Science.gov

Sample records for oxide metabolites induced

  1. Oxidative DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, an amino acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Hiraku, Y; Sugimoto, J; Yamaguchi, T; Kawanishi, S

    1999-05-01

    We investigated DNA damage induced by aminoacetone, a metabolite of threonine and glycine. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed that aminoacetone caused cellular DNA cleavage. Aminoacetone increased the amount of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) in human cultured cells in a dose-dependent manner. The formation of 8-oxodG in calf thymus DNA increased due to aminoacetone only in the presence of Cu(II). DNA ladder formation was observed at higher concentrations of aminoacetone than those causing DNA cleavage. Flow cytometry showed that aminoacetone enhanced the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in cultured cells. Aminoacetone caused damage to 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments, obtained from the human c-Ha-ras-1 and p53 genes, at cytosine and thymine residues in the presence of Cu(II). Catalase and bathocuproine inhibited DNA damage, suggesting that H2O2 and Cu(I) were involved. Analysis of the products generated from aminoacetone revealed that aminoacetone underwent Cu(II)-mediated autoxidation in two different pathways: the major pathway in which methylglyoxal and NH+4 are generated and the minor pathway in which 2,5-dimethylpyrazine is formed through condensation of two molecules of aminoacetone. These findings suggest that H2O2 generated by the autoxidation of aminoacetone reacts with Cu(I) to form reactive species capable of causing oxidative DNA damage.

  2. Effect of quercetin and its metabolite on caveolin-1 expression induced by oxidized LDL and lysophosphatidylcholine in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Kamada, Chiemi; Mukai, Rie; Kondo, Akari; Sato, Shinya; Terao, Junji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein contributes to atherosclerotic plaque formation, and quercetin is expected to exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. We previously reported accumulation of conjugated quercetin metabolites in the aorta of rabbits fed high-cholesterol diets with quercetin glucosides, resulting in attenuation of lipid peroxidation and inhibition of lipid accumulation. Caveolin-1, a major structural protein of caveolae in vascular endothelial cells, plays a role in atherosclerosis development. Here we investigated effects of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, quercetin and its metabolite, quercetin 3-O-β-glucuronide, on caveolin-1 expression. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein significantly upregulated caveolin-1 mRNA expression. An oxidized low-density lipoprotein component, lysophosphatidylcholine, also induced expression of both caveolin-1 mRNA and protein. However, lysophosphatidylcholine did not affect the location of caveolin-1 proteins within caveolae structures. Co-treatment with quercetin or quercetin 3-O-β-glucuronide inhibited lysophosphatidylcholine-induced caveolin-1 expression. Quercetin and quercetin 3-O-β-glucuronide also suppressed expression of adhesion molecules induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein and lysophosphatidylcholine. These results strongly suggest lysophosphatidylcholine derived from oxidized low-density lipoprotein contributes to atherosclerotic events by upregulating caveolin-1 expression, resulting in induction of adhesion molecules. Quercetin metabolites are likely to exert an anti-atherosclerotic effect by attenuating caveolin-1 expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27257344

  3. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation. PMID:9744574

  4. Oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis induced by metabolites of butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, S; Nishino, K; Oikawa, S; Inoue, S; Mizutani, T; Kawanishi, S

    1998-08-01

    DNA damage by metabolites of a food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), was investigated as a potential mechanism of carcinogenicity. The mechanism of DNA damage by 2,6-di-tert-butyl-p-benzoquinone (BHT-quinone), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroperoxyl-4-methyl-2,5-cyclohexadienone (BHT-OOH), and 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (BHT-CHO) in the presence of metal ions was investigated by using 32P-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the c-Ha-ras-1 proto-oncogene and the p53 tumor suppressor gene. BHT-OOH caused DNA damage in the presence of Cu(II), whereas BHT-quinone and BHT-CHO did not. However, BHT-quinone did induce DNA damage in the presence of NADH and Cu(II). Bathocuproine inhibited Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, indicating the participation of Cu(I) in the process. Catalase also inhibited DNA damage induced by BHT-quinone, but not that induced by BHT-OOH. The DNA cleavage pattern observed with BHT-quinone plus NADH was different from that seen with BHT-OOH. With BHT-quinone plus NADH, piperidine-labile sites could be generated at nucleotides other than adenine residue. BHT-OOH caused cleavage specifically at guanine residues. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis showed that BHT-OOH and BHT-quinone induced DNA strand breaks in cultured cells, whereas BHT-CHO did not. Both BHT-quinone and BHT-OOH induced internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, which is the characteristic of apoptosis. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of peroxides in cultured cells treated with BHT-OOH or BHT-quinone. These results suggest that BHT-OOH participates in oxidative DNA damage directly, whereas BHT-quinone causes DNA damage through H2O2 generation, which leads to internucleosomal DNA fragmentation.

  5. SERMs attenuate estrogen-induced malignant transformation of human mammary epithelial cells by upregulating detoxification of oxidative metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hemachandra, L P Madhubhani P; Patel, Hitisha; Chandrasena, R Esala P; Choi, Jaewoo; Piyankarage, Sujeewa C; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yijin; Thayer, Emily N; Scism, Robert A; Michalsen, Bradley T; Xiong, Rui; Siklos, Marton I; Bolton, Judy L; Thatcher, Gregory R J

    2014-05-01

    The risk of developing hormone-dependent cancers with long-term exposure to estrogens is attributed both to proliferative, hormonal actions at the estrogen receptor (ER) and to chemical carcinogenesis elicited by genotoxic, oxidative estrogen metabolites. Nontumorigenic MCF-10A human breast epithelial cells are classified as ER(-) and undergo estrogen-induced malignant transformation. Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERM), in use for breast cancer chemoprevention and for postmenopausal osteoporosis, were observed to inhibit malignant transformation, as measured by anchorage-independent colony growth. This chemopreventive activity was observed to correlate with reduced levels of oxidative estrogen metabolites, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and DNA oxidation. The ability of raloxifene, desmethylarzoxifene (DMA), and bazedoxifene to inhibit this chemical carcinogenesis pathway was not shared by 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Regulation of phase II rather than phase I metabolic enzymes was implicated mechanistically: raloxifene and DMA were observed to upregulate sulfotransferase (SULT 1E1) and glucuronidase (UGT 1A1). The results support upregulation of phase II metabolism in detoxification of catechol estrogen metabolites leading to attenuated ROS formation as a mechanism for inhibition of malignant transformation by a subset of clinically important SERMs.

  6. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  7. Lichen metabolites prevent UV light and nitric oxide-mediated plasmid DNA damage and induce apoptosis in human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Piovano, M; Lombardo, L; Garbarino, J; Cardile, V

    2008-09-26

    In humans both UV-A and UV-B can cause gene mutations and suppress immunity, which leads to skin cancer, including melanoma. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) appears particularly promising as ROS and RNS production by both UV-A and UV-B contributes to inflammation, immunosuppression, gene mutation and carcinogenesis. We evaluated the effect of two lichen compounds, sphaerophorin (depside) and pannarin (depsidone) on pBR322 DNA cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (()OH), and by nitric oxide (NO), and their superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) scavenging capacity. In addition, we investigated the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds against human melanoma cells (M14 cell line). Sphaerophorin and pannarin showed a protective effect on plasmid DNA and exhibited a superoxide dismutase like effect. The data obtained in cell culture show that these lichen metabolites inhibit the growth of melanoma cells, inducing an apoptotic cell death, demonstrated by the fragmentation of genomic DNA (COMET and TUNEL Assays) and by a significant increase of caspase-3 activity, and correlated, at least in part, to the increase of ROS generation, These results confirm the promising biological properties of sphaerophorin and pannarin and encourage further investigations on their molecular mechanisms.

  8. Genistein and daidzein induce cell proliferation and their metabolites cause oxidative DNA damage in relation to isoflavone-induced cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Koh, Masashi; Umezawa, Kazuo; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-03-01

    The soy isoflavones, genistein (5,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone) and daidzein (7,4'-dihydroxyisoflavone), are representative phytoestrogens that function as chemopreventive agents against cancers, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. However, recent studies indicated that genistein and/or daidzein induced cancers of reproductive organs in rodents, such as the uterus and vulva. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of carcinogenesis by soy isoflavones, we examined the ability of genistein, daidzein, and their metabolites, 5,7,3',4'-tetrahydroxyisoflavone (orobol), 7,3',4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-OH-IF), and 6,7,4'-trihydroxyisoflavone (6,7,4'-OH-IF), to cause DNA damage and cell proliferation. An E-screen assay revealed that genistein and daidzein enhanced proliferation of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer MCF-7 cells, while their metabolites had little or no effect. A surface plasmon resonance sensor showed that binding of isoflavone-liganded estrogen receptors (ER) to estrogen response elements (ERE) was largely consistent with cell proliferative activity of isoflavones. Orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF significantly increased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) formation in human mammary epithelial MCF-10A cells, while genistein, daidzein, and 6,7,4'-OH-IF did not. Experiments using isolated DNA revealed a metal-dependent mechanism of oxidative DNA damage induced by orobol and 7,3',4'-OH-IF. DNA damage was enhanced by the addition of endogenous reductant NADH, formed via the redox cycle. These findings suggest that oxidative DNA damage by isoflavone metabolites plays a role in tumor initiation and that cell proliferation by isoflavones via ER-ERE binding induces tumor promotion and/or progression, resulting in cancer of estrogen-sensitive organs.

  9. The cuprizone-induced changes in (1)H-MRS metabolites and oxidative parameters in C57BL/6 mouse brain: Effects of quetiapine.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Yinghua; Yan, Gen; Wu, Renhua; Huang, Qingjun; Li, Xinmin; Xu, Haiyun

    2015-11-01

    Cuprizone is a copper-chelating agent and able to induce oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination in C57BL/6 mouse brain. Recent studies have used the cuprizone-fed mouse as an animal model of schizophrenia to examine putative roles of altered oligodendrocytes in this mental disorder. The present study reported the effects of cuprizone on the brain metabolites and oxidative parameters with the aim of providing neurochemical evidence for the application of the cuprizone mouse as an animal model of schizophrenia. In addition, we examined effects of quetiapine on the cuprizone-induced changes in brain metabolites and oxidative parameters; this atypical antipsychotic was shown to ameliorate the cuprizone-induced demyelination and behavioral changes in previous studies. C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard rodent chow without or with cuprizone (0.2% w/w) for four weeks during which period they were given sterilized saline or quetiapine in saline. The results of the proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) showed that cuprizone-feeding decreased (1)H-MRS signals of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA), total NAA (NAA + NAAG), and choline-containing compounds (phosphorylcholine and glycerophosphorylcholine), suggestive of mitochondrial dysfunction in brain neurons. Biochemical analyses showed lower activities of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, but higher levels of malondialdehyde and H2O2 in the brain tissue of cuprizone-fed mice, indicative of an oxidative stress. These cuprizone-induced changes were effectively relieved in the mice co-administered with cuprizone and quetiapine, although the antipsychotic alone showed no effect. These findings suggest the toxic effects of cuprizone on mitochondria and an antioxidant capacity of quetiapine, by which this antipsychotic relieves the cuprizone-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in brain cells.

  10. Neurochemical evidence that the metabolites accumulating in 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency induce oxidative damage in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Grings, Mateus; Lobato, Vannessa Araújo; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-01-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (3MCCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine metabolism biochemically characterized by accumulation of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3MCG), 3-methylcrotonic acid (3MCA) and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. A considerable number of affected individuals present neurological symptoms with or without precedent crises of metabolic decompensation and brain abnormalities whose pathogenesis is poorly known. We investigated the in vitro effects of 3MCG and 3MCA on important parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of young rats. 3MCG and 3MCA significantly increased TBA-RS and carbonyl formation, indicating that these compounds provoke lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. In contrast, nitric oxide production was not affected by 3MCG and 3MCA. Furthermore, 3MCG- and 3MCA-induced elevation of TBA-RS values was fully prevented by melatonin, trolox and reduced glutathione, but not by the nitric oxide inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the combination of catalase plus superoxide dismutase, indicating that reactive oxygen species were involved in the oxidative damage caused by these compounds. We also found that the activity of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase were not altered in vitro by 3MCG and 3MCA. It is therefore presumed that alterations of the cellular redox homeostasis caused by the major metabolites accumulating in 3MCCD may potentially be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurological dysfunction and structural brain alterations found in patients affected by this disorder.

  11. Involvement of interleukin-6-regulated nitric oxide synthase in hemorrhagic cystitis and impaired bladder contractions in young rats induced by acrolein, a urinary metabolite of cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching-Chia; Weng, Te-I; Wu, En-Ting; Wu, Mei-Hwan; Yang, Rong-Sen; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common complication in children receiving cyclophosphamide, a chemotherapeutic alkylating agent. Acrolein is a urinary metabolite from cyclophosphamide and can induce hemorrhagic cystitis. Here, we investigated the effects and mechanisms of acrolein by intravesical instillation on urinary bladder muscle contractions and pathological alterations in rats. Acrolein instillation significantly increased the muscle contractions of rat bladder detrusor after 1 and 6 h but markedly decreased detrusor contractions after 24 h. Acrolein increased phosphorylated protein kinase C (pan-PKC) expressions in bladders after 1 and 6 h but inhibited it after 24 h. Inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) protein expressions were markedly induced in bladders 24 h after acrolein treatment. Twenty-four-hour acrolein instillation increased the levels of nitrite/nitrate and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the urinary bladder. The iNOS inhibitors significantly inhibited the acrolein-increased nitrite/nitrate levels, but not IL-6 levels. IL-6-neutralizing antibodies effectively inhibited the acrolein-increased NOx levels. The increased detrusor contractions by 1-h acrolein treatment were significantly reversed by the PKC inhibitor RO32-0432, and the decreased detrusor contractions by 24-h acrolein treatment were significantly reversed by the iNOS inhibitor and IL-6-neutralizing antibody. Both the iNOS inhibitor and IL-6-neutralizing antibody effectively reversed the increased iNOS expression, decreased PKC phosphorylation, increased bladder weight, and hemorrhagic cystitis in rats 24 h after acrolein treatment. Taken together, these results suggest that an IL-6-regulated iNOS/NO signaling pathway participates in the acrolein-triggered detrusor contraction inhibition and hemorrhagic cystitis. These findings may help us to find a new strategy to treat cyclophosphamide-induced hemorrhagic cystitis.

  12. Mitochondrial toxicity of diclofenac and its metabolites via inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (ATP synthesis) in rat liver mitochondria: Possible role in drug induced liver injury (DILI).

    PubMed

    Syed, Muzeeb; Skonberg, Christian; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2016-03-01

    Diclofenac is a widely prescribed NSAID, which by itself and its reactive metabolites (Phase-I and Phase-II) may be involved in serious idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity. Mitochondrial injury is one of the mechanisms of drug induced liver injury (DILI). In the present work, an investigation of the inhibitory effects of diclofenac (Dic) and its phase I [4-hydroxy diclofenac (4'-OH-Dic) and 5-hydroxy diclofenac (5-OH-dic)] and Phase-II [diclofenac acyl glucuronide (DicGluA) and diclofenac glutathione thioester (DicSG)] metabolites, on ATP synthesis in rat liver mitochondria was carried out. A mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis is exerted by diclofenac and its metabolites. Phase-I metabolite (4'-OH-Dic) and Phase-II metabolites (DicGluA and DicSG) showed potent inhibition (2-5 fold) of ATP synthesis, where as 5-OH-Dic, one of the Phase-I metabolite, was a less potent inhibitor as compared to Dic. The calculated kinetic constants of mechanism based inhibition of ATP synthesis by Dic showed maximal rate of inactivation (Kinact) of 2.64 ± 0.15 min(-1) and half maximal rate of inactivation (KI) of 7.69 ± 2.48 μM with Kinact/KI ratio of 0.343 min(-1) μM(-1). Co-incubation of mitochondria with Dic and reduced GSH exhibited a protective effect on Dic mediated inhibition of ATP synthesis. Our data from this study strongly indicate that Dic as well as its metabolites could be involved in the hepato-toxic action through inhibition of ATP synthesis.

  13. Influence of Pistachios on Performance and Exercise-Induced Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, Immune Dysfunction, and Metabolite Shifts in Cyclists: A Randomized, Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nieman, David C.; Scherr, Johannes; Luo, Beibei; Meaney, Mary Pat; Dréau, Didier; Sha, Wei; Dew, Dustin A.; Henson, Dru A.; Pappan, Kirk L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Pistachio nut ingestion (3 oz./d, two weeks) was tested for effects on exercise performance and 21-h post-exercise recovery from inflammation, oxidative stress, immune dysfunction, and metabolite shifts. Methods Using a randomized, crossover approach, cyclists (N = 19) engaged in two 75-km time trials after 2-weeks pistachio or no pistachio supplementation, with a 2-week washout period. Subjects came to the lab in an overnight fasted state, and ingested water only or 3 oz. pistachios with water before and during exercise. Blood samples were collected 45 min pre-exercise, and immediately post-, 1.5-h post-, and 21-h post-exercise, and analyzed for plasma cytokines, C-reactive protein (CRP), F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoP), granulocyte phagocytosis (GPHAG) and oxidative burst activity (GOBA), and shifts in metabolites. Results Performance time for the 75-km time trial was 4.8% slower under pistachio conditions (2.84±0.11 and 2.71±0.07 h, respectively, P = 0.034). Significant time effects were shown for plasma cytokines, CRP, F2-IsoP, GPHAG, and GOBA, with few group differences. Metabolomics analysis revealed 423 detectable compounds of known identity, with significant interaction effects for 19 metabolites, especially raffinose, (12Z)-9,10-Dihydroxyoctadec-12-enoate (9,10-DiHOME), and sucrose. Dietary intake of raffinose was 2.19±0.15 and 0.35±0.08 mg/d during the pistachio and no pistachio periods, and metabolomics revealed that colon raffinose and sucrose translocated to the circulation during exercise due to increased gut permeability. The post-exercise increase in plasma raffinose correlated significantly with 9,10-DiHOME and other oxidative stress metabolites. Conclusions In summary, 2-weeks pistachio nut ingestion was associated with reduced 75-km cycling time trial performance and increased post-exercise plasma levels of raffinose, sucrose, and metabolites related to leukotoxic effects and oxidative stress. Trial Registration Clinical

  14. Cysteine-Conjugated Metabolites of Ginger Components, Shogaols, Induce Apoptosis through Oxidative Stress-Mediated p53 Pathway in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Shogaols, the major constituents of thermally processed ginger, have been proven to be highly effective anticancer agents. Our group has identified cysteine-conjugated shogaols (M2, M2′, and M2″) as the major metabolites of [6]-, [8]-, and [10]-shogaol in human and found that M2 is a carrier of its parent molecule [6]-shogaol in cancer cells and in mice, while being less toxic to normal colon fibroblast cells. The objectives of this study are to determine whether M2′ and M2″ behave in a similar manner to M2, in both metabolism and efficacy as anticancer agents, and to further explore the biological pro-apoptotic mechanisms of the cysteine-conjugated shogaols against human colon cancer cells HCT-116 and HT-29. Our results show that [8]- and [10]-shogaol have similar metabolic profiles to [6]-shogaol and exhibit similar toxicity toward human colon cancer cells. M2′ and M2″ both show low toxicity against normal colon cells but retain potency against colon cancer cells, suggesting that they have similar activity to M2. We further demonstrate that the cysteine-conjugated shogaols can cause cancer cell death through the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Our results show that oxidative stress activates a p53 pathway that ultimately leads to p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) induction and down-regulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), followed by cytochrome c release, perturbation of inhibitory interactions of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) with caspases, and finally caspase 9 and 3 activation and cleavage. A brief screen of the markers attenuated by the proapoptotic activity of M2 revealed similar results for [8]- and [10]-shogaol and their respective cysteine-conjugated metabolites M2′ and M2″. This study highlights the cysteine-conjugated metabolites of shogaols as novel dietary colon cancer preventive agents. PMID:24786146

  15. Exposure to benzene metabolites causes oxidative damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Raj, Abhishek; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2016-06-01

    Hydroquinone (HQ) and benzoquinone (BQ) are known benzene metabolites that form reactive intermediates such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study attempts to understand the effect of benzene metabolites (HQ and BQ) on the antioxidant status, cell morphology, ROS levels and lipid alterations in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. There was a reduction in the growth pattern of wild-type cells exposed to HQ/BQ. Exposure of yeast cells to benzene metabolites increased the activity of the anti-oxidant enzymes catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase but lead to a decrease in ascorbic acid and reduced glutathione. Increased triglyceride level and decreased phospholipid levels were observed with exposure to HQ and BQ. These results suggest that the enzymatic antioxidants were increased and are involved in the protection against macromolecular damage during oxidative stress; presumptively, these enzymes are essential for scavenging the pro-oxidant effects of benzene metabolites. PMID:27016252

  16. Production of pesticide metabolites by oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, E

    1982-08-01

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system catalyzes a wide variety of oxidations of pesticide chemicals and related compounds. These reactions include epoxidation and aromatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation, O-, N- and S-dealkylation, N-oxidation, oxidative deamination, S-oxidation, P-oxidation, desulfuration and ester cleavage and may result in either detoxication or activation of the pesticide. The current status of such reactions, relative to the production, in vivo, of biologically active intermediates in pesticide metabolism is summarized. More recently we have shown that the FAD-containing monooxygenase of mammalian liver (E.C.1.14.13.8), a xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme of broad specificity formerly known as an amine oxidase, is involved in a variety of pesticide oxidations. These include sulfoxidation of organophosphorus insecticides such as phorate and disulfoton, oxidative desulfuration of phosphonate insecticides such as fonofos and oxidation at the phosphorus atom in such compounds as the cotton defoliant, folex. The relative importance of the FAD-containing monooxygenase vis-a-vis the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system is discussed, based on in vitro studies on purified enzymes. PMID:7161848

  17. Production of pesticide metabolites by oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, E

    1982-08-01

    The cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system catalyzes a wide variety of oxidations of pesticide chemicals and related compounds. These reactions include epoxidation and aromatic hydroxylation, aliphatic hydroxylation, O-, N- and S-dealkylation, N-oxidation, oxidative deamination, S-oxidation, P-oxidation, desulfuration and ester cleavage and may result in either detoxication or activation of the pesticide. The current status of such reactions, relative to the production, in vivo, of biologically active intermediates in pesticide metabolism is summarized. More recently we have shown that the FAD-containing monooxygenase of mammalian liver (E.C.1.14.13.8), a xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme of broad specificity formerly known as an amine oxidase, is involved in a variety of pesticide oxidations. These include sulfoxidation of organophosphorus insecticides such as phorate and disulfoton, oxidative desulfuration of phosphonate insecticides such as fonofos and oxidation at the phosphorus atom in such compounds as the cotton defoliant, folex. The relative importance of the FAD-containing monooxygenase vis-a-vis the cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase system is discussed, based on in vitro studies on purified enzymes.

  18. Oxidative metabolites of lycopene and their biological functions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of the beneficial biological activities of lycopene on cancer prevention, a greater knowledge of the metabolism of lycopene is needed. In particular, the identification of lycopene metabolites and oxidation products in vivo; the importance of tissue specific lycopene c...

  19. Urinary Phthalate Metabolites in Relation to Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress: NHANES 1999-2006

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Kelly K.; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Meeker, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Phthalate esters are a class of compounds utilized extensively in widely-distributed consumer goods, and have been associated with various adverse health outcomes in previous epidemiologic research. Some of these health outcomes may be the result of phthalate-induced increases in oxidative stress or inflammation, which has been demonstrated in animal studies. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and serum markers of inflammation and oxidative stress (C-reactive protein (CRP) and gamma glutamyltransferase (GGT), respectively). Subjects were participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) between the years 1999 and 2006. In multivariable linear regression models, we observed significant positive associations between CRP and mono-benzyl phthalate (MBzP) and mono-isobutyl phthalate (MiBP). There were CRP elevations of 6.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7% to 10.8%) and 8.3% (95% CI 2.9% to 14.0%) in relation to interquartile range (IQR) increases in urinary MBzP and MiBP, respectively. GGT was positively associated with mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) and an MEHP% variable calculated from the proportion of MEHP in comparison to other di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) metabolites. IQR increases in MEHP and MEHP% were associated with 2.5% (95%CI 0.2% to 4.8%) and 3.7% (95%CI 1.7% to 5.7%) increases in GGT, respectively. CRP and GGT were also inversely related to several phthalate metabolites, primarily oxidized metabolites. In conclusion, several phthalate monoester metabolites that are detected in a high proportion of urine samples from the US general population are associated with increased serum markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. On the other hand, several oxidized phthalate metabolites were inversely associated with these markers. These relationships deserve further exploration in both experimental and observational studies. PMID:21349512

  20. Redox metabolites signal polymicrobial biofilm development via the NapA oxidative stress cascade in Aspergillus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, He; Kim, Jaekuk; Liew, Mathew; Yan, John K.; Herrera, Oscar; Bok, JinWoo; Kelleher, Neil L.; Keller, Nancy P.; Wang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Filamentous fungi and bacteria form mixed-species biofilms in nature and diverse clinical contexts. They secrete a wealth of redox-active small molecule secondary metabolites, which are traditionally viewed as toxins that inhibit growth of competing microbes. Results Here we report that these “toxins” can act as interspecies signals, affecting filamentous fungal development via oxidative stress regulation. Specifically, in co-culture biofilms, Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazine-derived metabolites differentially modulated Aspergillus fumigatus development, shifting from weak vegetative growth to induced asexual sporulation (conidiation) along a decreasing phenazine gradient. The A. fumigatus morphological shift correlated with the production of phenazine radicals and concomitant reactive oxygen species (ROS) production generated by phenazine redox cycling. Phenazine conidiation signaling was conserved in the genetic model A. nidulans, and mediated by NapA, a homolog of AP-1-like bZIP transcription factor, which is essential for the response to oxidative stress in humans, yeast, and filamentous fungi. Expression profiling showed phenazine treatment induced a NapA-dependent response of the global oxidative stress metabolome including the thioredoxin, glutathione and NADPH-oxidase systems. Conidiation induction in A. nidulans by another microbial redox-active secondary metabolite, gliotoxin, also required NapA. Conclusions This work highlights that microbial redox metabolites are key signals for sporulation in filamentous fungi, which are communicated through an evolutionarily conserved eukaryotic stress response pathway. It provides a foundation for interspecies signaling in environmental and clinical biofilms involving bacteria and filamentous fungi. PMID:25532893

  1. Thalidomide teratogenesis: evidence for a toxic arene oxide metabolite.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G B; Spielberg, S P; Blake, D A; Balasubramanian, V

    1981-04-01

    It was postulated that thalidomide causes birth defects by being metabolized to a toxic electrophilic intermediate. This hypothesis was tested by using an in vitro assay in which drug toxicity to human lymphocytes was assessed in the presence of a hepatic microsomal drug metabolizing system. Maternal hepatic microsomes from pregnant rabbits mediated the production of a metabolite that was toxic to lymphocytes. Toxicity was enhanced by inhibitors of epoxide hydrolase (EC 3.3.2.3) and abolished by adding the purified enzyme to the incubation medium. The metabolite thus appears to be in arene oxide, consistent with the previously reported isolation of phenolic metabolites of thalidomide from the urine of treated animals. Two teratogenic analogs of thalidomide (phthalimidophthalimide and phthalimidinoglutarimide) were also toxic in the system; two nonteratogenic analogs (phthalimide and hexahydrothalidomide) were not toxic, even in the presence of epoxide hydrolase inhibitors. The toxic metabolite of thalidomide was not produced by rat liver microsomes (the rat is not sensitive to thalidomide teratogenesis) but was produced by hepatic preparations from maternal rabbits, and rabbit, monkey, and human (all sensitive species) fetuses. A toxic arene oxide therefore may be involved in the teratogenicity of thalidomide.

  2. Pro-oxidant effects of Ecstasy and its metabolites in mouse brain synaptosomes

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Capela, João Paulo; Oliveira, Jorge MA; Silva, Renata; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Siopa, Filipa; Branco, Paula Sério; Fernandes, Eduarda; Duarte, José Alberto; de Lourdes Bastos, Maria; Carvalho, Félix

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ‘Ecstasy’) is a worldwide major drug of abuse known to elicit neurotoxic effects. The mechanisms underlying the neurotoxic effects of MDMA are not clear at present, but the metabolism of dopamine and 5-HT by monoamine oxidase (MAO), as well as the hepatic biotransformation of MDMA into pro-oxidant reactive metabolites is thought to contribute to its adverse effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using mouse brain synaptosomes, we evaluated the pro-oxidant effects of MDMA and its metabolites, α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA), N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA) and 5-(glutathion-S-yl)-α-methyldopamine [5-(GSH)-α-MeDA], as well as those of 5-HT, dopamine, l-DOPA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). KEY RESULTS 5-HT, dopamine, l-DOPA, DOPAC and MDMA metabolites α-MeDA, N-Me-α-MeDA and 5-(GSH)-α-MeDA, concentration- and time-dependently increased H2O2 production, which was significantly reduced by the antioxidants N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC), ascorbic acid and melatonin. From experiments with MAO inhibitors, it was observed that H2O2 generation induced by 5-HT was totally dependent on MAO-related metabolism, while for dopamine, it was a minor pathway. The MDMA metabolites, dopamine, l-DOPA and DOPAC concentration-dependently increased quinoproteins formation and, like 5-HT, altered the synaptosomal glutathione status. Finally, none of the compounds modified the number of polarized mitochondria in the synaptosomal preparations, and the compounds’ pro-oxidant effects were unaffected by prior mitochondrial depolarization, excluding a significant role for mitochondrial-dependent mechanisms of toxicity in this experimental model. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS MDMA metabolites along with high levels of monoamine neurotransmitters can be major effectors of neurotoxicity induced by Ecstasy. PMID:21506960

  3. Heat generates oxidized linoleic acid metabolites that activate TRPV1 and produce pain in rodents.

    PubMed

    Patwardhan, Amol M; Akopian, Armen N; Ruparel, Nikita B; Diogenes, Anibal; Weintraub, Susan T; Uhlson, Charis; Murphy, Robert C; Hargreaves, Kenneth M

    2010-05-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel is the principal detector of noxious heat in the peripheral nervous system. TRPV1 is expressed in many nociceptors and is involved in heat-induced hyperalgesia and thermoregulation. The precise mechanism or mechanisms mediating the thermal sensitivity of TRPV1 are unknown. Here, we have shown that the oxidized linoleic acid metabolites 9- and 13-hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (9- and 13-HODE) are formed in mouse and rat skin biopsies by exposure to noxious heat. 9- and 13-HODE and their metabolites, 9- and 13-oxoODE, activated TRPV1 and therefore constitute a family of endogenous TRPV1 agonists. Moreover, blocking these substances substantially decreased the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rats and mice and reduced nociception. Collectively, our results indicate that HODEs contribute to the heat sensitivity of TRPV1 in rodents. Because oxidized linoleic acid metabolites are released during cell injury, these findings suggest a mechanism for integrating the hyperalgesic and proinflammatory roles of TRPV1 and linoleic acid metabolites and may provide the foundation for investigating new classes of analgesic drugs.

  4. Critical role of free cytosolic calcium, but not uncoupling, in mitochondrial permeability transition and cell death induced by diclofenac oxidative metabolites in immortalized human hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, M.S.; Lim, Priscilla L.K.; Gupta, Rashi; Boelsterli, Urs A. . E-mail: phcbua@nus.edu.sg

    2006-12-15

    Diclofenac is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug that has been associated with rare but serious hepatotoxicity. Experimental evidence indicates that diclofenac targets mitochondria and induces the permeability transition (mPT) which leads to apoptotic cell death in hepatocytes. While the downstream effector mechanisms have been well characterized, the more proximal pathways leading to the mPT are not known. The purpose of this study was to explore the role of free cytosolic calcium (Ca{sup 2+} {sub c}) in diclofenac-induced cell injury in immortalized human hepatocytes. We show that exposure to diclofenac caused time- and concentration-dependent cell injury, which was prevented by the specific mPT inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA, 5 {mu}M). At 8 h, diclofenac caused increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c} (Fluo-4 fluorescence), which was unaffected by CsA. Combined exposure to diclofenac/BAPTA (Ca{sup 2+} chelator) inhibited cell injury, indicating that Ca{sup 2+} plays a critical role in precipitating mPT. Diclofenac decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential, {delta}{psi}{sub m} (JC-1 fluorescence), even in the presence of CsA or BAPTA, indicating that mitochondrial depolarization was not a consequence of the mPT or elevated [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. The CYP2C9 inhibitor sulphaphenazole (10 {mu}M) protected from diclofenac-induced cell injury and prevented increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, while it had no effect on the dissipation of the {delta}{psi}{sub m}. Finally, diclofenac exposure greatly increased the mitochondria-selective superoxide levels secondary to the increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that diclofenac has direct depolarizing effects on mitochondria which does not lead to cell injury, while CYP2C9-mediated bioactivation causes increases in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub c}, triggering the mPT and precipitating cell death.

  5. Evaluation of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol metabolites and oxidative stress in type 2 diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Zeynep Mine; Bolkent, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The object of the study is to examine the effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) against oxidative stress in the blood and excretion of THC metabolites in urine of type 2 diabetic rats. Materials and Methods: The control (n=8), THC control (n=6), diabetes (n=8) and diabetes + THC (n=7) groups were created. Type 2 diabetes was induced by nicotinamide (NA, 85 mg/kg) + streptozotocin (STZ, 65 mg/kg). THC was administered intraperitoneally for seven days. The glutathione (GSH) level in erythrocytes and malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities in plasma were measured. THC metabolites were analyzed in urine. Results: The results showed that the erythrocyte GSH levels were significantly increased (P<0.05), but plasma MDA levels were non-significantly decreased in diabetes group treated with THC when compared with the diabetes group. The CAT activity was non-significantly reduced and SOD was significantly increased (P<0.01) in the plasma of diabetes induced by THC in comparison with the diabetic group. The excretion of THC metabolites was higher in the urine of diabetes + THC rats as compared to the THC control rats. Conclusion: These findings highlight that THC treatment may attenuate slightly the oxidative stress in diabetic rats. The excretion rate of THC may vary in the type 2 diabetes mellitus status. PMID:27081459

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration elicited by a bacterial metabolite in a C. elegans Parkinson's model.

    PubMed

    Ray, A; Martinez, B A; Berkowitz, L A; Caldwell, G A; Caldwell, K A

    2014-01-09

    Genetic and idiopathic forms of Parkinson's disease (PD) are characterized by loss of dopamine (DA) neurons and typically the formation of protein inclusions containing the alpha-synuclein (α-syn) protein. Environmental contributors to PD remain largely unresolved but toxins, such as paraquat or rotenone, represent well-studied enhancers of susceptibility. Previously, we reported that a bacterial metabolite produced by Streptomyces venezuelae caused age- and dose-dependent DA neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans and human SH-SY5Y neurons. We hypothesized that this metabolite from a common soil bacterium could enhance neurodegeneration in combination with PD susceptibility gene mutations or toxicants. Here, we report that exposure to the metabolite in C. elegans DA neurons expressing human α-syn or LRRK2 G2019S exacerbates neurodegeneration. Using the PD toxin models 6-hydroxydopamine and rotenone, we demonstrate that exposure to more than one environmental risk factor has an additive effect in eliciting DA neurodegeneration. Evidence suggests that PD-related toxicants cause mitochondrial dysfunction, thus we examined the impact of the metabolite on mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress. An ex vivo assay of C. elegans extracts revealed that this metabolite causes excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Likewise, enhanced expression of a superoxide dismutase reporter was observed in vivo. The anti-oxidant probucol fully rescued metabolite-induced DA neurodegeneration, as well. Interestingly, the stress-responsive FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 was activated following exposure to the metabolite. Through further mechanistic analysis, we discerned the mitochondrial defects associated with metabolite exposure included adenosine triphosphate impairment and upregulation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Metabolite-induced toxicity in DA neurons was rescued by complex I activators. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of mitochondrial

  7. Oxidative DNA damage by a common metabolite of carcinogenic nitrofluorene and N-acetylaminofluorene.

    PubMed

    Murata, Mariko; Yoshiki, Yumiko; Tada, Mariko; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2002-12-01

    Both carcinogenic NF and AAF are metabolized to a common N-hydroxy metabolite, N-OH-AF. We investigated oxidative DNA damage by N-OH-AF, using (32)P-labeled human DNA fragments from the human p53 and p16 tumor-suppressor genes and the c-Ha-ras-1 protooncogene. N-OH-AF caused Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage, and endogenous reductant NADH markedly enhanced this process. Catalase and bathocuproine, a Cu(I)-specific chelator, decreased the DNA damage, suggesting the involvement of H(2)O(2) and Cu(I). N-OH-AF induced piperidine-labile lesions frequently at thymine and cytosine residues. With formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase treatment, N-OH-AF induced cleavage at guanine residues, especially of the ACG sequence complementary to codon 273, a well-known hot spot of the p53 gene. N-OH-AF dose-dependently induced 8-oxodG formation in the presence of Cu(II) and NADH. Treatment with N-OH-AF increased amounts of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells compared to the H(2)O(2)-resistant clone HP100, supporting the involvement of H(2)O(2). The present study demonstrates that the N-hydroxy metabolite of NF and AAF induces oxidative DNA damage through H(2)O(2) in both a cell-free system and cultured human cells. We conclude that oxidative DNA damage may play an important role in the carcinogenic process of NF and AAF in addition to previously reported DNA adduct formation. PMID:12402298

  8. Evaluation of aspirin metabolites as inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor hydroxylases.

    PubMed

    Lienard, Benoit M; Conejo-García, Ana; Stolze, Ineke; Loenarz, Christoph; Oldham, Neil J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J

    2008-12-21

    Known and potential aspirin metabolites were evaluated as inhibitors of oxygen-sensing hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) hydroxylases; some of the metabolites were found to stabilise HIF-alpha in cells. PMID:19048166

  9. EMT-induced metabolite signature identifies poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Ramirez-Peña, Esmeralda; Arnold, James Michael; Putluri, Vasanta; Sphyris, Nathalie; Michailidis, George; Putluri, Nagireddy; Ambs, Stefan; Sreekumar, Arun; Mani, Sendurai A

    2015-12-15

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induces cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics and promotes tumor invasiveness; however relatively little is known about the metabolic reprogramming in EMT. Here we show that breast epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming following EMT. Relative to control, cell lines expressing EMT transcription factors show ≥1.5-fold accumulation of glutamine, glutamate, beta-alanine and glycylleucine as well as ≥1.5-fold reduction of phosphoenolpyruvate, urate, and deoxycarnitine. Moreover, these metabolic alterations were found to be predictive of overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.31-4.2), logrank p-value = 0.03) and define breast cancer molecular subtypes. EMT-associated metabolites are primarily composed of anapleurotic precursors, suggesting that cells undergoing EMT have a shift in energy production. In summary, we describe a unique panel of metabolites associated with EMT and demonstrate that these metabolites have the potential for predicting clinical and biological characteristics associated with patient survival. PMID:26315396

  10. EMT-induced metabolite signature identifies poor clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Putluri, Vasanta; Sphyris, Nathalie; Michailidis, George; Putluri, Nagireddy; Ambs, Stefan; Sreekumar, Arun; Mani, Sendurai A.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induces cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics and promotes tumor invasiveness; however relatively little is known about the metabolic reprogramming in EMT. Here we show that breast epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming following EMT. Relative to control, cell lines expressing EMT transcription factors show ≥1.5-fold accumulation of glutamine, glutamate, beta-alanine and glycylleucine as well as ≥1.5-fold reduction of phosphoenolpyruvate, urate, and deoxycarnitine. Moreover, these metabolic alterations were found to be predictive of overall survival (hazard ratio = 2.3 (95% confidence interval: 1.31–4.2), logrank p-value = 0.03) and define breast cancer molecular subtypes. EMT-associated metabolites are primarily composed of anapleurotic precursors, suggesting that cells undergoing EMT have a shift in energy production. In summary, we describe a unique panel of metabolites associated with EMT and demonstrate that these metabolites have the potential for predicting clinical and biological characteristics associated with patient survival. PMID:26315396

  11. Effects of the olive oil phenol metabolite 3,4-DHPEA-EDAH2 on human erythrocyte oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Paiva-Martins, F; Gonçalves, P; Borges, J E; Przybylska, D; Ibba, F; Fernandes, J; Santos-Silva, A

    2015-07-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs), as anucleated cells, have poor repair and biosynthetic mechanisms, suffering and accumulating oxidative lesions whenever oxidative stress develops. RBCs are particularly exposed to endogenous oxidative damage because of their specific role as oxygen carriers. However, as the most abundant blood cells, RBCs also play an important role in the oxidative status of the whole blood constituents. In previous studies by our group, the most important polyphenolic compounds found in virgin olive oil, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol-elenolic acid (3,4-DHPEA-EA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol-elenolic acid dialdehyde (3,4-DHPEA-EDA), were shown to significantly protect RBCs from oxidative damage initiated by AAPH and H2O2, with the most active compound being 3,4-DHPEA-EDA. However, the in vivo protective effects of these phenols are dependent on their bioavailability. It has been demonstrated that 3,4-DHPEA-EDA is absorbed by intestinal cells and is then metabolized, yielding a reduced metabolite, 3,4-DHPEA-EDAH2. In order to assess the importance of VOO phenolic compound metabolites for the overall in vivo protective activity, the capacity of this phase I metabolite to protect RBCs in the presence of the radical initiators AAPH or H2O2 was evaluated in the presence and absence of the naturally occurring antioxidant, ascorbic acid. The metabolite was shown to protect RBCs from haemolysis induced by both initiators, in a dose dependent way, after 2 h and 4 h of incubation. The protective effect was however lower than that of the parental compound. The analysis of the membrane proteins of erythrocytes showed that the metabolite can interact with these biological structures.

  12. Differential Oxidation of Two Thiophene-Containing Regioisomers to Reactive Metabolites by Cytochrome P450 2C9

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Peter M; Woods, Caleb M; Huang, Qingbiao; Szklarz, Grazyna D; Nelson, Sidney D

    2012-01-01

    The uricosuric diuretic agent tienilic acid (TA) is a thiophene-containing compound that is metabolized by P450 2C9 to 5-OH-TA. A reactive metabolite of TA also forms a covalent adduct to P450 2C9 that inactivates the enzyme and initiates immune-mediated hepatic injury in humans, purportedly through a thiophene-S-oxide intermediate. The 3-thenoyl regioisomer of TA, tienilic acid isomer (TAI), is chemically very similar and is reported to be oxidized by P450 2C9 to a thiophene-S-oxide, yet it is not a mechanism-based inactivator (MBI) of P450 2C9 and is reported to be an intrinsic hepatotoxin in rats. The goal of the work presented in this manuscript was to identify the reactive metabolites of TA and TAI by the characterization of products derived from P450 2C9-mediated oxidation. In addition, in silico approaches were used to better understand both the mechanisms of oxidation of TA and TAI and/or the structural rearrangements of oxidized thiophene compounds. Incubation of TA with P450 2C9 and NADPH yielded the well-characterized 5-OH-TA metabolite as the major product. However, contrary to previous reports, it was found that TAI was oxidized to two different types of reactive intermediates that ultimately lead to two types of products, a pair of hydroxythiophene/thiolactone tautomers and an S-oxide dimer. Both TA and TAI incorporated 18O from 18O2 into their respective hydroxythiophene/thiolactone metabolites indicating that these products are derived from an arene oxide pathway. Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations of the rearrangement reactions of the model compound 2-acetylthiophene-S-oxide showed that a 1,5-oxygen migration mechanism is energetically unfavorable and does not yield the 5-OH product, but instead yields a six-membered oxathiine ring. Therefore, arene oxide formation and subsequent NIH-shift rearrangement remains the favored mechanism for formation of 5-OH-TA. This also implicates the arene oxide as the initiating factor in TA induced liver

  13. Metal ion-inducing metabolite accumulation in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Jahangir, Muhammad; Abdel-Farid, Ibrahim Bayoumi; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert

    2008-09-29

    Plants face a number of biotic and abiotic environmental stress factors during growth. Among the abiotic factors, in particular, a great deal of attention has been paid to metals not only because of their increasing amounts in the environment due to rapid industrial development but also because of the variation of metal composition in soil. Cultivation of crops close to industrial areas or irrigation with contaminated water may result in both growth inhibition and tissue accumulation of metals. Brassica species are well known as metal accumulators and are being used for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. However, the metal tolerance mechanism in the plant still remains unclear. In order to investigate the metabolomic changes induced by metal ions in Brassica, plants were subjected to concentrations 50, 100, 250 and 500 mmol of copper (Cu), iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) in separate treatments. (1)H NMR and two-dimensional NMR spectra coupled with principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to investigate the metabolic change in Brassica rapa (var. Raapstelen). The (1)H-NMR analysis followed by the application of chemometric methods revealed a number of metabolic consequences. Among the metabolites that showed variation, glucosinolates and hydroxycinnamic acids conjugated with malates were found to be the discriminating metabolites as were primary metabolites like carbohydrates and amino acids. This study shows that the effects of Cu and Fe on plant metabolism were larger than those of Mn and that the metabolomic changes varied not only according to the type of metal but also according to its concentration.

  14. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Ambar K; Raja, Suganya; Mahapatra, Sanjata; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method) and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated compared to the anti-oxidant activity of curcumin. PMID:26783957

  15. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Anti-Oxidant Capacity of Curcumin Glucuronides, the Major Curcumin Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Ambar K.; Raja, Suganya; Mahapatra, Sanjata; Nagabhushanam, Kalyanam; Majeed, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin metabolites namely curcumin monoglucuronide and curcumin diglucuronide were synthesized using an alternative synthetic approach. The anti-oxidant potential of these curcumin glucuronides was compared with that of curcumin using DPPH scavenging method and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assay. The results show that curcumin monoglucuronide exhibits 10 fold less anti-oxidant activity (DPPH method) and the anti-oxidant capacity of curcumin diglucuronide is highly attenuated compared to the anti-oxidant activity of curcumin. PMID:26783957

  16. Synthesis and oxidation of 2-hydroxynevirapine, a metabolite of the HIV reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Alexandra M M; Novais, David A; da Silva, J L Ferreira; Santos, Pedro P; Oliveira, M Conceição; Beland, Frederick A; Marques, M Matilde

    2011-10-26

    Nevirapine (11-cyclopropyl-5,11-dihydro-4-methyl-6H-dipyrido[3,2-b:2',3'-e][1,4]diazepin-6-one, NVP) is a non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor used to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus. However, severe hepatotoxicity and serious adverse cutaneous effects have raised concerns about the safety of NVP administration. NVP metabolism yields several phenol-type derivatives conceivably capable of undergoing further metabolic oxidation to electrophilic quinoid species that could react with bionucleophiles. The covalent adducts thus formed might be at the genesis of toxic responses. As an initial step to test this hypothesis, we synthesized the phenolic metabolite, 2-hydroxy-NVP, and investigated its oxidation in vitro. Using potassium nitrosodisulfonate and sodium periodate as model oxidants, we obtained evidence for fast generation of an electrophilic quinone-imine, which readily underwent hydrolytic conversion to fully characterized spiro derivatives, 1'-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-1H,1'H-spiro[pyridine-2,2'-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine]-3,4',6(3'H)-trione in aqueous media and 1'-cyclopropyl-4-methyl-1'H,2H-spiro[pyridine-3,2'-pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine]-2,4',6(1H,3'H)-trione in non-aqueous media. The spiro compound generated in aqueous solution underwent subsequent hydrolytic degradation of the NVP ring system, whereas the one formed in non-aqueous media was stable to hydrolysis. The product profile observed with the chemical oxidants in aqueous solution was replicated using lactoperoxidase-mediated oxidation of 2-hydroxy-NVP. These observations suggest that metabolic activation of NVP, via Phase I oxidation to 2-hydroxy-NVP and subsequent generation of a quinone-imine, could occur in vivo and play a role in NVP-induced toxicity.

  17. Non-oxidative ethanol metabolites as a measure of alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Maenhout, Thomas M; De Buyzere, Marc L; Delanghe, Joris R

    2013-01-16

    Recent alcohol intake can be monitored by the measurement of indirect biomarkers. Elevated levels of liver enzymes (i.e. gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), alanine amino transferase (ALT) and aspartate amino transferase (AST)) in blood are commonly used in clinical practice as an indicator of alcohol-induced liver damage. With the exception of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), the specificity of indirect markers is only moderate because many cases of elevated levels are unrelated to alcohol consumption. Because of their intermediate half-life and tendency to accumulate in hair, non-oxidative ethanol metabolites can be used as markers with an intermediate timeframe between ethanol measurements and GGT and CDT with regard to recent alcohol consumption occurring between hours to 1 week. Additionally, these biomarkers offer a high ethanol-specificity in combination with approximately a two-fold higher sensitivity in comparison with indirect alcohol markers. In case of forensic use of direct ethanol metabolites, caution has to be taken in interpretation and pre-analytical pitfalls should be considered.

  18. Stress during slaughter increases lipid metabolites and decreases oxidative stability of farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) during frozen storage.

    PubMed

    Secci, G; Parisi, G; Dasilva, G; Medina, I

    2016-01-01

    The consequences of slaughter on the formation of lipid metabolites and oxidative stability of fish muscle during long term frozen storage (-10 °C) were evaluated using farmed rainbow trout killed by asphyxia in air or percussion. The level of major adenine nucleotides and their related compounds was determined in order to check the stress level during slaughter. Plasma lipid metabolites were studied through the determination of eicosanoids and docosanoids such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes, thromboxanes, isoprostanes, resolvins, hydroxides, hydroperoxides, coming from eicosapentaenoic (EPA), arachidonic (ARA), and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In addition, lipid oxidative stability of fillets was monitored. Results revealed that stress during slaughter can greatly influence oxidative stress and oxidative stability of rainbow trout fillets. In fact, asphyxia, which was the most stressful, induced a higher production of some lipid mediators such as hydroperoxides and EPA-derived prostaglandins, such as 12-HpHEPE/15-HpHEPE and PGD3/PGE3. As a consequence, fillets derived from asphyxiated fish were less stable in terms of oxidative stability and showed lower shelf-life.

  19. Effects of cocaine and its oxidative metabolites on mitochondrial respiration and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Boess, F; Ndikum-Moffor, F M; Boelsterli, U A; Roberts, S M

    2000-09-01

    Cocaine is capable of producing severe hepatocellular necrosis in laboratory animals and humans. The mechanism of cocaine hepatotoxicity is not well understood, but appears to result from the actions of one or more N-oxidative metabolites of cocaine. Mitochondria have been proposed as critical cellular targets for cocaine toxicity, and previous studies have found depressed mitochondrial respiration and increased mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in animals treated with cocaine. To examine the potential role of cocaine N-oxidative metabolites in these effects, mitochondrial respiration and ROS generation were examined in isolated mouse mitochondria treated with cocaine and its N-oxidative metabolites-norcocaine, N-hydroxynorcocaine, and norcocaine nitroxide. Cocaine, in concentrations of 0.25 or 0.5 mM, had no effect on state 3 respiration, state 4 respiration, respiratory control ratio (RCR), or ADP/O ratio. Norcocaine (0.5 mM) inhibited state 3 respiration, and N-hydroxynorcocaine (0.5 mM) inhibited both state 3 and state 4 respiration. Norcocaine nitroxide had the greatest effect on mitochondrial respiration; the lower concentration (0.25 mM) completely inhibited both state 3 and state 4 respiration. Preincubation of mitochondria with cocaine or metabolites increased the inhibitory effect of norcocaine and N-hydroxynorcocaine, but not cocaine. Cocaine, norcocaine, and N-hydroxynorcocaine (0.1 mM) had no effect on ROS generation during state 3 respiration, and cocaine and norcocaine decreased ROS generation under state 4 conditions. Norcocaine nitroxide interfered with the fluorescence ROS assay and could not be assessed. The results suggest that the effects of cocaine on mitochondrial respiration are due to its N-oxidative metabolites. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by the N-oxidative metabolites of cocaine may be the underlying cause for observed ATP depletion and subsequent cell death.

  20. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  1. Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Associations with Biomarkers of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress Across Pregnancy in Puerto Rico

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Phthalate exposure during pregnancy has been linked to adverse birth outcomes such as preterm birth, and inflammation and oxidative stress may mediate these relationships. In a prospective cohort study of pregnant women recruited early in gestation in Northern Puerto Rico, we investigated the associations between urinary phthalate metabolites and biomarkers of inflammation, including C-reactive protein, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α, and oxidative stress, including 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (OHdG) and 8-isoprostane. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in plasma twice during pregnancy (N = 215 measurements, N = 120 subjects), and oxidative stress biomarkers in urine were measured three times (N = 148 measurements, N = 54 subjects) per woman. In adjusted linear mixed models, metabolites of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) were associated with increased IL-6 and IL-10 but relationships were generally not statistically significant. All phthalates were associated with increases in oxidative stress markers. Relationships with OHdG were significant for DEHP metabolites as well as mono-n-butyl phthalate (MBP) and monoiso-butyl phthalate (MiBP). For 8-isoprostane, associations with nearly all phthalates were statistically significant and the largest effect estimates were observed for MBP and MiBP (49–50% increase in 8-isoprostane with an interquartile range increase in metabolite concentration). These relationships suggest a possible mechanism for phthalate action that may be relevant to a number of adverse health outcomes. PMID:24845688

  2. A Derivative Method with Free Radical Oxidation to Predict Resveratrol Metabolites by Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wangta; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Lin, Yi-Reng; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Liang, Shih-Shin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated an oxidative method with free radical to generate 3,5,4′-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene (trans-resveratrol) metabolites and detect sequentially by an autosampler coupling with liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer (LC-ESI–MS/MS). In this oxidative method, the free radical initiator, ammonium persulfate (APS), was placed in a sample bottle containing resveratrol to produce oxidative derivatives, and the reaction progress was tracked by autosampler sequencing. Resveratrol, a natural product with purported cancer preventative qualities, produces metabolites including dihydroresveratrol, 3,4′-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene, lunularin, resveratrol monosulfate, and dihydroresveratrol monosulfate by free radical oxidation. Using APS free radical, the concentrations of resveratrol derivatives differ as a function of time. Besides simple, convenient and time- and labor saving, the advantages of free radical oxidative method of its in situ generation of oxidative derivatives followed by LC-ESI–MS/MS can be utilized to evaluate different metabolites in various conditions. PMID:27594817

  3. Rapidly Probing Antibacterial Activity of Graphene Oxide by Mass Spectrometry-based Metabolite Fingerprinting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Hou, Jian; Chen, Suming; Xiong, Caiqiao; Liu, Huihui; Jin, Yulong; Wang, Jianing; He, Qing; Zhao, Rui; Nie, Zongxiu

    2016-01-01

    Application of nanomaterials as anti-bacteria agents has aroused great attention. To investigate the antibacterial activity and antibacterial mechanism of nanomaterials from a molecular perspective is important for efficient developing of nanomaterial antibiotics. In the current work, a new mass spectrometry-based method was established to investigate the bacterial cytotoxicity of graphene oxide (GO) by the metabolite fingerprinting of microbes. The mass spectra of extracted metabolites from two strains DH5α and ATCC25922 were obtained before and after the incubation with nanomaterials respectively. Then principal component analysis (PCA) of these spectra was performed to reveal the relationship between the metabolism disorder of microbes and bactericidal activity of GO. A parameter “D” obtained from PCA scores was proposed that is capable to quantitatively evaluate the antibacterial activity of GO in concentration and time-dependent experiments. Further annotation of the fingerprinting spectra shows the variabilities of important metabolites such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol and glutathione. This metabolic perturbation of E. coli indicates cell membrane destruction and oxidative stress mechanisms for anti-bacteria activity of graphene oxide. It is anticipated that this mass spectrometry-based metabolite fingerprinting method will be applicable to other antibacterial nanomaterials and provide more clues as to their antibacterial mechanism at molecular level. PMID:27306507

  4. Oxidative metabolites of lycopene and γ-carotene in gac (Momordica cochinchinensis).

    PubMed

    Maoka, Takashi; Yamano, Yumiko; Wada, Akimori; Etho, Tetsuji; Terada, Yukimasa; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2015-02-11

    Three new oxidative metabolites of lycopenes, (erythro)-lycopene-5,6-diol, (threo)-lycopene-5,6-diol, and 1,16-dehydro-2,6-cyclolycopene-5-ol B, and four new oxidative metabolites of γ-carotenes, 2',6'-cyclo-γ-carotene-1',5'-diol A, 2',6'-cyclo-γ-carotene-1',5'-diol B, (erythro)-γ-carotene-5,6-diol, and (threo)-γ-carotene-5,6-diol, were isolated as minor components from the aril of gac, Momordica cochinchinensis. These structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data, and some of them were compared to the structures of synthetic samples. Furthermore, the oxidative metabolic conversion pathways of lycopene and γ-carotene were discussed. PMID:25633727

  5. Oxidative metabolites of lycopene and γ-carotene in gac (Momordica cochinchinensis).

    PubMed

    Maoka, Takashi; Yamano, Yumiko; Wada, Akimori; Etho, Tetsuji; Terada, Yukimasa; Tokuda, Harukuni; Nishino, Hoyoku

    2015-02-11

    Three new oxidative metabolites of lycopenes, (erythro)-lycopene-5,6-diol, (threo)-lycopene-5,6-diol, and 1,16-dehydro-2,6-cyclolycopene-5-ol B, and four new oxidative metabolites of γ-carotenes, 2',6'-cyclo-γ-carotene-1',5'-diol A, 2',6'-cyclo-γ-carotene-1',5'-diol B, (erythro)-γ-carotene-5,6-diol, and (threo)-γ-carotene-5,6-diol, were isolated as minor components from the aril of gac, Momordica cochinchinensis. These structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data, and some of them were compared to the structures of synthetic samples. Furthermore, the oxidative metabolic conversion pathways of lycopene and γ-carotene were discussed.

  6. Identification of oxidized TNT metabolites in soil samples of a former ammunition plant.

    PubMed

    Bruns-Nagel, D; Schmidt, T C; Drzyzga, O; von Löw, E; Steinbach, K

    1999-01-01

    Water extracts of soil samples of the former ammunition plant "Tanne" near Clausthal-Zellerfeld, Lower Saxony, Germany, were investigated for highly polar oxidized 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) metabolites. 0.4 to 9.0 mg/kg dry soil 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoic acid (TNBA) and 5.8 to 544 mg/kg dry soil 2-amino-4,6-dinitrobenzoic acid (2-ADNBA) were found. In addition to the oxidized metabolites, TNT, 4- and 2-aminodinitrotoluene (4- and 2-ADNT), and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) were extractable with water. Most interestingly, in one sample, 2-ADNBA represented the main contaminant. The origin of the oxidized nitroaromatics is unknown at this time. They might be generated chemically or photochemically. Furthermore, a biological synthesis seems possible.

  7. Lipid Peroxidation, Nitric Oxide Metabolites, and Their Ratio in a Group of Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Caimi, Gregorio; Lo Presti, Rosalia; Montana, Maria; Canino, Baldassare; Averna, Maurizio R.

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate lipid peroxidation, expressed as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), nitric oxide metabolites (nitrite + nitrate) expressed as NOx, and TBARS/NOx ratio in a group of subjects with metabolic syndrome (MS). In this regard we enrolled 106 subjects with MS defined according to the IDF criteria, subsequently subdivided into diabetic (DMS) and nondiabetic (NDMS) and also into subjects with a low triglycerides/HDL-cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) index or with a high TG/HDL-C index. In the entire group and in the four subgroups of MS subjects we found an increase in TBARS and NOx levels and a decrease in TBARS/NOx ratio in comparison with normal controls. Regarding all these parameters no statistical difference between DMS and NDMS was evident, but a significant increase in NOx was present in subjects with a high TG/HDL-C index in comparison with those with a low index. In MS subjects we also found a negative correlation between TBARS/NOx ratio and TG/HDL-C index. Considering the hyperactivity of the inducible NO synthase in MS, these data confirm the altered redox and inflammatory status that characterizes the MS and suggest a link between lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and insulin resistance, evaluated as TG/HDL-C index. PMID:24987495

  8. Quantifying Translocation of Listeria monocytogenes in Rats by Using Urinary Nitric Oxide-Derived Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Sprong, R. Corinne; Hulstein, Marco F. E.; van der Meer, Roelof

    2000-01-01

    The urinary nitric oxide metabolites NO2− and NO3− (summed as NOx) are a noninvasive, quantitative biomarker of translocation of salmonella from the intestinal lumen to systemic organs. Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne gram-positive pathogen that can also cross the intestinal epithelium. In this study, we tested the efficacy of urinary NOx as a marker of listeria translocation. Rats (eight per group) were orally infected with increasing doses of L. monocytogenes; control rats received heat-killed listeria. The kinetics of urinary NOx and population levels of listeria in feces were determined for 7 days. Another group of rats was killed 1 day after infection to verify translocation by culturing viable listeria from systemic organs. Oral administration of increasing doses of L. monocytogenes resulted in a time- and dose-dependent increase in urinary NOx excretion. Translocation was a prerequisite for inducing a NOx response, since heat-killed L. monocytogenes did not elevate NOx excretion in urine. Fecal counts of listeria also showed dose and time dependency. Moreover, the number of viable L. monocytogenes cells in mesenteric lymph nodes also increased in a dose-dependent manner and correlated with urinary NOx. In conclusion, urinary NOx is a quantitative, noninvasive biomarker of listeria translocation. PMID:11097905

  9. Consumption of both low and high (-)-epicatechin apple puree attenuates platelet reactivity and increases plasma concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gasper, Amy; Hollands, Wendy; Casgrain, Amelie; Saha, Shikha; Teucher, Birgit; Dainty, Jack R; Venema, Dini P; Hollman, Peter C; Rein, Maarit J; Nelson, Rebecca; Williamson, Gary; Kroon, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    We hypothesised that consumption of flavanol-containing apple puree would modulate platelet activity and increase nitric oxide metabolite status, and that high flavanol apple puree would exert a greater effect than low flavanol apple puree. 25 subjects consumed 230 g of apple puree containing 25 and 100mg epicatechin (low and high flavanol apple puree, respectively) and aspirin (75 mg) in random order. Measurements were made at baseline, acutely after treatment (2, 6 and 24 h), and after 14 d of treatment. Low flavanol apple puree significantly attenuated ADP and epinephrine-induced integrin-β3 expression 2 h and 6 h after consumption and ADP and epinephrine-induced P-selectin expression within 2h of consumption. High flavanol apple puree attenuated epinephrine and ADP-induced integrin-β3 expression after 2 and 6h. ADP and epinephrine-induced integrin-β3 expression was significantly attenuated 2, 6 and 24 h after consumption of aspirin, whilst 14 d aspirin consumption attenuated collagen-induced P-selectin expression only. The plasma total nitric oxide metabolite conc. was significantly increased 6h after consumption of both low and high flavanol apple purees. In conclusion, consumption of apple purees containing ⩾25 or 100 mg flavanols transiently attenuated ex vivo integrin-β3 and P-selectin expression and increased plasma nitric oxide metabolite conc. in healthy subjects, but the effect was not enhanced for the high flavanol apple puree. PMID:24929184

  10. New insights into BaP-induced toxicity: role of major metabolites in transcriptomics and contribution to hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Terezinha; Jennen, Danyel; van Delft, Joost; van Herwijnen, Marcel; Kyrtoupolos, Soterios; Kleinjans, Jos

    2016-06-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitous carcinogen resulting from incomplete combustion of organic compounds and also present at high levels in cigarette smoke. A wide range of biological effects has been attributed to BaP and its genotoxic metabolite BPDE, but the contribution to BaP toxicity of intermediary metabolites generated along the detoxification path remains unknown. Here, we report for the first time how 3-OH-BaP, 9,10-diol and BPDE, three major BaP metabolites, temporally relate to BaP-induced transcriptomic alterations in HepG2 cells. Since BaP is also known to induce AhR activation, we additionally evaluated TCDD to source the expression of non-genotoxic AhR-mediated patterns. 9,10-Diol was shown to activate several transcription factor networks related to BaP metabolism (AhR), oxidative stress (Nrf2) and cell proliferation (HIF-1α, AP-1) in particular at early time points, while BPDE influenced expression of genes involved in cell energetics, DNA repair and apoptotic pathways. Also, in order to grasp the role of BaP and its metabolites in chemical hepatocarcinogenesis, we compared expression patterns from BaP(-metabolites) and TCDD to a signature set of approximately nine thousand gene expressions derived from hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. While transcriptome modulation by TCDD appeared not significantly related to HCC, BaP and BPDE were shown to deregulate metastatic markers via non-genotoxic and genotoxic mechanisms and activate inflammatory pathways (NF-κβ signaling, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction). BaP also showed strong repression of genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. Altogether, this study provides new insights into BaP-induced toxicity and sheds new light onto its mechanism of action as a hepatocarcinogen.

  11. Metabolomics of Oxidative Stress in Recent Studies of Endogenous and Exogenously Administered Intermediate Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Litt, Lawrence; Segal, Mark R.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Pelton, Jeffrey G.; Kim, Myungwon

    2011-01-01

    Aerobic metabolism occurs in a background of oxygen radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that originate from the incomplete reduction of molecular oxygen in electron transfer reactions. The essential role of aerobic metabolism, the generation and consumption of ATP and other high energy phosphates, sustains a balance of approximately 3000 essential human metabolites that serve not only as nutrients, but also as antioxidants, neurotransmitters, osmolytes, and participants in ligand-based and other cellular signaling. In hypoxia, ischemia, and oxidative stress, where pathological circumstances cause oxygen radicals to form at a rate greater than is possible for their consumption, changes in the composition of metabolite ensembles, or metabolomes, can be associated with physiological changes. Metabolomics and metabonomics are a scientific disciplines that focuse on quantifying dynamic metabolome responses, using multivariate analytical approaches derived from methods within genomics, a discipline that consolidated innovative analysis techniques for situations where the number of biomarkers (metabolites in our case) greatly exceeds the number of subjects. This review focuses on the behavior of cytosolic, mitochondrial, and redox metabolites in ameliorating or exacerbating oxidative stress. After reviewing work regarding a small number of metabolites—pyruvate, ethyl pyruvate, and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate—whose exogenous administration was found to ameliorate oxidative stress, a subsequent section reviews basic multivariate statistical methods common in metabolomics research, and their application in human and preclinical studies emphasizing oxidative stress. Particular attention is paid to new NMR spectroscopy methods in metabolomics and metabonomics. Because complex relationships connect oxidative stress to so many physiological processes, studies from different disciplines were reviewed. All, however, shared the common goal of ultimately developing

  12. Structure-activity relationship in the mutagenicity and cytotoxicity of putative metabolites and related analogs of benzene derived from the valence tautomers benzene oxide and oxepin

    SciTech Connect

    Stark, A.A.; Rastetter, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    A series of putative metabolites and related analogs of benzene, derived from the valence tautomers benzene oxide and oxepin, was tested for mutagenicity (reversions to histidine prototrophy and forward mutations to resistance to 8-azaguanine) and for cytotoxicity by the Ames Salmonella mutagenicity test. Benzene was not mutagenic in either assay. The benzene oxide-oxepin system and benzene dihydrodial induced point mutations but not frameshifts. 4,5-sym-Oxepin oxide, which is a putative metabolite of the oxepin valence tautomer; 3,6-diazo-cyclohexane-1,6-3,4-dioxide, a synthetic precursor of sym-oxepin oxide; and transoid-4,11-dioxatricyclo(5.1 0)undeca-1,6-diene, a stable bridgehead diene analog of sym-oxepin oxide, were toxic but not mutagenic in both assays. 4H-Pyran-4-=carboxaldehyde, a stable acid catalyzed rearrangement product of sym-oxepin oxide, was not mutagenic and much less cytotoxic than sym-oxepin oxide. Stable analogs of the valence tautomer benzene oxide, namely syn-indan-3a,7a-oxide and syn-2-hydroxyindan-3a,7a-oxide, were mutagenic and induced point mutations. All compounds were cytotoxic to Salmonella. Firstly, the apparent decay times of these chemicals, especially that of sym-oxepin oxide, were surprisingly longer than expected, as judged by quantitative plate diffusion assays. Secondly, it is concluded that if benzene oxide is further metabolized in its oxepin tautomeric form, toxic but not mutagenic products are formed. Thirdly, the relatively weak mutagenicity of benzene oxide may be mainly due to its instability and corresponding low probability to reach intracellular polynucleotide targets, whereas stable analogs of benzene oxide are relatively more potent mutagens. 48 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions.

  14. In situ assay of fatty acid β-oxidation by metabolite profiling following permeabilization of cell membranes[S

    PubMed Central

    Ensenauer, Regina; Fingerhut, Ralph; Schriever, Sonja C.; Fink, Barbara; Becker, Marc; Sellerer, Nina C.; Pagel, Philipp; Kirschner, Andreas; Dame, Torsten; Olgemöller, Bernhard; Röschinger, Wulf; Roscher, Adelbert A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of mitochondrial FA β-oxidation (FAO) has drawn increasing interest for defining lipid-induced metabolic dysfunctions, such as in obesity-induced insulin resistance, and evaluating pharmacologic strategies to improve β-oxidation function. The aim was to develop a new assay to quantify β-oxidation function in intact mitochondria and with a low amount of cell material. Cell membranes of primary human fibroblasts were permeabilized with digitonin prior to a load with FFA substrate. Following 120 min of incubation, the various generated acylcarnitines were extracted from both cells and incubation medium by protein precipitation/desalting and subjected to solid-phase extraction. A panel of 30 acylcarnitines per well was quantified by MS/MS and normalized to citrate synthase activity to analyze mitochondrial metabolite flux. Pretreatment with bezafibrate and etomoxir revealed stimulating and inhibiting regulatory effects on β-oxidation function, respectively. In addition to the advantage of a much shorter assay time due to in situ permeabilization compared with whole-cell incubation systems, the method allows the detection of multiple acylcarnitines from an only limited amount of intact cells, particularly relevant to the use of primary cells. This novel approach facilitates highly sensitive, simple, and fast monitoring of pharmacological effects on FAO. PMID:22345709

  15. Characterization of D-3-hydroxybutyrylcarnitine (ketocarnitine): an identified ketosis-induced metabolite.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Maarten R; Serlie, Mireille J; Sauerwein, Hans P; Duran, Marinus; Ruiter, Jos P; Kulik, Willem; Ackermans, Mariëtte T; Minkler, Paul E; Hoppel, Charles L; Wanders, Ronald J A; Houten, Sander M

    2012-07-01

    Hydroxybutyrylcarnitine (HB-carnitine) is a metabolite that has been associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. It is currently unknown whether HB-carnitine can be produced from D-3-hydroxybutyrate (D-3HB), a ketone body; but its formation from L-3-HB-CoA, a fatty acid β-oxidation intermediate, is well established. We aimed to assess which stereoisomers of 3-HB-carnitine are present in vivo. Ketosis and increased fatty acid oxidation were induced in 12 lean healthy men by a 38-hour fasting period. The D-3HB kinetics (stable isotope technique) and stereoisomers of muscle 3-HB-carnitine (high-performance liquid chromatography/ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) were measured. Muscle D-3HB-carnitine content was much higher compared with L-3HB-carnitine. In addition, muscle D-3HB-carnitine correlated significantly with D-3-HB production. Following the finding that a ketone body can be converted into a carnitine ester in vivo, we show in vitro that D-3-HB can be converted into HB-carnitine (ketocarnitine) via an acyl-CoA synthetase reaction in several tissues including human muscle. During fasting, HB-carnitine in muscle is derived mainly from the ketone body D-3HB. The role of D-3HB-carnitine synthesis in metabolism remains to be elucidated.

  16. Anthocyanins and their physiologically relevant metabolites alter the expression of IL‐6 and VCAM‐1 in CD40L and oxidized LDL challenged vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Hiren P.; Czank, Charles; Raheem, Saki; Zhang, Qingzhi; Botting, Nigel P.; Cassidy, Aedín

    2015-01-01

    Scope In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that dietary anthocyanins modulate cardiovascular disease risk; however, given anthocyanins extensive metabolism, it is likely that their degradation products and conjugated metabolites are responsible for this reported bioactivity. Methods and results Human vascular endothelial cells were stimulated with either oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or cluster of differentiation 40 ligand (CD40L) and cotreated with cyanidin‐3‐glucoside and 11 of its recently identified metabolites, at 0.1, 1, and 10 μM concentrations. Protein and gene expression of IL‐6 and VCAM‐1 was quantified by ELISA and RT‐qPCR. In oxLDL‐stimulated cells the parent anthocyanin had no effect on IL‐6 production, whereas numerous anthocyanin metabolites significantly reduced IL‐6 protein levels; phase II conjugates of protocatechuic acid produced the greatest effects (>75% reduction, p ≤ 0.05). In CD40L‐stimulated cells the anthocyanin and its phase II metabolites reduced IL‐6 protein production, where protocatechuic acid‐4‐sulfate induced the greatest reduction (>96% reduction, p ≤ 0.03). Similarly, the anthocyanin and its metabolites reduced VCAM‐1 protein production, with ferulic acid producing the greatest effect (>65% reduction, p ≤ 0.04). Conclusion These novel data provide evidence to suggest that anthocyanin metabolites are bioactive at physiologically relevant concentrations and have the potential to modulate cardiovascular disease progression by altering the expression of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25787755

  17. Circadian Rhythms of Oxidative Stress Markers and Melatonin Metabolite in Patients with Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) is a genetic disorder in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) with severe neurological disorders, in which oxidative stress and disturbed melatonin metabolism may be involved. Herein we confirmed the diurnal variation of melatonin metabolites, oxidative stress markers, and antioxidant power in urine of patients with XPA and age-matched controls, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The peak of 6-sulfatoxymelatonin, a metabolite of melatonin, was seen at 6:00 in both the XPA patients and controls, though the peak value is lower, specifically in the younger age group of XPA patients. The older XPA patients demonstrated an increase in the urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and hexanoyl-lysine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage and lipid peroxidation, having a robust peak at 6:00 and 18:00, respectively. In addition, the urinary level of total antioxidant power was decreased in the older XPA patients. Recently, it is speculated that oxidative stress and antioxidant properties may have a diurnal variation, and the circadian rhythm is likely to influence the NER itself. We believe that the administration of melatonin has the possibility of ameliorating the augmented oxidative stress in neurodegeneration, especially in the older XPA patients, modulating the melatonin metabolism and the circadian rhythm. PMID:27213030

  18. Further investigations into the genotoxicity of quinoxaline-di-N-oxides and their primary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianying; Zhang, Jianwu; Luo, Xun; Ihsan, Awais; Liu, Xianglian; Dai, Menghong; Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-07-01

    Quinoxaline-di-N-oxides (QdNOs) are potential antibacterial agents with a wide range of biological properties. Quinocetone (QCT), carbadox (CBX), olaquindox (OLA), mequindox (MEQ) and cyadox (CYA) are classical QdNOs. Though the genotoxicity of parent drugs has been evaluated, the genotoxicity of their primary N → O reduced metabolites remains unclear. In the present study, a battery of four different short-term tests, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), Ames test, chromosomal aberration assay in vitro and bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay in vivo was carried out to investigate the genotoxicity of the six primary N → O reduced metabolites. Additionally, the genotoxicity of five parent drugs was evaluated by the MLA. Strong genotoxicity of N1-MEQ, B-MEQ and B-CBX was found in three of the assays but not in the Ames assay, and the rank order was N1-MEQ>B-MEQ>B-CBX that is consistent with prototype QdNOs. Negative results for the five QdNOs were noted in the MLA. We present for the first time a comparison of the genotoxicity of primary N → O reduced metabolites, and evaluate the ability of five QdNOs to cause mutations in the MLA. The present study demonstrates that metabolites are involved in genetic toxicity mediated by QdNOs, and improve the prudent use of QdNOs for public health. PMID:27170491

  19. Further investigations into the genotoxicity of quinoxaline-di-N-oxides and their primary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianying; Zhang, Jianwu; Luo, Xun; Ihsan, Awais; Liu, Xianglian; Dai, Menghong; Cheng, Guyue; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-07-01

    Quinoxaline-di-N-oxides (QdNOs) are potential antibacterial agents with a wide range of biological properties. Quinocetone (QCT), carbadox (CBX), olaquindox (OLA), mequindox (MEQ) and cyadox (CYA) are classical QdNOs. Though the genotoxicity of parent drugs has been evaluated, the genotoxicity of their primary N → O reduced metabolites remains unclear. In the present study, a battery of four different short-term tests, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), Ames test, chromosomal aberration assay in vitro and bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus assay in vivo was carried out to investigate the genotoxicity of the six primary N → O reduced metabolites. Additionally, the genotoxicity of five parent drugs was evaluated by the MLA. Strong genotoxicity of N1-MEQ, B-MEQ and B-CBX was found in three of the assays but not in the Ames assay, and the rank order was N1-MEQ>B-MEQ>B-CBX that is consistent with prototype QdNOs. Negative results for the five QdNOs were noted in the MLA. We present for the first time a comparison of the genotoxicity of primary N → O reduced metabolites, and evaluate the ability of five QdNOs to cause mutations in the MLA. The present study demonstrates that metabolites are involved in genetic toxicity mediated by QdNOs, and improve the prudent use of QdNOs for public health.

  20. Effects of O-methylated metabolites of quercetin on oxidative stress, thermotolerance, lifespan and bioavailability on Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Surco-Laos, Felipe; Cabello, Juan; Gómez-Orte, Eva; González-Manzano, Susana; González-Paramás, Ana M; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Dueñas, Montserrat

    2011-08-01

    Quercetin is a major flavonoid in the human diet and the most commonly used in studies of biological activity. Most of the knowledge about its biological effects has originated from in vitro studies while in vivo data are scarce. Quercetin mostly occurs in foodstuffs as glycosides that are deglycosylated during absorption and further submitted to different conjugation reactions. Methylation to isorhamnetin (quercetin 3'-O-methylether) or tamarixetin (quercetin 4'-O-methylether) seems to be an important conjugation process in quercetin metabolism. In this work, the effects of quercetin and its 3'- and 4'-O-methylated metabolites on the phenotypic characteristics, stress oxidative resistance, thermotolerance and lifespan of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans have been assessed. The three assayed flavonols significantly prolonged the lifespan of this nematode with an increase from 11% to 16% in the mean lifespan with respect to controls. However, only quercetin significantly increased the reproductive capacity of the worm and enlarged the body size. Exposure to the assayed flavonols also increased significantly the resistance against thermal and juglone-induced oxidative stress, although differences were found depending on the stage of development of the worm. Thus, quercetin offered greater protection when thermal stress was applied in the 1st day of adulthood, whereas tamarixetin was more efficient in worms submitted to stress in the 6th day of adulthood. Similarly, significantly greater protection was provided by quercetin than by its methylated derivatives at the 1st day of adulthood, whilst quercetin and isorhamnetin were equally efficient when the oxidative stress was induced in the 6th of day of adulthood. Further evidence of antioxidant protection was obtained checking the oxidation status of proteins by the OxyBlot™ detection kit. Analyses by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS confirmed that the three flavonols were taken up by C. elegans leading to the formation of

  1. Oxidative metabolism of ferrocene analogues of tamoxifen: characterization and antiproliferative activities of the metabolites.

    PubMed

    Richard, Marie-Aude; Hamels, Didier; Pigeon, Pascal; Top, Siden; Dansette, Patrick M; Lee, Hui Zhi Shirley; Vessières, Anne; Mansuy, Daniel; Jaouen, Gérard

    2015-06-01

    Ferrociphenols have been found to have high antiproliferative activity against estrogen-independent breast cancer cells. The rat and human liver microsome-mediated metabolism of three compounds of the ferrocifen (FC) family, 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC1), 1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-1-(phenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC2), and 1-[4-(3-dimethylaminopropoxy)phenyl]-1-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-ferrocenyl-but-1-ene (FC3), was studied. Three main metabolite classes were identified: quinone methides (QMs) deriving from two-electron oxidation of FCs, cyclic indene products (CPs) deriving from acid-catalyzed cyclization of QMs, and allylic alcohols (AAs) deriving from hydroxylation of FCs. These metabolites are generated by cytochromes P450 (P450s), as shown by experiments with either N-benzylimidazole as a P450 inhibitor or recombinant human P450s. Such P450-dependent oxidation of the phenol function and hydroxylation of the allylic CH2 group of FCs leads to the formation of QM and AA metabolites, respectively. Some of the new ferrociphenols obtained in this study were found to exhibit remarkable antiproliferative effects toward MDA-MB-231 hormone-independent breast cancer cells.

  2. Decrease of plasma and urinary oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen after consumption of watercress by human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Mohr, S N; Yang, C S

    1996-12-01

    To investigate the effect of the consumption of watercress (Nasturtium officinale R. Br.), a cruciferous vegetable, on acetaminophen metabolism, the pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen and its metabolites were studied in a crossover trial of human volunteers. A single oral dose of acetaminophen (1 gm) was given 10 hours after ingestion of watercress homogenates (50 gm). In comparison with acetaminophen only, the ingestion of watercress resulted in a significant reduction in the area under the plasma cysteine acetaminophen (Cys-acetaminophen) concentration-time curve and in the peak plasma Cys-acetaminophen concentration by 28% +/- 3% and by 21% +/- 4% (mean +/- SE; n = 7; p < 0.005), respectively. Correspondingly, the Cys-acetaminophen formation rate constant and Cys-acetaminophen formation fraction were decreased by 55% +/- 9% and 52% +/- 7% (p < 0.01), respectively. Consistent with the results obtained from the plasma, the total urinary excretion of Cys-acetaminophen in 24 hours was also reduced. A decrease of mercapturate acetaminophen, a Cys-acetaminophen metabolite, was also shown in the plasma and urine samples. However, the plasma pharmacokinetic processes and the urinary excretions of acetaminophen, acetaminophen glucuronide, and acetaminophen sulfate were not altered significantly by the watercress treatment. These results suggest that the consumption of watercress causes a decrease in the levels of oxidative metabolites of acetaminophen, probably due to inhibition of oxidative metabolism of this drug.

  3. Sorption and related properties of the swine antibiotic carbadox and associated N-oxide reduced metabolites.

    PubMed

    Strock, Troy J; Sassman, Stephen A; Lee, Linda S

    2005-05-01

    Carbadox (CBX) (methyl 3-[2-quinoxalinylmethylene]-carbazate N1, N4 dioxide) is a chemotherapeutic growth promoter and antibacterial drug added to feed for starter pigs. Toxicity of CBX and at least one of its metabolites (bis-desoxycarbadox; DCBX) has resulted in a number of studies regarding its stability and residence time in edible swine tissue; however, little is known on its environmental fate pertinent to the application of antibiotic-laden manure to agricultural fields. We measured sorption of CBX and DCBX by soils, sediment, and homoionic clays from 10 mM KCl and 5 mM CaCl2 solutions, sorption of two N-oxide reduced metabolites (N4 and N1) by a subset of soils from 5 mM CaCl2, octanol-water partition coefficients (Kow) of CBX and all three metabolites, and CBX solubility in water and mixed solvents. Sorption appeared well-correlated to organic carbon (OC) for the soils (e.g., log (Koc, L/kg OC) = 3.96 +/- 0.18 for CBX). However, sorption was enhanced in the presence of K+, competitive sorption from the metabolites was observed, and sorption by clay minerals was large (approximately 10(5) L/kg for SWy(-1)). Sorption by clays was inversely correlated to surface charge density (e.g., sorption decreased from 10(5) to 10 L/kg as charge density increased from 1 to 2 micromolc/m2), similar to what has been observed for nitroaromatic compounds. In the absence of a clay surface, hydrophobic-type forces dominated with Kow values and reverse-phase chromatographic retention times increasing with the loss of oxygen from the aromatic nitrogens. Therefore, it is likely that both OC and clay contribute significantly to sorption of carbadox and related metabolites by soils with relative contributions most dependent on clay type.

  4. Impact of nutrient excess and endothelial nitric oxide synthase on the plasma metabolite profile in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sansbury, Brian E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    An increase in calorie consumption is associated with the recent rise in obesity prevalence. However, our current understanding of the effects of nutrient excess on major metabolic pathways appears insufficient to develop safe and effective metabolic interventions to prevent obesity. Hence, we sought to identify systemic metabolic changes caused by nutrient excess and to determine how endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)—which has anti-obesogenic properties—affects systemic metabolism by measuring plasma metabolites. Wild-type (WT) and eNOS transgenic (eNOS-TG) mice were placed on low fat or high fat diets for 6 weeks, and plasma metabolites were measured using an unbiased metabolomic approach. High fat feeding in WT mice led to significant increases in fat mass, which was associated with significantly lower plasma levels of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, lysophospholipids, 3-dehydrocarnitine, and bile acids, as well as branched chain amino acids (BCAAs) and their metabolites. Plasma levels of several lipids including sphingomyelins, stearoylcarnitine, dihomo-linoleate and metabolites associated with oxidative stress were increased by high fat diet. In comparison with low fat-fed WT mice, eNOS-TG mice showed lower levels of several free fatty acids, but in contrast, the levels of bile acids, amino acids, and BCAA catabolites were increased. When placed on a high fat diet, eNOS overexpressing mice showed remarkably higher levels of plasma bile acids and elevated levels of plasma BCAAs and their catabolites compared with WT mice. Treatment with GW4064, an inhibitor of bile acid synthesis, decreased plasma bile acid levels but was not sufficient to reverse the anti-obesogenic effects of eNOS overexpression. These findings reveal unique metabolic changes in response to high fat diet and eNOS overexpression and suggest that the anti-obesity effects of eNOS are likely independent of changes in the bile acid pool. PMID:25505420

  5. Oxidation of Metabolites Highlights the Microbial Interactions and Role of Acetobacter pasteurianus during Cocoa Bean Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Frédéric; Lefeber, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Four cocoa-specific acetic acid bacterium (AAB) strains, namely, Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B, Acetobacter ghanensis LMG 23848T, Acetobacter fabarum LMG 24244T, and Acetobacter senegalensis 108B, were analyzed kinetically and metabolically during monoculture laboratory fermentations. A cocoa pulp simulation medium (CPSM) for AAB, containing ethanol, lactic acid, and mannitol, was used. All AAB strains differed in their ethanol and lactic acid oxidation kinetics, whereby only A. pasteurianus 386B performed a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid into acetic acid and acetoin, respectively. Only A. pasteurianus 386B and A. ghanensis LMG 23848T oxidized mannitol into fructose. Coculture fermentations with A. pasteurianus 386B or A. ghanensis LMG 23848T and Lactobacillus fermentum 222 in CPSM for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) containing glucose, fructose, and citric acid revealed oxidation of lactic acid produced by the LAB strain into acetic acid and acetoin that was faster in the case of A. pasteurianus 386B. A triculture fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae H5S5K23, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B, using CPSM for LAB, showed oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid produced by the yeast and LAB strain, respectively, into acetic acid and acetoin. Hence, acetic acid and acetoin are the major end metabolites of cocoa bean fermentation. All data highlight that A. pasteurianus 386B displayed beneficial functional roles to be used as a starter culture, namely, a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid, and that these metabolites play a key role as substrates for A. pasteurianus in its indispensable cross-feeding interactions with yeast and LAB during cocoa bean fermentation. PMID:24413595

  6. Oxidation of metabolites highlights the microbial interactions and role of Acetobacter pasteurianus during cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Moens, Frédéric; Lefeber, Timothy; De Vuyst, Luc

    2014-03-01

    Four cocoa-specific acetic acid bacterium (AAB) strains, namely, Acetobacter pasteurianus 386B, Acetobacter ghanensis LMG 23848(T), Acetobacter fabarum LMG 24244(T), and Acetobacter senegalensis 108B, were analyzed kinetically and metabolically during monoculture laboratory fermentations. A cocoa pulp simulation medium (CPSM) for AAB, containing ethanol, lactic acid, and mannitol, was used. All AAB strains differed in their ethanol and lactic acid oxidation kinetics, whereby only A. pasteurianus 386B performed a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid into acetic acid and acetoin, respectively. Only A. pasteurianus 386B and A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) oxidized mannitol into fructose. Coculture fermentations with A. pasteurianus 386B or A. ghanensis LMG 23848(T) and Lactobacillus fermentum 222 in CPSM for lactic acid bacteria (LAB) containing glucose, fructose, and citric acid revealed oxidation of lactic acid produced by the LAB strain into acetic acid and acetoin that was faster in the case of A. pasteurianus 386B. A triculture fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae H5S5K23, L. fermentum 222, and A. pasteurianus 386B, using CPSM for LAB, showed oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid produced by the yeast and LAB strain, respectively, into acetic acid and acetoin. Hence, acetic acid and acetoin are the major end metabolites of cocoa bean fermentation. All data highlight that A. pasteurianus 386B displayed beneficial functional roles to be used as a starter culture, namely, a fast oxidation of ethanol and lactic acid, and that these metabolites play a key role as substrates for A. pasteurianus in its indispensable cross-feeding interactions with yeast and LAB during cocoa bean fermentation.

  7. Contribution of oxidative metabolism to cocaine-induced liver and kidney damage.

    PubMed

    Valente, M J; Carvalho, F; Bastos, M d L; de Pinho, P G; Carvalho, M

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine is a potent psychoactive illicit substance and its abuse represents a major health burden worldwide. The pharmacodynamics and toxicity of cocaine have been extensively documented, and are generally associated to its affinity towards neurotransmitters transporters and several receptors. However, drug-related formation of reactive compounds, as is the case of pro-oxidant reactive species, and interaction at molecular level is still an understudied matter. The involvement of oxidative stress (OS) in cocaine-induced toxicity has been reported in both human and animal models, in several organs and systems, including heart, liver, kidney, and central nervous system (CNS). Cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated cocaine metabolism yields the reactive pro-oxidant compound norcocaine (NCOC) and further oxidative metabolites. Special emphasis should be given to the stable radical norcocaine nitroxide (NCOC-NO·), which plays a key role in cocaine-induced hepatotoxicity, either by entering a futile redox cycle with an N-oxidative metabolite, or by being further oxidized to a highly reactive ion. In fact, cocaine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and consequent OS has been postulated based on the reactivity of cocaine N-oxidative metabolites. Depletion of cellular antioxidant defenses and impairment of mitochondrial respiration have also been considered important causes of ROS production, and subsequent cell death mediated by cocaine. The present review provides a thorough description of the current knowledge on cocaine oxidative metabolism and its role on drug-induced liver and kidney damage.

  8. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  9. UCP2 transports C4 metabolites out of mitochondria, regulating glucose and glutamine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vozza, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; De Leonardis, Francesco; Lasorsa, Francesco M; Castegna, Alessandra; Amorese, Daniela; Marmo, Raffaele; Calcagnile, Valeria M; Palmieri, Luigi; Ricquier, Daniel; Paradies, Eleonora; Scarcia, Pasquale; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Fiermonte, Giuseppe

    2014-01-21

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is involved in various physiological and pathological processes such as insulin secretion, stem cell differentiation, cancer, and aging. However, its biochemical and physiological function is still under debate. Here we show that UCP2 is a metabolite transporter that regulates substrate oxidation in mitochondria. To shed light on its biochemical role, we first studied the effects of its silencing on the mitochondrial oxidation of glucose and glutamine. Compared with wild-type, UCP2-silenced human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells, grown in the presence of glucose, showed a higher inner mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP:ADP ratio associated with a lower lactate release. Opposite results were obtained in the presence of glutamine instead of glucose. UCP2 reconstituted in lipid vesicles catalyzed the exchange of malate, oxaloacetate, and aspartate for phosphate plus a proton from opposite sides of the membrane. The higher levels of citric acid cycle intermediates found in the mitochondria of siUCP2-HepG2 cells compared with those found in wild-type cells in addition to the transport data indicate that, by exporting C4 compounds out of mitochondria, UCP2 limits the oxidation of acetyl-CoA-producing substrates such as glucose and enhances glutaminolysis, preventing the mitochondrial accumulation of C4 metabolites derived from glutamine. Our work reveals a unique regulatory mechanism in cell bioenergetics and provokes a substantial reconsideration of the physiological and pathological functions ascribed to UCP2 based on its purported uncoupling properties.

  10. Methods to Detect Nitric Oxide and its Metabolites in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) methodology is a complex and often confusing science and the focus of many debates and discussion concerning NO biochemistry. NO is involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response and neural communication. Therefore its accurate detection and quantification is critical to understanding health and disease. Due to the extremely short physiological half life of this gaseous free radical, alternative strategies for the detection of reaction products of NO biochemistry have been developed. The quantification of NO metabolites in biological samples provides valuable information with regards to in vivo NO production, bioavailability and metabolism. Simply sampling a single compartment such as blood or plasma may not always provide an accurate assessment of whole body NO status, particularly in tissues. Therefore, extrapolation of plasma or blood NO status to specific tissues of interest is no longer a valid approach. As a result, methods continue to be developed and validated which allow the detection and quantification of NO and NO-related products/metabolites in multiple compartments of experimental animals in vivo. The methods described in this review is not an exhaustive or comprehensive discussion of all methods available for the detection of NO but rather a description of the most commonly used and practical methods which allow accurate and sensitive quantification of NO products/metabolites in multiple biological matrices under normal physiological conditions. PMID:17664129

  11. The Oxidized Linoleic Acid Metabolite-Cytochrome P450 System is Active in Biopsies from Patients with Inflammatory Dental Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ruparel, Shivani; Hargreaves, Kenneth M.; Eskander, Michael; Rowan, Spencer; de Almeida, Jose F.A.; Roman, Linda; Henry, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous TRPV1 agonists such as oxidized linoleic acid metabolites (OLAMs) and the enzymes releasing them [e.g., cytochrome P450 (CYP)], are up-regulated following inflammation in the rat. However, it is not known if such agonists are elevated in human inflammatory pain conditions. Since TRPV1 is expressed in human dental pulp nociceptors, we hypothesized that OLAM-CYP machinery is active in this tissue type and is increased under painful inflammatory conditions such as irreversible pulpitis (IP). The aim of this study was to compare CYP expression and linoleic acid (LA) metabolism in normal versus inflamed human dental pulp. Our data showed that exogenous LA metabolism was significantly increased in IP tissues compared to normal tissues and that pretreatment with a CYP inhibitor, ketoconazole, significantly inhibited LA metabolism. Additionally, extracts obtained from LA-treated inflamed tissues, evoked significant inward currents in TG neurons, and were blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV1 antagonist, IRTX. Moreover, extracts obtained from ketoconazole-pretreated inflamed tissues significantly reduced inward currents in TG neurons. These data suggest that LA metabolites produced in human inflamed tissues act as TRPV1 agonists and that the metabolite production can be targeted by CYP inhibition. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis of two CYP isoforms, CYP2J and CYP3A1, were shown to be predominately expressed in immune cells infiltrating the inflamed dental pulp, emphasizing the paracrine role of CYP enzymes in OLAM regulation. Collectively, our data indicates that the machinery responsible for OLAM production is up-regulated during inflammation and can be targeted to develop potential analgesics for inflammatory-induced dental pain. PMID:23867730

  12. Lipid oxidative damage and distribution of inorganic arsenic and its metabolites in the rat nervous system after arsenite exposure: influence of alpha tocopherol supplementation.

    PubMed

    García-Chávez, Erika; Jiménez, Ismael; Segura, Bertha; Del Razo, Luz M

    2006-12-01

    Inorganic arsenic (iAs) exposure causes peripheral neuropathy. Oxidative effects caused by iAs exposure in peripheral nerves have been incompletely characterized. This study analyzed arsenic and lipid oxidative damage in the brain, spinal cord, and sciatic and sensory sural nerves following arsenite exposure. This study also explored whether alpha tocopherol (alpha-TOC) administration mitigates arsenite-induced oxidative damage. Thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels and distributions of iAs and its metabolites were evaluated in male Wistar rats following 30d of sodium arsenite exposure (10mg/kg bodyweight (bw)/d, by gavage). A second group also received alpha-TOC (125mg/kg bw/d, by gavage) during the final 20d of arsenite administration. Arsenite exposure caused increased TBARS levels within each region of the nervous system; oxidative stress was most pronounced in the sural and sciatic nerves. In addition there was a positive quadratic relationship between TBARS levels and the concentration of arsenicals found in the nervous system (r(2)=0.878, p<0.001). Dimethylarsenic was the predominant metabolite of iAs found. Animals alpha-TOC-treated had a 1.7-5.2-fold reduction in TBARS levels when compared with rats that received iAs alone. These results suggest that oxidative damage may be the main mechanism of toxicity induced by exposure of the peripheral nervous system to arsenite and that such damage could be attenuated by alpha-TOC-supplementation.

  13. Mechanism of angiotensin II-induced arachidonic acid metabolite release in aortic smooth muscle cells: involvement of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, J; Kozawa, O; Suzuki, A; Watanabe-Tomita, Y; Oiso, Y; Uematsu, T

    1997-02-01

    In a previous study, we have shown that angiotensin II (Ang II) activates phosphatidylcholine-hydrolyzing phospholipase D due to Ang II-induced Ca2+ influx from extracellular space in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. In the present study, we have investigated the role of phospholipase D in Ang II-induced arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite release and prostacyclin synthesis in subcultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells. Ang II significantly stimulated AA metabolite release in a concentration-dependent manner in the range between 1 nmol/I and 0.1 mumol/I. D.L.-Propranolol hydrochloride (propranolol), an inhibitor of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced release of AA metabolites. The Ang II-induced AA metabolite release was reduced by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA. Genistein, an inhibitor of protein tyrosine kinases, significantly suppressed the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. 1,6-Bis-(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)-hexane (RHC-80267), a potent and selective inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase, significantly inhibited the Ang II-induced AA metabolite release. Both propranolol and RHC-80267 inhibited the Ang II-induced synthesis of 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha, a stable metabolite of prostacyclin. The synthesis was suppressed by genistein. These results strongly suggest that the AA metabolite release induced by Ang II is mediated, at least in part, through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by phospholipase D activation in aortic smooth muscle cells.

  14. Profiles of metabolites and gene expression in rats with chemically induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Wilbert H M; Lamers, Robert-Jan A N; van Bladeren, Peter J; Groten, John P; van Nesselrooij, Joop H J; van Ommen, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated whether integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics data increased the sensitivity of detection and provided new insight in the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Metabolite levels in plasma or urine were analyzed in relation to changes in hepatic gene expression in rats that received bromobenzene to induce acute hepatic centrilobular necrosis. Bromobenzene-induced lesions were only observed after treatment with the highest of 3 dose levels. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that metabolite profiles of blood plasma were largely different from controls when the rats were treated with bromobenzene, also at doses that did not elicit histopathological changes. Changes in levels of genes and metabolites were related to the degree of necrosis, providing putative novel markers of hepatotoxicity. Levels of endogenous metabolites like alanine, lactate, tyrosine and dimethylglycine differed in plasma from treated and control rats. The metabolite profiles of urine were found to be reflective of the exposure levels. This integrated analysis of hepatic transcriptomics and plasma metabolomics was able to more sensitively detect changes related to hepatotoxicity and discover novel markers. The relation between gene expression and metabolite levels was explored and additional insight in the role of various biological pathways in bromobenzene-induced hepatic necrosis was obtained, including the involvement of apoptosis and changes in glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. The complete Table 2 is available as a supplemental file online at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurlasp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To access the file, click on the issue link for 33(4), then select this article. A download option appears at the bottom of this abstract. In order to access the full article online, you must either have an individual subscription or a member subscription accessed through www.toxpath.org. PMID:16036859

  15. Differential inhibition of CYP1-catalyzed regioselective hydroxylation of estradiol by berberine and its oxidative metabolites.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Ping; Huang, Chiung-Chiao; Shen, Chien-Chang; Tsai, Keng-Chang; Ueng, Yune-Fang

    2015-10-01

    Berberine is a pharmacologically active alkaloid present in widely used medicinal plants, such as Coptis chinensis (Huang-Lian). The hormone estradiol is oxidized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1B1 to primarily form the genotoxic metabolite 4-hydroxyestradiol, whereas CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 predominantly generate 2-hydroxyestradiol. To illustrate the effect of berberine on the regioselective oxidation of estradiol, effects of berberine and its metabolites on CYP1 activities were studied. Among CYP1s, CYP1B1.1, 1.3 (L432V), and 1.4 (N453S)-catalyzed 4-hydroxylation were preferentially inhibited by berberine. Differing from the competitive inhibition of CYP1B1.1 and 1.3, N453S substitution in CYP1B1 allowed a non-competitive or mixed-type pattern. An N228T in CYP1B1 highly decreased its activity and preference to 4-hydroxylation. A reverse mutation of T223N in CYP1A2 retained its 2-hydroxylation preference, but enhanced its inhibition susceptibility to berberine. Compared with berberine, metabolites demethyleneberberine and thalifendine caused weaker inhibition of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 activities. Unexpectedly, thalifendine was more potent than berberine in the inhibition of CYP1A2, in which case an enhanced interaction through polar hydrogen-π bond was predicted from the docking analysis. These results demonstrate that berberine preferentially inhibits the estradiol 4-hydroxylation activity of CYP1B1 variants, suggesting that 4-hydroxyestradiol-mediated toxicity might be reduced by berberine, especially in tissues/tumors highly expressing CYP1B1.

  16. [Extracellular protein metabolite of Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei reactivates cells subjected to oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Vorob'eva, L I; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Ponomareva, G M; Briukhanov, A L

    2003-01-01

    A protein exometabolite isolated from the culture liquid of Luteococcus japonicus subsp. casei reactivates the cells of this microorganism, following H2O2 or paraquat-induced oxidative stress. The resistance of L. casei cells to these oxidizers is accounted for by the high activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. The effect of the protein exometabolite is universal, in that it reactivates the cells after UV irradiation, heating, or oxidative stress. However, the cells subjected to oxidative stress are significantly less susceptible to the reactivating effect, as compared to their UV-irradiated or heated counterparts. Possible causes of these differences are discussed. PMID:12722655

  17. Spongionella secondary metabolites protect mitochondrial function in cortical neurons against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Leirós, Marta; Sánchez, Jon A; Alonso, Eva; Rateb, Mostafa E; Houssen, Wael E; Ebel, Rainer; Jaspars, Marcel; Alfonso, Amparo; Botana, Luis M

    2014-02-01

    The marine habitat provides a large number of structurally-diverse bioactive compounds for drug development. Marine sponges have been studied over many years and are found to be a rich source of these bioactive chemicals. This study is focused on the evaluation of the activity of six diterpene derivatives isolated from Spongionella sp. on mitochondrial function using an oxidative in vitro stress model. The test compounds include the Gracilins (A, H, K, J and L) and tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1. Compounds were co-incubated with hydrogen peroxide for 12 hours to determine their protective capacities and their effect on markers of apoptosis and Nrf2/ARE pathways was evaluated. Results conclude that Gracilins preserve neurons against oxidative damage, and that in particular, tetrahydroaplysulphurin-1 shows a complete neuroprotective activity. Oxidative stress is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and consequently to neurodegenerative disorders like Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases, Friedreich ataxia or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This neuroprotection against oxidation conditions suggest that these metabolites could be interesting lead candidates in drug development for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24473170

  18. Glucose metabolite glyoxal induces senescence in telomerase-immortalized human mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Various by-products of the cellular metabolism, such as reactive carbonyl species (RCS) are potentially harmful to cells and tissues, and play a role in many physiological and pathological processes. Among various RCS is the highly reactive dicarbonyl glyoxal (GO), which is a natural physiological metabolite produced by the auto-oxidation of glucose, and can form covalent adducts known as advanced glycation endproducts (AGE). We have previously reported that GO accelerates ageing and causes premature senescence in normal human skin fibroblasts. Results Using a bone marrow-derived telomerase-immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line hMSC-TERT we have observed that an exposure of cells to 0.75 mM and 1 mM GO induces irreversible cellular senescence within 3 days. Induction of senescence in hMSC-TERT was demonstrated by a variety of markers, including characteristic cell morphology and enlargement, vacuolisation, multinucleation, induction of senescence associated β-galactosidase, cell cycle arrest, and increased levels of a cell cycle inhibitor p16. These changes were accompanied by increased extent of DNA breaks as measured by the comet assay, and increased levels of the AGE product, carboxymethyl-lysine (CML). Furthermore, the in vitro differentiation potential of hMSC-TERT to become functional osteoblasts was highly reduced in GO-treated stem cells, as determined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralized matrix (MM) formation. Conclusions The results of our study imply that an imbalanced glucose metabolism can reduce the functioning ability of stem cells in vivo both during ageing and during stem cell-based therapeutic interventions. PMID:22424056

  19. "Ecstasy"-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y differentiated cells: role of hyperthermia and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Daniel José; Capela, João Paulo; Silva, Renata; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Branco, Paula Sério; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Carvalho, Félix

    2014-02-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") is a recreational hallucinogenic drug of abuse known to elicit neurotoxic properties. Hepatic formation of neurotoxic metabolites is thought to play a major role in MDMA-related neurotoxicity, though the mechanisms involved are still unclear. Here, we studied the neurotoxicity mechanisms and stability of MDMA and 6 of its major human metabolites, namely α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) and N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA) and their correspondent glutathione (GSH) and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) conjugates, under normothermic (37 °C) or hyperthermic conditions (40 °C), using cultured SH-SY5Y differentiated cells. We showed that MDMA metabolites exhibited toxicity to SH-SY5Y differentiated cells, being the GSH and NAC conjugates more toxic than their catecholic precursors and MDMA. Furthermore, whereas the toxicity of the catechol metabolites was potentiated by hyperthermia, NAC-conjugated metabolites revealed higher toxicity under normothermia and GSH-conjugated metabolites-induced toxicity was temperature-independent. Moreover, a time-dependent decrease in extracellular concentration of MDMA metabolites was observed, which was potentiated by hyperthermia. The antioxidant NAC significantly protected against the neurotoxic effects of MDMA metabolites. MDMA metabolites increased intracellular glutathione levels, though depletion in thiol content was observed in MDMA-exposed cells. Finally, the neurotoxic effects induced by the MDMA metabolite N-Me-α-MeDA involved caspase 3 activation. In conclusion, this study evaluated the stability of MDMA metabolites in vitro, and demonstrated that the catechol MDMA metabolites and their GSH and NAC conjugates, rather than MDMA itself, exhibited neurotoxic actions in SH-SY5Y differentiated cells, which were differently affected by hyperthermia, thus highlighting a major role for reactive metabolites and hyperthermia in MDMA's neurotoxicity.

  20. In Vitro Study of Nitric Oxide Metabolites Effects on Human Hydatid of Echinococcus granulosus.

    PubMed

    Zeghir-Bouteldja, Razika; Amri, Manel; Aitaissa, Saliha; Bouaziz, Samia; Mezioug, Dalila; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia

    2009-01-01

    Hydatidosis is characterized by the long-term coexistence of larva Echinococcus granulosus and its host without effective rejection. Previous studies demonstrated nitric oxide (NO) production (in vivo and in vitro) during hydatidosis. In this study, we investigated the direct in vitro effects of NO species: nitrite (NO(2) (-)), nitrate (NO(3) (-)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) on protoscolices (PSCs) viability and hydatid cyst layers integrity for 24 hours and 48 hours. Our results showed protoscolicidal activity of NO(2) (-) and ONOO(-) 24 hours and 3 hours after treatment with 320 muM and 80 muM respectively. Degenerative effects were observed on germinal and laminated layers. The comparison of the in vitro effects of NO species on the PSCs viability indicated that ONOO(-) is more cytotoxic than NO(2) (-). In contrast, NO(3) (-) has no effect. These results suggest possible involvement of NO(2) (-) and ONOO(-) in antihydatic action and point the efficacy of these metabolites as scolicidal agents.

  1. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern. - Highlights: • Nivalenol induces oxidative stress in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). • Nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effects in IECs. • Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol trigger antioxidant response IECs. • These results indicate the importance of mycotoxins co-contamination.

  2. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions. PMID:27542476

  3. Involvement of a volatile metabolite during phosphoramide mustard-induced ovotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-05-15

    The finite ovarian follicle reserve can be negatively impacted by exposure to chemicals including the anti-neoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide (CPA). CPA requires bioactivation to phosphoramide mustard (PM) to elicit its therapeutic effects however; in addition to being the tumor-targeting metabolite, PM is also ovotoxic. In addition, PM can break down to a cytotoxic, volatile metabolite, chloroethylaziridine (CEZ). The aim of this study was initially to characterize PM-induced ovotoxicity in growing follicles. Using PND4 Fisher 344 rats, ovaries were cultured for 4 days before being exposed once to PM (10 or 30 μM). Following eight additional days in culture, relative to control (1% DMSO), PM had no impact on primordial, small primary or large primary follicle number, but both PM concentrations induced secondary follicle depletion (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a reduction in follicle number in the control-treated ovaries was observed. Thus, the involvement of a volatile, cytotoxic PM metabolite (VC) in PM-induced ovotoxicity was explored in cultured rat ovaries, with control ovaries physically separated from PM-treated ovaries during culture. Direct PM (60 μM) exposure destroyed all stage follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05). VC from nearby wells depleted primordial follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05), temporarily reduced secondary follicle number after 2 days, and did not impact other stage follicles at any other time point. VC was determined to spontaneously liberate from PM, which could contribute to degradation of PM during storage. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PM and VC are ovotoxicants, with different follicular targets, and that the VC may be a major player during PM-induced ovotoxicity observed in cancer survivors. - Highlights: • PM depletes all stage ovarian follicles in a temporal pattern. • A volatile ovotoxic compound is liberated from PM. • The volatile metabolite depletes primordial follicles.

  4. Dissection of Trichoderma longibrachiatum-induced defense in onion (Allium cepa L.) against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepa by target metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Abdel-Motaal, Fatma; El-Sayed, Magdi; Jogaiah, Sudisha; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Ito, Shin-ichi; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2016-05-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts that can cause substantial changes in the metabolism of host plants, thereby increasing plant growth and activating plant defense to various diseases. Target metabolite profiling approach was selected to demonstrate that Trichoderma longibrachiatum isolated from desert soil can confer beneficial agronomic traits to onion and induce defense mechanism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepa (FOC), through triggering a number of primary and secondary metabolite pathways. Onion seeds primed with Trichoderma T1 strain displayed early seedling emergence and enhanced growth compared with Trichoderma T2-treatment and untreated control. Therefore, T1 was selected for further investigations under greenhouse conditions, which revealed remarkable improvement in the onion bulb growth parameters and resistance against FOC. The metabolite platform of T1-primed onion (T1) and T1-primed onion challenged with FOC (T1+FOC) displayed significant accumulation of 25 abiotic and biotic stress-responsive metabolites, representing carbohydrate, phenylpropanoid and sulfur assimilation metabolic pathways. In addition, T1- and T1+FOC-treated onion plants showed discrete antioxidant capacity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) compared with control. Our findings demonstrated the contribution of T. longibrachiatum to the accumulation of key metabolites, which subsequently leads to the improvement of onion growth, as well as its resistance to oxidative stress and FOC.

  5. Dissection of Trichoderma longibrachiatum-induced defense in onion (Allium cepa L.) against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepa by target metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Abdel-Motaal, Fatma; El-Sayed, Magdi; Jogaiah, Sudisha; Shigyo, Masayoshi; Ito, Shin-ichi; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2016-05-01

    Trichoderma spp. are versatile opportunistic plant symbionts that can cause substantial changes in the metabolism of host plants, thereby increasing plant growth and activating plant defense to various diseases. Target metabolite profiling approach was selected to demonstrate that Trichoderma longibrachiatum isolated from desert soil can confer beneficial agronomic traits to onion and induce defense mechanism against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cepa (FOC), through triggering a number of primary and secondary metabolite pathways. Onion seeds primed with Trichoderma T1 strain displayed early seedling emergence and enhanced growth compared with Trichoderma T2-treatment and untreated control. Therefore, T1 was selected for further investigations under greenhouse conditions, which revealed remarkable improvement in the onion bulb growth parameters and resistance against FOC. The metabolite platform of T1-primed onion (T1) and T1-primed onion challenged with FOC (T1+FOC) displayed significant accumulation of 25 abiotic and biotic stress-responsive metabolites, representing carbohydrate, phenylpropanoid and sulfur assimilation metabolic pathways. In addition, T1- and T1+FOC-treated onion plants showed discrete antioxidant capacity against 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) compared with control. Our findings demonstrated the contribution of T. longibrachiatum to the accumulation of key metabolites, which subsequently leads to the improvement of onion growth, as well as its resistance to oxidative stress and FOC. PMID:26993243

  6. Methoxychlor and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rupesh K; Aberdeen, Graham; Babus, Janice K; Albrecht, Eugene D; Flaws, Jodi A

    2007-08-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC), an organochlorine pesticide, inhibits growth and induces atresia of antral follicles in rodents. MXC metabolites, mono-OH MXC (mono-OH) and bis-OH MXC (HPTE), are thought to be more toxic than the parent compound. Although studies have examined effects of MXC in rodents, few studies have evaluated the effects of MXC in primates. Therefore, the present study tested the hypothesis that MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from adult baboon ovaries and cultured with vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide; DMSO), MXC (1-100 micro g/ml), mono-OH (0.1-10 micro g/ml), or HPTE (0.1-10 micro g/ml) for 96 hr. Growth was monitored at 24 hr intervals. After culture, follicles were processed for histological evaluation of atresia. MXC, mono-OH, and HPTE significantly inhibited follicular growth and increased atresia compared to DMSO. Moreover, the adverse effects of MXC and its metabolites on growth and atresia in baboon antral follicles were observed at lower (100-fold) doses than those causing similar effects in rodents. These data suggest that MXC and its metabolites inhibit growth and induce atresia of baboon antral follicles, and that primate follicles are more sensitive to MXC than rodent follicles.

  7. Lipid oxidation induced oxidative degradation of cereal beta-glucan.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Jie; Mäkelä, Noora; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Lampi, Anna-Maija; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula

    2016-04-15

    In food systems, lipid oxidation can cause oxidation of other molecules. This research for the first time investigated oxidative degradation of β-glucan induced by lipid oxidation using an oil-in-water emulsion system which simulated a multi-phased aqueous food system containing oil and β-glucan. Lipid oxidation was monitored using peroxide value and hexanal production while β-glucan degradation was evaluated by viscosity and molecular weight measurements. The study showed that while lipid oxidation proceeded, β-glucan degradation occurred. Emulsions containing β-glucan, oil and ferrous ion showed significant viscosity and molecular weight decrease after 1 week of oxidation at room temperature. Elevated temperature (40°C) enhanced the oxidation reactions causing higher viscosity drop. In addition, the presence of β-glucan appeared to retard the hexanal production in lipid oxidation. The study revealed that lipid oxidation may induce the degradation of β-glucan in aqueous food systems where β-glucan and lipids co-exist.

  8. Lichen metabolites modulate hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Iracilda Z; Quilles, Marcela B; Carli, Camila B A; Maia, Danielle C G; Benzatti, Fernanda P; Lopes, Thiago I B; Gianini, Aline S; Brum, Rosenei L; Vilegas, Wagner; dos Santos, Lourdes C; Honda, Neli K

    2009-01-01

    The activities of perlatolic acid (1), atranorin (2), and lecanoric acid (3) and their derivatives, such as orsellinates and beta-methyl orsellinates obtained by alcoholysis, were assessed for stimulation of the release of hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide in cultures of peritoneal macrophage cells from mice. The hydrogen peroxide production was estimated by oxidation of phenol red, while the Griess reagent was used to determine the nitric oxide production. 1 and 4-methoxy-ethyl orsellinate (XVII) were the compounds that induced the greatest release of H2O2, whereas n-pentyl orsellinate (IV), iso-propyl orsellinate (V), sec-butyl orsellinate (VI), and XVII induced a small release of NO. These results indicate that lichen products and their derivatives have potential immune-modulating activities. PMID:19957434

  9. Dendritic Spine Injury Induced by the 8-Hydroxy Metabolite of Efavirenz

    PubMed Central

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Bumpus, Namandjé N.; Pomerantz, Daniel; Avery, Lindsay B.; Sacktor, Ned; McArthur, Justin C.

    2012-01-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs), a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Ongoing viral replication in the central nervous system (CNS) caused by poor brain penetration of cART may contribute to HAND. However, it has also been proposed that the toxic effects of long-term cART may contribute to HAND. A better understanding of the neurotoxic potential of cART is critically needed in light of the use of CNS-penetrating cARTs to contend with the virus reservoir in the brain. The efavirenz (EFV) metabolites 7-hydroxyefavirenz (7-OH-EFV) and 8-hydroxyefavirenz (8-OH-EFV) were synthesized and purified, and their chemical structures were confirmed by mass spectrometry and NMR. The effects of EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV on calcium, dendritic spine morphology, and survival were determined in primary neurons. EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV each induced neuronal damage in a dose-dependent manner. However, 8-OH-EFV was at least an order of magnitude more toxic than EFV or 7-OH-EFV, inducing considerable damage to dendritic spines at a 10 nM concentration. The 8-OH-EFV metabolite evoked calcium flux in neurons, which was mediated primarily by L-type voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). Blockade of L-type VOCCs protected dendritic spines from 8-OH-EFV-induced damage. Concentrations of EFV and 8-OH-EFV in the cerebral spinal fluid of HIV-infected subjects taking EFV were within the range that damaged neurons in culture. These findings demonstrate that the 8-OH metabolite of EFV is a potent neurotoxin and highlight the importance of directly determining the effects of antiretroviral drugs and drug metabolites on neurons and other brain cells. PMID:22984227

  10. Dendritic spine injury induced by the 8-hydroxy metabolite of efavirenz.

    PubMed

    Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Bumpus, Namandjé N; Pomerantz, Daniel; Avery, Lindsay B; Sacktor, Ned; McArthur, Justin C; Haughey, Norman J

    2012-12-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs), a significant proportion of HIV-infected patients develop HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Ongoing viral replication in the central nervous system (CNS) caused by poor brain penetration of cART may contribute to HAND. However, it has also been proposed that the toxic effects of long-term cART may contribute to HAND. A better understanding of the neurotoxic potential of cART is critically needed in light of the use of CNS-penetrating cARTs to contend with the virus reservoir in the brain. The efavirenz (EFV) metabolites 7-hydroxyefavirenz (7-OH-EFV) and 8-hydroxyefavirenz (8-OH-EFV) were synthesized and purified, and their chemical structures were confirmed by mass spectrometry and NMR. The effects of EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV on calcium, dendritic spine morphology, and survival were determined in primary neurons. EFV, 7-OH-EFV, and 8-OH-EFV each induced neuronal damage in a dose-dependent manner. However, 8-OH-EFV was at least an order of magnitude more toxic than EFV or 7-OH-EFV, inducing considerable damage to dendritic spines at a 10 nM concentration. The 8-OH-EFV metabolite evoked calcium flux in neurons, which was mediated primarily by L-type voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). Blockade of L-type VOCCs protected dendritic spines from 8-OH-EFV-induced damage. Concentrations of EFV and 8-OH-EFV in the cerebral spinal fluid of HIV-infected subjects taking EFV were within the range that damaged neurons in culture. These findings demonstrate that the 8-OH metabolite of EFV is a potent neurotoxin and highlight the importance of directly determining the effects of antiretroviral drugs and drug metabolites on neurons and other brain cells. PMID:22984227

  11. Use of radiolabeled acetate to evaluate the rate of clearance of cerebral oxidative metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.; Kasliwal, R.; Duryea, R.A.

    1994-05-01

    Radiolabel derived from glucose (GLC) has been shown to have different cerebral retention kinetics than radiolabel derived from deoxyglucose (DG). In particular, activated structures with high metabolic rates have more rapid loss of GLC-derived radiolabel than DG-derived radiolabel. Because GLC-derived radiolabel can be lost from the brain glycolytically through lactate or oxidatively through CO{sub 2}, the cause of the difference between GLC and FDG is uncertain. We investigated the isolated oxidative pathway using radiolabeled acetate, which is only metabolized through the Krebs cycle. Male albino rats were anesthetized with halothane and femoral vein and artery catheters were placed. The rats were allowed to awaken for two hours prior to the studies. 100 uCi of {sup 14}C-acetate was administered as a 30 second IV infusion to each rat. Arterial samples were obtained at regular intervals. Groups of rats were killed at 5, 10, 15, 30, and 60 minutes. Brains were rapidly removed, sectioned, and used to produce autoradiograms. The extracted and retained radiolabel was calculated as the brain concentration at time of death divided by the integral of the arterial tracer concentration. No detectable loss of radiolabel was found over the initial 10 minutes. Thereafter the rate of loss gradually increased reaching a maximum of 1.2% per minute by 60 minutes. This corresponds to a k4 rate constant of 0.012 min{sup -1}. The rate of loss of oxidative metabolites from rat brain was found to be very slow. This probably results from exchange of radiolabel with amino acid pools as the tracer is metabolized through the Krebs cycle. Therefore in conditions were glycolysis is increased out of proportion to oxidation and cerebral lactate concentration rises, radiolabel loss through lactate efflux can be a substantial fraction of overall loss.

  12. Gastroprotective and Antioxidant Effects of Lobaria pulmonaria and Its Metabolite Rhizonyl Alcohol on Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Fadime; Odabasoglu, Fehmi; Halici, Mesut; Cakir, Ahmet; Cadirci, Elif; Aslan, Ali; Aydin Berktas, Ozlem; Kazaz, Cavit

    2015-11-01

    Two lichen metabolites, rhizonaldehyde (1) and rhizonyl alcohol (2), were isolated from the acetone extract of Lobaria pulmonaria by chromatographic methods, and their chemical structures were determined by UV/VIS, IR, and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic methods. The gastroprotective and in vivo antioxidant activities of extracts of L. pulmonaria and its metabolites, 1 and 2, were investigated in indomethacin-induced ulcer models in rats. The gastric lesions were significantly reduced by acetone, hexane, and CHCl3 extracts, with 75.3-41.5% inhibition. Rhizonyl alcohol (2) significantly reduced the gastric lesions with an inhibition rate of 84.6-42.8%, whereas rhizonaldehyde (1) significantly increased the gastric lesions. Antioxidant parameters and myeloperoxidase activities were also evaluated in the gastric tissues of the rats. Indomethacin caused oxidative stress, which resulted in lipid peroxidation in gastric tissues by decreasing the levels of the antioxidants as compared to healthy rat tissues. In contrast to indomethacin, all extracts and rhizonyl alcohol (2) caused a significant decrease in lipid peroxidation levels and an increase in antioxidant parameters, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase, and reduced glutathione in gastric tissues. The administration of rhizonyl alcohol (2) also resulted in a decrease in gastric myeloperoxidase activity increased by indomethacin. The gastroprotective effect of rhizonyl alcohol (2) can be attributed to its antioxidant properties and its suppressing effect on neutrophil infiltration into gastric tissues.

  13. Magnetic graphene oxide as adsorbent for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linli; Xu, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Detection of monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites in urine is an advisable and valid method to assess human environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In this work, novel Fe3O4/graphene oxide composites were prepared and their application in the magnetic solid-phase extraction of monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urine was investigated by coupling with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. In the hybrid material, superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles provide fast separation to simplify the analytical process and graphene oxide provides a large functional surface for the adsorption. The prepared magnetic nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The experimental conditions were optimized systematically. Under the optimal conditions, the recoveries of these compounds were in the range of 98.3-125.2%, the relative standard deviations ranged between 6.8 and 15.5%, and the limits of detection were in the range of 0.01-0.15 ng/mL. The simple, quick, and affordable method was successfully used in the analysis of human urinary monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in two different cities. The results indicated that the monohydroxy polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons level in human urine can provide useful information for environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  14. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota.

  15. Pomegranate extract induces ellagitannin metabolite formation and changes stool microbiota in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoping; Henning, Susanne M; Lee, Ru-Po; Lu, Qing-Yi; Summanen, Paula H; Thames, Gail; Corbett, Karen; Downes, Julia; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Finegold, Sydney M; Heber, David

    2015-08-01

    The health benefits of pomegranate (POM) consumption are attributed to ellagitannins and their metabolites, formed and absorbed in the intestine by the microbiota. In this study twenty healthy participants consumed 1000 mg of POM extract daily for four weeks. Based on urinary and fecal content of the POM metabolite urolithin A (UA), we observed three distinct groups: (1) individuals with no baseline UA presence but induction of UA formation by POM extract consumption (n = 9); (2) baseline UA formation which was enhanced by POM extract consumption (N = 5) and (3) no baseline UA production, which was not inducible (N = 6). Compared to baseline the phylum Actinobacteria was increased and Firmicutes decreased significantly in individuals forming UA (producers). Verrucomicrobia (Akkermansia muciniphila) was 33 and 47-fold higher in stool samples of UA producers compared to non-producers at baseline and after 4 weeks, respectively. In UA producers, the genera Butyrivibrio, Enterobacter, Escherichia, Lactobacillus, Prevotella, Serratia and Veillonella were increased and Collinsella decreased significantly at week 4 compared to baseline. The consumption of pomegranate resulted in the formation of its metabolites in some but not all participants. POM extract consumption may induce health benefits secondary to changes in the microbiota. PMID:26189645

  16. Puerariae radix isoflavones and their metabolites inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.-J.; Hou, Y.C.; Lin, C.-H.; Hsu, Y.-A.; Sheu, Jim J.C.; Lai, C.-H.; Chen, B.-H.; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Wan Lei Tsai, F.-J.

    2009-01-23

    Puerariae radix (PR) is a popular natural herb and a traditional food in Asia, which has antithrombotic and anti-allergic properties and stimulates estrogenic activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the PR isoflavones puerarin, daidzein, and genistein on the growth of breast cancer cells. Our data revealed that after treatment with PR isoflavones, a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth occurred in HS578T, MDA-MB-231, and MCF-7 cell lines. Results from cell cycle distribution and apoptosis assays revealed that PR isoflavones induced cell apoptosis through a caspase-3-dependent pathway and mediated cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. Furthermore, we observed that the serum metabolites of PR (daidzein sulfates/glucuronides) inhibited proliferation of the breast cancer cells at a 50% cell growth inhibition (GI{sub 50}) concentration of 2.35 {mu}M. These results indicate that the daidzein constituent of PR can be metabolized to daidzein sulfates or daidzein glucuronides that exhibit anticancer activities. The protein expression levels of the active forms of caspase-9 and Bax in breast cancer cells were significantly increased by treatment with PR metabolites. These metabolites also increased the protein expression levels of p53 and p21. We therefore suggest that PR may act as a chemopreventive and/or chemotherapeutic agent against breast cancer by reducing cell viability and inducing apoptosis.

  17. Suppression of store overload-induced calcium release by hydroxylated metabolites of carvedilol.

    PubMed

    Malig, Thomas; Xiao, Zhichao; Chen, S R Wayne; Back, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Carvedilol is a drug widely used in the treatment of heart failure and associated cardiac arrhythmias. A unique action of carvedilol is its suppression of store overload-induced calcium release (SOICR) through the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2), which can trigger ventricular arrhythmias. Since the effects of carvedilol metabolites on SOICR have not yet been investigated, three carvedilol metabolites hydroxylated at the 3-, 4' and 5'-positions were synthesized and assayed for SOICR inhibition in mutant HEK 293 cells expressing the RyR2 mutant R4496C. This cell line is especially prone to SOICR and calcium release through the defective RyR2 channel was measured with a calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye. These results revealed that the 3- and 4'-hydroxy derivatives are slightly more effective than carvedilol in suppressing SOICR, while the 5'-analog proved slightly less active. Metabolic deactivation of carvedilol via these hydroxylation pathways is therefore insignificant.

  18. Microbial phenolic metabolites improve glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and protect pancreatic beta cells against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced toxicity via ERKs and PKC pathways.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Millán, Elisa; Ramos, Sonia; Alvarez, Carmen; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis; Martín, María Ángeles

    2014-04-01

    Oxidative stress is accepted as one of the causes of beta cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Therefore, identification of natural antioxidant agents that preserve beta cell mass and function is considered an interesting strategy to prevent or treat diabetes. Recent evidences indicated that colonic metabolites derived from flavonoids could possess beneficial effects on various tissues. The aim of this work was to establish the potential anti-diabetic properties of the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DHPAA), 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA) and 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (HPPA). To this end, we tested their ability to influence beta cell function and to protect against tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced beta cell toxicity. DHPAA and HPPA were able to potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in a beta cell line INS-1E and in rat pancreatic islets. Moreover, pre-treatment of cells with both compounds protected against beta cell dysfunction and death induced by the pro-oxidant. Finally, experiments with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that these effects were mediated by the activation of protein kinase C and the extracellular regulated kinases pathways. Altogether, these findings strongly suggest that the microbial-derived flavonoid metabolites DHPAA and HPPA may have anti-diabetic potential by promoting survival and function of pancreatic beta cells. PMID:24491264

  19. Involvement of a volatile metabolite during phosphoramide mustard-induced ovotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Jill A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Devine, Patrick J.; Keating, Aileen F.

    2014-01-01

    The finite ovarian follicle reserve can be negatively impacted by chemical exposures including the anti-neoplastic agent, cyclophosphamide (CPA). CPA requires bioactivation to phosphoramide mustard (PM) to elicit its therapeutic effects however; in addition to being the tumor-targeting metabolite, PM is also ovotoxic. In addition, PM can break down to a cytotoxic, volatile metabolite, chloroethylaziridine (CEZ). The aim of this study was initially to characterize PM-induced ovotoxicity in growing follicles. Using PND4 Fisher 344 rats, ovaries were cultured for 4 days before being exposed once to PM (10 or 30 μM). Following eight additional days in culture, relative to control (1% DMSO), PM had no impact on primordial, small primary or large primary follicle number, but both PM concentrations induced secondary follicle depletion (P < 0.05). Interestingly, a reduction in follicle number in the control-treated ovaries was observed. Thus, the involvement of a volatile, cytotoxic PM metabolite (VC) in PM-induced ovotoxicity was explored in cultured rat ovaries, with control ovaries physically separated from PM-treated ovaries during culture. Direct PM (60 μM) exposure destroyed all stage follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05). VC from nearby wells depleted primordial follicles after 4 days (P < 0.05), temporarily reduced secondary follicle number after 2 days, and did not impact other stage follicles at any other time point. VC was determined to spontaneously liberate from PM, which could contribute to degradation of PM during storage. Taken together, this study demonstrates that PM and VC are ovotoxicants, with different follicular targets, and that the VC may be a major player during PM-induced ovotoxicity observed in cancer survivors. PMID:24642057

  20. Dual mechanism of brain damage induced in vivo by the major metabolites accumulating in hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carolina Maso; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; de Moura, Alana Pimentel; Grings, Mateus; Ritter, Luciana; Schuck, Patrícia Fernanda; Ferreira, Gustavo da Costa; Sitta, Angela; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Wajner, Moacir

    2011-01-19

    Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria (HHH) syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a defect in the mitochondrial ornithine transporter, leading to accumulation of ornithine (Orn), homocitrulline (Hcit) and ammonia. Progressive neurological regression whose pathogenesis is not well established is common in this disease. The present work investigated the in vivo effects of intracerebroventricular administration of Orn and Hcit on important parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism in cerebral cortex from young rats. Orn and Hcit significantly increased thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances values and carbonyl formation, indicators of lipid and protein oxidative damage, respectively. Furthermore, N-acetylcysteine and the combination of the free radical scavengers ascorbic acid plus α-tocopherol attenuated the lipid oxidation and totally prevented the protein oxidative damage provoked by Orn and Hcit, suggesting that reactive species were involved in these effects. Hcit, but not Orn administration, also decreased glutathione concentrations, as well as the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase, indicating that Hcit provokes a reduction of brain antioxidant defenses. As regards to the parameters of energy metabolism, we verified that Orn and Hcit significantly inhibited the citric acid cycle function (inhibition of CO(2) synthesis from [1-(14)C] acetate), the aerobic glycolytic pathway (reduced CO(2) production from [U-(14)C] glucose) and complex I-III activity of the respiratory chain. Hcit also inhibited the activity of aconitase, an enzyme very susceptible to free radical attack. Taken together, our data indicate that mitochondrial homeostasis is disturbed by Orn and especially by Hcit. It is presumed that the impairment of brain bioenergetics and the oxidative damage induced by these metabolites may possibly contribute to the brain deterioration and neurological symptoms affecting patients with HHH syndrome. PMID

  1. Toxicity of the insecticide terbufos, its oxidation metabolites, and the herbicide atrazine in binary mixtures to Ceriodaphnia cf dubia.

    PubMed

    Choung, Catherine B; Hyne, Ross V; Stevens, Mark M; Hose, Grant C

    2011-04-01

    The acute toxicity of terbufos and its major metabolites, tested alone, in binary mixtures or in combination with atrazine were evaluated using neonates of the cladoceran Ceriodaphnia cf dubia. Terbufos, terbufos sulfoxide, and terbufos sulfone tested individually were highly toxic to C. cf dubia, with mean 96-h EC(50) values of 0.08, 0.36, and 0.19 μg/l, respectively. The addition of atrazine (10 μg/l) significantly increased the toxicity of terbufos. The toxicity of terbufos sulfone was unaffected by atrazine, whereas the results for terbufos sulfoxide were equivocal. Equitoxic mixtures of the metabolites showed additive toxicity to C. cf dubia. The high toxicities of terbufos and its environmentally persistent oxidative metabolites suggest that contamination of aquatic systems with this insecticide mixture and the coapplied herbicide atrazine might pose a greater hazard to some biota than their individual toxicities.

  2. Hepatic microsomal metabolism of the anthelmintic benzimidazole fenbendazole: enhanced inhibition of cytochrome P450 reactions by oxidized metabolites of the drug.

    PubMed

    Murray, M; Hudson, A M; Yassa, V

    1992-01-01

    Potentiation of the anthelmintic action of benzimidazole carbamates, such as fenbendazole [methyl 5(6)-(phenylthio)-1H-benzimidazol-2-ylcarbamate], has been noted during concurrent administration of benzimidazoles that possess no intrinsic anthelmintic activity. This study investigated the possibility that inhibition of P450 enzymes by fenbendazole and its metabolites could play a role in the potentiation phenomenon. Fenbendazole underwent P450-mediated oxidation in microsomes from untreated rat liver to the sulfoxide and (4'-hydroxyphenyl)thio metabolites [2.92 and 2.87 nmol/(mg of protein.h)]. Pretreatment of rats with phenobarbital or dexamethasone enhanced sulfoxidation by 1.9- and 2.9-fold, respectively. 4'-Hydroxylation was increased slightly (by 28%) by phenobarbital and decreased slightly (by 41%) by dexamethasone. Induction also promoted further metabolism of the sulfoxide to fenbendazole sulfone. Immunoinhibition and chemical inhibition studies suggested that P450 3A proteins and the flavin-containing monooxygenase are involved in sulfoxide and sulfone formation whereas 4'-hydroxylation involved the P450s 2C11, 2C6, and 2B1, depending on the type of induction. In untreated rat liver, the sulfoxide and (4'-hydroxyphenyl)thio metabolites of fenbendazole were relatively potent inhibitors of P450-mediated androstenedione 16 alpha-, 16 beta-, and 6 beta-hydroxylation (IC50 values of 42, 36, and 74 microM, respectively); 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity was uninhibited. In contrast, fenbendazole and its sulfone metabolite were not inhibitors of these reactions. Mixed-function oxidase activities in phenobarbital-induced rat hepatic microsomes were refractory to inhibition by most compounds, but P450 1A1 mediated activities in microsomes from beta-naphthoflavone-induced rat liver were quite susceptible to inhibition by fenbendazole sulfoxide. Studies with two analogous sulfoxides yielded similar findings.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. An integrated approach for profiling oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts using liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Cheng, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Kerong; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-09-10

    The use of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Qtrap) mass spectrometry (MS) for both quantitative and qualitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is of great interest. Here, a new Qtrap-based analytical methodology for simultaneous detection, structural characterization and semi-quantitation of in vitro oxidative metabolites and glutathione trapped reactive metabolites was reported. In the current study, combined multiple ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring were served as surveying scans to trigger product ion spectral acquisition of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adduct, respectively. Then, detection of metabolites and recovery of their MS/MS spectra were accomplished using multiple data mining approaches. Additionally, on-line ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed to determine relative concentrations of major metabolites. Analyses of metabolites of clozapine and nomifensine in rat liver microsomes not only revealed multiple oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts, but also identified their major oxidative metabolism and bioactivation pathways. The results demonstrated that the LC/UV/MS method enabled Qtrap to perform the comprehensive profiling of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts in vitro. PMID:27497649

  4. An integrated approach for profiling oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts using liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Cheng, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Kerong; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-09-10

    The use of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Qtrap) mass spectrometry (MS) for both quantitative and qualitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is of great interest. Here, a new Qtrap-based analytical methodology for simultaneous detection, structural characterization and semi-quantitation of in vitro oxidative metabolites and glutathione trapped reactive metabolites was reported. In the current study, combined multiple ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring were served as surveying scans to trigger product ion spectral acquisition of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adduct, respectively. Then, detection of metabolites and recovery of their MS/MS spectra were accomplished using multiple data mining approaches. Additionally, on-line ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed to determine relative concentrations of major metabolites. Analyses of metabolites of clozapine and nomifensine in rat liver microsomes not only revealed multiple oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts, but also identified their major oxidative metabolism and bioactivation pathways. The results demonstrated that the LC/UV/MS method enabled Qtrap to perform the comprehensive profiling of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts in vitro.

  5. Nitric Oxide Metabolite Concentration in Cerebrospinal Fluid: Useful as a Prognostic Marker?

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saurabh; Singh, Rakesh; Verma, Ashish; Bansal, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Purpose To establish the significance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitric oxide metabolite (NOx) concentration in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) patients to assess the neurological severity and prognosis. Overview of Literature Quantitative analysis of specific biomarkers in CSF will assess neurological severity more accurately and permit the formulation of a more precise management plan. Methods Forty SCI patients represented the cases and 20 lower limb injury patients were the controls. NOx concentration in CSF was measured at week 1, 2, and 4 by Griess method. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, T2-weighted) done in each case to measure cord edema and neurological severity was assessed using the Frankel classification. Results CSF NOx concentration peaked at week 2 and declined to normal by week 4. The concentration remained normal in controls. Mean NOx concentration was directly proportional to the severity of acute SCI as correlated with cord edema seen in MRI and neurological severity assessed. Conclusions CSF NOx concentration can be considered a specific quantitative biomarker in acute stage of SCI to predict the severity and prognosis of SCI patients. PMID:27790309

  6. Inhaled Nitric Oxide Increases Urinary Nitric Oxide Metabolites and Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate in Premature Infants: Relationship to Pulmonary Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Philip L.; Keller, Roberta L.; Black, Dennis M.; Durand, David J.; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Eichenwald, Eric C.; Truog, William E.; Mammel, Mark C.; Steinhorn, Robin; Ryan, Rita M.; Courtney, Sherry E.; Horneman, Hart; Ballard, Roberta A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) has been tested to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature infants, however, the role of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is not known. We hypothesized that levels of NO metabolites (NOx) and cGMP in urine, as a noninvasive source for biospecimen collection, would reflect the dose of iNO and relate to pulmonary outcome. Study Design Studies were performed on 125 infants who required mechanical ventilation at 7 to 14 days and received 24 days of iNO at 20–2 ppm. A control group of 19 infants did not receive iNO. Results In NO-treated infants there was a dose-dependent increase of both NOx and cGMP per creatinine (maximal 3.1- and 2-fold, respectively, at 10–20 ppm iNO) compared with off iNO. NOx and cGMP concentrations at both 2 ppm and off iNO were inversely related to severity of lung disease during the 1st month, and the NOx levels were lower in infants who died or developed BPD at term. NOx was higher in Caucasian compared with other infants at all iNO doses. Conclusion Urinary NOx and cGMP are biomarkers of endogenous NO production and lung uptake of iNO, and some levels reflect the severity of lung disease. These results support a role of the NO–cGMP pathway in lung development. PMID:24968129

  7. Safrole oxide inhibits angiogenesis by inducing apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Miao, Junying; Zhao, Baoxiang; Zhang, Shangli; Yin, Deling

    2005-06-01

    Our previous studies indicate that 3, 4-(methylenedioxy)-1-(2', 3'-epoxypropyl)-benzene (safrole oxide), a newly synthesized compound, induces apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and A549 lung cancer cells. To our knowledge, the inhibition of angiogenesis by safrole oxide has not been reported yet. We report here that cultured rat aorta treated with safrole oxide exhibited a significant microvessel reduction as determined by counting the number of microvessels in a phase contrast microscope. There were more microvessels formed in the presence of A549 lung cancer cells in rat aorta model, while a dramatic inhibition of angiogenesis was obtained by adding 220-450 micromol l(-1) of safrole oxide to the growth medium (P<.01). The culture of rat aorta treated with safrole oxide produced only some abortive endothelial cells but not microvessels. Furthermore, safrole oxide induced antiangiogenic effect in the chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) as a dose dependent manner. Eggs treated with 2-11 micromol 100 microl(-1) per egg of the safrole oxide for 48 h exhibited a significant reduction in blood vessel area of the CAM, a process likely mediated by apoptosis as demonstrated by DNA fragmentation. Our results suggest that safrole oxide has antiangiogenic activity and this effect might occur by induction of cellular apoptosis.

  8. Fucoxanthinol, Metabolite of Fucoxanthin, Improves Obesity-Induced Inflammation in Adipocyte Cells.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hayato; Kanno, Shogo; Kodate, Mei; Hosokawa, Masashi; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2015-08-04

    Fucoxanthin (Fx) is a marine carotenoid found in edible brown seaweeds. We previously reported that dietary Fx metabolite into fucoxanthinol (FxOH), attenuates the weight gain of white adipose tissue of diabetic/obese KK-Ay mice. In this study, to evaluate anti-diabetic effects of Fx, we investigated improving the effect of insulin resistance on the diabetic model of KK-Ay mice. Furthermore, preventing the effect of FxOH on low-grade chronic inflammation related to oxidative stress was evaluated on 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells and a RAW264.7 macrophage cell co-culture system. A diet containing 0.1% Fx was fed to diabetic model KK-Ay mice for three weeks, then glucose tolerance was observed. Fx diet significantly improved glucose tolerance compared with the control diet group.  In in vitro studies, FxOH showed suppressed tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) mRNA expression and protein levels in a co-culture of adipocyte and macrophage cells. These findings suggest that Fx ameliorates glucose tolerance in the diabetic model mice. Furthermore, FxOH, a metabolite of Fx, suppresses low-grade chronic inflammation in adipocyte cells.

  9. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  10. Inhibition of anaerobic ammonium oxidizing (anammox) enrichment cultures by substrates, metabolites and common wastewater constituents.

    PubMed

    Carvajal-Arroyo, José M; Sun, Wenjie; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2013-03-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is an emerging technology for nitrogen removal that provides a more environmentally sustainable and cost effective alternative compared to conventional biological treatment methods. The objective of this study was to investigate the inhibitory impact of anammox substrates, metabolites and common wastewater constituents on the microbial activity of two different anammox enrichment cultures (suspended and granular), both dominated by bacteria from the genus Brocadia. Inhibition was evaluated in batch assays by comparing the N(2) production rates in the absence or presence of each compound supplied in a range of concentrations. The optimal pH was 7.5 and 7.3 for the suspended and granular enrichment cultures, respectively. Among the substrates or products, ammonium and nitrate caused low to moderate inhibition, whereas nitrite caused almost complete inhibition at concentrations higher than 15 mM. The intermediate, hydrazine, either stimulated or caused low inhibition of anammox activity up to 3mM. Of the common constituents in wastewater, hydrogen sulfide was the most severe inhibitor, with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) as low as 0.03 mM undissociated H(2)S. Dissolved O(2) showed moderate inhibition (IC(50)=2.3-3.8 mg L(-1)). In contrast, phosphate and salinity (NaCl) posed very low inhibition. The suspended- and granular anammox enrichment cultures had similar patterns of response to the various inhibitory stresses with the exception of phosphate. The findings of this study provide comprehensive insights on the tolerance of the anammox process to a wide variety of potential inhibiting compounds.

  11. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F. Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  12. Oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, and renal sodium handling in leptin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Beltowski, Jerzy; Wójcicka, Grazyna; Marciniak, Andrzej; Jamroz, Anna

    2004-04-30

    Chronic hyperleptinemia induces arterial hypertension in experimental animals and may contribute to the development of hypertension in obese humans; however, the mechanism of hypertensive effect of leptin is not completely elucidated. We investigated the effect of leptin on whole-body oxidative stress, nitric oxide production, and renal sodium handling. The study was performed on male Wistar rats divided into 3 groups: 1) control, fed standard chow ad libitum, 2) leptin-treated group, receiving leptin injections (0.25 mg/kg twice daily s.c. for 7 days), 3) pair-fed group, in which food intake was adjusted to the leptin group. Leptin caused 30.5% increase in systolic blood pressure. Plasma concentration and urinary excretion of 8-isoprostanes in animals receiving leptin was 46.4% and 49.2% higher, respectively. The level of lipid peroxidation products, malonyldialdehyde + 4-hydroxyalkenals, increased by 52.5% in the renal cortex and by 48.4% in the renal medulla following leptin treatment, whereas aconitase activity decreased in these regions of the kidney by 45.3% and 39.2%, respectively. Urinary excretion of nitric oxide metabolites (NOx) was 55.0% lower, and fractional excretion of NOx was 55.8% lower in the leptin-treated group. Urinary excretion of cGMP decreased in leptin-treated rats by 26.3%. Following leptin treatment, absolute and fractional sodium excretion decreased by 35.0% and 41.2%, respectively. These results indicate that hyperleptinemia induces systemic and intrarenal oxidative stress, decreases the amount of bioactive NO possibly due to its degradation by reactive oxygen species, and causes renal sodium retention by stimulating tubular sodium reabsorption. NO deficiency and abnormal renal Na+ handling may contribute to leptin-induced hypertension.

  13. Epigenetic Manipulation of a Filamentous Fungus by the Proteasome-Inhibitor Bortezomib Induces the Production of an Additional Secondary Metabolite

    PubMed Central

    VanderMolen, Karen M.; Darveaux, Blaise A.; Chen, Wei-Lun; Swanson, Steven M.; Pearce, Cedric J.; Oberlies, Nicholas H.

    2014-01-01

    The use of epigenetic modifiers, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, has been explored increasingly as a technique to induce the production of additional microbial secondary metabolites. The application of such molecules to microbial cultures has been shown to upregulate otherwise suppressed genes, and in several cases has led to the production of new molecular structures. In this study, the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib was used to induce the production of an additional metabolite from a filamentous fungus (Pleosporales). The induced metabolite was previously isolated from a plant, but the configuration was not assigned until now; in addition, an analogue was isolated from a degraded sample, yielding a new compound. Proteasome inhibitors have not previously been used in this application and offer an additional tool for microbial genome mining. PMID:24955237

  14. The benzene metabolite para-benzoquinone is genotoxic in human, phorbol-12-acetate-13-myristate induced, peripheral blood mononuclear cells at low concentrations.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Götz Alexander; Bünger, Jürgen; Lichey, Nadine; Taeger, Dirk; Mönnich, Angelika; Hallier, Ernst

    2009-07-01

    Benzene is one of the most prominent occupational and environmental pollutants. The substance is a proven human carcinogen that induces hematologic malignancies in humans, probably at even low doses. Yet knowledge of the mechanisms leading to benzene-induced carcinogenesis is still incomplete. Benzene itself is not genotoxic. The generation of carcinogenic metabolites involves the production of oxidized intermediates such as catechol, hydroquinone and para-benzoquinone (p-BQ) in the liver. Further activation to the ultimate carcinogenic intermediates is most probably catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO). Yet the products of the MPO pathway have not been identified. If an oxidized benzene metabolite such as p-BQ was actually the precursor for the ultimate carcinogenic benzene metabolite and further activation proceeds via MPO mediated reactions, it should be possible to activate p-BQ to a genotoxic compound in vitro. We tested this hypothesis with phorbol-12-acetate-13-myristate (PMA) activated peripheral blood cells exposed to p-BQ, using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test. Addition of 20-28 ng/ml PMA caused a significant increase of micronuclei at low and non-cytotoxic p-BQ concentrations between 0.04 and 0.2 microg/ml (0.37-1.85 microM). Thus with PMA or p-BQ alone no reproducible elevation of micronuclei was seen up to toxic concentrations. PMA and p-BQ induce micronuclei when administered jointly. Our results add further support to the hypothesis that MPO is a key enzyme in the activation of benzene. PMID:19212761

  15. MAMMALIAN METABOLISM AND DISTRIBUTION OF PERFLUOROOCTYL ETHANOL (8-2 TELOMER ALCOHOL) AND ITS OXIDATION METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds have been shown to be globally distributed, bioaccumulative, persistent and potentially toxic. It has been hypothesized that many precursor fluorinated compounds, including the telomer alcohols, degrade or metabolize to the common metabolite PFOA.

  16. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes.

  17. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-01-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  18. Characterization of Train-Induced Vibration and its Effect on Fecal Corticosterone Metabolites in Mice.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Nicholas A; Sargent, Jennifer L; Parmigiani, John P; Palme, Rupert; Diggs, Helen E

    2015-11-01

    Excessive environmental vibrations can have deleterious effects on animal health and experimental results, but they remain poorly understood in the animal laboratory setting. The aims of this study were to characterize train-associated vibration in a rodent vivarium and to assess the effects of this vibration on the reproductive success and fecal corticosterone metabolite levels of mice. An instrumented cage, featuring a high-sensitivity microphone and accelerometer, was used to characterize the vibrations and sound in a vivarium that is near an active railroad. The vibrations caused by the passing trains are 3 times larger in amplitude than are the ambient facility vibrations, whereas most of the associated sound was below the audible range for mice. Mice housed in the room closest to the railroad tracks had pregnancy rates that were 50% to 60% lower than those of mice of the same strains but bred in other parts of the facility. To verify the effect of the train vibrations, we used a custom-built electromagnetic shaker to simulate the train-induced vibrations in a controlled environment. Fecal pellets were collected from male and female mice that were exposed to the simulated vibrations and from unexposed control animals. Analysis of the fecal samples revealed that vibrations similar to those produced by a passing train can increase the levels of fecal corticosterone metabolites in female mice. These increases warrant attention to the effects of vibration on mice and, consequently, on reproduction and experimental outcomes. PMID:26632783

  19. Suppression of SOS-inducing activity of chemical mutagens by metabolites from microbial transformation of (+)-longicyclene.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kazuki; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2010-08-25

    In this study, biotransformation of (+)-longicyclene (1) by Aspergillus niger (NBRC 4414) and the suppressive effect on umuC gene expression by chemical mutagens 2-(2-furyl)-3-(5-nitro-2-furyl)acrylamide (furylfuramide) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) of the SOS response in Salmonella typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 were investigated. Initially, compound 1 was converted to three new terpenoids, (-)-(10R)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (2), (+)-(10S)-10-hydroxy-longicyclic acid (3), and (+)-10-oxo-longicyclic acid (4) by A. niger , and their conversion rates were 27, 23, and 30%, respectively. The metabolites suppressed the SOS-inducing activity of furylfuramide and AFB1 in the umu test. Compounds 1-4 were hardly showing a suppressive effect on umu gene expression of the SOS responses in S. typhimurium TA1535/pSK1002 against furylfuramid. However, metabolites showed a suppressive effect against AFB1. Compound 4 had gene expression by chemical mutagen AFB1, was suppressed 53% at <1.0 mM, and was the most effective compound in this experiment. PMID:20662538

  20. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health.

    PubMed

    Scurachio, R S; Mattiucci, F; Santos, W G; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from riboflavin solvation shell upon caffeine metabolite binding to riboflavin. The caffeine metabolites 1-methyl uric acid and 1,7-dimethyl uric acid were shown by transient absorption laser flash photolysis to be efficient as quenchers of triplet riboflavin with second-order rate constant of 1.4 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1) and 1.0 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution of pH6.4 at 25°C and more efficient than the other caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethyl xanthine with second-order rate constant of 4.2 10(7)Lmol(-1)s(-1). Caffeine was in contrast found to be non-reactive towards triplet riboflavin. Caffeine metabolites rather than caffeine seem accordingly important for the observed protective effect against cutaneous melanoma identified for drinkers of regular but not of decaffeinated coffee. The caffeine metabolites, but not caffeine, were by time resolved single photon counting found to quench singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization.

  1. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health.

    PubMed

    Scurachio, R S; Mattiucci, F; Santos, W G; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from riboflavin solvation shell upon caffeine metabolite binding to riboflavin. The caffeine metabolites 1-methyl uric acid and 1,7-dimethyl uric acid were shown by transient absorption laser flash photolysis to be efficient as quenchers of triplet riboflavin with second-order rate constant of 1.4 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1) and 1.0 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution of pH6.4 at 25°C and more efficient than the other caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethyl xanthine with second-order rate constant of 4.2 10(7)Lmol(-1)s(-1). Caffeine was in contrast found to be non-reactive towards triplet riboflavin. Caffeine metabolites rather than caffeine seem accordingly important for the observed protective effect against cutaneous melanoma identified for drinkers of regular but not of decaffeinated coffee. The caffeine metabolites, but not caffeine, were by time resolved single photon counting found to quench singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization. PMID:27611451

  2. Cocaine and specific cocaine metabolites induce von Willebrand Factor release from endothelial cells in a tissue-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, William E.; Moore, Emily E.; Penkala, Rebecca A.; Bolgiano, D.; López, José A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cocaine use is associated with arterial thrombosis, including myocardial infarction and stroke. Cocaine use results in increased plasma von Willebrand Factor (VWF), accelerated atherosclerosis, and platelet-rich arterial thrombi, suggesting that cocaine activates the endothelium, promoting platelet-VWF interactions. Approach and Results Human umbilical vein (HUVEC), brain microvasculature (BMVEC), or coronary artery (CAEC) endothelial cells were treated with cocaine or metabolites benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, norcocaine, or ecgonine methylester. Supernatant VWF concentration and multimer structure were measured, and platelet–VWF strings formed on the endothelial surface under flow were quantified. Cocaine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF release, with the two metabolites being more potent than the parent molecule. BMVEC were more sensitive to cocaine and metabolites than were HUVEC or CAEC. CAEC released VWF into the supernatant but did not form VWF–platelet strings. Intracellular cAMP concentration was not increased after treatment with cocaine or its metabolites. Conclusions Both cocaine and metabolites benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene induced endothelial VWF secretion, possibly explaining thrombotic risk after cocaine ingestion. VWF secretion is likely to vary between vascular beds, with brain endothelial cells being particularly sensitive. These results suggest that clinical management of cocaine-induced ischemia may benefit from therapies aimed at disrupting the VWF–platelet interaction. PMID:23539221

  3. An oxygenated metabolite of benzo[a]pyrene increases hepatic β-oxidation of fatty acids in chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Westman, Ola; Larsson, Maria; Venizelos, Nikolaos; Hollert, Henner; Engwall, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are well-known carcinogens to humans and ecotoxicological effects have been shown in several studies. However, PAHs can also be oxidized into more water soluble-oxygenated metabolites (Oxy-PAHs). The first purpose of the present project was to (1) assess the effects of a mixture containing three parent PAHs: anthracene, benz[a]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene versus a mixture of their oxygenated metabolites, namely: anthracene-9,10-dione, benz[a]anthracene-7,12-dione, and 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one on the hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation in chicken embryos (Gallus gallus domesticus) exposed in ovo. The second and also main purpose of the project was to (2) assess the effects of the parent PAHs versus their oxy-PAHs analogues when injected individually, followed by (3) additional testing of the individual oxy-PAHs. The hepatic β-oxidation was measured using a tritium release assay with [9,10-(3)H]-palmitic acid (16:0) as substrate. The result from the first part (1) showed reduced hepatic β-oxidation after exposure in ovo to a mixture of three PAHs, however, increased after exposure to the mixture of three oxy-PAHs compared to control. The result from the second part (2) and also the follow-up experiment (3) showed that 9,10-dihydrobenzo[a]pyrene-7-(8H)-one was the causative oxy-PAH. The implication of this finding on the risk assessment of PAH metabolite exposure in avian wildlife remains to be determined. To the best of our knowledge, no similar studies have been reported.

  4. The Crabtree and Warburg effects: Do metabolite-induced regulations participate in their induction?

    PubMed

    Hammad, Noureddine; Rosas-Lemus, Monica; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne

    2016-08-01

    The Crabtree and Warburg effects are two well-known deviations of cell energy metabolism that will be described herein. A number of hypotheses have been formulated regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to these cellular energy metabolism deviations. In this review, we will focus on the emerging notion that metabolite-induced regulations participate in the induction of these effects. All throughout this review, it should be kept in mind that no regulatory mechanism is exclusive and that it may vary in cancer cells owing to different cell types or oncogenic background. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27066942

  5. Stress-induced chromatin changes in plants: of memories, metabolites and crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Vriet, Cécile; Hennig, Lars; Laloi, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Exposure of plants to adverse environmental conditions leads to extensive transcriptional changes. Genome-wide approaches and gene function studies have revealed the importance of chromatin-level control in the regulation of stress-responsive gene expression. Advances in understanding chromatin modifications implicated in plant stress response and identifying proteins involved in chromatin-mediated transcriptional responses to stress are briefly presented in this review. We then highlight how chromatin-mediated gene expression changes can be coupled to the metabolic status of the cell, since many of the chromatin-modifying proteins involved in transcriptional regulation depend on cofactors and metabolites that are shared with enzymes in basic metabolism. Lastly, we discuss the stability and heritability of stress-induced chromatin changes and the potential of chromatin-based strategies for increasing stress tolerance of crops.

  6. An Unusual Stress Metabolite from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus Aspergillus sp. WU 243 Induced by Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chihong; Wu, Xiaodan; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Ye, Ying; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel hybrid polyketide-terpenoid, aspergstressin (1), possessing a unique fused polycyclic structure, was induced from culture broth of strain Aspergillus sp. WU 243 by cobalt ion stimulation. The strain was isolated from the digestive gland of Xenograpsus testudinatus, a unique type of crab which dwells in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The chemical structure and relative configuration of the stress metabolite were established by spectroscopic means. Aspergillus sp. WU 243 produced aspergstressin (1) only under cobalt stressed culture conditions. The results show that stress-driven discovery of new natural products from hydrothermal vent fungi is an effective strategy to unveil the untapped reservoir of small molecules from species found in the hydrothermal vent environment. PMID:26784166

  7. An Unusual Stress Metabolite from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus Aspergillus sp. WU 243 Induced by Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chihong; Wu, Xiaodan; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Ye, Ying; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel hybrid polyketide-terpenoid, aspergstressin (1), possessing a unique fused polycyclic structure, was induced from culture broth of strain Aspergillus sp. WU 243 by cobalt ion stimulation. The strain was isolated from the digestive gland of Xenograpsus testudinatus, a unique type of crab which dwells in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The chemical structure and relative configuration of the stress metabolite were established by spectroscopic means. Aspergillus sp. WU 243 produced aspergstressin (1) only under cobalt stressed culture conditions. The results show that stress-driven discovery of new natural products from hydrothermal vent fungi is an effective strategy to unveil the untapped reservoir of small molecules from species found in the hydrothermal vent environment. PMID:26805789

  8. An Unusual Stress Metabolite from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus Aspergillus sp. WU 243 Induced by Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chihong; Wu, Xiaodan; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Ye, Ying; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-16

    A novel hybrid polyketide-terpenoid, aspergstressin (1), possessing a unique fused polycyclic structure, was induced from culture broth of strain Aspergillus sp. WU 243 by cobalt ion stimulation. The strain was isolated from the digestive gland of Xenograpsus testudinatus, a unique type of crab which dwells in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The chemical structure and relative configuration of the stress metabolite were established by spectroscopic means. Aspergillus sp. WU 243 produced aspergstressin (1) only under cobalt stressed culture conditions. The results show that stress-driven discovery of new natural products from hydrothermal vent fungi is an effective strategy to unveil the untapped reservoir of small molecules from species found in the hydrothermal vent environment.

  9. The Crabtree and Warburg effects: Do metabolite-induced regulations participate in their induction?

    PubMed

    Hammad, Noureddine; Rosas-Lemus, Monica; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne

    2016-08-01

    The Crabtree and Warburg effects are two well-known deviations of cell energy metabolism that will be described herein. A number of hypotheses have been formulated regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to these cellular energy metabolism deviations. In this review, we will focus on the emerging notion that metabolite-induced regulations participate in the induction of these effects. All throughout this review, it should be kept in mind that no regulatory mechanism is exclusive and that it may vary in cancer cells owing to different cell types or oncogenic background. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  10. An Unusual Stress Metabolite from a Hydrothermal Vent Fungus Aspergillus sp. WU 243 Induced by Cobalt.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chihong; Wu, Xiaodan; Auckloo, Bibi Nazia; Chen, Chen-Tung Arthur; Ye, Ying; Wang, Kuiwu; Wu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    A novel hybrid polyketide-terpenoid, aspergstressin (1), possessing a unique fused polycyclic structure, was induced from culture broth of strain Aspergillus sp. WU 243 by cobalt ion stimulation. The strain was isolated from the digestive gland of Xenograpsus testudinatus, a unique type of crab which dwells in the Kueishantao hydrothermal vents off Taiwan. The chemical structure and relative configuration of the stress metabolite were established by spectroscopic means. Aspergillus sp. WU 243 produced aspergstressin (1) only under cobalt stressed culture conditions. The results show that stress-driven discovery of new natural products from hydrothermal vent fungi is an effective strategy to unveil the untapped reservoir of small molecules from species found in the hydrothermal vent environment.

  11. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-02-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields.

  12. Induced effects of advanced oxidation processes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Li, Chaolin; Zhao, Zhuanjun; Lu, Gang; Cui, Haibo; Zhang, Wenfang

    2014-01-01

    Hazardous organic wastes from industrial, military, and commercial activities represent one of the greatest challenges to human beings. Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) are alternatives to the degradation of those organic wastes. However, the knowledge about the exact mechanisms of AOPs is still incomplete. Here we report a phenomenon in the AOPs: induced effects, which is a common property of combustion reaction. Through analysis EDTA oxidation processes by Fenton and UV-Fenton system, the results indicate that, just like combustion, AOPs are typical induction reactions. One most compelling example is that pre-feeding easily oxidizable organic matter can promote the oxidation of refractory organic compound when it was treated by AOPs. Connecting AOPs to combustion, it is possible to achieve some helpful enlightenment from combustion to analyze, predict and understand AOPs. In addition, we assume that maybe other oxidation reactions also have induced effects, such as corrosion, aging and passivation. Muchmore research is necessary to reveal the possibilities of induced effects in those fields. PMID:24503715

  13. Individual Shrink Wrapping of Zucchini Fruit Improves Postharvest Chilling Tolerance Associated with a Reduction in Ethylene Production and Oxidative Stress Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Megías, Zoraida; Martínez, Cecilia; Manzano, Susana; García, Alicia; Rebolloso-Fuentes, María Del Mar; Garrido, Dolores; Valenzuela, Juan Luis; Jamilena, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of individual shrink wrapping (ISW) on the postharvest performance of refrigerated fruit from two zucchini cultivars that differ in their sensitivity to cold storage: Sinatra (more sensitive) and Natura (more tolerant). The fruit was individually shrink wrapped before storing at 4°C for 0, 7 and 14 days. Quality parameters, ethylene and CO2 productions, ethylene gene expression, and oxidative stress metabolites were assessed in shrink wrapped and non-wrapped fruit after conditioning the fruit for 6 hours at 20°C. ISW decreased significantly the postharvest deterioration of chilled zucchini in both cultivars. Weight loss was reduced to less than 1%, pitting symptoms were completely absent in ISW fruit at 7 days, and were less than 25% those of control fruits at 14 days of cold storage, and firmness loss was significantly reduced in the cultivar Sinatra. These enhancements in quality of ISW fruit were associated with a significant reduction in cold-induced ethylene production, in the respiration rate, and in the level of oxidative stress metabolites such as hydrogen peroxide and malonyldialdehyde (MDA). A detailed expression analysis of ethylene biosynthesis, perception and signaling genes demonstrated a downregulation of CpACS1 and CpACO1 genes in response to ISW, two genes that are upregulated by cold storage. However, the expression patterns of six other ethylene biosynthesis genes (CpACS2 to CpACS7) and five ethylene signal transduction pathway genes (CpCTR1, CpETR1, CpERS1, CpEIN3.1 and CpEN3.2), suggest that they do not play a major role in response to cold storage and ISW packaging. In conclusion, ISW zucchini packaging resulted in improved tolerance to chilling concomitantly with a reduction in oxidative stress, respiration rate and ethylene production, as well as in the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes, but not of those involved in ethylene perception and sensitivity.

  14. Purple grape juices prevent pentylenetetrazol-induced oxidative damage in the liver and serum of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Adriana D; Scheffel, Thamiris B; Scola, Gustavo; Dos Santos, Maitê T; Fank, Bruna; Dani, Caroline; Vanderlinde, Regina; Henriques, João A P; Coitinho, Adriana S; Salvador, Mirian

    2013-02-01

    Oxidative damages in hepatocytes may be caused by epilepsy and/or anticonvulsant drugs. Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, characterized by recurrent seizures, which may increase the content of reactive oxygen species. Organic and conventional grape juices are rich in polyphenols, compounds with important antioxidant activity. It is hypothesized that organic and conventional purple grape juices may have protective effect against oxidative damage induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) (a standard convulsant drug) in the liver and serum of Wistar rats. Animals (n = 16 in each group) received, by gavage, saline, organic grape juice or conventional grape juice (10 μL/g of body weight) for 17 days. Subsequently, half of the rats in each group received PTZ (60 mg/kg). After 30 minutes, the animals were euthanized by decapitation. Liver and blood samples were isolated to evaluate oxidative parameters (lipid and protein oxidation, nitric oxide metabolite content, antioxidant defenses, and protein sulfhydryl content). The results of this study showed that although organic juice contains higher polyphenol content than conventional juice, both juices conferred protection against lipid and protein oxidative damage and limited the increase in PTZ-induced nitric oxide metabolite content in the liver and serum. In addition, both juices inhibited the PTZ-induced reduction in enzymatic antioxidant defenses (superoxide dismutase and catalase activities) and sulfhydryl protein content in the liver and serum. In summary, both organic and conventional grape juices were able to reduce oxidative damage induced by PTZ in the liver and serum of Wistar rats.

  15. Laser induced single spot oxidation of titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jwad, Tahseen; Deng, Sunan; Butt, Haider; Dimov, S.

    2016-11-01

    Titanium oxides have a wide range of applications in industry, and they can be formed on pure titanium using different methods. Laser-induced oxidation is one of the most reliable methods due to its controllability and selectivity. Colour marking is one of the main applications of the oxidation process. However, the colourizing process based on laser scanning strategies is limited by the relative large processing area in comparison to the beam size. Single spot oxidation of titanium substrates is proposed in this research in order to increase the resolution of the processed area and also to address the requirements of potential new applications. The method is applied to produce oxide films with different thicknesses and hence colours on titanium substrates. High resolution colour image is imprinted on a sheet of pure titanium by converting its pixels' colours into laser parameter settings. Optical and morphological periodic surface structures are also produced by an array of oxide spots and then analysed. Two colours have been coded into one field and the dependencies of the reflected colours on incident and azimuthal angles of the light are discussed. The findings are of interest to a range of application areas, as they can be used to imprint optical devices such as diffusers and Fresnel lenses on metallic surfaces as well as for colour marking.

  16. Effect of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Their Metabolites on Bleomycin-Induced Cytotoxic Action on Human Neuroblastoma Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Polavarapu, Sailaja; Mani, Arul M.; Gundala, Naveen K. V.; Hari, Anasuya D.; Bathina, Siresha; Das, Undurti N.

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we noted that bleomycin induced growth inhibitory action was augmented by all the polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) tested on human neuroblastoma IMR-32 (0.5×104 cells/100 µl of IMR) cells (EPA> DHA> ALA = GLA = AA> DGLA = LA: ∼60, 40, 30, 10–20% respectively) at the maximum doses used. Of all the prostaglandins (PGE1, PGE2, PGF2α, and PGI2) and leukotrienes (LTD4 and LTE4) tested; PGE1, PGE2 and LTD4 inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells to a significant degree at the highest doses used. Lipoxin A4 (LXA4), 19,20-dihydroxydocosapentaenoate (19, 20 DiHDPA) and 10(S),17(S)-dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13Z,15E,19Z-docosahexaenoic acid (protectin: 10(S),17(S)DiHDoHE), metabolites of DHA, significantly inhibited the growth of IMR-32 cells. Pre-treatment with AA, GLA, DGLA and EPA and simultaneous treatment with all PUFAs used in the study augmented growth inhibitory action of bleomycin. Surprisingly, both indomethacin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) at 60 and 20 µg/ml respectively enhanced the growth of IMR-32 cells even in the presence of bleomycin. AA enhanced oxidant stress in IMR-32 cells as evidenced by an increase in lipid peroxides, superoxide dismutase levels and glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that PUFAs suppress growth of human neuroblastoma cells, augment growth inhibitory action of bleomycin by enhancing formation of lipid peroxides and altering the status of anti-oxidants and, in all probability, increase the formation of lipoxins, resolvins and protectins from their respective precursors that possess growth inhibitory actions. PMID:25536345

  17. Enhanced efficacy of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles against antibiotic-resistant biofilms in the presence of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Taylor, Erik N; Kummer, Kim M; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-10-25

    Antibiotic resistance and the lack of new antibacterial agents cause major challenges for the treatment of infections. Here, we describe a simple, broad-spectrum, and low-cost dual-sided approach which uses superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPION) in combination with fructose metabolites as an alternative to existing antibacterial strategies. This strategy offers further improved efficacy of SPION against persistent gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria infections by manipulating the biofilm metabolic microenvironment and outperforms vancomycin (the antibiotic of last resort), creating a new nanotechnology-driven approach. PMID:23963848

  18. Enhanced efficacy of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles against antibiotic-resistant biofilms in the presence of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Durmus, Naside Gozde; Taylor, Erik N; Kummer, Kim M; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-10-25

    Antibiotic resistance and the lack of new antibacterial agents cause major challenges for the treatment of infections. Here, we describe a simple, broad-spectrum, and low-cost dual-sided approach which uses superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPION) in combination with fructose metabolites as an alternative to existing antibacterial strategies. This strategy offers further improved efficacy of SPION against persistent gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria infections by manipulating the biofilm metabolic microenvironment and outperforms vancomycin (the antibiotic of last resort), creating a new nanotechnology-driven approach.

  19. 5-Hydroxyquinoline-2-Carboxylic Acid, a Dead-End Metabolite from the Bacterial Oxidation of 5-Aminonaphthalene-2-Sulfonic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Nörtemann, Bernd; Glässer, Andrea; Machinek, Reinhard; Remberg, Gerd; Knackmuss, Hans-Joachim

    1993-01-01

    5-Aminonaphthalene-2-sulfonate (5A2NS) is converted by strain BN6 into 5-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxylate (5H2QC). The authenticity of this new compound is confirmed by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Its formation is explained by a spontaneous cyclization of the hypothetical metabolite 6′-amino-2′-hydroxybenzalpyruvate. The formation of 5H2QC as a dead-end product of 5A2NS prevents NADH regeneration so that 5A2NS oxidation is limited by the internal NADH pool. PMID:16348967

  20. Facile Access to Graphene Oxide from Ferro-Induced Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chao; Wang, Cai-Feng; Chen, Su

    2016-01-01

    Methods allowing the oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide (GO) are vital important for the production of graphene from GO. This oxidation reaction has mainly relied on strong acid strategy for 174 years, which circumvents issues associated with toxicity of reagent and product, complex post-treatment, high cost and waste generation. Here, we report a green route for performing this oxidization reaction via a ferro-induced strategy, with use of water, potassium ferrate (Fe(VI)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as reagents, to produce about 65% yield of GO (vs. 40% for Hummers’ method, the most commonly used concentrated acid strategy) and non-toxic by-products. Moreover, GO produced from this new method shows equivalent performance to those reported previously. This H2SO4-free strategy makes it possible to process graphite into GO in a safe, low-cost, time-saving, energy-efficient and eco-friendly pathway, opening a promising avenue for the large-scale production of GO and GO-based materials.

  1. Online Monitoring Oxidative Products and Metabolites of Nicotine by Free Radicals Generation with Fenton Reaction in Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shih-Shin; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Kuo, Chao-Jen; Liao, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2013-01-01

    In general, over 70% absorbed nicotine is metabolized to cotinine and trans-3′-hydroxycotinine by cytochrome oxidase P450, and nicotine is also a major addictive and the psychoactive component in cigarettes. As a xenobiotic metabolism, hydrophobic compounds are usually converted into more hydrophilic products through enzyme systems such as cytochrome oxidase P450, sulfotransferases, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases to deliver drug metabolites out of the cell during the drug metabolic process. In this study, an electrodeless electrochemical oxidation (EEO) reaction via Fenton reaction by producing free radical to react with nicotine to immediately monitor the oxidative products and metabolic derivatives of nicotine by tandem mass spectrometer (MS) is done. Fenton reaction generates free radicals via ferrous ion (Fe2+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to oxidize DNA and to degrade proteins in cells. In the EEO method, the oxidative products of nicotine including cotinine, cotinine-N-oxide, trans-3′-hydroxycotinine, nornicotine, norcotinine, 4-oxo-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, 4-hydroxy-4-(3-pyridyl)-butanoic acid, and nicotine-N′-oxide were detected by tandem mass spectrometer to simulate the changes of nicotine and its derivatives in a time-dependent manner. PMID:23983622

  2. The metabolites of glutamine prevent hydroxyl radical-induced apoptosis through inhibiting mitochondria and calcium ion involved pathways in fish erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Huatao; Jiang, Weidan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Yongan; Wu, Pei; Zhao, Juan; Duan, Xudong; Zhou, Xiaoqiu; Feng, Lin

    2016-03-01

    The present study explored the apoptosis pathways in hydroxyl radicals ((∙)OH)-induced carp erythrocytes. Carp erythrocytes were treated with the caspase inhibitors in physiological carp saline (PCS) or Ca(2+)-free PCS in the presence of 40μM FeSO4/20μM H2O2. The results showed that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the release of cytochrome c and DNA fragmentation were caspase-dependent, and Ca(2+) was involved in calpain activation and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure in (∙)OH-induced carp erythrocytes. Moreover, the results suggested that caspases were involved in PS exposure, and Ca(2+) was involved in DNA fragmentation in (∙)OH-induced fish erythrocytes. These results demonstrated that there might be two apoptosis pathways in fish erythrocytes, one is the caspase and cytochrome c-dependent apoptosis that is similar to that in mammal nucleated cells, the other is the Ca(2+)-involved apoptosis that was similar to that in mammal non-nucleated erythrocytes. So, fish erythrocytes may be used as a model for studying oxidative stress and apoptosis in mammal cells. Furthermore, the present study investigated the effects of glutamine (Gln)'s metabolites [alanine (Ala), citrulline (Cit), proline (Pro) and their combination (Ala10Pro4Cit1)] on the pathways of apoptosis in fish erythrocytes. The results displayed that Ala, Cit, Pro and Ala10Pro4Cit1 effectively suppressed ROS generation, cytochrome c release, activation of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 at the physiological concentrations, prevented Ca(2+) influx, calpain activation, PS exposure, DNA fragmentation and the degradation of the cytoskeleton and oxidation of membrane and hemoglobin (Hb) and increased activity of anti-hydroxyl radical (AHR) in (∙)OH-induced carp erythrocytes. Ala10Pro4Cit1 produced a synergistic effect of inhibited oxidative stress and apoptosis in fish erythrocytes. These results demonstrated that Ala, Cit, Pro and their combination can protect mammal erythrocytes

  3. 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, a microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin, attenuates acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury through activation of Nrf-2.

    PubMed

    Xue, Huiting; Xie, Wenyan; Jiang, Zhihui; Wang, Meng; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hongqiong; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-10-01

    1. Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose leads to severe hepatotoxicity. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) is a scarcely studied microbiota-derived metabolite of quercetin. The aim of this study was to determine the protective effect of DOPAC against APAP-induced liver injury. 2. Mice were treated intragastrically with DOPAC (10, 20 or 50 mg/kg) for 3 days before APAP (300 mg/kg) injection. APAP alone caused increase in serum aminotransferase levels and changes in hepatic histopathology. APAP also promoted oxidative stress by increasing lipid peroxidation and decreasing anti-oxidant enzyme activities. These events led to hepatocellular necrosis and reduced liver function. DOPAC increased nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf-2) translocation to the nucleus and enhanced the expression of phase II enzymes and anti-oxidant enzymes, and thereby reduced APAP hepatotoxicity and enhanced anti-oxidant ability. 3. Our data provide evidence that DOPAC protected the liver against APAP-induced injury, which is involved in Nrf-2 activation, implying that DOPAC can be considered as a potential natural hepatoprotective agent.

  4. CYP epoxygenase metabolites of docosahexaenoic acid protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity through SIRT1

    PubMed Central

    Samokhvalov, V; Jamieson, K L; Vriend, J; Quan, S; Seubert, J M

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial LPS is an environmental toxin capable of promoting various cardiac complications. Current evidence suggests that LPS-induced myocardial dysfunction emerges as a consequence of compromised quality of cardiac mitochondria. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n3) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), which produces a broad spectrum of intrinsic physiological effects including regulation of cell survival and death mechanisms. Although, numerous studies revealed fundamentally beneficial effects of DHA on cardiovascular system, it remains unknown whether these effects were produced by DHA or one of its possibly more potent metabolites. Emerging evidence indicates that cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase metabolites of DHA, epoxydocosapentaenoic acids (EDPs), produce more potent biological activity compared to its precursor DHA. In this study, we investigated whether DHA and its metabolite 19,20-EDP could protect HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. We provide evidence that exogenously added or DHA-derived EDPs promote mitochondrial biogenesis and function in HL-1 cardiac cells. Our results illustrate the CYP epoxygenase metabolite of DHA, 19,20-EDP, confers extensive protection to HL-1 cardiac cells against LPS-induced cytotoxicity via activation of SIRT1. PMID:27182450

  5. Drought-Induced Responses of Physiology, Metabolites, and PR Proteins in Triticum aestivum.

    PubMed

    Gregorová, Zuzana; Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Maglovski, Marína; Kuna, Roman; Hauptvogel, Pavol; Matušíková, Ildikó

    2015-09-23

    The impact of severe drought stress (13% soil moisture) on the physiological responses, metabolic profile, and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in wheat above- and below-ground biomass after 20 days of treatment was studied. Drought depleted growth, assimilation pigments, and majority of free amino acids in the shoots (but proline increased considerably, +160%). On the contrary, root growth parameters were elevated, and free amino acids did not decrease, indicating investment of metabolites into the growth of roots under water deficiency. Mineral nutrients were only slightly influenced. Profiling of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins revealed that chitinases (EC 3.2.1.14) and glucanases (EC 3.2.1.39) were activated in wheat by drought. Individual isoforms and their activity were rather stimulated under drought, especially in shoots. The expression of selected genes is in agreement with enzymatic data and suggests an organ (tissue) specific- and opposing behavior of these two types of defense components in drought-stressed wheat. Metabolic analyses at the level of phenolics showed an increase in the free and bound fraction of phenolic acids almost exclusively in the shoots and flavonoid isoorientin increased considerably: protective action against oxidative stress and dehydration of the leaves seems to be the main reason for this finding. The role of PR proteins and phenolics in drought-stressed tissue is discussed. PMID:26330002

  6. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Ellingsen, Trond E; Bruheim, Per

    2012-02-17

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  7. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Consortium, Stream; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Bruheim, Per

    2012-01-01

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor. PMID:24957373

  8. An active metabolite of oltipraz (M2) increases mitochondrial fuel oxidation and inhibits lipogenesis in the liver by dually activating AMPK

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Eom, Jeong Sik; Lee, Chan Gyu; Yang, Yoon Mee; Lee, Yong Sup; Kim, Sang Geon

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Oltipraz, a cancer chemopreventive agent, has an anti-steatotic effect via liver X receptor-α (LXRα) inhibition. Here we have assessed the biological activity of a major metabolite of oltipraz (M2) against liver steatosis and steatohepatitis and the underlying mechanism(s). Experimental Approach Blood biochemistry and histopathology were assessed in high-fat diet (HFD)-fed mice treated with M2. An in vitroHepG2 cell model was used to study the mechanism of action. Immunoblotting, real-time PCR and luciferase reporter assays were performed to measure target protein or gene expression levels. Key Results M2 treatment inhibited HFD-induced steatohepatitis and diminished oxidative stress in liver. It increased expression of genes encoding proteins involved in mitochondrial fuel oxidation. Mitochondrial DNA content and oxygen consumption rate were enhanced. Moreover, M2 treatment repressed activity of LXRα and induction of its target genes, indicating anti-lipogenic effects. M2 activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Inhibition of AMPK by over-expression of dominant negative AMPK (DN-AMPK) or by Compound C prevented M2 from inducing genes for fatty acid oxidation and repressed sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) expression. M2 activated liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and increased the AMP/ATP ratio. LKB1 knockdown failed to reverse target protein modulations or AMPK activation by M2, supporting the proposal that both LKB1 and increased AMP/ATP ratio contribute to its anti-steatotic effect. Conclusion and Implications M2 inhibited liver steatosis and steatohepatitis by enhancing mitochondrial fuel oxidation and inhibiting lipogenesis. These effects reflected activation of AMPK elicited by increases in LKB1 activity and AMP/ATP ratio. PMID:23145499

  9. Inhibition of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Attenuates Monosodium Urate-induced Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Tae-Jin; Dan, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Young-Je

    2011-01-01

    The present study elucidated the effect of the selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor N6-(1-iminoethyl)-L-lysine (L-NIL) on monosodium urate (MSU) crystal-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet. L-NIL (5 or 10 mg/kg/day) was administered intraperitoneally 4 h before injection of MSU (4 mg) into the soles of mice hindlimb feet. Twenty-four hours after MSU injection, foot thickness was increased by 160% and L-NIL pretreatment reduced food pad swelling in a dose dependent manner. Pretreatment of 10 mg/kg/day L-NIL significantly suppressed the foot pad swelling by MSU. Plasma level of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites and gene expression and protein level of iNOS in feet were increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. Similar pattern of change was observed in nitrotyrosine level. MSU increased the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β and L-NIL pretreatment suppressed MSU-induced cytokines expression. The mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase1 were increased by MSU and L-NIL pretreatment normalized the gene expression. Phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38 was increased by MSU, which was suppressed by L-NIL pretreatment. The mRNA levels of iNOS, TNF-α, and IL-1β were increased by MSU in human dermal fibroblasts, C2C12 myoblasts, and human fetal osteoblasts in vitro, which was attenuated by L-NIL in a dose dependent manner. This study shows that L-NIL inhibits MSU-induced inflammation and edema in mice feet suggesting that iNOS might be involved in MSU-induced inflammation. PMID:22359474

  10. Acidosis induces reprogramming of cellular metabolism to mitigate oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of oncogenic and environmental factors alter tumor metabolism to serve the distinct cellular biosynthetic and bioenergetic needs present during oncogenesis. Extracellular acidosis is a common microenvironmental stress in solid tumors, but little is known about its metabolic influence, particularly when present in the absence of hypoxia. In order to characterize the extent of tumor cell metabolic adaptations to acidosis, we employed stable isotope tracers to examine how acidosis impacts glucose, glutamine, and palmitate metabolism in breast cancer cells exposed to extracellular acidosis. Results Acidosis increased both glutaminolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, which contribute metabolic intermediates to drive the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) and ATP generation. Acidosis also led to a decoupling of glutaminolysis and novel glutathione (GSH) synthesis by repressing GCLC/GCLM expression. We further found that acidosis redirects glucose away from lactate production and towards the oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). These changes all serve to increase nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) production and counter the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) present under acidosis. The reduced novel GSH synthesis under acidosis may explain the increased demand for NADPH to recycle existing pools of GSH. Interestingly, acidosis also disconnected novel ribose synthesis from the oxidative PPP, seemingly to reroute PPP metabolites to the TCA cycle. Finally, we found that acidosis activates p53, which contributes to both the enhanced PPP and increased glutaminolysis, at least in part, through the induction of G6PD and GLS2 genes. Conclusions Acidosis alters the cellular metabolism of several major metabolites, which induces a significant degree of metabolic inflexibility. Cells exposed to acidosis largely rely upon mitochondrial metabolism for energy generation to the extent that metabolic intermediates are

  11. Acrolein induces oxidative stress in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Shi, Riyi

    2005-02-01

    Acrolein, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation, has been shown to inflict significant structural and functional damage to isolated guinea pig spinal cord. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to mediate such detrimental effects. The current study demonstrates that acrolein can directly stimulate mitochondrial oxidative stress. Specifically, exposure of purified brain mitochondria to acrolein resulted in a dose-dependent increase of ROS and decreases in glutathione content and aconitase activity. This effect was not accompanied by significant intramitochondrial calcium influx or mitochondrial permeability transition, but rather by impaired function of the mitochondrial electron transport system. As well, we detected a significant inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in the presence of acrolein. This inhibition of ANT likely contributes to acrolein-induced ROS elevation since application of atractyloside, a specific ANT inhibitor, induced significant increase of ROS. We hypothesize that inhibition of ANT may mediate, in part, the acrolein-induced ROS increase in mitochondria.

  12. Liver toxicity from norcocaine nitroxide, an N-oxidative metabolite of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ndikum-Moffor, F M; Schoeb, T R; Roberts, S M

    1998-01-01

    The oxidative metabolism of cocaine to norcocaine nitroxide has been postulated to be essential for cocaine hepatotoxicity. The hepatic effects of norcocaine nitroxide have never been evaluated in vivo, however. In this study mice were administered norcocaine nitroxide i.p., and hepatotoxicity was assessed using serum alanine aminotransferase activities and microscopic examination of liver tissue. Hepatotoxicity of norcocaine nitroxide was dose-related; significant injury was detectable at doses of 20 to 30 mg/kg i.p., and severe hepatocellular necrosis was observed at doses of 40 and 50 mg/kg. Elevated serum alanine aminotransferase activities peaked between 12 and 18 hr after norcocaine nitroxide treatment. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of pronounced changes in cell morphology as early as 30 min after the norcocaine nitroxide dose. Pretreatment of mice with phenobarbital had no effect on the magnitude of hepatic injury but shifted the intralobular site of necrosis from the midzonal to the periportal region. Pretreatment with diazinon, an esterase inhibitor, increased norcocaine nitroxide-induced liver damage, whereas each of the P450 inhibitors SKF 525A, cimetidine, troleandomycin, ketaconazole and chloramphenicol significantly diminished norcocaine nitroxide hepatotoxicity. The results indicate that norcocaine nitroxide is hepatotoxic and suggest the involvement of P450 enzymes.

  13. In vitro glucuronidation of the antibacterial triclocarban and its oxidative metabolites.

    PubMed

    Schebb, N H; Franze, B; Maul, R; Ranganathan, A; Hammock, B D

    2012-01-01

    Triclocarban (3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; TCC) is widely used as an antibacterial in bar soaps. During use of these soaps, a significant portion of TCC is absorbed by humans. For the elimination from the body, glucuronidation plays a key role in both biliary and renal clearance. To investigate this metabolic pathway, we performed microsomal incubations of TCC and its hydroxylated metabolites 2'-OH-TCC, 3'-OH-TCC, and 6-OH-TCC. Using a new liquid chromatography-UV-mass spectrometry method, we could show a rapid glucuronidation for all OH-TCCs by the uridine-5'-diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) present in liver microsomes of humans (HLM), cynomolgus monkeys (CLM), rats (RLM), and mice (MLM). Among the tested human UGT isoforms, UGT1A7, UGT1A8, and UGT1A9 showed the highest activity for the conjugation of hydroxylated TCC metabolites followed by UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and UGT1A10. Due to this broad pattern of active UGTs, OH-TCCs can be efficiently glucuronidated in various tissues, as shown for microsomes from human kidney (HKM) and intestine (HIM). The major renal metabolites in humans, TCC-N-glucuronide and TCC-N'-glucuronide, were formed at very low conversion rates (<1%) by microsomal incubations. Low amounts of N-glucuronides were generated by HLM, HIM, and HKM, as well as by MLM and CLM, but not by RLM, according to the observed species specificity of this metabolic pathway. Among the human UGT isoforms, only UGT1A9 had activity for the N-glucuronidation of TCC. These results present an anomaly where in vivo the predominant urinary metabolites of TCC are N and N'-glucuronides, but these compounds are slowly produced in vitro. PMID:21953915

  14. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress. PMID:26445572

  15. Acute effect of aspartame-induced oxidative stress in Wistar albino rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ashok, Iyaswamy; Sheeladevi, Rathinasamy; Wankhar, Dapkupar

    2015-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the acute effect of aspartame on oxidative stress in the Wistar albino rat brain. We sought to investigate whether acute administration of aspartame (75 mg/kg) could release methanol and induce oxidative stress in the rat brain 24 hours after administration. To mimic human methanol metabolism, methotrexate treated rats were used to study aspartame effects. Wistar strain male albino rats were administered with aspartame orally as a single dose and studied along with controls and methotrexate treated controls. Blood methanol and formate level were estimated after 24 hours and rats were sacrificed and free radical changes were observed in discrete regions by assessing the scavenging enzymes, reduce dglutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation and protein thiol levels. There was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation levels, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD), glutathione peroxidase levels (GPx), and catalase activity (CAT) with a significant decrease in GSH and protein thiol. Aspartame exposure resulted in detectable methanol even after 24 hours. Methanol and its metabolites may be responsible for the generation of oxidative stress in brain regions. The observed alteration in aspartame fed animals may be due to its metabolite methanol and elevated formate. The elevated free radicals due to methanol induced oxidative stress.

  16. Mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate induces oxidative stress responses in human placental cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Tetz, Lauren M.; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. - Highlights: ► MEHP increased reactive oxygen species, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase activity. ► MEHP induced expression of PTGS2, a gene

  17. Unraveling oxidation-induced modifications in proteins by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress-driven modifications can occur in lipids, proteins, and DNA and form the basis of several chronic pathologies. The metabolites generated during oxidative responses consist of very reactive substances that result in oxidative damage and modulation of redox signaling as the main outcomes. Oxidative modifications occurring in proteins are poorly understood; among the several methods employed to study such modifications, the most promising strategies are based on proteomics approaches. Proteomics has emerged as one of the most powerful and sensitive analytical tools for mapping the oxidative changes present in proteins in a wide range of sample types and disease models. This chapter addresses the main aspects of redox processes, including an overview of oxidative stress and its biological consequences on proteins. Moreover, major proteomic strategies that can be employed as powerful tools for understanding protein oxidative modifications detected in chronic pathologies are discussed, highlighting cancer research as a model. PMID:24629184

  18. Arachidonic acid metabolites do not mediate toluene diisocyanate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Thompson, J.E.; Sheppard, D.

    1988-05-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites have previously been demonstrated to mediate the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in guinea pigs and dogs after exposure to ozone. Guinea pigs were treated with indomethacin (a cyclooxygenase inhibitor), U-60,257 (piriprost, a 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor), or BW775c (a lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitor) and exposed to air or 3 ppm TDI. Airway responsiveness to acetylcholine aerosol was examined 2 h after exposure. In control animals, the provocative concentration of acetylcholine which caused a 200% increase in pulmonary resistance over baseline (PC200) was significantly less (p less than 0.05) after exposure to TDI (8.6 +/- 2.0 mg/ml, geometric mean + geometric SE, n = 10) than after exposure to air (23.9 + 2.5 mg/ml, n = 14). The airway responsiveness to acetylcholine in animals treated with indomethacin or piriprost and exposed to TDI was not different from that of control animals exposed to TDI. Treatment with BW755c enhanced the airway hyperresponsiveness observed in animals exposed to TDI without altering the PC200 of animals exposed to air. The PC200 of animals treated with BW755c and exposed to TDI (2.3 + 0.8 mg/ml, n = 8) was significantly lower than the PC200 of control animals exposed to TDI (p less than 0.025). These results suggest that products of arachidonic acid metabolism are not responsible for TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. BW755c, however, appears to potentiate the TDI-induced airway hyperresponsiveness to acetylcholine by an as yet unidentified mechanism.

  19. Obesity-induced gut microbial metabolite promotes liver cancer through senescence secretome.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shin; Loo, Tze Mun; Atarashi, Koji; Kanda, Hiroaki; Sato, Seidai; Oyadomari, Seiichi; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Oshima, Kenshiro; Morita, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Masahira; Hattori, Masahisa; Honda, Kenya; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Hara, Eiji; Ohtani, Naoko

    2013-07-01

    Obesity has become more prevalent in most developed countries over the past few decades, and is increasingly recognized as a major risk factor for several common types of cancer. As the worldwide obesity epidemic has shown no signs of abating, better understanding of the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated cancer is urgently needed. Although several events were proposed to be involved in obesity-associated cancer, the exact molecular mechanisms that integrate these events have remained largely unclear. Here we show that senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) has crucial roles in promoting obesity-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development in mice. Dietary or genetic obesity induces alterations of gut microbiota, thereby increasing the levels of deoxycholic acid (DCA), a gut bacterial metabolite known to cause DNA damage. The enterohepatic circulation of DCA provokes SASP phenotype in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which in turn secretes various inflammatory and tumour-promoting factors in the liver, thus facilitating HCC development in mice after exposure to chemical carcinogen. Notably, blocking DCA production or reducing gut bacteria efficiently prevents HCC development in obese mice. Similar results were also observed in mice lacking an SASP inducer or depleted of senescent HSCs, indicating that the DCA-SASP axis in HSCs has key roles in obesity-associated HCC development. Moreover, signs of SASP were also observed in the HSCs in the area of HCC arising in patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, indicating that a similar pathway may contribute to at least certain aspects of obesity-associated HCC development in humans as well. These findings provide valuable new insights into the development of obesity-associated cancer and open up new possibilities for its control.

  20. A bacterial metabolite induces glutathione-tractable proteostatic damage, proteasomal disturbances, and PINK1-dependent autophagy in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Martinez, B A; Kim, H; Ray, A; Caldwell, G A; Caldwell, K A

    2015-10-15

    Gene-by-environment interactions are thought to underlie the majority of idiopathic cases of neurodegenerative disease. Recently, we reported that an environmental metabolite extracted from Streptomyces venezuelae increases ROS and damages mitochondria, leading to eventual neurodegeneration of C. elegans dopaminergic neurons. Here we link those data to idiopathic disease models that predict loss of protein handling as a component of disorder progression. We demonstrate that the bacterial metabolite leads to proteostatic disruption in multiple protein-misfolding models and has the potential to synergistically enhance the toxicity of aggregate-prone proteins. Genetically, this metabolite is epistatically regulated by loss-of-function to pink-1, the C. elegans PARK6 homolog responsible for mitochondrial maintenance and autophagy in other animal systems. In addition, the metabolite works through a genetic pathway analogous to loss-of-function in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which we find is also epistatically regulated by loss of PINK-1 homeostasis. To determine remitting counter agents, we investigated several established antioxidants and found that glutathione (GSH) can significantly protect against metabolite-induced proteostasis disruption. In addition, GSH protects against the toxicity of MG132 and can compensate for the combined loss of both pink-1 and the E3 ligase pdr-1, a Parkin homolog. In assessing the impact of this metabolite on mitochondrial maintenance, we observe that it causes fragmentation of mitochondria that is attenuated by GSH and an initial surge in PINK-1-dependent autophagy. These studies mechanistically advance our understanding of a putative environmental contributor to neurodegeneration and factors influencing in vivo neurotoxicity.

  1. A bacterial metabolite induces glutathione-tractable proteostatic damage, proteasomal disturbances, and PINK1-dependent autophagy in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, B A; Kim, H; Ray, A; Caldwell, G A; Caldwell, K A

    2015-01-01

    Gene-by-environment interactions are thought to underlie the majority of idiopathic cases of neurodegenerative disease. Recently, we reported that an environmental metabolite extracted from Streptomyces venezuelae increases ROS and damages mitochondria, leading to eventual neurodegeneration of C. elegans dopaminergic neurons. Here we link those data to idiopathic disease models that predict loss of protein handling as a component of disorder progression. We demonstrate that the bacterial metabolite leads to proteostatic disruption in multiple protein-misfolding models and has the potential to synergistically enhance the toxicity of aggregate-prone proteins. Genetically, this metabolite is epistatically regulated by loss-of-function to pink-1, the C. elegans PARK6 homolog responsible for mitochondrial maintenance and autophagy in other animal systems. In addition, the metabolite works through a genetic pathway analogous to loss-of-function in the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which we find is also epistatically regulated by loss of PINK-1 homeostasis. To determine remitting counter agents, we investigated several established antioxidants and found that glutathione (GSH) can significantly protect against metabolite-induced proteostasis disruption. In addition, GSH protects against the toxicity of MG132 and can compensate for the combined loss of both pink-1 and the E3 ligase pdr-1, a Parkin homolog. In assessing the impact of this metabolite on mitochondrial maintenance, we observe that it causes fragmentation of mitochondria that is attenuated by GSH and an initial surge in PINK-1-dependent autophagy. These studies mechanistically advance our understanding of a putative environmental contributor to neurodegeneration and factors influencing in vivo neurotoxicity. PMID:26469957

  2. Short-term hypoxic vasodilation in vivo is mediated by bioactive nitric oxide metabolites, rather than free nitric oxide derived from haemoglobin-mediated nitrite reduction

    PubMed Central

    Umbrello, Michele; Dyson, Alex; Pinto, Bernardo Bollen; Fernandez, Bernadette O; Simon, Verena; Feelisch, Martin; Singer, Mervyn

    2014-01-01

    Local increases in blood flow – ‘hypoxic vasodilation’ – confer cellular protection in the face of reduced oxygen delivery. The physiological relevance of this response is well established, yet ongoing controversy surrounds its underlying mechanisms. We sought to confirm that early hypoxic vasodilation is a nitric oxide (NO)-mediated phenomenon and to study putative pathways for increased levels of NO, namely production from NO synthases, intravascular nitrite reduction, release from preformed stores and reduced deactivation by cytochrome c oxidase. Experiments were performed on spontaneously breathing, anaesthetized, male Wistar rats undergoing short-term systemic hypoxaemia, who received pharmacological inhibitors and activators of the various NO pathways. Arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, tissue oxygen tension and the circulating pool of NO metabolites (oxidation, nitrosation and nitrosylation products) were measured in plasma and erythrocytes. Hypoxaemia caused a rapid and sustained vasodilation, which was only partially reversed by non-selective NO synthase inhibition. This was associated with significantly lower plasma nitrite, and marginally elevated nitrate levels, suggestive of nitrite bioinactivation. Administration of sodium nitrite had little effect in normoxia, but produced significant vasodilation and increased nitrosylation during hypoxaemia that could not be reversed by NO scavenging. Methodological issues prevented assessment of the contribution, if any, of reduced deactivation of NO by cytochrome c oxidase. In conclusion, acute hypoxic vasodilation is an adaptive NO-mediated response conferred through bioactive metabolites rather than free NO from haemoglobin-mediated reduction of nitrite. PMID:24396056

  3. In vitro metabolism of α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist AZD0328 and enzyme identification for its N-oxide metabolite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Diansong; Zhang, Minli; Ye, Xiaomei; Gu, Chungang; Piser, Timothy M; Lanoue, Bernard A; Schock, Sara A; Cheng, Yi-Fang; Grimm, Scott W

    2011-03-01

    1. AZD0328 was pharmacologically characterized as a α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist intended for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In vitro AZD0328 cross species metabolite profile and enzyme identification for its N-oxide metabolite were evaluated in this study. 2. AZD0328 was very stable in the human hepatocyte incubation, whereas extensively metabolized in rat, dog and guinea pig hepatocyte incubations. The N-oxidation metabolite (M6) was the only metabolite detected in human hepatocyte incubations, and it also appeared to be the major in vitro metabolic pathway in a number of preclinical species. In addition, N-glucuronide metabolite of AZD0328 was observed in human liver microsomes. 3. Other metabolic pathways in the preclinical species include hydroxylation in azabicyclo octane or furopyridine part of the molecule. Pyridine N-methylation of AZD0328 (M2) was identified as a dog specific metabolite, not observed in human or other preclinical species. 4. Multiple enzymes including CYP2D6, CYP3A4/5, FMO1 and FMO3 catalyzed AZD0328 metabolism. The potential for AZD0328 to be inhibited clinically by co-administered drugs or genetic polymorphism is relative low. PMID:21226652

  4. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  5. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  6. Plant polyphenols and oxidative metabolites of the herbal alkenylbenzene methyleugenol suppress histone deacetylase activity in human colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes.

  7. Plant Polyphenols and Oxidative Metabolites of the Herbal Alkenylbenzene Methyleugenol Suppress Histone Deacetylase Activity in Human Colon Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Groh, Isabel Anna Maria; Chen, Chen; Lüske, Claudia; Cartus, Alexander Thomas; Esselen, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Evidence has been provided that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms associated with cancer development in humans. The inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and the disruption of the HDAC complex have been recognized as a potent strategy for cancer therapy and chemoprevention. In the present study, we investigated whether selected plant constituents affect HDAC activity or HDAC1 protein status in the human colon carcinoma cell line HT29. The polyphenols (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and genistein (GEN) as well as two oxidative methyleugenol (ME) metabolites were shown to inhibit HDAC activity in intact HT29 cells. Concomitantly, a significant decrease of the HDAC1 protein level was observed after incubation with EGCG and GEN, whereas the investigated ME metabolites did not affect HDAC1 protein status. In conclusion, dietary compounds were found to possess promising HDAC-inhibitory properties, contributing to epigenetic alterations in colon tumor cells, which should be taken into account in further risk/benefit assessments of polyphenols and alkenylbenzenes. PMID:23476753

  8. Estrogen receptor alpha overexpressing mouse antral follicles are sensitive to atresia induced by methoxychlor and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Paulose, Tessie; Hannon, Patrick R; Peretz, Jackye; Craig, Zelieann R; Flaws, Jodi A

    2012-06-01

    Methoxychlor (MXC) and its metabolites bind to estrogen receptors (ESRs) and increase ovarian atresia. To test whether ESR alpha (ESR1) overexpressing (ESR1 OE) antral follicles are more sensitive to atresia compared to controls, we cultured antral follicles with vehicle, MXC (1-100 μg/ml) or metabolites (0.1-10 μg/ml). Results indicate that MXC and its metabolites significantly increase atresia in ESR1 OE antral follicles at lower doses compared to controls. Activity of pro-apoptotic factor caspase-3/7 was significantly higher in ESR1 OE treated antral follicles compared to controls. ESR1 OE mice dosed with MXC 64 mg/kg/day had an increased percentage of atretic antral follicles compared to controls. Furthermore, pro-caspase-3 levels were found to be significantly lower in ESR1 OE ovaries than controls dosed with MXC 64 mg/kg/day. These data suggest that ESR1 OE ovaries are more sensitive to atresia induced by MXC and its metabolites in vitro and in vivo compared to controls.

  9. Mechanisms of mycotoxin-induced neurotoxicity through oxidative stress-associated pathways.

    PubMed

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB(1) induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  10. Mechanisms of Mycotoxin-Induced Neurotoxicity through Oxidative Stress-Associated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B1 (FB1) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB1 induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  11. 6β-Hydroxytestosterone, a Cytochrome P450 1B1-Testosterone-Metabolite, Mediates Angiotensin II-Induced Renal Dysfunction in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Pingili, Ajeeth K; Thirunavukkarasu, Shyamala; Kara, Mehmet; Brand, David D; Katsurada, Akemi; Majid, Dewan S A; Navar, L Gabriel; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2016-05-01

    6β-Hydroxytestosterone, a cytochrome P450 1B1-derived metabolite of testosterone, contributes to the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiovascular pathophysiology. In view of the critical role of angiotensin II in the maintenance of renal homeostasis, development of hypertension, and end-organ damage, this study was conducted to determine the contribution of 6β-hydroxytestosterone to angiotensin II actions on water consumption and renal function in male Cyp1b1(+/+) and Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Castration of Cyp1b1(+/+) mice or Cyp1b1(-/-) gene disruption minimized the angiotensin II-induced increase in water consumption, urine output, proteinuria, and sodium excretion and decreases in urine osmolality. 6β-Hydroxytestosterone did not alter angiotensin II-induced increases in water intake, urine output, proteinuria, and sodium excretion or decreases in osmolality in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, but restored these effects of angiotensin II in Cyp1b1(-/-) or castrated Cyp1b1(+/+) mice. Cyp1b1 gene disruption or castration prevented angiotensin II-induced renal fibrosis, oxidative stress, inflammation, urinary excretion of angiotensinogen, expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, and angiotensin-converting enzyme. 6β-Hydroxytestosterone did not alter angiotensin II-induced renal fibrosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, urinary excretion of angiotensinogen, expression of angiotensin II type 1 receptor, or angiotensin-converting enzyme in Cyp1b1(+/+)mice. However, in Cyp1b1(-/-) or castrated Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, it restored these effects of angiotensin II. These data indicate that 6β-hydroxytestosterone contributes to increased thirst, impairment of renal function, and end-organ injury associated with angiotensin II-induced hypertension in male mice and that cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for treating renal disease and hypertension in male mice.

  12. Piceatannol and its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, induce SIRT1 expression in THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Kinoshita, Yosuke; Maruki-Uchida, Hiroko; Yanae, Koji; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical that is present in large amounts in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) seeds, and is an analog of resveratrol. Recently, the absorption and metabolism of piceatannol were investigated in rats, and isorhapontigenin, O-methyl piceatannol, was detected as a piceatannol metabolite in rat plasma. To elucidate the function of piceatannol and its metabolites, we investigated the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in THP-1 monocytic cells after treatment with piceatannol and its metabolites, and compared their effects with those of resveratrol and its metabolites. Piceatannol and resveratrol upregulated the expression levels of SIRT1 mRNA and SIRT1 protein. An extract of passion fruit seeds, which contained high levels of piceatannol, also upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression. As for the metabolites, isorhapontigenin upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression, whereas resveratrol glucuronides and sulfate did not affect SIRT1 expression. These findings indicate that after intake of piceatannol, not only piceatannol itself, but also its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, contributed to the upregulation of SIRT1 expression. PMID:25360511

  13. Autoimmune Hepatitis Induced by Syngeneic Liver Cytosolic Proteins Biotransformed by Alcohol Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Duryee, Michael J.; Willis, Monte S.; Tuma, Dean J.; Radio, Stanley J.; Hunter, Carlos D.; Schaffert, Courtney S.; Klassen, Lynell W.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Aldehydes that are produced following the breakdown of ethanol (acetaldehyde) and lipid peroxidation of membranes (malondialdehyde) have been shown to bind (adduct) proteins. Additionally, these two aldehydes can combine (MAA) on non-syngeneic and syngeneic proteins to initiate numerous immune responses to the unmodified part of the protein in the absence of an adjuvant. Therefore, these studies provide a potential mechanism for the development of antigen-specific immune responses resulting in liver damage should syngeneic liver proteins be adducted with MAA. Methods This study sought to test whether MAA modified syngeneic liver cytosolic proteins administered daily in the absence of adjuvant into C57BL/6 mice abrogates tolerance to initiate a MAA induced autoimmune-like hepatitis (MIAH). Results In mice immunized with MAA modified cytosols there was an increase in liver damage as assessed by AST/ALT levels that correlated with liver pathology scores and the presence of the pro-fibrotic factors; smooth muscle actin (SMA), TGF-β, and collagen. IgG antibodies and T-cell proliferative responses specific for cytosolic proteins were also detected. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were produced in the livers of animals exposed to MAA-modified cytosols. Finally, transfer of immunized T-cells to naïve animals caused biochemical and histological evidence of liver damage. Conclusions These data demonstrate that a disease with an autoimmune-like pathophysiology can be generated in this animal model using soluble MAA modified syngeneic liver cytosols as the immunogen. These studies provide insight into potential mechanism(s) that the metabolites of alcohol may play in contributing to the onset of an autoimmune-like disease in ALD patients. PMID:20860619

  14. Hydroxytyrosol glucuronides protect renal tubular epithelial cells against H(2)O(2) induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Deiana, Monica; Incani, Alessandra; Rosa, Antonella; Atzeri, Angela; Loru, Debora; Cabboi, Barbara; Paola Melis, M; Lucas, Ricardo; Morales, Juan C; Assunta Dessì, M

    2011-09-30

    Hydroxytyrosol (2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol; HT), the most active ortho-diphenolic compound, present either in free or esterified form in extravirgin olive oil, is extensively metabolized in vivo mainly to O-methylated, O-sulfated and glucuronide metabolites. We investigated the capacity of three glucuronide metabolites of HT, 3'-O-β-d-glucuronide and 4'-O-β-d-glucuronide derivatives and 2-(3',4'-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol-1-O-β-d-glucuronide, in comparison with the parent compound, to inhibit H(2)O(2) induced oxidative damage and cell death in LLC-PK1 cells, a porcine kidney epithelial cell line. H(2)O(2) treatment exerted a toxic effect inducing cell death, interacting selectively within the pro-death extracellular-signal relate kinase (ERK 1/2) and the pro-survival Akt/PKB signaling pathways. It also produced direct oxidative damage initiating the membrane lipid peroxidation process. None of the tested glucuronides exhibited any protection against the loss in renal cell viability. They also failed to prevent the changes in the phosphorylation states of ERK and Akt, probably reflecting their inability to enter the cells, while HT was highly effective. Notably, pretreatment with glucuronides exerted a protective effect at the highest concentration tested against membrane oxidative damage, comparable to that of HT: the formation of malondialdehyde, fatty acid hydroperoxides and 7-ketocholesterol was significantly inhibited.

  15. Cardioprotective Effect of High Intensity Interval Training and Nitric Oxide Metabolites (NO2−, NO3−)

    PubMed Central

    FALLAHI, Aliasghar; GAEINI, Abbasali; SHEKARFROUSH, Shahnaz; KHOSHBATEN, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) on nitric oxide metabolites (NO2−, NO3−) and myocardial infarct size after Ischemia/Reperfusion (I/R) injury in healthy male rats. Methods: A total of 44 Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups including HIIT (n=8), HIIT + IR protocol (n=14), control (n=8), and control + IR (n=14). Each training session of HIIT consisted of 1 hour of exercise in three stages: 6-minute running at 50–60% VO2max for warm-up; 7 intervals of 7-minute running on treadmill with a slope of 5° to 20° (4 minutes with an intensity of 80–100% VO2max and 3 minutes at 50–60% VO2max); and 5-minute running at 50–60% VO2max for cool-down. The control group did not participate in any exercise program. Nitric Oxide (NO) and its metabolites were measured by using Griess reaction test. Results: The results showed that eight weeks of exercise training exerted a significantly increasing effect on nitrite (8.55 μmol per liter, equivalent to 34.79%), nitrate (62.02 μmol per liter, equivalent to 149.48%), and NOx (66 μmol per liter, equivalent to 98.11%) in the HIIT group compared with the control group. The results showed myocardial infract size (IS) was significantly smaller (23.2%, P<0.001) in the exercise training group compared with the control group. Conclusion: Incremental changes in NO-NO3−, NO2− axis are one of mechanisms through which HIIT program can protect the heart from I/R injury and decrease myocardial infarction. PMID:26587502

  16. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here

  17. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  18. Neuroprotection comparison of chlorogenic acid and its metabolites against mechanistically distinct cell death-inducing agents in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    PubMed

    Taram, Faten; Winter, Aimee N; Linseman, Daniel A

    2016-10-01

    While the number of patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease is increasing, there are currently no effective treatments that significantly limit the neuronal cell death underlying these diseases. Chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenolic compound found in high concentration in coffee, is known to possess antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of CGA and its major metabolites in primary cultures of rat cerebellar granule neurons. We show that CGA and caffeic acid displayed a dramatic protective effect against the nitric oxide donor, sodium nitroprusside. In marked contrast, ferulic acid and quinic acid had no protective effect against this nitrosative stress. While CGA and quinic acid had no protective effect against glutamate-induced cell death, caffeic acid and ferulic acid significantly protected neurons from excitotoxicity. Finally, caffeic acid was the only compound to display significant protective activity against hydrogen peroxide, proteasome inhibition, caspase-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that caffeic acid displays a much broader profile of neuroprotection against a diverse range of stressors than its parent polyphenol, CGA, or the other major metabolites, ferulic acid and quinic acid. We conclude that caffeic acid is a promising candidate for testing in pre-clinical models of neurodegeneration. PMID:27444557

  19. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Ali, S F

    1996-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the relatively selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), protects against methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. Male Swiss Webster mice received the following treatments (i.p.; q 3 h x 3): (a) vehicle/saline, (b) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/saline, (c) vehicle/METH (5 mg/kg), and (d) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/METH (5 mg/kg). On the second day, groups (a) and (b) received two vehicle injections, and groups (c) and (d) received two 7-NI injections (25 mg/kg, each). Administration of vehicle/METH resulted in 68, 44, and 55% decreases in the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid, respectively, and a 48% decrease in the number of [3H]mazindol binding sites in the striatum compared with control values. Treatment with 7-NI (group d) provided full protection against the depletion of dopamine and its metabolites and the loss of dopamine transporter binding sites. Administration of 7-NI/saline (group b) affected neither the tissue concentration of dopamine and its metabolites nor the binding parameters of [3H] mazindol compared with control values. 7-NI had no significant effect on animals' body temperature, and it did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia. These findings indicate a role for nitric oxide in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and also suggest that blockade of NOS may be beneficial for the management of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Individual Shrink Wrapping of Zucchini Fruit Improves Postharvest Chilling Tolerance Associated with a Reduction in Ethylene Production and Oxidative Stress Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Megías, Zoraida; Martínez, Cecilia; Manzano, Susana; García, Alicia; Rebolloso-Fuentes, María del Mar; Garrido, Dolores; Valenzuela, Juan Luis; Jamilena, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of individual shrink wrapping (ISW) on the postharvest performance of refrigerated fruit from two zucchini cultivars that differ in their sensitivity to cold storage: Sinatra (more sensitive) and Natura (more tolerant). The fruit was individually shrink wrapped before storing at 4°C for 0, 7 and 14 days. Quality parameters, ethylene and CO2 productions, ethylene gene expression, and oxidative stress metabolites were assessed in shrink wrapped and non-wrapped fruit after conditioning the fruit for 6 hours at 20°C. ISW decreased significantly the postharvest deterioration of chilled zucchini in both cultivars. Weight loss was reduced to less than 1%, pitting symptoms were completely absent in ISW fruit at 7 days, and were less than 25% those of control fruits at 14 days of cold storage, and firmness loss was significantly reduced in the cultivar Sinatra. These enhancements in quality of ISW fruit were associated with a significant reduction in cold-induced ethylene production, in the respiration rate, and in the level of oxidative stress metabolites such as hydrogen peroxide and malonyldialdehyde (MDA). A detailed expression analysis of ethylene biosynthesis, perception and signaling genes demonstrated a downregulation of CpACS1 and CpACO1 genes in response to ISW, two genes that are upregulated by cold storage. However, the expression patterns of six other ethylene biosynthesis genes (CpACS2 to CpACS7) and five ethylene signal transduction pathway genes (CpCTR1, CpETR1, CpERS1, CpEIN3.1 and CpEN3.2), suggest that they do not play a major role in response to cold storage and ISW packaging. In conclusion, ISW zucchini packaging resulted in improved tolerance to chilling concomitantly with a reduction in oxidative stress, respiration rate and ethylene production, as well as in the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes, but not of those involved in ethylene perception and sensitivity. PMID:26177024

  1. Individual Shrink Wrapping of Zucchini Fruit Improves Postharvest Chilling Tolerance Associated with a Reduction in Ethylene Production and Oxidative Stress Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Megías, Zoraida; Martínez, Cecilia; Manzano, Susana; García, Alicia; Rebolloso-Fuentes, María Del Mar; Garrido, Dolores; Valenzuela, Juan Luis; Jamilena, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the effect of individual shrink wrapping (ISW) on the postharvest performance of refrigerated fruit from two zucchini cultivars that differ in their sensitivity to cold storage: Sinatra (more sensitive) and Natura (more tolerant). The fruit was individually shrink wrapped before storing at 4°C for 0, 7 and 14 days. Quality parameters, ethylene and CO2 productions, ethylene gene expression, and oxidative stress metabolites were assessed in shrink wrapped and non-wrapped fruit after conditioning the fruit for 6 hours at 20°C. ISW decreased significantly the postharvest deterioration of chilled zucchini in both cultivars. Weight loss was reduced to less than 1%, pitting symptoms were completely absent in ISW fruit at 7 days, and were less than 25% those of control fruits at 14 days of cold storage, and firmness loss was significantly reduced in the cultivar Sinatra. These enhancements in quality of ISW fruit were associated with a significant reduction in cold-induced ethylene production, in the respiration rate, and in the level of oxidative stress metabolites such as hydrogen peroxide and malonyldialdehyde (MDA). A detailed expression analysis of ethylene biosynthesis, perception and signaling genes demonstrated a downregulation of CpACS1 and CpACO1 genes in response to ISW, two genes that are upregulated by cold storage. However, the expression patterns of six other ethylene biosynthesis genes (CpACS2 to CpACS7) and five ethylene signal transduction pathway genes (CpCTR1, CpETR1, CpERS1, CpEIN3.1 and CpEN3.2), suggest that they do not play a major role in response to cold storage and ISW packaging. In conclusion, ISW zucchini packaging resulted in improved tolerance to chilling concomitantly with a reduction in oxidative stress, respiration rate and ethylene production, as well as in the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes, but not of those involved in ethylene perception and sensitivity. PMID:26177024

  2. Ochratoxin A induces oxidative DNA damage in liver and kidney after oral dosing to rats.

    PubMed

    Kamp, Hennicke G; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Janzowski, Christine; Kiossev, Jetchko; Latendresse, John R; Schlatter, Josef; Turesky, Robert J

    2005-12-01

    The nephrotoxic/carcinogenic mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) occurs as a contaminant in food and feed and may be linked to human endemic Balkan nephropathy. The mechanism of OTA-derived carcinogenicity is still under debate, since reactive metabolites of OTA and DNA adducts have not been unambiguously identified. Oxidative DNA damage, however, has been observed in vitro after incubation of mammalian cells with OTA. In this study, we investigated whether OTA induces oxidative DNA damage in vivo as well. Male F344 rats were dosed with 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3 mg/kg bw per day OTA for 4 wk (gavage, 7 days/wk, five animals per dose group). Subsequently, oxidative DNA damage was determined in liver and kidney by the comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) with/without use of the repair enzyme formamido-pyrimidine-DNA-glycosylase (FPG). The administration of OTA had no effect on basic DNA damage (determined without FPG); however, OTA-mediated oxidative damage was detected with FPG treatment in kidney and liver DNA of all dose groups. Since the doses were in a range that had caused kidney tumors in a 2-year carcinogenicity study with rats, the oxidative DNA damage induced by OTA may help to explain its mechanism of carcinogenicity. For the selective induction of tumors in the kidney, increased oxidative stress in connection with severe cytotoxicity and increased cell proliferation might represent driving factors.

  3. The pentachlorophenol metabolite tetrachlorohydroquinone induces massive ROS and prolonged p-ERK expression in splenocytes, leading to inhibition of apoptosis and necrotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsiu-Min; Zhu, Ben-Zhan; Chen, Rong-Jane; Wang, Bour-Jr; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used extensively as a biocide and a wood preservative and has been reported to be immunosuppressive in rodents and humans. Tetrachlorohydroquinone (TCHQ) is a major metabolite of PCP. TCHQ has been identified as the main cause of PCP-induced genotoxicity due to reactive oxidant stress (ROS). However, the precise mechanisms associated with the immunotoxic effects of PCP and TCHQ remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of PCP and TCHQ on the induction of ROS and injury to primary mouse splenocytes. Our results shown that TCHQ was more toxic than PCP and that a high dose of TCHQ led to necrotic cell death of the splenocytes through induction of massive and sudden ROS and prolonged ROS-triggered ERK activation. Inhibition of ROS production by N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) partially restored the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited ERK activity, elevated caspase-3 activity and PARP cleavage, and, eventually, switched the TCHQ-induced necrosis to apoptosis. We suggest that prolonged ERK activation is essential for TCHQ-induced necrosis, and that ROS play a pivotal role in the different TCHQ-induced cell death mechanisms. PMID:24586814

  4. 1H NMR-Based Analysis of Serum Metabolites in Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Taijie; Gu, Jinping; Huang, Caihua; Zheng, Suli; Lin, Xu; Xie, Liangdi; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Aims. To study the changes of the metabolic profile during the pathogenesis in monocrotaline (MCT) induced pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Methods. Forty male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 8, each). PAH rats were induced by a single dose intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg MCT, while 8 rats given intraperitoneal injection of 1 ml normal saline and scarified in the same day (W0) served as control. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured through catherization. The degree of right ventricular hypertrophy and pulmonary hyperplasia were determined at the end of first to fourth weeks; nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sera were then acquired for the analysis of metabolites. Principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least-squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) were used to discriminate different metabolic profiles. Results. The prominent changes of metabolic profiles were seen during these four weeks. Twenty specific metabolites were identified, which were mainly involved in lipid metabolism, glycolysis, energy metabolism, ketogenesis, and methionine metabolism. Profiles of correlation between these metabolites in each stage changed markedly, especially in the fourth week. Highly activated methionine and betaine metabolism pathways were selected by the pathway enrichment analysis. Conclusions. Metabolic dysfunction is involved in the development and progression of PAH. PMID:27057080

  5. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host. PMID:15634847

  6. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host.

  7. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Carcinogenesis Induced by Metals and Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Luch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In addition to a wide range of adverse effects on human health, toxic metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can also promote carcinogenesis. The toxicological properties of these metals are partly related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can induce DNA damage and trigger redox-dependent transcription factors. The precise mechanisms that induce oxidative stress are not fully understood. Further, it is not yet known whether chronic exposures to low doses of arsenic, cadmium or other metals are sufficient to induce mutations in vivo, leading to DNA repair responses and/or tumorigenesis. Oxidative stress can also be induced by environmental xenobiotics, when certain metabolites are generated that lead to the continuous release of superoxide, as long as the capacity to reduce the resulting dions (quinones) into hydroquinones is maintained. However, the specific significance of superoxide-dependent pathways to carcinogenesis is often difficult to address, because formation of DNA adducts by mutagenic metabolites can occur in parallel. Here, we will review both mechanisms and toxicological consequences of oxidative stress triggered by metals and dietary or environmental pollutants in general. Besides causing DNA damage, ROS may further induce multiple intracellular signaling pathways, notably NF-κB, JNK/SAPK/p38, as well as Erk/MAPK. These signaling routes can lead to transcriptional induction of target genes that could promote proliferation or confer apoptosis resistance to exposed cells. The significance of these additional modes depends on tissue, cell-type and is often masked by alternate oncogenic mechanisms being activated in parallel. PMID:24281075

  8. Mono-2-Ethylhexyl Phthalate Induces Oxidative Stress Responses in Human Placental Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tetz, Lauren M; Cheng, Adrienne A.; Korte, Cassandra S.; Giese, Roger W.; Wang, Poguang; Harris, Craig; Meeker, John D; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) is an environmental contaminant commonly used as a plasticizer in polyvinyl chloride products. Exposure to DEHP has been linked to adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans including preterm birth, low birth-weight, and pregnancy loss. Although oxidative stress is linked to the pathology of adverse pregnancy outcomes, effects of DEHP metabolites, including the active metabolite, mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (MEHP), on oxidative stress responses in placental cells have not been previously evaluated. The objective of the current study is to identify MEHP-stimulated oxidative stress responses in human placental cells. We treated a human placental cell line, HTR-8/SVneo, with MEHP and then measured reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation using the dichlorofluorescein assay, oxidized thymine with mass-spectrometry, redox-sensitive gene expression with qRT-PCR, and apoptosis using a luminescence assay for caspase 3/7 activity. Treatment of HTR-8 cells with 180 μM MEHP increased ROS generation, oxidative DNA damage, and caspase 3/7 activity, and resulted in differential expression of redox-sensitive genes. Notably, 90 and 180 μM MEHP significantly induced mRNA expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), an enzyme important for synthesis of prostaglandins implicated in initiation of labor. The results from the present study are the first to demonstrate that MEHP stimulates oxidative stress responses in placental cells. Furthermore, the MEHP concentrations used were within an order of magnitude of the highest concentrations measured previously in human umbilical cord or maternal serum. The findings from the current study warrant future mechanistic studies of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and prostaglandins as molecular mediators of DEHP/MEHP-associated adverse pregnancy outcomes. PMID:23360888

  9. Basic oxidative stress metabolites in eastern Pacific green turtles (Chelonia mydas agassizii).

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Paloma A; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Gardner, Susan C; Aguirre, A Alonso

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of hematological and biochemical parameters, including oxidative stress indicators, is an invaluable tool in wildlife health assessment, particularly for threatened or endangered species. This study was aimed at obtaining baseline information of oxidative stress indicators in eastern Pacific green turtles (Chelonia mydas agassizii) from a relatively undisturbed habitat at Bahía Magdalena, Baja California Sur, Mexico. Tissues were analyzed for superoxide radical (O(2)(*-) production, lipid peroxidation (measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS), and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione S-transferase (GST)). Overall levels for all variables were within ranges reported for other reptile species. Results suggest differences in oxidative metabolism among tissues (p< or =0.05). Liver, lung and muscle had the highest levels of O(2)(*-) production. Liver revealed the highest TBARS levels. Liver and muscle showed the highest SOD activity, while liver and kidney had the highest CAT and GST activities. These data provide baseline values of the oxidative stress indicators in tissues from eastern Pacific green turtles. Development of a biomarker system to assess the health of wildlife species, especially one that could detect early exposure to environmental pollutants or emerging diseases, would provide a useful tool in the long-term conservation of the species.

  10. Drug Oxidation by Cytochrome P450BM3 : Metabolite Synthesis and Discovering New P450 Reaction Types.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xinkun; Yorke, Jake A; Taylor, Emily; Zhang, Ting; Zhou, Weihong; Wong, Luet Lok

    2015-10-12

    There is intense interest in late-stage catalytic C-H bond functionalization as an integral part of synthesis. Effective catalysts must have a broad substrate range and tolerate diverse functional groups. Drug molecules provide a good test of these attributes of a catalyst. A library of P450BM3 mutants developed from four base mutants with high activity for hydrocarbon oxidation produced human metabolites of a panel of drugs that included neutral (chlorzoxazone, testosterone), cationic (amitriptyline, lidocaine) and anionic (diclofenac, naproxen) compounds. No single mutant was active for all the tested drugs but multiple variants in the library showed high activity with each compound. The high conversions enabled full product characterization that led to the discovery of the new P450 reaction type of oxidative decarboxylation of an α-hydroxy carboxylic acid and the formation a protected imine from an amine, offering a novel route to α-functionalization of amines. The substrate range and varied product profiles suggest that this library of enzymes is a good basis for developing late-stage C-H activation catalysts.

  11. Methylated arsenic metabolites bind to PML protein but do not induce cellular differentiation and PML-RARα protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian Qian; Zhou, Xin Yi; Zhang, Yan Fang; Bu, Na; Zhou, Jin; Cao, Feng Lin; Naranmandura, Hua

    2015-09-22

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) is one of the most effective therapeutic agents used for patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The probable explanation for As2O3-induced cell differentiation is the direct targeting of PML-RARα oncoprotein by As2O3, which results in initiation of PML-RARα degradation. However, after injection, As2O3 is rapidly methylated in body to different intermediate metabolites such as trivalent monomethylarsonous acid (MMA(III)) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA(III)), therefore, it remains unknown that which arsenic specie is actually responsible for the therapeutic effects against APL. Here we have shown the role of As2O3 (as iAs(III)) and its intermediate metabolites (i.e., MMA(III)/DMA(III)) in NB4 cells. Inorganic iAs(III) predominantly showed induction of cell differentiation, while MMA(III) and DMA(III) specifically showed to induce mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis, respectively. On the other hand, in contrast to iAs(III), MMA(III) showed stronger binding affinity for ring domain of PML recombinant protein, however, could not induce PML protein SUMOylation and ubiquitin/proteasome degradation. In summary, our results suggest that the binding of arsenicals to the ring domain of PML proteins is not associated with the degradation of PML-RARα fusion protein. Moreover, methylated arsenicals can efficiently lead to cellular apoptosis, however, they are incapable of inducing NB4 cell differentiation. PMID:26213848

  12. Metabolites of the phospholipase D pathway regulate H2O2-induced filamin redistribution in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hastie, L E; Patton, W F; Hechtman, H B; Shepro, D

    1998-03-15

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury to cultured endothelial cells results in cytoskeletal rearrangement and second messenger activation related to increased monolayer junctional permeability. Cytoskeletal rearrangement by reactive oxygen species may be related to specific activation of the phospholipase D (PLD) pathway. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers are exposed to H2O2 (100 microM) or metabolites of the PLD pathway for 1-60 min. Changes in cAMP levels, Ca2+ levels, PIP2 production, filamin distribution, and intercellular gap formation are then quantitated. H2O2-induced filamin translocation from the membrane to the cytosol occurs after 1-min H2O2 treatment, while intercellular gap formation significantly increases after 15 min. H2O2 and phosphatidic acid exposure rapidly decrease intracellular cAMP levels, while increasing PIP2 levels in a Ca2+-independent manner. H2O2-induced cAMP decreases are prevented by inhibiting phospholipase D. H2O2-induced cytoskeletal changes are prevented by inhibiting phospholipase D, phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate kinase, phosphoinositide turnover, or by adding a synthetic peptide that binds PIP2. These data indicate that metabolites produced downstream of H2O2-induced PLD activation may mediate filamin redistribution and F-actin rearrangement.

  13. The Pesticide Metabolites Paraoxon and Malaoxon Induce Cellular Death by Different Mechanisms in Cultured Human Pulmonary Cells.

    PubMed

    Angelini, Daniel J; Moyer, Robert A; Cole, Stephanie; Willis, Kristen L; Oyler, Jonathan; Dorsey, Russell M; Salem, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides are known to induce pulmonary toxicity in both humans and experimental animals. To elucidate the mechanism of OP-induced cytotoxicity, we examined the effects of parathion and malathion and their respective metabolites, paraoxon and malaoxon, on primary cultured human large and small airway cells. Exposure to paraoxon and malaoxon produced a dose-dependent increase in cytotoxicity following a 24-hour exposure, while treatment with parathion or malathion produced no effects at clinically relevant concentrations. Exposure to paraoxon-induced caspase activation, but malaoxon failed to induce this response. Since caspases have a major role in the regulation of apoptosis and cell death, we evaluated OP-induced cell death in the presence of a caspase inhibitor. Pharmacological caspase inhibition protected against paraoxon-induced cell death but not malaoxon-induced cell death. These data suggest that caspase activation is a key signaling element in paraoxon-induced cell death, but not malaoxon-induced cellular death in the pulmonary epithelium. PMID:26173615

  14. Space radiation-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and memory impairment in mice: ameliorative potential of the melatonin metabolite, AFMK.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-11-01

    Evaluation of potential health effects from high energy charged particle radiation exposure during long duration space travel is important for the future of manned missions. Cognitive health of an organism is considered to be maintained by the capacity of hippocampal precursors to proliferate and differentiate. Environmental stressors including irradiation have been shown to inhibit neurogenesis and are associated with the onset of cognitive impairments. The present study reports on the protective effects of N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK), a melatonin metabolite, against high energy charged particle radiation-induced oxidative damage to the brain. We observed that radiation exposure (2.0 Gy of 500 MeV/nucleon (56)Fe beams, a ground-based model of space radiation) impaired the spatial memory of mice at later intervals without affecting the motor activities. AFMK pretreatment significantly ameliorated these neurobehavioral ailments. Radiation-induced changes in the population of immature and proliferating neurons in the dentate gyrus were localized using anti-doublecortin (Dcx) and anti-Ki-67 expression. AFMK pretreatment significantly inhibited the loss of Dcx and Ki-67 positive cells. Moreover, AFMK pretreatment ameliorated the radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxyalkenal + malondialdehyde (MDA + HAE) in the brain and maintained the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and nonprotein sulfhydryl contents in brain.

  15. Space radiation-induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and memory impairment in mice: ameliorative potential of the melatonin metabolite, AFMK.

    PubMed

    Manda, Kailash; Ueno, Megumi; Anzai, Kazunori

    2008-11-01

    Evaluation of potential health effects from high energy charged particle radiation exposure during long duration space travel is important for the future of manned missions. Cognitive health of an organism is considered to be maintained by the capacity of hippocampal precursors to proliferate and differentiate. Environmental stressors including irradiation have been shown to inhibit neurogenesis and are associated with the onset of cognitive impairments. The present study reports on the protective effects of N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK), a melatonin metabolite, against high energy charged particle radiation-induced oxidative damage to the brain. We observed that radiation exposure (2.0 Gy of 500 MeV/nucleon (56)Fe beams, a ground-based model of space radiation) impaired the spatial memory of mice at later intervals without affecting the motor activities. AFMK pretreatment significantly ameliorated these neurobehavioral ailments. Radiation-induced changes in the population of immature and proliferating neurons in the dentate gyrus were localized using anti-doublecortin (Dcx) and anti-Ki-67 expression. AFMK pretreatment significantly inhibited the loss of Dcx and Ki-67 positive cells. Moreover, AFMK pretreatment ameliorated the radiation-induced augmentation of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxyalkenal + malondialdehyde (MDA + HAE) in the brain and maintained the total antioxidant capacity of plasma and nonprotein sulfhydryl contents in brain. PMID:18631288

  16. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1984-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weight. A cationic mechanism is evidenced by the strongly retarding effect of tri-n-propylamine on the polymerization rate. At 25/sup 0/C, limonene oxide gives the highest polymerization rates, an average conversion of 36% per Mrad being obtained in comparison with values of 5.7 and 7.3% per Mrad for the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides, respectively. Similarly, the average anti DP/sub n/ decreases from 11.8 for the limonene oxide polymer to 5.6 and 4.0 for the ..cap alpha..-pinene oxide and ..beta..-pinene oxide polymers, respectively. A high frequency of chain transfer to monomer is indicated in each case by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be on the order of a hundred times larger than the anti DP/sub n/ values. Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that in the polymerization of these monomers, the opening of the epoxide ring is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-dimethyl group in the main chain. The detection of isopropenyl end groups in the pinene oxide polymers is also consistent with this mode of propagation being followed by chain (proton) transfer to monomer.

  17. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  18. Oxidant-induced apoptosis is mediated by oxidation of the actin-regulatory protein cofilin

    PubMed Central

    Klamt, Fábio; Zdanov, Stéphanie; Levine, Rodney L.; Pariser, Ashley; Zhang, Yaqin; Zhang, Baolin; Yu, Li-Rong; Veenstra, Timothy D.; Shacter, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Physiological oxidants that are generated by activated phagocytes comprise the main source of oxidative stress during inflammation1,2. Oxidants such as taurine chloramine (TnCl) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can damage proteins and induce apoptosis, but the role of specific protein oxidation in this process has not been defined. We found that the actin-binding protein cofilin is a key target of oxidation. When oxidation of this single regulatory protein is prevented, oxidant-induced apoptosis is inhibited. Oxidation of cofilin causes it to lose its affinity for actin and to translocate to the mitochondria, where it induces swelling and cytochrome c release by mediating opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP). This occurs independently of Bax activation and requires both oxidation of cofilin Cys residues and dephosphorylation at Ser 3. Knockdown of endogenous cofilin using targeted siRNA inhibits oxidant-induced apoptosis, which is restored by re-expression of wild-type cofilin but not by cofilin containing Cys to Ala mutations. Exposure of cofilin to TnCl results in intramolecular disulphide bonding and oxidation of Met residues to Met sulphoxide, but only Cys oxidation causes cofilin to induce mitochondrial damage. PMID:19734890

  19. Biosynthesis and Defensive Function of Nδ-Acetylornithine, a Jasmonate-Induced Arabidopsis Metabolite[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Adio, Adewale M.; Casteel, Clare L.; De Vos, Martin; Kim, Jae Hak; Joshi, Vijay; Li, Baohua; Juéry, Caroline; Daron, Josquin; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.; Jander, Georg

    2011-01-01

    Since research on plant interactions with herbivores and pathogens is often constrained by the analysis of already known compounds, there is a need to identify new defense-related plant metabolites. The uncommon nonprotein amino acid Nδ-acetylornithine was discovered in a targeted search for Arabidopsis thaliana metabolites that are strongly induced by the phytohormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Stable isotope labeling experiments show that, after MeJA elicitation, Arg, Pro, and Glu are converted to Orn, which is acetylated by NATA1 to produce Nδ-acetylornithine. MeJA-induced Nδ-acetylornithine accumulation occurs in all tested Arabidopsis accessions, other Arabidopsis species, Capsella rubella, and Boechera stricta, but not in less closely related Brassicaceae. Both insect feeding and Pseudomonas syringae infection increase NATA1 expression and Nδ-acetylornithine accumulation. NATA1 transient expression in Nicotiana tabacum and the addition of Nδ-acetylornithine to an artificial diet both decrease Myzus persicae (green peach aphid) reproduction, suggesting a direct toxic or deterrent effect. However, since broad metabolic changes that are induced by MeJA in wild-type Arabidopsis are attenuated in a nata1 mutant strain, there may also be indirect effects on herbivores and pathogens. In the case of P. syringae, growth on a nata1 mutant is reduced compared with wild-type Arabidopsis, but growth in vitro is unaffected by Nδ-acetylornithine addition. PMID:21917546

  20. Biocontrol treatments confer protection against Verticillium dahliae infection of potato by inducing antimicrobial metabolites.

    PubMed

    El Hadrami, A; Adam, L R; Daayf, F

    2011-03-01

    Verticillium wilt, caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb., is a serious potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) disease worldwide, and biocontrol represents a promising eco-friendly strategy to reduce its impact. We used extracts from Canada milk vetch (CMV) and a set of four V. dahliae-antagonistic bacterial strains to coat potato seeds at planting and examined the degree of protection provided against V. dahliae as well as accumulation of soluble phenolics as markers for induced resistance. All tested treatments were effective in reducing disease severity, and CMV showed the highest level of protection. In this treatment, flavonol-glycoside rutin was a highly abundant compound induced in potato tissues, with levels two to three times higher than those detected in noninoculated controls and V. dahliae-inoculated plants. We investigated dose-dependent effects of rutin on V. dahliae growth and sporulation in vitro and in planta. The effect of rutin on mycelial growth was inconsistent between disk assay and amended medium experiments. On the other hand, significant reduction of V. dahliae sporulation in vitro was consistently observed starting at 300 and 100 μM for isolates Vd-9 and Vd-21, respectively. We successfully detected 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid (2-PCPGCA) using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, indicating that V. dahliae dioxygenally oxidizes quercetin. Quercetin, as an aglycone, is freed from the sugar moiety by glucosidases and rhamnosidases produced by the fungus and is a substrate for quercetinases. The occurrence of quercetinases in V. dahliae provides a background to formulate a hypothesis about how by-product 2-PCPGCA may be interfering with potato defenses.

  1. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood.

  2. Oxidative stress contributes to the tamoxifen-induced killing of breast cancer cells: implications for tamoxifen therapy and resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bekele, Raie T.; Venkatraman, Ganesh; Liu, Rong-Zong; Tang, Xiaoyun; Mi, Si; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Mackey, John R.; Godbout, Roseline; Curtis, Jonathan M.; McMullen, Todd P. W.; Brindley, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Tamoxifen is the accepted therapy for patients with estrogen receptor-α (ERα)-positive breast cancer. However, clinical resistance to tamoxifen, as demonstrated by recurrence or progression on therapy, is frequent and precedes death from metastases. To improve breast cancer treatment it is vital to understand the mechanisms that result in tamoxifen resistance. This study shows that concentrations of tamoxifen and its metabolites, which accumulate in tumors of patients, killed both ERα-positive and ERα-negative breast cancer cells. This depended on oxidative damage and anti-oxidants rescued the cancer cells from tamoxifen-induced apoptosis. Breast cancer cells responded to tamoxifen-induced oxidation by increasing Nrf2 expression and subsequent activation of the anti-oxidant response element (ARE). This increased the transcription of anti-oxidant genes and multidrug resistance transporters. As a result, breast cancer cells are able to destroy or export toxic oxidation products leading to increased survival from tamoxifen-induced oxidative damage. These responses in cancer cells also occur in breast tumors of tamoxifen-treated mice. Additionally, high levels of expression of Nrf2, ABCC1, ABCC3 plus NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone-1 in breast tumors of patients at the time of diagnosis were prognostic of poor survival after tamoxifen therapy. Therefore, overcoming tamoxifen-induced activation of the ARE could increase the efficacy of tamoxifen in treating breast cancer. PMID:26883574

  3. Intestinal ellagitannin metabolites ameliorate cytokine-induced inflammation and associated molecular markers in human colon fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan A; Larrosa, Mar; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco; Espín, Juan C; García-Conesa, María-Teresa

    2012-09-12

    Pomegranate ellagitannins (ETs) are transformed in the gut to ellagic acid (EA) and its microbiota metabolites, urolithin A (Uro-A) and urolithin B (Uro-B). These compounds exert anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Uro-A, Uro-B, and EA on colon fibroblasts, cells that play a key role in intestinal inflammation. CCD18-Co colon fibroblasts were exposed to a mixture of Uro-A, Uro-B, and EA, at concentrations comparable to those found in the colon (40 μM Uro-A, 5 μM Uro-B, 1 μM EA), both in the presence or in the absence of IL-1β (1 ng/mL) or TNF-α (50 ng/mL), and the effects on fibroblast migration and monocyte adhesion were determined. The levels of several growth factors and adhesion cytokines were also measured. The mixture of metabolites significantly inhibited colon fibroblast migration (∼70%) and monocyte adhesion to fibroblasts (∼50%). These effects were concomitant with a significant down-regulation of the levels of PGE(2), PAI-1, and IL-8, as well as other key regulators of cell migration and adhesion. Of the three metabolites tested, Uro-A exhibited the most significant anti-inflammatory effects. The results show that a combination of the ET metabolites found in colon, urolithins and EA, at concentrations achievable in the intestine after the consumption of pomegranate, was able to moderately improve the inflammatory response of colon fibroblasts and suggest that consumption of ET-containing foods has potential beneficial effects on gut inflammatory diseases.

  4. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes.

  5. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  6. Differential metabolite levels in response to spawning-induced inappetence in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Rocco C; Smith, McKenzie L; Vermeersch, Kathleen A; Dove, Alistair D M; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-03-01

    Atlantic salmon Salmo salar undergo months-long inappetence during spawning, but it is not known whether this inappetence is a pathological state or one for which the fish are adapted. Recent work has shown that inappetent whale sharks can exhibit circulating metabolite profiles similar to ketosis known to occur in humans during starvation. In this work, metabolite profiling was used to explore differences in analyte profiles between a cohort of inappetent spawning run Atlantic salmon and captively reared animals that were fed up to and through the time of sampling. The two classes of animals were easily distinguished by their metabolite profiles. The sea-run fish had elevated ɷ-9 fatty acids relative to the domestic feeding animals, while other fatty acid concentrations were reduced. Sugar alcohols were generally elevated in inappetent animals, suggesting potentially novel metabolic responses or pathways in fish that feature these compounds. Compounds expected to indicate a pathological catabolic state were not more abundant in the sea-run fish, suggesting that the animals, while inappetent, were not stressed in an unnatural way. These findings demonstrate the power of discovery-based metabolomics for exploring biochemistry in poorly understood animal models.

  7. Chloride Secretion Induced by Rotavirus Is Oxidative Stress-Dependent and Inhibited by Saccharomyces boulardii in Human Enterocytes

    PubMed Central

    Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Laudiero, Gabriella; Russo, Carla; Miele, Erasmo; Sofia, Morena; Monini, Marina; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Guarino, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) infection causes watery diarrhea via multiple mechanisms, primarily chloride secretion in intestinal epithelial cell. The chloride secretion largely depends on non-structural protein 4 (NSP4) enterotoxic activity in human enterocytes through mechanisms that have not been defined. Redox imbalance is a common event in cells infected by viruses, but the role of oxidative stress in RV infection is unknown. RV SA11 induced chloride secretion in association with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Caco-2 cells. The ratio between reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione was decreased by RV. The same effects were observed when purified NSP4 was added to Caco-2 cells. N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, strongly inhibited the increase in ROS and GSH imbalance. These results suggest a link between oxidative stress and RV-induced diarrhea. Because Saccharomyces boulardii (Sb) has been effectively used to treat RV diarrhea, we tested its effects on RV-infected cells. Sb supernatant prevented RV-induced oxidative stress and strongly inhibited chloride secretion in Caco-2 cells. These results were confirmed in an organ culture model using human intestinal biopsies, demonstrating that chloride secretion induced by RV-NSP4 is oxidative stress-dependent and is inhibited by Sb, which produces soluble metabolites that prevent oxidative stress. The results of this study provide novel insights into RV-induced diarrhea and the efficacy of probiotics. PMID:24918938

  8. Effects on Nitric Oxide Production of Urolithins, Gut-Derived Ellagitannin Metabolites, in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Spigoni, Valentina; Mena, Pedro; Cito, Monia; Fantuzzi, Federica; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Brighenti, Furio; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-08-02

    The consumption of foodstuffs yielding circulating compounds able to maintain endothelial function by improving nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability can be considered as an effective strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention. This work assessed the in vitro effects of urolithin A, urolithin B, and urolithin B-glucuronide, ellagitannin-derived metabolites of colonic origin, on NO release and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Urolithins were tested both individually at 15 μM and as a mixture of 5 μM each, at different time points. The biotransformation of these molecules in cell media due to cell metabolism was also evaluated by UHPLC-MS(n). The mix of urolithins at 5 μM significantly increased nitrite/nitrate levels following 24 h of incubation, while single urolithins at 15 μM did not modify NO bioavailability. Both the mix of urolithins at 5 μM and urolithin B-glucuronide at 15 μM activated eNOS expression. All urolithins underwent metabolic reactions, but these were limited to conjugation with sulfate moieties. This study represents a step forward in the understanding of cardiovascular health benefits of ellagitannin-rich foodstuffs and backs the idea that peripheral cells may contribute to urolithin metabolism.

  9. Effects on Nitric Oxide Production of Urolithins, Gut-Derived Ellagitannin Metabolites, in Human Aortic Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Spigoni, Valentina; Mena, Pedro; Cito, Monia; Fantuzzi, Federica; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Brighenti, Furio; Dei Cas, Alessandra; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    The consumption of foodstuffs yielding circulating compounds able to maintain endothelial function by improving nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability can be considered as an effective strategy for cardiovascular disease prevention. This work assessed the in vitro effects of urolithin A, urolithin B, and urolithin B-glucuronide, ellagitannin-derived metabolites of colonic origin, on NO release and endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation in primary human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Urolithins were tested both individually at 15 μM and as a mixture of 5 μM each, at different time points. The biotransformation of these molecules in cell media due to cell metabolism was also evaluated by UHPLC-MS(n). The mix of urolithins at 5 μM significantly increased nitrite/nitrate levels following 24 h of incubation, while single urolithins at 15 μM did not modify NO bioavailability. Both the mix of urolithins at 5 μM and urolithin B-glucuronide at 15 μM activated eNOS expression. All urolithins underwent metabolic reactions, but these were limited to conjugation with sulfate moieties. This study represents a step forward in the understanding of cardiovascular health benefits of ellagitannin-rich foodstuffs and backs the idea that peripheral cells may contribute to urolithin metabolism. PMID:27490528

  10. Phimosis in male dromedary camels: Clinical findings and changes in the hemogram, nitric oxide metabolites, and testosterone concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ahmed; Derar, Derar; Al-Sobyil, Fahd A; Zeitoun, Moustafa M; Hassanein, Khaled M A; Al-Howas, Abdella

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to elucidate the clinical findings in male dromedary camels with phimosis (PHI, n = 43) and to investigate the association of this syndrome with the hemogram, nitric oxide metabolites (NOMs), and testosterone concentrations. History and signalment were obtained, and a breeding soundness examination was performed. The penis was exteriorized after administration of a pudendal nerve block. Abnormal masses obtained from the prepuce and penis were prepared for histopathology. Blood samples for hemogram assessment were taken from the diseased animals and from 10 healthy control males. Total nitrates/nitrites were determined in sera using the Griess assay. Testosterone was estimated in sera using ELISA. Phimosis associated with detectable pathologic lesions, mainly including ulcerative posthitis and lacerated glans penis, was present in 34 (79.1%) of the 43 cases (PHI-P), whereas the remaining nine (20.9%) of the 43 cases had no noticeable lesions (PHI-N). The PHI-P group showed higher leukocyte counts (P = 0.001), especially neutrophils (P = 0.0001), and greater NOM concentrations (P = 0.002) than the PHI-N and control groups. However, testosterone concentrations did not differ among groups. In conclusion, PHI in the male dromedary camels was mainly associated with ulcerative posthitis and laceration of the glans penis. The presence of pathologic lesions in cases with PHI was associated with leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and high NOM concentrations. PMID:26879996

  11. Identification of circulatory and excretory metabolites of a novel nitric oxide donor ZJM-289 in rat plasma, bile, urine and faeces by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Xuliang; Li, Tingting; Ji, Hui; Zhang, Yihua; Qiu, Zhixia; Zhao, Di; Chen, Xijing

    2011-09-01

    ZJM-289, [2-(1-diethylaminoacetoxy)pentyl] benzoic acid-{2-methoxy-4-[2-(4-nitrooxybutoxy carbonyl)-vinyl]}phenyl ester hydrochloride, is a novel nitric oxide-donating derivative of 3-n-butylphthalide synthesised on the hypothesis that it may be hydrolysed in vivo into 3-n-butylphthalide, ferulic acid and nitric oxide in hope that the three components may exert effects on the platelets as well as on central nervous system synergistically. In this study, ZJM-289 was extensively metabolised in rats. Eight major metabolites were identified by liquid chromatography (LC)-mass spectrometry (MS)/MS in rat plasma, bile, urine and faeces after intravenous administration. Metabolites M1, M2, M3, M4 and M5 were hydrolytic products of ZJM-289, M6 and M7 was a hydroxylation product of M5, and M8 was a glucuronide of M1. The pharmacologically active metabolite ferulic acid (M3) was a major metabolite in all the biological matrixes examined. 3-n-Butylphthalide was also present at a moderate level in the circulation. And along with the previous research, the anti-platelet activity of ZJM-289 was more potent than that of 3-n-butylphthalide both in vivo and in vitro. All these findings validated the theory of drug design.

  12. Tocopherols inhibit oxidative and nitrosative stress in estrogen-induced early mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats.

    PubMed

    Das Gupta, Soumyasri; So, Jae Young; Wall, Brian; Wahler, Joseph; Smolarek, Amanda K; Sae-Tan, Sudathip; Soewono, Kelvin Y; Yu, Haixiang; Lee, Mao-Jung; Thomas, Paul E; Yang, Chung S; Suh, Nanjoo

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative stress is known to play a key role in estrogen-induced breast cancer. This study assessed the chemopreventive activity of the naturally occurring γ-tocopherol-rich mixture of tocopherols (γ-TmT) in early stages of estrogen-induced mammary hyperplasia in ACI rats. ACI rats provide an established model of rodent mammary carcinogenesis due to their high sensitivity to estrogen. Female rats were implanted with 9 mg of 17β-estradiol (E2) in silastic tubings and fed with control or 0.3% γ-TmT diet for 1, 3, 7, and 14 d. γ-TmT increased the levels of tocopherols and their metabolites in the serum and mammary glands of the rats. Histological analysis revealed mammary hyperplasia in the E2 treated rats fed with control or γ-TmT diet. γ-TmT decreased the levels of E2-induced nitrosative and oxidative stress markers, nitrotyrosine, and 8-oxo-dG, respectively, in the hyperplastic mammary tissues. 8-Isoprostane, a marker of oxidative stress in the serum, was also reduced by γ-TmT. Noticeably, γ-TmT stimulated Nrf2-dependent antioxidant response in the mammary glands of E2 treated rats, evident from the induced mRNA levels of Nrf2 and its downstream antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. Therefore, inhibition of nitrosative/oxidative stress through induction of antioxidant response is the primary effect of γ-TmT in early stages of E2-induced mammary hyperplasia. Due to its cytoprotective activity, γ-TmT could be a potential natural agent for the chemoprevention of estrogen-induced breast cancer.

  13. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Chengcheng; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaobo; Chen, Rui

    2015-12-09

    Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al₂O₃ ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al₂O₃ nanoparticles (NPs) through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al₂O₃ NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals.

  14. 1-Methylnicotinamide ameliorates lipotoxicity-induced oxidative stress and cell death in kidney proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Kume, Shinji; Araki, Hisazumi; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Shin-ichi; Nakagawa, Fumiyuki; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    Free fatty acid-bound albumin (FFA-albumin)-related oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of proximal tubular cell (PTC) damage and subsequent renal dysfunction in patients with refractory proteinuria. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) metabolism has recently been focused on as a novel therapeutic target for several modern diseases, including diabetes. This study was designed to identify a novel molecule in NAD metabolism to protect PTCs from lipotoxicity-related oxidative stress. Among 19 candidate enzymes involved in mammalian NAD metabolism, the mRNA expression level of nicotinamide n-methyltransferase (NNMT) was significantly increased in both the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice and cultured PTCs stimulated with palmitate-albumin. Knockdown of NNMT exacerbated palmitate-albumin-induced cell death in cultured PTCs, whereas overexpression of NNMT inhibited it. Intracellular concentration of 1-Methylnicotinamide (1-MNA), a metabolite of NNMT, increased and decreased in cultured NNMT-overexpressing and -knockdown PTCs, respectively. Treatment with 1-MNA inhibited palmitate-albumin-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation and cell death in cultured PTCs. Furthermore, oral administration of 1-MNA ameliorated oxidative stress, apoptosis, necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the kidneys of FFA-albumin-overloaded mice. In conclusion, NNMT-derived 1-MNA can reduce lipotoxicity-mediated oxidative stress and cell damage in PTCs. Supplementation of 1-MNA may have potential as a new therapy in patients with refractory proteinuria.

  15. Agmatine attenuates reserpine-induced oral dyskinesia in mice: Role of oxidative stress, nitric oxide and glutamate NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Andréia S; Matheus, Filipe C; Moretti, Morgana; Sampaio, Tuane B; Poli, Anicleto; Santos, Danúbia B; Colle, Dirleise; Cunha, Mauricio P; Blum-Silva, Carlos H; Sandjo, Louis P; Reginatto, Flávio H; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Farina, Marcelo; Prediger, Rui D

    2016-10-01

    Dyskinesia consists in a series of trunk, limbs and orofacial involuntary movements that can be observed following long-term pharmacological treatment in some psychotic and neurological disorders such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease, respectively. Agmatine is an endogenous arginine metabolite that emerges as neuromodulator and a promising agent to manage diverse central nervous system disorders by modulating nitric oxide (NO) pathway, glutamate NMDA receptors and oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the effects of a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of different agmatine doses (10, 30 or 100mg/kg) against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine (1mg/kg,s.c.) in mice by measuring the vacuous chewing movements and tongue protusion frequencies, and the duration of facial twitching. The results showed an orofacial antidyskinetic effect of agmatine (30mg/kg, i.p.) or the combined administration of sub-effective doses of agmatine (10mg/kg, i.p.) with the NMDA receptor antagonists amantadine (1mg/kg, i.p.) and MK801 (0.01mg/kg, i.p.) or the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI; 0.1mg/kg, i.p.). Reserpine-treated mice displayed locomotor activity deficits in the open field and agmatine had no effect on this response. Reserpine increased nitrite and nitrate levels in cerebral cortex, but agmatine did not reverse it. Remarkably, agmatine reversed the decrease of dopamine and non-protein thiols (NPSH) levels caused by reserpine in the striatum. However, no changes were observed in striatal immunocontent of proteins related to the dopaminergic system including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter, vesicular monoamine transporter type 2, pDARPP-32[Thr75], dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. These results indicate that the blockade of NO pathway, NMDAR and oxidative stress are possible mechanisms associated with the protective effects of agmatine against the orofacial dyskinesia induced by reserpine in mice.

  16. Apo-10'-lycopenoic acid, an enzymatic metabolite of lycopene, induces Nrf2-mediated expression of phase II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The chemopreventive effects of lycopene against certain types of cancers have been proposed to be mediated by its oxidative products/metabolites. Lycopene can be cleaved by carotene 9',10'-oxygenase at its 9',10' double bond to form apo-10'-lycopenoids, including apo-10'-lycopenal, -lycopenol and -...

  17. Low water activity induces the production of bioactive metabolites in halophilic and halotolerant fungi.

    PubMed

    Sepcic, Kristina; Zalar, Polona; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2010-12-27

    The aim of the present study was to investigate indigenous fungal communities isolated from extreme environments (hypersaline waters of solar salterns and subglacial ice), for the production of metabolic compounds with selected biological activities: hemolysis, antibacterial, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition. In their natural habitats, the selected fungi are exposed to environmental extremes, and therefore the production of bioactive metabolites was tested under both standard growth conditions for mesophilic microorganisms, and at high NaCl and sugar concentrations and low growth temperatures. The results indicate that selected halotolerant and halophilic species synthesize specific bioactive metabolites under conditions that represent stress for non-adapted species. Furthermore, adaptation at the level of the chemical nature of the solute lowering the water activity of the medium was observed. Increased salt concentrations resulted in higher hemolytic activity, particularly within species dominating the salterns. The appearance of antibacterial potential under stress conditions was seen in the similar pattern of fungal species as for hemolysis. The active extracts exclusively affected the growth of the Gram-positive bacterium tested, Bacillus subtilis. None of the extracts tested showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity.

  18. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  19. Effect of cotreatment of aspirin metabolites on mitomycin C-induced genotoxicity using the somatic mutation and recombination test in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Niikawa, Miki; Nakamura, Takeshi; Nagase, Hisamitsu

    2006-01-01

    In our previous reports, aspirin, an antipyretic analgesic, suppressed the genotoxicity of mitomycin C (MMC) in a somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in Drosophila melanogaster. In order to reveal the mechanism of the anti-genotoxicity of aspirin, we evaluated the suppressing ability of each aspirin metabolite, such as salicylic acid (SA), salicyluric acid (SUA), gentisic acid (GA), gentisuric acid (GUA), and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA), in SMART in Drosophila melanogaster using the cotreatment protocol in this report. SUA, GA, GUA, and DHBA reduced the number of the three types of spot induced by MMC without decrease of survival. These aspirin metabolites decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC for total spots in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, each metabolite decreased the genotoxicity frequency of MMC by approximately 80% at a dose of 40 mg/bottle, respectively. It is suggested that these metabolites are the main substances of anti-genotoxicity in the aspirin metabolic pathway. PMID:16931440

  20. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J.; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress plays a key role in UV-induced cell and tissue injuries. • Quercitrin decreases ROS generation and restores antioxidants irradiated by UVB. • Quercitrin reduces UVB-irradiated oxidative DNA damage, apoptosis, and inflammation. • Quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB-induced skin injuries.

  1. The marine-derived fungal metabolite, terrein, inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell cycle arrest in human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Fei; Wang, Shu-Ying; Shen, Hong; Yao, Xiao-Fen; Zhang, Feng-Li; Lai, Dongmei

    2014-12-01

    The difficulties faced in the effective treatment of ovarian cancer are multifactorial, but are mainly associated with relapse and drug resistance. Cancer stem-like cells have been reported to be an important contributor to these hindering factors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the anticancer activities of a bioactive fungal metabolite, namely terrein, against the human epithelial ovarian cancer cell line, SKOV3, primary human ovarian cancer cells and ovarian cancer stem-like cells. Terrein was separated and purified from the fermentation metabolites of the marine sponge-derived fungus, Aspergillus terreus strain PF26. Its anticancer activities against ovarian cancer cells were investigated by cell proliferation assay, cell migration assay, cell apoptosis and cell cycle assays. The ovarian cancer stem-like cells were enriched and cultured in a serum-free in vitro suspension system. Terrein inhibited the proliferation of the ovarian cancer cells by inducing G2/M phase cell cycle arrest. The underlying mechanisms involved the suppression of the expression of LIN28, an important marker gene of stemness in ovarian cancer stem cells. Of note, our study also demonstrated the ability of terrein to inhibit the proliferation of ovarian cancer stem-like cells, in which the expression of LIN28 was also downregulated. Our findings reveal that terrein (produced by fermention) may prove to be a promising drug candidate for the treatment of ovarian cancer by inhibiting the proliferation of cancer stem-like cells.

  2. NaCl-induced accelerated oxidation of chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Shinata, Y.; Nishi, Y.

    1986-10-01

    This paper describes new phenomena about chloride-induced ;accelerated oxidation of chromium. Thermal analysis was adopted to examine the oxidation, which was studied particularly in the case of NaCl. The presence of NaCl remarkably accelerates the oxidation of chromium. The process occurs below the melting point of NaCl, and the main reaction product is Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/. In the accelerated oxidation NaCl plays a catalytic role because it is not consumed significantly in the process. DTA analysis reveals that the heat of reaction also accelerates the rate of oxidation, especially at an early stage of the reaction. The accelerated oxidation takes place similarly under the presence of chlorides other than NaCl, but the oxidation rate depends on the kind of salt. Therefore the Cl/sup -/ anion plays an important role in the process, while the nature of the cation affects the rate of acceleration.

  3. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde induces water and salt intake via two distinct pathways in the central nervous system of rats.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Izumi; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ono, Kentaro; Kakinoki, Yasuaki; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Ueta, Yoichi; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The sensation of thirst experienced after heavy alcohol drinking is widely regarded as a consequence of ethanol (EtOH)-induced diuresis, but EtOH in high doses actually induces anti-diuresis. The present study was designed to investigate the introduction mechanism of water and salt intake after heavy alcohol drinking, focusing on action of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of EtOH and a toxic substance, using rats. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitor cyanamide was used to mimic the effect of prolonged acetaldehyde exposure because acetaldehyde is quickly degraded by ALDH. Systemic administration of a high-dose of EtOH at 2.5 g/kg induced water and salt intake with anti-diuresis. Cyanamide enhanced the fluid intake following EtOH and acetaldehyde administration. Systemic administration of acetaldehyde with cyanamide suppressed blood pressure and increased plasma renin activity. Blockade of central angiotensin receptor AT1R suppressed the acetaldehyde-induced fluid intake and c-Fos expression in the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which form part of dipsogenic mechanism in the brain. In addition, central administration of acetaldehyde together with cyanamide selectively induced water but not salt intake without changes in blood pressure. In electrophysiological recordings from slice preparations, acetaldehyde specifically excited angiotensin-sensitive neurons in the CVO. These results suggest that acetaldehyde evokes the thirst sensation following heavy alcohol drinking, by two distinct and previously unsuspected mechanisms, independent of diuresis. First acetaldehyde indirectly activates AT1R in the dipsogenic centers via the peripheral renin-angiotensin system following the depressor response and induces both water and salt intake. Secondly acetaldehyde directly activates neurons in the dipsogenic centers and induces only water intake.

  4. Dipyrone metabolite 4-MAA induces hypothermia and inhibits PGE2-dependent and -independent fever while 4-AA only blocks PGE2-dependent fever

    PubMed Central

    Malvar, David do C; Aguiar, Fernando A; Vaz, Artur de L L; Assis, Débora C R; de Melo, Miriam C C; Jabor, Valquíria A P; Kalapothakis, Evanguedes; Ferreira, Sérgio H; Clososki, Giuliano C; de Souza, Glória E P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The antipyretic and hypothermic prodrug dipyrone prevents PGE2-dependent and -independent fever induced by LPS from Escherichia coli and Tityus serrulatus venom (Tsv) respectively. We aimed to identify the dipyrone metabolites responsible for the antipyretic and hypothermic effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Male Wistar rats were treated i.p. with indomethacin (2 mg·kg−1), dipyrone, 4-methylaminoantipyrine (4-MAA), 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AA) (60–360 mg·kg−1), 4-formylaminoantipyrine, 4-acethylaminoantipyrine (120–360 mg·kg−1) or vehicle 30 min before i.p. injection of LPS (50 μg·kg−1), Tsv (150 μg·kg−1) or saline. Rectal temperatures were measured by tele-thermometry and dipyrone metabolite concentrations determined in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus by LC-MS/MS. PGE2 concentrations were determined in the CSF and hypothalamus by elisa. KEY RESULTS In contrast to LPS, Tsv-induced fever was not followed by increased PGE2 in the CSF or hypothalamus. The antipyretic time-course of 4-MAA and 4-AA on LPS-induced fever overlapped with the period of the highest concentrations of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the hypothalamus, CSF and plasma. These metabolites reduced LPS-induced fever and the PGE2 increase in the plasma, CSF and hypothalamus. Only 4-MAA inhibited Tsv-induced fever. The higher doses of dipyrone and 4-MAA also induced hypothermia. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of 4-MAA and 4-AA in the CSF and hypothalamus was associated with PGE2 synthesis inhibition and a decrease in LPS-induced fever. 4-MAA was also shown to be an antipyretic metabolite for PGE2-independent fever induced by Tsv suggesting that it is responsible for the additional antipyretic mechanism of dipyrone. Moreover, 4-MAA is the hypothermic metabolite of dipyrone. PMID:24712707

  5. Nitroxides protect against peroxynitrite-induced nitration and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Skolimowski, Janusz; Szewczyk, Rafał; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2015-12-01

    Nitroxides are promising compounds for prevention of undesired protein modifications. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of 11 nitroxides, derivatives of 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxide (TEMPO) and 2,2,5,5-tetramethylpirrolidine-1-oxyl (PROXYL) in prevention of nitration and oxidation of model compounds and human serum albumin (HSA). Most nitroxides were very efficient in preventing loss of fluorescein fluorescence induced by peroxynitrite (PN) (IC50 in the nanomolar range) and preventing HSA nitration. The loss of fluorescein fluorescence was demonstrated to be due to nitration. Nitroxides were more effective in prevention nitration than oxidation reactions. They showed a concentration window for preventing dihydrorhodamine (DHR) 123 oxidation but exerted a prooxidant effect at both high and low concentrations. No prooxidant effect of nitroxides was seen in prevention of DHR123 oxidation induced by SIN-1. In all essays hydrophobic nitroxides (especially 4-nonylamido-TEMPO and 3-carbamolyl-dehydroPROXYL) showed the lowest efficiency. An exception was the prevention of thiol group oxidation by PN and SIN-1 where hydrophobic nitroxides were the most effective, apparently due to binding to the protein. Nitroxides showed low toxicity to MCF-7 cells. Most nitroxides, except for the most hydrophobic ones, protected cells from the cytotoxic action of SIN-1 and SIN-1-induced protein nitration. These results point to potential usefulness of nitroxides for prevention of PN-induced oxidation and, especially, nitration.

  6. Exposure to HT-2 toxin causes oxidative stress induced apoptosis/autophagy in porcine oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Han, Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Tang, Feng; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    T-2 toxin is a main type A trichothecene mycotoxin which is the most toxic trichothecence. T-2 toxin has posed various toxic effects on human and animals in vigorous cell proliferation tissues like lymphoid, hematopoietic and gastrointestinal tissues, while HT-2 toxin is the major metabolite which is deacetylated by T-2 toxin. In this study, we focused on the toxic effects of HT-2 on porcine oocyte maturation. We treated the porcine oocyte with HT-2 toxin in vitro, and we first found that HT-2 treatment inhibited porcine oocyte polar body extrusion and cumulus cell expansion. We observed the disrupted meiotic spindle morphology after treatment, which might be due to the reduced p-MAPK protein level. Actin distribution was also disturbed, indicating that HT-2 affects cytoskeleton of porcine oocytes. We next explored the causes for the failure of oocyte maturation after HT-2 treatment. We found that HT-2 treated oocytes showed the increased ROS level, which indicated that oxidative stress had occurred. We also detected autophagy as well as early apoptosis in the treatment oocytes. Due to the fact that oxidative stress could induced apoptosis, our results indicated that HT-2 toxin caused oxidative stress induced apoptosis and autophagy, which further affected porcine oocyte maturation. PMID:27658477

  7. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  8. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy.

    PubMed

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  9. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  10. Transcript and metabolite alterations increase ganoderic acid content in Ganoderma lucidum using acetic acid as an inducer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ang; Li, Xiong-Biao; Miao, Zhi-Gang; Shi, Liang; Jaing, Ai-Liang; Zhao, Ming-Wen

    2014-12-01

    Acetic acid at 5-8 mM increased ganoderic acid (GA) accumulation in Ganoderma lucidum. After optimization by the response surface methodology, the GA content reached 5.5/100 mg dry weight, an increase of 105% compared with the control. The intermediate metabolites of GA biosynthesis, lanosterol and squalene also increased to 47 and 15.8 μg/g dry weight, respectively, in response to acetic acid. Acetic acid significantly induced transcription levels of sqs, lano, hmgs and cyp51 in the GA biosynthesis pathway. An acetic acid-unregulated acetyl coenzyme A synthase (acs) gene was selected from ten candidate homologous acs genes. The results indicate that acetic acid alters the expression of genes related to acetic acid assimilation and increases GA biosynthesis and the metabolic levels of lanosterol, squalene and GA-a, thereby resulting in GA accumulation.

  11. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  12. Arachidonic Acid Metabolite 19(S)-HETE Induces Vasorelaxation and Platelet Inhibition by Activating Prostacyclin (IP) Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chennupati, Ramesh; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    19(S)-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acid (19(S)-HETE) belongs to a family of arachidonic acid metabolites produced by cytochrome P450 enzymes, which play critical roles in the regulation of cardiovascular, renal and pulmonary functions. Although it has been known for a long time that 19(S)-HETE has vascular effects, its mechanism of action has remained unclear. In this study we show that 19(S)-HETE induces cAMP accumulation in the human megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line MEG-01. This effect was concentration-dependent with an EC50 of 520 nM, insensitive to pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 and required the expression of the G-protein Gs. Systematic siRNA-mediated knock-down of each G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed in MEG-01 followed by functional analysis identified the prostacyclin receptor (IP) as the mediator of the effects of 19(S)-HETE, and the heterologously expressed IP receptor was also activated by 19(S)-HETE in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 of 567 nM. Pretreatment of isolated murine platelets with 19(S)-HETE blocked thrombin-induced platelets aggregation, an effect not seen in platelets from mice lacking the IP receptor. Furthermore, 19(S)-HETE was able to relax mouse mesenteric artery- and thoracic aorta-derived vessel segments. While pharmacological inhibition of COX-1/2 enzymes had no effect on the vasodilatory activity of 19(S)-HETE these effects were not observed in vessels from mice lacking the IP receptor. These results identify a novel mechanism of action for the CYP450-dependent arachidonic acid metabolite 19(S)-HETE and point to the existence of a broader spectrum of naturally occurring prostanoid receptor agonists. PMID:27662627

  13. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  14. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces hematopoietic stem cell senescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Gui-Hai; Wang, Yu-Ying; Liu, Jun; Wei, Qiang; Xu, Chun-Yan; Wang, Jian-Wei; Wang, Ya-Ping

    2013-09-01

    We have investigated oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) induced senescence in hematopoietic stem cells (HCs). Mouse Sca-1+ HCs were separated and purified using the magnetic activated cell sorting technique. Ox-LDL induced significant senescence in HCs measured by SA-β-Gal staining, and reduced CFU-Mix colony-forming capacity, arresting cells at G0/G1 phase. In agreement with the cell cycle arrest, ox-LDL markedly reduced the expression of CDK4, cyclin D, and cyclin E. As possible contributing factors for cell senescence, ox-LDL also induced cellular oxidative stress and reduced telomerase activity.

  15. Acute restraint stress induces endothelial dysfunction: role of vasoconstrictor prostanoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carda, Ana P P; Marchi, Katia C; Rizzi, Elen; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute stress would induce endothelial dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were restrained for 2 h within wire mesh. Functional and biochemical analyses were conducted 24 h after the 2-h period of restraint. Stressed rats showed decreased exploration on the open arms of an elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone concentration. Acute restraint stress did not alter systolic blood pressure, whereas it increased the in vitro contractile response to phenylephrine and serotonin in endothelium-intact rat aortas. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor) did not alter the contraction induced by phenylephrine in aortic rings from stressed rats. Tiron, indomethacin and SQ29548 reversed the increase in the contractile response to phenylephrine induced by restraint stress. Increased systemic and vascular oxidative stress was evident in stressed rats. Restraint stress decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration and increased aortic expression of inducible (i) NOS, but not endothelial (e) NOS. Reduced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, but not COX-2, was observed in aortas from stressed rats. Restraint stress increased thromboxane (TX)B(2) (stable TXA(2) metabolite) concentration but did not affect prostaglandin (PG)F2α concentration in the aorta. Restraint reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, whereas concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected. The major new finding of our study is that restraint stress increases vascular contraction by an endothelium-dependent mechanism that involves increased oxidative stress and the generation of COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids. Such stress-induced endothelial dysfunction could predispose to the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  16. Effects of octadecanoid metabolites and inhibitors on induced nicotine accumulation inNicotiana sylvestris.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, I T; Schmelz, E A; Zhang, Z P

    1996-01-01

    We examined the effects of inhibitors of the octadecanoid pathway (n-propyl gallate, acetosalicylic acid, salicylhydroxamic acid, methyl salicylate, and antipyrine) on wound- and jasmonate-induced nicotine accumulation and compared the nicotine-inducing ability of exogeneous additions of linolenic acid (18:3) and its methyl ester, linoleic acid (18:2), abscisic acid, traumatic acid, and methyl dihydrojasmonate to the nicotine-inducing ability of exogenous additions of methyl jasmonate (MJ). The first four of these inhibitors significantly reduced wound-induced nicotine accumulation when applied in a lanolin paste to wounded tissues immediately after wounding at concentrations of 89-90µg/plant. When methyl salicylate and propyl gallate were mixed individually with MJ, neither inhibited MJ-induced nicotine synthesis, which suggests that the inhibitors block jasmonate synthesis or release from stored pools and not its effects. Linolenic acid or its methyl ester applied to undamaged plants or damaged plants (to either damaged or undamaged leaves) or to the roots of hydroponically growing plants did not induce nicotine accumulation or increase nicotine accumulation above levels found in damaged plants. Similarly, traumatic acid, linoleic acid, and abscisic acid did not induce nicotine accumulations. Methyl dihydrojasmonate, which is biosynthetically derived from linoleic acid, had 12-56% of the nicotine-inducing acitivity of MJ when added to the roots of hydroponically grown plants. The signal transduction pathway mediating wound-induced nicotine production therefore shares many features of the pathway eliciting wound-induced proteinase inhibitor production but differs in not being regulated at the lipase step in jasmonic acid production and not being responsive to abscisic acid. PMID:24226983

  17. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (p<0.05 respectively) and TB (p<0.001) were higher in SCA subjects than in NSCA subjects. [R] and [NOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 and p<0.05 respectively). Supplementation caused greater percent increases in [R], and [NOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). l-Arginine caused greater percent reductions in ALT and AST in SCA subjects but greater percent reduction in ALP in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). Changes in [MDA] and [TB] in the two groups were similar. Study shows that chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects.

  18. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (p<0.05 respectively) and TB (p<0.001) were higher in SCA subjects than in NSCA subjects. [R] and [NOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 and p<0.05 respectively). Supplementation caused greater percent increases in [R], and [NOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). l-Arginine caused greater percent reductions in ALT and AST in SCA subjects but greater percent reduction in ALP in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). Changes in [MDA] and [TB] in the two groups were similar. Study shows that chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects. PMID:27156372

  19. Nanostructured indium tin oxide slides for small-molecule profiling and imaging mass spectrometry of metabolites by surface-assisted laser desorption ionization MS.

    PubMed

    López de Laorden, Carlos; Beloqui, Ana; Yate, Luis; Calvo, Javier; Puigivila, Maria; Llop, Jordi; Reichardt, Niels-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Due to their electrical conductivity and optical transparency, slides coated with a thin layer of indium tin oxide (ITO) are the standard substrate for protein imaging mass spectrometry on tissue samples by MALDI-TOF MS. We have now studied the rf magnetron sputtering deposition parameters to prepare ITO thin films on glass substrates with the required nanometric surface structure for their use in the matrix-free imaging of metabolites and small-molecule drugs, without affecting the transparency required for classical histology. The custom-made surfaces were characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ellipsometry, UV, and laser desorption ionization MS (LDI-MS) and employed for the LDI-MS-based analysis of glycans and druglike molecules, the quantification of lactose in milk by isotopic dilution, and metabolite imaging on mouse brain tissue samples. PMID:25411795

  20. Land Spreading of Wastewaters from the Fruit-Packaging Industry and Potential Effects on Soil Microbes: Effects of the Antioxidant Ethoxyquin and Its Metabolites on Ammonia Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, Evangelia S.; Tsachidou, Bella; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania

    2015-01-01

    Thiabendazole (TBZ), imazalil (IMZ), ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), diphenylamine (DPA), and ethoxyquin (EQ) are used in fruit-packaging plants (FPP) with the stipulation that wastewaters produced by their application would be depurated on site. However, no such treatment systems are currently in place, leading FPP to dispose of their effluents in agricultural land. We investigated the dissipation of those pesticides and their impact on soil microbes known to have a key role on ecosystem functioning. OPP and DPA showed limited persistence (50% dissipation time [DT50], 0.6 and 1.3 days) compared to TBZ and IMZ (DT50, 47.0 and 150.8 days). EQ was rapidly transformed to the short-lived quinone imine (QI) (major metabolite) and the more persistent 2,4-dimethyl-6-ethoxyquinoline (EQNL) (minor metabolite). EQ and OPP exerted significant inhibition of potential nitrification, with the effect of the former being more persistent. This was not reflected in the abundance (determined by quantitative PCR [qPCR]) of the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Considering the above discrepancy and the metabolic pattern of EQ, we further investigated the hypothesis that its metabolites and not only EQ were toxic to ammonia oxidizers. Potential nitrification, amoA gene abundance, and amoA gene transcripts of AOB and AOA showed that QI was probably responsible for the inhibition of nitrification. Our findings have serious ecological and practical implications for soil productivity and N conservation in agriculturally impacted ecosystems and stress the need to include metabolites and RNA-based methods when the soil microbial toxicity of pesticides is assessed. PMID:26590271

  1. Land Spreading of Wastewaters from the Fruit-Packaging Industry and Potential Effects on Soil Microbes: Effects of the Antioxidant Ethoxyquin and Its Metabolites on Ammonia Oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Evangelia S; Tsachidou, Bella; Sułowicz, Sławomir; Menkissoglu-Spiroudi, Urania; Karpouzas, Dimitrios G

    2015-11-20

    Thiabendazole (TBZ), imazalil (IMZ), ortho-phenylphenol (OPP), diphenylamine (DPA), and ethoxyquin (EQ) are used in fruit-packaging plants (FPP) with the stipulation that wastewaters produced by their application would be depurated on site. However, no such treatment systems are currently in place, leading FPP to dispose of their effluents in agricultural land. We investigated the dissipation of those pesticides and their impact on soil microbes known to have a key role on ecosystem functioning. OPP and DPA showed limited persistence (50% dissipation time [DT50], 0.6 and 1.3 days) compared to TBZ and IMZ (DT50, 47.0 and 150.8 days). EQ was rapidly transformed to the short-lived quinone imine (QI) (major metabolite) and the more persistent 2,4-dimethyl-6-ethoxyquinoline (EQNL) (minor metabolite). EQ and OPP exerted significant inhibition of potential nitrification, with the effect of the former being more persistent. This was not reflected in the abundance (determined by quantitative PCR [qPCR]) of the amoA gene of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA). Considering the above discrepancy and the metabolic pattern of EQ, we further investigated the hypothesis that its metabolites and not only EQ were toxic to ammonia oxidizers. Potential nitrification, amoA gene abundance, and amoA gene transcripts of AOB and AOA showed that QI was probably responsible for the inhibition of nitrification. Our findings have serious ecological and practical implications for soil productivity and N conservation in agriculturally impacted ecosystems and stress the need to include metabolites and RNA-based methods when the soil microbial toxicity of pesticides is assessed.

  2. Protective effect of secondary plant metabolites from Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. against carbofuran induced damages.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanjukta; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh; Ghosh, Santinath; Dhar, Pubali

    2013-12-01

    Plausible interactions between food contaminants and natural constituents in vivo and protective effect of polyphenols present in I. aquatica against carbofuran toxicity in Charles Foster rats were evaluated. Determinations based on antioxidant enzyme activities showed significant alterations in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in tissues (liver and brain) and plasma of pesticide treated group while polyphenolic extracts from I. aquatica (IAE) attenuated their activities when given alongwith carbofuran. IAE decreased enhanced lipid peroxidation levels in plasma and erythrocyte membrane and cholesterol levels in brain and plasma. IAE also minimized histopathological degenerative changes produced by carbofuran. While single cell gel electrophoresis showed that secondary metabolites in leafy vegetables produced a combinatorial effect with pesticide at cellular level, DNA fragmentation level in bone marrow cells showed a decline in the IAE treated rats. Food safety adversely affected by various chemical contaminants can be retained by plant polyphenols and secondary plant constituents that can be found together in bolus. Therefore, the present study gives an insight into the protective role of naturally found polyphenols against pesticide toxicity. PMID:24579377

  3. Protective effect of secondary plant metabolites from Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. against carbofuran induced damages.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sanjukta; Sinha, Mahuya; Das, Dipesh; Ghosh, Santinath; Dhar, Pubali

    2013-12-01

    Plausible interactions between food contaminants and natural constituents in vivo and protective effect of polyphenols present in I. aquatica against carbofuran toxicity in Charles Foster rats were evaluated. Determinations based on antioxidant enzyme activities showed significant alterations in glutathione, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase in tissues (liver and brain) and plasma of pesticide treated group while polyphenolic extracts from I. aquatica (IAE) attenuated their activities when given alongwith carbofuran. IAE decreased enhanced lipid peroxidation levels in plasma and erythrocyte membrane and cholesterol levels in brain and plasma. IAE also minimized histopathological degenerative changes produced by carbofuran. While single cell gel electrophoresis showed that secondary metabolites in leafy vegetables produced a combinatorial effect with pesticide at cellular level, DNA fragmentation level in bone marrow cells showed a decline in the IAE treated rats. Food safety adversely affected by various chemical contaminants can be retained by plant polyphenols and secondary plant constituents that can be found together in bolus. Therefore, the present study gives an insight into the protective role of naturally found polyphenols against pesticide toxicity.

  4. Radiation-Induced Growth Retardation and Microstructural and Metabolite Abnormalities in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Zawaski, Janice A.; Sahnoune, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Cranial radiotherapy (CRT) increases survival in pediatric brain-tumor patients but can cause deleterious effects. This study evaluates the acute and long-term impact of CRT delivered during childhood/adolescence on the brain and body using a rodent model. Rats received CRT, either 4 Gy fractions × 5 d (fractionated) or a cumulative dose of 20 Gy (single dose) at 28 d of age. Animals were euthanized 1 d, 5 d, or 3.5 mo after CRT. The 3.5 mo group was imaged prior to euthanasia. At 3.5 mo, we observed significant growth retardation in irradiated animals, versus controls, and the effects of single dose on brain and body weights were more severe than fractionated. Acutely single dose significantly reduced body weight but increased brain weight, whereas fractionation significantly reduced brain but not body weights, versus controls. CRT suppressed cell proliferation in the hippocampal subgranular zone acutely. Fractional anisotropy (FA) in the fimbria was significantly lower in the single dose versus controls. Hippocampal metabolite levels were significantly altered in the single dose animals, reflecting a heightened state of inflammation that was absent in the fractionated. Our findings indicate that despite the differences in severity between the doses they both demonstrated an effect on cell proliferation and growth retardation, important factors in pediatric CRT. PMID:27242931

  5. Arginine therapy: a novel strategy to induce nitric oxide production in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, C R; Kuypers, F A; Larkin, S; Sweeters, N; Simon, J; Vichinsky, E P; Styles, L A

    2000-11-01

    To determine the effects of L-arginine (L-Arg) supplementation on nitric oxide metabolite (NOx) production, oral L-Arg was given to normal controls, sickle cell disease (SCD) patients at steady state and SCD patients hospitalized with a vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC). L-Arg (0.1 g/kg) increased NOx formation by 18.8 +/- 68% in normal controls, whereas steady-state SCD patients demonstrated a paradoxical decrease in NOx of -16.7 +/- 4% (P = 0.004). In contrast, patients with VOC demonstrated a dramatic increase in NOx production by +77.7 +/- 103%, a response that was dose dependent. L-Arg appears to be the rate-limiting step in NOx production during VOC. Oral arginine may therefore benefit SCD patients by inducing an increase in NO production during VOC. PMID:11122090

  6. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, Joao B.T.

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  7. Radiation-induced cationic polymerization of limonene oxide,. cap alpha. -pinene oxide, and. beta. -pinene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Aikins, J.A.; Williams, F.

    1985-01-01

    After suitable drying, the subject monomers in the form of neat liquids undergo radiation-induced polymerization with no apparent side reactions and high conversions to precipitatable polymers of low molecular weights. A high frequency of chain (proton) transfer to monomer is indicated by the fact that the kinetic chain lengths are estimated to be several hundred times larger than the range of DP/sub n/ values (12-4). Structural characterization of the limonene oxide polymer by /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectroscopy provides conclusive evidence that the polymerization proceeds by the opening of the epoxide ring to yield a 1,2-trans polyether. Similar NMR studies on the polymers formed from the ..cap alpha..-pinene and ..beta..-pinene oxides show that the opening of the epoxide ring for these monomers is generally accompanied by the concomitant ring opening of the cyclobutane ring structure to yield a gem-di-methyl group in the main chain.

  8. (+)-Catechin protects dermal fibroblasts against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress has been suggested as a mechanism underlying skin aging, as it triggers apoptosis in various cell types, including fibroblasts, which play important roles in the preservation of healthy, youthful skin. Catechins, which are antioxidants contained in green tea, exert various actions such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-cancer actions. In this study, we investigated the effect of (+)-catechin on apoptosis induced by oxidative stress in fibroblasts. Methods Fibroblasts (NIH3T3) under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (0.1 mM) were treated with either vehicle or (+)-catechin (0–100 μM). The effect of (+)-catechin on cell viability, apoptosis, phosphorylation of c-Jun terminal kinases (JNK) and p38, and activation of caspase-3 in fibroblasts under oxidative stress were evaluated. Results Hydrogen peroxide induced apoptotic cell death in fibroblasts, accompanied by induction of phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Pretreatment of the fibroblasts with (+)-catechin inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38 and activation of caspase-3. Conclusion (+)-Catechin protects against oxidative stress-induced cell death in fibroblasts, possibly by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 and JNK. These results suggest that (+)-catechin has potential as a therapeutic agent for the prevention of skin aging. PMID:24712558

  9. Acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity: the role of the acyclovir aldehyde metabolite.

    PubMed

    Gunness, Patrina; Aleksa, Katarina; Bend, John; Koren, Gideon

    2011-11-01

    For decades, acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity was believed to be secondary to crystalluria. Clinical evidence of nephrotoxicity in the absence of crystalluria suggests that acyclovir induces direct insult to renal tubular cells. We postulated that acyclovir is metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) enzyme to acyclovir aldehyde, which is metabolized by the aldehyde dehydrognase 2 (ALDH2) enzyme to 9-carboxymethoxymethylguanine (CMMG). We hypothesized that acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity. Human renal proximal tubular (HK-2) cells were used as our in vitro model. Western blot and enzymes activities assays were performed to determine whether the HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, respectively. Cytotoxicity (measured as a function of cell viability) assays were conducted to determine (1) whether the acyclovir aldehyde plays a role in acyclovir-induced nephrotoxicity and (2) whether CMMG induces cell death. A colorimetric assay was performed to determine whether acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in vitro. Our results illustrated that (1) HK-2 cells express ADH and ALDH2 isozymes, (2) 4-methylpyrazole rendered significant protection against cell death, (3) CMMG does not induce cell death, and (4) acyclovir was metabolized to an aldehyde in tubular cells. These data indicate that acyclovir aldehyde is produced in HK-2 cells and that inhibition of its production by 4-methylpyrazole offers significant protection from cell death in vitro, suggesting that acyclovir aldehyde may cause the direct renal tubular insult associated with acyclovir.

  10. Skeletal muscle phenotype affects fasting-induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation flexibility in cold-acclimated ducklings.

    PubMed

    Monternier, Pierre-Axel; Fongy, Anaïs; Hervant, Frédéric; Drai, Jocelyne; Collin-Chavagnac, Delphine; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien

    2015-08-01

    Starvation is particularly challenging for endotherms that remain active in cold environments or during winter. The aim of this study was to determine whether fasting-induced mitochondrial coupling flexibility depends upon the phenotype of skeletal muscles. The rates of oxidative phosphorylation and mitochondrial efficiency were measured in pectoralis (glycolytic) and gastrocnemius (oxidative) muscles from cold-acclimated ducklings (Cairina moschata). Pyruvate and palmitoyl-l-carnitine were used in the presence of malate as respiratory substrates. Plasma metabolites, skeletal muscle concentrations of triglycerides, glycogen and total protein and mitochondrial levels of oxidative phosphorylation complexes were also quantified. Results from ad libitum fed ducklings were compared with those from ducklings that were fasted for 4 days. During the 4 days of nutritional treatment, birds remained in the cold, at 4°C. The 4 days of starvation preferentially affected the pectoralis muscles, inducing an up-regulation of mitochondrial efficiency, which was associated with a reduction of both total muscle and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation protein, and with an increase of intramuscular lipid concentration. By contrast, fasting decreased the activity of oxidative phosphorylation but did not alter the coupling efficiency and protein expression of mitochondria isolated from the gastrocnemius muscles. Hence, the adjustment of mitochondrial efficiency to fasting depends upon the muscle phenotype of cold-acclimated birds. Furthermore, these results suggest that the reduced cost of mitochondrial ATP production in pectoralis muscles may trigger lipid storage within this tissue and help to sustain an important metabolic homeostatic function of skeletal muscles, which is to maintain levels of amino acids in the circulation during the fast.

  11. Nivalenol induces oxidative stress and increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidant effect in intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Del Regno, Marisanta; Adesso, Simona; Popolo, Ada; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Severino, Lorella; Marzocco, Stefania

    2015-06-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary fungal metabolites often found as contaminants in almost all agricultural commodities worldwide, and the consumption of food or feed contaminated by mycotoxins represents a major risk for human and animal health. Reactive oxygen species are normal products of cellular metabolism. However, disproportionate generation of reactive oxygen species poses a serious problem to bodily homeostasis and causes oxidative tissue damage. In this study we analyzed the effect of two trichothecenes mycotoxins: nivalenol and deoxynivalenol, alone and in combination, on oxidative stress in the non-tumorigenic intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Our results indicate the pro-oxidant nivalenol effect in IEC-6, the stronger pro-oxidant effect of nivalenol when compared to deoxynivalenol and, interestingly, that nivalenol increases deoxynivalenol pro-oxidative effects. Mechanistic studies indicate that the observed effects were mediated by NADPH oxidase, calcium homeostasis alteration, NF-kB and Nrf2 pathways activation and by iNOS and nitrotyrosine formation. The toxicological interaction by nivalenol and deoxynivalenol reported in this study in IEC-6, points out the importance of the toxic effect of these mycotoxins, mostly in combination, further highlighting the risk assessment process of these toxins that are of growing concern.

  12. Biotransformation of Daclatasvir In Vitro and in Nonclinical Species: Formation of the Main Metabolite by Pyrrolidine δ-Oxidation and Rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenying; Zhao, Weiping; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Xiaohua; Lopez, Omar D; Leet, John E; Fancher, R Marcus; Nguyen, Van; Goodrich, Jason; Easter, John; Hong, Yang; Caceres-Cortes, Janet; Chang, Shu Y; Ma, Li; Belema, Makonen; Hamann, Lawrence G; Gao, Min; Zhu, Mingshe; Shu, Yue-Zhong; Humphreys, W Griffith; Johnson, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Daclatasvir is a first-in-class, potent, and selective inhibitor of the hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 5A replication complex. In support of nonclinical studies during discovery and exploratory development, liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance were used in connection with synthetic and radiosynthetic approaches to investigate the biotransformation of daclatasvir in vitro and in cynomolgus monkeys, dogs, mice, and rats. The results of these studies indicated that disposition of daclatasvir was accomplished mainly by the release of unchanged daclatasvir into bile and feces and, secondarily, by oxidative metabolism. Cytochrome P450s were the main enzymes involved in the metabolism of daclatasvir. Oxidative pathways included δ-oxidation of the pyrrolidine moiety, resulting in ring opening to an aminoaldehyde intermediate followed by an intramolecular reaction between the aldehyde and the proximal imidazole nitrogen atom. Despite robust formation of the resulting metabolite in multiple systems, rates of covalent binding to protein associated with metabolism of daclatasvir were modest (55.2-67.8 pmol/mg/h) in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced form)-supplemented liver microsomes (human, monkey, rat), suggesting that intramolecular rearrangement was favored over intermolecular binding in the formation of this metabolite. This biotransformation profile supported the continued development of daclatasvir, which is now marketed for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

  13. Role of Oxidative Stress in Transformation Induced by Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity. PMID:22191014

  14. Triolein and trilinolein ameliorate oxidized low-density lipoprotein-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Deng, Ze-yuan; Li, Xiao-ping; Rao, Huan; Fan, Ya-wei

    2014-05-01

    Uptake of oxidized low-density lipoprotein by endothelial cells is a critical step for the initiation of atherosclerosis. Triacylglycerol uptake in these cells is understood to be a part of the process. The present investigation, comparison among the effects of simple acylglycerol, including tristearin, triolein, and trilinolein, upon oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced oxidative stress was undertaken. Results indicated that trilinolein (78 % ± 0.02) and triolein (90 % ± 0.01) increased cell viability of endothelial cells exposed to oxidized low-density lipoprotein, whereas tristearin decreased the cell viability (55 % ± 0.03) (P < 0.05). Oxidized low-density lipoprotein treatment significantly increased apoptosis (23 %), compared to cells simultaneously exposed to trilinolein (19 %) or triolein (16 %), where apoptosis was reduced (P < 0.05). On the other hand, exposure to tristearin further increased oxidized low-density lipoprotein -induced cell apoptosis (34 %). Treatment with trilinolein or triolein on oxidized low-density lipoprotein -stimulated endothelial cells inhibited the expression of ICAM-1 and E-selectin mRNA. Moreover, both trilinolein and triolein demonstrated a strong antioxidant response to oxidative stress caused by oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Taken together, the results indicate trilinolein and triolein possess anti-inflammatory properties, which are mediated via the antioxidant defense system.

  15. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, William A; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-03-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  16. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, Jr., William A.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  17. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes. PMID:27251462

  18. Ovariectomy exacerbates oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Castañeda, Juan Rafael; Muntané, Jordi; Herencia, Carmen; Muñoz, Maria C; Bujalance, Inmaculada; Montilla, Pedro; Túnez, Issac

    2006-02-01

    Ovarian hormone depletion in ovariectomized experimental animals is a useful model with which to study the physiopathological consequences of menopause in women. It has been suggested that menopause is a risk factor for the induction of several cardiovascular disorders. In the present study we analyzed the effects of ovarian hormone depletion by ovariectomy (OVX) in a model of oxidative stress and cardiopathy induced by adriamycin (AD). To evaluate these effects, we measured parameters related to cardiac damage (creatinine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase) and oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide and carbonyl proteins) in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes. OVX was found to alter all markers of oxidative stress and cell damage in cardiac tissue. Similarly, the OVX-derived loss of ovarian hormones enhanced cardiac damage and oxidative stress induced by AD. Our results suggest that antioxidant status in cardiac tissue and erythrocytes is seriously compromised by OVX during the cardiomyopathy induced by AD in experimental animals. In conclusion, the absence of hormones caused by OVX or menopause may induce or accelerate pre-existing cardiovascular dysfunctions.

  19. [Inhibition of bacterial lypopolysaccharide-induced inflammation by oxidized lipids].

    PubMed

    Korotaeva, A A; Samokhodskaia, L M; Bochkov, V N

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphorylcholine inhibits inflammatory effects of the bacterial lipopolisacharide (LPS, endotoxin). In this work we have characterized the anti-endotoxin activity of other classes of oxidized phospholipids with different polar head groups and fatty acid residues. LPS-induced expression of E-selectin on human endothelial cells was inhibited by oxidized phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidic acids. The anti-endotoxin effect insignificantly depended on the type of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unoxidized phospholipids did not suppress effects of LPS. Thus, the anti-endotoxin activity of oxidized phospholipids crucially depends on the presence of oxidatively modified fatty acid residue. PMID:17436686

  20. Inhibition of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Could Enhance 1,4-Benzoquinone-Induced Oxidative Damage in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng; Yang, Wenwen; Sun, Fengmei; Xu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a chemical contaminant widespread in industrial and living environments. The oxidative metabolites of benzene induce toxicity involving oxidative damage. Protecting cells and cell membranes from oxidative damage, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) maintains the reduced state of glutathione (GSH). This study aims to investigate whether the downregulation of G6PD in K562 cell line can influence the oxidative toxicity induced by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). G6PD was inhibited in K562 cell line transfected with the specific siRNA of G6PD gene. An empty vector was transfected in the control group. Results revealed that G6PD was significantly upregulated in the control cells and in the cells with inhibited G6PD after they were exposed to BQ. The NADPH/NADP and GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly lower in the cells with inhibited G6PD than in the control cells at the same BQ concentration. The relative reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA oxidative damage were significantly increased in the cell line with inhibited G6PD. The apoptotic rate and G2 phase arrest were also significantly higher in the cells with inhibited G6PD and exposed to BQ than in the control cells. Our results suggested that G6PD inhibition could reduce GSH activity and alleviate oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is also a possible susceptible risk factor of benzene exposure.

  1. Inhibition of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Could Enhance 1,4-Benzoquinone-Induced Oxidative Damage in K562 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Meng; Yang, Wenwen; Sun, Fengmei; Xu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is a chemical contaminant widespread in industrial and living environments. The oxidative metabolites of benzene induce toxicity involving oxidative damage. Protecting cells and cell membranes from oxidative damage, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) maintains the reduced state of glutathione (GSH). This study aims to investigate whether the downregulation of G6PD in K562 cell line can influence the oxidative toxicity induced by 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). G6PD was inhibited in K562 cell line transfected with the specific siRNA of G6PD gene. An empty vector was transfected in the control group. Results revealed that G6PD was significantly upregulated in the control cells and in the cells with inhibited G6PD after they were exposed to BQ. The NADPH/NADP and GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly lower in the cells with inhibited G6PD than in the control cells at the same BQ concentration. The relative reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and DNA oxidative damage were significantly increased in the cell line with inhibited G6PD. The apoptotic rate and G2 phase arrest were also significantly higher in the cells with inhibited G6PD and exposed to BQ than in the control cells. Our results suggested that G6PD inhibition could reduce GSH activity and alleviate oxidative damage. G6PD deficiency is also a possible susceptible risk factor of benzene exposure. PMID:27656260

  2. Tryptophan in Alcoholism Treatment I:  Kynurenine Metabolites Inhibit the Rat Liver Mitochondrial Low Km Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity, Elevate Blood Acetaldehyde Concentration and Induce Aversion to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Badawy, Abdulla A.-B.; Bano, Samina; Steptoe, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Aims: The aims were to provide proofs of mechanism and principle by establishing the ability of kynurenine metabolites to inhibit the liver mitochondrial low Km aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity after administration and in vivo, and to induce aversion to alcohol. Methods: Kynurenic acid (KA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and 3-hydroxyanthranilic acid (3-HAA) were administered to normal male Wistar rats and ALDH activity was determined both in vitro in liver homogenates and in vivo (by measuring blood acetaldehyde following ethanol administration). Alcohol consumption was studied in an aversion model in rats and in alcohol-preferring C57 mice. Results: ALDH activity was significantly inhibited by all three metabolites by doses as small as 1 mg/kg body wt. Blood acetaldehyde accumulation after ethanol administration was strongly elevated by KA and 3-HK and to a lesser extent by 3-HAA. All three metabolites induced aversion to alcohol in rats and decreased alcohol preference in mice. Conclusions: The above kynurenine metabolites of tryptophan induce aversion to alcohol by inhibiting ALDH activity. An intellectual property covering the use of 3-HK and 3-HAA and derivatives thereof in the treatment of alcoholism by aversion awaits further development. PMID:21896552

  3. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  4. Detection of doxorubicin and metabolites in cell extracts and in single cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Adrian B; Gergen, Jamie; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2002-03-25

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection was used to separate and detect doxorubicin and at least five metabolites from NS-1 cells that were treated with 25 microM doxorubicin for 8 h. Using 10 mM borate, 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (pH 9.3) as separation buffer, the 488-nm argon-ion laser line for fluorescence excitation, and a 635 +/- 27.5 nm bandpass filter for detection, the limit of detection (S/N=3) for doxorubicin is 61 +/- 13 zmol. This low limit of detection allows for the detection of a larger number of metabolites than previously reported. Two extraction procedures were performed: a bulk liquid-liquid extraction and an in-capillary single-cell lysis. While in the bulk liquid-liquid extraction procedure, recovery for doxorubicin range from 50 to 99%, in single cell analysis the recovery is expected to be complete. Furthermore performing lysis of a single cell inside the separation capillary prevents doxorubicin or metabolite loss or degradation during handling. Based on the bulk method the calculated metabolite abundance is in the sub-amol per cell range while it varies from 0.1 to 1.1 fmol per cell in single cell analysis confirming metabolite loss during handling. Each metabolite was found at a level less than 0.1% of the doxorubicin content in either method, suggesting a slow metabolism in the NS-1 cell system or effective removal of metabolites by the cell.

  5. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  6. Quinonediimine-induced oxidative coupling of organomagnesium reagents.

    PubMed

    Amaya, Toru; Suzuki, Riyo; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2014-01-13

    N,N'-Diphenyl-p-benzoquinonediimine, a redox-active unit of polyaniline, efficiently induced the oxidative homocoupling of various aryl- and vinylmagnesium reagents in suppressing the side reactions, such as 1,2- or 1,4-addition reaction. PMID:24339200

  7. Quercitrin protects skin from UVB-induced oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuanqin; Li, Wenqi; Son, Young-Ok; Sun, Lijuan; Lu, Jian; Kim, Donghern; Wang, Xin; Yao, Hua; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Hitron, Andrew J; Luo, Jia; Gao, Ning; Shi, Xianglin; Zhang, Zhuo

    2013-06-01

    Exposure of the skin to ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation causes oxidative damage to skin, resulting in sunburn, photoaging, and skin cancer. It is generally believed that the skin damage induced by UV irradiation is a consequence of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there is an increased interest in the use of natural products as chemopreventive agents for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) due to their antioxidants and anti-inflammatory properties. Quercitrin, glycosylated form of quercetin, is the most common flavonoid in nature with antioxidant properties. The present study investigated the possible beneficial effects of quercitrin to inhibit UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage in vitro and in vivo. Our results showed that quercitrin decreased ROS generation induced by UVB irradiation in JB6 cells. Quercitrin restored catalase expression and GSH/GSSG ratio reduced by UVB exposure, two major antioxidant enzymes, leading to reductions of oxidative DNA damage and apoptosis and protection of the skin from inflammation caused by UVB exposure. The present study demonstrated that quercitrin functions as an antioxidant against UVB irradiation-induced oxidative damage to skin.

  8. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed

    Kacprzak, Dorota; Pawliczak, Rafał

    2015-06-19

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu; Jensen, Frank B; Thiel, Bonnie; Evans, Alina L; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Stuehr, Dennis J; Kevil, Christopher G; Fago, Angela

    2014-08-01

    During winter hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) lie in dens for half a year without eating while their basal metabolism is largely suppressed. To understand the underlying mechanisms of metabolic depression in hibernation, we measured type and content of blood metabolites of two ubiquitous inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood cells of hibernating bears. In contrast, circulating nitrite and erythrocytic S-nitrosation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, taken as markers of NO metabolism, did not change appreciably. Our findings reveal that remodeling of H2S metabolism and enhanced intracellular GSH levels are hallmarks of the aerobic metabolic suppression of hibernating bears. PMID:24909614

  10. Hydrogen sulfide and nitric oxide metabolites in the blood of free-ranging brown bears and their potential roles in hibernation.

    PubMed

    Revsbech, Inge G; Shen, Xinggui; Chakravarti, Ritu; Jensen, Frank B; Thiel, Bonnie; Evans, Alina L; Kindberg, Jonas; Fröbert, Ole; Stuehr, Dennis J; Kevil, Christopher G; Fago, Angela

    2014-08-01

    During winter hibernation, brown bears (Ursus arctos) lie in dens for half a year without eating while their basal metabolism is largely suppressed. To understand the underlying mechanisms of metabolic depression in hibernation, we measured type and content of blood metabolites of two ubiquitous inhibitors of mitochondrial respiration, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO), in winter-hibernating and summer-active free-ranging Scandinavian brown bears. We found that levels of sulfide metabolites were overall similar in summer-active and hibernating bears but their composition in the plasma differed significantly, with a decrease in bound sulfane sulfur in hibernation. High levels of unbound free sulfide correlated with high levels of cysteine (Cys) and with low levels of bound sulfane sulfur, indicating that during hibernation H2S, in addition to being formed enzymatically from the substrate Cys, may also be regenerated from its oxidation products, including thiosulfate and polysulfides. In the absence of any dietary intake, this shift in the mode of H2S synthesis would help preserve free Cys for synthesis of glutathione (GSH), a major antioxidant found at high levels in the red blood cells of hibernating bears. In contrast, circulating nitrite and erythrocytic S-nitrosation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, taken as markers of NO metabolism, did not change appreciably. Our findings reveal that remodeling of H2S metabolism and enhanced intracellular GSH levels are hallmarks of the aerobic metabolic suppression of hibernating bears.

  11. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on the spinal-cord glutathione system and nitric-oxide metabolites in rats with neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Horst, Andréa; Kolberg, Carolina; Moraes, Maira S; Riffel, Ana Paula K; Finamor, Isabela A; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Pavanato, Maria Amália; Partata, Wania A

    2014-05-21

    Since N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a donor of cysteine, we studied the relationship between NAC and concentration of oxidized and reduced glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities in the lumbosacral spinal cord of rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve that received NAC (150mg/kg/day, i.p.) or 0.9% saline solution for 3 or 10 days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric-oxide (NO) metabolites were also measured. Von Frey hair and hot-plate tests showed hyperalgesia at day 1 in CCI rats. Hyperalgesia persisted at all other times in saline-treated CCI rats, but returned to pre-injury values in NAC-treated CCI rats after 3 postoperative days. GST activity and the GSH/GSSG ratio increased in saline-treated CCI rats, while the NAC treatment increased GST and GPx activities at day 10, with no significant change in the GSH/GSSG ratio. NAC treatment did not affect H2O2 levels, but it reduced NO metabolites in CCI rats 3 days after the surgery. Thus, the anti-hyperalgesic effect of NAC appears not to involve its action as a cysteine precursor for GSH synthesis, but involves a decrease in NO. PMID:24704379

  12. Characterization of a polyacrylamide gel-induced granuloma in mice: involvement of arachidonate metabolites.

    PubMed

    Errasfa, M; Russo-Marie, F

    1988-06-01

    The injection of polyacrylamide gel (Bio Gel P-4, 200-400 mesh) into the subcutaneous area of mice, induced an inflammatory reaction which was characterized by the migration of leukocytes (mainly neutrophils) from the blood vessels towards the polyacrylamide gel. A rapid protein accumulation was observed during the migration of cells towards the inflamed site. Neutrophils released some pro-inflammatory lipids (prostaglandins, leukotriene B4) and lysozyme, these products were assayed in the granuloma exudate at various times of the granuloma formation. In our experimental inflammatory model, the results suggest that neutrophils that are attracted by the polyacrylamide gel produce eicosanoids and lysozyme, which could act synergistically to potentiate cell migration and protein accumulation in the inflamed site.

  13. Microbially Induced Iron Oxidation: What, Where, How

    SciTech Connect

    SCHIERMEYER,ELISA M.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; NORTHUP,DIANA E.

    2000-08-15

    From the results of the different bacterial cells seen, it is fairly certain that Gallionella is present because of the bean-shaped cells and twisted stalks found with the TEM. The authors cannot confirm, though, what other iron-oxidizing genera exist in the tubes, since the media was only preferential and not one that isolated a specific genus of bacteria. Based on the environment in which they live and the source of the water, they believe their cultures contain Gallionella, Leptothrix, and possibly Crenothrix and Sphaerotilus. They believe the genus Leptothrix rather than Sphaerotilus exist in the tubes because the water source was fresh, unlike the polluted water in which Sphaerotilus are usually found. The TEM preparations worked well. The cryogenic method rapidly froze the cells in place and allowed them to view their morphology. The FAA method, as stated previously, was the best of the three methods because it gave the best contrast. The gluteraldehyde samples did not come out as well. It is possible that the gluteraldehyde the authors prepared was still too concentrated and did not mix well. Although these bacteria were collected from springs and then cultured in an environment containing a presumably pure iron-bearing metal, it seems the tube already containing Manganese Gradient Medium could be used with a piece of metal containing these bacteria. A small piece of corroding metal could then be inserted into the test tube and cultured to study the bacteria.

  14. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia

    PubMed Central

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  15. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding. PMID:21140278

  16. Prey-induced changes in the accumulation of amino acids and phenolic metabolites in the leaves of Drosera capensis L.

    PubMed

    Kováčik, Jozef; Klejdus, Bořivoj; Stork, František; Hedbavny, Josef

    2012-04-01

    Effect of prey feeding (ants Formica fusca) on the quantitative changes in the accumulation of free amino acids, soluble proteins, phenolic metabolites and mineral nutrients in the leaves of carnivorous plant Drosera capensis was studied. Arginine was the most abundant compound in Drosera leaves, while proline was abundant in ants. The amount of the majority of amino acids and their sum were elevated in the fed leaves after 3 and 21 days, and the same, but with further enhancement after 21 days, was observed in ants. Accumulation of amino acids also increased in young non-fed leaves of fed plants. Soluble proteins decreased in ants, but were not enhanced in fed leaves. This confirms the effectiveness of sundew's enzymatic machinery in digestion of prey and suggests that amino acids are not in situ deposited, but rather are allocated within the plant. The content of total soluble phenols, flavonoids and two selected flavonols (quercetin and kaempferol) was not affected by feeding in Drosera leaves, indicating that their high basal level was sufficient for the plant's metabolism and prey-induced changes were mainly N based. The prey also showed to be an important source of other nutrients besides N, and a stimulation of root uptake of some mineral nutrients is assumed (Mg, Cu, Zn). Accumulation of Ca and Na was not affected by feeding.

  17. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family. PMID:25603394

  18. Activation of p53 with ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, marine sponge metabolites, induces apoptosis and autophagy in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Young; Chung, Kyu Jin; Hwang, In Hyun; Gwak, Jungsuk; Park, Seoyoung; Ju, Bong Gun; Yun, Eunju; Kim, Dong-Eun; Chung, Young-Hwa; Na, MinKyun; Song, Gyu-Yong; Oh, Sangtaek

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor, p53, plays an essential role in the cellular response to stress through regulating the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and autophagy. Here, we used a cell-based reporter system for the detection of p53 response transcription to identify the marine sponge metabolites, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone, as activators of the p53 pathway. We demonstrated that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone efficiently stabilize the p53 protein through promotion of p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 in both HCT116 and RKO colon cancer cells. Moreover, both compounds upregulate the expression of p21WAF1/CIP1, a p53-dependent gene, and suppress proliferation of colon cancer cells. In addition, ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased caspase-3 cleavage and the population of cells that positively stained with Annexin V-FITC, both of which are typical biochemical markers of apoptosis. Furthermore, autophagy was elicited by both compounds, as indicated by microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta formations and LC3-II turnover in HCT116 cells. Our findings suggest that ilimaquinone and ethylsmenoquinone exert their anti-cancer activity by activation of the p53 pathway and may have significant potential as chemo-preventive and therapeutic agents for human colon cancer. PMID:25603347

  19. Alnus peptides modify membrane porosity and induce the release of nitrogen-rich metabolites from nitrogen-fixing Frankia.

    PubMed

    Carro, Lorena; Pujic, Petar; Alloisio, Nicole; Fournier, Pascale; Boubakri, Hasna; Hay, Anne E; Poly, Franck; François, Philippe; Hocher, Valerie; Mergaert, Peter; Balmand, Severine; Rey, Marjolaine; Heddi, Abdelaziz; Normand, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Actinorhizal plant growth in pioneer ecosystems depends on the symbiosis with the nitrogen-fixing actinobacterium Frankia cells that are housed in special root organs called nodules. Nitrogen fixation occurs in differentiated Frankia cells known as vesicles. Vesicles lack a pathway for assimilating ammonia beyond the glutamine stage and are supposed to transfer reduced nitrogen to the plant host cells. However, a mechanism for the transfer of nitrogen-fixation products to the plant cells remains elusive. Here, new elements for this metabolic exchange are described. We show that Alnus glutinosa nodules express defensin-like peptides, and one of these, Ag5, was found to target Frankia vesicles. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed that Ag5 induces drastic physiological changes in Frankia, including an increased permeability of vesicle membranes. A significant release of nitrogen-containing metabolites, mainly glutamine and glutamate, was found in N2-fixing cultures treated with Ag5. This work demonstrates that the Ag5 peptide is central for Frankia physiology in nodules and uncovers a novel cellular function for this large and widespread defensin peptide family.

  20. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Is Responsible for TRPV4-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwen; Tian, Yujing; Yuan, Yibiao; Qi, Mengwen; Li, Yingchun; Du, Yimei; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been reported to be responsible for neuronal injury in pathological conditions. Excessive oxidative stress can lead to neuronal damage, and activation of TRPV4 increases the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in many types of cells. The present study explored whether TRPV4-induced neuronal injury is mediated through enhancing oxidative stress. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A increased the content of methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and NO in the hippocampus, which was blocked by administration of the TRPV4 specific antagonist HC-067047. The activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were decreased by GSK1016790A, whereas the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) remained unchanged. Moreover, the protein level and activity of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were increased by GSK1016790A, and the GSK1016790A-induced increase in NO content was blocked by an nNOS specific antagonist ARL-17477. The GSK1016790A-induced modulations of CAT, GSH-Px and nNOS activities and the protein level of nNOS were significantly inhibited by HC-067047. Finally, GSK1016790A-induced neuronal death and apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 area were markedly attenuated by administration of a ROS scavenger Trolox or ARL-17477. We conclude that activation of TRPV4 enhances oxidative stress by inhibiting CAT and GSH-Px and increasing nNOS, which is responsible, at least in part, for TRPV4-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27799895

  1. Oxidant-induced damage to equine erythrocytes from exposure to Pistacia atlantica, Pistacia terebinthus, and Pistacia chinensis.

    PubMed

    Walter, Kyla M; Moore, Caroline E; Bozorgmanesh, Rana; Magdesian, K Gary; Woods, Leslie W; Puschner, Birgit

    2014-11-01

    Two horses were referred for methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following 5 acute deaths in their herd from an unidentified toxin source. Horses have a greater risk than other mammalian species of developing methemoglobinemia and hemolytic anemia following ingestion of oxidizing toxins, due to deficiencies in the mechanisms that protect against oxidative damage in erythrocytes. Their susceptibility to oxidative erythrocyte damage is evident in the numerous cases of red maple (Acer rubrum) toxicosis. The suspected toxins causing A. rubrum toxicosis are tannic acid, gallic acid, and a metabolite of gallic acid, pyrogallol. These compounds can be found in a variety of plants, posing a risk to equine health. In order to quickly identify toxin sources, 2 rapid in vitro assays were developed to screen plant extracts for the ability to induce methemoglobin formation or cause hemolysis in healthy equine donor erythrocytes. The plant extract screening focused on 3 species of the genus Pistacia: P. atlantica, P. terebinthus, and P. chinensis, which were located in the horse pasture. Extracts of the seeds and leaves of each species induced methemoglobin formation and resulted in hemolysis, with seed extracts having greater potency. The in vitro assays used in the current study provide a useful diagnostic method for the rapid identification of oxidizing agents from unidentified sources. There is no effective treatment for oxidative erythrocyte damage in horses, making rapid identification and removal of the source essential for the prevention of poisoning.

  2. Electrochemical detection of DNA damage induced by acrylamide and its metabolite at the graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion modified pyrolytic graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Qu, Xiangjin; Dong, Jing; Ai, Shiyun; Han, Ruixia

    2011-06-15

    A new electrochemical biosensor for directly detecting DNA damage induced by acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite was presented in this work. The graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion modified pyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE) was prepared, and then horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and natural double-stranded DNA were alternately assembled on the modified electrode by the layer-by-layer method. The PGE/graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion and the construction of the (HRP/DNA)(n) film were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. With the guanine signal in DNA as an indicator, the damage of DNA was detected by differential pulse voltammetry after PGE/graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion/(HRP/DNA)(n) was incubated in AA solution or AA+H(2)O(2) solution at 37°C. This method provides a new model to mimic and directly detect DNA damage induced by chemical pollutants and their metabolites in vitro. The results indicated that, in the presence of H(2)O(2), HRP was activated and catalyzed the transformation of AA to glycidamide, which could form DNA adducts and induce more serious damage of DNA than AA. In order to further verify these results, UV-vis spectrophotometry was also used to investigate DNA damage induced by AA and its metabolites in solution and the similar results were obtained.

  3. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  4. Gradients of metabolite accumulation and redifferentiation of nutritive cells associated with vascular tissues in galls induced by sucking insects

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Isaias, Rosy Mary dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells respond to abiotic and biotic stimuli, which generate adaptive phenotypes in plant organs. In the case of plant galls, cell phenotypes are adaptive for the gall inducer and assume characteristics mainly linked to its protection and nutrition. Herein, the cytological development and histochemical profile of Nothotrioza cattleiani galls, a sucking insect, on the leaves of Psidium cattleianum are compared with those of other galls, especially N. myrtoidis galls, searching for conserved and divergent alterations in cell fates and cycles. Leaf cell fates are completely changed within galls, except for epidermal cells, but the comparison between Nothotrioza spp. galls shows conserved fates. Nevertheless, cytological development of N. cattleiani galls is different from the standby-redifferentiation of N. myrtoidis galls. Starch and lignins, and reducing sugars form centrifugal and centripetal gradients of accumulation, respectively. Proteins, total phenolics, terpenoids, proanthocyanidins and reactive oxygen species are detected in bidirectional gradients, i.e. weak or undetectable reaction in the median cortical cells that is gradually more intense in the cell layers towards the inner and outer surfaces of the gall. True nutritive cells associated with vascular tissues, together with the bidirectional gradients of metabolite accumulation, are herein reported for the first time in insect galls. The globoid galls of N. cattleiani, though macro-morphologically similar to the galls of N. myrtoidis, are distinct and unique among insect galls, as far as the cellular, subcellular and histochemical traits are concerned. Thus, the traits of the galls on P. cattleianum studied herein represent the extended phenotypes of their inducers. PMID:26209687

  5. Gradients of metabolite accumulation and redifferentiation of nutritive cells associated with vascular tissues in galls induced by sucking insects.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Renê Gonçalves da Silva; Isaias, Rosy Mary Dos Santos

    2015-01-01

    Plant cells respond to abiotic and biotic stimuli, which generate adaptive phenotypes in plant organs. In the case of plant galls, cell phenotypes are adaptive for the gall inducer and assume characteristics mainly linked to its protection and nutrition. Herein, the cytological development and histochemical profile of Nothotrioza cattleiani galls, a sucking insect, on the leaves of Psidium cattleianum are compared with those of other galls, especially N. myrtoidis galls, searching for conserved and divergent alterations in cell fates and cycles. Leaf cell fates are completely changed within galls, except for epidermal cells, but the comparison between Nothotrioza spp. galls shows conserved fates. Nevertheless, cytological development of N. cattleiani galls is different from the standby-redifferentiation of N. myrtoidis galls. Starch and lignins, and reducing sugars form centrifugal and centripetal gradients of accumulation, respectively. Proteins, total phenolics, terpenoids, proanthocyanidins and reactive oxygen species are detected in bidirectional gradients, i.e. weak or undetectable reaction in the median cortical cells that is gradually more intense in the cell layers towards the inner and outer surfaces of the gall. True nutritive cells associated with vascular tissues, together with the bidirectional gradients of metabolite accumulation, are herein reported for the first time in insect galls. The globoid galls of N. cattleiani, though macro-morphologically similar to the galls of N. myrtoidis, are distinct and unique among insect galls, as far as the cellular, subcellular and histochemical traits are concerned. Thus, the traits of the galls on P. cattleianum studied herein represent the extended phenotypes of their inducers. PMID:26209687

  6. Pre-emptive anti-hyperalgesic effect of electroacupuncture in carrageenan-induced inflammation: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Suárez, Bárbara B; Garrido, Gabino; Márquez, Lucía; Martínez, Ioanna; Hernández, Ivones; Merino, Nelson; Luque, Yilian; Delgado, Rene; Bosch, Fe

    2009-08-14

    Central sensitization theory has been defined as pivotal for understanding the excitability changes in central neurons following peripheral inflammation or neuropathic injury. Considerable evidence has demonstrated that activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors and subsequent nitric oxide (NO) production are the key in these changes. Consequently, neuromodulator drugs have been developed during the last decades. The electroacupuncture (EA) that acts as biochemical modulator in the spinal horn cord would prevent these changes. The aim of this study was to determine the thermal anti-hyperalgesic effect of EA (10 Hz, 3 mA) and its combination with L-NAME as nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor in carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia in rats. Also, it investigated the changes in the plasmatic concentrations of NO metabolites. Moreover, the EA combination with sub-effective dose of ketamine as a NMDA antagonist was tested. The EA pre-treatment conducted in unsedated, unrestrained and conscious animals showed a thermal anti-hyperalgesic effect in correspondence with plasmatic increase of NO metabolites. The L-NAME (30 mg/kg) pre-administration decreased significantly the plasmatic concentrations of NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) and suppressed the anti-hyperalgesic effect of EA. The combination of EA with ketamine enhanced the anti-hyperalgesic effect. These data constitute the first report that suggested the participation, at least in part, of the L-arginine-NOS-NO-GMPc pathway activation in anti-hyperalgesic effect of EA in carrageenan-induced inflammation model.

  7. New bioactive metabolites from a crown gall induced on an Eucalyptus tereticornis Sm. tree.

    PubMed

    Salama, Maha M; Ezzat, Shahira M; El Dine, Riham Salah; El-Sayed, Aly M; Sleem, Amany A

    2013-01-01

    Applying a bioactivity-guided isolation strategy for the ethanolic extract of crown gall tumours induced on an Eucalyptus tereticornis tree, two new compounds in addition to a known one were isolated. The new compounds were identified as an amino acid derivative named 1-ethyl-6-(1'-methyl-1'-phenylethyl) piperidin-2-one (1) and a lanostane tetracyclic triterpene named 3beta-hydroxy-24-methyllanosta-8,17(20),24(28)-trien-22-oic acid (2), together with stigmasterol-3-O-glucoside (3). The three compounds exhibited significant cytotoxic activity against two human cell lines, breast (MCF7) and colon (HCT116), with IC50 values of 1.01, 1.54, and 2.15 microg/ml, respectively, against MCF7 and 3.49, 3.83, and 3.39 microg/ ml, respectively, against HCT116. Furthermore, in rats elevated levels of blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein (LDLc) were significantly reduced, while the level of high-density lipoprotein (HDLc) was significantly increased by administration of the ethanolic extract as well as of 3. These results support a correlation between the reduction of blood cholesterol levels and improvement of colorectal cancer. PMID:24601084

  8. Hesperetin and its sulfate and glucuronide metabolites inhibit TNF-α induced human aortic endothelial cell migration and decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) levels.

    PubMed

    Giménez-Bastida, Juan Antonio; González-Sarrías, Antonio; Vallejo, Fernando; Espín, Juan Carlos; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have reported the protection offered by citrus consumption, mainly orange, against cardiovascular diseases, which is primarily mediated by the antiatherogenic and vasculoprotective effects of the flavanone hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside (hesperidin). However, flavanone aglycones or glycosides are not present in the bloodstream but their derived phase-II metabolites could be the actual bioactive molecules. To date, only a few studies have explored the effects of circulating hesperetin-derived metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) on endothelial cells. Herein, we describe for the first time the effects of hesperetin 3'-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 7-O-glucuronide, hesperetin 3'-O-sulfate, hesperetin 7-O-sulfate and hesperetin on human aortic endothelial cell (HAEC) migration upon pro-inflammatory stimuli as an essential step to angiogenesis. Hesperetin and its derived metabolites, at physiologically relevant concentrations (1-10 μM), significantly attenuated cell migration in the presence of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α (50 ng mL(-1)), which was accompanied and perhaps mediated by a significant decrease in the levels of the thrombogenic plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). However, hesperetin metabolites did not counteract the TNF-α-induced production of pro-inflammatory interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8. We also study here for the first time, the metabolism of hesperetin and its derived metabolites by HAEC with and without a pro-inflammatory stimulus. All these results reinforce the concept according to which circulating phase-II hesperetin metabolites are critical molecules contributing to the cardioprotective effects upon consumption of citrus fruits such as orange.

  9. Arsenic-induced oxidative cerebral disorders: protection by taurine.

    PubMed

    Das, Joydeep; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Manna, Prasenjit; Sinha, Mahua; Sil, Parames C

    2009-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate whether the conditionally essential amino acid, taurine, could play any protective role against the potent neurotoxin arsenic (As)-induced oxidative impairment in the rat brain. Administration in the form of NaAsO(2) (at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days, orally), As increased the intracellular accumulation of metallic As, reactive oxygen species, and super oxide radicals. The toxin also augmented the extent of lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and the levels of glutathione disulphide. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, membrane-bound enzymes, acetylcholinesterase, and the levels of reduced glutathione, as well as total thiols, have been significantly decreased due to As exposure. Oral administration of taurine (at a dose of 100 mg/kg/body weight for 5 days) was found to be very effective in the prevention of As-induced oxidative impairment in the brain tissue of the experimental rats. To validate the experimental results, a well-known water-soluble antioxidant, vitamin C, was used as the positive control in the study. Combining all, results suggest that taurine plays a beneficial role against As-induced cerebral oxidative stress.

  10. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    SciTech Connect

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  11. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  12. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Mahua G; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  13. Induction of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase by Lipopolysaccharide and the Influences of Cell Volume Changes, Stress Hormones and Oxidative Stress on Nitric Oxide Efflux from the Perfused Liver of Air-Breathing Catfish, Heteropneustes fossilis

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Mahua G.; Saha, Nirmalendu

    2016-01-01

    The air-breathing singhi catfish (Heteropneustes fossilis) is frequently being challenged by bacterial contaminants, and different environmental insults like osmotic, hyper-ammonia, dehydration and oxidative stresses in its natural habitats throughout the year. The main objectives of the present investigation were to determine (a) the possible induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene with enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) by intra-peritoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (a bacterial endotoxin), and (b) to determine the effects of hepatic cell volume changes due to anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites, stress hormones and by induction of oxidative stress on production of NO from the iNOS-induced perfused liver of singhi catfish. Intra-peritoneal injection of LPS led to induction of iNOS gene and localized tissue specific expression of iNOS enzyme with more production and accumulation of NO in different tissues of singhi catfish. Further, changes of hydration status/cell volume, caused either by anisotonicity or by infusion of certain metabolites such as glutamine plus glycine and adenosine, affected the NO production from the perfused liver of iNOS-induced singhi catfish. In general, increase of hydration status/cell swelling due to hypotonicity caused decrease, and decrease of hydration status/cell shrinkage due to hypertonicity caused increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver, thus suggesting that changes in hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells serve as a potent modulator for regulating the NO production. Significant increase of NO efflux from the perfused liver was also observed while infusing the liver with stress hormones like epinephrine and norepinephrine, accompanied with decrease of hydration status/cell volume of hepatic cells. Further, oxidative stress, caused due to infusion of t-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide separately, in the perfused liver of singhi catfish, resulted in

  14. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer.

  15. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer. PMID:26550986

  16. Protective effect of arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative stress in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Mahua; Manna, Prasenjit; Sil, Parames C

    2008-02-01

    Arsenic, a notoriously poisonous metalloid, is ubiquitous in the environment, and it affects nearly all organ systems of animals including humans. The present study was designed to investigate the preventive role of a triterpenoid saponin, arjunolic acid against arsenic-induced oxidative damage in murine brain. Sodium arsenite was selected as a source of arsenic for this study. The free-radical-scavenging activity and the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid were determined from its 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assay, respectively. Oral administration of sodium arsenite at a dose of 10 mg/kg body weight for 2 days significantly decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase, the level of cellular metabolites, reduced glutathione, total thiols and increased the level of oxidized glutathione. In addition, it enhanced the levels of lipid peroxidation end products and protein carbonyl content. Treatment with arjunolic acid at a dose of 20 mg/kg body weight for 4 days prior to arsenic administration almost normalized above indices. Histological findings due to arsenic intoxication and arjunolic acid treatment supported the other biochemical changes in murine brains. Results of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl radical scavenging and ferric reducing/antioxidant power assays clearly showed the in vitro radical scavenging as well as the in vivo antioxidant power of arjunolic acid, respectively. The effect of a well-established antioxidant, vitamin C, has been included in the study as a positive control. Combining all, results suggest that arjunolic acid possessed the ability to ameliorate arsenic-induced oxidative insult in murine brain and is probably due to its antioxidant activity.

  17. Oxidative stress induced in sunflower seedling roots by aqueous dry olive-mill residues.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O(2)·(-) generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O(2)·(-) generation and EC-POX's activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O(2)·(-) and H(2)O(2) accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX's activities might be involved in the enhancement of H(2)O(2) content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress.

  18. Oxidative Stress Induced in Sunflower Seedling Roots by Aqueous Dry Olive-Mill Residues

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Inmaculada; García-Sánchez, Mercedes; Casimiro, Ilda; Casero, Pedro Joaquin; García-Romera, Inmaculada; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; Espinosa, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The contamination of soils with dry olive-mill residue can represent a serious problem as being an environmental stressor in plants. It has been demonstrated that inoculation of aqueous extract of olive oil-mill residue (ADOR) with saprobe fungi removes some phenolic compounds. In this paper we studied the effect of ADOR uninoculated or inoculated with saprobe fungi in sunflower seedling roots. The germination and root growth, O2·- generation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and extracellular peroxidases (EC-POXs) activities, and the content of some metabolites involved in the tolerance of stress were tested. The roots germinated in ADOR uninoculated show a decrease in meristem size, resulting in a reduction of the root length and fresh weight, and in the number of layers forming the cortex, but did not alter the dry weight, protein and soluble amino acid content. ADOR caused the decreases in O2·- generation and EC-POX′s activities and protein oxidation, but enhanced SOD activity, lipid peroxidation and proline content. Fluorescence imaging showed that ADOR induced O2·- and H2O2 accumulation in the roots. The increase in SOD and the decrease in EC-POX′s activities might be involved in the enhancement of H2O2 content and lipid peroxidation. Control roots treated with ADOR for 10 min show an oxidative burst. Roots germinated in ADOR inoculated with saprobe fungi partially recovered normal levels of ROS, morphological characteristics and antioxidant activities. These results suggested that treatment with ADOR caused a phytotoxic effect during germination inducing an oxidative stress. The inoculation of ADOR with saprobe fungi limited the stress. PMID:23049960

  19. Oxidative stress-induced calcium signalling in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Greene, Vilma; Cao, Hong; Schanne, Francis A X; Bartelt, Diana C

    2002-05-01

    The effects of oxidative stress on levels of calcium ion (Ca(2+)) in Aspergillus nidulans were measured using strains expressing aequorin in the cytoplasm (Aeq(cyt)) and mitochondria (Aeq(mt)). When oxidative stress was induced by exposure to 10-mM H(2)O(2), the mitochondrial calcium response (Ca(mt)(2+)) was greater than the change in cytoplasmic calcium (Ca(c)(2+)). The Ca(mt)(2+) response to H(2)O(2) was dose dependent, while the increase in [Ca(c)(2+)] did not change with increasing H(2)O(2). The increase in both [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] in response to oxidative stress was enhanced by exposure of cells to Ca(2+). The presence of chelator in the external medium only partially inhibited the Ca(mt)(2+) and Ca(c)(2+) responses to oxidative stress. Reagents that alter calcium fluxes had varied effects on the Ca(mt)(2+) response to peroxide. Ruthenium red blocked the increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)], while neomycin caused an even greater increase in [Ca(mt)(2+)]. Treatment with ruthenium red and neomycin had no effect on the Ca(c)(2+) response. Bafilomycin A and oligomycin had no effect on either the mitochondrial or cytoplasmic response. Inhibitors of both voltage-regulated calcium channels and intracellular calcium release channels inhibited the Ca(2+)-dependent component of the Ca(mt)(2+) response to oxidative stress. We conclude that the more significant Ca(2+) response to oxidative stress occurs in the mitochondria and that both intracellular and extracellular calcium pools can contribute to the increases in [Ca(c)(2+)] and [Ca(mt)(2+)] induced by oxidative stress.

  20. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Xing, Mingyou; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 μmol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  1. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  2. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells.

    PubMed

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence. PMID:27651846

  3. Oxidative Stress Induces Senescence in Cultured RPE Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aryan, Nona; Betts-Obregon, Brandi S.; Perry, George; Tsin, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine whether oxidative stress induces cellular senescence in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Cultured ARPE19 cells were subjected to different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide to induce oxidative stress. Cells were seeded into 24-well plates with hydrogen peroxide added to cell medium and incubated at 37°C + 5% CO2 for a 90-minute period [at 0, 300, 400 and 800 micromolar (MCM) hydrogen peroxide]. The number of viable ARPE19 cells were recorded using the Trypan Blue Dye Exclusion Method and cell senescence was measured by positive staining for senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-Gal) protein. Without hydrogen peroxide treatment, the number of viable ARPE19 cells increased significantly from 50,000 cells/well to 197,000 within 72 hours. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide reduced this level of cell proliferation significantly (to 52,167 cells at 400 MCM; to 49,263 cells at 800 MCM). Meanwhile, cells with a high level of positive senescence-indicator SA-Beta-Gal-positive staining was induced by hydrogen peroxide treatment (from a baseline level of 12% to 80% at 400 MCM and at 800 MCM). Our data suggests that oxidative stress from hydrogen peroxide treatment inhibited ARPE19 cell proliferation and induced cellular senescence.

  4. Light-induced oxidation in semihard cheeses. Evaluation of methods used to determine levels of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Grith; Sørensen, John; Stapelfeldt, Henrik

    2002-07-17

    Light-induced oxidation in Havarti cheese (38% fat) stored in the dark and exposed to fluorescent light was evaluated by an array of chemical, physical, and spectroscopic methods. Light-induced changes were noticeable already after short exposure times (<12 h). A clear differentiation between samples stored in the dark and samples exposed to 1000 lx fluorescent light was obtained by means of the following methods: color measurements (a values), peroxide value determinations, and evaluations of volatile oxidation products by solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography (SPME-GC). The expected changes in peroxide values in relation to storage time were not evident. Measuring free radicals by electron spin resonance spectrometry could not be done to distinguish between samples, possibly due to the conversion of radicals during sample preparation. However, significant light-exposure effects on secondary oxidation products, detected by SPME-GC, were noted for 1-pentanol, 1-hexanol, nonanal, and benzaldehyde. PMID:12105971

  5. Increased Oxidative Stress Induces Apoptosis in Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Tual-Chalot, Simon; Mostefai, H. Ahmed; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, María Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress results in deleterious cell function in pathologies associated with inflammation. Here, we investigated the generation of superoxide anion as well as the anti-oxidant defense systems related to the isoforms of superoxide dismutases (SOD) in cystic fibrosis (CF) cells. Pro-apoptotic agents induced apoptosis in CF but not in control cells that was reduced by treatment with SOD mimetic. These effects were associated with increased superoxide anion production, sensitive to the inhibition of IκB-α phosphorylation, in pancreatic but not tracheal CF cells, and reduced upon inhibition of either mitochondrial complex I or NADPH oxidase. CF cells exhibited reduced expression, but not activity, of both Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD when compared to control cells. Although, expression of EC-SOD was similar in normal and CF cells, its activity was reduced in CF cells. We provide evidence that high levels of oxidative stress are associated with increased apoptosis in CFTR-mutated cells, the sources being different depending on the cell type. These observations underscore a reduced anti-oxidant defense mechanism, at least in part, via diminished EC-SOD activity and regulation of Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD expressions. These data point to new therapeutic possibilities in targeting anti-oxidant pathways to reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis in CF cells. PMID:21931865

  6. Detection of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and NADPH-diaphorase in experimentally induced hyperoxaluric animals.

    PubMed

    Pragasam, Viswanathan; Sakthivel, Ramasamy; Kalaiselvi, Periyandavan; Rajesh, Nachiappa Ganesh; Varalakshmi, Palaninathan

    2005-08-01

    Nitrosative stress plays a role in calcium oxalate stone formation, as nitrosated proteins have been identified in stone formers. Nitric oxide (NO(*)), the common precursor for reactive nitrogen species, is synthesized in the juxtaglomerular apparatus of the kidneys. The present study is aimed to determine the role of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in an experimental hyperoxaluric condition by histological and biochemical techniques. Hyperoxaluria was induced by 0.75% ethylene glycol in drinking water. L-arginine (L-arg) was supplemented at a dose of 1.25 g/kg body weight orally for 28 days. Nitric oxide metabolites (NOx), protein content in the urine and lipid peroxidation in the kidney were determined at the end of the experimental period. Histopathological examination of the rat kidneys was then carried out. NADPH-diaphorase and eNOS expression studies were carried out in control and hyperoxaluric rat kidneys using histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques. Significant amounts of NOx were present in the urine of hyperoxaluric animals when compared to control rats. Histopathological examinations revealed membrane injury, tubular dilatation and edema in the hyperoxaluric rats, whereas co-supplementation of L-arg to the hyperoxaluric rats significantly reduced these changes. The results of histochemical analysis for NADPH-diaphorase staining demonstrate the role of NOS in hyperoxaluric rats. Hyperoxaluric rats showed intense staining for NADPH-diaphorase when compared to control and L-arg co-supplemented hyperoxaluric rats. Immunohistochemical demonstration confirmed that eNOS expression was markedly increased in L-arg supplemented rats, when compared to EG treated rat kidney sections. Thus, from the present study, we conclude that supplementation of L-arg to the hyperoxaluric animals minimizes the cellular injury mediated by ethylene glycol, prevents oxidative/nitrosative damage to the membranes and reduces the incidence of calcium oxalate stone formation.

  7. Role of Metabolism in Arsenic-Induced Toxicity: Identification and Quantification of Arsenic Metabolites in Tissues and Excreta

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic is a known toxicant and carcinogen. Methylation of inorganic arsenic was once thought to be a detoxification mechanism because of the rapid excretion and relatively lower toxicity of the pentavalent organic arsenical metabolites. Advances in analytical chemistry have al...

  8. PPAR-pan activation induces hepatic oxidative stress and lipidomic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Ament, Zsuzsanna; West, James A; Stanley, Elizabeth; Ashmore, Tom; Roberts, Lee D; Wright, Jayne; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

    2016-06-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand activated nuclear receptors that regulate cellular homoeostasis and metabolism. PPARs control the expression of genes involved in fatty-acid and lipid metabolism. Despite evidence showing beneficial effects of their activation in the treatment of metabolic diseases, particularly dyslipidaemias and type 2 diabetes, PPAR agonists have also been associated with a variety of side effects and adverse pathological changes. Agonists have been developed that simultaneously activate the three PPAR receptors (PPARα, γ and δ) in the hope that the beneficial effects can be harnessed while avoiding some of the negative side effects. In this study, the hepatic effects of a discontinued PPAR-pan agonist (a triple agonist of PPAR-α, -γ, and -δ), was investigated after dietary treatment of male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The agonist induced liver enlargement in conjunction with metabolomic and lipidomic remodelling. Increased concentrations of several metabolites related to processes of oxidation, such as oxo-methionine, methyl-cytosine and adenosyl-methionine indicated increased stress and immune status. These changes are reflected in lipidomic changes, and increased energy demands as determined by free fatty acid (decreased 18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3 and increased ratios of n-6/n-3 fatty acids) triacylglycerol, phospholipid (decreased and increased bulk changes respectively) and eicosanoid content (increases in PGB2 and 15-deoxy PGJ2). We conclude that the investigated PPAR agonist, GW625019, induces liver enlargement, accompanied by lipidomic remodelling, oxidative stress and increases in several pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. This suggests that such pathways should be monitored in the drug development process and also outline how PPAR agonists induce liver proliferation. PMID:26654758

  9. Effects of vitamin D metabolites on healing of low phosphate, vitamin D-deficient induced rickets in rats.

    PubMed

    Atkin, I; Pita, J C; Ornoy, A; Agundez, A; Castiglione, G; Howell, D S

    1985-01-01

    A model of low-phosphate, vitamin D-deficient rachitic rats was used to compare the effects of 1 alpha(OH)D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, and 24,25(OH)2D3 on cartilage and bone. The rats were maintained for 3 weeks on a high-calcium, low-phosphate, vitamin D-deficient diet, during which period they developed severe rickets. The rachitic rats were injected for 2 or 3 consecutive days with a physiologic dose of either metabolite. Other littermates were given a single dose of 50,000 IU of cholecalciferol in combination with a normal diet. Samples of cartilage fluid (Cfl) and of blood were removed prior to sacrifice for biochemical studies of some parameters of calcification. These parameters were correlated with the results of light and electron microscopic studies of the growth plate cartilage and bone. Treatment with 1 alpha (OH)D3 or with 1,25(OH)2D3, in spite of increasing Ca and P levels in the Cfl, induced only partial healing of the rickets. In contrast, 24,25(OH)2D3 or vitamin D with a normal diet resulted in complete morphologic and biochemical healing of the rickets. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) studies have shown partial mineralization of the wide hypertrophic zone of the growth plate following treatment with 1 alpha(OH)D3 or with 1,25(OH)2D3. Mineralization was more complete with 24,25(OH)2D3 treatment. The results of this study emphasize the importance of 24,25(OH)2D3 for normal endochondral bone formation and mineralization.

  10. Involvement of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway and nitric oxide synthase in dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 6-hydroxydopamine and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sarika; Kumar, Sachin; Dikshit, Madhu

    2010-01-01

    The primary pathology in Parkinson's disease patients is significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra through multiple mechanisms. We previously have demonstrated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rats. The present study was undertaken to investigate further the role of NO in the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons during the early time period after administration of 6-OHDA and LPS. Measurement of dopamine and its metabolites, TH immunolabeling, cytochrome-c release, mitochondrial complex-I and caspase-3 activity assessment was performed in both the 6-OHDA- and LPS-induced experimental models of Parkinson's disease. Significant decreases in dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunolabeling and mitochondrial complex-I activity were observed, with increase in cytochrome-c release and caspase-3 activation. Dopmaine and its metabolite levels, mitochondrial complex-I activity and caspase-3 activity were significantly reversed with treatment of the NOS inhibitor, L-NAME. The reduction in the extent of cytochrome-c release responded variably to NOS inhibition in both the models. The results obtained suggest that NO contributes to mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration induced by 6-OHDA and LPS in rats. PMID:20594414

  11. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress. PMID:26649137

  12. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress.

  13. Magnetism in graphene oxide induced by epoxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Su, Haibin; Cole, Jacqueline M.

    2015-04-27

    We have engineered magnetism in graphene oxide. Our approach transforms graphene into a magnetic insulator while maintaining graphene's structure. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra reveal that graphene oxide has various chemical groups (including epoxy, ketone, hydroxyl, and C-O groups) on its surface. Destroying the epoxy group with heat treatment or chemical treatment diminishes magnetism in the material. Local density approximation calculation results well reproduce the magnetic moments obtained from experiments, and these results indicate that the unpaired spin induced by the presence of epoxy groups is the origin of the magnetism. The calculation results also explain the magnetic properties, which are generated by the interaction between separated magnetic regions and domains. Our results demonstrate tunable magnetism in graphene oxide based on controlling the epoxy group with heat or chemical treatment.

  14. Antioxidative Metabolites Synthesized by Marine Pigmented Vibrio sp. and Its Protection on Oxidative Deterioration of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Ravindra; Mohandass, C; Dastager, Syed G; Kolekar, Yogesh M; Malwankar, Rahul

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial strain Vibrio sp. (PIGB 184) isolated from water samples of the Arabian Sea and identified through 16S rRNA demonstrated the production of pigmentary antioxidants with higher ABTS activities 90.9 ± 0.42 % in comparison with the standard commercial pigmented antioxidant, quercetin 88.8 ± 1.4 %. Antioxidative metabolites of this strain substantially inhibit the lipid peroxidation (LPO) reactions tested in sheep liver and brain. The antioxidant compounds produced by the Vibrio sp. (PIGB 184), analysed by GC-MS, reveals that it is composed mostly of phenol, 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl) and pyrrolo[1,2-a]pyrazine-1,4-dione,hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl). The interrelationship assessed between LPO and the phenolic compounds showed significant correlation with anti-LPO properties (R (2) = 0.9698 to 0.9861). These compounds are responsible for obstruction of harmful radical associated biochemical reactions in biological systems. Pigmented metabolites also tested for attributive biological properties against pathogenic bacteria showed prominent inhibition towards Gram-positive organisms (31.25 to 62.5 μg ml(-1)). From this study, it may be suggested that the marine bacterium PIGB 184 could be used as a potential bio-resource for antioxidants and needs to be worked out for mass production. PMID:26815500

  15. Lack of aldehyde dehydrogenase ameliorates oxidative stress induced by single-dose ethanol administration in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Akiko; Ichiba, Masayoshi; Horita, Mikako; Yamashita, Zenko; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Isse, Toyohi; Oyama, Tsunehiro; Kawamoto, Toshihiro; Tomokuni, Katsumaro

    2007-02-01

    Polymorphism of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), denoted ALDH2*2, is far more common in East Asian countries. Acetaldehyde, an intermediate metabolite of ethanol, is metabolized very slowly in people who have ALDH2*2, as the mutated ALDH2 lacks acetaldehyde metabolizing activity. On the other hand, it is well established that metabolism of ethanol causes oxidative stress in liver tissue. To examine the consequences of this polymorphism on ethanol-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue, we conducted a study using Aldh2 knockout mice. Aldh2+/+ and Aldh2-/- mice were orally administered ethanol at a dose of 5g/kg body weight. Levels of malondialdehyde, an indicator of oxidative stress, and glutathione, a key antioxidant, in liver tissue were analyzed 0-24h after administration. Levels of malondialdehyde were significantly lower in Aldh2-/- mice than in Aldh2+/+ mice at 12h after injection, while levels of glutathione were higher in Aldh2-/- mice than in Aldh2+/+ mice at 6 and 12h after injection. Our results suggest that a lack of ALDH ameliorates ethanol-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue. PMID:17452299

  16. Flavonoid Fraction of Orange and Bergamot Juices Protect Human Lung Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ferlazzo, Nadia; Visalli, Giuseppa; Smeriglio, Antonella; Cirmi, Santa; Lombardo, Giovanni Enrico; Campiglia, Pietro; Di Pietro, Angela; Navarra, Michele

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that oxidant/antioxidant imbalance triggers cell damage that in turn causes a number of lung diseases. Flavonoids are known for their health benefits, and Citrus fruits juices are one of the main food sources of these secondary plant metabolites. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the flavonoid fraction of bergamot and orange juices, on H2O2-induced oxidative stress in human lung epithelial A549 cells. First we tested the antioxidant properties of both extracts in cell-free experimental models and then we assayed their capability to prevent the cytotoxic effects induced by H2O2. Our results demonstrated that both Citrus juice extracts reduce the generation of reactive oxygen species and membrane lipid peroxidation, improve mitochondrial functionality, and prevent DNA-oxidative damage in A549 cells incubated with H2O2. Our data indicate that the mix of flavonoids present in both bergamot and orange juices may be of use in preventing oxidative cell injury and pave the way for further research into a novel healthy approach to avoid lung disorders. PMID:26221182

  17. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Chengcheng; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaobo; Chen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al2O3 ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al2O3 NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals. PMID:26690197

  18. Sex-Dependent Depression-Like Behavior Induced by Respiratory Administration of Aluminum Oxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Xu, Yan; Zhou, Lian; Zhang, Chengcheng; Meng, Qingtao; Wu, Shenshen; Wang, Shizhi; Ding, Zhen; Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Xiaobo; Chen, Rui

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafine aluminum oxide, which are abundant in ambient and involved occupational environments, are associated with neurobehavioral alterations. However, few studies have focused on the effect of sex differences following exposure to environmental Al₂O₃ ultrafine particles. In the present study, male and female mice were exposed to Al₂O₃ nanoparticles (NPs) through a respiratory route. Only the female mice showed depression-like behavior. Although no obvious pathological changes were observed in mice brain tissues, the neurotransmitter and voltage-gated ion channel related gene expression, as well as the small molecule metabolites in the cerebral cortex, were differentially modulated between male and female mice. Both mental disorder-involved gene expression levels and metabolomics analysis results strongly suggested that glutamate pathways were implicated in sex differentiation induced by Al₂O₃ NPs. Results demonstrated the potential mechanism of environmental ultrafine particle-induced depression-like behavior and the importance of sex dimorphism in the toxic research of environmental chemicals. PMID:26690197

  19. Hepatic glutathione contributes to attenuation of thioacetamide-induced hepatic necrosis due to suppression of oxidative stress in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Makoto; Matsuoka, Miho; Makino, Toshihiko; Kai, Kiyonori; Teranishi, Munehiro; Takasaki, Wataru

    2015-08-01

    We previously reported that hepatic necrosis induced by thioacetamide (TA), a hepatotoxicant, was attenuated in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD mice) in comparison with mice fed a normal rodent diet (ND mice). In this study, we focused on investigation of the mechanism of the attenuation. Hepatic content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an oxidative stress marker, significantly increased in ND mice at 24 and 48 hr after TA administration in comparison to that in vehicle-treated ND mice. At these time points, severe hepatic necrosis was observed in ND mice. Treatment with an established antioxidant, butylated hydroxyanisole, attenuated the TA-induced hepatic necrosis in ND mice. In contrast, in HFD mice, hepatic TBARS content did not increase, and hepatic necrosis was attenuated in comparison with ND mice at 24 and 48 hr after TA dosing. Metabolomics analysis regarding hepatic glutathione, a biological antioxidant, revealed decreased glutathione and changes in the amount of glutathione metabolism-related metabolites, such as increased ophtalmate and decreased cysteine, and this indicated activation of glutathione synthesis and usage in HFD mice. Finally, after treatment with L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoxinine, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis, TA-induced hepatic necrosis was enhanced and hepatic TBARS contents increased after TA dosing in HFD mice. These results suggested that activated synthesis and usage of hepatic GSH, which suppresses hepatic oxidative stress, is one of the factors that attenuate TA-induced hepatic necrosis in HFD mice. PMID:26165648

  20. Increasing mitochondrial muscle fatty acid oxidation induces skeletal muscle remodeling toward an oxidative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hénique, Carole; Mansouri, Abdelhak; Vavrova, Eliska; Lenoir, Véronique; Ferry, Arnaud; Esnous, Catherine; Ramond, Elodie; Girard, Jean; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Prip-Buus, Carina; Cohen, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Adult skeletal muscle is a dynamic, remarkably plastic tissue, which allows myofibers to switch from fast/glycolytic to slow/oxidative types and to increase mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (mFAO) capacity and vascularization in response to exercise training. mFAO is the main muscle energy source during endurance exercise, with carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) being the key regulatory enzyme. Whether increasing muscle mFAO affects skeletal muscle physiology in adulthood actually remains unknown. To investigate this, we used in vivo electrotransfer technology to express in mouse tibialis anterior (TA), a fast/glycolytic muscle, a mutated CPT1 form (CPT1mt) that is active but insensitive to malonyl-CoA, its physiologic inhibitor. In young (2-mo-old) adult mice, muscle CPT1mt expression enhanced mFAO (+40%), but also increased the percentage of oxidative fibers (+28%), glycogen content, and capillary-to-fiber density (+45%). This CPT1mt-induced muscle remodeling, which mimicked exercise-induced oxidative phenotype, led to a greater resistance to muscle fatigue. In the context of aging, characterized by sarcopenia and reduced oxidative capacity, CPT1mt expression in TAs from aged (20-mo-old) mice partially reversed aging-associated sarcopenia and fiber-type transition, and increased muscle capillarity. These findings provide evidence that mFAO regulates muscle phenotype and may be a potential target to combat age-related decline in muscle function. PMID:25713059

  1. Effect of low doses γ-irradiation on oxidative stress and secondary metabolites production of rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) callus culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Beltagi, Hossam S.; Ahmed, Osama K.; El-Desouky, Wael

    2011-09-01

    Effect of various γ-irradiation doses (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 G) on the enhancement of secondary metabolites production and antioxidant properties of rosemary callus culture was investigated. The obtained data showed a highly metabolic modification of chemical constituents and various antioxidant defense enzymes (APX, CAT, SOD and GR), which gradually increased in response to radiation doses, while reduced (GSH), ascorbic acid (AsA) contents, total soluble protein, total soluble amino acids, total soluble sugars and PAL activity positively correlated with the increased doses. On the other hands the high irradiation levels significantly increased the accumulation of various oxidative burst (MDA, H 2O 2 and O 2-). Meanwhile, higher doses of gamma irradiation positively enhanced secondary products accumulation of total phenols and total flavonoids in rosemary callus culture.

  2. Textile dye degradation by bacterial consortium and subsequent toxicological analysis of dye and dye metabolites using cytotoxicity, genotoxicity and oxidative stress studies.

    PubMed

    Phugare, Swapnil S; Kalyani, Dayanand C; Patil, Asmita V; Jadhav, Jyoti P

    2011-02-15

    The present study aims to evaluate Red HE3B degrading potential of developed microbial consortium SDS using two bacterial cultures viz. Providencia sp. SDS (PS) and Pseudomonas aeuroginosa strain BCH (PA) originally isolated from dye contaminated soil. Consortium was found to be much faster for decolorization and degradation of Red HE3B compared to the individual bacterial strain. The intensive metabolic activity of these strains led to 100% decolorization of Red HE3B (50 mg l(-1)) with in 1h. Significant induction of various dye decolorizing enzymes viz. veratryl alcohol oxidase, laccase, azoreductase and DCIP reductase compared to control, point out towards their involvement in overall decolorization and degradation process. Analytical studies like HPLC, FTIR and GC-MS were used to scrutinize the biodegradation process. Toxicological studies before and after microbial treatment was studied with respect to cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, antioxidant enzyme status, protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation analysis using root cells of Allium cepa. Toxicity analysis with A. cepa signifies that dye Red HE3B exerts oxidative stress and subsequently toxic effect on the root cells where as biodegradation metabolites of the dye are relatively less toxic in nature. Phytotoxicity studies also indicated that microbial treatment favors detoxification of Red HE3B.

  3. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induced morphological changes, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in Chinook salmon (CHSE-214) cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Mahajan, Amit; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando Costa; Venkateswara Rao, Janapala

    2015-10-01

    Aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 NPs) are increasingly used in diverse applications that has raised concern about their safety. Recent studies suggested that Al2 O3 NPs induced oxidative stress may be the cause of toxicity in algae, Ceriodaphnia dubia, Caenorhabditis elegans and Danio rerio. However, there is paucity on the toxicity of Al2 O3 NPs on fish cell lines. The current study was aimed to investigate Al2 O3 NPs induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and morphological abnormality of Chinnok salmon cells (CHSE-214). A dose-dependent decline in cell viability was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs. Oxidative stress induced by Al2 O3 NPs in CHSE-214 cells has resulted in the significant reduction of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione in a dose-dependent manner. However, a significant increase in glutathione sulfo-transferase and lipid peroxidation was observed in CHSE-214 cells exposed to Al2 O3 NPs in a dose-dependent manner. Significant morphological changes in CHSE-214 cells were observed when exposed to Al2 O3 NPs at 6, 12 and 24 h. The cells started to detach and appear spherical at 6 h followed by loss of cellular contents resulting in the shrinking of the cells. At 24 h, the cells started to disintegrate and resulted in cell death. Our data demonstrate that Al2 O3 NPs induce cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner in CHSE-214 cells. Thus, our current work may serve as a base-line study for future evaluation of toxicity studies using CHSE-214 cells. PMID:25875951

  4. Oxidation-Induced Degradable Nanogels for Iron Chelation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Wang, Yan; Purro, Max; Xiong, May P.

    2016-01-01

    Iron overload can increase cellular oxidative stress levels due to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS); untreated, it can be extremely destructive to organs and fatal to patients. Since elevated oxidative stress levels are inherent to the condition in such patients, oxidation-induced degradable nanogels for iron chelation were rationally designed by simultaneously polymerizing oxidation-sensitive host-guest crosslinkers between β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and ferrocene (Fc) and iron chelating moieties composed of deferoxamine (DFO) into the final gel scaffold in reverse emulsion reaction chambers. UV-Vis absorption and atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) was used to verify iron chelating capability of nanogels. These materials can degrade into smaller chelating fragments at rates proportional to the level of oxidative stress present. Conjugating DFO reduces the cytotoxicity of the chelator in the macrophage cells. Importantly, the nanogel can effectively reduce cellular ferritin expression in iron overloaded cells and regulate intracellular iron levels at the same time, which is important for maintaining a homeostatic level of this critical metal in cells. PMID:26868174

  5. Losartan abolishes oxidative stress induced by intermittent hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Pialoux, Vincent; Foster, Glen E; Ahmed, Sofia B; Beaudin, Andrew E; Hanly, Patrick J; Poulin, Marc J

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the role of the type 1 angiotensin II (AT(1)) receptor in the increase of oxidative stress and NO metabolism during a single 6 h exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH). Nine healthy young men were exposed, while awake, to sham IH, IH with placebo medication, and IH with the AT(1) receptor antagonist, losartan, using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, crossover study design. In addition to blood pressure, oxidative stress, peroxynitrite activity, uric acid, global antioxidant status and the end-products of NO (NOx) metabolism were measured in plasma before and after 6 h of IH. Oxidative stress and peroxynitrite activity increased and NOx decreased during IH with placebo. In contrast, neither sham IH nor IH with losartan affected these parameters. With respect to each condition, blood pressure had the same profile as oxidative stress. These results demonstrate that blockade of AT(1) receptors prevented the increase in oxidative stress and peroxynitrite activity and the decrease in NO metabolism induced by IH. Finally, this study suggests that the renin-angiotensin system may participate in the overproduction of reactive oxygen species associated with IH by upregulation of the actions of angiotensin II.

  6. Effect of trace mineral supplementation on selected minerals, energy metabolites, oxidative stress, and immune parameters and its association with uterine diseases in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Bicalho, M L S; Lima, F S; Ganda, E K; Foditsch, C; Meira, E B S; Machado, V S; Teixeira, A G V; Oikonomou, G; Gilbert, R O; Bicalho, R C

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between selected minerals' serum levels, energy metabolites, oxidative stress indicators, IL-8 and haptoglobin levels, and the potential for uterine diseases. Additionally, we investigated the effect of injectable trace mineral supplementation (ITMS) on metabolism, immune function, and animal health under field conditions involving a dairy herd with high milk production. The study was conducted in 1 dairy farm located near Ithaca, New York, with 270 multiparous cows were enrolled from October 3, 2012 until January 10, 2013. Cows were randomly allocated into 1 of 2 treatments groups: ITMS or control. Cows randomly assigned to the ITMS group received 2 injections of trace minerals at 230 and 260 d of gestation; each injection contained 300 mg of Zn, 50mg of Mn, 25mg of Se, and 75 mg of Cu. Retained placenta (RP) and metritis were diagnosed and treated by trained farm personnel. Clinical endometritis evaluation was performed by the investigators. Blood mineral levels, plasma nonesterified fatty acids and serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations, plasma IL-8 concentrations, serum haptoglobin concentration, and serum superoxidase dismutase and plasma glutathione peroxidase activities were measured at various time points before and after calving. Four groups of mixed general linear models were fitted to the data using MIXED procedure of SAS. Injectable trace mineral-supplemented cows had increased serum concentration of Cu, Se, and Zn. Conversely, ITMS did not affect energy metabolites or immune and oxidative stress parameters. Serum concentration of Ca, Cu, K, Mg, Mo, Ps, Pt, Se, and Zn varied according to days relative to parturition. Cows with RP had reduced serum concentrations of Ca, Mg, Mo, and Zn when compared with cows without RP. Cows affected with metritis had significantly lower serum concentrations of Ca, Mo, soluble P, total P, Se, and Zn than nonaffected cows. Serum concentration of Ca, Cu, Mo, and

  7. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described.

  8. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described. PMID:26607273

  9. Characterization of urinary metabolites as biomarkers of colistin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats by a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Sook; Kim, Gabin; Moon, Kyoung-Sik; Kim, Yong-Bum; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Kim, Ho-Sook; Jeong, Jayoung; Shin, Jae-Gook; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2016-04-25

    Colistin is a polypeptide antibiotic that effectively treats infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, but its clinical use is limited due to nephrotoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to identify biomarkers of colistin-induced nephrotoxicity and to further characterize the mechanisms underlying this process by analyzing urinary metabolites using untargeted metabolomic approach. Rats receiving intraperitoneal administration of colistin sodium methanesulfonate (CMS) (25 or 50mg/kg) exhibited histopathological changes in the kidney and increased blood urea nitrogen levels. Additionally, the levels of phenylalanine, tryptophan, and tyrosine in the urine of the CMS-treated group were significantly higher than those of the control group, suggesting that colistin caused proximal tubular damage. Urinary acetylcarnitine and butyrylcarnitine levels also increased after CMS treatment, but the levels of purine metabolites and metabolites related to the tricarboxylic acid cycle were reduced. The most significant increase in the CMS-treated groups was observed in creatine levels. CMS-induced selective nephrotoxicity may be attributed to relatively high tissue concentrations of colistin in the kidney. Taken together, our results indicate that high levels of colistin in the kidney caused perturbations in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, amino acid metabolism, creatine metabolism, and purine metabolism and ultimately led to kidney injury.

  10. Influence of a thiazole derivative on ethanol and thermally oxidized sunflower oil-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kode, Aruna; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani; Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Menon, Venugopal P

    2004-10-01

    The present work describes the protective influence of the dendrodoine analogue (DA) [4-amino-5-benzoyl-2-(4-methoxy phenylamino) thiazole] on thermally oxidized sunflower oil and ethanol-induced oxidative stress. Ethanol was fed to animals at a level of 20% [(7.9 g/kg body weight (bw)] and thermally oxidized sunflower oil at a level of 15% (15 mL/100 g feed). Hepatotoxicity was assessed by measuring the activity of plasma aspartate transaminase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT), which were elevated in thermally oxidized oil, and ethanol fed rats when compared with normal control rats. Tissue damage was associated with increased lipid peroxidation and disruption in the antioxidant defence mechanism in thermally oxidized oil- and ethanol-fed groups when compared with normal control group. The activity of liver marker enzymes (AST, ALP and GGT) and the level of lipid peroxidation decreased when DA was administered along with ethanol and thermally oxidized oil. The antioxidant status was near normal in DA-administered groups. Thus we propose that DA exerts antioxidant properties by modulating the activity of hepatic marker enzymes, level of lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status.

  11. Spaceflight environment induces mitochondrial oxidative damage in ocular tissue.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao W; Pecaut, Michael J; Stodieck, Louis S; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Bouxsein, Mary; Jones, Tamako A; Moldovan, Maria; Cunningham, Christopher E; Chieu, Jenny; Gridley, Daila S

    2013-10-01

    A recent report shows that more than 30% of the astronauts returning from Space Shuttle missions or the International Space Station (ISS) were diagnosed with eye problems that can cause reduced visual acuity. We investigate here whether spaceflight environment-associated retinal damage might be related to oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial apoptosis. Female C57BL/6 mice were flown in the space shuttle Atlantis (STS-135), and within 3-5 h of landing, the spaceflight and ground-control mice, similarly housed in animal enclosure modules (AEMs) were euthanized and their eyes were removed for analysis. Changes in expression of genes involved in oxidative stress, mitochondrial and endothelial cell biology were examined. Apoptosis in the retina was analyzed by caspase-3 immunocytochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Levels of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) protein, an oxidative specific marker for lipid peroxidation were also measured. Evaluation of spaceflight mice and AEM ground-control mice showed that expression of several genes playing central roles in regulating the mitochondria-associated apoptotic pathway were significantly altered in mouse ocular tissue after spaceflight compared to AEM ground-control mice. In addition, the mRNA levels of several genes, which are responsible for regulating the production of reactive oxygen species were also significantly up-regulated in spaceflight samples compared to AEM ground-control mice. Further more, the level of HNE protein was significantly elevated in the retina after spaceflight compared to controls. Our results also revealed that spaceflight conditions induced significant apoptosis in the retina especially inner nuclear layer (INL) and ganglion cell layer (GCL) compared to AEM ground controls. The data provided the first evidence that spaceflight conditions induce oxidative damage that results in mitochondrial apoptosis in the retina. This data suggest

  12. PAMAM dendrimers as nano carriers to investigate inflammatory responses induced by pulmonary exposure of PCB metabolites in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Wangpradit, Orarat; Adamcakova-Dodd, Andrea; Heitz, Katharina; Robertson, Larry; Thorne, Peter S; Luthe, Gregor

    2016-02-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) persist and accumulate in the ecosystem depending upon the degree of chlorination of the biphenyl rings. Airborne PCBs are especially susceptible to oxidative metabolism, yielding mono- and di-hydroxy metabolites. We have previously demonstrated that 4-chlorobiphenyl hydroquinones (4-CB-HQs) acted as cosubstrates for arachidonic acid metabolism by prostaglandin H synthase (PGHS) and resulted in an increase of prostaglandin production in vitro. In the present study, we tested the capability of 4-CB-HQ to act as a co-substrate for PGHS catalysis in vivo. BQ and 4-CB-2',5'-HQ were administered intratracheally to male Sprague-Dawley rats (2.5 μmol/kg body weight) using nanosized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers as carriers. We found that 24 h post application, PGE2 metabolites in kidney of rats treated with 4-CB-2',5'-HQ were significantly increased compared to the controls. The increase of PGE2 metabolites was correlated with increased alveolar macrophages in lung lavage fluid. The elevation of PGE2 synthesis is of great interest since it plays a crucial role in balancing homeostasis and inflammation where a chronic disturbance may increase risk of cancer. PAMAM dentrimers proved to be an effective transport medium and did not stimulate an inflammatory response themselves. PMID:26400242

  13. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces FGF21 in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Wicks, Shawna E.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Salbaum, J. Michael; Burk, David; Dubuisson, Olga S.; Mendoza, Tamra M.; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Fatty acids are the primary fuel source for skeletal muscle during most of our daily activities and impaired fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is associated with insulin resistance. We have developed a mouse model of impaired FAO by deleting carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1b specifically in skeletal muscle (Cpt1bm−/−). Cpt1bm−/− mice have increased glucose utilization and are resistant to diet induced obesity. Here we show that inhibition of mitochondrial FAO induces FGF21 expression specifically in skeletal muscle. The induction of FGF21 in Cpt1b-deficient muscle is dependent on AMPK and Akt1 signaling but independent on the stress signaling pathways. FGF21 appears to act in a paracrine manner to increase glucose uptake under low insulin conditions, but does not contribute to the resistance to diet induced obesity. PMID:27184848

  14. Field trial on glucose-induced insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein and Estonian Red dairy cows in two herds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Insulin secretion and tissue sensitivity to insulin is considered to be one of the factors controlling lipid metabolism post partum. The objective of this study was to compare glucose-induced blood insulin and metabolite responses in Estonian Holstein (EH, n = 14) and Estonian Red (ER, n = 14) cows. Methods The study was carried out using the glucose tolerance test (GTT) performed at 31 ± 1.9 days post partum during negative energy balance. Blood samples were obtained at -15, -5, 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60 min relative to infusion of 0.15 g/kg BW glucose and analysed for glucose, insulin, triglycerides (TG), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), cholesterol and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). Applying the MIXED Procedure with the SAS System the basal concentration of cholesterol, and basal concentration and concentrations at post-infusion time points for other metabolites, area under the curve (AUC) for glucose and insulin, clearance rate (CR) for glucose, and maximum increase from basal concentration for glucose and insulin were compared between breeds. Results There was a breed effect on blood NEFA (P < 0.05) and a time effect on all metabolites concentration (P < 0.01). The following differences were observed in EH compared to ER: lower blood insulin concentration 5 min after glucose infusion (P < 0.05), higher glucose concentration 20 (P < 0.01) and 30 min (P < 0.05) after infusion, and higher NEFA concentration before (P < 0.01) and 5 min after infusion (P < 0.05). Blood TG concentration in ER remained stable, while in EH there was a decrease from the basal level to the 40th min nadir (P < 0.01), followed by an increase to the 60th min postinfusion (P < 0.01). Conclusion Our results imply that glucose-induced changes in insulin concentration and metabolite responses to insulin differ between EH and ER dairy cows. PMID:20089161

  15. Untargeted metabolite profiling reveals that nitric oxide bioynthesis is an endogenous modulator of carotenoid biosynthesis in Deinococcus radiodurans and is required for extreme ionizing radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Hansler, Alex; Chen, Qiuying; Ma, Yuliang; Gross, Steven S

    2016-01-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (Drad) is the most radioresistant organism known. Although mechanisms that underlie the extreme radioresistance of Drad are incompletely defined, resistance to UV irradiation-induced killing was found to be greatly attenuated in an NO synthase (NOS) knockout strain of Drad (Δnos). We now show that endogenous NO production is also critical for protection of Drad against γ-irradiation (3000 Gy), a result of accelerated growth recovery, not protection against killing. NO-donor treatment rescued radiosensitization in Δnos Drad but did not influence radiosensitivity in wild type Drad. To discover molecular mechanisms by which endogenous NO confers radioresistance, metabolite profiling studies were performed. Untargeted LC-MS-based metabolite profiling in Drad quantified relative abundances of 1425 molecules and levels of 294 of these were altered by >5-fold (p < 0.01). Unexpectedly, these studies identified a dramatic perturbation in carotenoid biosynthetic intermediates in Δnos Drad, including a reciprocal switch in the pathway end-products from deoxydeinoxanthin to deinoxanthin. NO supplementation rescued these nos deletion-associated changes in carotenoid biosynthesis, and fully-restored radioresistance to wildtype levels. Because carotenoids were shown to be important contributors to radioprotection in Drad, our findings suggest that endogenously-produced NO serves to maintain a spectrum of carotenoids critical for Drad's ability to withstand radiation insult.

  16. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  17. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  18. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  19. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism in the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; de Castro Ghizoni, Cristiane Vizioli; Bersani Amado, Ciomar Aparecida; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar; Comar, Jurandir Fernando

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative status of the brain of arthritic rats, based mainly on the observation that arthritis induces a pronounced oxidative stress in the liver of arthritis rats and that morphological alterations have been reported to occur in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis were used. These animals presented higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the total brain homogenate (25% higher) and in the mitochondria (+55%) when compared to healthy rats. The nitrite plus nitrate contents, nitric oxide (NO) markers, were also increased in both mitochondria (+27%) and cytosol (+14%). Arthritic rats also presented higher levels of protein carbonyl groups in the total homogenate (+43%), mitochondria (+69%) and cytosol (+145%). Arthritis caused a diminution of oxygen consumption in isolated brain mitochondria only when ascorbate was the electron donor. The disease diminished the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity by 55%, but increased the transmembrane potential by 16%. The pro-oxidant enzyme xanthine oxidase was 150%, 110% and 283% higher, respectively, in the brain homogenate, mitochondria and cytosol of arthritic animals. The same occurred with the calcium-independent NO-synthase activity that was higher in the brain homogenate (90%) and cytosol (122%) of arthritic rats. The catalase activity, on the other hand, was diminished by arthritis in all cellular fractions (between 30 and 40%). It is apparent that the brain of rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis presents a pronounced oxidative stress and a significant injury to lipids and proteins, a situation that possibly contributes to the brain symptoms of the arthritis disease.

  20. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  1. Effect on hepatonephric organs, serum metabolites and oxidative stress in post-weaning piglets fed purified zearalenone-contaminated diets with or without Calibrin-Z.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S Z; Yang, Z B; Yang, W R; Wang, S J; Wang, Y; Broomhead, J; Johnston, S L; Chi, F

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the toxicity of zearalenone (ZEA) on hepatonephric organs, serum metabolites and oxidative stress of piglets and to evaluate the efficacy of Calibrin-Z (CAZ) in preventing ZEA-induced adverse effects. The experiment was conducted for 22 days using 36 piglets weaned at 21 days of age (Landrace × Yorkshire × Duroc, 18 females and 18 males; 8.84 ± 0.21 kg average body weight). Piglets of each gender were randomly allocated to the following six dietary treatments: (i) Control (basal diet only); (ii) Control + 1 g/kg CAZ; (iii) Control + 1 mg/kg ZEA; (iv) Control + 1 mg/kg ZEA + 1 g/kg CAZ; (v) Control + 1 mg/kg ZEA + 2 g/kg CAZ; (vi) Control + 1 mg/kg ZEA + 4 g/kg CAZ. Piglets were housed and fed individually for the entire experimental period. Blood samples were taken, and piglets were killed at the end of the experiment to obtain organs for physiological assessment. Results showed that piglets fed the ZEA-contaminated diet had increased (p < 0.05) activities of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatine kinase and cholinesterase, concentrations of urea, and creatinine in serum, and malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum and liver. Pigs fed the ZEA-only diet also showed reductions in serum (p < 0.05) globulin, triglycerides and high-density lipoproteins (HDL), and reductions in total superoxide dismutase (TSOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) activity in both serum and liver. Supplementation of CAZ at the dosages of 1-4 g/kg to the diet containing 1.05 mg/kg ZEA linearly increased (p < 0.05) concentrations of triglycerides and HDL in serum, activity of TSOD and GSHPx in serum and liver, but linearly reduced (p < 0.05) all tested serum enzymes and lowered (p < 0.05) the elevated concentrations of urea, and creatinine in serum, and MDA in serum and liver caused

  2. Analysis of oxidative signalling induced by ozone in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mahalingam, Ramamurthy; Jambunathan, Niranjani; Gunjan, Samir Kumar; Faustin, Enock; Weng, Hua; Ayoubi, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    We are using acute ozone as an elicitor of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) to understand oxidative signalling in Arabidopsis. Temporal patterns of ROS following a 6 h exposure to 300 nL L(-1) of ozone in ozone-sensitive Wassilewskija (Ws-0) ecotype showed a biphasic ROS burst with a smaller peak at 4 h and a larger peak at 16 h. This was accompanied by a nitric oxide (NO) burst that peaked at 9 h. An analysis of antioxidant levels showed that both ascorbate (AsA) and glutathione (GSH) were at their lowest levels, when ROS levels were high in ozone-stressed plants. Whole genome expression profiling analysis at 1, 4, 8, 12 and 24 h after initiation of ozone treatment identified 371 differentially expressed genes. Early induction of proteolysis and hormone-responsive genes indicated that an oxidative cell death pathway was triggered rapidly. Down-regulation of genes involved in carbon utilization, energy pathways and signalling suggested an inefficient defense response. Comparisons with other large-scale expression profiling studies indicated some overlap between genes induced by ethylene and ozone, and a significant overlap between genes repressed by ozone and methyl jasmonate treatment. Further, analysis of cis elements in the promoters of ozone-responsive genes also supports the view that phytohormones play a significant role in ozone-induced cell death. PMID:17080957

  3. Cordycepin prevents oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Yin, Peipei; Lu, Ye; Zhou, Zubin; Jiang, Chaolai; Liu, Yingjie; Yu, Xiaowei

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in impairment of osteogenesis and age-related osteoporosis. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there are few reports available regarding the effects of cordycepin on osteogenesis and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated the potential osteoprotective effects of cordycepin and its mechanism systematically using both in vitro model as well as in vivo mouse models. We discovered that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenesis which was rescued by cordycepin treatment in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Cordycepin exerted its protective effects partially by increasing or decreasing expression of osteogenic and osteoclastogenesis marker genes. Treatment with cordycepin increased Wnt-related genes' expression whereas supplementation of Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed its protective effects. In addition, administration of cordycepin promoted osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs by reducing oxidative stress in both ovariectomized and aged animal models. Taken together, these results support the protective effects of cordycepin on oxidative stress induced inhibition of osteogenesis by activation of Wnt pathway. PMID:26462178

  4. Cordycepin prevents oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Yin, Peipei; Lu, Ye; Zhou, Zubin; Jiang, Chaolai; Liu, Yingjie; Yu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is known to be involved in impairment of osteogenesis and age-related osteoporosis. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris that has been shown to exert antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, there are few reports available regarding the effects of cordycepin on osteogenesis and the underlying mechanism. In this study, we investigated the potential osteoprotective effects of cordycepin and its mechanism systematically using both in vitro model as well as in vivo mouse models. We discovered that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced inhibition of osteogenesis which was rescued by cordycepin treatment in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). Cordycepin exerted its protective effects partially by increasing or decreasing expression of osteogenic and osteoclastogenesis marker genes. Treatment with cordycepin increased Wnt-related genes' expression whereas supplementation of Wnt pathway inhibitor reversed its protective effects. In addition, administration of cordycepin promoted osteogenic differentiation of BM-MSCs by reducing oxidative stress in both ovariectomized and aged animal models. Taken together, these results support the protective effects of cordycepin on oxidative stress induced inhibition of osteogenesis by activation of Wnt pathway. PMID:26462178

  5. Electrotransport-induced unmixing and decomposition of ternary oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Jakyu; Yoo, Han-Ill; Martin, Manfred

    2015-03-28

    A general expectation is that in a uniform oxygen activity atmosphere, cation electrotransport induces a ternary or higher oxide, e.g., AB{sub 1+ξ}O{sub 3+δ}, to kinetically unmix unless the electrochemical mobilities of, say, A{sup 2+}and B{sup 4+} cations are identically equal, and eventually to decompose into the component oxides AO and BO{sub 2} once the extent of unmixing exceeds the stability range of its nonmolecularity ξ. It has, however, earlier been reported [Yoo et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 92, 252103 (2008)] that even a massive cation electrotransport induces BaTiO{sub 3} to neither unmix nor decompose even at a voltage far exceeding the so-called decomposition voltage U{sub d}, a measure of the standard formation free energy of the oxide (|ΔG{sub f}{sup o}| = nFU{sub d}). Here, we report that as expected, NiTiO{sub 3} unmixes at any voltage and even decomposes if the voltage applied exceeds seemingly a threshold value larger than U{sub d}. We demonstrate experimentally that the electrochemical mobilities of Ni{sup 2+} and Ti{sup 4+} should be necessarily unequal for unmixing. Also, we show theoretically that equal cation mobilities appear to be a sufficiency for BaTiO{sub 3} only for a thermodynamic reason.

  6. Anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenoside Rg1 and its metabolites ginsenoside Rh1 and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol in mice with TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Eun, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1, one of the main constituents of Panax ginseng, exhibits anti-inflammatory effect. In a preliminary study, it was observed that ginsenoside Rg1 was metabolized to 20(S)-protopanaxtriol via ginsenosides Rh1 and F1 by gut microbiota. We further investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenoside Rg1 and its metabolites in vitro and in vivo. Ginsenosides Rg1, Rh1, and 20(S)-protopanaxtriol inhibited the activation of NF-κB activation, phosphorylation of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase, and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. They also inhibited the binding of LPS to toll-like receptor 4 on the macrophages. Orally administered ginsenoside Rg1, Rh1, or 20(S)-protopanaxtriol inhibited 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colon shortening, myeloperoxidase activity, and expression of IL-1β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α in mice with TNBS-induced colitis. They did not only inhibit TNBS-induced NF-κB activation, but also restored TNBS-induced Th17/Treg imbalance. They restored IL-10 and Foxp3 expression. Moreover, they inhibited Th17 cell differentiation in vitro. Of these metabolites, in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of 20(S)-protopanaxtriol was the most potent, followed by Rh1. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 is metabolized to 20(S)-protopanaxtriol via ginsenosides Rh1 and F1 and these metabolites particularly 20(S)-protopanaxtriol, may ameliorate inflammatory disease such as colitis by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 on macrophages and restoring the Th17/Treg imbalance.

  7. Possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in the regulation of gender related differences in stress induced anxiogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Ayanabha; Gulati, Kavita; Ray, Arunabha

    2014-12-01

    Gender related differences in stress induced neurobehavioral disorders have been reported although the mechanisms involved are not yet clear. The present study investigated the role of nitric oxide, an important biomodulator in the sex related differences in stress induced anxiety like behavior in rats. Restraint stress (RS for 1 h) was used as the experimental stressor and the effects of NO modulators were assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) test in both male and female rats. No metabolites (NOx) and asymmetric dimethyl arginine (ADMA) were measured in brain homogenates of these rats for corroborative purposes. RS induced anxiogenesis in both male and female rats and such changes were greater in males as compared to females. The behavioral alterations were associated with enhanced levels of ADMA and reductions in levels of NOx in brain homogenates - the effects being greater in intensity in males as compared to females. Pretreatment with NO precursor L-arginine (500 mg/kg) reversed the RS induced behavioral and biochemical changes, while NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME (50 mg/kg) had opposite effects. Additionally, Formestane (50 mg/kg), an estrogen synthesis blocker, aggravated stress induced anxiogenesis with a corresponding increase in ADMA and decrease in NOx levels in the females. To our knowledge, this is the first report indicating the involvement of ADMA, an endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor in stress induced neurobehavioral changes. Furthermore, it is also evident that nitric oxide and its interactions with estrogens play a crucial modulatory role in the differential anxiogenic response to stress among males and females.

  8. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles against lead-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Asieh; Sharifi, Ali Mohammad; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Najafi, Rezvan; Baeeri, Maryam; Rayegan, Samira; Cheshmehnour, Jamshid; Hassani, Shokoufeh; Bayrami, Zahra; Safa, Majid

    2015-03-01

    Due to numerous industrial applications, lead has caused widespread pollution in the environment; it seems that the central nervous system (CNS) is the main target for lead in the human body. Oxidative stress and programmed cell death in the CNS have been assumed as two mechanisms related to neurotoxicity of lead. Cerium oxide (CeO2) and yttrium oxide (Y2O3) nanoparticles have recently shown antioxidant effects, particularly when used together, through scavenging the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) required for cell apoptosis. We looked into the neuroprotective effects of the combinations of these nanoparticles against acute lead-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus. We used five groups in this study: control, lead, CeO2 nanoparticles + lead, Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead, and CeO2 and Y2O3 nanoparticles + lead. Nanoparticles of CeO2 (1000 mg/kg) and Y2O3 (230 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally during 2 days prior to intraperitoneal injection of the lead (25 mg/kg for 3 days). At the end of the treatments, oxidative stress markers, antioxidant enzymes activity, and apoptosis indexes were investigated. The results demonstrated that pretreatments with CeO2 and/or Y2O3 nanoparticles recovered lead-caused oxidative stress markers (ROS, lipid peroxidation, and total thiol molecules) and apoptosis indexes (Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3 protein expression). Besides, these nanoparticles reduced the activities of lead-induced superoxide dismutase and catalase as well as the ADP/ATP ratio. Interestingly, the best recovery resulted from the compound of these nanoparticles. Based on these outcomes, it appears that this combination may potentially be beneficial for protection against lead-caused acute toxicity in the brain through improving the oxidative stress-mediated programmed cell death pathway.

  9. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    McLean, Lancelot S; Watkins, Cheri N; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E; Livingston, W Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-05-18

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action.

  10. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Ligand 5F 203 Induces Oxidative Stress That Triggers DNA Damage in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Lancelot S.; Watkins, Cheri N.; Campbell, Petreena; Zylstra, Dain; Rowland, Leah; Amis, Louisa H.; Scott, Lia; Babb, Crystal E.; Livingston, W. Joel; Darwanto, Agus; Davis, Willie L.; Senthil, Maheswari; Sowers, Lawrence C.; Brantley, Eileen

    2015-01-01

    Breast tumors often show profound sensitivity to exogenous oxidative stress. Investigational agent 2-(4-amino-3-methylphenyl)-5-fluorobenzothiazole (5F 203) induces aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated DNA damage in certain breast cancer cells. Since AhR agonists often elevate intracellular oxidative stress, we hypothesize that 5F 203 increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) to induce DNA damage, which thwarts breast cancer cell growth. We found that 5F 203 induced single-strand break formation. 5F 203 enhanced oxidative DNA damage that was specific to breast cancer cells sensitive to its cytotoxic actions, as it did not increase oxidative DNA damage or ROS formation in nontumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells. In contrast, AhR agonist and procarcinogen benzo[a]pyrene and its metabolite, 1,6-benzo[a]pyrene quinone, induced oxidative DNA damage and ROS formation, respectively, in MCF-10A cells. In sensitive breast cancer cells, 5F 203 activated ROS-responsive kinases: c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (p38). AhR antagonists (alpha-naphthoflavone, CH223191) or antioxidants (N-acetyl-l-cysteine, EUK-134) attenuated 5F 203-mediated JNK and p38 activation, depending on the cell type. Pharmacological inhibition of AhR, JNK, or p38 attenuated 5F 203-mediated increases in intracellular ROS, apoptosis, and single-strand break formation. 5F 203 induced the expression of cytoglobin, an oxidative stress-responsive gene and a putative tumor suppressor, which was diminished with AhR, JNK, or p38 inhibition. Additionally, 5F 203-mediated increases in ROS production and cytoglobin were suppressed in AHR100 cells (AhR ligand-unresponsive MCF-7 breast cancer cells). Our data demonstrate 5F 203 induces ROS-mediated DNA damage at least in part via AhR, JNK, or p38 activation and modulates the expression of oxidative stress-responsive genes such as cytoglobin to confer its anticancer action. PMID:25781201

  11. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Yasuko

    2015-12-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions.

  12. Nitric oxide in liver fibrosis: The role of inducible nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in hepatic cells in pathological conditions. Its induction is involved in the development of liver fibrosis, and thus iNOS could be a therapeutic target for liver fibrosis. This review summarizes the role of iNOS in liver fibrosis, focusing on 1) iNOS biology, 2) iNOS-expressing liver cells, 3) iNOS-related therapeutic strategies, and 4) future directions. PMID:26770919

  13. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  14. Controllably Inducing and Modeling Optical Response from Graphene Oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Nicholas; Naumov, Anton

    Graphene, a novel 2-dimensional sp2-hybridized allotrope of Carbon, has unique electrical and mechanical properties. While it is naturally a highly conductive zero band gap semiconductor, graphene does not exhibit optical emission. It has been shown that functionalization with oxygen-containing groups elicits an opening of band gap in graphene. In this work, we aim to induce an optical response in graphene via controlled oxidation, and then explore potential origins of its photoluminescence through mathematical modeling. We employ timed ozone treatment of initially non-fluorescent reduced graphene oxide (RGO) to produce graphene oxide (GO) with specific optical properties. Oxidized material exhibits substantial changes in the absorption spectra and a broad photoluminescence feature, centered at 532 nm, which suggests the appearance of a band gap. We then explore a number of possible mechanisms for the origin of GO photoluminescence via PM3 and ab initio calculations on a functionalized single sheet of graphene. By adjusting modeling parameters to fit experimentally obtained optical transition energies we estimate the size of the sp2 graphitic regions in GO and the arrangement of functional groups that could be responsible for the observed emission.

  15. Inducible beta-oxidation pathway in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Kionka, C; Kunau, W H

    1985-01-01

    An inducible beta-oxidation system was demonstrated in a particulate fraction from Neurospora crassa. The activities of all individual beta-oxidation enzymes were enhanced in cells after a shift from a sucrose to an acetate medium. The induction was even more pronounced in transfer to a medium containing oleate as sole carbon and energy source. Since an acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) dehydrogenase was detected instead of acyl-CoA oxidase, the former enzyme seems to catalyze the first step of the beta-oxidation sequence in N. crassa. After isopycnic centrifugation in a linear sucrose gradient, the intracellular organelles housing the fatty acid degradation pathway cosedimented (1.21 g/cm3) with the glyoxylate bypass enzymes isocitrate lyase and malate synthase and were clearly resolved from both mitochondrial marker enzymes (1.19 g/cm3) and catalase (1.26 g/cm3). On the basis of biochemical as well as morphological properties, these particles from N. crassa have recently been designated as glyoxysome-like particles (G. Wanner and T. Theimer, Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 386:269-284, 1982). The failure to detect catalase, urate oxidase, and acyl-CoA oxidase indicate that these glyoxysome-like microbodies in N. crassa lack peroxisomal function and thus are clearly different from the various microbodies reported so far to contain a beta-oxidation pathway. PMID:3155714

  16. Carbofuran-induced oxidative stress in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Rai, Devendra K; Sharma, Bechan

    2007-09-01

    Chronic exposure to carbofuran, a carbamate pesticide, via oral administration has been reported to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat brain. However, information regarding the effect of short-term intraperitoneal (i.p.) carbofuran intoxication on oxidative stress is lacking. In the present study, the effect of carbofuran on oxidative indices in brain of Wistar rats has been determined by exposing the animals to three subacute concentrations (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight) equivalent to 10, 20, and 40%, respectively, of its LD50 (i.p.) for 24 h. Rat liver has been used as a positive control. The results demonstrated that carbofuran treatment at the 3 concentrations tested caused significant increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) by 12.50, 34.38, and 59.38%, respectively. The increased oxidative stress at same pesticide concentrations significantly induced activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in rat brain; the impact on catalase being more marked only at high-pesticide doses (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg body weight). Carbofuran also caused reduction in protein content of rat tissues tested. Rat brain was more severely affected by carbofuran than liver. The results clearly demonstrated that i.p. administration of carbofuran accelerated oxidative stress in rat brain in a dose-dependent manner.

  17. Dietary vanadium induces oxidative stress in the intestine of broilers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuanxin; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Wang, Kangping; Cui, Wei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine oxidative stress induced by dietary vanadium in the mucosa of different parts of intestine including duodenum, jejunum, ileum, and cecal tonsil. A total of 420 1-day-old avian broilers were divided into six groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 mg/kg vanadium as ammonium metavanadate. During the experimental period of 42 days, oxidative stress parameters were determined for both control and experimental groups. The results showed that malondialdehyde content was significantly higher (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) in 30, 45, and 60 mg/kg groups than in control group. In contrast, the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase, and ability to inhibit hydroxyl radical, and glutathione hormone content were significantly decreased (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) mainly in 45 and 60 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of control group. However, the abovementioned oxidative stress parameters were not significantly changed (p > 0.05) in 5 and 15 mg/kg groups. It was concluded that dietary vanadium in excess of 30 mg/kg could cause obvious oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa, which could impact the antioxidant function of intestinal tract in broilers.

  18. Nitric oxide ameliorates zinc oxide nanoparticles-induced phytotoxicity in rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Chao; Yin, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiu-Ling; Hu, Wen-Jun; Simon, Martin; Shen, Zhi-Jun; Xiao, Qiang; Chu, Cheng-Cai; Peng, Xin-Xiang; Zheng, Hai-Lei

    2015-10-30

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been found to function in enhancing plant tolerance to various environmental stresses. However, role of NO in relieving zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-induced phytotoxicity remains unknown. Here, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a NO donor) was used to investigate the possible roles and the regulatory mechanisms of NO in counteracting ZnO NPs toxicity in rice seedlings. Our results showed that 10 μM SNP significantly inhibited the appearance of ZnO NP toxicity symptoms. SNP addition significantly reduced Zn accumulation, reactive oxygen species production and lipid peroxidation caused by ZnO NPs. The protective role of SNP in reducing ZnO NPs-induced oxidative damage is closely related to NO-mediated antioxidant system. A decrease in superoxide dismutase activity, as well as an increase in reduced glutathione content and peroxidase, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activity was observed under SNP and ZnO NPs combined treatments, compared to ZnO NPs treatment alone. The relative transcript abundance of corresponding antioxidant genes exhibited a similar change. The role of NO in enhancing ZnO NPs tolerance was further confirmed by genetic analysis using a NO excess mutant (noe1) and an OsNOA1-silenced plant (noa1) of rice. Together, this study provides the first evidence indicating that NO functions in ameliorating ZnO NPs-induced phytotoxicity.

  19. Endostatin induces acute endothelial nitric oxide and prostacyclin release

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chunying; Harris, M. Brennan; Venema, Virginia J.; Venema, Richard C. . E-mail: rvenema@mcg.edu

    2005-04-15

    Chronic exposure to endostatin (ES) blocks endothelial cell (EC) proliferation, and migration and induces EC apoptosis thereby inhibiting angiogenesis. Nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin (PGI{sub 2}), in contrast, play important roles in promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we examined the acute effects of ES on endothelial NO and PGI{sub 2} production. Unexpectedly, a cGMP reporter cell assay showed that ES-induced acute endothelial NO release in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). Enzyme immunoassay showed that ES also induced an acute increase in PGI{sub 2} production in BAECs. These results were confirmed by ex vivo vascular ring studies that showed vascular relaxation in response to ES. Immunoblot analysis showed that ES stimulated acute phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser116, Ser617, Ser635, and Ser1179, and dephosphorylation at Thr497 in BAECs, events associated with eNOS activation. Short-term exposure of EC to ES, therefore, unlike long-term exposure which is anti-angiogenic, may be pro-angiogenic.

  20. Preventive effect of gomisin J from Schisandra chinensis on angiotensin II-induced hypertension via an increased nitric oxide bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byeong Hyeok; Lee, Seung Jin; Choi, Young Whan; Park, So Youn; Kim, Chi Dae

    2015-03-01

    Gomisin J (GJ) is a small molecular weight lignan found in Schisandra chinensis and has been demonstrated to have vasodilatory activity. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of GJ on blood pressure (BP) in angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced hypertensive mice. In addition, we determined the relative potencies of gomisin A (GA) and GJ with respect to vasodilatory activity and antihypertensive effects. C57/BL6 mice infused s.c. with Ang II (2 μg kg(-1) min(-1) for 2 weeks) showed an increase in BP and a decrease in plasma nitric oxide (NO) metabolites. In the thoracic aortas of Ang II-induced hypertensive mice, a decrease in vascular NO was accompanied by an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Furthermore, these alterations in BP, plasma concentrations of NO metabolites and in the vascular productions of NO and ROS in Ang II-treated mice were reversed by the co-administration of GJ (1 and 3 μg kg(-1) min(-1)). In in vitro studies, Ang II decreased the cellular concentration of NO, which was accompanied by a reduction in phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and an increase in ROS production. These eNOS phosphorylation and ROS production changes in Ang II-treated cells were also reversed by GJ pretreatment (0-3 μg ml(-1)). Interestingly, the vasodilatory and antihypertensive effects of GJ were more prominent than those of GA. Collectively, an increase in BP in mice treated with Ang II was markedly attenuated by GJ, which was attributed to the preservations of vascular NO bioavailability and eNOS function, and to the inhibition of ROS production in Ang II-induced hypertensive mice.

  1. Radiation induced leakage current and stress induced leakage current in ultra-thin gate oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ceschia, M.; Paccagnella, A. |; Cester, A.; Scarpa, A.; Ghidini, G.

    1998-12-01

    Low-field leakage current has been measured in thin oxides after exposure to ionizing radiation. This Radiation Induced Leakage Current (RILC) can be described as an inelastic tunneling process mediated by neutral traps in the oxide, with an energy loss of about 1 eV. The neutral trap distribution is influenced by the oxide field applied during irradiation, thus indicating that the precursors of the neutral defects are charged, likely being defects associated to trapped holes. The maximum leakage current is found under zero-field condition during irradiation, and it rapidly decreases as the field is enhanced, due to a displacement of the defect distribution across the oxide towards the cathodic interface. The RILC kinetics are linear with the cumulative dose, in contrast with the power law found on electrically stressed devices.

  2. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Shawna E.; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Fuller, Scott E.; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2015-01-01

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity. PMID:26056297

  3. Nitric oxide mediates caerulein-induced suppression of locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Volke, V; Soosaar, A; Kõks, S; Bourin, M; Männistö, P T; Vasar, E

    1996-08-01

    Caerulein, a non-selective agonist of cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors, is shown to suppress locomotor activity in rodents via stimulation of CCK(A) receptors. In the present study we examined the possible involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in caerulein-induced hypolocomotion in rats. Caerulein (10 microg/kg) markedly decreased the horizontal and vertical components of locomotor activity in rats measured in dark motility boxes. Pretreatment with a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), at 5 mg/kg i.p., abolished the inhibiting action of caerulein on the horizontal activity, but did not affect the reduced frequency of rearing. The other doses of L-NAME (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg) were ineffective against caerulein. As L-NAME at this dose range does not stimulate locomotor activity, it is likely that NO is involved in the motor suppressant effect of systemically administered caerulein.

  4. Oxidation-induced contraction and strengthening of boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicarlo, J. A.; Wagner, T. C.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to measure and understand the physical and mechanical effects that occur in boron fibers during and after thermal treatment in a controlled oxygen argon gaseous mixture. Of principal concern was the optimization of this treatment as a secondary processing method for significantly improving fiber tensile strength. Strengthening was accomplished by an oxidation induced axial contraction of the fiber and a resulting axial compression of strength limiting flaws within the fiber's tungsten boride core. Various physical observations were used to develop mechanistic models for oxidation, contraction, and flow formation. Processing guidelines are discussed for possibly exceeding the 5.5 GN/sq m strength limit and also for achieving fiber strengthening during application of boron containing diffusion barrier coatings.

  5. L-Cysteine and glutathione restore the reduction of rat hippocampal Na+, K+-ATPase activity induced by aspartame metabolites.

    PubMed

    Simintzi, Irene; Schulpis, Kleopatra H; Angelogianni, Panagoula; Liapi, Charis; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2007-07-31

    Studies have implicated aspartame (ASP) ingestion in neurological problems. The aim of this study was to evaluate hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities after incubation with ASP or each of ASP metabolites, phenylalanine (Phe), methanol (MeOH) and aspartic acid (asp) separately. Suckling rat hippocampal homogenates or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase were incubated with ASP metabolites. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities were measured spectrophotometrically. Incubation of hippocampal or pure Na(+),K(+)-ATPase with ASP concentrations (expected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)) after ASP consumption of 34, 150 or 200mg/kg resulted in hippocampal enzyme activity reduction of 26%, 50% or 59%, respectively, whereas pure enzyme was remarkably stimulated. Moreover, incubation with hippocampal homogenate of each one of the corresponding in the CSF ASP metabolites related to the intake of common, high/abuse doses of the sweetener, inhibited Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, while pure enzyme was activated. Hippocampal Mg(2+)-ATPase remained unaltered. Addition of l-cysteine (cys) or reduced glutathione (GSH) in ASP mixtures, related with high/toxic doses of the sweetener, completely or partially restored the inactivated membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, whereas the activated pure enzyme activity returned to normal. CSF concentrations of ASP metabolites related to common, abuse/toxic doses of the additive significantly reduced rat hippocampal Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, whereas pure enzyme was activated. Cys or GSH completely or partially restored both enzyme activities.

  6. Effects of Standardised Fermented Papaya Gel on Clinical Symptoms, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: An Open Randomised Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Kharaeva, Zaira F; Zhanimova, Lyana R; Mustafaev, Magomet Sh; De Luca, Chiara; Mayer, Wolfgang; Chung Sheun Thai, Jeffrey; Tiew Siok Tuan, Rebecca; Korkina, Liudmila G

    2016-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of topical administration of standardised fermented papaya gel (SFPG), known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, versus conventional therapy was evaluated in a group of 84 patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis, randomly assigned to control group (n = 45) undergoing traditional pharmacologic/surgical protocols or to experimental group (n = 39), additionally treated with intragingival pocket SFPG (7 g) applications (15 min daily for 10 days). Patients undergoing SFPG treatment showed significant (P < 0.05), durable improvement of three major clinical indices of disease severity: reduced bleeding (day 7), plaque and gingival conditions (day 14), and consistent gingival pocket depth reduction (day 45). Proinflammatory nitric oxide metabolites reached normal values in plasma (day 14) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) at day 45 with SFPG applications compared to controls that did not reach normalisation. Levels of highly increased proinflammatory (IL-1B, IL-6) and suppressed anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines normalised in the SFPG group by days 14 (plasma) and 45 (GCF), but never in the control group. Although not acting directly as antibiotic, SFPG acted in synergy with human granulocytes blocking adaptive catalase induction in S. aureus in response to granulocyte-derived oxidative stress, thus enhancing intracellular bacterial killing. PMID:26977121

  7. Effects of Standardised Fermented Papaya Gel on Clinical Symptoms, Inflammatory Cytokines, and Nitric Oxide Metabolites in Patients with Chronic Periodontitis: An Open Randomised Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Kharaeva, Zaira F.; Zhanimova, Lyana R.; Mustafaev, Magomet Sh.; De Luca, Chiara; Mayer, Wolfgang; Chung Sheun Thai, Jeffrey; Tiew Siok Tuan, Rebecca; Korkina, Liudmila G.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of topical administration of standardised fermented papaya gel (SFPG), known to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, versus conventional therapy was evaluated in a group of 84 patients with moderate-to-severe periodontitis, randomly assigned to control group (n = 45) undergoing traditional pharmacologic/surgical protocols or to experimental group (n = 39), additionally treated with intragingival pocket SFPG (7 g) applications (15 min daily for 10 days). Patients undergoing SFPG treatment showed significant (P < 0.05), durable improvement of three major clinical indices of disease severity: reduced bleeding (day 7), plaque and gingival conditions (day 14), and consistent gingival pocket depth reduction (day 45). Proinflammatory nitric oxide metabolites reached normal values in plasma (day 14) and gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) at day 45 with SFPG applications compared to controls that did not reach normalisation. Levels of highly increased proinflammatory (IL-1B, IL-6) and suppressed anti-inflammatory (IL-10) cytokines normalised in the SFPG group by days 14 (plasma) and 45 (GCF), but never in the control group. Although not acting directly as antibiotic, SFPG acted in synergy with human granulocytes blocking adaptive catalase induction in S. aureus in response to granulocyte-derived oxidative stress, thus enhancing intracellular bacterial killing. PMID:26977121

  8. Role of Oxidative Damage in Radiation-Induced Bone Loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Alwood, Joshua S.; Limoli, Charles L.; Globus, Ruth K.

    2014-01-01

    During prolonged spaceflight, astronauts are exposed to both microgravity and space radiation, and are at risk for increased skeletal fragility due to bone loss. Evidence from rodent experiments demonstrates that both microgravity and ionizing radiation can cause bone loss due to increased bone-resorbing osteoclasts and decreased bone-forming osteoblasts, although the underlying molecular mechanisms for these changes are not fully understood. We hypothesized that excess reactive oxidative species (ROS), produced by conditions that simulate spaceflight, alter the tight balance between osteoclast and osteoblast activities, leading to accelerated skeletal remodeling and culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used the MCAT mouse model; these transgenic mice over-express the human catalase gene targeted to mitochondria, the major organelle contributing free radicals. Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts reactive species, hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. This animal model was selected as it displays extended lifespan, reduced cardiovascular disease and reduced central nervous system radio-sensitivity, consistent with elevated anti-oxidant activity conferred by the transgene. We reasoned that mice overexpressing catalase in mitochondria of osteoblast and osteoclast lineage cells would be protected from the bone loss caused by simulated spaceflight. Over-expression of human catalase localized to mitochondria caused various skeletal phenotypic changes compared to WT mice; this includes greater bone length, decreased cortical bone area and moment of inertia, and indications of altered microarchitecture. These findings indicate mitochondrial ROS are important for normal bone-remodeling and skeletal integrity. Catalase over-expression did not fully protect skeletal tissue from structural decrements caused by simulated spaceflight; however there was significant protection in terms of cellular oxidative damage (MDA levels) to the skeletal tissue. Furthermore, we

  9. Hyperoside Induces Endogenous Antioxidant System to Alleviate Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Han, Xia; Piao, Mei Jing; Oh, Min Chang; Fernando, Pattage Madushan Dilhara Jayatissa; Kang, Kyoung Ah; Ryu, Yea Seong; Jung, Uhee; Kim, In Gyu; Hyun, Jin Won

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hyperoside, a flavonoid which is mainly found in Hypericum perforatum L., has many biological effects. One of the most important effects is to prevent the oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its effect are not fully understood. Oxidative stress is implicated in the occurrence of various physical diseases. A wide array of enzymatic antioxidant defense systems include NADH: quinone oxidoreductase 1, superoxide dismutase, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). In the present study, the protective effects of hyperoside against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human lens epithelial cells, HLE-B3, were investigated in terms of HO-1 induction. Methods: The protein and mRNA expressions of HO-1 were examined by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase-PCR assays, respectively. To evaluate the ability of hyperoside to activate nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), Western blotting and electrophoretic mobility shift assay were performed with nuclear extracts prepared from HLE-B3 cells treated with hyperoside. The activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), the upstream kinase of Nrf2 signaling, was monitored by Western blot analysis. The protective effect of hyperoside in HLE-B3 cells against hydrogen peroxide was performed by MTT assay. Results: Hyperoside increased both the mRNA and protein expression of HO-1 in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, hyperoside elevated the level of of Nrf2 and its antioxidant response element-binding activity, which was modulated by upstream of ERK. Moreover, it activated ERK and restored cell viability which was decreased by hydrogen peroxide. Conclusions: Hyperoside is an effective compound to protect cells against oxidative stress via HO-1 induction. PMID:27051648

  10. Oxidant conditioning protects cartilage from mechanically induced damage.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Prem; Hecht, Benjamin A; Pedersen, Douglas R; Lavery, Matthew R; Maynard, Jerry; Buckwalter, Joseph A; Martin, James A

    2010-07-01

    Articular cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis has been linked to abnormal mechanical stresses that are known to cause chondrocyte apoptosis and metabolic derangement in in vitro models. Evidence implicating oxidative damage as the immediate cause of these harmful effects suggests that the antioxidant defenses of chondrocytes might influence their tolerance for mechanical injury. Based on evidence that antioxidant defenses in many cell types are stimulated by moderate oxidant exposure, we hypothesized that oxidant preconditioning would reduce acute chondrocyte death and proteoglycan depletion in cartilage explants after exposure to abnormal mechanical stresses. Porcine cartilage explants were treated every 48 h with tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (tBHP) at nonlethal concentrations (25, 100, 250, and 500 microM) for a varying number of times (one, two, or four) prior to a bout of unconfined axial compression (5 MPa, 1 Hz, 1800 cycles). When compared with untreated controls, tBHP had significant positive effects on post-compression viability, lactate production, and proteoglycan losses. Overall, the most effective regime was 100 microM tBHP applied four times. RNA analysis revealed significant effects of 100 microM tBHP on gene expression. Catalase, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), and glyceraldehyde 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were significantly increased relative to untreated controls in explants treated four times with 100 microM tBHP, a regime that also resulted in a significant decrease in matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) expression. These findings demonstrate that repeated exposure of cartilage to sublethal concentrations of peroxide can moderate the acute effects of mechanical stress, a conclusion supported by evidence of peroxide-induced changes in gene expression that could render chondrocytes more resistant to oxidative damage. PMID:20058262

  11. Apiaceous Vegetable Consumption Decreases PhIP-Induced DNA Adducts and Increases Methylated PhIP Metabolites in the Urine Metabolome in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Gallaher, Daniel D; Chen, Chi; Yao, Dan; Trudo, Sabrina P

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heterocyclic aromatic amines, such as 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), are carcinogenic compounds produced during heating of protein-containing foods. Apiaceous vegetables inhibit PhIP-activating enzymes, whereas cruciferous vegetables induce both PhIP-activating and -detoxifying enzymes. Objective: We investigated the effects of these vegetables, either alone or combined, on PhIP metabolism and colonic DNA adduct formation in rats. Methods: Male Wistar rats were fed cruciferous vegetables (21%, wt:wt), apiaceous vegetables (21%, wt:wt), or a combination of both vegetables (10.5% wt:wt of each). Negative and positive control groups were fed an AIN-93G diet. After 6 d, all groups received an intraperitoneal injection of PhIP (10 mg · kg body weight−1) except for the negative control group, which received only vehicle. Urine was collected for 24 h after the injection for LC–tandem mass spectrometry metabolomic analyses. On day 7, rats were killed and tissues processed. Results: Compared with the positive control, cruciferous vegetables increased the activity of hepatic PhIP-activating enzymes [39.5% and 45.1% for cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 (P = 0.0006) and CYP1A2 (P < 0.0001), respectively] and of uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase 1A (PhIP-detoxifying) by 24.5% (P = 0.0267). Apiaceous vegetables did not inhibit PhIP-activating enzymes, yet reduced colonic PhIP-DNA adducts by 20.4% (P = 0.0496). Metabolomic analyses indicated that apiaceous vegetables increased the relative abundance of urinary methylated PhIP metabolites. The sum of these methylated metabolites inversely correlated with colonic PhIP-DNA adducts (r = −0.43, P = 0.01). We detected a novel methylated urinary PhIP metabolite and demonstrated that methylated metabolites are produced in the human liver S9 fraction. Conclusions: Apiaceous vegetables did not inhibit the activity of PhIP-activating enzymes in rats, suggesting that the reduction in Ph

  12. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Yu, Yingchun

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.

  13. Secondhand smoke exposure induces acutely airway acidification and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kostikas, Konstantinos; Minas, Markos; Nikolaou, Eftychia; Papaioannou, Andriana I; Liakos, Panagiotis; Gougoura, Sofia; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Dinas, Petros C; Metsios, Giorgos S; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Flouris, Andreas D; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that secondhand smoke induces lung function impairment and increases proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute effects of secondhand smoke on airway acidification and airway oxidative stress in never-smokers. In a randomized controlled cross-over trial, 18 young healthy never-smokers were assessed at baseline and 0, 30, 60, 120, 180 and 240 min after one-hour secondhand smoke exposure at bar/restaurant levels. Exhaled NO and CO measurements, exhaled breath condensate collection (for pH, H(2)O(2) and NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) measurements) and spirometry were performed at all time-points. Secondhand smoke exposure induced increases in serum cotinine and exhaled CO that persisted until 240 min. Exhaled breath condensate pH decreased immediately after exposure (p < 0.001) and returned to baseline by 180 min, whereas H(2)O(2) increased at 120 min and remained increased at 240 min (p = 0.001). No changes in exhaled NO and NO(2)/NO(3) were observed, while decreases in FEV(1) (p < 0.001) and FEV(1)/FVC (p < 0.001) were observed after exposure and returned to baseline by 180 min. A 1-h exposure to secondhand smoke induced airway acidification and increased airway oxidative stress, accompanied by significant impairment of lung function. Despite the reversal in EBC pH and lung function, airway oxidative stress remained increased 4 h after the exposure. Clinical trial registration number (EudraCT): 2009-013545-28.

  14. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.; Yu, Yingchun; Aschner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterations in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 hours following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 µM Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F2-IsoPs and PGE2 in adult mouse brain 24 hours following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19607852

  15. Chemical Elicitor-Induced Modulation of Antioxidant Metabolism and Enhancement of Secondary Metabolite Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Scrophularia kakudensis Franch

    PubMed Central

    Manivannan, Abinaya; Soundararajan, Prabhakaran; Park, Yoo Gyeong; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Scrophularia kakudensis is an important medicinal plant with pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. To develop a sustainable source of naturaceuticals with vital therapeutic importance, a cell suspension culture was established in S. kakudensis for the first time. Friable calli were induced from the leaf explants cultured on a Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing 3.0 mg·L−1 6-benzyladenine (BA) in a combination with 2 mg·L−1 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). From the callus cultures, a cell suspension culture was initiated and the cellular differentiation was investigated. In addition, the effect of biotic elicitors such as methyl jasmonate (MeJa), salicylic acid (SA), and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the accumulation of secondary metabolites and antioxidant properties was demonstrated. Among the elicitors, the MeJa elicited the accumulation of total phenols, flavonoids, and acacetin, a flavonoid compound with multiple pharmaceutical values. Similarly, the higher concentrations of the MeJa significantly modulated the activities of antioxidant enzymes and enhanced the scavenging potentials of free radicals of cell suspension extracts. Overall, the outcomes of this study can be utilized for the large scale production of pharmaceutically important secondary metabolites from S. kakudensis through cell suspension cultures. PMID:26999126

  16. Association Between Variants in Arsenic (+3 Oxidation State) Methyltranserase (AS3MT) and Urinary Metabolites of Inorganic Arsenic: Role of Exposure Level.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaofan; Drobná, Zuzana; Voruganti, V Saroja; Barron, Keri; González-Horta, Carmen; Sánchez-Ramírez, Blanca; Ballinas-Casarrubias, Lourdes; Cerón, Roberto Hernández; Morales, Damián Viniegra; Terrazas, Francisco A Baeza; Ishida, María C; Gutiérrez-Torres, Daniela S; Saunders, R Jesse; Crandell, Jamie; Fry, Rebecca C; Loomis, Dana; García-Vargas, Gonzalo G; Del Razo, Luz M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Mendez, Michelle A

    2016-09-01

    Variants in AS3MT, the gene encoding arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltranserase, have been shown to influence patterns of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism. Several studies have suggested that capacity to metabolize iAs may vary depending on levels of iAs exposure. However, it is not known whether the influence of variants in AS3MT on iAs metabolism also vary by level of exposure. We investigated, in a population of Mexican adults exposed to drinking water As, whether associations between 7 candidate variants in AS3MT and urinary iAs metabolites were consistent with prior studies, and whether these associations varied depending on the level of exposure. Overall, associations between urinary iAs metabolites and AS3MT variants were consistent with the literature. Referent genotypes, defined as the genotype previously associated with a higher percentage of urinary dimethylated As (DMAs%), were associated with significant increases in the DMAs% and ratio of DMAs to monomethylated As (MAs), and significant reductions in MAs% and iAs%. For 3 variants, associations between genotypes and iAs metabolism were significantly stronger among subjects exposed to water As >50 versus ≤50 ppb (water As X genotype interaction P < .05). In contrast, for 1 variant (rs17881215), associations were significantly stronger at exposures ≤50 ppb. Results suggest that iAs exposure may influence the extent to which several AS3MT variants affect iAs metabolism. The variants most strongly associated with iAs metabolism-and perhaps with susceptibility to iAs-associated disease-may vary in settings with exposure level. PMID:27370415

  17. Absorption of nicotine induces oxidative stress among bidi workers.

    PubMed

    Swami, S; Suryakar, A N; Katkam, R V; Kumbar, K M

    2006-01-01

    Chronic exposure to tobacco dust causes nasal inhalation and cutaneous absorption of tobacco alkaloids especially nicotine, therefore the considerable evidences showed that workers employed in bidi industries are at risk of cancer, lung diseases and other many health related common problems. Many references revealed that tobacco dust exposure induces mutations, damage to DNA etc. which are supposed to be the consequences of free radical generation. In present study attempt have been made to evaluate the status of oxidants and antioxidants and their relation with nicotine. 90 bidi workers were screened for serum lipid peroxide (MDA) and serum nitric oxide (NO*) as oxidant and erythrocytic-Superoxide Dismutase (RBC-SOD), Vitamin-C as antioxidant. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and urinary cotinine were also measured. These bidi workers were further divided in 3 groups, Group 1, 11 and III exposed to tobacco dust for about 10 to 14 yrs, 15 to 19 yrs and 20 to 24 yrs of exposure respectively. Highly significant excretion of Urinary cotinine was found in all groups of bidi workers as compared with control (p < 0.001). The levels of MDA, and NO* were found to be significantly elevated in all the three groups with progression of exposure, than the control (p < 0.001), where as the levels of RBC-SOD, Vitamin-C and TAC were significantly decreased in all the three groups as compared with controls (p < 0.001). From our findings it is evident that nicotine absorption might contribute to the disturbed oxidant and antioxidant balance leading to oxidative stress. PMID:17444052

  18. Development, validation and application of a comprehensive stereoselective LC/MS-MS assay for bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Flaker, Alicia M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2016-08-01

    A stereoselective assay was developed for the quantification of bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites (16 analytes total) in human urine. Initially, authentic glucuronide standards obtained from commercial sources were found to be incorrectly labeled with regard to stereochemistry; the correct stereochemistry was unequivocally reassigned. A trifurcated urine sample preparation and analysis procedure was employed for the stereoselective analysis of bupropion, hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and threohydrobupropion enantiomers, and hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers in urine. Method 1 stereoselectively analyzed bupropion (R and S), and unconjugated free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R), and threohydrobupropion (1R,2R and 1S,2S) using chiral chromatography with an α1-acid glycoprotein column. Because no hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide standards were commercially available, method 2 stereoselectively analyzed total hydroxybupropion aglycones (R,R and S,S-hydroxybupropion) after urine hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase. Hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide (R,R and S,S) urine concentrations were calculated as the difference between total and free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S) concentrations. Due to incomplete β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers, method 3 stereoselectively analyzed intact erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers using C18 column chromatography. All analytes were quantified by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The assay was fully validated over analyte-specific concentrations. Intra- and inter assay precision were within 15% for each analyte. The limits of quantification for bupropion (R and S), hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), threohydrobupropion (1S,2S and 1R,2R), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R

  19. Development, validation and application of a comprehensive stereoselective LC/MS-MS assay for bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Teitelbaum, Aaron M; Flaker, Alicia M; Kharasch, Evan D

    2016-08-01

    A stereoselective assay was developed for the quantification of bupropion and oxidative, reductive, and glucuronide metabolites (16 analytes total) in human urine. Initially, authentic glucuronide standards obtained from commercial sources were found to be incorrectly labeled with regard to stereochemistry; the correct stereochemistry was unequivocally reassigned. A trifurcated urine sample preparation and analysis procedure was employed for the stereoselective analysis of bupropion, hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion, and threohydrobupropion enantiomers, and hydroxybupropion, erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers in urine. Method 1 stereoselectively analyzed bupropion (R and S), and unconjugated free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R), and threohydrobupropion (1R,2R and 1S,2S) using chiral chromatography with an α1-acid glycoprotein column. Because no hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide standards were commercially available, method 2 stereoselectively analyzed total hydroxybupropion aglycones (R,R and S,S-hydroxybupropion) after urine hydrolysis by β-glucuronidase. Hydroxybupropion β-d-glucuronide (R,R and S,S) urine concentrations were calculated as the difference between total and free hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S) concentrations. Due to incomplete β-glucuronidase hydrolysis of erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers, method 3 stereoselectively analyzed intact erythrohydrobupropion and threohydrobupropion β-d-glucuronide diastereomers using C18 column chromatography. All analytes were quantified by positive ion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The assay was fully validated over analyte-specific concentrations. Intra- and inter assay precision were within 15% for each analyte. The limits of quantification for bupropion (R and S), hydroxybupropion (R,R and S,S), threohydrobupropion (1S,2S and 1R,2R), erythrohydrobupropion (1R,2S and 1S,2R

  20. Oxidative state and oxidative metabolism of the heart from rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Amanda Caroline; Wendt, Mariana Marques Nogueira; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Amado, Ciomar Aparecida Bersani; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Bracht, Adelar

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate, in a more extensive way, the oxidative state and parameters related to energy metabolism of the heart tissue of rats using the model of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The latter is a model for the human arthritic disease. Measurements were done in the total tissue homogenate, isolated mitochondria and cytosolic fraction. The adjuvant-induced arthritis caused several modifications in the oxidative state of the heart which, in general, indicate an increased oxidative stress (+80% reactive oxygen species), protein damage (+53% protein carbonyls) and lipid damage (+63% peroxidation) in the whole tissue. The distribution of these changes over the various cell compartments was frequently unequal. For example, protein carbonyls were increased in the whole tissue and in the cytosol, but not in the mitochondria. No changes in GSH content of the whole tissue were found, but it was increased in the mitochondria (+33%) and decreased in the cytosol (-19%). The activity of succinate dehydrogenase was 77% stimulated by arthritis; the activities of glutamate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase and cytochrome c oxidase were diminished by 31, 25 and 35.3%, respectively. In spite of these alterations, no changes in the mitochondrial respiratory activity and in the efficiency of energy transduction were found. It can be concluded that the adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats causes oxidative damage to the heart with an unequal intracellular distribution. Compared to the liver and brain the modifications caused by arthritis in the heart are less pronounced on variables such as GSH levels and protein integrity. Possibly this occurs because the antioxidant system of the heart is less impaired by arthritis than that reported for the former tissues. Even so, the modifications caused by arthritis represent an imbalanced situation that probably contributes to the cardiac symptoms of the arthritis disease. PMID:27032477

  1. Expression Patterns of Glutathione Transferase Gene (GstI) in Maize Seedlings Under Juglone-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) has been identified in organs of many plant species within Juglandaceae family. This secondary metabolite is considered as a highly bioactive substance that functions as direct oxidant stimulating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in acceptor plants. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, E.C.2.5.1.18) represent an important group of cytoprotective enzymes participating in detoxification of xenobiotics and limiting oxidative damages of cellular macromolecules. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of tested allelochemical on growth and development of maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings. Furthermore, the effect of juglone-induced oxidative stress on glutathione transferase (GstI) gene expression patterns in maize seedlings was recorded. It was revealed that 4-day juglone treatment significantly stimulated the transcriptional activity of GstI in maize seedlings compared to control plants. By contrast, at the 6th and 8th day of experiments the expression gene responses were slightly lower as compared with non-stressed seedlings. Additionally, the specific gene expression profiles, as well as the inhibition of primary roots and coleoptile elongation were proportional to juglone concentrations. In conclusion, the results provide strong molecular evidence that allelopathic influence of juglone on growth and development of maize seedlings may be relevant with an induction of oxidative stress in acceptor plants. PMID:22174645

  2. Red and blue lights induced oxidative stress tolerance promote cadmium rhizocomplexation in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and related stress responses have been investigated in red, blue and white lights exposed Oryza sativa L. cv MTU 7029. Cd translocation was reduced significantly by red and blue lights. Increase in amount of organic acids, thiols, and nutrients in the roots that cause Cd rhizocomplexation was the reason for reduction in Cd translocation. These effects were due to higher efficiency to perform photosynthesis and transpiration under red or blue lights compare with white light during Cd stress. Increased photosynthetic assimilate turnover was witnessed as a function of sugar content. Amount of redox regulators such as glutathione and ascorbate were also increased under red and blue light exposure. Together with up regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities, these metabolites ensured redox balance in presence of reactive oxygen species produced due to Cd toxicity. Protection of photosynthesis from Cd inducible oxidative stress ensured supplies of sugar intermediates essential for the synthesis of metal chelators in roots. Therefore, it was inferred that red and blue lights promote Cd rhizocomplexation and ameliorated Cd stress in rice seedlings.

  3. Ammonia-induced oxidative damage in neurons is prevented by resveratrol and lipoic acid with participation of heme oxygenase 1.

    PubMed

    Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Wartchow, Krista Minéia; Flores, Marianne Pires; Leite, Marina Concli; Quincozes-Santos, André; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia is a metabolite that, at high concentrations, is implicated in neurological disorders, such as hepatic encephalopathy (HE), which is associated with acute or chronic liver failure. Astrocytes are considered the primary target of ammonia toxicity in the central nervous system (CNS) because glutamine synthetase (GS), responsible for ammonia metabolism in CNS, is an astrocytic enzyme. Thus, neuronal dysfunction has been associated as secondary to astrocytic impairment. However, we demonstrated that ammonia can induce direct effects on neuronal cells. The cell viability was decreased by ammonia in SH-SY5Y cells and cerebellar granule neurons. In addition, ammonia induced increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased GSH intracellular content, the main antioxidant in CNS. As ammonia neurotoxicity is strongly associated with oxidative stress, we also investigated the potential neuroprotective roles of the antioxidants, resveratrol (RSV) and lipoic acid (LA), against ammonia toxicity in cerebellar granule neurons. RSV and LA were able to prevent the oxidative damage induced by ammonia, maintaining the levels of ROS production and GSH close to basal values. Both antioxidants also decreased ROS production and increased GSH content under basal conditions (in the absence of ammonia). Moreover, we showed that heme oxygenase 1 (HO1), a protein associated with protection against stress conditions, is involved in the beneficial effects of RSV and LA in cerebellar granule neurons. Thus, this study reinforces the neuroprotective effects of RSV and LA. Although more studies in vivo are required, RSV and LA could represent interesting therapeutic strategies for the management of HE.

  4. Proliferation of macrophages due to the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis by oxidized low-density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Monika; Gruber, Miriam; Schmid, Diethart; Baran, Halina; Moeslinger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is assumed to be a major causal agent in hypercholesteraemia-induced atherosclerosis. Because the proliferation of lipid-loaden macrophages within atherosclerotic lesions has been described, we investigated the dependence of macrophage proliferation on the inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by hypochlorite oxidized LDL. Ox-LDL induces a dose dependent inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthesis in lipopolysaccharide-interferon stimulated mouse macrophages (J774.A1) with concomitant macrophage proliferation as assayed by cell counting, tritiated-thymidine incorporation and measurement of cell protein. Native LDL did not influence macrophage proliferation and inducible nitric oxide synthesis. iNOS protein and mRNA was reduced by HOCl-oxidized LDL (0-40 µg/ml) as revealed by immunoblotting and competitive semiquantitative PCR. Macrophage proliferation was increased by the addition of the iNOS inhibitor L-NAME. The addition of ox-LDL to L-NAME containing incubations induced no further statistically significant increase in cell number. Nitric oxide donors decreased ox-LDL induced macrophage proliferation and nitric oxide scavengers restored macrophage proliferation to the initial values achieved by ox-LDL. The decrease of cytosolic DNA fragments in stimulated macrophages incubated with ox-LDL demonstrates that the proliferative actions of ox-LDL are associated with a decrease of NO-induced apoptosis. Our data show that inhibition of iNOS dependent nitric oxide production caused by hypochlorite oxidized LDL enhances macrophage proliferation. This might be a key event in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26600745

  5. Assessment of cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by titanium oxide nanoparticles on Chinook salmon cells.

    PubMed

    Srikanth, Koigoora; Pereira, Eduarda; Duarte, Armando C; Ahmad, Iqbal; Rao, Janapala Venkateswara

    2015-10-01

    Titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have received wide attention in diverse application, but the potential impact of these nanomaterials on the environment, aquatic life and especially on fish cell lines is lacking. The present study aimed to investigate the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by TiO2 NPs on Chinook salmon cells derived from Oncorhynchus tshawytscha embryos (CHSE-214). The The MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide] and neutral red (NR) assays in CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs revealed concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect in the range of 10 to 60 μg/ml for 24 h. CHSE-214 cells exposed to TiO2 NPs (10-60 μg/ml) exhibited significant decline in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione (GSH) content and increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) in a concentration-dependent manner. TiO2 NPs induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in CHSE-214 cells which serve as a base line studies for future studies. PMID:26013742

  6. Role of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide in lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-gamma-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zeidler, Patti C; Millecchia, Lyndell M; Castranova, Vincent

    2004-02-15

    Exposure of mice to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plus interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) increases nitric oxide (NO) production, which is proposed to play a role in the resulting pulmonary damage and inflammation. To determine the role of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-induced NO in this lung reaction, the responses of inducible nitric oxide synthase knockout (iNOS KO) versus C57BL/6J wild-type (WT) mice to aspirated LPS + IFN-gamma were compared. Male mice (8-10 weeks) were exposed to LPS (1.2 mg/kg) + IFN-gamma (5000 U/mouse) or saline. At 24 or 72 h postexposure, lungs were lavaged with saline and the acellular fluid from the first bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, albumin, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2). The cellular fraction of the total BAL was used to determine alveolar macrophage (AM) and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) counts, and AM zymosan-stimulated chemiluminescence (AM-CL). Pulmonary responses 24 h postexposure to LPS + IFN-gamma were characterized by significantly decreased TAC, increased BAL AMs and PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and enhanced AM-CL to the same extent in both WT and iNOS KO mice. Responses 72 h postexposure were similar; however, significant differences were found between WT and iNOS KO mice. iNOS KO mice demonstrated a greater decline in total antioxidant capacity, greater BAL PMNs, LDH, albumin, TNF-alpha, and MIP-2, and an enhanced AM-CL compared to the WT. These data suggest that the role of iNOS-derived NO in the pulmonary response to LPS + IFN-gamma is anti-inflammatory, and this becomes evident over time. PMID:14962504

  7. Hyperglycemia-induced diaphragm weakness is mediated by oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A major consequence of ICU-acquired weakness (ICUAW) is diaphragm weakness, which prolongs the duration of mechanical ventilation. Hyperglycemia (HG) is a risk factor for ICUAW. However, the mechanisms underlying HG-induced respiratory muscle weakness are not known. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) injure multiple tissues during HG, but only one study suggests that excessive ROS generation may be linked to HG-induced diaphragm weakness. We hypothesized that HG-induced diaphragm dysfunction is mediated by excessive superoxide generation and that administration of a specific superoxide scavenger, polyethylene glycol superoxide dismutase (PEG-SOD), would ameliorate these effects. Methods HG was induced in rats using streptozotocin (60 mg/kg intravenously) and the following groups assessed at two weeks: controls, HG, HG + PEG-SOD (2,000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days), and HG + denatured (dn)PEG-SOD (2000U/kg/d intraperitoneally for seven days). PEG-SOD and dnPEG-SOD were administered on day 8, we measured diaphragm specific force generation in muscle strips, force-pCa relationships in single permeabilized fibers, contractile protein content and indices of oxidative stress. Results HG reduced diaphragm specific force generation, altered single fiber force-pCa relationships, depleted troponin T, and increased oxidative stress. PEG-SOD prevented HG-induced reductions in diaphragm specific force generation (for example 80 Hz force was 26.4 ± 0.9, 15.4 ± 0.9, 24.0 ± 1.5 and 14.9 ± 0.9 N/cm2 for control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). PEG-SOD also restored HG-induced reductions in diaphragm single fiber force generation (for example, Fmax was 182.9 ± 1.8, 85.7 ± 2.0, 148.6 ± 2.4 and 90.9 ± 1.5 kPa in control, HG, HG + PEG-SOD, and HG + dnPEG-SOD groups, respectively, P <0.001). HG-induced troponin T depletion, protein nitrotyrosine formation

  8. Taurine treatment protects against chronic nicotine-induced oxidative changes.

    PubMed

    Sener, Göksel; Ozer Sehirli, A; Ipçi, Yeşim; Cetinel, Sule; Cikler, Esra; Gedik, Nursal; Alican, Inci

    2005-04-01

    Experiments have shown that chronic nicotine administration caused oxidative damage in various organs by increasing lipid peroxidation products and decreasing the activity of endogenous antioxidants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of taurine treatment on nicotine-induced oxidative changes in rat thoracic aorta and heart and to explore the possible mechanisms of action. Male Wistar albino rats (200-250 g) were injected with nicotine hydrogen bitartrate (0.6 mg/kg; i.p.) or saline for 21 days. Taurine was administered (50 mg/kg; i.p.) alone or along with nicotine injections. After decapitation, the thoracic aorta and heart tissues were excised. The aorta was used for in vitro contractility studies or stored along with the heart samples for the measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and collagen content. Tissue samples were also examined histologically. Serum samples were stored for the measurement of MDA, GSH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity. Chronic nicotine treatment impaired both the contraction and relaxation responses of the aortic rings to phenylephrine and acetylcholine, respectively. It increased lipid peroxidation, MPO levels and tissue collagen content of both aorta and heart samples. Taurine supplementation to nicotine-treated animals reversed the contractile dysfunction and restored the endogenous GSH levels and decreased high lipid peroxidation and MPO activities in both tissues. These data suggest that taurine supplementation effectively attenuates the oxidative damage because of chronic nicotine administration possibly by its antioxidant effects.

  9. Dietary nickel chloride induces oxidative intestinal damage in broilers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Huang, Jianying

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the oxidative damage induced by dietary nickel chloride (NiCl2) in the intestinal mucosa of different parts of the intestine of broilers, including duodenum, jejunum and ileum. A total of 240 one-day-old broilers were divided into four groups and fed on a corn-soybean basal diet as control diet or the same basal diet supplemented with 300, 600 or 900 mg/kg NiCl2 during a 42-day experimental period. The results showed that the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) decreased in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups in comparison with those of the control group. In contrast, malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01) higher in the 300, 600 and 900 mg/kg groups than that in the control group. It was concluded that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg could cause oxidative damage in the intestinal mucosa in broilers, which finally impaired the intestinal functions including absorptive function and mucosal immune function. The oxidative damage might be a main mechanism on the effects of NiCl2 on the intestinal health of broilers. PMID:23702803

  10. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. Results: It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Conclusions: Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes. PMID:25883776

  11. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities.

  12. Countermeasures against space radiation induced oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, A R; Guan, J; Ware, J H

    2007-06-01

    Of particular concern for the health of astronauts during space travel is radiation from protons and high atomic number (Z), high energy particles (HZE particles). Space radiation is known to induce oxidative stress in astronauts after extended space flight. In the present study, the total antioxidant status was used as a biomarker to evaluate oxidative stress induced by proton and HZE particle radiation in the plasma of CBA mice and the protective effect of dietary supplement agents. The results indicate that exposure to proton and HZE particle radiation significantly decreased the plasma level of total antioxidants in the irradiated CBA mice. Dietary supplementation with L: -selenomethionine (SeM) or a combination of selected antioxidant agents (which included SeM) could partially or completely prevent the decrease in the total antioxidant status in the plasma of animals exposed to proton or HZE particle radiation. These findings suggest that exposure to space radiation may compromise the capacity of the host antioxidant defense system; this adverse biological effect can be prevented at least partially by dietary supplementation with agents expected to have effects on antioxidant activities. PMID:17387501

  13. Evaluation of milk enzymes and electrolytes, plasma metabolites, and oxidative status in twin cows milked in an automatic milking system or twice daily in a conventional milking parlor.

    PubMed

    Abeni, F; Terzano, M G; Speroni, M; Migliorati, L; Capelletti, M; Calza, F; Bianchi, L; Pirlo, G

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of automatic milking (AM) on milk enzymes and minerals related to mammary epithelial integrity in comparison with twice-daily conventional milking (CM). One cow from each of 6 pairs of twins was assigned to be milked with AM or with CM throughout first lactation. Milk production was recorded and milk samples were collected at 4, 11, 18, 25, 32, and 39 wk of lactation (WOL) to determine fat and protein content, somatic cell count, pH, plasminogen (pl) and plasmin (Pl) activities, Na, K, and Cl. Body condition score was monitored; blood samples were collected to determine energy-related metabolites in the first third of lactation (14 WOL), and plasma oxidative status throughout lactation. Overall mean and standard deviation of milking frequency (MF) in AM were 2.69 and 0.88, respectively. Milk production, fat and protein contents, and somatic cell count did not differ between milking systems. The pl and pl+Pl activities were lesser in AM than in CM. Milk pH was greater in AM than in CM. Milk Na, K, Na/K ratio, and Cl did not differ across the whole lactation. Milk pH had a positive correlation with milk Pl activity (r = 0.41), Na (r = 0.37), and Cl (r = 0.40) concentration, and negative correlation with the log(10) of pl/Pl ratio (r = -0.47). The milk Na/K ratio had a positive correlation (r = 0.55) with milk Pl activity. Milking system (MS) did not seem to affect mammary epithelial permeability. The differences in enzymatic (proteolytic) activity due to the MS, probably related to daily MF, lead one to suppose that the quality of the protein fraction for the cheese-making process was preserved better with AM than with CM, even if differences in pH might negatively interfere. No difference was detected in BCS, and in plasma concentration of triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids, whereas plasma cholesterol concentration during the first 10 WOL was lesser in AM than CM. Oxidative status, measured by plasma

  14. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress.

  15. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress. PMID:25867895

  16. The basic chemistry of exercise-induced DNA oxidation: oxidative damage, redox signaling, and their interplay

    PubMed Central

    Cobley, James N.; Margaritelis, Nikos V.; Morton, James P.; Close, Graeme L.; Nikolaidis, Michalis G.; Malone, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation. This phenomenon is associated with two major outcomes: (1) redox signaling and (2) macromolecule damage. Mechanistic knowledge of how exercise-induced redox signaling and macromolecule damage are interlinked is limited. This review focuses on the interplay between exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage, using hydroxyl radical (·OH) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as exemplars. It is postulated that the biological fate of H2O2 links the two processes and thus represents a bifurcation point between redox signaling and damage. Indeed, H2O2 can participate in two electron signaling reactions but its diffusion and chemical properties permit DNA oxidation following reaction with transition metals and ·OH generation. It is also considered that the sensing of DNA oxidation by repair proteins constitutes a non-canonical redox signaling mechanism. Further layers of interaction are provided by the redox regulation of DNA repair proteins and their capacity to modulate intracellular H2O2 levels. Overall, exercise-induced redox signaling and DNA damage may be interlinked to a greater extent than was previously thought but this requires further investigation. PMID:26136689

  17. Effects of Chamaecyparis formosensis Matasumura extractives on lipopolysaccharide-induced release of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Kuo, Pei-Min; Chien, Shih-Chang; Shyur, Lie-Fen; Wang, Sheng-Yang

    2007-10-01

    Chamaecyparis formaosensis, commonly known as Taiwan red cypress, is native to Taiwan and grows at elevations of 1500-2150 m in Taiwan's central mountains. Many compounds have been identified from different pasts of C. formosensis, but up until now, little research has been done on the link between the constituents of C. formosensis and its bioactivities. In this study, we found that an ethyl acetate fraction (EA) of methonal extract of C. formosecsis, strongly inhibited LPS-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production in Raw 264.7 cells. The EA was further divided into 25 subfractions (EA1-EA25) by column chromatography. EA12 possessed the strongest NO production inhibition activity (IC(50) was 4.1 microg/mL). At a dosage of 20 microg/mL, EA12 completely inhibited NO production and the mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in LPS-stimulated macrophage RAW264.7 cells. Bioactivity-guided chromatographic fractionation and metabolite profiling coupled with spectroscopic analyses, including (1)H-NMR, (13)C-NMR analyses, identified six compounds: vanillin (1), 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde (2), trans-hinokiresinol (3), taiwanin E (4), 4alpha-hydroxyeudesm- 11-en-12-al (5), savinin (6). All of these six compounds were the first identified and reported from this tree species. Compounds (1), (3) and (5) demonstrated significant NO inhibition effect through reduction of NO production in activated RAW 264.7 cells due to the suppression of iNOS gene expression: compounds that can selectively inhibit undesirable expression of iNOS are important as they may serve as potential cancer chemopreventatives. This study suggests that C. formosensis may have potential for use as a natural resource for human health care. PMID:17291735

  18. 6β-hydroxytestosterone, a cytochrome P450 1B1 metabolite of testosterone, contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and its pathogenesis in male mice.

    PubMed

    Pingili, Ajeeth K; Kara, Mehmet; Khan, Nayaab S; Estes, Anne M; Lin, Zongtao; Li, Wei; Gonzalez, Frank J; Malik, Kafait U

    2015-06-01

    Previously, we showed that Cyp1b1 gene disruption minimizes angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated pathophysiological changes in male mice. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that cytochrome P450 1B1-generated metabolites of testosterone, 6β-hydroxytestosterone and 16α-hydroxytestosterone, contribute to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and its pathogenesis. Angiotensin II infusion for 2 weeks increased cardiac cytochrome P450 1B1 activity and plasma levels of 6β-hydroxytestosterone, but not 16α-hydroxytestosterone, in Cyp1b1(+/+) mice without altering Cyp1b1 gene expression; these effects of angiotensin II were not observed in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. Angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure and associated cardiac hypertrophy, and fibrosis, measured by intracardiac accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin, collagen, and transforming growth factor-β, and increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity and production of reactive oxygen species; these changes were minimized in Cyp1b1(-/-) or castrated Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, and restored by treatment with 6β-hydroxytestoterone. In Cyp1b1(+/+) mice, 6β-hydroxytestosterone did not alter the angiotensin II-induced increase in systolic blood pressure; the basal systolic blood pressure was also not affected by this agent in either genotype. Angiotensin II or castration did not alter cardiac, angiotensin II type 1 receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme, Mas receptor, or androgen receptor mRNA levels in Cyp1b1(+/+) or in Cyp1b1(-/-) mice. These data suggest that the testosterone metabolite, 6β-hydroxytestosterone, contributes to angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated cardiac pathogenesis in male mice, most probably by acting as a permissive factor. Moreover, cytochrome P450 1B1 could serve as a novel target for developing agents for treating renin-angiotensin and testosterone-dependent hypertension and associated pathogenesis in males.

  19. Protection of dichlorvos induced oxidative stress and nigrostriatal neuronal death by chronic Coenzyme Q{sub 10} pretreatment

    SciTech Connect

    Binukumar, BK; Gupta, Nidhi; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2011-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have shown an association between pesticide exposure and increased risk of developing Parkinson's diseases. Oxidative stress generated as a result of mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated as an important factor in the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Previously, we reported that chronic dichlorvos exposure causes mitochondrial impairments and nigrostriatal neuronal death in rats. The present study was designed to test whether Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (CoQ{sub 10}) administration has any neuroprotective effect against dichlorvos mediated nigrostriatal neuronal death, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, and motor dysfunction. Male albino rats were administered dichlorvos by subcutaneous injection at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight over a period of 12 weeks. Results obtained there after showed that dichlorvos exposure leads to enhanced mitochondrial ROS production, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation, decreased dopamine and its metabolite levels resulting in nigrostriatal neurodegeneration. Pretreatment by Coenzyme Q{sub 10} (4.5 mg/kg ip for 12 weeks) to dichlorvos treated animals significantly attenuated the extent of nigrostriatal neuronal damage, in terms of decreased ROS production, increased dopamine and its metabolite levels, and restoration of motor dysfunction when compared to dichlorvos treated animals. Thus, the present study shows that Coenzyme Q{sub 10} administration may attenuate dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegeneration, {alpha}-synuclein aggregation and motor dysfunction by virtue of its antioxidant action. - Highlights: > CoQ{sub 10} administration attenuates dichlorvos induced nigrostriatal neurodegenaration. > CoQ{sub 10} pre treatment leads to preservation of TH-IR neurons. > CoQ{sub 10} may decrease oxidative damage and {alpha}-synuclin aggregation. > CoQ{sub 10} treatment enhances motor function and protects rats from catalepsy.

  20. GLUCOSE-INDUCED INTESTINAL VASODILATION VIA ADENOSINE A1 RECEPTORS REQUIRES NITRIC OXIDE BUT NOT K+ATP CHANNELS

    PubMed Central

    Matheson, Paul J.; Li, Na; Harris, Patrick D.; Zakaria, El Rasheid; Garrison, R. Neal

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Both nitric oxide (NO) and adenosine A1 receptor activation mediate microvascular vasodilation during intestinal glucose absorption. Our overall hypothesis is that ATP utilization during glucose absorption would increase adenosine metabolite release, which acts on adenosine A1 receptors to alter endothelial production of NO and/or activate ATP-dependent potassium channels (K+ATP) to dilate intestinal microvessels. METHODS Intravital videomicroscopy of the rat jejunum was used to record the vascular responses of inflow (termed 1A) arterioles and proximal (p3A) and distal (d3A) premucosal arterioles during exposure to isotonic glucose or mannitol solutions alone or in the presence of the selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (L-NMMA), an adenosine A1 receptor antagonist (8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX)), or a K+ATP channel inhibitor (glibenclamide). RESULTS As expected, glucose exposure caused rapid dilation of both p3A and d3A arterioles, while mannitol exposure had no effect on microvascular diameters. Adenosine A1 receptor blockade completely prevented glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles. NOS inhibition significantly blunted the glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles, but had little effect in the mannitol group. Simultaneous application of both the NOS inhibitor and the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist gave the same reduction in glucose-induced dilation of the premucosal arterioles as the adenosine A1 receptor antagonist alone. Blockade of K+ATP channels with glibenclamide did not attenuate glucose-induced vasodilation of the premucosal arterioles. CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that glucose-induced vasodilation of premucosal jejunal arterioles is mediated through adenosine A1 receptors, and NO at least partially mediates the adenosine A1 receptor-induced vasodilation. In addition, K+ATP channels are not involved in premucosal arteriolar vasodilation during intestinal glucose exposure. PMID

  1. Garlic provides protection to mice heart against isoproterenol-induced oxidative damage: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Khatua, Tarak Nath; Padiya, Raju; Karnewar, Santosh; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Agawane, Sachin B; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Banerjee, Sanjay Kumar

    2012-06-30

    Garlic has been widely recognized as a cardioprotective agent. However, the molecular mechanism of its cardioprotective effects is not well established. Here we hypothesized that aqueous garlic homogenate may mediate cardioprotection via nitric oxide (NO). Mice were fed with saline and aqueous garlic homogenate (250 and 500 mgkg(-1)day(-1) orally) for 30 days. In another set of experiment, mice were pre-treated with saline, aqueous garlic homogenate (AGH) (250 mgkg(-1)day(-1) for 30 days), and AGH (30 days) along with L-NAME (20 mgkg(-1)day(-1) i.p. for last 7 days) before inducing acute myocardial infarction by isoproterenol (s.c. injection of isoproterenol 150 mgkg(-1)day(-1) for 2 days) and sacrificed after 48 h. Dose dependent increase in serum NO level was observed after garlic 250 and 500 mgkg(-1) dose feeding. While no change in serum SGPT and SGOT level, a significant decrease in serum LDH level was observed after garlic feeding. Garlic-induced NO formation was further confirmed in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Administration of isoproterenol caused a significant decrease in endogenous antioxidants i.e., myocardial catalase, GSH and GPx activity, and mitochondrial enzyme activities like citrate synthase and β hydroxyacyl CoA dehydrogenase. All those deleterious cardiac changes induced by isoproterenol were significantly attenuated by garlic homogenate. However this beneficial effect of garlic was blunted when garlic was administered with L-NAME, a nonspecific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). Further, a significant increase in myocardial TBARS and decrease in total antioxidant activity was observed in L-NAME treated group compared to isoproterenol treated group. Administration of L-NAME in mice from control group lowered serum and cardiac NO levels without any change of oxidative stress parameters. In conclusion, our study provides novel evidence that garlic homogenate is protective in myocardial infarction via NO-signaling pathway in mice.

  2. Requirement of the inducible nitric oxide synthase pathway for IL-1-induced osteoclastic bone resorption

    PubMed Central

    van't Hof, R. J.; Armour, K. J.; Smith, L. M.; Armour, K. E.; Wei, X. Q.; Liew, F. Y.; Ralston, S. H.

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of bone turnover, especially in pathological conditions characterized by release of bone-resorbing cytokines. The cytokine IL-1 is thought to act as a mediator of periarticular bone loss and tissue damage in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. IL-1 is a potent stimulator of both osteoclastic bone resorption and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in bone cells and other cell types. In this study, we investigated the role that the iNOS pathway plays in mediating the bone-resorbing effects of IL-1 by studying mice with targeted disruption of the iNOS gene. Studies in vitro and in vivo showed that iNOS-deficient mice exhibited profound defects of IL-1-induced osteoclastic bone resorption but responded normally to calciotropic hormones such as 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3 and parathyroid hormone. Immunohistochemical studies and electrophoretic mobility shift assays performed on bone marrow cocultures from iNOS-deficient mice showed abnormalities in IL-1-induced nuclear translocation of the p65 component of NFκB and in NFκB-DNA binding, which were reversed by treatment with the NO donor S-nitroso-acetyl penicillamine. These results show that the iNOS pathway is essential for IL-1-induced bone resorption and suggest that the effects of NO may be mediated by modulating IL-1-induced nuclear activation of NFκB in osteoclast precursors. PMID:10869429

  3. In vivo Expression of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase in Experimentally Induced Neurologic Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Zheng, Yong Mu; Heber-Katz, Ellen; Fraser, Nigel; Rorke, Lucy; Fu, Zhen Fang; Hanlon, Cathleen; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA in the brain tissue of rats and mice under the following experimental conditions: in rats infected with borna disease virus and rabies virus, in mice infected with herpes simplex virus, and in rats after the induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The results showed that iNOS mRNA, normally nondetectable in the brain, was present in animals after viral infection or after induction of experimental allergic encephalitis. The induction of iNOS mRNA coincided with the severity of clinical signs and in some cases with the presence of inflammatory cells in the brain. The results indicate that nitric oxide produced by cells induced by iNOS may be the toxic factor accounting for cell damage and this may open the door to approaches to the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases.

  4. Pectin Enhances Bio-Control Efficacy by Inducing Colonization and Secretion of Secondary Metabolites by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQY 162 in the Rhizosphere of Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kai; Fang, Zhiying; Guo, Rong; Pan, Bin; Shi, Wen; Yuan, Saifei; Guan, Huilin; Gong, Ming; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is a plant-beneficial Gram-positive bacterium involved in suppressing soil-borne pathogens through the secretion of secondary metabolites and high rhizosphere competence. Biofilm formation is regarded as a prerequisite for high rhizosphere competence. In this work, we show that plant extracts affect the chemotaxis and biofilm formation of B. amyloliquefaciens SQY 162 (SQY 162). All carbohydrates tested induced the chemotaxis and biofilm formation of the SQY 162 strain; however, the bacterial growth rate was not influenced by the addition of carbohydrates. A strong chemotactic response and biofilm formation of SQY 162 were both induced by pectin through stimulation of surfactin synthesis and transcriptional expression of biofilm formation related matrix genes. These results suggested that pectin might serve as an environmental factor in the stimulation of the biofilm formation of SQY 162. Furthermore, in pot experiments the surfactin production and the population of SQY 162 in the rhizosphere significantly increased with the addition of sucrose or pectin, whereas the abundance of the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia decreased. With increased production of secondary metabolites in the rhizosphere of tobacco by SQY 162 and improved colonization density of SQY 162 in the pectin treatment, the disease incidences of bacterial wilt were efficiently suppressed. The present study revealed that certain plant extracts might serve as energy sources or environmental cues for SQY 162 to enhance the population density on tobacco root and bio-control efficacy of tobacco bacterial wilt. PMID:25996156

  5. Pectin Enhances Bio-Control Efficacy by Inducing Colonization and Secretion of Secondary Metabolites by Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SQY 162 in the Rhizosphere of Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rong; Pan, Bin; Shi, Wen; Yuan, Saifei; Guan, Huilin; Gong, Ming; Shen, Biao; Shen, Qirong

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens is a plant-beneficial Gram-positive bacterium involved in suppressing soil-borne pathogens through the secretion of secondary metabolites and high rhizosphere competence. Biofilm formation is regarded as a prerequisite for high rhizosphere competence. In this work, we show that plant extracts affect the chemotaxis and biofilm formation of B. amyloliquefaciens SQY 162 (SQY 162). All carbohydrates tested induced the chemotaxis and biofilm formation of the SQY 162 strain; however, the bacterial growth rate was not influenced by the addition of carbohydrates. A strong chemotactic response and biofilm formation of SQY 162 were both induced by pectin through stimulation of surfactin synthesis and transcriptional expression of biofilm formation related matrix genes. These results suggested that pectin might serve as an environmental factor in the stimulation of the biofilm formation of SQY 162. Furthermore, in pot experiments the surfactin production and the population of SQY 162 in the rhizosphere significantly increased with the addition of sucrose or pectin, whereas the abundance of the bacterial pathogen Ralstonia decreased. With increased production of secondary metabolites in the rhizosphere of tobacco by SQY 162 and improved colonization density of SQY 162 in the pectin treatment, the disease incidences of bacterial wilt were efficiently suppressed. The present study revealed that certain plant extracts might serve as energy sources or environmental cues for SQY 162 to enhance the population density on tobacco root and bio-control efficacy of tobacco bacterial wilt. PMID:25996156

  6. Wound-induced Oxidative Responses in Mountain Birch Leaves

    PubMed Central

    RUUHOLA, TEIJA; YANG, SHIYONG

    2006-01-01

    • Aims The aim of the study was to examine oxidative responses in subarctic mountain birch, Betula pubescens subsp. czerepanovii, induced by herbivory and manual wounding. • Methods Herbivory-induced changes in polyphenoloxidase, peroxidase and catalase activities in birch leaves were determined. A cytochemical dye, 3,3-diaminobenzidine, was used for the in situ and in vivo detection of H2O2 accumulation as a response to herbivory and wounding. To localize peroxidase activity in leaves, 10 mm H2O2 was applied to the dye reagent. • Key Results Feeding by autumnal moth, Epirrita autumnata, larvae caused an induction in polyphenoloxidase and peroxidase activities within 24 h, and a concomitant decrease in the activity of antioxidative catalases in wounded leaves. Wounding also induced H2O2 accumulation, which may have both direct and indirect defensive properties against herbivores. Wound sites and guard cells showed a high level of peroxidase activity, which may efficiently restrict invasion by micro-organisms. • Conclusion Birch oxidases together with their substrates may form an important front line in defence against herbivores and pathogens. PMID:16254021

  7. Senescence-Induced Oxidative Stress Causes Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bhayadia, Raj; Schmidt, Bernhard M W; Melk, Anette; Hömme, Meike

    2016-02-01

    Age is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, suggesting a causal relationship between age-related changes and vascular damage. Endothelial dysfunction is an early pathophysiological hallmark in the development of cardiovascular disease. Senescence, the cellular equivalent of aging, was proposed to be involved in endothelial dysfunction, but functional data showing a causal relationship are missing.Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was measured in aortic rings ex vivo. We investigated aortas from aged C57Bl/6 mice (24-28 months), in which p16 (INK4a) and p19 (ARF) expression, markers of stress-induced senescence, were significantly induced compared to young controls (4-6 months). To reflect telomere shortening in human aging, we investigated aortas from telomerase deficient (Terc(-/-)) mice of generation 3 (G3). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and in Terc(-/-) G3 mice was impaired. A combination of the superoxide dismutase mimetic 1-Oxyl-2,2,6, 6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (TEMPOL) and the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase inhibitor apocynin significantly improved endothelium-dependent vasodilation in aged wildtype and Terc(-/-) G3 mice compared to untreated controls. We show that both, aging and senescence induced by telomere shortening, cause endothelial dysfunction that can be restored by antioxidants, indicating a role for oxidative stress. The observation that cellular senescence is a direct signalling event leading to endothelial dysfunction holds the potential to develop new targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  8. Oxidative remodeling of chromoplast carotenoids: identification of the carotenoid dioxygenase CsCCD and CsZCD genes involved in Crocus secondary metabolite biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Florence; Suire, Claude; Mutterer, Jérôme; Camara, Bilal

    2003-01-01

    The accumulation of three major carotenoid derivatives-crocetin glycosides, picrocrocin, and safranal-is in large part responsible for the color, bitter taste, and aroma of saffron, which is obtained from the dried styles of Crocus. We have identified and functionally characterized the Crocus zeaxanthin 7,8(7',8')-cleavage dioxygenase gene (CsZCD), which codes for a chromoplast enzyme that initiates the biogenesis of these derivatives. The Crocus carotenoid 9,10(9',10')-cleavage dioxygenase gene (CsCCD) also has been cloned, and the comparison of substrate specificities between these two enzymes has shown that the CsCCD enzyme acts on a broader range of precursors. CsZCD expression is restricted to the style branch tissues and is enhanced under dehydration stress, whereas CsCCD is expressed constitutively in flower and leaf tissues irrespective of dehydration stress. Electron microscopy revealed that the accumulation of saffron metabolites is accompanied by the differentiation of amyloplasts and chromoplasts and by interactions between chromoplasts and the vacuole. Our data suggest that a stepwise sequence exists that involves the oxidative cleavage of zeaxanthin in chromoplasts followed by the sequestration of modified water-soluble derivatives into the central vacuole.

  9. Dissipation and residues of clethodim and its oxidation metabolites in a rape-field ecosystem using QuEChERS and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    You, Xiangwei; Liang, Lin; Liu, Fengmao

    2014-01-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective method using Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) procedure for simultaneous determination of clethodim and its oxidation metabolites (clethodim sulfoxide and clethodim sulphone) in soil, rape plant and rape seed was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method ranged from 0.002mg/kg to 0.01mg/kg, and average recoveries were 78.7-104.2%. The trial results showed that clethodim dissipated so rapidly that few clethodim residues were detectable. Clethodim sulfoxide dissipated quickly in rape plant and soil with half-lives of 4.3 and 4.0days, respectively. Clethodim sulphone showed a tendency of rapid increase initially followed by a decrease in rape plant but could not be detected in soil. The terminal residues of clethodim in rape seedsat harvest time were below the maximum residue limit (MRL, 0.5mg/kg).

  10. Dissipation and residues of clethodim and its oxidation metabolites in a rape-field ecosystem using QuEChERS and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    You, Xiangwei; Liang, Lin; Liu, Fengmao

    2014-01-15

    A rapid, sensitive and selective method using Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe (QuEChERS) procedure for simultaneous determination of clethodim and its oxidation metabolites (clethodim sulfoxide and clethodim sulphone) in soil, rape plant and rape seed was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). The limits of detection (LODs) of the proposed method ranged from 0.002mg/kg to 0.01mg/kg, and average recoveries were 78.7-104.2%. The trial results showed that clethodim dissipated so rapidly that few clethodim residues were detectable. Clethodim sulfoxide dissipated quickly in rape plant and soil with half-lives of 4.3 and 4.0days, respectively. Clethodim sulphone showed a tendency of rapid increase initially followed by a decrease in rape plant but could not be detected in soil. The terminal residues of clethodim in rape seedsat harvest time were below the maximum residue limit (MRL, 0.5mg/kg). PMID:24054227

  11. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Glück, B; Merkle, I; Dornberger, G; Stelzner, A

    2000-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important bioactive molecule with regulatory, cytotoxic or cytoprotective properties. In virus-induced myocarditis, NO mediates host defense mechanisms against the infection or causes cardiac dysfunctions. NO is synthesized from L-arginine by the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The expression of the inducible form of the nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is regulated by cytokines, involved in the complex myocardial immune response to enterovirus infections. The present study was undertaken to characterize the role of iNOS and NO in the murine model of viral myocarditis induced by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). In response to CVB3 infection we investigated the time course of iNOS induction in correlation with cytokine mRNA expression (TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta) in the heart of NMRI mice by RT-PCR. Positive PCR signals for viral RNA were found in the acute and chronic stage of disease by seminested PCR, indicating the persistence of viral genome. We found distinct expression of iNOS at all time points (1, 2, 3, 4, 7, 14, 28, 56, 98 days post infection [p.i.]). Higher iNOS mRNA levels were identified between days 4 until 28 p.i. in comparison to day 56 and 98 p.i. using densitometric values. The mRNA of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha, IFN-gamma appeared at days 1, 4, and 7 p.i., peaked at day 7 p.i. and persisted until day 98 p.i. Similar like the iNOS mRNA pattern was the expression profile of TGF-beta. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry iNOS was localized in infiltrates, vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, myocytes and throughout the interstitial spaces between myocardial fibers in the heart sections of NMRI mice. Increased levels of NO were measured as total nitrate/nitrite concentration in the sera of mice from day 7 until day 28 p.i.

  12. Methylated pentavalent arsenic metabolites are bifunctional inducers, as they induce cytochrome P450 1A1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase through AhR- and Nrf2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elshenawy, Osama H; Soshilov, Anatoly A; Denison, Michael S; Chris Le, X; Klotz, Lars-Oliver; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2014-02-01

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ultimately leads to the induction of the carcinogen-activating enzyme cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), and activation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in addition to the AhR pathway induces the expression of the NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1). Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the effect of As(III) pentavalent metabolites, MMA(V), DMA(V), and TMA(V), on AhR and Nrf2 activation and on the expression of their prototypical downstream targets CYP1A1 and NQO1, respectively. Our results showed that treatment of HepG2 cells with MMA(V), DMA(V), or TMA(V) in the absence and presence of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin or sulforaphane significantly induced both CYP1A1 and NQO1 at the mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels. Furthermore, these metabolites increased the AhR-dependent XRE-driven and the Nrf2-dependent ARE-driven luciferase reporter activities, which coincided with increased nuclear accumulation of both transcription factors. However, none of these metabolites were shown to be AhR ligands. The induction of CYP1A1 by these metabolites seems to be ligand-independent, possibly through a decrease in HSP90 protein expression levels. The metabolites also increased ROS production, which was significantly higher than that produced by As(III). Upon knockdown of AhR and Nrf2 the MMA(V)-, DMA(V)-, and TMA(V)-mediated induction of both CYP1A1 and NQO1 proteins was significantly decreased. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time that methylated pentavalent arsenic metabolites are bifunctional inducers, as they increase CYP1A1 by activating the AhR/XRE signaling pathway and they increase NQO1 by activating the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway in addition to the AhR/XRE pathway.

  13. A Comparison of the Effects of Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition on Cartilage Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gokay, Nevzat Selim; Yilmaz, Ibrahim; Demiroz, Ahu Senem; Gokce, Alper; Dervisoglu, Sergülen; Gokay, Banu Vural

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of selective inducible nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on cartilage regeneration. The study involved 27 Wistar rats that were divided into five groups. On Day 1, both knees of 3 rats were resected and placed in a formalin solution as a control group. The remaining 24 rats were separated into 4 groups, and their right knees were surgically damaged. Depending on the groups, the rats were injected with intra-articular normal saline solution, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (50 mg/kg), inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor amino-guanidine (30 mg/kg), or nitric oxide precursor L-arginine (200 mg/kg). After 21 days, the right and left knees of the rats were resected and placed in formalin solution. The samples were histopathologically examined by a blinded evaluator and scored on 8 parameters. Although selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibition exhibited significant (P = 0.044) positive effects on cartilage regeneration following cartilage damage, it was determined that inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition had no statistically significant effect on cartilage regeneration. It was observed that the nitric oxide synthase activation triggered advanced arthrosis symptoms, such as osteophyte formation. The fact that selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors were observed to have mitigating effects on the severity of the damage may, in the future, influence the development of new agents to be used in the treatment of cartilage disorders. PMID:27382570

  14. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  15. Cerium oxide nanoparticles protect endothelial cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shizhu; Hou, Yingjian; Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Cuimiao; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress is well documented to cause injury to endothelial cells (ECs), which in turn trigger cardiovascular diseases. Previous studies revealed that cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) had antioxidant property, but the protective effect of nanoceria on ROS injury to ECs and cardiovascular diseases has not been reported. In the current study, we investigated the protective effect and underlying mechanisms of nanoceria on oxidative injury to ECs. The cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase release, cellular uptake, intracellular localization and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, endocytosis mechanism, cell apoptosis, and mitochondrial membrane potential were performed. The results indicated that nanoceria had no cytotoxicity on ECs but had the ability to prevent injury by H2O2. Nanoceria could be uptaken into ECs through caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis and distributed throughout the cytoplasma. The internalized nanoceria effectively attenuated ROS overproduction induced by H2O2. Apoptosis was also alleviated greatly by nanoceria pretreatment. These results may be helpful for more rational application of nanoceria in biomedical fields in the future.

  16. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin induces nitric oxide synthesis via oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    We have recently shown that apocynin elicits an oxidative stress in N11 mouse glial cells and other cell types. Here we report that apocynin increased the accumulation of nitrite, the stable derivative of nitric oxide (NO), in the extracellular medium of N11 cell cultures, and the NO synthase (NOS) activity in cell lysates. The increased synthesis of NO was associated with increased expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA, increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and decreased intracellular level of its inhibitor IkB{alpha}. These effects, accompanied by increased production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, were very similar to those observed after incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and were inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that apocynin, similarly to LPS, induces increased NO synthesis by eliciting a generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes NF-{kappa}B activation and increased expression of iNOS. Therefore, the increased bioavailability of NO reported in the literature after in vivo or in vitro treatments with apocynin might depend, at least partly, on the drug-elicited induction of iNOS, and not only on the inhibition of NADPH oxidase and the subsequent decreased scavenging of NO by oxidase-derived ROS, as it is often supposed.

  17. Nitrous oxide-induced hypothermia in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Quock, R.M.; Panek, R.W.; Kouchich, F.J.; Rosenthal, M.A.

    1987-08-10

    Exposure of rats to high levels of nitrous oxide (N2O) in oxygen reduced body temperature in a concentration-related manner. The hypothermia was partly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. But in rats rendered tolerant to morphine by pellet implantation, exposure to 75% N2O/25% O2 evoked a marked hypothermia similar to that observed in morphine-naive animals. In another experiment, the hypothermic effect of chloral hydrate was also sensitive to antagonism by pretreatment with naloxone but not naltrexone. These observations lead the authors to suspect that N2O-induced hypothermia in rats is possibly not mediated by opiate receptors. The thermotropic activity of N2O may result from some non-opioid action of N2O. Its selective antagonism by naloxone (but not naltrexone) may be due to a unique non-opioid analeptic action of naloxone. 32 references, 4 figures.

  18. Curcumin Attenuates Hepatotoxicity Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, Layasadat; Mansouri, Esrafil; Orazizadeh, Mahmoud; Jozi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background: Zinc oxide nanoparticles (NZnO) are increasingly used in modern life. Most metal nanoparticles have adverse effects on the liver. Aims: To explore the protective action of curcumin (Cur) against hepatotoxicity induced by NZnO in rats. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Control group animals received normal saline, while the Cur group animals were treated with 200 mg/kg of Cur orally for 21 days. NZnO-intoxicated rats received 50 mg/kg of NZnO for 14 days by gavage method. In the NZnO+Cur group, rats were pretreated with Cur for 7 days before NZnO administration. Plasma activities of Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured as biomarkers of hepatotoxicity. Hepatic levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured for detection of oxidative stress in liver tissue. Histological changes and apoptosis in liver tissue were studied by using Hematoxylin-eosin staining and the transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. Results: NZnO induced a significant increase in plasma AST (2.8-fold), ALT (2.7-fold) and ALP (1.97-fold) activity in comparison to the control group (p<0.01). NZnO increased MDA content and reduced SOD and GPx activities. NZnO caused liver damage including centrilobular necrosis and microvesicular steatosis. The percentage of apoptosis in hepatocytes was increased in NZnO-treated rats (p<0.01). Pre-treatment of Cur significantly reduced lipid peroxidation (39%), increased SOD (156%) and GPx (26%) activities, and attenuated ALT (47%), AST (41%) and ALP (30%) activities. Pre-treatment with Cur also decreased the histology changes and apoptotic index of hepatocytes (p<0.05). Conclusion: These findings indicate that Cur effectively protects against NZnO-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. However, future studies are required to propose Cur as a potential protective agent against hepatotoxicity

  19. Identification of N-Oxide and Sulfoxide Functionalities in Protonated Drug Metabolites by Using Ion-Molecule Reactions Followed by Collisionally Activated Dissociation in a Linear Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Huaming; Tang, Weijuan; Yerabolu, Ravikiran; Max, Joann; Kotha, Raghavendhar R; Riedeman, James S; Nash, John J; Zhang, Minli; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2016-01-15

    The in vivo oxidation of sulfur and nitrogen atoms in many drugs into sulfoxide and N-oxide functionalities is a common biotransformation process. Unfortunately, the unambiguous identification of these metabolites can be challenging. In the present study, ion-molecule reactions of tris(dimethylamino)borane followed by collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) in an ion trap mass spectrometer are demonstrated to allow the identification of N-oxide and sulfoxide functionalities in protonated polyfunctional drug metabolites. Only ions with N-oxide or sulfoxide functionality formed diagnostic adducts that had lost dimethyl amine (DMA). This was demonstrated even for an analyte that contains a substantially more basic functionality than the functional group of interest. CAD of the diagnostic product ions (M) resulted mainly in type A (M - DMA) and B fragment ions (M - HO-B(N(CH3)2)2) for N-oxides, but sulfoxides also formed diagnostic C ions (M - O═BN(CH3)2), thus allowing differentiation of the functionalities. Some protonated analytes yielded abundant TDMAB adducts that had lost two DMA molecules instead of just one. This provides information on the environment of the N-oxide and sulfoxide functionalities. Quantum chemical calculations were performed to explore the mechanisms of the above-mentioned reactions. The method can be implemented on HPLC for real drug analysis. PMID:26651970

  20. Eicosapentaenoic Acid Inhibits Oxidation of ApoB-containing Lipoprotein Particles of Different Size In Vitro When Administered Alone or in Combination With Atorvastatin Active Metabolite Compared With Other Triglyceride-lowering Agents.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Jacob, Robert F

    2016-07-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) is a triglyceride-lowering agent that reduces circulating levels of the apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoprotein particles small dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL), very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL). These benefits may result from the direct antioxidant effects of EPA. To investigate this potential mechanism, these particles were isolated from human plasma, preincubated with EPA in the absence or presence of atorvastatin (active) metabolite, and subjected to copper-initiated oxidation. Lipid oxidation was measured as a function of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances formation. EPA inhibited sdLDL (IC50 ∼2.0 μM) and LDL oxidation (IC50 ∼2.5 μM) in a dose-dependent manner. Greater antioxidant potency was observed for EPA in VLDL. EPA inhibition was enhanced when combined with atorvastatin metabolite at low equimolar concentrations. Other triglyceride-lowering agents (fenofibrate, niacin, and gemfibrozil) and vitamin E did not significantly affect sdLDL, LDL, or VLDL oxidation compared with vehicle-treated controls. Docosahexaenoic acid was also found to inhibit oxidation in these particles but over a shorter time period than EPA. These data support recent clinical findings and suggest that EPA has direct antioxidant benefits in various apoB-containing subfractions that are more pronounced than those of other triglyceride-lowering agents and docosahexaenoic acid. PMID:26945158

  1. Strain-induced topological quantum phase transition in phosphorene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Seoung-Hun; Park, Jejune; Woo, Sungjong; Kwon, Young-Kyun

    Using ab initio density functional theory, we investigate the structural stability and electronic properties of phosphorene oxides (POx) with different oxygen compositions x. A variety of configurations are modeled and optimized geometrically to search for the equilibrium structure for each x value. Our electronic structure calculations on the equilibrium configuration obtained for each x reveal that the band gap tends to increase with the oxygen composition of x < 0.5, and then to decrease with x > 0.5. We further explore the strain effect on the electronic structure of the fully oxidized phosphorene, PO, with x = 1. At a particular strain without spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is observed a band gap closure near the Γ point in the k space. We further find the strain in tandem with SOC induces an interesting band inversion with a reopened very small band gap (5 meV), and thus gives rise to a topological quantum phase transition from a normal insulator to a topological insulator. Such a topological phase transition is confirmed by the wave function analysis and the band topology identified by the Z2 invariant calculation.

  2. Oxidative Stress Mediates Radiation Lung Injury by Inducing Apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yu; Zhang Xiuwu; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Jackson, Isabel L.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Apoptosis in irradiated normal lung tissue has been observed several weeks after radiation. However, the signaling pathway propagating cell death after radiation remains unknown. Methods and Materials: C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 15 Gy to the whole thorax. Pro-apoptotic signaling was evaluated 6 weeks after radiation with or without administration of AEOL10150, a potent catalytic scavenger of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Results: Apoptosis was observed primarily in type I and type II pneumocytes and endothelium. Apoptosis correlated with increased PTEN expression, inhibition of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling, and increased p53 and Bax protein levels. Transforming growth factor-{beta}1, Nox4, and oxidative stress were also increased 6 weeks after radiation. Therapeutic administration of AEOL10150 suppressed pro-apoptotic signaling and dramatically reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Increased PTEN signaling after radiation results in apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. We hypothesize that upregulation of PTEN is influenced by Nox4-derived oxidative stress. To our knowledge, this is the first study to highlight the role of PTEN in radiation-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  3. Oxide nanoparticles synthesis via laser-induced plasma in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Taku; Weihs, Hansel; Honda, Mitsuhiro; Kulinich, Sergei; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Ito, Tsuyohito

    2014-10-01

    Laser ablation in fluids has recently attracted a lot of attention as one of synthetic techniques to prepare new attractive nanomaterials, with the ability to control both product chemistry and morphology in many systems. In this study, we generated laser-induced plasma in H2O - ethanol mixtures, while ablating metal targets to produce oxide nanoparticles and to study the effect of the medium on their properties. The ablated targets used in this study were Zn or Sn plates. A nanosecond Nd:YAG laser with the wavelength of 532 nm (10 Hz, 20--30 mJ/pulse) was applied to irradiate the targets. The liquid media were maintained at 0.1 to 30 MPa to study the effect of pressure. We found that the H2O/ethanol ratio (at atmospheric pressure) can control the properties of the produced ZnO nanoparticles, such as defects and oxidation degree. The properties were examined by photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies, and so on. More details will be presented at the symposium.

  4. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M

    2016-07-12

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell. The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins, and G protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphorylation of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an endothelial cell subjected to a step increase of wall shear stress from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1-5 min) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases. PMID:27410748

  5. Radiation induced oxidative damage modification by cholesterol in liposomal membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, B. N.; Mishra, K. P.

    1999-05-01

    Ionizing radiation induced structural and chemical alterations in egg lecithin liposomal membrane have been studied by measurements of lipid peroxides, conjugated diene and fluorescence polarization. Predominantly unilamellar phospholipid vesicles prepared by sonication procedure were subjected to radiation doses of γ-rays from Co-60 in aerated, buffered aqueous suspensions. The oxidative damage in irradiated lipid molecules of liposomes has been determined spectrophotometrically by diene conjugate formation and thiobarbituric acid reactive (TBAR) method as a function of radiation dose. A correlation was found between the radiation dose applied (0.1-1 kGy) and the consequent lipid oxidation. The damage produced in irradiated liposomal membrane was measured by 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) fluorescence decay and polarization. The observed decrease in DPH fluorescence and increase in polarization was found dependent on the radiation dose suggesting alterations in rigidity or organizational order in phospholipid bilayer after irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated liposome vesicles composed of cholesterol showed marked reduction in observed radiation mediated peroxide formation and significantly affected the DPH fluorescence parameters. The magnitude of these modifying effects were found dependent on the mole fraction of cholesterol. It is concluded that modulation of structural order in unilamellar vesicle membrane by variations in basic molecular components controlled the magnitude of lipid peroxidation and diene conjugate formation. These observations contribute to our understanding of mechanism of radical reaction mediated damage caused by ionizing radiation in phospholipid membrane.

  6. Urea-induced oxidative damage in Elodea densa leaves.

    PubMed

    Maleva, Maria; Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Prasad, M N V

    2015-09-01

    Urea being a fertilizer is expected to be less toxic to plants. However, it was found that urea at 100 mg L(-1) caused the oxidative stress in Elodea leaves due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation that are known to stimulate antioxidant pathway. Urea at a concentration of 500 and 1000 mg L(-1) decreased low-molecular-weight antioxidants. In this case, the antioxidant status of plants was supported by the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase and guaiacol peroxidase. A significant increase in the soluble proteins and -SH groups was observed with high concentrations of urea (30-60 % of control). Thus, the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes, low-molecular-weight antioxidants, and induced soluble protein thiols are implicated in plant resistance to oxidative stress imposed by urea. We found that guaiacol peroxidase plays an important role in the removal of the peroxide in Elodea leaves exposed to 1000 mg L(-1)of urea.

  7. Liposomal Antioxidants for Protection against Oxidant-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Suntres, Zacharias E.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical, can be formed as normal products of aerobic metabolism and can be produced at elevated rates under pathophysiological conditions. Overproduction and/or insufficient removal of ROS result in significant damage to cell structure and functions. In vitro studies showed that antioxidants, when applied directly and at relatively high concentrations to cellular systems, are effective in conferring protection against the damaging actions of ROS, but results from animal and human studies showed that several antioxidants provide only modest benefit and even possible harm. Antioxidants have yet to be rendered into reliable and safe therapies because of their poor solubility, inability to cross membrane barriers, extensive first-pass metabolism, and rapid clearance from cells. There is considerable interest towards the development of drug-delivery systems that would result in the selective delivery of antioxidants to tissues in sufficient concentrations to ameliorate oxidant-induced tissue injuries. Liposomes are biocompatible, biodegradable, and nontoxic artificial phospholipid vesicles that offer the possibility of carrying hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and amphiphilic molecules. This paper focus on the use of liposomes for the delivery of antioxidants in the prevention or treatment of pathological conditions related to oxidative stress. PMID:21876690

  8. Nitric Oxide Signaling in Hypergravity-Induced Neuronal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, Gay R.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this research project was to identify the neurons and circuits in the vestibular nuclei and nucleus prepositus hypoglossi that utilize nitric oxide (NO) for intercellular signaling during gravity-induced plasticity. This objective was pursued using histochemical and immunocytochemical approaches to localize NO-producing neurons and characterize the fine morphology of the cells in ground-based studies of normal rats, rats adapted to hypergravity, and rats adapted to hypergravity and then re-adapted to the 1G environment. NO-producing neurons were identified and studied using four methodologies: i) immunocytochemistry employing polyclonal antibodies directed against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), to provide an indication of the capacity of a cell for NO production; ii) immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, to provide an indirect index of the enzyme's activity; iii) histochemistry based on the NADPH-diaphorase reaction, for fuI1 cytological visualization of neurons; and iv) double immunofluorescence to co-localize nNOS and L-citrulline in individual vestibular nuclei (VN) and neurons.

  9. Shear-Induced Nitric Oxide Production by Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, Krishna; Laughlin, Justin G.; Rangamani, Padmini; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2016-07-01

    We present a biochemical model of the wall shear stress (WSS)-induced activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in an endothelial cell (EC). The model includes three key mechanotransducers: mechanosensing ion channels, integrins and G-protein-coupled receptors. The reaction cascade consists of two interconnected parts. The first is rapid activation of calcium, which results in formation of calcium-calmodulin complexes, followed by recruitment of eNOS from caveolae. The second is phosphoryaltion of eNOS by protein kinases PKC and AKT. The model also includes a negative feedback loop due to inhibition of calcium influx into the cell by cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). In this feedback, increased nitric oxide (NO) levels cause an increase in cGMP levels, so that cGMP inhibition of calcium influx can limit NO production. The model was used to predict the dynamics of NO production by an EC subjected to a step increase of WSS from zero to a finite physiologically relevant value. Among several experimentally observed features, the model predicts a highly nonlinear, biphasic transient behavior of eNOS activation and NO production: a rapid initial activation due to the very rapid influx of calcium into the cytosol (occurring within 1 to 5 minutes) is followed by a sustained period of activation due to protein kinases.

  10. Transparent conducting oxide induced by liquid electrolyte gating

    PubMed Central

    ViolBarbosa, Carlos; Karel, Julie; Kiss, Janos; Gordan, Ovidiu-dorin; Altendorf, Simone G.; Utsumi, Yuki; Samant, Mahesh G.; Wu, Yu-Han; Tsuei, Ku-Ding; Felser, Claudia; Parkin, Stuart S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Optically transparent conducting materials are essential in modern technology. These materials are used as electrodes in displays, photovoltaic cells, and touchscreens; they are also used in energy-conserving windows to reflect the infrared spectrum. The most ubiquitous transparent conducting material is tin-doped indium oxide (ITO), a wide-gap oxide whose conductivity is ascribed to n-type chemical doping. Recently, it has been shown that ionic liquid gating can induce a reversible, nonvolatile metallic phase in initially insulating films of WO3. Here, we use hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry to show that the metallic phase produced by the electrolyte gating does not result from a significant change in the bandgap but rather originates from new in-gap states. These states produce strong absorption below ∼1 eV, outside the visible spectrum, consistent with the formation of a narrow electronic conduction band. Thus WO3 is metallic but remains colorless, unlike other methods to realize tunable electrical conductivity in this material. Core-level photoemission spectra show that the gating reversibly modifies the atomic coordination of W and O atoms without a substantial change of the stoichiometry; we propose a simple model relating these structural changes to the modifications in the electronic structure. Thus we show that ionic liquid gating can tune the conductivity over orders of magnitude while maintaining transparency in the visible range, suggesting the use of ionic liquid gating for many applications. PMID:27647884

  11. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cianchi, Fabio; Cortesini, Camillo; Fantappiè, Ornella; Messerini, Luca; Schiavone, Nicola; Vannacci, Alfredo; Nistri, Silvia; Sardi, Iacopo; Baroni, Gianna; Marzocca, Cosimo; Perna, Federico; Mazzanti, Roberto; Bechi, Paolo; Masini, Emanuela

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the potential involvement of the nitric oxide (NO) pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, we correlated the expression and the activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) with the degree of tumor angiogenesis in human colorectal cancer. Tumor samples and adjacent normal mucosa were obtained from 46 surgical specimens. Immunohistochemical expression of iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and CD31 was analyzed on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. iNOS activity and cyclic GMP levels were assessed by specific biochemical assays. iNOS protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. iNOS and VEGF mRNA levels were evaluated using Northern blot analysis. Both iNOS and VEGF expressions correlated significantly with intratumor microvessel density (rs = 0.31, P = 0.02 and rs = 0.67, P < 0.0001, respectively). A significant correlation was also found between iNOS and VEGF expression (P = 0.001). iNOS activity and cyclic GMP production were significantly higher in the cancer specimens than in the normal mucosa (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.0001, respectively), as well as in metastatic tumors than in nonmetastatic ones (P = 0.002 and P = 0.04, respectively). Western and Northern blot analyses confirmed the up-regulation of the iNOS protein and gene in the tumor specimens as compared with normal mucosa. NO seems to play a role in colorectal cancer growth by promoting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:12598314

  12. Glucuronidation of the oxidative cytochrome P450-mediated phenolic metabolites of the endocrine disruptor pesticide: methoxychlor by human hepatic UDP-glucuronosyl transferases.

    PubMed

    Hazai, Eszter; Gagne, Peter V; Kupfer, David

    2004-07-01

    Methoxychlor, a currently used pesticide, is a proestrogen exhibiting estrogenic activity in mammals in vivo. Methoxychlor undergoes oxidative metabolism by cytochromes P450, yielding 1,1,1-trichloro-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane (mono-OH-M) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)ethane (bis-OH-M) as main metabolites. Since humans may be exposed to these estrogenic metabolites, which are potential substrates of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), their glucuronide conjugation was investigated with human liver preparations and individual UGTs. Incubation of both mono-OH-M and bis-OH-M with human liver microsomes formed monoglucuronides. The structures of the glucuronides were identified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectometry. Examination of cDNA-expressed recombinant human hepatic UGTs revealed that several catalyze glucuronidation of both compounds. Among the cDNA-expressed UGT1A enzymes, UGT1A9 seemed to be the main catalyst of formation of mono-OH-M-glucuronide, whereas UGT1A3 seemed to be the most active in bis-OH-M-glucuronide formation. Furthermore, the chiral selectivity of mono-OH-M glucuronidation was examined. The results of the incubation of single enantiomers generally agreed with the chiral analyses of mono-OH-M derived from the glucuronidase digestion of the glucuronides of the racemic mono-OH-M. There was a relatively slight but consistent enantioselective preference of individual UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A9, and UGT2B15 enzymes for glucuronidation of the S- over the R-mono-OH-M, whereas in human liver microsomes differences were observed among donors in generating the respective R/S-mono-OH-M ratio. Since it was previously shown that human liver microsomes demethylate methoxychlor mainly into S-mono-OH-M, the observation that UGT1A isoforms preferentially glucuronidate the S-mono-OH-M suggests a suitable mechanism for eliminating this major enantiomer. This enantiomeric preference, however, is not extended to all samples of

  13. Metabolite Profiling Reveals the Effect of Dietary Rubus coreanus Vinegar on Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee Youn; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Singh, Digar; Yeo, Soo Hwan; Baek, Seong Yeol; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-26

    The study was aimed at exploring the curative effects of Rubus coreanus (RC) vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis by using ovariectomized rats as a model. The investigations were performed in five groups: sham, ovariectomized (OVX) rats without treatment, low-dose RC vinegar (LRV)-treated OVX rats, high-dose RC vinegar (HRV)-treated OVX rats and alendronate (ALEN)-treated OVX rats. The efficacy of RC vinegar was evaluated using physical, biochemical, histological and metabolomic parameters. Compared to the OVX rats, the LRV and HRV groups showed positive effects on the aforementioned parameters, indicating estrogen regulation. Plasma metabolome analysis of the groups using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-TOF-MS (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis revealed 19 and 16 metabolites, respectively. Notably, the levels of butyric acid, phenylalanine, glucose, tryptophan and some lysophosphatidylcholines were marginally increased in RC vinegar-treated groups compared to OVX. However, the pattern of metabolite levels in RC vinegar-treated groups was found similar to ALEN, but differed significantly from that in sham group. The results highlight the prophylactic and curative potential of dietary vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis. RC vinegar could be an effective natural alternative for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  14. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana.

  15. Light-induced biochemical variations in secondary metabolite production and antioxidant activity in callus cultures of Stevia rebaudiana (Bert).

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Rab, Abdur; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-01-01

    Stevia rebaudiana (S. rebaudiana) is a very important species with worldwide medicinal and commercial uses. Light is one of the major elicitors that fluctuate morphogenic potential and biochemical responses. In the present study, we investigated the effect of various spectral lights on biomass accumulation and secondary metabolite production in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. Leaf explants were placed on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium and exposed to various spectral lights. 6-Benzyle adenine (BA) and 2, 4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2, 4-D; 2.0 mgl(-1)) were used for callus induction. The control light (16/8h) produced optimum callogenic response (92.73%) than other colored lights. Compared to other colored lights, control grown cultures displayed maximum biomass accumulation (5.78 gl(-1)) during a prolonged log phase at the 18th day of growth kinetics. Cultures grown under blue light enhanced total phenolic content (TPC; 102.32 μg/g DW), total flavonoid content (TFC; 22.07 μg/g DW) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC; 11.63 μg/g DW). On the contrary, green and red lights improved reducing power assay (RPA; 0.71Fe(II)g(-1) DW) and DPPH-radical scavenging activity (DRSA; 80%). Herein, we concluded that the utilization of colored lights is a promising strategy for enhanced production of antioxidant secondary metabolites in callus cultures of S. rebaudiana. PMID:26688290

  16. Metabolite Profiling Reveals the Effect of Dietary Rubus coreanus Vinegar on Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee Youn; Kim, Hyang Yeon; Singh, Digar; Yeo, Soo Hwan; Baek, Seong Yeol; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Choong Hwan

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at exploring the curative effects of Rubus coreanus (RC) vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis by using ovariectomized rats as a model. The investigations were performed in five groups: sham, ovariectomized (OVX) rats without treatment, low-dose RC vinegar (LRV)-treated OVX rats, high-dose RC vinegar (HRV)-treated OVX rats and alendronate (ALEN)-treated OVX rats. The efficacy of RC vinegar was evaluated using physical, biochemical, histological and metabolomic parameters. Compared to the OVX rats, the LRV and HRV groups showed positive effects on the aforementioned parameters, indicating estrogen regulation. Plasma metabolome analysis of the groups using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and ultra-performance liquid chromatography quadrupole-TOF-MS (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS) with multivariate analysis revealed 19 and 16 metabolites, respectively. Notably, the levels of butyric acid, phenylalanine, glucose, tryptophan and some lysophosphatidylcholines were marginally increased in RC vinegar-treated groups compared to OVX. However, the pattern of metabolite levels in RC vinegar-treated groups was found similar to ALEN, but differed significantly from that in sham group. The results highlight the prophylactic and curative potential of dietary vinegar against postmenopausal osteoporosis. RC vinegar could be an effective natural alternative for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:26821009

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Differential Gene Expressions for Cell Growth and Functional Secondary Metabolites in Induced Autotetraploid of Chinese Woad (Isatis indigotica Fort.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yingying; Kang, Lei; Liao, Shiying; Pan, Qi; Ge, Xianhong; Li, Zaiyun

    2015-01-01

    The giant organs and enhanced concentrations of secondary metabolites realized by autopolyploidy are attractive for breeding the respective medicinal and agricultural plants and studying the genetic mechanisms. The traditional medicinal plant Chinese woad (Isatis indigotica Fort., 2n = 2x = 14) is now still largely used for the diseases caused by bacteria and viruses in China. In this study, its autopolyploids (3x, 4x) were produced and characterized together with the 2x donor for their phenotype and transcriptomic alterations by using high-throughput RNA sequencing. With the increase of genome dosage, the giantism in cells and organs was obvious and the photosynthetic rate was higher. The 4x plants showed predominantly the normal meiotic chromosome pairing (bivalents and quadrivalents) and equal segregation and then produced the majority of 4x progeny. The total 70136 All-unigenes were de novo assembled, and 56,482 (80.53%) unigenes were annotated based on BLASTx searches of the public databases. From pair-wise comparisons between transcriptomic data of 2x, 3x, 4x plants, 1856 (2.65%)(2x vs 4x), 693(0.98%)(2x vs 3x), 1045(1.48%)(3x vs 4x) unigenes were detected to differentially expressed genes (DEGs), including both up- and down-regulated ones. These DEGs were mainly involved in cell growth (synthesis of expansin and pectin), cell wall organization, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, response to stress and photosynthetic pathways. The up-regulation of some DEGs for metabolic pathways of functional compounds in the induced autotetraploids substantiates the promising new type of this medicinal plant with the increased biomass and targeted metabolites. PMID:25739089

  18. Haptoglobin alters oxygenation and oxidation of hemoglobin and decreases propagation of peroxide-induced oxidative reactions.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sambuddha; Jia, Yiping; Siburt, Claire J Parker; Abraham, Bindu; Wood, Francine; Bonaventura, Celia; Henkens, Robert; Crumbliss, Alvin L; Alayash, Abdu I

    2012-09-15

    We compared oxygenation and anaerobic oxidation reactions of a purified complex of human hemoglobin (Hb) and haptoglobin (Hb-Hp) to those of uncomplexed Hb. Under equilibrium conditions, Hb-Hp exhibited active-site heterogeneity and noncooperative, high-affinity O(2) binding (n(1/2)=0.88, P(1/2)=0.33 mm Hg in inorganic phosphate buffer at pH 7 and 25 °C). Rapid-reaction kinetics also exhibited active-site heterogeneity, with a slower process of O(2) dissociation and a faster process of CO binding relative to uncomplexed Hb. Deoxygenated Hb-Hp had significantly reduced absorption at the λ(max) of 430 nm relative to uncomplexed Hb, as occurs for isolated Hb subunits that lack T-state stabilization. Under comparable experimental conditions, the redox potential (E(1/2)) of Hb-Hp was found to be +54 mV, showing that it is much more easily oxidized than uncomplexed Hb (E(1/2)=+125 mV). The Nernst plots for Hb-Hp oxidation showed no cooperativity and slopes less than unity indicated active-site heterogeneity. The redox potential of Hb-Hp was unchanged by pH over the range of 6.4-8.3. Exposure of Hb-Hp to excess hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) produced ferryl heme, which was found to be more kinetically inert in the Hb-Hp complex than in uncomplexed Hb. The negative shift in the redox potential of Hb-Hp and its stabilized ferryl state may be central elements in the protection against Hb-induced oxidative damage afforded by formation of the Hb-Hp complex. PMID:22841869

  19. Effect of Treadmill Exercise and Hydrogen-rich Water Intake on Serum Oxidative and Anti-oxidative Metabolites in Serum of Thoroughbred Horses.

    PubMed

    Tsubone, Hirokazu; Hanafusa, Masakazu; Endo, Maiko; Manabe, Noboru; Hiraga, Atsushi; Ohmura, Hajime; Aida, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify changes of oxidative stress and antioxidative functions in treadmill-exercised Thoroughbred horses (n=5, 3 to 7 years old), using recently developed techniques for measurement of serum d-ROMs for oxidative stress, and BAP for antioxidative markers. Also, the effect of nasogastric administration of hydrogen-rich water (HW) or placebo water preceding the treadmill exercise on these parameters was examined. Each horse was subjected to a maximum level of treadmill exercise in which the horses were exhausted at an average speed of 13.2 ± 0.84 m/sec. Blood samples were taken 4 times, immediately before the intake of HW or placebo water at 30 min preceding the treadmill exercise, immediately before the exercise (pre-exercise), immediately after the exercise (post-exercise) and at 30 min following the exercise. In all horses, both d-ROMs and BAP values significantly increased at post-exercise. The increase in d-ROMs tended to be lower in the HW trial, as compared to the placebo trial at pre-exercise. The increase in BAP was considerable at approximately 150% of the pre-exercise values in both the HW and placebo treatment trials. The BAP/d-ROMs ratio was significantly elevated at post-exercise in both treatment trials, while a significant elevation was also observed at pre-exercise in the HW trial. BAP, d-ROM, and the BAP/d-ROM ratio tended to decline at 30 min after the exercise, except BAP and BAP/d-ROMs in the placebo trial. These results demonstrate that the marked elevation of oxidative stress and anitioxidative functions occurred simultaneously in the intensively exercised horses, and suggest a possibility that HW has some antioxidative efficacy. PMID:24833996

  20. Effect of Treadmill Exercise and Hydrogen-rich Water Intake on Serum Oxidative and Anti-oxidative Metabolites in Serum of Thoroughbred Horses

    PubMed Central

    TSUBONE, Hirokazu; HANAFUSA, Masakazu; ENDO, Maiko; MANABE, Noboru; HIRAGA, Atsushi; OHMURA, Hajime; AIDA, Hiroko

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to clarify changes of oxidative stress and antioxidative functions in treadmill-exercised Thoroughbred horses (n=5, 3 to 7 years old), using recently developed techniques for measurement of serum d-ROMs for oxidative stress, and BAP for antioxidative markers. Also, the effect of nasogastric administration of hydrogen-rich water (HW) or placebo water preceding the treadmill exercise on these parameters was examined. Each horse was subjected to a maximum level of treadmill exercise in which the horses were exhausted at an average speed of 13.2 ± 0.84 m/sec. Blood samples were taken 4 times, immediately before the intake of HW or placebo water at 30 min preceding the treadmill exercise, immediately before the exercise (pre-exercise), immediately after the exercise (post-exercise) and at 30 min following the exercise. In all horses, both d-ROMs and BAP values significantly increased at post-exercise. The increase in d-ROMs tended to be lower in the HW trial, as compared to the placebo trial at pre-exercise. The increase in BAP was considerable at approximately 150% of the pre-exercise values in both the HW and placebo treatment trials. The BAP/d-ROMs ratio was significantly elevated at post-exercise in both treatment trials, while a significant elevation was also observed at pre-exercise in the HW trial. BAP, d-ROM, and the BAP/d-ROM ratio tended to decline at 30 min after the exercise, except BAP and BAP/d-ROMs in the placebo trial. These results demonstrate that the marked elevation of oxidative stress and anitioxidative functions occurred simultaneously in the intensively exercised horses, and suggest a possibility that HW has some antioxidative efficacy. PMID:24833996

  1. In vitro antioxidative activity of (-)-epicatechin glucuronide metabolites present in human and rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Natsume, Midori; Osakabe, Naomi; Yasuda, Akiko; Baba, Seigo; Tokunaga, Takashi; Kondo, Kazuo; Osawa, Toshihiko; Terao, Junji

    2004-12-01

    Recently we identified four conjugated glucuronide metabolites of epicatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (E3'G), 4'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-3'-O-glucuronide (4'ME3'G), (-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (E7G) and 3'-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin-7-O-glucuronide (3'ME7G) from plasma and urine. E3'G and 4'ME3'G were isolated from human urine, while E7G and 3'ME7G were isolated from rats that had received oral administration of (-)-epicatechin (Natsume et al. (2003), Free Radic. Biol. Med. 34,840-849). It has been suggested that these metabolites possess considerable in vivo activity, and therefore we carried out a study to compare the antioxidant activities of the metabolites with that of the parent compound. This was achieved by measuring superoxide scavenging activity, reduction of plasma TBARS production and reduced susceptibility of low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) to oxidation. (-)-Epicatechin was found to have more potent antioxidant activity than the conjugated glucuronide metabolites. Both (-)-epicatechin and E7G had marked antioxidative properties with respect to superoxide radical scavenging activity, plasma oxidation induced by 2,2'-azobis-(2-aminopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) and LDL oxidation induced by copper ions or 2,2'-azobis(4-methoxy-2,4-dimethylvaleronitrile) (MeO-AMVN). In contrast, the other metabolites had light antioxidative activities over the range of physiological concentrations found in plasma.

  2. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  3. Influence of curcumin on cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion and on biliary excretion of cyclosporin and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Deters, M; Siegers, C; Hänsel, W; Schneider, K P; Hennighausen, G

    2000-06-01

    We investigated the ability of curcumin, which can be extracted from different Curcuma species, to prevent cyclosporin-induced reduction of biliary bilirubin and cholesterol excretion, and its influence on biliary excretion of cyclosporin (CS) and its metabolites in the bile fistula model in rats. I.v. injection of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) after 30 min increased dose-dependently basal bile flow (30 microliters/kg/min) up to 200%, biliary bilirubin excretion (3000 pmol/kg/min) up to 150%, and biliary cholesterol excretion (22 nmol/kg/min) up to 113%. CS (30 mg/kg) reduced bile flow to 66% and biliary excretion of bilirubin and of cholesterol to 33% of the basal value 30 min after i.v. injection. I.v. administration of curcumin (25 and 50 mg/kg) 30 min after CS increased bile flow dose dependently again to 130% for 1 hour and biliary excretion of cholesterol and of bilirubin to 100% of the basal value for 30 and 150 min, respectively. Injection of curcumin 15 min before CS prevented the CS-induced drop of bile flow at 50 mg/kg and reduction of biliary bilirubin excretion already at 25 mg/kg until the end of the experiment (180 min). The CS-induced reduction of biliary cholesterol excretion, however, was not prevented by curcumin. Finally, the biliary excretions of CS (1200 ng/kg/min) and its metabolites (1200 ng/kg/min) were slightly reduced by curcumin at a dose of 50 mg/kg (to 83% of the initial values). The clinical importance of these controversial effects remains to be shown.

  4. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles co