamate levels and AChE activity as well as decreases in brain GSH level and SOD and CAT activities. In addition, KCN significantly decreased norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin levels in different brain regions which were resolved by MECP. From the present results, it can be concluded that the neuroprotective effects of MECP against KCN-induced seizures and oxidative stress may be due to the inhibition of oxidative stress overproduction and maintenance of antioxidant defense mechanisms.

  12. Possible effects of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Alevtina; Koc, Emine Rabia; Sahin, Semsettin; Duzgun, Ulkuhan; Acar, Burcu; Ilhan, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    The problem of noise has recently gained more attention as it has become an integral part of our daily lives. However, its influence has yet to be fully elucidated. Other than being an unpleasant stimulus, noise may cause health disorders through annoyance and stress, including oxidative stress. Rosuvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, may possess antioxidant properties. Based on rat models, our project investigates the effect of rosuvastatin on noise-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Thirty-two male Wistar albino rats were used. The rats were divided into four groups: Noise exposure plus rosuvastatin usage, only noise exposure, only rosuvastatin usage, and control. After the data had been collected, oxidant and antioxidant parameters were analyzed in the cerebral cortex, brain stem, and cerebellum. Results indicated that superoxide dismutase values were significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex, while malondialdehyde values in the brainstem and cerebellum were significantly increased in the group with only noise exposure. Superoxide dismutase values in the brainstem were significantly increased, but nitric oxide values in the cerebellum and brainstem and malondialdehyde values in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex were significantly decreased in the group where only rosuvastatin was used. During noise exposure, the use of rosuvastatin caused significantly increased superoxide dismutase values in the cerebral cortex and brainstem, but significantly reduced malondialdehyde values in the brain stem. Consequently, our data show that brain tissue was affected by oxidative stress due to continued exposure to noise. This noise-induced stress decreases with rosuvastatin therapy.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Induced Oxidative Imbalance in Neutrophils: Possible Protective Role of Nanoconjugated Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infection causes oxidative stress in neutrophils. The immune cells use reactive oxygen species (ROS) for carrying out their normal functions while an excess amount of ROS can attack cellular components that lead to cell damage. The present study was aimed to test the protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against vancomycin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA) and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infection induced oxidative stress in neutrophils. VSSA- and VRSA-infection were developed in Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection of 5 × 106 CFU/mL bacterial solutions. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was treated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at its effective dose for 10 days. Vancomycin was treated to VSSA and VRSA infected mice at similar dose, respectively, for 10 days. The result reveals that in vivo VSSA and VRSA infection significantly increases the level of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, oxidized glutathione level, and nitrite generation and decreases the level of reduced glutathione, antioxidant enzyme status, and glutathione-dependent enzymes as compared to control group; which were increased or decreased significantly near to normal in nanoconjugated vancomycin-treated group. These finding suggests the potential use and beneficial protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against VSSA and VRSA infection induced oxidative imbalance in neutrophils. PMID:22530141

  14. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice.

  15. Chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein acetylation and oxidative stress in the kidney

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter S.; Roy, Samantha R.; Coughlan, Christina; Orlicky, David J.; Liang, Yongliang; Shearn, Colin T.; Roede, James R.; Fritz, Kristofer S.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present the novel findings that chronic ethanol consumption induces mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation in the kidney and correlates with significantly increased renal oxidative stress. A major proteomic footprint of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is an increase in hepatic mitochondrial protein acetylation. Protein hyperacetylation has been shown to alter enzymatic function of numerous proteins and plays a role in regulating metabolic processes. Renal mitochondrial targets of hyperacetylation include numerous metabolic and antioxidant pathways, such as lipid metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, and amino acid metabolism, as well as glutathione and thioredoxin pathways. Disruption of protein lysine acetylation has the potential to impair renal function through metabolic dysregulation and decreased antioxidant capacity. Due to a significant elevation in ethanol-mediated renal oxidative stress, we highlight the acetylation of superoxide dismutase, peroxiredoxins, glutathione reductase, and glutathione transferase enzymes. Since oxidative stress is a known factor in ethanol-induced nephrotoxicity, we examined biochemical markers of protein hyperacetylation and oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate increased protein acetylation concurrent with depleted glutathione, altered Cys redox potential, and the presence of 4-HNE protein modifications in our 6-week model of early-stage alcoholic nephrotoxicity. These findings support the hypothesis that ethanol metabolism causes an influx of mitochondrial metabolic substrate, resulting in mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation with the potential to impact mitochondrial metabolic and antioxidant processes. PMID:26177469

  16. Oxidative damage induced by copper in mouse primary hepatocytes by single-cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Jing, Mingyang; Liu, Yang; Song, Wei; Yan, Yunxing; Yan, Wenbao; Liu, Rutao

    2016-01-01

    Copper can disturb the intracellular redox balance, induce oxidative stress, and subsequently cause irreversible damage, leading to a variety of diseases. In the present study, mouse primary hepatocytes were chosen to elucidate the in vitro oxidative damage of short-term copper exposure (10-200 μM) by single-cell analysis. We evaluated the toxicity of copper by reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH), and oxidative DNA damage at the single-cell level. Oxidative damage induced by copper was verified by the morphological changes, persistent elevations of excessive ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA), a decrease in GSH level, and the oxidative DNA damage. Furthermore, the average ROS generation, GSH consumption, and the indicators in DNA damage did not significantly change at relatively low concentrations (10 or 50 μM), but we can find the alterations of parameters in some single cells clearly. Emphasis on the analysis of single cells is conducive to gain a better understanding on the toxicity of copper. This study will also complement studies on the environmental risk assessment of copper pollution.

  17. Hepatoprotective and anti-oxidant activities of Glossogyne tenuifolia against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Tien, Yu-Hsiu; Chen, Bing-Huei; Wang Hsu, Guoo-Shyng; Lin, Wan-Teng; Huang, Jui-Hua; Lu, Yi-Fa

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-oxidative and hepatoprotective effects of Glossogyne tenuifolia (GT) Cassini, against acetaminophen-induced acute liver injury in BALB/c mice. The extracts of GT by various solvents (hot water, 50% ethanol and 95% ethanol) were compared for their 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity, reducing power, total phenolic content, and total anti-oxidant capacity. The results showed that hot water (HW) extracts of GT contained high levels of phenolics and exerted an excellent anti-oxidative capacity; thus, these were used in the animal experiment. The male BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, acetaminophen (APAP) group, positive control group and two GT groups at low (GT-L) and high (GT-H) dosages. The results showed that mice treated with GT had significantly decreased serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). GT-H increased glutathione levels and the ratios of reduced glutathione and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) in the liver, and inhibited serum and lipid peroxidation. This experiment was the first to determine phenolic compounds, chlorogenic acid and luteolin-7-glucoside in HW extract of GT. In conclusion, HW extract of GT may have potential anti-oxidant capacity and show hepatoprotective capacities in APAP-induced liver damaged mice. PMID:25384447

  18. Cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress in skeletal muscles of mice.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; del Puerto-Nevado, Laura; Puig-Vilanova, Ester; Pérez-Rial, Sandra; Sánchez, Francisco; Martínez-Galán, Lourdes; Rivera, Stephanie; Gea, Joaquim; González-Mangado, Nicolás; Peces-Barba, Germán

    2012-06-15

    Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced oxidative stress may cause muscle alterations in chronic conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to explore in AKR/J mice exposed to CS for 6 months and in control animals, levels of protein oxidation, oxidized proteins (immunoblotting, proteomics) and antioxidant mechanisms in both respiratory and limb muscles, body weight modifications, systemic inflammation, and lung structure. Compared to control mice, CS-exposed animals exhibited a reduction in body weight gain at 3 months and thereafter, showed lung emphysema, and exhibited increased oxidative stress levels in their diaphragms and gastrocnemius at 6 months. Proteins involved in glycolysis, ATP production and distribution, carbon dioxide hydration, and muscle contraction were carbonylated in respiratory and limb muscles. Blood tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha levels were significantly greater in CS-exposed mice than in control animals. In AKR/J mice, chronic exposure to CS induces lung emphysema concomitantly with greater oxidative modifications on muscle proteins in both respiratory and limb muscles, and systemic inflammation.

  19. Thalidomide: chemistry, therapeutic potential and oxidative stress induced teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Upendra; Singh, Chitra; Singh, Bikram

    2012-01-01

    Thalidomide and its one analogue, lenalidomide (CC5103 or revlimid) are recently approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is characterized by an overproduction of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. The journey of thalidomide was started in 1956 when it was marketed as a non-barbiturate sedative agent. It was considered as a "wonder drug" that provided safe and sound sleep and hence, used to cure morning sickness in pregnant women. Later, in 1961, it was withdrawn from the world market due to its serious side effects, i.e., teratogenic activity. However, the recent decade has witnessed a true renaissance in interest in its broad biological activity. In particular, thalidomide was reevaluated and attracted significant attention due to its selective inhibitory activity of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which is a clinically important activity against serious diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn's disease, leprosy, AIDS, and various cancers. The comeback of thalidomide to the legitimate status of a marketed drug came in 1998 when it received FDA approval for the treatment of erythema nodosum leprosum (ENL). Recently, the drug has got FDA approval for the treatment of multiple myeloma. In the last few years, number of thalidomide analogues have been synthesized and are in clinical development as a class of immunomodulatory drugs. Among these, lenalidomide is more potent than thalidomide, and is also non-neurotoxic. It was shown in vitro studies to induce apoptosis or arrest growth even in resistant multiple myeloma cell lines, decrease binding of the cells to bone marrow stromal cells, and stimulate host natural killer cell immunity. It also inhibits tumour growth and decreases angiogenesis. Earlier reviews have described the pharmacological aspects of thalidomide and a review has focused only on synthetic aspect of thalidomide. However, review focusing on chemistry and metabolism and mechanism of biological activity is still

  20. Potential role of inducible nitric oxide synthase in the sleep-wake states occurrence in old rats.

    PubMed

    Clément, P; Sarda, N; Cespuglio, R; Gharib, A

    2005-01-01

    Extensive evidences now suggest that an association between inducible nitric oxide synthase and oxidative stress takes place during aging. Since the part played by inducible nitric oxide synthase in the sleep impairments associated with aging still remains unexplored, we compared its involvement in old rats (20-24 months) versus adult ones (3-5 months) using polygraphic, biochemical, voltammetric and immunohistochemical techniques. The experiments were conducted either in basal condition or after a systemic injection of selected inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors. We found that 2-amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or aminoguanidine (400 mg/kg, i.p.) was capable to suppress rapid-eye-movement sleep and induce a delayed enhancement in slow-wave sleep in old rats. These effects did not occur in adult animals. Within the frontal cortex, the laterodorsal tegmentum and dorsal raphe nuclei, the basal inducible nitric oxide synthase activity was 85-200% higher in old rats than in adult ones. In contrast, the neuronal nitric oxide synthase activity did not vary in both groups. 2-Amino-5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-4H-1,3-thiazine administration significantly reduced inducible nitric oxide synthase activity (70-80% according to the brain areas) independently of age, but significantly decreased the cortical nitric oxide release in old rats. Finally, in frontal cortex and dorsal raphe immunohistochemical analysis showed inducible nitric oxide synthase-positive cells again only in old animals. These data support the idea that nitric oxide produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase plays a role in the triggering and maintenance of rapid-eye-movement sleep during aging.

  1. Aluminium induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed

    Achary, V Mohan Murali; Jena, Suprava; Panda, Kamal K; Panda, Brahma B

    2008-06-01

    Aluminium (Al) was evaluated for induction of oxidative stress and DNA damage employing the growing roots of Allium cepa L. as the assay system. Intact roots of A. cepa were treated with different concentrations, 0, 1, 10, 50, 100, or 200 microM of aluminium chloride, at pH 4.5 for 4 h (or 2 h for comet assay) at room temperature, 25+/-1 degrees C. Following treatment the parameters investigated in root tissue were Al-uptake, cell death, extra cellular generation of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI), viz. O(2)(*-), H(2)O(2) and (*)OH, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, activities of antioxidant enzymes namely catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX); and DNA damage, assessed by comet assay. The findings indicated that Al triggered generation of extra-cellular ROI following a dose-response. Through application of specific enzyme inhibitors it was demonstrated that extra-cellular generation of ROI was primarily due to the activity of cell wall bound NADH-PX. Generation of ROI in root tissue as well as cell death was better correlated to the levels of root Al-uptake rather than to the concentrations of Al in ambient experimental solutions. Induction of lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation by Al were statistically significant. Whereas Al inhibited CAT activity, enhanced SOD, GPX and APX activities significantly; that followed dose-response. Comet assay provided evidence that Al induced DNA damage in a range of concentrations 50-200 microM, which was comparable to that induced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS), an alkylating mutagen served as the positive control. The findings provided evidence that Al comparable to biotic stress induced oxidative burst at the cell surface through up- or down-regulation of some of the key enzymes of oxidative metabolism ultimately resulting in oxidative stress leading to DNA damage and cell death in root cells of A. cepa. PMID:18068230

  2. Opposing roles for caspase and calpain death proteases in L-glutamate-induced oxidative neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Elphick, Lucy M.; Hawat, Mohammad; Toms, Nick J.; Meinander, Annika; Mikhailov, Andrey; Eriksson, John E.; Kass, George E.N.

    2008-10-15

    Oxidative glutamate toxicity in HT22 murine hippocampal cells is a model for neuronal death by oxidative stress. We have investigated the role of proteases in HT22 cell oxidative glutamate toxicity. L-glutamate-induced toxicity was characterized by cell and nuclear shrinkage and chromatin condensation, yet occurred in the absence of either DNA fragmentation or mitochondrial cytochrome c release. Pretreatment with the selective caspase inhibitors either benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (pan-caspase), N-acetyl-Leu-Glu-His-Asp-aldehyde (caspase 9) or N-acetyl-Ile-Glu-Thr-Asp-aldehyde (caspase 8), significantly increased L-glutamate-induced cell death with a corresponding increase in observed nuclear shrinkage and chromatin condensation. This enhancement of glutamate toxicity correlated with an increase in L-glutamate-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of caspase inhibition. Pretreating the cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented ROS production, cell shrinkage and cell death from L-glutamate as well as that associated with the presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor. In contrast, the caspase-3/-7 inhibitor N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp aldehyde was without significant effect. However, pretreating the cells with the calpain inhibitor N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO, but not the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074, prevented cell death. The cytotoxic role of calpains was confirmed further by: 1) cytotoxic dependency on intracellular Ca{sup 2+} increase, 2) increased cleavage of the calpain substrate Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC and 3) immunoblot detection of the calpain-selective 145 kDa {alpha}-fodrin cleavage fragment. We conclude that oxidative L-glutamate toxicity in HT22 cells is mediated via calpain activation, whereas inhibition of caspases-8 and -9 may exacerbate L-glutamate-induced oxidative neuronal damage through increased oxidative stress.

  3. Effect of centrophenoxine against rotenone-induced oxidative stress in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ranjeet; Nehru, Bimla

    2009-11-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The important biochemical features of PD, being profound deficit in dopamine (DA) content, reduced glutathione (GSH), and enhanced lipid peroxidation (LPO) in dopaminergic (DA-ergic) neurons resulting in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. Rotenone-induced neurotoxicity is a well acknowledged preclinical model for studying PD in rodents as it produces selective DA-ergic neuronal degeneration. In our previous study, we have shown that chronic administration of rotenone to rats is able to produce motor dysfunction, which increases progressively with rotenone treatment and centrophenoxine (CPH) co-treatment is able to attenuate these motor defects. The present study was carried out to evaluate the antioxidant potential of CPH against rotenone-induced oxidative stress. Chronic administration of rotenone to SD rats resulted in marked oxidative damage in the midbrain region compared to other regions of the brain and CPH co-treatment successfully attenuated most of these changes. CPH significantly attenuated rotenone-induced depletion in DA, GSH and increase in LPO levels. In addition, the drug prevented the increase in nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline levels and also enhanced the activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Histological analysis carried out using hematoxylin and eosin staining has indicated severe damage to mid brain in comparison to cortex and cerebellum and this damage is attenuated by CPH co-treatment. Our results strongly indicate the possible therapeutic potential of centrophenoxine as an antioxidant in Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders where oxidative stress is a key player in the disease process.

  4. Neuroprotective efficacy of Bacopa monnieri against rotenone induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hosamani, Ravikumar; Muralidhara

    2009-11-01

    Bacopa monnieri, Linn. (Brahmi, BM), traditionally used to improve mental health in Indian ayurvedic system of medicine is known to possess various neuropharmacolgical properties. In the recent past, Drosophila has been widely used as a model to study various neurodegenerative diseases. Environmental toxins like rotenone, a specific inhibitor of complex I is employed to increase oxidative stress mediated neuropathology and sporadic Parkinson's disease. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective properties of BM against rotenone induced oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Flies (Oregon K strain, adult males) exposed to a standardized BM powder for 7 days in the diet exhibited significant diminution in the levels of endogenous oxidative markers viz., malondialdehyde, hydroperoxide and protein carbonyl content. Further, BM offered complete protection against rotenone (500 microM) induced oxidative stress and markedly inhibited dopamine depletion (head region, 33%; body region, 44%) in flies. Flies exposed to rotenone+BM exhibited a lower incidence of mortality (40-66% protection) and performed better in a negative geotaxis assay (45-65%) both suggesting the neuroprotective potential of BM. Interestingly, BM also conferred significant resistance (43-54% protection) in a paraquat oxidative stress bioassay. The neuroprotective effects of BM were highly comparable to those of a commercially available Brahmi preparation. Although the precise mechanism/s underlying the neuroprotective efficacy of BM are not clear, it is hypothesized that it is wholly or in part related to its ability to mitigate rotenone induced oxidative stress. Further, our approach confirms the utility of the Drosophila model in screening putative neuroprotective phytomedicines prior to their use in mammalian models. PMID:19744517

  5. The neuroprotectant ebselen inhibits oxidative DNA damage induced by dopamine in the presence of copper ions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunbo; Cao, Zhuoxiao

    2002-09-13

    Ebselen (2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one), a seleno-organic compound with glutathione peroxidase-like activity, has been shown to be protective against brain ischemic injury and Parkinson's disease. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effects of ebselen on oxidative DNA damage induced by dopamine in the presence of copper ions. Incubation of phiX-174 plasmid DNA with micromolar dopamine in the presence of Cu(II) resulted in a concentration-dependent induction of DNA strand breaks. Both a Cu(II)/Cu(I) redox cycle and H(2)O(2) formation were critically involved in the induction of DNA strand breaks by the dopamine/Cu(II) system. The presence of ebselen at micromolar concentrations led to a marked concentration-dependent inhibition of DNA strand breaks induced by the dopamine/Cu(II) system. Further studies showed that ebselen did not affect either the Cu(II)-mediated oxidation of dopamine to dopamine quinone or the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) by dopamine. Instead, the presence of ebselen resulted in a marked decrease in the levels of H(2)O(2) derived from the Cu(II)-mediated oxidation of dopamine. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time that ebselen is able to inhibit the dopamine/Cu(II)-induced oxidative DNA damage, which appears to be attributable to the ability of ebselen to decrease the levels of H(2)O(2) derived from the dopamine/Cu(II) system. Since oxidative DNA damage has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, the inhibition of oxidative DNA damage by ebselen may be responsible, at least partially, for its neuroprotective activities observed in both humans and experimental animals.

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  7. PTEN Phosphorylation and Nuclear Export Mediate Free Fatty Acid-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Zhou, Hillary; Wu, Ke; Lee, Sangkyu; Li, Ruijin

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Oxidative stress induced by free fatty acids (FFA) contributes to metabolic syndrome-associated development of cardiovascular diseases, yet molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study aimed at establishing whether phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) and its subcellular location play a role in FFA-induced endothelial oxidative stress. Results: Exposing human endothelial cells (ECs) with FFA activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/S6K pathway, and upon activation, S6K directly phosphorylated PTEN at S380. Phosphorylation of PTEN increased its interaction with its deubiquitinase USP7 in the nucleus, leading to PTEN deubiquitination and nuclear export. The reduction of PTEN in the nucleus, in turn, decreased p53 acetylation and transcription, reduced the expression of the p53 target gene glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX1), resulting in reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and endothelial damage. Finally, C57BL/6J mice fed with high-fat atherogenic diet (HFAD) showed PTEN nuclear export, decreased p53 and GPX1 protein expressions, elevated levels of ROS, and significant lesions in aortas. Importantly, inhibition of mTOR or S6K effectively blocked these effects, suggesting that mTOR/S6K pathway mediates HFAD-induced oxidative stress and vascular damage via PTEN/p53/GPX1 inhibition in vivo. Innovation: Our study demonstrated for the first time that S6K directly phosphorylated PTEN at S380 under high FFA conditions, and this phosphorylation mediated FFA-induced endothelial oxidative stress. Furthermore, we showed that S380 phosphorylation affected PTEN monoubiquitination and nuclear localization, providing the first example of coordinated regulation of PTEN nuclear localization via phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Conclusion: Our studies provide a novel mechanism by which hyperlipidemia causes vascular oxidative damage through the phosphorylation of PTEN, blocking of PTEN nuclear function, and inhibition

  8. Prophylaxis with Bacopa monnieri attenuates acrylamide induced neurotoxicity and oxidative damage via elevated antioxidant function.

    PubMed

    Shinomol, George Kunnel; Raghunath, Narayanareddy; Bharath, Muchukunte Mukunda Srinivas; Muralidhara

    2013-03-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a water-soluble, vinyl monomer that has multiple chemical and industrial applications. Exposure to ACR causes neuropathy and associated neurological defects including gait abnormalities and skeletal muscle weakness, due to impaired neurotransmitter release and eventual neurodegeneration. Using in vivo and in vitro models, we examined whether oxidative events are involved in ACR-mediated neurotoxicity and whether these could be prevented by natural plant extracts. Administration (i.p.) of ACR in mice (40 mg/kg bw/ d for 5d) induced significant oxidative damage in the brain cortex and liver as evidenced by elevated lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species and protein carbonyls. This was associated with lowered antioxidant activities including antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione-s-transferase) and reduced glutathione (GSH) compared to untreated controls. Similarly, exposure of N27 neuronal cells in culture to ACR (1-5 mM) caused dose-dependent neuronal death and lowered GSH. Interestingly, dietary supplementation with the leaf powder of Bacopa monnieri (BM) (which possesses neuroprotective properties and nootropic activity) in mice for 30 days offered significant protection against ACR toxicity and oxidative damage in vivo. Similarly, pretreatment with BM protected the N27 cells against ACR-induced cell death and associated oxidative damage. Co-treatment and pre-treatment of Drosophila melanogaster with BM extract protected against ACR-induced locomotor dysfunction and GSH depletion. We infer that BM displays prophylactic effects against ACR induced oxidative damage and neurotoxicity with potential therapeutic application in human pathology associated with neuropathy.

  9. Metformin protects against seizures, learning and memory impairments and oxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ran-Ran; Xu, Xiao-Chen; Xu, Fei; Zhang, Wei-Li; Zhang, Wen-Lin; Liu, Liang-Min; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2014-06-13

    Cognitive impairment, the most common and severe comorbidity of epilepsy, greatly diminishes the quality of life. However, current therapeutic interventions for epilepsy can also cause untoward cognitive effects. Thus, there is an urgent need for new kinds of agents targeting both seizures and cognition deficits. Oxidative stress is considered to play an important role in epileptogenesis and cognitive deficits, and antioxidants have a putative antiepileptic potential. Metformin, the most commonly prescribed antidiabetic oral drug, has antioxidant properties. This study was designed to evaluate the ameliorative effects of metformin on seizures, cognitive impairment and brain oxidative stress markers observed in pentylenetetrazole-induced kindling animals. Male C57BL/6 mice were administered with subconvulsive dose of pentylenetetrazole (37 mg/kg, i.p.) every other day for 14 injections. Metformin was injected intraperitoneally in dose of 200mg/kg along with alternate-day PTZ. We found that metformin suppressed the progression of kindling, ameliorated the cognitive impairment and decreased brain oxidative stress. Thus the present study concluded that metformin may be a potential agent for the treatment of epilepsy as well as a protective medicine against cognitive impairment induced by seizures.

  10. Astragalus polysaccharide ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Fang; Yang, Ya; Li, Di; Lv, Jun; Ou, Yangjin; Sun, Fengjun; Chen, Jianhong; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Radioprotective compounds from plant resources may represent safe and cost-effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide derived from the dried roots of the Astragalus spp. (APS) against ionizing radiation (IR) injury in liver and to explore its role in radiation-induced oxidative stress using a mouse model. Prior to (60)Co γ-irradiation (5Gy, single dose), mice received 7 days of APS at low, mid and high doses (50, 100 or 200mg/kg/day, respectively; n=6 each group), vehicle alone (5mL normal saline orally/daily; n=6). A non-irradiated control group (n=6) received the 7-day distilled water regimen only. At 24h post-irradiation, the APS pre-treated mice showed significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and NF-κB expression. All APS-treated mice also showed attenuation of the IR-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and resolution of the IR-induced decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione activities (all p<0.05). High dose APS pre-treatment led to remarkably less morphologic features of IR-induced hepatic and pulmonary injury. Thus, APS exerts protective effects against IR-induced injury in liver in mice, and the related molecular mechanism may involve suppressing the radiation-induced oxidative stress reaction. PMID:24820157

  11. Salidroside protects against kainic acid-induced status epilepticus via suppressing oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Si, Pei-Pei; Zhen, Jun-Li; Cai, Yun-Lei; Wang, Wen-Jing; Wang, Wei-Ping

    2016-04-01

    There are numerous mechanisms by which the brain generates seizures. It is well known that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in status epilepticus (SE). Salidroside (SDS) extracted from Rhodiola rosea L. shows multiple bioactive properties, such as neuroprotection and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo. This study explored the role of SDS in kainic acid (KA)-induced SE and investigated the underlying mechanism. Latency to SE increased in the SDS-pretreated mice compared to the KA group, while the percentage of incidence of SE was significantly reduced. These results suggested that pretreatment with SDS not only delayed SE, but it also decreased the incidence of SE induced by KA. KA increased MDA level and reduced the production of SOD and GSH at multiple timepoints after KA administration. SDS inhibited the change of MDA, SOD and GSH induced by KA prior to SE onset, indicating that SDS protects against KA-induced SE via suppressing oxidative stress. Based on these results, we investigated the possible molecular mechanism of SDS. Pretreatment with SDS reversed the KA-induced decrease in AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK); increased the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) deacetylase activity in KA-treated mice, which had no demonstrable effect on SIRT1 mRNA and protein; and suppressed the KA-induced increase in Ace-FoxO1. These results showed that AMPK/SIRT1/FoxO1 signaling is possibly the molecular mechanism of neuroprotection by SDS.

  12. (-) Epigallocatechin-3-gallate attenuates reserpine-induced orofacial dyskinesia and oxidative stress in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mao-Hsien; Lin, Rui-Feng; Tseng, Hsiang-Chien; Soung, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Kuo-Chi; Tsai, Cheng-Chia

    2015-04-01

    Reserpine-induced orofacial dyskinesia (OD) has been used for decades as an animal model for human tardive dyskinesia (TD) because both of them have pathophysiology strongly associated with striatal oxidative stress. Green tea catechins, especially (-) epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), have potent antioxidative effects and are able to protect against various oxidative injuries. In this study, we examined the potential protective effects of EGCG on reserpine-induced behavioral and neurochemical dysfunction in rats. Reserpine treatment (1mg/kgs.c. one injection every other day, three injections total) induced significant increases (p<0.001) in the frequency of vacuous chewing movement (VCM) and tongue protrusion (TP) as well as the duration of facial twitching (FT). EGCG treatment (100mg/kgi.p. for 11days, starting 7days before the reserpine injections) was able to prevent most of the reserpine-induced OD. Also, EGCG treatment was able to reduce the reserpine-induced lipid peroxidation (LPO) production, and enhances the antioxidation power in the striatum of reserpine-treated rats. The above results indicate that EGCG has a protective role against reserpine-induced OD, probably via its powerful antioxidative properties. Thus, EGCG may possible have a clinically relevant therapeutic effect in preventing, delaying or even treating TD. PMID:25668129

  13. Astragalus polysaccharide ameliorates ionizing radiation-induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao; Liu, Fang; Yang, Ya; Li, Di; Lv, Jun; Ou, Yangjin; Sun, Fengjun; Chen, Jianhong; Shi, Ying; Xia, Peiyuan

    2014-07-01

    Radioprotective compounds from plant resources may represent safe and cost-effective prophylactic and therapeutic agents. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of polysaccharide derived from the dried roots of the Astragalus spp. (APS) against ionizing radiation (IR) injury in liver and to explore its role in radiation-induced oxidative stress using a mouse model. Prior to (60)Co γ-irradiation (5Gy, single dose), mice received 7 days of APS at low, mid and high doses (50, 100 or 200mg/kg/day, respectively; n=6 each group), vehicle alone (5mL normal saline orally/daily; n=6). A non-irradiated control group (n=6) received the 7-day distilled water regimen only. At 24h post-irradiation, the APS pre-treated mice showed significantly decreased alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase levels, and NF-κB expression. All APS-treated mice also showed attenuation of the IR-induced increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance and resolution of the IR-induced decreases in superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione activities (all p<0.05). High dose APS pre-treatment led to remarkably less morphologic features of IR-induced hepatic and pulmonary injury. Thus, APS exerts protective effects against IR-induced injury in liver in mice, and the related molecular mechanism may involve suppressing the radiation-induced oxidative stress reaction.

  14. Arginase 2 Deficiency Prevents Oxidative Stress and Limits Hyperoxia-Induced Retinal Vascular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Suwanpradid, Jutamas; Rojas, Modesto; Behzadian, M. Ali; Caldwell, R. William; Caldwell, Ruth B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hyperoxia exposure of premature infants causes obliteration of the immature retinal microvessels, leading to a condition of proliferative vitreoretinal neovascularization termed retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Previous work has demonstrated that the hyperoxia-induced vascular injury is mediated by dysfunction of endothelial nitric oxide synthase resulting in peroxynitrite formation. This study was undertaken to determine the involvement of the ureahydrolase enzyme arginase in this pathology. Methods and Findings Studies were performed using hyperoxia-treated bovine retinal endothelial cells (BRE) and mice with oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) as experimental models of ROP. Treatment with the specific arginase inhibitor 2(S)-amino-6-boronohexanoic acid (ABH) prevented hyperoxia-induced apoptosis of BRE cells and reduced vaso-obliteration in the OIR model. Furthermore, deletion of the arginase 2 gene protected against hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration, enhanced physiological vascular repair, and reduced retinal neovascularization in the OIR model. Additional deletion of one copy of arginase 1 did not improve the vascular pathology. Analyses of peroxynitrite by quantitation of its biomarker nitrotyrosine, superoxide by dihydroethidium imaging and NO formation by diaminofluoroscein imaging showed that the protective actions of arginase 2 deletion were associated with blockade of superoxide and peroxynitrite formation and normalization of NOS activity. Conclusions Our data demonstrate the involvement of arginase activity and arginase 2 expression in hyperoxia-induced vascular injury. Arginase 2 deletion prevents hyperoxia-induced retinal vascular injury by preventing NOS uncoupling resulting in decreased reactive oxygen species formation and increased nitric oxide bioavailability. PMID:25375125

  15. Ghrelin-induced growth hormone release from goldfish pituitary cells is nitric oxide dependent.

    PubMed

    Grey, Caleb L; Chang, John P

    2012-11-01

    Ghrelin (GRLN) is an important neuroendocrine regulator of growth hormone (GH) release in vertebrates. Previous studies show goldfish (g)GRLN(19)-induced GH from the goldfish pituitary involves voltage sensitive Ca(2+) channels, increases in intracellular Ca(2+) and the PKC signalling pathway. We set out to examine the role of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in gGLRN(19)-induced GH release from primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells using pharmacological regulators in cell column perifusion systems. The NO scavenger PTIO abolished gGRLN(19)-induced GH release and co-treatment with the NO donor SNP and GRLN did not produce additive GH release responses. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors 1400 W and 7-Ni abolished GRLN-induced GH release while treatment with another NOS inhibitor, AGH, had no significant effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the NOS/NO is an integral component of gGRLN(19)-induced signalling within the goldfish pituitary cells, and given the relative specificity of AGH for inducible NOS and endothelial NOS isoforms, suggests that neuronal NOS is the likely NOS isoform utilized in goldfish somatotropes by this physiological regulator.

  16. Role of ellagic acid against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ateşşahín, Ahmet; Ceríbaşi, Ali Osman; Yuce, Abdurrauf; Bulmus, Ozgür; Cikim, Gürkan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using biochemical and histopatological approaches. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The control group received 0.9% saline; animals in the ellagic acid group received only ellagic acid (10 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin group received only cisplatin (7 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin + ellagic acid group received ellagic acid for 10 days after cisplatin. The effects of ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were evaluated by plasma creatinine, urea, sodium and calcium concentrations; kidney tissue malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase) and catalase activities and histopatological examinations. Administration of cisplatin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized by significant increases in plasma creatinine, urea and calcium concentrations. Cisplatin also induced oxidative stress, as indicated by increased kidney tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde, and reduced activities of GSH peroxidase and catalase. Furthermore, treatment with cisplatin caused a marked tubular necrosis, degeneration and desquamation, luminal cast formation, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration and inter-tubular haemorrhagia. Ellagic acid markedly reduced elevated plasma creatinine, urea and calcium levels and counteracted the deleterious effects of cisplatin on oxidative stress markers. In the same way, ellagic acid ameliorated cisplatin-induced pathological changes including tubular necrosis, degeneration, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation when compared to the cisplatin alone group. These results indicate that the antioxidant ellagic acid might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat, but not enough to inhibit cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction.

  17. Direct nano-scale patterning of Ag films using hard X-ray induced oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Myung; Lee, Su Yong; Kang, Hyon Chol; Noh, Do Young

    2015-01-01

    The morphological change of silver nano-particles (AgNPs) exposed to an intense synchrotron X-ray beam was investigated for the purpose of direct nano-scale patterning of metal thin films. AgNPs irradiated by hard X-rays in oxygen ambient were oxidized and migrated out of the illuminated region. The observed X-ray induced oxidation was utilized to fabricate nano-scale metal line patterns using sectioned WSi2/Si multilayers as masks. Lines with a width as small as 21 nm were successfully fabricated on Ag films on silicon nitride. Au/Ag nano-lines were also fabricated using the proposed method.

  18. Chemical patterning of Ag(111): Spatially confined oxide formation induced by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, S.; Reichelt, R.; Wintterlin, J.; Barinov, A.; Mentes, T. O.; Nino, M. A.; Locatelli, A.

    2008-12-08

    Low energy electron irradiation of a Ag(111) surface during NO{sub 2} adsorption at 300 K induces formation of Ag oxide. Using a spatially confined electron beam, small Ag{sub 2}O spots could be grown with a sharp, {approx}100 nm wide, boundary to the nonirradiated metallic surface. Since the structure size will mainly depend on the sharpness of the irradiating electron beam, this process has the potential of a single step nanostructuring process. Temperature treatment offers an easy way to manipulate the boundary between oxide and metallic silver by steering a chemical front.

  19. Oxidative Stress Induced by Zearalenone in Porcine Granulosa Cells and Its Rescue by Curcumin In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xunsi; Cao, Mingjun; Lai, Fangnong; Yang, Fan; Ge, Wei; Zhang, Xifeng; Cheng, Shunfeng; Sun, Xiaofeng; Qin, Guoqing; Shen, Wei; Li, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress (OS), as a signal of aberrant intracellular mechanisms, plays key roles in maintaining homeostasis for organisms. The occurrence of OS due to the disorder of normal cellular redox balance indicates the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or deficiency of antioxidants. Once the balance is broken down, repression of oxidative stress is one of the most effective ways to alleviate it. Ongoing studies provide remarkable evidence that oxidative stress is involved in reproductive toxicity induced by various stimuli, such as environmental toxicants and food toxicity. Zearalenone (ZEA), as a toxic compound existing in contaminated food products, is found to induce mycotoxicosis that has a significant impact on the reproduction of domestic animals, especially pigs. However, there is no information about how ROS and oxidative stress is involved in the influence of ZEA on porcine granulosa cells, or whether the stress can be rescued by curcumin. In this study, ZEA-induced effect on porcine granulosa cells was investigated at low concentrations (15 μM, 30 μM and 60 μM). In vitro ROS levels, the mRNA level and activity of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase were obtained. The results showed that in comparison with negative control, ZEA increased oxidative stress with higher ROS levels, reduced the expression and activity of antioxidative enzymes, increased the intensity of fluorogenic probes 2’, 7’-Dichlorodihydrofluorescin diacetate and dihydroethidium in flow cytometry assay and fluorescence microscopy. Meanwhile, the activity of glutathione (GSH) did not change obviously following 60 μM ZEA treatment. Furthermore, the underlying protective mechanisms of curcumin on the ZEA-treated porcine granulosa cells were investigated. The data revealed that curcumin pre-treatment significantly suppressed ZEA-induced oxidative stress. Collectively, porcine granulosa cells were sensitive to ZEA, which may induce oxidative

  20. Periodontitis in Rats Induces Systemic Oxidative Stress That Is Controlled by Bone-Targeted Antiresorptives

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Sehkar; Chukkapalli, Sasanka S.; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes F.; Velsko, Irina M.; Holliday, L. Shannon; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is a chronic, polymicrobial inflammatory disease that degrades connective tissue and alveolar bone and results in tooth loss. Oxidative stress has been linked to the onset of periodontal tissue breakdown and systemic inflammation, and the success of antiresorptive treatments will rely on how effectively they can ameliorate periodontal disease–induced oxidative stress during oral infection. Methods Rats were infected with polybacterial inoculum consisting of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia, as an oral lavage every other week for 12 weeks. Daily subcutaneous injections of enoxacin, bisenoxacin, alendronate, or doxycycline were administered for 6 weeks after 6 weeks of polybacterial infection in rats. The serum levels of oxidative stress parameters and antioxidant enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase, were evaluated in each of the infected, treated, and sham-infected rats. Results Rats infected with the periodontal pathogens displayed a five-fold increase in the oxidative stress index compared with controls as a result of increased levels of serum oxidants and decreases in total antioxidant activity. The overall decrease in antioxidant activity occurred despite increases in three important antioxidant enzymes, suggesting an imbalance between antioxidant macromolecules/small molecules production and antioxidant enzyme levels. Surprisingly, the bone-targeted antiresorptives bis-enoxacin and alendronate inhibited increases in oxidative stress caused by periodontitis. Bis-enoxacin, which has both antiresorptive and antibiotic activities, was more effective than alendronate, which acts only as an antiresorptive. Conclusion To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the increased oxidative stress induced by periodontal infection in rats can be ameliorated by bone-targeted antiresorptives. PMID:25101489

  1. Electric-induced oxide breakdown of a charge-coupled device under femtosecond laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Liuzheng; Zhu, Zhiwu; Shao, Zhengzheng; Cheng, Xiang'ai; Chang, Shengli

    2013-11-01

    A femtosecond laser provides an ideal source to investigate the laser-induced damage of a charge-coupled device (CCD) owing to its thermal-free and localized damage properties. For conventional damage mechanisms in the nanosecond laser regime, a leakage current and degradation of a point spread function or modulation transfer function of the CCD are caused by the thermal damages to the oxide and adjacent electrodes. However, the damage mechanisms are quite different for a femtosecond laser. In this paper, an area CCD was subjected to Ti: sapphire laser irradiation at 800 nm by 100 fs single pulses. Electric-induced oxide breakdown is considered to be the primary mechanism to cause a leakage current, and the injured oxide is between the gate and source in the metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) structure for one CCD pixel. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy are used to investigate the damaged areas and the results show that the electrodes and the oxide underneath are not directly affected by the femtosecond laser, which helps to get rid of the conventional damage mechanisms. For the primary damage mechanism, direct damage by hot carriers, anode hole injection, and an enlarged electric field in the insulating layer are three possible ways to cause oxide breakdown. The leakage current is proved by the decrease of the resistance of electrodes to the substrate. The output saturated images and the dynamics of an area CCD indicate that the leakage current is from an electrode to a light sensing area (or gate to source for a MOSFET), which proves the oxide breakdown mechanism. PMID:24216654

  2. Nickel oxide nanoparticles exert cytotoxicity via oxidative stress and induce apoptotic response in human liver cells (HepG2).

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Ali, Daoud; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Akhtar, Mohd Javed

    2013-11-01

    Increasing use of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO NPs) necessitates an improved understanding of their potential impact on human health. Previously, toxic effects of NiO NPs have been investigated, mainly on airway cells. However, information on effect of NiO NPs on human liver cells is largely lacking. In this study, we investigated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated cytotoxicity and induction of apoptotic response in human liver cells (HepG2) due to NiO NPs exposure. Prepared NiO NPs were crystalline and spherical shaped with an average diameter of 44 nm. NiO NPs induced cytotoxicity (cell death) and ROS generation in HepG2 cells in dose-dependent manner. Further, ROS scavenger vitamin C reduced cell death drastically caused by NiO NPs exposure indicating that oxidative stress plays an important role in NiO NPs toxicity. Micronuclei induction, chromatin condensation and DNA damage in HepG2 cells treated with NiO NPs suggest that NiO NPs induced cell death via apoptotic pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that following the exposure of HepG2 cells to NiO NPs, the expression level of mRNA of apoptotic genes (bax and caspase-3) were up-regulated whereas the expression level of anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated. Moreover, activity of caspase-3 enzyme was also higher in NiO NPs treated cells. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report demonstrating that NiO NPs caused cytotoxicity via ROS and induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells, which is likely to be mediated through bax/bcl-2 pathway. This work warrants careful assessment of Ni NPs before their commercial and industrial applications. PMID:24139157

  3. Autophagy Induction Protects Against 7-Oxysterol-induced Cell Death via Lysosomal Pathway and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Sultana, Nargis; Siraj, Nabeel; Ward, Liam J.; Ghafouri, Bijar; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    7-Oxysterols are major toxic components in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and human atheroma lesions, which cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Autophagy may function as a survival mechanism in this process. Here, we investigated whether 7-oxysterols mixed in an atheroma-relevant proportion induce autophagy, whether autophagy induction influences 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death, and the underlying mechanisms, by focusing on cellular lipid levels, oxidative stress, and LMP in 7-oxysterol-treated macrophages. We found that 7-oxysterols induced cellular lipid accumulation, autophagy dysfunction, and cell death in the form of both apoptosis and necrosis. Exposure to 7-oxysterols induced autophagic vacuole synthesis in the form of increased autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and LC3-phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (LC3-II) and autophagic vacuole formation. This led to an accumulation of p62, indicating a reduction in autophagic vacuole degradation. Importantly, autophagy induction significantly reduced 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death by diminishing LMP and oxidative stress. Moreover, autophagy induction minimized cellular lipid accumulation induced by 7-oxysterols. These findings highlight the importance of autophagy in combating cellular stress, LMP, and cell death in atherosclerosis. Therefore, activation of the autophagy pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of necrotic core formation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26966389

  4. Quercetin protected isolated human erythrocytes against mancozeb-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Bhaskar; Rajendar, Bandi; Ramanathan, Muthiah

    2014-07-01

    Mancozeb is a fungicide belonging to the ethylene-bisdithiocarbamate group and is widely used in agriculture. The aim of this study was to examine the protective effect of quercetin (QRN) against oxidative stress induced by mancozeb in human erythrocytes. In order to verify this, 5 ml of venous blood was collected and the erythrocytes were separated and divided into equal parts. One part was incubated with different concentrations of mancozeb (0, 10, 30, 100 µM) for 4 h at 37°C. The other part was preincubated with QRN (40 and 80 μM) for 30 min, followed by mancozeb (0, 10, 30, 100 µM) incubation for 4 h. We found reduction in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) along with elevated levels of lipid peroxide (LPO) in erythrocytes incubated with 30 and 100 µm of mancozeb. Pre-incubation with QRN (80 μM) reversed oxidative stress induced by mancozeb (30 μM) and inhibited LPO induced at 100 μM by 64.36%. QRN also reduced the haemolytic effect on erythrocytes but could not prevent the induction of haemolysis by mancozeb. Therefore, these results suggest that QRN may play a role in preventing the oxidative stress induced by mancozeb in human erythrocytes. PMID:23024109

  5. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  6. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppress the inducible nitric oxide synthase expression in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Young; Jung, Kyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Jin; Na, Han Kwang; Chun, Hyo-Kon; Kho, Yung-Hee; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2004-09-30

    Excessive nitric oxide production by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in stimulated inflammatory cells is thought to be a causative factor of cellular injury in cases of inflammation. In recent studies, it has been shown that kahweol, coffee-specific diterpene, exhibit chemoprotective effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of kahweol on the production of and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. The nitrite production induced by LPS was markedly reduced in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, kahweol suppressed the expression of iNOS protein and iNOS mRNA. Since iNOS transcription has been shown to be under the control of the transcription factor, NF-kappaB, the effects of kahweol on NF-kappaB activation were examined. Transient transfection experiments showed that kahweol inhibited NF-kappaB-dependent transcriptional activity. Moreover, electrophoretic mobility shift assay experiments indicated that kahweol blocked the LPS-induced activation of NF-kappaB. The results of these studies suggest that the suppression of the transcriptional activation of iNOS by kahweol might be mediated through the inhibition of NF-kappaB activation. Taken together, the results of our study provide evidence that kahweol possess an anti-inflammatory potential, which constitutes a previously unrecognized biologic activity, and which may provide new insights into the inflammatory process. PMID:15327829

  7. Antioxidant potential of tea reduces arsenite induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Sinha, D; Roy, S; Roy, M

    2010-04-01

    Environmental arsenic (As) is a potent human carcinogen and groundwater As contamination is a major health concern in West Bengal, India. Oxidative stress has been one of the prime factors in As-induced carcinogenicity. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), beyond the body's endogenous antioxidant balance cause a severe imbalance of the cellular antioxidant defence mechanism. Tea, a popular beverage has excellent chemopreventive and antioxidant properties. In this study it was investigated whether these flavonoids could ameliorate the arsenite (As III) induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice. Bio-monitoring with comet assay elicited that the increase in genotoxicity caused by As III was counteracted by both black tea and green tea. Elevated levels of lipid peroxides and protein carbonyl by As III were effectively reduced with green as well as black tea. They also exhibited protective action against the As III induced depletion of antioxidants like catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and glutathione (GSH) in mice liver tissue. Thus the tea polyphenols by virtue of their antioxidant potential may be used as an effective agent to reduce the As III induced oxidative stress in Swiss albino mice.

  8. Influence of green tea extract on oxidative damage and apoptosis induced by deltamethrin in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ogaly, Hanan A; Khalaf, A A; Ibrahim, Marwa A; Galal, Mona K; Abd-Elsalam, Reham M

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the protective effect of an aqueous extract of green tea leaves (GTE) against neurotoxicity and oxidative damage induced by deltamethrin (DM) in male rats. Four different groups of rats were used: the 1st group was the vehicle treated control group, the 2nd group received DM (0.6 mg/kg BW), the 3rd group received DM plus GTE, and the 4th received GTE alone (25 mg/kg BW). The brain tissues were collected at the end of the experimental regimen for subsequent investigation. Rats that were given DM had a highly significant elevation in MDA content, nitric oxide concentration, DNA fragmentation and expression level of apoptotic genes, TP53 and COX2. Additionally, a significant reduction in the total antioxidant capacity in the second group was detected. The findings for the 3rd group highlight the efficacy of GTE as a neuro-protectant in DM-induced neurotoxicity through improving the oxidative status and DNA fragmentation as well as suppressing the expression of the TP53 and COX2 genes. In conclusion, GTE, at a concentration of 25mg/kg/day, protected against DM-induced neurotoxicity through its antioxidant and antiapoptotic influence; therefore, it can be used as a protective natural product against DM-induced neurotoxicity.

  9. Isorhamnetin attenuates collagen-induced arthritis via modulating cytokines and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuewen; Zhong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress were involved in the development and progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Isorhamnetin has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities, but its effects on RA have not been investigated. In order to observe the possible therapeutic effects of isorhamnetin on RA, we established a collagen-induced arthritis mouse model and treated the animal with isorhamnetin for 3 weeks. Besides, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and isorhamnetin. The severity of arthritis was assessed by arthritis score, joint destruction score and inflammation score. Levels of cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-10 and IL-35 in the joint tissue homogenate and cell culture medium as well as anti-type II collagen antibody in serum were measured using ELISA. Contents of H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA) in joint tissue homogenate were measured using assay kits. We found collagen immunization induced significant arthritis in mice and isorhamnetin at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day could significantly attenuate the collagen-induced arthritis. Isorhamnetin also modulated the production of cytokines and suppressed the oxidative stress in the mice with collagen-induced arthritis at the dose of 10 and 20 mg/kg/day. These data suggested that isorhamnetin might be a potential agent for the management of RA. PMID:26629181

  10. HCV Core Protein Uses Multiple Mechanisms to Induce Oxidative Stress in Human Hepatoma Huh7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Smirnova, Olga A.; Petrushanko, Irina Y.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Karpenko, Inna L.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A.; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGFβ1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37–191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1α. The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein. PMID:26035647

  11. HCV core protein uses multiple mechanisms to induce oxidative stress in human hepatoma Huh7 cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander V; Smirnova, Olga A; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Ivanova, Olga N; Karpenko, Inna L; Alekseeva, Ekaterina; Sominskaya, Irina; Makarov, Alexander A; Bartosch, Birke; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Isaguliants, Maria G

    2015-05-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is accompanied by the induction of oxidative stress, mediated by several virus proteins, the most prominent being the nucleocapsid protein (HCV core). Here, using the truncated forms of HCV core, we have delineated several mechanisms by which it induces the oxidative stress. The N-terminal 36 amino acids of HCV core induced TGF\\(\\upbeta\\)1-dependent expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases 1 and 4, both of which independently contributed to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The same fragment also induced the expression of cyclo-oxygenase 2, which, however, made no input into ROS production. Amino acids 37-191 of HCV core up-regulated the transcription of a ROS generating enzyme cytochrome P450 2E1. Furthermore, the same fragment induced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1\\(\\upalpha\\). The latter triggered efflux of Ca2+ from ER to mitochondria via mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, leading to generation of superoxide anions, and possibly also H2O2. Suppression of any of these pathways in cells expressing the full-length core protein led to a partial inhibition of ROS production. Thus, HCV core causes oxidative stress via several independent pathways, each mediated by a distinct region of the protein.

  12. Chronic administration of troxerutin protects mouse kidney against D-galactose-induced oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan-Min; Ma, Jie-Qiong; Lou, Yao

    2010-10-01

    Troxerutin, a natural bioflavonoid, has been reported to have many benefits and medicinal properties. In this study, we evaluated the protective effect of troxerutin against D-gal-induced oxidative DNA damage in mouse kidney, and explored the potential mechanism of its action. Our data showed that troxerutin significantly decreased levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine in serum and the renal histological injury in D-gal-treated mice. Troxerutin markedly restored Cu/Zn-SOD, CAT and GPx activities in the kidney of D-gal-treated mouse. Furthermore, the increase of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (a marker of oxidative DNA damage) induced by d-gal was effectively suppressed by troxerutin. Internucleosomal DNA ladder fragmentation and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells in D-gal-treated mice were inhibited by troxerutin, which might be attributed to its antioxidant property by decreasing activities of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH oxidase) and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, these results suggested that troxerutin could protect the mouse kidney against D-gal-induced injury by improving renal function, attenuating histopathologic changes, reducing ROS production, renewing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and decreasing DNA oxidative damage. This study provided novel insights into the protective mechanisms of troxerutin in D-gal-induced kidney injury.

  13. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals. PMID:26962394

  14. Comprehensive Assessment of Oxidatively Induced Modifications of DNA in a Rat Model of Human Wilson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Guerrero, Candace R; Liu, Shuo; Amato, Nicholas J; Sharma, Yogeshwar; Gupta, Sanjeev; Wang, Yinsheng

    2016-03-01

    Defective copper excretion from hepatocytes in Wilson's disease causes accumulation of copper ions with increased generation of reactive oxygen species via the Fenton-type reaction. Here we developed a nanoflow liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with the isotope-dilution method for the simultaneous quantification of oxidatively induced DNA modifications. This method enabled measurement, in microgram quantities of DNA, of four oxidative stress-induced lesions, including direct ROS-induced purine cyclonucleosides (cPus) and two exocyclic adducts induced by byproducts of lipid peroxidation, i.e. 1,N(6)-etheno-2'-deoxyadenosine (εdA) and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (εdG). Analysis of liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, which constitute an animal model of human Wilson's disease, and their healthy counterparts [i.e. Long-Evans Agouti rats] showed significantly higher levels of all four DNA lesions in Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats. Moreover, cPus were present at much higher levels than εdA and εdG lesions. In contrast, the level of 5-hydroxymethyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-HmdC), an oxidation product of 5-methyl-2'-deoxycytidine (5-mdC), was markedly lower in the liver tissues of Long-Evans Cinnamon than Long-Evans Agouti rats, though no differences were observed for the levels of 5-mdC. In vitro biochemical assay showed that Cu(2+) ions could directly inhibit the activity of Tet enzymes. Together, these results suggest that aberrant copper accumulation may perturb genomic stability by elevating oxidatively induced DNA lesions, and by altering epigenetic pathways of gene regulation.

  15. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  16. Ampelopsin protects endothelial cells from hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage by inducing autophagy via the AMPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinyu; Zhang, Ting; Shi, Linying; Kang, Chao; Wan, Jing; Zhou, Yong; Zhu, Jundong; Mi, Mantian

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic angiopathy is a major diabetes-specific complication that often begins with endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia; however, the pathological mechanisms of this progression remain unclear. Ampelopsin is a natural flavonol that has strong antioxidant activity, but little information is available regarding its antidiabetic effect. This study focused on the effect of ampelopsin on hyperglycemia-induced oxidative damage and the underlying mechanism of this effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that hyperglycemia impaired autophagy in HUVECs through the inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which directly led to endothelial cell damage. Ampelopsin significantly attenuated the detrimental effect of hyperglycemia-induced cell dysfunction in a concentration-dependent manner in HUVECs. Ampelopsin significantly upregulated LC3-II, Beclin1, and Atg5 protein levels but downregulated p62 protein levels in HUVECs. Transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy indicated that ampelopsin notably induced autophagosomes and LC3-II dots, respectively. Additionally, the autophagy-specific inhibitor 3-MA, as well as Atg5 and Beclin1 siRNA pretreatment, markedly attenuated ampelopsin-induced autophagy, which subsequently abolished the protective effect of ampelopsin against hyperglycemia in HUVECs. Moreover, ampelopsin also increased AMPK activity and inhibited mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) complex activation. Ampelopsin-induced autophagy was attenuated by the AMPK antagonist compound C but strengthened by the AMPK agonist AICAR (5-minoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide). Furthermore, AMPK siRNA transfection eliminated ampelopsin's alleviation of cell injury induced by hyperglycemia. The protective effect of ampelopsin against hyperglycemia-induced cell damage, which functions by targeting autophagy via AMPK activation, makes it a promising pharmacological treatment for type-2 diabetes.

  17. Amomum tsao-ko fruit extract suppresses lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase by inducing heme oxygenase-1 in macrophages and in septic mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Ryu, Suran; Jang, Dae Sik; Cho, Young-Wuk; Chung, Eun Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2015-12-01

    Amomum tsao-ko Crevost et Lemarié (Zingiberaceae) has traditionally been used to treat inflammatory and infectious diseases, such as throat infections, malaria, abdominal pain and diarrhoea. This study was designed to assess the anti-inflammatory effects and the molecular mechanisms of the methanol extract of A. tsao-ko (AOM) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages and in a murine model of sepsis. In LPS-induced RAW 264.7 macrophages, AOM reduced the production of nitric oxide (NO) by inhibiting inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, and increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression at the protein and mRNA levels. Pretreatment with SnPP (a selective inhibitor of HO-1) and silencing HO-1 using siRNA prevented the AOM-mediated inhibition of NO production and iNOS expression. Furthermore, AOM increased the expression and nuclear accumulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which enhanced Nrf2 binding to antioxidant response element (ARE). In addition, AOM induced the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC; a ROS scavenger) diminished the AOM-induced phosphorylation of ERK and JNK and AOM-induced HO-1 expression, suggesting that ERK and JNK are downstream mediators of ROS during the AOM-induced signalling of HO-1 expression. In LPS-induced endotoxaemic mice, pretreatment with AOM reduced NO serum levels and liver iNOS expression and increased HO-1 expression and survival rates. These results indicate that AOM strongly inhibits LPS-induced NO production by activating the ROS/MAPKs/Nrf2-mediated HO-1 signalling pathway, and supports its pharmacological effects on inflammatory diseases.

  18. Protective effects of quercetin during influenza virus-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Raju, T A; Lakshmi, A N; Anand, T; Rao, L V; Sharma, G

    2000-12-01

    Oxidative stress was found to have a role in many viral diseases including AIDS, hepatitis and influenza. In the present study the pathology of influenza viral infection in the lungs, which may lead to oxidative stress, was investigated and an attempt was made to study the efficacy of anti-oxidants as therapeutic agents. Adult male mice of Swiss albino type were infected with influenza virus (A/Hong Kong/8/68) and studied for the antioxidant status in the lungs by evaluating the lung enzymatic anti-oxidant system including superoxide dismutase and catalase. Superoxide radical generation, which might increase by the activated alveolar macrophages, was estimated by nitroblue-tetrazolium reduction assay. We have also estimated lipid peroxidation levels in lung through thiobarbutiric acid reactive substances assay. We also examined the ability of flavonoid quercetin in protecting from influenza virus-induced oxidative stress. The influenza-infected group showed decreased levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase; however, anti-oxidant supplemented groups showed these activities to be the same as in the control group. The lipid peroxide levels were increased in virus-infected mice. Administration of quercetin lowered the lipid peroxide levels significantly. Formazan positive cells were increased by 80% in the virus-infected group and supplementation with quercetin reduced their number to 44%.

  19. Age-induced hair greying - the multiple effects of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Seiberg, M

    2013-12-01

    An obvious sign of ageing is hair greying, or the loss of pigment production and deposition within the hair shafts. Numerous mechanisms, acting at different levels and follicular locations, contribute to hair greying, ranging from melanocyte stem cells defects to follicular melanocyte death. One key issue that is in common to these processes is oxidative damage. At the hair follicle stem cells niche, oxidative stress, accelerated by B-cell lymphoma 2 gene (BCL-2) depletion, leads to selective apoptosis and diminution of melanocyte stem cells, reducing the repopulation of newly formed anagen follicles. Melanotic bulbar melanocytes express high levels of BCL-2 to enable survival from melanogenesis- and ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) attacks. With ageing, the bulbar melanocyte expression of anti-oxidant proteins such as BCL-2, and possibly TRP-2, is reduced, and the dedicated enzymatic anti-oxidant defence system throughout the follicle weakens, resulting in enhanced oxidative stress. A marked reduction in catalase expression and activity results in millimolar accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, contributing to bulbar melanocyte malfunction and death. Interestingly, amelanotic melanocytes at the outer root sheath (ORS) are somewhat less affected by these processes and survive for longer time even within the white, ageing hair follicles. Better understanding of the overtime susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress at the different follicular locations might yield clues to possible therapies for the prevention and reversal of hair greying.

  20. Protective Effect of Selected Medicinal Plants against Hydrogen Peroxide Induced Oxidative Damage on Biological Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Pai Kotebagilu, Namratha; Reddy Palvai, Vanitha

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is developed due to susceptibility of biological substrates to oxidation by generation of free radicals. In degenerative diseases, oxidative stress level can be reduced by antioxidants which neutralize free radicals. Primary objective of this work was to screen four medicinal plants, namely, Andrographis paniculata, Costus speciosus, Canthium parviflorum, and Abrus precatorius, for their antioxidant property using two biological substrates—RBC and microsomes. The antioxidative ability of three solvent extracts, methanol (100% and 80%) and aqueous leaf extracts, was studied at different concentrations by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances method using Fenton's reagent to induce oxidation in the substrates. The polyphenol and flavonoid content were analyzed to relate with the observed antioxidant effect of the extracts. The phytochemical screening indicated the presence of flavonoids, polyphenols, tannins, and β-carotene in the samples. In microsomes, 80% methanol extract of Canthium and Costus and, in RBC, 80% methanol extract of Costus showed highest inhibition of oxidation and correlated well with the polyphenol and flavonoid content. From the results it can be concluded that antioxidants from medicinal plants are capable of inhibiting oxidation in biological systems, suggesting scope for their use as nutraceuticals. PMID:25436152

  1. Safrole oxide induces apoptosis in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Aiying; Zhang, Shangli; Miao, Junying; Zhao, Baoxiang

    2004-09-01

    3,4-(Methylenedioxy)-1-(2',3'-epoxypropyl)-benzene (safrole oxide) was synthesized in the authors' laboratory. To investigate the effects of safrole oxide on the growth and apoptosis of A549 human lung cancer cells, the authors treated the cells with safrole oxide, 112.36 to 449.44 micromol/L, for 24 to 48 hours. The results showed that the drug led A549 cells to apoptosis and blocked cell cycle completely at G1 phase and partly at G(2)-M phase. To further study the correlated mechanism, the authors examined P53 and H-Ras protein expressions by using immunofluorescence assay. They found that the expression of P53 was dramatically up-regulated but the expression of H-Ras was hardly affected by safrole oxide, 224.72 micromol/L, within 24 hours. Taken together, these results revealed that safrole oxide could induce apoptosis of A549 cells and suggested that safrole oxide might perform its function by blocking cells completely at G1 phase and partly at G(2)-M phase, and also by up-regulating the expression of P53 protein. These findings would raise exciting possibilities for cancer therapy in future.

  2. Age-dependent oxidative stress-induced DNA damage in Down's lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zana, Marianna . E-mail: mzana@freemail.hu; Szecsenyi, Anita; Czibula, Agnes; Bjelik, Annamaria; Juhasz, Anna; Rimanoczy, Agnes; Vetro, Agnes; Pakaski, Magdolna; Janka, Zoltan; Kalman, Janos; Szabo, Krisztina; Szucs, Peter; Varkonyi, Agnes; Boda, Krisztina; Rasko, Istvan

    2006-06-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the oxidative status of lymphocytes from children (n = 7) and adults (n = 18) with Down's syndrome (DS). The basal oxidative condition, the vulnerability to in vitro hydrogen peroxide exposure, and the repair capacity were measured by means of the damage-specific alkaline comet assay. Significantly and age-independently elevated numbers of single strand breaks and oxidized bases (pyrimidines and purines) were found in the nuclear DNA of the lymphocytes in the DS group in the basal condition. These results may support the role of an increased level of endogenous oxidative stress in DS and are similar to those previously demonstrated in Alzheimer's disease. In the in vitro oxidative stress-induced state, a markedly higher extent of DNA damage was observed in DS children as compared with age- and gender-matched healthy controls, suggesting that young trisomic lymphocytes are more sensitive to oxidative stress than normal ones. However, the repair ability itself was not found to be deteriorated in either DS children or DS adults.

  3. Comparative proteomic analysis of thiol proteins in the liver after oxidative stress induced by diethylnitrosamine.

    PubMed

    Aparicio-Bautista, Diana I; Pérez-Carreón, Julio I; Gutiérrez-Nájera, Nora; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan P; Arellanes-Robledo, Jaime; Vásquez-Garzón, Verónica R; Jiménez-García, Mónica N; Villa-Treviño, Saúl

    2013-12-01

    Conversion of protein -SH groups to disulfides is an early event during protein oxidation, which has prompted great interest in the study of thiol proteins. Chemical carcinogenesis is strongly associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The goal of this study was to detect thiol proteins that are sensitive to ROS generated during diethylnitrosamine (DEN) metabolism in the rat liver. DEN has been widely used to induce experimental hepatocellular carcinoma. We used modified redox-differential gel electrophoresis (redox-DIGE method) and mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF/TOF to identify differential oxidation protein profiles associated with carcinogen exposure. Our analysis revealed a time-dependent increase in the number of oxidized thiol proteins after carcinogen treatment; some of these proteins have antioxidant activity, including thioredoxin, peroxirredoxin 2, peroxiredoxin 6 and glutathione S-transferase alpha-3. According to functional classifications, the identified proteins in our study included chaperones, oxidoreductases, activity isomerases, hydrolases and other protein-binding partners. This study demonstrates that oxidative stress generated by DEN tends to increase gradually through DEN metabolism, causes time-dependent necrosis in the liver and has an oxidative effect on thiol proteins, thereby increasing the number of oxidized thiol proteins. Furthermore, these events occurred during the hepatocarcinogenesis initiation period.

  4. Ulinastatin attenuates LPS-induced human endothelial cells oxidative damage through suppressing JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunping; Ma, Dandan; Chen, Man; Zhang, Linlin; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Jicheng; Qu, Xin; Wang, Chunting

    2016-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress is a main feature observed in the sepsis by increasing endothelial oxidative damage. Many studies have demonstrated that Ulinastatin (UTI) can inhibit pro-inflammatory proteases, decrease inflammatory cytokine levels and suppress oxidative stress. However, the potential molecular mechanism underlying UTI which exerts its antioxidant effect is not well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of UTI on the LPS-induced oxidative stress and the underlying mechanisms using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). After oxidative stress induced By LPS in HUVECs, the cell viability and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cytoplasm were measured. In addition, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were examined. We found that LPS resulted in a profound elevation of ROS production and MDA levels. The decrease in Cu/Zn-SOD protein and increased in Mn-SOD protein were observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These responses were suppressed by an addition of UTI. The increase in c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation by LPS in HUVECs was markedly blocked by UTI or JNK inhibitor SP600125. Our results suggest that UTI exerts its anti-oxidant effects by decreasing overproduction of ROS induced by LPS via suppressing JNK/c-Jun phosphorylation. Therefore UTI may play a protective role in vascular endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress such as sepsis. This study may provide insight into a possible molecular mechanism by which Ulinastatin inhibits LPS-induced oxidative stress.

  5. Protective effects of flavonoids against oxidative stress induced by simulated microgravity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Lina; Chen, Hailong; Liu, Xinmin; Bi, Lei; Xiong, Jianghui; Mao, Zebin; Li, Yinghui

    2010-09-01

    Many lines of evidence suggest that microgravity results in increased oxidative stress in the nervous system. In order to protect neuronal cells from oxidative damage induced by microgravity, we selected some flavonoids that might prevent oxidative stress because of their antioxidant activities. Among the 20 flavonoids we examined, we found that isorhamnetin and luteolin had the best protective effects against H(2)O(2) or SIN-1-induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Using a clinostat to simulate microgravity, we found that isorhamnetin and luteolin treatment protected SH-SY5Y cells by preventing microgravity-induced increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) levels, and a decrease in antioxidant power (AP). Moreover, isorhamnetin and luteolin treatment downregulated the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and oxidative stress was significantly inhibited by an iNOS inhibitor in SH-SY5Y cells exposed to simulated microgravity (SMG). These results indicate that isorhamnetin and luteolin could protect against microgravity-induced oxidative stress in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by inhibiting the ROS-NO pathway. These two flavonoids may have potential for preventing oxidative stress induced by space flight or microgravity.

  6. High oxidative stress adversely affects NFκB mediated induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase in human neutrophils: Implications in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Awasthi, Deepika; Dubey, Megha; Nagarkoti, Sheela; Kumar, Ashutosh; Chandra, Tulika; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar; Tripathi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu

    2016-08-31

    Increasing evidence support bimodal action of nitric oxide (NO) both as a promoter and as an impeder of oxygen free radicals in neutrophils (PMNs), however impact of high oxidative stress on NO generation is less explored. In the present study, we comprehensively investigated the effect of high oxidative stress on inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and NO generation in human PMNs. Our findings suggest that PMA or diamide induced oxidative stress in PMNs from healthy volunteers, and high endogenous ROS in PMNs of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients attenuate basal as well as LPS/cytokines induced NO generation and iNOS expression in human PMNs. Mechanistically, we found that under high oxidative stress condition, S-glutathionylation of NFκB (p50 and p65 subunits) severely limits iNOS expression due to its reduced binding to iNOS promoter, which was reversed in presence of DTT. Furthermore, by using pharmacological inhibitors, scavengers and molecular approaches, we identified that enhanced ROS generation via NOX2 and mitochondria, reduced Grx1/2 expression and GSH level associated with NFκB S-glutathionylation in PMNs from CML patients. Altogether data obtained suggest that oxidative status act as an important regulator of NO generation/iNOS expression, and under enhanced oxidative stress condition, NOX2-mtROS-NFκB S-glutathionylation is a feed forward loop, which attenuate NO generation and iNOS expression in human PMNs. PMID:27264783

  7. Laser induced densification of cerium gadolinium oxide: Application to single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariño, Mariana; Rieu, Mathilde; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Garrelie, Florence

    2016-06-01

    In single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SC-SOFC), anode and cathode are placed in a gas chamber where they are exposed to a fuel/air mixture. Similarly to conventional dual-chamber SOFC, the anode and the cathode are separated by an electrolyte. However, as in the SC-SOFC configuration the electrolyte does not play tightness role between compartments, this one can be a porous layer. Nevertheless, it is necessary to have a diffusion barrier to prevent the transportation of hydrogen produced locally at the anode to the cathode that reduces fuel cell performances. This study aims to obtain directly a diffusion barrier through the surface densification of the electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO) by a laser treatment. KrF excimer laser and Yb fiber laser irradiations were used at different fluences and number of pulses to modify the density of the electrolyte coating. Microstructural characterizations confirmed the modifications on the surface of the electrolyte for appropriate experimental conditions showing either grain growth or densified but cracked surfaces. Gas permeation and electrical conductivities of the modified electrolyte were evaluated. Finally SC-SOFC performances were improved for the cells presenting grain growth at the electrolyte surface.

  8. In vitro evidence for the protective role of Sida rhomboidea. Roxb extract against LDL oxidation and oxidized LDL-induced apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Devkar, Ranjisinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2011-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate protective role of S. rhomboidea. Roxb (SR) leaf extract against in vitro low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and oxidized LDL (Ox-LDL) induced macrophage apoptosis. Copper and cell-mediated LDL oxidation, Ox-LDL-induced peroxyl radical generation, mitochondrial activity, and apoptosis in human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDMs) were assessed in presence of SR extract. Results clearly indicated that SR was capable of reducing LDL oxidation and formation of intermediary oxidation products. Also, SR successfully attenuated peroxyl radical formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, nuclear condensation, and apoptosis in Ox-LDL-exposed HMDMs. This scientific report is the first detailed investigation that establishes anti-atherosclerotic potential of SR extract.

  9. Mechanisms of mycotoxin-induced neurotoxicity through oxidative stress-associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB(1) induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  10. Mechanisms of Mycotoxin-Induced Neurotoxicity through Oxidative Stress-Associated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B1 (FB1) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB1 induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  11. Phosphodiesterase 5 Inhibition Limits Doxorubicin-induced Heart Failure by Attenuating Protein Kinase G Iα Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Burgoyne, Joseph Robert; Scotcher, Jenna; Grover, Steven; Kass, David; Eaton, Philip

    2016-08-12

    Phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors limit myocardial injury caused by stresses, including doxorubicin chemotherapy. cGMP binding to PKG Iα attenuates oxidant-induced disulfide formation. Because PDE5 inhibition elevates cGMP and protects from doxorubicin-induced injury, we reasoned that this may be because it limits PKG Iα disulfide formation. To investigate the role of PKG Iα disulfide dimerization in the development of apoptosis, doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy was compared in male wild type (WT) or disulfide-resistant C42S PKG Iα knock-in (KI) mice. Echocardiography showed that doxorubicin treatment caused loss of myocardial tissue and depressed left ventricular function in WT mice. Doxorubicin also reduced pro-survival signaling and increased apoptosis in WT hearts. In contrast, KI mice were markedly resistant to the dysfunction induced by doxorubicin in WTs. In follow-on experiments the influence of the PDE5 inhibitor tadalafil on the development of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in WT and KI mice was investigated. In WT mice, co-administration of tadalafil with doxorubicin reduced PKG Iα oxidation caused by doxorubicin and also protected against cardiac injury and loss of function. KI mice were again innately resistant to doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity, and therefore tadalafil afforded no additional protection. Doxorubicin decreased phosphorylation of RhoA (Ser-188), stimulating its GTPase activity to activate Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) in WTs. These pro-apoptotic events were absent in KI mice and were attenuated in WTs co-administered tadalafil. PKG Iα disulfide formation triggers cardiac injury, and this initiation of maladaptive signaling can be blocked by pharmacological therapies that elevate cGMP, which binds kinase to limit its oxidation. PMID:27342776

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Instigates the Rotenone Induced Oxidative Apoptotic Neuronal Death: a Study in Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Poonam; Gupta, Sonam; Biswas, Joyshree; Sharma, Sharad; Singh, Sarika

    2016-10-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in rotenone-induced oxidative neuronal death in rat brain. Rotenone (6 μg/3 μl) was administered intranigrally, unilaterally (right side) in SD rat brain. Neuronal morphology, expression level of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers like glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153), eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α/eIF2α) and cleaved caspase-12 were estimated in the rat brain. Levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and enzymatic activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRd) were estimated to assess the rotenone induced oxidative stress. Apoptotic death of neurons was assessed by estimating the mRNA level of caspase-3. Rotenone administration caused altered neuronal morphology, decreased expression of TH, augmented ROS level, decreased level of GSH and decreased activities of GPx and GRd enzymes which were significantly attenuated with the pretreatment of ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal). Significantly increased levels of GRP78, GADD, dephosphorylated eIF2α and cleaved caspase-12 was also observed after rotenone administration, which was inhibited with the pretreatment of salubrinal. Rotenone-induced increased mRNA level of caspase-3 was also attenuated by pretreatment of salubrinal. Findings suggested that salubrinal treatment significantly inhibited the rotenone-induced neurotoxicity implicating that ER stress initiates the rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death. PMID:26446018

  13. Glycine inhibits ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neurodegeneration in postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Amin, Faiz Ul; Shah, Shahid Ali; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2016-06-01

    Here we investigated for the first time the inhibitory potential of Glycine (Gly) against ethanol-induced oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptotic neurodegeneration in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the developing rat brain. The Gly co-treatment significantly increased the cell viability, inhibited the expression of phospho-Nuclear Factor kappa B (p-NF-kB) and caspase-3 and reduced the oxidative stress in ethanol-treated SH-SY5Y cells in a PI3K-dependent manner. Seven days old male rat pups were injected with ethanol (5 g/kg subcutaneously, prepared in a 20% saline solution) and Gly (1 g/kg). Gly co-treatment stimulated the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to limit the ethanol induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the developing rat brain. It lowered the ethanol-elevated levels of phospho-c Jun N terminal kinase (p-JNK) and its various downstream apoptotic markers, including Bax, cytochrome C, caspase-3 and PARP-1. Additionally, the Gly treatment upregulated antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and prevented ethanol-induced neurodegeneration as assessed by Fluoro-Jade-B (FJB) and Nissl staining. Furthermore, the Gly administration caused significant reduction in the ethanol-induced neuroinflammation by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory markers such as p-NF-kB, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and reversed the ethanol-induced synaptic protein markers expression. The results suggest that acute Gly treatment reduces ethanol-induced oxidative stress and neuronal cell loss in SH-SY5Y cells and in the developing rat brain. Therefore, Gly may be considered as potential treatment in ethanol-intoxicated newborns and infants. PMID:27058626

  14. Permafrost Thaw Induces Methane Oxidation in Transitional Thaw Stages in a Subarctic Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perryman, C. R.; Kashi, N. N.; Malhotra, A.; McCalley, C. K.; Varner, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Rising temperatures in the subarctic are accelerating permafrost thaw and increasing methane (CH4) emissions from subarctic peatlands. Methanotrophs in these peatlands can consume/oxidize CH4, potentially mitigating CH4 emissions in these peatlands. Oxidation rates can exceed 90% of CH4 production in some settings, depending on O2 and CH4 availability and environmental conditions. Malhotra and Roulet identified 10 thaw stages in Stordalen Mire near Abisko, Sweden (68°21'N,18°49'E ) with variable vegetation, environmental conditions, and associated CH4 emissions. We investigated potential methane oxidation rates across these thaw stages. Peat cores were extracted from two depths at each stage and incubated in 350ml glass jars at in situ temperatures and CH4 concentrations. Headspace samples were collected from each incubation jar over a 48-hour period and analyzed for CH4 concentration using flame ionization detection gas chromatography (GC-FID). Oxidation rates ranged from <0.1 to 17 μg of CH4 per gram of dry biomass per day. Water table depth and pore water pH were the strongest environmental correlates of oxidation (sample size = 56, p < 0.001). The highest potential oxidation rates were observed in collapsing palsa sites and recently collapsed sedge-dominated open water sites near palsa mounds. Our results suggest that permafrost thaw induces high CH4 oxidation rates by creating conditions ideal for both methanogenic and methanotrophic microbial communities. Our results also reinforce the importance of incorporating transitional thaw stages in landscape level carbon budgets of thawing peatlands emphasized by Malhotra and Roulet. Forthcoming microbial analysis and stable isotope analysis will further elucidate the factors controlling methane oxidation rates at Stordalen Mire.

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhiza partially protect chicory roots against oxidative stress induced by two fungicides, fenpropimorph and fenhexamid.

    PubMed

    Campagnac, Estelle; Lounès-Hadj Sahraoui, Anissa; Debiane, Djouher; Fontaine, Joël; Laruelle, Frédéric; Garçon, Guillaume; Verdin, Anthony; Durand, Roger; Shirali, Pirouz; Grandmougin-Ferjani, Anne

    2010-03-01

    The present work examined the oxidative stress induced by different concentrations (0.02 and 0.2 mg l-1) of two sterol biosynthesis inhibitor fungicides (fenpropimorph and fenhexamid) in non-target chicory root colonised or not by Glomus intraradices in a monoxenic system. The fungicides were found to cause oxidative damage by increasing lipid peroxidation measured by malondialdehyde production in non-colonised roots. Detoxification of the H(2)O(2) product was measured at 0.2 mg l-1 of fenpropimorph by an increase in peroxidase activities suggesting an antioxidant capacity in these roots. Moreover, this study pointed out the ability of arbuscular mycorrhiza to alleviate partially the oxidative stress in chicory roots, probably by lowering reactive oxygen species concentrations, resulting from increases in antioxidant defences. Our results suggest that the enhanced fungicide tolerance in the AM symbiosis could be related to less cell membrane damage.

  16. Suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway by 7-deacetylgedunin, a limonoid from Xylocarpus sp.

    PubMed

    Sarigaputi, Chanin; Sangpech, Nuanpan; Palaga, Tanapat; Pudhom, Khanitha

    2015-03-01

    In this study, limonoids isolated from Xylocarpus plants were tested for their in vitro anti-inflammatory effects. The results demonstrated that only 7-deacetylgedunin (1), a gedunin-type limonoid, significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide- and interferon-γ-stimulated production of nitric oxide in murine macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. The suppression of nitric oxide production by 1 was correlated with the downregulation of mRNA and protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Mechanistic studies revealed that the transcriptional activity of nuclear factor-κB, IκBα degradation, and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases, stimulated with lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ, were suppressed by 1. PMID:25714725

  17. Effect of cationic/anionic organic surfactants on evaporation induced self assembled tin oxide nanostructured films