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Sample records for oxidized cu110 surface

  1. Properties of the Oxidized Cu(110) Surface: The DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olenga, Antoine; Fazleev, N. G.

    2012-10-01

    The study of adsorption of oxygen on transition metal surfaces is important for the understanding of oxidation, heterogeneous catalysis, and metal corrosion. In this work we have studied from first principles the changes of electronic properties of the Cu(110) surface due to oxygen adsorption. Especially, we have focused on studies of changes in the work function, electronic density, interlayer spacing, density of states and band structure with oxygen coverage. Calculations of electronic properties from first principles have been also performed for the (110) and surface of Cu2O to use for comparison. The first-principles calculations in this work have been performed on the basis of the Density Functional Theory and using DMOl3 code. The obtained theoretical results have been compared with available experimental data.

  2. Surface-mediated isomerization and oxidation of allyl alcohol on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, R.L.; Peterson, C.G.; Madix, R.J. )

    1989-06-21

    Allyl alcohol reacts with clean and oxygen-covered Cu(110) surfaces to produce propanal, acrolein, n-propyl alcohol, and hydrogen under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. Very small amounts of propylene and water are also formed. This pattern of reactivity contrasts sharply to the selective oxidation to acrolein observed on Ag(110). On the clean Cu(110) surface allyl alcohol undergoes O-H cleavage to form the surface alkoxide CH{sub 2}{double bond}CHCH{sub 2}O{sub (a)} and H{sub (a)}. The results suggest that the olefin in this species undergoes partial hydrogenation to the surface-bound oxametallacycles ({minus}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O-){sub (a)} and ({minus}CH-(CH{sub 3})CH{sub 2}O-){sub (a)} and complete hydrogenation to CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O{sub (a)}. Propanal forms at 320 K via further reaction of these oxametallacycles. Evidence for a {pi}-bonded allyl oxide CH{sub 2}{double bond}CHCH{sub 2}O{sub (a)}, which is more stable than n-propoxide (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O{sub (a)}) toward {beta}-hydride elimination, is presented. This allyl oxide decomposes at 370 K to form acrolein. The interaction of the double bond with the surface apparently restricts the interaction of the {beta}-C-H bond with the surface and increases the stability of this species. Propanal, acrolein, and H{sub 2} are formed at 435 K by a process thought to involve the thermal decomposition of ({minus}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O-){sub (a)} by a {beta}-hydride elimination pathway. This dehydrogenation pathway exhibits an activation energy 8 kcal/mol greater than for acyclic alkoxides. The conversion of allyl alcohol to propanal and propyl alcohol obviously involves the hydrogenation of the double bond which, by comparison, does not occur for propylene coadsorbed with hydrogen under similar conditions on this surface.

  3. Oxygen subsurface adsorption on the Cu(110)-c(6 × 2) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Zhou, Guangwen

    2013-09-01

    To understand the initial steps of the oxidation of Cu(110), we applied density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study oxygen subsurface adsorption at the Cu(110)-c(6 × 2) reconstructed surface by increasing oxygen coverage. A transition from oxygen octahedral occupancy to tetrahedral preference occurs when the coverage reaches 1 monolayer, which may signal the onset of bulk oxidation that initially forms highly distorted Cusbnd O tetrahedrons by comparing the bond lengths and angles of the resulting Cusbnd O tetrahedron with the bulk Cu2O structure. These results suggest that a critical oxygen coverage is required for such a crossover from the oxygen chemisorption to bulk oxide formation. A comparison with the oxygen subsurface adsorption at Cu(100) suggests that the Cu(110) surface has a larger tendency to form Cusbnd O tetrahedrons. We model oxygen subsurface adsorption at the Cu(110)-c(6 × 2) reconstructed surface. Increasing O coverage leads to O tetrahedral preference over octahedral occupancy. The resulting Cusbnd O tetrahedrons show resemblance to that of the Cu2O structure. Cu(110) shows a stronger tendency than Cu(100) to form Cu2O-like tetrahedrons.

  4. Oxalic acid adsorption states on the clean Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortuna, Sara

    2016-11-01

    Carboxylic acids are known to assume a variety of configurations on metallic surfaces. In particular oxalic acid on the Cu(110) surface has been proposed to assume a number of upright configurations. Here we explore with DFT calculations the possible structures that oxalic acid can form on copper 110 at different protonation states, with particular attention at the possibility of forming structures composed of vertically standing molecules. In its fully protonated form it is capable of anchoring itself on the surface thanks to one of its hydrogen-free oxygens. We show the monodeprotonated upright molecule with two oxygens anchoring it on the surface to be the lowest energy conformation of a single oxalic molecules on the Cu(110) surface. We further show that it is possible for this configuration to form dense hexagonally arranged patterns in the unlikely scenario in which adatoms are not involved.

  5. A Window on Surface Explosions: Tartaric Acid on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Mhatre, B S; Pushkarev, V; Holsclaw, B; Lawton, T J; Sykes, E C. H.; Gellman, A J

    2013-04-18

    Autocatalytic reaction mechanisms are observed in a range of important chemical processes including catalysis, radical-mediated explosions, and biosynthesis. Because of their complexity, the microscopic details of autocatalytic reaction mechanisms have been difficult to study on surfaces and heterogeneous catalysts. Autocatalytic decomposition reactions of S,S- and R,R-tartaric acid (TA) adsorbed on Cu(110) offer molecular-level insight into aspects of these processes, which until now, were largely a matter of speculation. The decomposition of TA/Cu(110) is initiated by a slow, irreversible process that forms vacancies in the adsorbed TA layer, followed by a vacancy-mediated, explosive decomposition process that yields CO{sub 2} and small hydrocarbon products. Initiation of the explosive decomposition of TA/Cu(110) has been studied by measurement of the reaction kinetics, time-resolved low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Initiation results in a decrease in the local coverage of TA and a concomitant increase in the areal vacancy concentration. Observations of explosive TA decomposition on the Cu(651)S surface suggest that initiation does not occur at structural defects in the surface, as has been suggested in the past. Once the vacancy concentration reaches a critical value, the explosive, autocatalytic decomposition step dominates the TA decomposition rate. The onset of the explosive decomposition of TA on Cu(110) is accompanied by the extraction of Cu atoms from the surface to form a (±6,7; {-+}2,1) overlayer that is readily observable using LEED and STM. The explosive decomposition step is second-order in vacancy concentration and accelerates with increasing extent of reaction.

  6. Water adsorbate influence on the Cu(110) surface optical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghbanpourasl, Amirreza; Schmidt, Wolf Gero; Denk, Mariella; Cobet, Christoph; Hohage, Michael; Zeppenfeld, Peter; Hingerl, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Surface reflectance anisotropy may be utilized for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and adsorption structures. Here, the reflectance anisotropy and surface dielectric functions of the thermodynamically most favored water adsorbate structures on the Cu(110) surface (i.e. hexagonal bilayers, pentagonal chains, and partially dissociated water structures) are calculated from density-functional theory and compared with recent experimental data. It is shown that the water overlayer structures modify in a geometry-specific way the optical anisotropy of the bare surface which can be exploited for in situ determination of the adsorption structures. For hexagonal bilayer overlayer geometries, strong features in the vacuum ultraviolet region are predicted. The theoretical analysis shows a noticeable influence of intraband transitions also for higher photon energies and rather slight influences of the van der Waals interaction on the spectral signatures. Water induced strain effects on the surface optical response are found to be negligible.

  7. Role of valence states of adsorbates in inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy: A study of nitric oxide on Cu(110) and Cu(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotari, Akitoshi; Okuyama, Hiroshi; Hatta, Shinichiro; Aruga, Tetsuya; Alducin, Maite; Frederiksen, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We studied nitric oxide (NO) molecules on Cu(110) and Cu(001) surfaces with low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). NO monomers on the surfaces are characterized by STM images reflecting 2 π* resonance states located at the Fermi level. NO is bonded vertically to the twofold short-bridge site on Cu(110) and to the fourfold hollow site on Cu(001). When NO molecules form dimers on the surfaces, the valence orbitals are modified due to the covalent bonding. We measured inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) for both NO monomers and dimers on the two surfaces, and detected characteristic structures assigned to frustrated rotation and translation modes by density functional theory simulations. Considering symmetries of valence orbitals and vibrational modes, we explain the intensity of the observed IETS signals in a qualitative manner.

  8. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy of Glycyl-Glycine Adsorbed on Cu(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyer, V.; Plekan, O.; Lyamayev, V.; Skala, T.; Prince, K. C.; Chab, V.; Tsud, N.; Matolin, V.; Carravetta, V.

    2010-06-01

    Studies of the interaction between organic compounds and surfaces are motivated by their application as bio sensors, and their relevance to biocompatibility of implants and the origin of life. In the present work interaction of the simplest peptide, glycyl-glycine, with the Cu surface has been studied. Multilayer, monolayer and sub-monolayer films of this dipeptide on the clean and oxygen modified Cu(110) surface were prepared by thermal evaporation in high vacuum. The techniques used were soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. By comparing the experimental and theoretical spectra, detailed models of the electronic structure and adsorption geometry for each coverage have been proposed, which are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. The carboxylic acid group of glycyl-glycine loses hydrogen and the molecule is coordinated via the carboxylate oxygen atoms to the surface. At low coverage the amino group bonds to the surface via a hydrogen atom, while at higher coverage the bonding is via the nitrogen lone pair. The peptide group is not involved in the bonding to the surface.

  9. Experimental intensity analysis of second harmonic generation at the Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, C.; Meister, G.; Woll, J.; Gerlach, A.; Goldmann, A.

    2000-06-01

    We have analyzed second harmonic generation (SHG) intensities from Cu(110) at fundamental wavelengths λ=1064 nm and between λ=650 and 540 nm. Experimentally the light incidence direction was chosen along the two inequivalent mirror planes of the surface lattice unit cell, and the linear polarizations of both input (fundamental) and output (frequency-doubled) radiation could be varied independently. At λ=1064 nm the relative sizes of the different components of the second-order susceptibility tensor are as follows: | χ zzz|=2490, | χ yzy|=139 and | χ zyy|=33.7. The remaining elements are below detection threshold: | χ xzx|<3 and | χ zxx|<3. This analysis is based on the use of Fresnel coefficients and bulk optical constants. The results indicate that SHG is dominated by transitions induced by the z-components of the incident electric field. However, the situation is completely different in the intensity maximum ( λ=600 nm) of a resonant intersurface band transition occurring around the Ȳ-point of the surface Brillouin zone: now SHG is dominated by the zyy tensor component, which exceeds both yzy and zzz, while again | χ zxx| and | χ xzx| are negligible. All available data, including temperature-dependent SHG studies of different authors, clearly show that contributions of electronic surface states to SHG intensities may be significant or even dominant. Therefore, a detailed quantitative understanding is a necessary condition for any analysis of adsorbate-induced SHG signals, since adsorbates can modify the surface electronic properties considerably. Our results furthermore indicate that the use of isotropic Fresnel coefficients to model the SHG-active electric fields is inadequate for a complete quantitative analysis.

  10. Local and global chirality at surfaces: succinic acid versus tartaric acid on Cu110.

    PubMed

    Humblot, Vincent; Lorenzo, Maria Ortega; Baddeley, Christopher J; Haq, Sam; Raval, Rasmita

    2004-05-26

    A detailed comparison of tartaric acid (HOOC-CHOH-CHOH-COOH) and succinic acid (HOOC-CH(2)-CH(2)-COOH) molecules on a Cu(110) surface is presented with a view to elucidate how the two-dimensional chirality exhibited by such robust, chemisorbed systems is affected when both OH groups of the former molecule are replaced with H groups, a stereochemical change that leaves the metal-bonding functionalities of the molecule untouched but destroys both chiral centers. It is found that this change does not significantly affect the thermodynamically preferred chemical forms that are adopted, namely the doubly deprotonated bicarboxylate at low coverages (theta

  11. Chemistry of Cu(acac){sub 2} on Ni(110) and Cu(110) surfaces: Implications for atomic layer deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qiang; Zaera, Francisco

    2013-01-15

    The thermal chemistry of copper(II)acetylacetonate, Cu(acac){sub 2}, on Ni(110) and Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces was probed under vacuum by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Some data for acetylacetone (Hacac, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 2}COCH{sub 3}) adsorbed on Ni(110) are also reported as reference. Chemical transformations were identified in several steps covering a temperature range from 150 K to at least 630 K. The desorption of Hacac and a 3-oxobutanal (CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 2}CHO) byproduct was observed first at 150 and 180 K on Ni(110) and at 160 and 185 K on Cu(110), respectively. Partial loss of the acetylacetonate (acac) ligands and a likely change in adsorption geometry are seen next, with the possible production of HCu(acac), which desorbs at 200 and 235 K from the nickel and copper surfaces, respectively. Molecular Cu(acac){sub 2} desorption is observed on both surfaces at approximately 300 K, probably from recombination of Cu(acac) and acac surface species. The remaining copper atoms on the surface lose their remaining acac ligands to the substrate and become reduced directly to metallic copper. At the same time, the organic ligands follow a series of subsequent surface reactions, probably involving several C-C bond-scissions, to produce other fragments, additional Hacac and HCu(acac) in the gas phase in the case of the copper surface, and acetone on nickel. A significant amount of acac must nevertheless survive on the surface to high temperatures, because Hacac peaks are seen in the TPD at about 515 and 590 K and the C 1s XPS split associated with acac is seen up to close to 500 K. In terms of atomic layer deposition processes, this suggests that cycles could be design to run at such temperatures as long as an effective hydrogenation agent is used as the second reactant to remove the surface acac as Hacac. Only a small fraction of carbon is left behind on Ni after heating to 800 K, whereas more carbon

  12. Thermal chemistry of copper(I)-N,N '-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Qiang; Zaera, Francisco; Gordon, Roy G.

    2012-01-15

    The surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces has been characterized under ultrahigh vacuum by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A series of thermal stepwise conversions were identified, starting with the partial dissociative adsorption of the copper acetamidinate dimers into a mixture of monomers and dimers on the surface. An early dissociation of a C-N bond leads to the production of N-sec-butylacetamidine, which is detected in TPD experiments in three temperature regimes, the last one centered around 480 K. Butene, and a small amount of butane, is also detected above approximately 500 K, and hydrogen production, an indication of dehydrogenation of surface fragments, is observed at 460, 550 and 670 K. In total, only about 10% of the initial copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate adsorbed monolayer decomposes, and only about {approx}3% of carbon is left behind on the surface after heating to high temperatures. The implications of this surface chemistry to the design of chemical film growth processes using copper acetamidinates as precursors are discussed.

  13. Autocatalytic effect of Cu nano-islands on the reaction of water with the oxygen covered Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, Kirill; Guillemot, Laurent

    2013-05-01

    We present a detailed STM study on the reactivity to water of the oxygen covered Cu(110) surface at 200 K. This reactive interaction is known to produce hydroxyls. We found that the hydroxyl chemical state is a key factor regulating further chemical reactions and causing a strong re-structuring of the surface. Parts of the hydroxyls are originally produced on the surface in the form of highly mobile copper-hydroxyl [Cu-OH] complexes. We demonstrate that interaction of the [Cu-OH] complexes with the substrate governs the surface restructuring. The hydroxyl complexes can dissociate either on step sites of the surface, incorporating Cu to the substrate and releasing hydroxyls (OHs) either, remarkably, condensate on the terraces shaping two-dimensional monoatomic height Cu islands possessing under-coordinated sites at their borders. We show that nucleation and growth of these nanometer scaled islands significantly enhance the surface reactivity towards water. Indeed, the Cu islands providing under-coordinated sites enhance water adsorption and furthermore produce a local effect favoring diffusion of the water molecules towards the more reactive sites.

  14. Thermal chemistry of hydrazine on clean and oxygen- and water-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunxi; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    The chemistry of hydrazine on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces was probed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions by temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Survey TPD experiments identified molecular nitrogen and ammonia as the main desorbing products from thermal activation of the adsorbate, but small amounts of diazene and NH2· radicals were also detected. At saturation coverage, N2 production leads NH3 desorption by approximately 10 K (with TPD peaks at 350 K versus 360 K, respectively), indicating a preference for dehydrogenation over N-N bond scission steps, and additional nitrogen was seen at even lower temperatures (320 K) in experiments starting with even higher doses of hydrazine. On the other hand, the formation of NH3 and NH2·, which desorb in a wide range of temperatures between approximately 300 K and 700 K, dominates in experiments with low N2H4 doses, presumably because a stronger interaction of the N-N bond with the metal in the flat adsorption geometry expected at such low coverages. Dosing at room temperature seems to also facilitate the dissociative adsorption, albeit via dehydrogenation steps that lead to the subsequent production of more significant amounts of diazene and of molecular hydrogen (in addition to N2, NH3, and NH2·). Preadsorption of oxygen on the Cu(110) surface helps stabilize the hydrazine, increasing its desorption temperature and helping with the low-temperature (320 K) production of N2. Coadsorption of hydrazine with water leads to facile proton exchange, as indicated by the production of NH2D in TPD experiments with N2H4 + D2O. This isotope scrambling must occur at cryogenic temperatures because all water desorbs from the surface below 200 K and no other changes in surface chemistry are observed after that. The implications of all this chemistry to practical applications that may use hydrazine in surface reactions with copper, including its use as a reducing agent in atomic layer

  15. The synthesis of methanol and the reverse water-gas shift reaction over Zn-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces: comparison with Zn/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Fujitani, T.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1998-03-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn vapor-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces for methanol synthesis by the hydrogenation of CO 2 and the reverse water-gas shift reaction were studied using an XPS apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor (18 atm). At a reaction temperature of 523 K, no promotional effect of Zn was observed for the methanol synthesis on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110). The results were quite different from those for Zn/Cu(111), on which a significant promotion of methanol synthesis activity appeared to be due to the deposition of Zn, indicating that the promotional effect of Zn was sensitive to the surface structure of Cu. However, hysteresis was observed in the catalytic activity for methanol synthesis over the Zn/Cu(110) surface upon heating above 543 K in the reaction mixture. The activity became twice that measured before heating, which was close to the methanol synthesis activity of Zn/Cu(111) at the same Zn coverage. On the other hand, no such hysteresis was observed for the reverse water-gas shift reaction on Zn/Cu(110), indicating that the active site for methanol synthesis was not identical to that for the reverse water-gas shift reaction. In the post-reaction surface analysis, formate species was detected on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110), whose coverage increased with increasing Zn coverage at 0< ΘZn<0.2. No correlation between the formate coverage and the methanol synthesis activity was obtained, which was in contrast to the results for Zn/Cu(111). Thus, the structure sensitivity observed in the catalytic activity of methanol synthesis over Zn-deposited Cu surfaces is ascribed to the significant difference in the reactivity of the formate intermediate.

  16. Adsorption and thermal chemistry of formic acid on clean and oxygen-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yunxi; Zaera, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The thermal chemistry of formic acid on clean and oxygen-predosed Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces was studied under ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV) conditions by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Key results reported in the past were confirmed, including the partial switchover from H2 to H2O desorption upon oxygen addition on the surface and the development of a second decomposition regime at 420 K, in addition to the one observed at 460 K on the clean substrate. In addition, new observations were added, including the previously missed desorption of H2 at 420 K and the existence of a normal kinetic isotope effect in both TPD peaks. Peak fitting of the XPS data afforded the identification of an asymmetric geometry for the formate intermediate, which was established to form by 200 K, and the presence of coadsorbed molecular formic acid up to the temperatures of decomposition, probably in a second layer and held by hydrogen bonding. Quantitative analysis of the TPD data indicated a one-to-one correspondence between the increase in oxygen coverage beyond θO = 0.5 ML and a decrease in formic acid uptake that mainly manifests itself in a decrease in the decomposition seen in the 460 K TPD peak. All these observations were interpreted in terms of a simple decomposition mechanism involving hydrogen abstraction from adsorbed formate species, possibly aided by coadsorbed oxygen, and a change in reaction activation energy as a function of the structure of the oxygen overlayer, which reverts from a O-c(6 × 2) structure at high oxygen coverages to the O-(2 × 1) order seen at θO = 0.5 ML.

  17. Insight into the influence of liquid paraffin for methanol synthesis on Cu(110) surface using continuum and atomistic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Wei-Hong; Liu, Shi-Zhong; Zuo, Zhi-Jun; Ren, Rui-Peng; Gao, Zhi-Hua; Huang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO/CO2 hydrogenation and water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu(110) in liquid paraffin and vacuum have been systematically researched with density functional theory calculation (DFT). For methanol synthesis from CO hydrogenation, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + H → HCO → H2CO → H3CO → H3COH; in the case of WGS, the reaction pathways in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO + 2H2O → CO + 2OH + 2H → CO + H2O + O + H2 → CO2 + H2O + H2; the reaction pathways of methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation in liquid paraffin and vacuum are CO2 + H → HCOO → H2COO → H2CO → H3CO → H3COH and CO2 + H → HCOO → HCOOH → H2COOH → H3CO → H3COH, respectively. The result shows that liquid paraffin does not affect the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO and WGS, but it changes the reaction mechanisms of methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. Hirshfeld charge and the d-band centers indicate that the catalytic activity of Cu(110) in liquid paraffin is smaller than that in vacuum. Our results also show that it is necessary to consider both continuum and atomistic models in the slurry bed.

  18. Supramolecular clusters and chains of 2,6-dimethylpyridine on Cu(110): Observation of dynamic configuration change with real-space surface science techniques and DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junseok; Sorescu, Dan C.; Lee, Jae-Gook; Dougherty, Dan

    2016-10-01

    The adsorption of 2,6-dimethylpyridine (2,6-DMP) on Cu(110) has been studied using low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM), time-of-flight electron stimulated desorption ion angular distribution (TOF-ESDIAD), and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. At low temperatures (T < ~ 150 K), the 2,6-DMP adsorbs in a flat configuration on Cu(110) producing clusters and extended domains via weak hydrogen bonding (C-H···N) with the molecular symmetry axis aligned along the < 001 > surface direction. At near-saturation coverage, a c(6 × 2) long-range ordered structure was observed. Upon annealing to T = 200 K, the 2,6-DMP molecules adopt an upright configuration with their pyridine ring plane oriented parallel to the < 1 1 ̅ 0 > azimuth. These upright 2,6-DMP molecules produce extended molecular chains where the repulsive interactions between the molecular chains give rise to coverage-dependent interchain distances.

  19. Superatom orbitals of Sc₃N@C₈₀ and their intermolecular hybridization on Cu(110)-(2x1)-O surface

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Tian; Zhao, Jin; Feng, Min; Petek, Hrvoje; Yang, Shangfeng; Dunsch, Lothar

    2010-02-24

    We investigate the electronic structure of an endohedral fullerene, Sc₃N@C₈₀, chemisorbed on Cu(110)-(2x1)-O surface by scanning tunneling microscopy and density-functional theory. Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy identify a series of delocalized atomlike superatom molecular orbitals (SAMOs) in the Sc₃N@C₈₀ and its aggregates. By contrast to C60, the encapsulated Sc₃N cluster in Sc₃N@C₈₀ distorts the nearly-spherical central potential of the carbon cage, imparting an asymmetric spatial distribution to the SAMOs. When Sc₃N@C₈₀ molecules form dimers and trimers, however, the strong intermolecular hybridization results in highly symmetric hybridized SAMOs with clear bonding and antibonding characteristics. The electronic-structure calculations on Sc3N@C80 and its aggregates confirm the existence of SAMOs and reproduce their hybridization as observed in the experiment.

  20. Role of the van der Waals interactions on the bonding mechanism of pyridine on Cu(110) and Ag(110) surface: First-principles study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atodiresei, N.; Caciuc, V.; Franke, J.-H.; Blügel, S.

    2008-07-01

    We performed density-functional calculations aimed to investigate the adsorption mechanism of a single pyridine (C5H5N) molecule on Cu(110) and Ag(110) surfaces. Our ab initio simulations show that, in the ground state, the pyridine molecule adsorbs with its molecular plane perpendicular to these substrates and is oriented along the [001] direction. In this case, the bonding mechanism involves a σ bond through the lone-pair electrons of the nitrogen atom. When the heterocyclic ring is parallel to the surface, the bonding takes place via π -like molecular orbitals. However, depending on the position of the N atom on the surface, the planar adsorption configuration can relax to a perpendicular geometry. The role of the long-range van der Waals interactions on the adsorption geometries and energies was analyzed in the framework of the semiempirical method proposed by Grimme [J. Comput. Chem. 27, 1787 (2006)]. We demonstrate that these dispersion effects are very important for geometry and electronic structure of flat adsorption configurations.

  1. Growth models of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface studied by noncontact atomic force microscopy at 78 K.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan Jun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kinoshita, Yukinori; Ma, Zong Min; Wen, Huanfei; Nomura, Hikaru; Naitoh, Yoshitaka; Sugawara, Yasuhiro

    2016-05-20

    We present an experimental study of coexisting p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases on an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) at 78 K. Ball models of the growth processes of coexisting p(2 × 1)/c(6 × 2) phases on a terrace and near a step are proposed. We found that the p(2 × 1) and c(6 × 2) phases are grown from the super Cu atoms on both sides of O-Cu-O rows of an atomic spacing. In this paper, we summarize our investigations of an oxygen-terminated Cu(110) surface by NC-AFM employing O- and Cu-terminated tips. Also, we state several problems and issues for future investigation.

  2. Tuning self-organized O/Cu(110) nanostructures by co-adsorption of sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiame, Frédéric; Poulain, Clément; Budinská, Zuzana; Maurice, Vincent; Marcus, Philippe

    2015-06-01

    A method for tuning the nanostructures formed by self-organized growth of oxygen on Cu(110) surface is proposed. It is shown that the range of possible nanostructures, consisting in alternating stripes of bare and oxidized copper, can largely be extended by the co-adsorption of sulfur. The classical Marchenko-Vanderbilt model describing the nanostructuration was generalized in order to take into account the change in the surface properties induced by the presence of sulfur. This modified model enabled us to infer the expressions of the periodicity and width of the self-organized stripes as a function of the sulfur and oxygen coverages.

  3. Reflectance difference spectroscopy of water on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denk, M.; Hohage, M.; Sun, L. D.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Esser, N.; Cobet, C.

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption of H2O on Cu(110) was probed by means of reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) in the energy range between 1.5 and 9.3 eV and by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The adsorption of water on the pristine Cu(110) substrate mainly induces changes in the Cu surface state related optical transitions. Furthermore, the H2O adsorbate modifies the Cu bulk transitions. In particular, our investigations demonstrate that the coverage-dependent phase transition from 1D pentamer chains to a (7 × 8) superstructure can be monitored by means of RDS. In the vacuum-UV range, new RD features assigned to Cu bulk transitions were detected. Adsorption on the metal surface strongly modifies or quenches the H2O HOMO-LUMO transition, whereby a distinct RD feature of the water molecules themselves in the vacuum-UV range is absent.

  4. Configuration change of NO on Cu(110) as a function of temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Shiotari, A.; Mitsui, T.; Okuyama, H. Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Koitaya, T.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2014-06-07

    The bonding structure of nitric oxide (NO) on Cu(110) is studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy at 6–160 K. At low temperatures, the NO molecule adsorbs at the short bridge site via the N end in an upright configuration. At around 50 K, this turns into a flat configuration, in which both the N and O atoms interact with the surface. The flat configuration is characterized by the low-frequency N–O stretching mode at 855 cm{sup −1}. The flat-lying NO flips back and forth when the temperature increases to ∼80 K, and eventually dissociates at ∼160 K. We propose a potential energy diagram for the conversion of NO on the surface.

  5. Configuration change of NO on Cu(110) as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotari, A.; Mitsui, T.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.; Koitaya, T.; Yoshinobu, J.

    2014-06-01

    The bonding structure of nitric oxide (NO) on Cu(110) is studied by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy at 6-160 K. At low temperatures, the NO molecule adsorbs at the short bridge site via the N end in an upright configuration. At around 50 K, this turns into a flat configuration, in which both the N and O atoms interact with the surface. The flat configuration is characterized by the low-frequency N-O stretching mode at 855 cm-1. The flat-lying NO flips back and forth when the temperature increases to ˜80 K, and eventually dissociates at ˜160 K. We propose a potential energy diagram for the conversion of NO on the surface.

  6. Effects of laser irradiation on the morphology of Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstetter, T.; Draxler, M.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Stehrer, T.; Heitz, J.; Georgiev, N.; Martinotti, D.; Ernst, H.-J.

    2008-07-15

    The effects of pulsed laser irradiation on the morphology of the Cu(110) surface were investigated by means of reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) and spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). The laser light induces surface defects (adatoms and islands) as well as subsurface dislocation lines. The high surface mobility leads to efficient annealing of the surface defects even at room temperature, whereas the subsurface dislocation lines persist up to temperatures T>800 K. SPA-LEED profiles of the (00) diffraction spot from the laser irradiated surface suggest an anisotropic distribution of the subsurface line defects related to the geometry of the fcc easy glide system, which is corroborated by STM measurements. Comparative experiments using conventional Ar ion bombardment point out the distinctiveness of the morphological changes induced by laser irradiation.

  7. Temperature dependent effects during Ag deposition on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.N.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Hoffbauer, M.A.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; van der Veen, J.F.; FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam )

    1989-01-01

    The composition, structure, and morphology of ultrathin films grown by Ag deposition on Cu(110) were monitored as a function of temperature using low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and medium energy ion scattering (MEIS). Aligned backscattering measurements with 150 keV He ions indicate that the Ag resides on top of the Cu and there is no significant surface compound formation. Measurements with LEED show that the Ag is initially confined to the substrate troughs. Further deposition forces the Ag out of the troughs and results in a split c(2 {times} 4) LEED pattern, which is characteristic of a distorted Ag(111) monolayer template. As verified by both AES and MEIS measurements, postmonolayer deposition of Ag on Cu(110) at 300K leads to a pronounced 3-dimensional clustering. Ion blocking analysis of the Ag clusters show that the crystallites have a (110)-like growth orientation, implying that the Ag monolayer template undergoes a rearrangement. These data are confirmed by low temperature LEED results in the absence of clusters, which indicate that Ag multilayers grow from a Ag--Cu interface where the Ag is captured in the troughs. Changes observed in the film structure and morphology are consistent with a film growth mechanism that is driven by overlayer strain response to the substrate corrugation. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Calculations of oxide formation on low-index Cu surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lian, Xin; Xiao, Penghao; Yang, Sheng-Che; Liu, Renlong; Henkelman, Graeme

    2016-07-28

    Density-functional theory is used to evaluate the mechanism of copper surface oxidation. Reaction pathways of O2 dissociation on the surface and oxidation of the sub-surface are found on the Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) facets. At low oxygen coverage, all three surfaces dissociate O2 spontaneously. As oxygen accumulates on the surfaces, O2 dissociation becomes more difficult. A bottleneck to further oxidation occurs when the surfaces are saturated with oxygen. The barriers for O2 dissociation on the O-saturated Cu(100)-c(2×2)-0.5 monolayer (ML) and Cu(100) missing-row structures are 0.97 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively; significantly lower than those have been reported previously. Oxidation of Cu(110)-c(6×2), the most stable (110) surface oxide, has a barrier of 0.72 eV. As the reconstructions grow from step edges, clean Cu(110) surfaces can dissociatively adsorb oxygen until the surface Cu atoms are saturated. After slight rearrangements, these surface areas form a "1 ML" oxide structure which has not been reported in the literature. The barrier for further oxidation of this "1 ML" phase is only 0.31 eV. Finally the oxidized Cu(111) surface has a relatively low reaction energy barrier for O2 dissociation, even at high oxygen coverage, and allows for facile oxidation of the subsurface by fast O diffusion through the surface oxide. The kinetic mechanisms found provide a qualitative explanation of the observed oxidation of the low-index Cu surfaces. PMID:27475390

  9. Calculations of oxide formation on low-index Cu surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Xin; Xiao, Penghao; Yang, Sheng-Che; Liu, Renlong; Henkelman, Graeme

    2016-07-01

    Density-functional theory is used to evaluate the mechanism of copper surface oxidation. Reaction pathways of O2 dissociation on the surface and oxidation of the sub-surface are found on the Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111) facets. At low oxygen coverage, all three surfaces dissociate O2 spontaneously. As oxygen accumulates on the surfaces, O2 dissociation becomes more difficult. A bottleneck to further oxidation occurs when the surfaces are saturated with oxygen. The barriers for O2 dissociation on the O-saturated Cu(100)-c(2×2)-0.5 monolayer (ML) and Cu(100) missing-row structures are 0.97 eV and 0.75 eV, respectively; significantly lower than those have been reported previously. Oxidation of Cu(110)-c(6×2), the most stable (110) surface oxide, has a barrier of 0.72 eV. As the reconstructions grow from step edges, clean Cu(110) surfaces can dissociatively adsorb oxygen until the surface Cu atoms are saturated. After slight rearrangements, these surface areas form a "1 ML" oxide structure which has not been reported in the literature. The barrier for further oxidation of this "1 ML" phase is only 0.31 eV. Finally the oxidized Cu(111) surface has a relatively low reaction energy barrier for O2 dissociation, even at high oxygen coverage, and allows for facile oxidation of the subsurface by fast O diffusion through the surface oxide. The kinetic mechanisms found provide a qualitative explanation of the observed oxidation of the low-index Cu surfaces.

  10. New analysis of He scattering data from Ag(110) and Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortona, P.; Dondi, M. G.; Lausi, A.; Tommasini, F.

    1992-10-01

    A method for the analysis of the He-surface scattering data using a model potential based on the superposition of pseudo-pairwise anisotropic terms and degenaracy-dependent self-interaction-corrected (D-SIC) calculations of the atomic electron densities is presented and applied to the study of the electron density of Ag(110) and Cu(110). Rearrangements of the electron clouds around the surface atoms with respect to those of the free atoms, leaving unchanged the lateral average, are observed in both cases.

  11. Temperature dependence and anharmonicity of phonons on Ni(110) and Cu(110) using molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koleske, D. D.; Sibener, S. J.

    1993-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for Ni(110) and Cu(110) using Finnis-Sinclair model potential. During the simulations the temperature dependencies of the mean-square displacements (MSD), the layer-by-layer stress tensors, and the surface phonon spectral densities were measured. A more pronounced increase in the MSD perpendicular to the atomic rows was observed as the temperature was increased as compared to either the other in-plane direction or along the surface normal. Also, at each temperature studied, the MSD along the direction normal to the surface were always larger in the second layer than in the first. Our calculations reveal that the surface phonon frequencies all decrease linearly with increasing temperature. Moreover, the surface phonon linewidths increase linearly with T at low T, and then exhibit an increased sensitivity to temperature variation, changing from a T to T2 dependence, approximately 150° before the onset of defect creation at the surface. These simulation results imply that the Ni(110) and Cu(110) surfaces do not extensively roughen before the onset of adatom-defect formation, and, in confirmation of experimental findings, that the rapid decrease of specular intensity for helium or electron scattering at elevated temperatures is due to the influence of anharmonicity in the surface potential.

  12. Elementary Process for CVD Graphene on Cu(110): Size-selective Carbon Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jialin; Wang, Zhunzhun; Niu, Tianchao; Wang, Shengnan; Li, Zhenyu; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Revealing the graphene growth mechanism at the atomic-scale is of great importance for achieving high quality graphene. However, the lack of direct experimental observation and density functional theory (DFT) verification hinders a comprehensive understanding of the structure of the carbon clusters and evolution of the graphene growth on surface. Here, we report an in-situ low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM) study of the elementary process of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene growth via thermal decomposition of methane on Cu(110), including the formation of monodispersed carbon clusters at the initial stage, the graphene nucleation and the ripening of graphene islands to form continuous graphene film. STM measurement, supported by DFT calculations, suggests that the carbon clusters on the surface are C2H5. It is found that graphene layers can be joined by different domains, with a relative misorientation of 30°. These graphene layers can be decoupled from Cu(110) through low temperature thermal cycling. PMID:24651211

  13. Oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  14. Adsorbed states of chlorophenol on Cu(110) and controlled switching of single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuyama, H.; Kitaguchi, Y.; Hattori, T.; Ueda, Y.; Ferrer, N. G.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2016-06-01

    A molecular junction of substituted benzene (chlorophenol) is fabricated and controlled by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Prior to the junction formation, the bonding geometry of the molecule on the surface is characterized by STM and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). EELS shows that the OH group of chlorophenol is dissociated on Cu(110) and that the molecule is bonded nearly flat to the surface via an O atom, with the Cl group intact. We demonstrate controlled contact of an STM tip to the "available" Cl group and lift-up of the molecule while it is anchored to the surface via an O atom. The asymmetric bonding motifs of the molecule to the electrodes allow for reversible control of the junction.

  15. Imaging sequential dehydrogenation of methanol on Cu(110) with a scanning tunneling microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Y.; Shiotari, A.; Okuyama, H.; Hatta, S.; Aruga, T.

    2011-05-01

    Adsorption of methanol and its dehydrogenation on Cu(110) were studied by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Upon adsorption at 12 K, methanol preferentially forms clusters on the surface. The STM could induce dehydrogenation of methanol sequentially to methoxy and formaldehyde. This enabled us to study the binding structures of these products in a single-molecule limit. Methoxy was imaged as a pair of protrusion and depression along the [001] direction. This feature is fully consistent with the previous result that it adsorbs on the short-bridge site with the C-O axis tilted along the [001] direction. The axis was induced to flip back and forth by vibrational excitations with the STM. Two configurations were observed for formaldehyde, whose structures were proposed based on their characteristic images and motions.

  16. The onset of sub-surface oxidation induced by defects in a chemisorbed oxygen layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jonathan; Li, Liang; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-02-28

    We investigate the onset of internal oxidation of a Cu(110) surface induced by oxygen subsurface adsorption via defects in the Cu(110)–(2 × 1)–O chemisorbed layer. The presence of a boundary formed by merged add-row structure domains due to a mismatch of half unit-cell leads to preferred oxygen adsorption at the subsurface tetrahedral sites. The resulting distorted Cu–O tetrahedra along the domain boundary have comparable bond length and angles to those of the bulk oxide phase of Cu{sub 2}O. Our results indicate that the presence of defects in the oxygen-chemisorbed adlayer can lead to the internal oxidation via the formation of Cu{sub 2}O-like tetrahedra in between the topmost and second outermost atomic layers at the oxygen coverage θ = 0.53 and the second and third outermost atomic layers at θ = 0.56. These results show that the internal oxidation of a metal surface can occur in the very beginning of the oxygen chemisorption process enabled by the presence of defects in the oxygen chemisorbed layer.

  17. Bond length and adsorbate vibrations of (2×3)N/Cu(110): A SEXAFS study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wende, H.; Arvanitis, D.; Tischer, M.; Chauvistré, R.; Henneken, H.; May, F.; Baberschke, K.

    1996-08-01

    Temperature- and angle-dependent surface-extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (SEXAFS) measurements on the system (2×3)N/Cu(110) are reported. Three inequivalent adsorption sites of the N atoms within the surface unit cell are identified. The successful separation of their contributions in the present SEXAFS analysis allows for a determination of N-Cu bond lengths not only within the surface plane but also to the second Cu layer. The temperature-dependent measurements between 60 and 300 K enable us to separate structural from dynamic effects in the SEXAFS amplitude, leading to a reliable determination of coordination numbers. A strong anisotropy is found in the adsorbate vibrations parallel versus perpendicular to the surface. The relative motion of the N atom relative to the first three Cu neighbor shells is characterized by means of the corresponding Einstein temperatures. These indicate that the N atom is primarily bonded only to four Cu atoms, and not to five as previously suggested. Anharmonic corrections are found necessary for a reliable distance determination of the N-Cu bonds to the second layer. The structural parameters are compared to the ones predicted by the pseudo-(100)-c(2×2)-N reconstruction.

  18. 1D self-assembly of chemisorbed thymine on Cu(110) driven by dispersion forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temprano, I.; Thomas, G.; Haq, S.; Dyer, M. S.; Latter, E. G.; Darling, G. R.; Uvdal, P.; Raval, R.

    2015-03-01

    Adsorption of thymine on a defined Cu(110) surface was studied using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), temperature programmed desorption (TPD), and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). In addition, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were undertaken in order to further understand the energetics of adsorption and self-assembly. The combination of RAIRS, TPD, and DFT results indicates that an upright, three-point-bonded adsorption configuration is adopted by the deprotonated thymine at room temperature. DFT calculations show that the upright configuration adopted by individual molecules arises as a direct result of strong O-Cu and N-Cu bonds between the molecule and the surface. STM data reveal that this upright thymine motif self-assembles into 1D chains, which are surprisingly oriented along the open-packed [001] direction of the metal surface and orthogonal to the alignment of the functional groups that are normally implicated in H-bonding interactions. DFT modelling of this system reveals that the molecular organisation is actually driven by dispersion interactions, which cause a slight tilt of the molecule and provide the major driving force for assembly into dimers and 1D chains. The relative orientations and distances of neighbouring molecules are amenable for π-π stacking, suggesting that this is an important contributor in the self-assembly process.

  19. Near-UV photodissociation of oriented CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on Cu(110)-I

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.T.

    2005-11-22

    Methyl iodide adsorbed on a Cu(110)-I surface has been found to be highly orientationally ordered. We have exploited this orientation to select different CH{sub 3}I excited states for photodissociation by using polarized near-UV light at wavelengths of 308, 248, and 222 nm. Using p-polarized light at all three wavelengths, we find that dissociation proceeds largely via the {sup 3}Q{sub 0} state, consistent with the picture from gas-phase photolysis. In contrast, using s-polarized light we find contributions from the {sup 3}Q{sub 1} state at {lambda}=308 nm, the {sup 1}Q{sub 1} state at {lambda}=248 nm, and the (E,1) state at {lambda}=222 nm--the latter being a state that has not been implicated in gas-phase studies of CH{sub 3}I A-band photolysis. We also note the contribution to surface photodissociation from low-energy photoelectrons causing dissociative electron attachment to adsorbed CH{sub 3}I and have identified the promotion of direct photodissociation pathways during {lambda}=308 nm photolysis.

  20. Effect of oxygen surfactant on the magnetic and structural properties of Co films grown on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, W.L.; Qiu, Z.Q.; Takeuchi, O.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, M.

    2000-04-13

    It was found that atomically flat Co(110) film could be grown on Cu(110) using O as a surfactant. To obtain detailed knowledge on the effect of O on the growth, as well as on the magnetic properties of Co overlayer, we carried out an investigation on this system using Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED), Surface Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect (SMOKE), and Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). With O as a surfactant, the initial growth of Co (< 1 ML) results in a flat monolayer structure. When the Co is thicker than 1 ML, three-dimensional clusters begin to form. These clusters become ordered islands at 3 ML Co and coalesce at about 5 ML Co. Above 5 ML Co, layer-by-layer growth resumes. No Cu segregation is observed. SMOKE studies at room temperature show that the Co film is magnetic above about 5 ML Co, with the magnetization easy axis along the [001] direction. On the other hand, without using oxygen as a surfactant, Co grows three-dimensionally on Cu(110). The Co overlayer has its easy magnetization axis along the [001] direction, but the onset of the magnetization was observed at 11 ML Co at room temperature.

  1. Effect of oxygen surfactant on the magnetic and structural properties of Co films grown on Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, W. L.; Qiu, Z. Q.; Takeuchi, O.; Ogletree, D. F.; Salmeron, M.

    2001-01-01

    It was found that atomically flat Co(110) films could be grown on Cu(110) using O as a surfactant. To obtain detailed knowledge on the effect of O on the growth, as well as on the magnetic properties of Co overlayer, we carried out an investigation on this system using Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE), and scanning tunneling microscopy. With O as a surfactant, the initial growth of Co (<1 ML) results in a flat monolayer structure. When the Co is thicker than 1 ML, three-dimensional clusters begin to form. These clusters become ordered islands at 3 ML Co and coalesce at {approx}5 ML Co. Above 5 ML Co, layer-by-layer growth resumes. No significant Cu segregation is observed. SMOKE studies at room temperature show that the Co film is magnetic above {approx}5 ML Co, with the magnetization easy axis along the [001] direction. On the other hand, without using oxygen as a surfactant, Co grows three-dimensionally on Cu(110). The Co overlayer has its easy magnetization axis along the [001] direction, but the onset of the magnetization was observed at 11 ML Co at room temperature.

  2. L-Methionine adsorption on Cu(110), binding and geometry of the amino acid as a function of coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méthivier, Christophe; Humblot, Vincent; Pradier, Claire-Marie

    2015-02-01

    The adsorption of L-methionine on Cu(110) has been characterized by combining in situ Polarization Modulation Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). Both the chemical state of the molecule, and its anchoring points were determined at various coverage values. Adsorbed methionine is anionic and first interacts with the copper surface via its sulfur and/or oxygen atoms, likely lying flat on the surface; at higher coverage, a stronger interaction of oxygen and nitrogen atoms with copper, evidenced by slight shifts of the XPS peaks, together with an angular dependence of the peak ratios, suggests that the molecule stands up on the surface, interacting with the surface via the N and O atoms but almost not anymore via its S atom. Last but not least, no multilayers were evidenced, and this was explained by the geometry of the molecules which leaves no groups accessible for intermolecular interactions.

  3. Electronic and structural properties at the interface between iron-phthalocyanine and Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Fang; Mao, Hongying; Zhang, Hanjie; Wu, Ke; Cai, Yiliang; He, Pimo

    2014-03-07

    Electronic structure and adsorption geometry of Iron-Phthalocyanine (FePc) adsorbed on Cu(110) were investigated by using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The emission features α, β, γ, and δ originating from the FePc molecules in UPS spectra are located at 3.42, 5.04, 7.36, and 10.28 eV below Fermi level. The feature α is mostly deriving from Fe 3d orbital with some contributions from C 2p orbital. A considerable charge transfer from the Cu substrate to the Fe 3d orbital occurs upon the adsorption of FePc molecules. The angle-resolved UPS measurements indicate that FePc molecules adopt lying-down configurations with their molecular plane nearly parallel to the Cu(110) substrate at monolayer stage. In combination with the DFT calculations, the adsorption structure is determined to be that FePc molecule adsorbs on the top site of Cu(110) with an angle of 45° between the lobes of FePc and the [11{sup ¯}0] azimuth of the substrate.

  4. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  5. Iron oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  6. Structural and magnetic studies of fcc Fe films with self-organized lateral modulation on striped Cu(110)-O(2x1) substrates.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.

    1998-09-21

    Fcc Fe wedges of 0-12 monolayer (ML) were grown by means of molecular beam epitaxy onto a novel substrate: flat Cu(110) with an oxygen-induced, long-range ordered striped phase, and studied in-situ with medium energy electron diffraction (MEED) and the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect (SMOKE). In contrast to Fe growth on either clean or oxygen-saturated Cu(110), the films on the striped substrates retain a layer-by-layer growth mode up to 6-7 ML and are fcc at least up to 12 ML. In addition, satellite peaks were observed on both sides of the MEED (0,0) streak, indicating a long-range-ordered lateral modulation of the Fe surface. We postulate that the Fe films grow conformally onto the original striped substrate. SMOKE studies show that these fcc Fe wedges are ferromagnetic with an easy axis along the original stripes for Fe thickness > 4ML and a remnant magnetization that increases linearly with thickness beyond 4 ML.

  7. Controlled injection of a liquid into ultra-high vacuum: Submonolayers of adenosine triphosphate deposited on Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobrado, J. M.; Martín-Gago, J. A.

    2016-10-01

    We have combined a fast-valve device with vacuum technology for implementing a new method that allows introducing liquid solutions in an ultra-high vacuum chamber in the form of very small droplets. This technical development allows the easy deposition of (bio) organic molecules or small nanoparticles on a surface in a fully in-situ process, avoiding possible contamination due to the handle of the material. Moreover, our experimental set-up is suitable for any liquid and does not require any voltage application as in electrospray. We can easily change the operating regime from liquid droplet injection to the formation of a highly dispersive jet of micro-droplets by exclusively adjusting external parameters. Due to the nature of the injection process, the operational protocol makes possible the deposition of delicate molecular species that cannot be thermally sublimated. In particular, we have used this system to study the deposition of adenosine triphosphate on Cu(110). The structure of the layer was analyzed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and the evolution of the signal from the deposited molecule with the number of injections indicates that the molecular coverage can be controlled with submonolayer precision.

  8. XPS and STM studies of the oxidation of hydrogen chloride at Cu(100) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altass, Hatem; Carley, Albert F.; Davies, Philip R.; Davies, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The dissociative chemisorption of HCl on clean and oxidized Cu(100) surfaces has been investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Whereas the dissociation of HCl at the clean surface is limited to the formation of a (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° Cl(a) monolayer, the presence of surface oxygen removes this barrier, leading to chlorine coverages up to twice that obtained at the clean surface. Additional features in the STM images that appear at these coverages are tentatively assigned to the nucleation of CuCl islands. The rate of reaction of the HCl was slightly higher on the oxidized surface but unaffected by the initial oxygen concentration or the availability of clean copper sites. Of the two distinct domains of adsorbed oxygen identified at room temperature on the Cu(100) surfaces, the (√ 2 × √ 2)-R45° structure reacts slightly faster with HCl than the missing row (√ 2 × 2 √ 2)-R45° O(a) structure. The results address the first stages in the formation of a copper chloride and present an interesting comparison with the HCl/O(a) reaction at Cu(110) surfaces, where oxygen also increased the extent of HCl reactions. The results emphasize the importance of the exothermic reaction to form water in the HCl/O(a) reaction on copper.

  9. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  10. The surface oxidation of pyrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, A. N.; Woods, R.

    1987-02-01

    The surface oxidation in air and air-saturated aqueous solutions of the iron sulfide mineral, pyrite, has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Iron sulfate was produced on fracture surfaces within the first few minutes of exposure to air under ambient conditions. Iron oxide was also included in the oxidation products after prolonged exposure which implies that a sulfur product in addition to sulfate must be formed. It is suggested that this product is an iron-deficient sulfide. Elemental sulfur was not evident at surfaces exposed to air. Iron oxide rather than sulfate was present at abraded surfaces exposed to air for a few minutes. Oxidation of pyrite in air-saturated acid solutions resulted in the formation of a surface sulfur layer the extent and nature of which depended on solution composition and exposure time. Sulfate was the only sulfur oxidation product identified in alkaline solutions not containing soluble sulfide, and iron oxide remained at the surface after such treatment. Thin layers of elemental sulfur were observed at fracture surfaces immersed in aerated, dilute sodium sulfide solutions.

  11. Oxides on Nanoscale Platinum Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Daniel; Komanicky, Vladimir; Pierce, Michael S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; You, Hoydoo

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate the existence of oxide layers on nanoscale Pt interfaces annealed in an oxygen environment. The sample is a Pt single crystal cut at the midpoint between the 100 and 111 crystal directions; annealing in Ar produces a smooth surface, while annealing in air produces ~ 10 nm-sized 100 and 111 facets. Synchrotron x-ray crystal truncation rod (CTR) measurements indicate a bilayer Pt oxide structure on the nanofacets. Fitted Pt occupancies are consistent with a nearest-neighbor avoidance structure of the surface oxygen atoms. Electrochemical cycling of the faceted surface in CO-saturated solution removes the oxide and leaves clean, ordered facets. Pt single crystals of 100 and 111 surface orientations prepared the same way did not support an oxide layer. Work at ANL is supported by DOE-BES and work at SU by VEGA.

  12. Insulating oxide surfaces and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Noguera, Claudine

    2016-03-01

    This contribution describes some peculiarities of the science of oxide surfaces and nanostructures and proposes a simple conceptual scheme to understand their electronic structure, in the spirit of Jacques Friedel's work. Major results on the effects of non-stoichiometry and polarity are presented, for both semi-infinite surfaces and ultra-thin films, and promising lines of research for the near future are sketched. xml:lang="fr"

  13. Surface-Step-Induced Oscillatory Oxide Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liang; Luo, Langli; Ciston, Jim; Saidi, Wissam A.; Stach, Eric A.; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-09-01

    We report in situ atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations of the oxidation of stepped Cu surfaces. We find that the presence of surface steps both inhibits oxide film growth and leads to the oxide decomposition, thereby resulting in oscillatory oxide film growth. Using atomistic simulations, we show that the oscillatory oxide film growth is induced by oxygen adsorption on the lower terrace along the step edge, which destabilizes the oxide film formed on the upper terrace.

  14. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T.; Milosevic, Erik; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  15. Surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation

    DOEpatents

    Stephens, Elizabeth V; Sun, Xin; Liu, Wenning; Stevenson, Jeffry W; Surdoval, Wayne; Khaleel, Mohammad A

    2013-07-16

    A surface modification to prevent oxide scale spallation is disclosed. The surface modification includes a ferritic stainless steel substrate having a modified surface. A cross-section of the modified surface exhibits a periodic morphology. The periodic morphology does not exceed a critical buckling length, which is equivalent to the length of a wave attribute observed in the cross section periodic morphology. The modified surface can be created using at least one of the following processes: shot peening, surface blasting and surface grinding. A coating can be applied to the modified surface.

  16. Electron stimulated oxidation of silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, M.C.; Sacedon, J.L.

    1981-04-15

    Experimental evidence of electron stimulated oxidation (ESO) has been given for Si(111) 7 x 7 surface. In a first stage, the oxide thickness as a function of time shows a linear relationship; in a second stage, the growth rate quickly decreases and a pressure dependent saturation oxide thickness is reached. During the oxidation process an electrical potential does exist across the oxide, as is required in the Cabrera--Mott theory. The linear kinetics and the electrical potential are shown to be explicable in terms of a modified coupled-current approach based on the Cabrera--Mott theory, provided a semiphenomenological pressure dependent parameter is included. This represents a contribution of the surface reaction to the transport equation. The saturation has been explained as due to the decrease of the negative surface charge (donor levels) which produces a decrease of the electron current.

  17. Surface complexes of acrolein on oxide catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, G.Ya.; Davydov, A.A.; Andrushkevich, T.V.; Zakharov, I.I.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that acrolein can be adsorbed by different mechanisms on the surface of oxide catalysts with the formation of {sigma}- and {pi}-complexes, H-complexes with surface OH groups; a species bound via the carbonyl group (the dissociative form of adsorption); and oxidized fragments, such as surface acrylates, carboxylates, formylacetates, and malonates. On the basis of the quantum-chemical analysis of the acrolein interaction with the surface of oxide catalysts in combination with IR-spectroscopic, thermodesorption, and catalytic studies, a conclusion has been drawn that the formation of a certain surface species and its reactivity are determined by the nature of an adsorption site and by the reactivity of surface oxygen.

  18. Surface Wrinkling on Polydimethylsiloxane Microspheres via Wet Surface Chemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-01-01

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties. PMID:25028198

  19. Surface Wrinkling on Polydimethylsiloxane Microspheres via Wet Surface Chemical Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jian; Han, Xue; Cao, Yanping; Lu, Conghua

    2014-07-01

    Here we introduce a simple low-cost yet robust method to realize spontaneously wrinkled morphologies on spherical surfaces. It is based on surface chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase-synthesized polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microspheres in the mixed H2SO4/HNO3/H2O solution. Consequently, curvature and overstress-sensitive wrinkles including dimples and labyrinth patterns are successfully induced on the resulting oxidized PDMS microspheres. A power-law dependence of the wrinkling wavelength on the microsphere radius exists. The effects of experimental parameters on these tunable spherical wrinkles have been systematically investigated, when the microspheres are pre-deposited on a substrate. These parameters include the radius and modulus of microspheres, the mixed acid solution composition, the oxidation duration, and the water washing post-treatment. Meanwhile, the complicated chemical oxidation process has also been well studied by in-situ optical observation via the microsphere system, which represents an intractable issue in a planar system. Furthermore, we realize surface wrinkled topographies on the whole microspheres at a large scale, when microspheres are directly dispersed in the mixed acid solution for surface oxidation. These results indicate that the introduced wet surface chemical oxidation has the great potential to apply to other complicated curved surfaces for large-scale generation of well-defined wrinkling patterns, which endow the solids with desired physical properties.

  20. Surface protected lithium-metal-oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Kang, Sun-Ho

    2016-04-05

    A lithium-metal-oxide positive electrode having a layered or spinel structure for a non-aqueous lithium electrochemical cell and battery is disclosed comprising electrode particles that are protected at the surface from undesirable effects, such as electrolyte oxidation, oxygen loss or dissolution by one or more lithium-metal-polyanionic compounds, such as a lithium-metal-phosphate or a lithium-metal-silicate material that can act as a solid electrolyte at or above the operating potential of the lithium-metal-oxide electrode. The surface protection significantly enhances the surface stability, rate capability and cycling stability of the lithium-metal-oxide electrodes, particularly when charged to high potentials.

  1. Surface chemistry and structure of beryllium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, E.L. Jr.; Eager, M.H.; Smithwick, R.W. III; Smyrl, N.R.

    1982-02-01

    Detailed examination of nitrogen sorption isotherms related to the surface chemistry and structure of high-purity beryllium oxide and the products of alkali treatment aid in a better understanding of the topochemical problems encountered in the production of ceramic items. Details are corroborated by additional techniques: diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT); mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP); and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results correlate well with studies on other oxides when the unique thermophysical properties of this material are considered.

  2. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  3. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focusmore » of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.« less

  4. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water-gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid-base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. Most surface science studies have been conducted on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  5. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  6. Patterning pentacene surfaces by local oxidation nanolithography.

    PubMed

    Losilla, N S; Martinez, J; Bystrenova, E; Greco, P; Biscarini, F; García, R

    2010-05-01

    Sequential and parallel local oxidation nanolithographies have been applied to pattern pentacene samples by creating a variety of nanostructures. The sequential local oxidation process is performed with an atomic force microscope and requires the application of a sequence of voltage pulses of 36V for 1ms. The parallel local oxidation process is performed by using a conductive and patterned stamp. Then, a voltage pulse is applied between the stamp and the pentacene surface. Patterns formed by arrays of parallel lines covering 1mm(2) regions and with a periodicity of less than 1microm have been generated in a few seconds. We also show that the patterns can be used as templates for the deposition of antibodies.

  7. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. The importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications is discussed. PMID:25436035

  8. Acceleration of Biochar Surface Oxidation during Composting?

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Katja; Fischer, Daniel; Walther, Sabine; Criscuoli, Irene; Favilli, Filippo; Nelle, Oliver; Glaser, Bruno

    2015-04-22

    Biochar composting experiments were performed to determine whether composting is a suitable method to accelerate biochar surface oxidation for increasing its reactivity. To assess the results, surface properties of Terra Preta (Brazil) and ancient charcoal pit (Northern Italy) biochars were additionally investigated. Calculation of O/C ratios by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated the anticipated increasing values from fresh biochars (0.13) to composted biochars (0.40), and finally charcoal pit biochars (0.54) and ancient Terra Preta biochars (0.64). By means of Fourier transformation infrared microscopy, formation of carboxylic and phenolic groups on biochars surface could be detected. Carboxylic acids of three composted biochars increased up to 14%, whereas one composted biochar showed a 21% lower proportion of carboxylic acids compared to the corresponding fresh biochar. Phenolic groups increased by 23% for the last mentioned biochar, and on all other biochars phenolic groups decreased up to 22%. Results showed that biochar surface oxidation can be accelerated through composting but still far away from ancient biochars. PMID:25802948

  9. Polarity of oxide surfaces and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goniakowski, Jacek; Finocchi, Fabio; Noguera, Claudine

    2008-01-01

    Whenever a compound crystal is cut normal to a randomly chosen direction, there is an overwhelming probability that the resulting surface corresponds to a polar termination and is highly unstable. Indeed, polar oxide surfaces are subject to complex stabilization processes that ultimately determine their physical and chemical properties. However, owing to recent advances in their preparation under controlled conditions and to improvements in the experimental techniques for their characterization, an impressive variety of structures have been investigated in the last few years. Recent progress in the fabrication of oxide nano-objects, which have been largely stimulated by a growing demand for new materials for applications ranging from micro-electronics to heterogeneous catalysis, also offer interesting examples of exotic polar structures. At odds with polar orientations of macroscopic samples, some smaller size polar nano-structures turn out to be perfectly stable. Others are subject to unusual processes of stabilization, which are absent or not effective in their extended counterparts. In this context, a thorough and comprehensive reflexion on the role that polarity plays at oxide surfaces, interfaces and in nano-objects seems timely. This review includes a first section which presents the theoretical concepts at the root of the polar electrostatic instability and its compensation and introduces a rigorous definition of polar terminations that encompasses previous theoretical treatments; a second section devoted to a summary of all experimental and theoretical results obtained since the first review paper by Noguera (2000 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 12 R367); and finally a discussion section focusing on the relative strength of the stabilization mechanisms, with special emphasis on ternary compound surfaces and on polarity effects in ultra-thin films.

  10. Surface phonons and surface reconstruction in calcium doped magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masri, P.; Tasker, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Static lattice calculation of the structure and energy of calcium doped magnesium oxide have indicated that the surface will be heavily segregated with calcium in accordance with experimental measurement. At moderate temperatures the enthalpy of segregation is sufficient to produce a monolayer coverage of impurity at equilibrium. The phonons for the segregated surface reported here show an instability that was not found in the static calculation. A phonon of imaginary frequency over much of the Brillouin zone indicates that a lower energy structure of larger periodicity should exist. We propose a self-consistent static-dynamic procedure that uses the phonon results to suggest a restructuring that is calculated in a static calculation. The phonon calculation is then repeated. When a lowest energy static calculation gives surface phonons with no softening, we can be confident of the predicted structure. In this case we have predicted a segregation induced surface restructuring. The restructured cell is c(√2 × √2)R45° with half the oxygen ions pushed high out of the surface. The small long wavelength phonon anomaly which remains suggests that there may also be a longer range rumpling of surface cations.

  11. Perfluorodiethoxymethane on nickel and nickel oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, J.

    1994-03-03

    The interaction of perfluorodiethoxymethane with a nickel single crystal, Ni(100); a nickel crystal with chemisorbed oxygen, Ni(100)-c(2x2)O; and a nickel crystal with nickel oxide crystallites, NiO(100) is investigated in an ultra high vacuum environment using thermal desorption spectroscopy and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy. Nickel, a component of hard disk drives and stainless steel, is used to represent metal surfaces in these {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} systems. Perfluorodiethoxymethane is used in this study as a model compound of industrial perfluoropolyether lubricants. These lubricants are known for their exceptional stability, except in the presence of metals. Perfluorodiethoxymethane contains the acetal group (-OCF{sub 2}O-), believed to be particularly vulnerable to attack in the presence of Lewis acids. Since the surfaces studied show increasing Lewis acidity at the nickel atom sites, one might expect to see increasing decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane due to acidic attack of the acetal group. No decomposition of perfluorodiethoxymethane is observed on the clean Ni(100) surface, while more research is needed to determine whether a small decomposition pathway is observed on the oxygenated surfaces, or whether sample impurities are interfering with results. The strength of the bonding of perfluorodiethoxymethane to the surface is found to increase as the nickel atoms sites become more acidic in moving from Ni(100) to Ni (100)-c(2x2)O to NiO (100).

  12. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-01-01

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). By comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps. PMID:25548155

  13. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling up of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.

  14. Oxidation-driven surface dynamics on NiAl(100)

    DOE PAGES

    Qin, Hailang; Chen, Xidong; Li, Liang; Sutter, Peter W.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2014-12-29

    Atomic steps, a defect common to all crystal surfaces, can play an important role in many physical and chemical processes. However, attempts to predict surface dynamics under nonequilibrium conditions are usually frustrated by poor knowledge of the atomic processes of surface motion arising from mass transport from/to surface steps. Using low-energy electron microscopy that spatially and temporally resolves oxide film growth during the oxidation of NiAl(100) we demonstrate that surface steps are impermeable to oxide film growth. The advancement of the oxide occurs exclusively on the same terrace and requires the coordinated migration of surface steps. The resulting piling upmore » of surface steps ahead of the oxide growth front progressively impedes the oxide growth. This process is reversed during oxide decomposition. The migration of the substrate steps is found to be a surface-step version of the well-known Hele-Shaw problem, governed by detachment (attachment) of Al atoms at step edges induced by the oxide growth (decomposition). As a result, by comparing with the oxidation of NiAl(110) that exhibits unimpeded oxide film growth over substrate steps, we suggest that whenever steps are the source of atoms used for oxide growth they limit the oxidation process; when atoms are supplied from the bulk, the oxidation rate is not limited by the motion of surface steps.« less

  15. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed. Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.

  16. Surface Structure of Aerobically Oxidized Diamond Nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Wolcott, Abraham; Schiros, Theanne; Trusheim, Matthew E.; Chen, Edward H.; Nordlund, Dennis; Diaz, Rosa E.; Gaaton, Ophir; Englund, Dirk; Owen, Jonathan S.

    2014-10-27

    Here we investigate the aerobic oxidation of high-pressure, high-temperature nanodiamonds (5–50 nm dimensions) using a combination of carbon and oxygen K-edge X-ray absorption, wavelength-dependent X-ray photoelectron, and vibrational spectroscopies. Oxidation at 575 °C for 2 h eliminates graphitic carbon contamination (>98%) and produces nanocrystals with hydroxyl functionalized surfaces as well as a minor component (<5%) of carboxylic anhydrides. The low graphitic carbon content and the high crystallinity of HPHT are evident from Raman spectra acquired using visible wavelength excitation (λexcit = 633 nm) as well as carbon K-edge X-ray absorption spectra where the signature of a core–hole exciton is observed.more » Both spectroscopic features are similar to those of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond but differ significantly from the spectra of detonation nanodiamond. Lastly, we discuss the importance of these findings to the functionalization of nanodiamond surfaces for biological labeling applications.« less

  17. Non-conventional halide oxidation pathways : oxidation by imidazole triplet and surface specific oxidation by ozone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Markus; Corral-Arroyo, Pablo; Aellig, Raphael; Orlando, Fabrizio; Lee, Ming-Tao; Artiglia, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Oxidation of halide ions (chloride, bromide, iodide) are the starting point of halogen release mechanisms out of sea water, marine aerosol or other halide containing continental aerosols. Slow oxidation of chloride and bromide by ozone in the bulk aqueous phase is of limited relevance. Faster surface specific oxidation has been suggested based on heterogeneous kinetics experiments. We provide first insight into very efficient bromide oxidation by ozone at the aqueous solution - air interface by surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicating significant build-up of an oxidized intermediate at the surface within millisecond time scales. The second source of oxidants in the condensed we have considered is the absorption of light by triplet forming photosensitizers at wavelengths longer than needed for direct photolysis and radical formation. We have performed coated wall flow tube experiments with mixtures of citric acid (CA) and imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) to represent secondary organic material rich marine aerosol. The halide ions bromide and iodide have been observed to act as efficient electron donors leading to their oxidation, HO2 formation and finally release of molecular halogen compounds. The photosensitization of imidazole-2-carboxaldehyde (IC) involves a well-known mechanism where the triplet excited state of IC is reduced by citric acid to a reduced ketyl radical that reacts with halide ions. A competition kinetics approach has been used to evaluate the rate limiting steps and to assess the significance of this source of halogens to the gas phase.

  18. The oxidation and surface speciation of indium and indium oxides exposed to atmospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detweiler, Zachary M.; Wulfsberg, Steven M.; Frith, Matthew G.; Bocarsly, Andrew B.; Bernasek, Steven L.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic indium and its oxides are useful in electronics applications, in transparent conducting electrodes, as well as in electrocatalytic applications. In order to understand more fully the speciation of the indium and oxygen composition of the indium surface exposed to atmospheric oxidants, XPS, HREELS, and TPD were used to study the indium surface exposed to water, oxygen, and carbon dioxide. Clean In and authentic samples of In2O3 and In(OH)3 were examined with XPS to provide standard spectra. Indium was exposed to O2 and H2O, and the ratio of O2 - to OH- in the O1s XPS region was used to monitor oxidation and speciation of the surface. HREELS and TPD indicate that water dissociates on the indium surface even at low temperature, and that In2O3 forms at higher temperatures. Initially, OH- is the major species at the surface. Pure In2O3 is also OH- terminated following water exposure. Ambient pressure XPS studies of water exposure to these surfaces suggest that high water pressures tend to passivate the surface, inhibiting extensive oxide formation.

  19. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  20. Pretreatment of lubricated surfaces with sputtered cadmium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Cadmium oxide is used with a dry solid lubricant on a surface to improve wear resistance. The surface topography is first altered by photochemical etching to a predetermined pattern. The cadmium oxide is then sputtered onto the altered surface to form an intermediate layer to more tightly hold the dry lubricant, such as graphite.

  1. Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

    2011-12-01

    (WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

  2. Negative ion mediated electron stimulated disordering of c(8 × 2) benzoate-Cu(110): extension of the displaced harmonic oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Q.; Frederick, B. G.; Perry, C. C.; Munz, A. W.; Bertrams, Th.; Richardson, N. V.

    1997-11-01

    We have extended the displaced harmonic oscillator model for negative ion resonance (NIR) scattering in high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), to interpret the energy transfer processes leading to disordering in STM and LEED, by allowing the curvature of the negative ion PES to be different to that of the ground PES. For the benzoate-Cu(110) system, the results of the extended model are significantly better if the ground and negative ion PESs have frequencies hω = 0.40 and 0.48 eV, respectively, rather than the same frequency. The large resonance width and asymmetry, but not the small overtone to fundamental excitation probability ratio, observed in HREELS can be accounted for with values of the coupling constant, β = 22.2 and inverse lifetime of Г = 0.6 eV (1.1 fs). These parameters, with nD = 7 are simultaneously able to account for the ratio of the STM:LEED disordering cross-sections and, most significantly, predict the large slope observed in the STM disordering cross-section as a function of bias. The properties of the probability distribution, Pn( ɛi, for the NIR process, involving two Franck-Condon transitions, is contrasted with the DIET process and some non-classical behaviour for the case ω 0 ≉ ω 1 is noted.

  3. Mechanisms for the near-UV photodissociation of CH{sub 3}I on D{sub 2}O/Cu(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, E. R.; Muirhead, G. D.; Jensen, E. T.

    2013-02-28

    The system of CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on submonolayer, monolayer, and multilayer thin films of D{sub 2}O on Cu(110) has been studied by measuring the time of flight (TOF) distributions of the desorbing CH{sub 3} fragments after photodissociation using linearly polarized {lambda} = 248 nm light. For multilayer D{sub 2}O films (2-120 ML), the photodissociation is dominated by neutral photodissociation via the 'A-band' absorption of CH{sub 3}I. The polarization and angle dependent variation in the observed TOF spectra of the CH{sub 3} photofragments find that dissociation is largely via the {sup 3}Q{sub 0} excited state, but that also a contribution via the {sup 1}Q{sub 1} excitation can be identified. The photodissociation results also indicate that the CH{sub 3}I adsorbed on D{sub 2}O forms close-packed islands at submonolayer coverages, with a mixture of C-I bond axis orientations. For monolayer and submonolayer quantities of D{sub 2}O we have observed a contribution to CH{sub 3}I photodissociation via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) by photoelectrons. The observed DEA is consistent with delocalized photoelectrons from the substrate causing the observed dissociation- we do not find evidence for an enhanced DEA mechanism via the temporary solvation of photoelectrons in localized states of the D{sub 2}O ice.

  4. Surface chemistry of copper metal and copper oxide atomic layer deposition from copper(ii) acetylacetonate: a combined first-principles and reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Schuster, Jörg; Schulz, Stefan E; Gessner, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    Atomistic mechanisms for the atomic layer deposition using the Cu(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate) precursor are studied using first-principles calculations and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Cu(acac)2 chemisorbs on the hollow site of the Cu(110) surface and decomposes easily into a Cu atom and the acac-ligands. A sequential dissociation and reduction of the Cu precursor [Cu(acac)2 → Cu(acac) → Cu] are observed. Further decomposition of the acac-ligand is unfavorable on the Cu surface. Thus additional adsorption of the precursors may be blocked by adsorbed ligands. Molecular hydrogen is found to be nonreactive towards Cu(acac)2 on Cu(110), whereas individual H atoms easily lead to bond breaking in the Cu precursor upon impact, and thus release the surface ligands into the gas-phase. On the other hand, water reacts with Cu(acac)2 on a Cu2O substrate through a ligand-exchange reaction, which produces gaseous H(acac) and surface OH species. Combustion reactions with the main by-products CO2 and H2O are observed during the reaction between Cu(acac)2 and ozone on the CuO surface. The reactivity of different co-reactants toward Cu(acac)2 follows the order H > O3 > H2O. PMID:26399423

  5. Surface chemistry of copper metal and copper oxide atomic layer deposition from copper(ii) acetylacetonate: a combined first-principles and reactive molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao; Schuster, Jörg; Schulz, Stefan E; Gessner, Thomas

    2015-10-28

    Atomistic mechanisms for the atomic layer deposition using the Cu(acac)2 (acac = acetylacetonate) precursor are studied using first-principles calculations and reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that Cu(acac)2 chemisorbs on the hollow site of the Cu(110) surface and decomposes easily into a Cu atom and the acac-ligands. A sequential dissociation and reduction of the Cu precursor [Cu(acac)2 → Cu(acac) → Cu] are observed. Further decomposition of the acac-ligand is unfavorable on the Cu surface. Thus additional adsorption of the precursors may be blocked by adsorbed ligands. Molecular hydrogen is found to be nonreactive towards Cu(acac)2 on Cu(110), whereas individual H atoms easily lead to bond breaking in the Cu precursor upon impact, and thus release the surface ligands into the gas-phase. On the other hand, water reacts with Cu(acac)2 on a Cu2O substrate through a ligand-exchange reaction, which produces gaseous H(acac) and surface OH species. Combustion reactions with the main by-products CO2 and H2O are observed during the reaction between Cu(acac)2 and ozone on the CuO surface. The reactivity of different co-reactants toward Cu(acac)2 follows the order H > O3 > H2O.

  6. Oxidation of nickel surfaces by low energy ion bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saric, Iva; Peter, Robert; Kavre, Ivna; Badovinac, Ivana Jelovica; Petravic, Mladen

    2016-03-01

    We have studied formation of oxides on Ni surfaces by low energy oxygen bombardment using X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Different oxidation states of Ni ions have been identified in XPS spectra measured around Ni 2p and O 1s core-levels. We have compared our results with thermal oxidation of Ni and shown that ion bombardment is more efficient in creating thin oxide films on Ni surfaces. The dominant Ni-oxide in both oxidation processes is NiO (Ni2+ oxidation state), while some Ni2O3 contributions (Ni3+ oxidation state) are still present in all oxidised samples. The oxide thickness of bombarded Ni samples, as determined by SIMS, was shown to be related to the penetration depth of oxygen ions in Ni.

  7. Engineering Polarons at a Metal Oxide Surface.

    PubMed

    Yim, C M; Watkins, M B; Wolf, M J; Pang, C L; Hermansson, K; Thornton, G

    2016-09-01

    Polarons in metal oxides are important in processes such as catalysis, high temperature superconductivity, and dielectric breakdown in nanoscale electronics. Here, we study the behavior of electron small polarons associated with oxygen vacancies at rutile TiO_{2}(110), using a combination of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. We find that the electrons are symmetrically distributed around isolated vacancies at 78 K, but as the temperature is reduced, their distributions become increasingly asymmetric, confirming their polaronic nature. By manipulating isolated vacancies with the STM tip, we show that particular configurations of polarons are preferred for given locations of the vacancies, which we ascribe to small residual electric fields in the surface. We also form a series of vacancy complexes and manipulate the Ti ions surrounding them, both of which change the associated electronic distributions. Thus, we demonstrate that the configurations of polarons can be engineered, paving the way for the construction of conductive pathways relevant to resistive switching devices. PMID:27661706

  8. Engineering Polarons at a Metal Oxide Surface.

    PubMed

    Yim, C M; Watkins, M B; Wolf, M J; Pang, C L; Hermansson, K; Thornton, G

    2016-09-01

    Polarons in metal oxides are important in processes such as catalysis, high temperature superconductivity, and dielectric breakdown in nanoscale electronics. Here, we study the behavior of electron small polarons associated with oxygen vacancies at rutile TiO_{2}(110), using a combination of low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), density functional theory, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. We find that the electrons are symmetrically distributed around isolated vacancies at 78 K, but as the temperature is reduced, their distributions become increasingly asymmetric, confirming their polaronic nature. By manipulating isolated vacancies with the STM tip, we show that particular configurations of polarons are preferred for given locations of the vacancies, which we ascribe to small residual electric fields in the surface. We also form a series of vacancy complexes and manipulate the Ti ions surrounding them, both of which change the associated electronic distributions. Thus, we demonstrate that the configurations of polarons can be engineered, paving the way for the construction of conductive pathways relevant to resistive switching devices.

  9. Surface and sub-surface thermal oxidation of thin ruthenium films

    SciTech Connect

    Coloma Ribera, R.; Kruijs, R. W. E. van de; Yakshin, A. E.; Bijkerk, F.; Kokke, S.; Zoethout, E.

    2014-09-29

    A mixed 2D (film) and 3D (nano-column) growth of ruthenium oxide has been experimentally observed for thermally oxidized polycrystalline ruthenium thin films. Furthermore, in situ x-ray reflectivity upon annealing allowed the detection of 2D film growth as two separate layers consisting of low density and high density oxides. Nano-columns grow at the surface of the low density oxide layer, with the growth rate being limited by diffusion of ruthenium through the formed oxide film. Simultaneously, with the growth of the columns, sub-surface high density oxide continues to grow limited by diffusion of oxygen or ruthenium through the oxide film.

  10. Inverse gas chromatography investigation of oxidized polyolefins: surface properties.

    PubMed

    Voelkel, Adam; Strzemiecka, Beata; Marek, Adam Andrzej; Zawadiak, Jan

    2014-04-11

    Oxidized polyolefins were obtained in processes with the use of air or oxygen as oxidizing agent. The oxidation process caused partial polymer degradation and the change of the surface properties of examined materials. The magnitude of these changes was estimated by means of inverse gas chromatography. All oxidized materials were found to exhibit slightly acidic character. Surface properties strongly depend on the content of oxygen functional groups (oxidation degree) and type of initial material. The most active surfaces were found for oxidized polypropylene and polyethylene wax. The use of principal component analysis allowed to select four parameters offering complete information on the physiochemical character of examined materials (γS(D)), acid volume or saponification number, KA or KD and KA/KD.

  11. Multiscale Investigations of the Early Stage Oxidation on Cu Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qing; Xiao, Penghao; Lian, Xin; Yang, Shen-Che; Henkelman, Grame; Saidi, Wissam; Yang, Judith; University of Pittsburgh Team; University of Texas at Austin Team

    Previous in situ TEM experiments have shown that the oxidation of the three low index Cu surfaces (100), (110) and (111) exhibit different oxide nucleation rates, and the resulting oxides have 3-dimensional (3D) island shapes or 2D rafts under different conditions. In order to better understand these results, we have investigated the early stages of Cu oxidation using a multiscale computational approach that employs density functional theory (DFT), reactive force field (ReaxFF), and kinetic Mote Carlo (KMC). With DFT calculation, we have compared O2 dissociation barriers on Cu (100), (110) and (111) surfaces at high oxygen coverage to evaluate the kinetic barrier of sublayer oxidization. We found that O2 dissociation barriers on Cu(111) surface are all lower than those on (110) and (100) surfaces. This trend agrees with experimental observations that (111) surface is easier to oxidize. These DFT calculated energy barriers are then incorporated into KMC simulations. The large scale ReaxFF molecular dynamics and KMC simulations detail the oxidation dynamics of the different Cu surfaces, and show the formation of various oxide morphologies that are consistent with experimental observations.

  12. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wei; He, Quanguo; Jiang, Changzhong

    2008-10-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed.

  13. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  14. Selective placement of carbon nanotubes on metal-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hannon, J B; Afzali, A; Klinke, Ch; Avouris, Ph

    2005-09-13

    We describe a method to selectively position carbon nanotubes on Al2O3 and HfO2 surfaces. The method exploits the selective binding of alkylphosphonic acids to oxide surfaces with large isoelectric points (i.e. basic rather than acidic surfaces). We have patterned oxide surfaces with acids using both microcontact printing and conventional lithography. With proper choice of the functional end group (e.g., -CH3 or -NH2), nanotube adhesion to the surface can be either prevented or enhanced.

  15. High-Temperature Oxide Regrowth on Mechanically-Damaged Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, Peter Julian; Lowe, Tracie M

    2008-01-01

    Here we report the effects of mechanical damage from a sharp stylus on the regrowth of oxide layers on a Ni-based superalloy known as Pyromet 80A . It was found that the oxide that reformed on the damaged portion of a pre-oxidized surface differed from that which formed on undamaged areas after the equal exposures to elevated temperature in air. These findings have broad implications for modeling the processes of material degradation in applications such as exhaust valves in internal combustion engines because they imply that static oxidation data for candidate materials may not adequately reflect their reaction to operating environments that involve both mechanical contact and oxidation.

  16. Optical glass surfaces polishing by cerium oxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzid, D.; Belkhie, N.; Aliouane, T.

    2012-02-01

    The use of powders in metallic oxides as means of grinding and polishing of the optical glass components have seen recently a large application in optical industry. In fact, cerium oxide abrasive is more used in the optical glass polishing. It is used as grains abrasive in suspension or fixed abrasive (pellets); these pellets are manufactured from a mixture made of cerium oxide abrasive and a organic binder. The cerium oxide used in the experiments is made by (Logitech USA) of 99 % purity, the average grain size of the particle is 300 nm, the density being 6,74 g /cm3 and the specific surface is 3,3042 m2/g. In this study, we are interested in the surfaces quality of the optical glass borosilicate crown (BK7) polished by particles in cerium oxide bounded by epoxy. The surfaces of the optical glass treated are characterized by the roughness, the flatness by using the microscope Zygo and the SEM.

  17. The Electronic Structure of Nonpolar Surfaces in Insulating Metal Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the electronic and geometric structures of metal oxide surfaces has a key interest in many technological areas. A randomly chosen crystal surface has a high probability of being polar, unstable and containing in-gap states due to surface dangling bonds. As a result, the surface should be stabilized by passivation or reconstruction. However, do the nonpolar surfaces of ionic crystals of insulating metal oxides need the passivation or reconstruction similar to covalent crystals? We address this question by analyzing the nonpolar surfaces and their electronic structure for the common crystal structures of metal oxides. The study using periodic DFT calculations is performed for following representatives: Cu2O, ZnO, Al2O3, TiO2, V2O5, WO3, CaTiO3, Mg2SiO4. It has been shown that the nonpolar surface can be constructed out of dipole-free, charge-neutral and stoichiometric unit cells for each crystal. We demonstrate that all constructed and relaxed nonpolar surfaces of the metal oxides show a clear band gap. It should be emphasized that the constructed surfaces are neither reconstructed nor passivated. Additionally, we show a correlation between the electronic structure of the relaxed surfaces and Ewald energies calculated for the surface ions.

  18. Mechanisms, kinetics, and dynamics of oxidation and reactions on oxide surfaces investigated by scanning probe microscopy.

    PubMed

    Altman, Eric I; Schwarz, Udo D

    2010-07-20

    Advances in scanning probe microscopies (SPM) have allowed the mechanisms and rates of adsorption, diffusion and reactions on surfaces to be characterized by directly observing the motions of the individual atoms and molecules involved. The importance of oxides as thermal and photocatalysts, chemical sensors, and substrates for epitaxial growth has motivated dynamical SPM studies of oxide surfaces and their formation. Work on the TiO(2) (110) surface is reviewed as an example of how dynamic SPM studies have revealed unexpected interactions between adsorbates and defects that influence macroscopic reaction rates. Studies following diffusion, adsorption and phase transitions on bulk and surface oxides are also discussed. A perspective is provided on advanced SPM techniques that hold great promise for yielding new insights into the mechanisms and rates of elemental processes that take place either during oxidation or on oxide surfaces, with particular emphasis on methods that extend the time and chemical resolution of dynamical SPM measurements.

  19. Thermal instability of GaSb surface oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, K.; Matsukura, Y.; Suzuki, R.; Aoki, M.

    2016-05-01

    In the development of InAs/GaSb Type-II superlattice (T2SL) infrared photodetectors, the surface leakage current at the mesa sidewall must be suppressed. To achieve this requirement, both the surface treatment and the passivation layer are key technologies. As a starting point to design these processes, we investigated the GaSb oxide in terms of its growth and thermal stability. We found that the formation of GaSb oxide was very different from those of GaAs. Both Ga and Sb are oxidized at the surface of GaSb. In contrast, only Ga is oxidized and As is barely oxidized in the case of GaAs. Interestingly, the GaSb oxide can be formed even in DI water, which results in a very thick oxide film over 40 nm after 120 minutes. To examine the thermal stability, the GaSb native oxide was annealed in a vacuum and analyzed by XPS and Raman spectroscopy. These analyses suggest that SbOx in the GaSb native oxide will be reduced to metallic Sb above 300°C. To directly evaluate the effect of oxide instability on the device performance, a T2SL p-i-n photodetector was fabricated that has a cutoff wavelength of about 4 μm at 80 K. As a result, the surface leakage component was increased by the post annealing at 325°C. On the basis of these results, it is possible to speculate that a part of GaSb oxide on the sidewall surface will be reduced to metallic Sb, which acts as an origin of additional leakage current path.

  20. Halogens on Semiconductor Surfaces: Adsorption, Oxidation, and Etching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepniak, Frank

    This dissertation presents studies of Si, GaAs, and InP surfaces following exposure to the halogens Cl _2 and Br_2. Synchrotron radiation photoemission is used to investigate the oxidation states of Si near the Si/SiO_2 interface as a function of Cl_2 exposure. Oxidation of highly ordered surfaces shows no dependence of the oxidation state concentration on Cl_2 inclusion in the gas mixture. For less-than-ideal Si surfaces, oxidation with O_2 -only results in a broader transition region, and presumably, inferior electrical properties. The addition of Cl_2 in the oxidizing gas reduced the concentration of intermediate oxides by a factor of two for these disordered starting Si surfaces. A new feature is also measured from Cl-Si bonds that we associate with passivation of Si defects at the oxide interface. The adsorption and reactivity of Br_2 and Cl_2 on GaAs(110) and InP(110) was studied in the temperature range of 25 K < T < 625 K with photoemission spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. Initial halogen adsorption was dissociative at all temperatures and we find that a simple model where the halogen atoms bond to a single Ga or As surface site can not account for the complex surface chemistry and morphology. Thermally-activated etching was observed after warming a surface with chemisorbed Br or Cl. Etching resulted from the formation and eventual temperature dependent desorption of the trihalides of Ga and As. For halogen exposures where T < 650 K, monohalide-like surface bonding persist during the etching process and the etched surface is rough. For T > 700 K, the surface is essentially free of halogen and etching occurs in a nearly layer-by-layer fashion.

  1. Rates of oxidative weathering on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Implicit in the mnemonic 'MSATT' (Mars surface and atmosphere through time) is that rates of surface processes on Mars through time should be investigated, including studies of the kinetics and mechanism of oxidative weathering reactions occurring in the Martian regolith. Such measurements are described. Two major elements analyzed in the Viking Lander XRF experiment that are most vulnerable to atmospheric oxidation are iron and sulfur. Originally, they occurred as Fe(2+)-bearing silicate and sulfide minerals in basaltic rocks on the surface of Mars. However, chemical weathering reactions through time have produced ferric- and sulfate-bearing assemblages now visible in the Martian regolith. Such observations raise several question about: (1) when the oxidative weathering reactions took place on Mars; (2) whether or not the oxidized regolith is a fossilized remnant of past weathering processes; (3) deducting chemical interactions of the ancient Martian atmosphere with its surface from surviving phases; (4) possible weathering reactions still occurring in the frozen regolith; and (5) the kinetics and mechanism of past and present-day oxidative reactions on Mars. These questions may be addressed experimentally by studying reaction rates of dissolution and oxidation of basaltic minerals, and by identifying reaction products forming on the mineral surfaces. Results for the oxidation of pyrrhotite and dissolved ferrous iron are reported.

  2. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z. X.; Zhang, C.; Huang, X. F.; Liu, W. B.; Yang, Z. G.

    2015-01-01

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content. PMID:26269034

  3. Surface oxides on Pd(111): STM and density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klikovits, J.; Napetschnig, E.; Schmid, M.; Seriani, N.; Dubay, O.; Kresse, G.; Varga, P.

    2007-07-01

    The formation of one-layer surface oxides on Pd(111) has been studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT). Besides the Pd5O4 structure determined previously, structural details of six different surface oxides on Pd(111) will be presented. These oxides are observed for preparation in oxygen-rich conditions, approaching the thermodynamic stability limit of the PdO bulk oxide at an oxygen chemical potential of -0.95to-1.02eV ( 570-605K , 5×10-4mbar O2 ). Sorted by increasing oxygen fraction in the primitive unit cell, the stoichiometry of the surface oxides is Pd5O4 , Pd9O8 , Pd20O18 , Pd23O21 , Pd19O18 , Pd8O8 , and Pd32O32 . All structures are one-layer oxides, in which oxygen atoms form a rectangular lattice, and all structures follow the same rules of favorable alignment of the oxide layer on the Pd(111) substrate. DFT calculations were used to simulate STM images as well as to determine the stability of the surface oxide structures. Simulated and measured STM images are in excellent agreement, indicating that the structural models are correct. Since the newly found surface oxides are clearly less stable than Pd5O4 , we conclude that Pd5O4 is the only thermodynamically stable phase, whereas all newly found structures are only kinetically stabilized. We also discuss possible mechanisms for the formation of these oxide structures.

  4. The surface and materials science of tin oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzill, Matthias; Diebold, Ulrike

    The study of tin oxide is motivated by its applications as a solid state gas sensor material, oxidation catalyst, and transparent conductor. This review describes the physical and chemical properties that make tin oxide a suitable material for these purposes. The emphasis is on surface science studies of single crystal surfaces, but selected studies on powder and polycrystalline films are also incorporated in order to provide connecting points between surface science studies with the broader field of materials science of tin oxide. The key for understanding many aspects of SnO 2 surface properties is the dual valency of Sn. The dual valency facilitates a reversible transformation of the surface composition from stoichiometric surfaces with Sn 4+ surface cations into a reduced surface with Sn 2+ surface cations depending on the oxygen chemical potential of the system. Reduction of the surface modifies the surface electronic structure by formation of Sn 5s derived surface states that lie deep within the band gap and also cause a lowering of the work function. The gas sensing mechanism appears, however, only to be indirectly influenced by the surface composition of SnO 2. Critical for triggering a gas response are not the lattice oxygen concentration but chemisorbed (or ionosorbed) oxygen and other molecules with a net electric charge. Band bending induced by charged molecules cause the increase or decrease in surface conductivity responsible for the gas response signal. In most applications tin oxide is modified by additives to either increase the charge carrier concentration by donor atoms, or to increase the gas sensitivity or the catalytic activity by metal additives. Some of the basic concepts by which additives modify the gas sensing and catalytic properties of SnO 2 are discussed and the few surface science studies of doped SnO 2 are reviewed. Epitaxial SnO 2 films may facilitate the surface science studies of doped films in the future. To this end film growth

  5. Structural and surface changes of copper modified manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gac, Wojciech; Słowik, Grzegorz; Zawadzki, Witold

    2016-05-01

    The structural and surface properties of manganese and copper-manganese oxides were investigated. The oxides were prepared by the redox-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies evidenced transformation of cryptomelane-type nanoparticles with 1-D channel structure into the large MnO crystallites with regular rippled-like surface patterns under reduction conditions. The development of Cu/CuO nanorods from strongly dispersed species was evidenced. Coper-modified manganese oxides showed good catalytic performance in methanol steam reforming reaction for hydrogen production. Low selectivity to CO was observed in the wide range of temperatures.

  6. MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28

    To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

  7. Surface Morphology of Si(111) during Electrochemical Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, A.; Miki, K.; Sakamoto, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Morita, Y.; Tokumoto, H.

    1997-03-01

    Topographical changes of hydrogen terminated Si(111) during electrochemical oxidation in a 0.2 M H_2SO4 aqueous solution have been investigated using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The hydrogen terminated surface with atomically flat terraces was prepared by dipping into a NH_4F aqueous solution. Electrochemical oxidation has been performed by a potentiostatic (constant potential) or a galvanostatic (constant current) method. AFM images show that the oxidation occured on the terraces and proceeded homogeneously. The surface became rough as the oxidation proceeded. However, step edges were still observed even after the charge of 50 mC/cm^2 was applied. Quantitative analysis of a relation between the charge and surface morphology will be discussed. the address below:

  8. Oxidation of pyrite surfaces: a photoelectron spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthe, S.; Szargan, R.; Suoninen, E.

    1993-10-01

    Surfaces of pyrite (FeS 2) differently prepared in situ and ex situ have been studied before and after contact to air and air-saturated aqueous solutions of 4≤pH≤10 by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. Pyrite surfaces fractured or scraped in situ revealed FeS-like species concentrated in the surface region. Preparation (polishing, grinding, powdering) and prolonged oxidation in air mainly resulted in basic iron sulphate and iron oxide/hydroxide. A promoting effect of an increased surface roughness due to the preparation was observed for the formation of iron oxide/hydroxide compared with sulphate in contrast to the natural oxidation process. Oxidation in air also led to sulphur-rich species identified as iron-deficient regions below monolayer coverage. Similar regions were present at ground surfaces exposed to air-saturated solution of pH4 and pH5. In near-neutral to alkaline solution mainly iron hydroxy-oxide is formed the layer thickness of which was estimated in the range of 0.5 nm (pH5) to 1.7 nm (pH10).

  9. Metal-oxide-semiconductor photocapacitor for sensing surface plasmon polaritons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalilzade-Rezaie, Farnood; Peale, Robert E.; Panjwani, Deep; Smith, Christian W.; Nath, Janardan; Lodge, Michael; Ishigami, Masa; Nader, Nima; Vangala, Shiva; Yannuzzi, Mark; Cleary, Justin W.

    2015-09-01

    An electronic detector of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) is reported. SPPs optically excited on a metal surface using a prism coupler are detected by using a close-coupled metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor. Semitransparent metal and graphene gates function similarly. We report the dependence of the photoresponse on substrate carrier type, carrier concentration, and back-contact biasing.

  10. Surface passivation of semiconducting oxides by self-assembled nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae-Sung; Wang, Haiyuan; Vasheghani Farahani, Sepehr K.; Walker, Marc; Bhatnagar, Akash; Seghier, Djelloul; Choi, Chel-Jong; Kang, Jie-Hun; McConville, Chris F.

    2016-01-01

    Physiochemical interactions which occur at the surfaces of oxide materials can significantly impair their performance in many device applications. As a result, surface passivation of oxide materials has been attempted via several deposition methods and with a number of different inert materials. Here, we demonstrate a novel approach to passivate the surface of a versatile semiconducting oxide, zinc oxide (ZnO), evoking a self-assembly methodology. This is achieved via thermodynamic phase transformation, to passivate the surface of ZnO thin films with BeO nanoparticles. Our unique approach involves the use of BexZn1-xO (BZO) alloy as a starting material that ultimately yields the required coverage of secondary phase BeO nanoparticles, and prevents thermally-induced lattice dissociation and defect-mediated chemisorption, which are undesirable features observed at the surface of undoped ZnO. This approach to surface passivation will allow the use of semiconducting oxides in a variety of different electronic applications, while maintaining the inherent properties of the materials. PMID:26757827

  11. Heterogeneous nucleation of calcium oxalate on native oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.; Pattillo, M.J.; Graff, G.L.; Campbell, A.A.; Bunker, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    The aqueous deposition of calcium oxalate onto colloidal oxides has been studied as a model system for understanding heterogeneous nucleation processes of importance in biomimetic synthesis of ceramic thin films. Calcium oxalate nucleation has been monitored by measuring induction times for nucleation using Constant Composition techniques and by measuring nucleation densities on extended oxide surfaces using an atomic force microscope. Results show that the dependence of calcium oxalate nucleation on solution supersaturation fits the functional form predicted by classical nucleation theories. Anionic surfaces appear to promote nucleation better than cationic surfaces, lowering the effective energy barrier to heterogeneous nucleation.

  12. Microbial Manganese Oxidation in Saltmarsh Surface Sediments Using a Leuco Crystal Violet Manganese Oxide Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spratt, Henry G.; Siekmann, Ellen C.; Hodson, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Microbial manganese (Mn) oxide production in surface sediments of a Georgia saltmarsh was directly measured using an assay involving the oxidation of 4,4',4″-methylidynetris (N,N-dimethylaniline), leuco crystal violet (LCV), by Mn oxides to produce crystal violet. The assay exhibits high specificity for Mn oxides without interference by Mn(II) and is sufficiently sensitive to determine rates of Mn oxidation in surface sediment or saltmarsh creek water suspensions. Sample salinity affects crystal violet absorbance in the 0-25 salinity range and must be corrected for in Mn oxide determinations for estuarine samples of variable salinity. Other oxidants found to oxidize LCV slowly included Cl(I), Cr(III), I(V), Fe(III), and Mn(III), although the sensitivity of the assay for Mn(IV) oxides was found to be seven times greater than for Mn(III), and at least 100 times greater than for any of the other oxidants. Rates of abiotic Mn oxide production in sediment suspensions treated with either sodium azide or formalin, or autoclaved, were much slower than rates determined for untreated sediments. Sodium azide (7·7 mM) inhibited Mn oxide production in these sediment suspensions to rates between 5 and 10% of the rates of Mn oxidation determined for unamended suspensions. Manganese oxidation was highly temperature dependent, with maximal rates on a dry weight basis (8·9 nmol mg dwt -1 h -1), occurring at 60°C, and negligible activity at 100 and 0°C. Rates were also dependent on sample pH, with maximal rates at pH 6·7, decreasing to near 0 as the pH was lowered to approximately 3·0. For Mn(II) concentrations ranging from 9 to 91 μM, rates of Mn oxide production were independent of Mn(II) concentration, while Mn oxide production was inhibited at concentrations greater than 91 μM (e.g. by 25-40% at 450 μM). Rates of microbial Mn oxide production in surface sediment/saltmarsh creek water suspensions incubated under natural conditions of temperature, pH, and Mn

  13. A molecular catalyst for water oxidation that binds to metal oxide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Stafford W.; Thomsen, Julianne M.; Hintermair, Ulrich; Crabtree, Robert H.; Brudvig, Gary W.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular catalysts are known for their high activity and tunability, but their solubility and limited stability often restrict their use in practical applications. Here we describe how a molecular iridium catalyst for water oxidation directly and robustly binds to oxide surfaces without the need for any external stimulus or additional linking groups. On conductive electrode surfaces, this heterogenized molecular catalyst oxidizes water with low overpotential, high turnover frequency and minimal degradation. Spectroscopic and electrochemical studies show that it does not decompose into iridium oxide, thus preserving its molecular identity, and that it is capable of sustaining high activity towards water oxidation with stability comparable to state-of-the-art bulk metal oxide catalysts. PMID:25757425

  14. Surface structures of polar and non-polar metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Sara E.

    Metal oxides have long been a challenge to surface science since many traditional surface techniques are often affected by their insulating nature. In particular, high current electron beams can cause charging effects in addition to potentially desorbing surface species and damaging the surface. The development of a low current, low energy electron diffraction (LEED) system has allowed us to investigate metal oxide surfaces while significantly limiting the above mentioned complications. This low current LEED system has been used to perform a structural LEED-IV study of the reconstructed TiO2(011)-(2x1) surface. This surface is known to experience significant oxygen desorption when exposed to high current electron beams. The low current LEED system was crucial to maintain confidence in the structure found, which generally agreed with recently published models, but did not confirm one key feature. The oxygen atoms at the surface were not found to be asymmetrically bonded, which has been thought to be the cause of this surface's enhanced photocatalytic activity. We have also used the low current LEED system to investigate the polar oxide surfaces of ZnO(000 1¯) and MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30°. For Zn0(000 1¯) LEED-IV structural study was combined with Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to investigate the impact of hydrogen on the surface. Our results support a disordered, fractional coverage of hydrogen terminating the surface. MgO(111)-(✓3x✓3)R30° has proven to be a challenging reconstructed surface. Both LEED-IV and surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) find that previously proposed models for the surface are not a good fit to the data, so other models have been explored. The SXRD data in particular suggest that the reconstruction is more than one atomic layer deep.

  15. The intermediate oxidation of the Pd(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, A.; Lundgren, E.; Gustafson, J.; Borg, M.; Andersen, J. N.

    2003-03-01

    The formation of oxides on metal surfaces has recently received much attention. Apart from the fundamental importance of the oxidation process, the interest is driven by the observation that oxides can play an important role in catalysis1, 2. The geometric structure of surface oxides can in some cases3 not be directly inferred from known bulk oxides. The surface structures formed by oxygen on Pd(100) have been studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM), High Resolution Core-Level Spectroscopy (HRCLS) and Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED). It is shown that the structure determined in a recent LEED analysis4 of the Pd(100)- (root5xroot5)-O structure formed by adsorption of 0.8 ML of oxygen is difficult to reconcile with our STM and HRCLS data. New models for this surface oxide consistent with our experimental results are suggested. [1] Y. D. Kim, A. P. Seitsonen, S. Wendt, E. Lundgren, M. Schmid, P. Varga, A. Morgante, and G. Ertl., Science 287, 1474 (2000). [2] B. L. M. Hendriksen and J. W. M. Frenken, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 046101 (2002). [3] E. Lundgren,, G. Kresse, C. Klein, M. Borg, J.N. Andersen, M. De Santis, Y. Gauthier, C. Konvicka, M. Schmid, and P.Varga, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 246103 [4] M. Saidy, O.L. Warren, P.A. Thiel, and K.A.R. Mitchell, Surf. Sci. 494, L799 (2001).

  16. Comparison of thermal oxidation and plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) for surface flattening

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hui; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-10

    The thermal oxidation and water vapor plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) were investigated. The initial oxidation rate of helium-based atmospheric-pressure plasma oxidation was six times higher than that of thermal oxidation. The oxide-SiC interface generated by plasma oxidation became flatter with increasing thickness of the oxide, whereas the interface generated by thermal oxidation was atomically flat regardless of the oxide thickness. Many pits were generated on the thermally oxidized surface, whereas few pits were observed on the surface oxidized by plasma. After the oxide layer generated plasma oxidation was removed, an atomically flat and pit-free SiC surface was obtained.

  17. A characterization study of a hydroxylated polycrystalline tin oxide surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoflund, Gar B.; Grogan, Austin L., Jr.; Asbury, Douglas A.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    In this study Auger electron spectroscopy, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) have been used to examine a polycrystalline tin oxide surface before and after annealing in vacuum at 500 C. Features due to surface hydroxyl groups are present in both the ESCA and ESD spectra, and ESD shows that several chemical states of hydrogen are present. Annealing at 500 C causes a large reduction in the surface hydrogen concentration but not complete removal.

  18. Radiation induced chemical activity at iron and copper oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, Sarah C.

    The radiolysis of three iron oxides, two copper oxides, and aluminum oxide with varying amounts of water were performed using gamma-rays and 5 MeV 4He ions. The adsorbed water on the surfaces was characterized using temperature programmed desorption and diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy, which indicated that all of the oxides had chemisorbed water on the surface. Physisorbed water was observed on the Fe2O 3 and Al2O3 surfaces as well. Molecular hydrogen was produced from adsorbed water only on Fe2O3 and Al 2O3, while the other compounds did not show any hydrogen production due to the low amounts of water on the surfaces. Slurries of varying amounts of water were also examined for hydrogen production, and they showed yields that were greater than the yield for bulk water. However, the yields of hydrogen from the copper compounds were much lower than those of the iron suggesting that the copper oxides are relatively inert to radiation induced damage to nearby water. X-ray diffraction measurements did not show any indication of changes to the bulk crystal structure due to radiolysis for any of the oxides. The surfaces of the oxides were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the iron samples, FeO and Fe3O4, Raman spectroscopy revealed areas of Fe2O3 had formed following irradiation with He ions. XPS indicated the formation of a new oxygen species on the iron oxide surfaces. Raman spectroscopy of the copper oxides did not reveal any changes in the surface composition, however, XPS measurements showed a decrease in the amount of OH groups on the surface of Cu2O, while for the CuO samples the amount of OH groups were found to increase following radiolysis. Pristine Al2O3 showed the presence of a surface oxyhydroxide layer which was observed to decrease following radiolysis, consistent with the formation of molecular hydrogen.

  19. Surface topography and alignment of liquid crystals on rubbed oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Minoru

    1981-07-01

    For several nematic liquid crystals (LC's), the relation between alignments of the LC's on rubbed oxide surfaces and rubbing pressures of the substrates is given. When the LC's take a parallel alignment to the surfaces, good homogeneous alignment is achieved at low pressures. High pressure rubbing also produces good homogeneous alignment of LC's, although alignment is perpendicular to the nonrubbed surfaces. Fine stripes of deposited cloth fibers can be observed on the cloth-rubbed oxide surfaces. The stripes consist of asymmetric projections ranging in the rubbed direction. On the basis of the asymmetric structure formed on the surface, the tilt direction of LC's and their tilt angles are interpreted.

  20. Recent applications of liquid metals featuring nanoscale surface oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Taylor V.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2016-05-01

    This proceeding describes recent efforts from our group to control the shape and actuation of liquid metal. The liquid metal is an alloy of gallium and indium which is non-toxic, has negligible vapor pressure, and develops a thin, passivating surface oxide layer. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be patterned and shaped into structures that do not minimize interfacial energy. The surface oxide can be selectively removed by changes in pH or by applying a voltage. The surface oxide allows the liquid metal to be 3D printed to form free-standing structures. It also allows for the liquid metal to be injected into microfluidic channels and to maintain its shape within the channels. The selective removal of the oxide results in drastic changes in surface tension that can be used to control the flow behavior of the liquid metal. The metal can also wet thin, solid films of metal that accelerates droplets of the liquid along the metal traces .Here we discuss the properties and applications of liquid metal to make soft, reconfigurable electronics.

  1. Tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene and silicon oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Uçar, A.; Çopuroğlu, M.; Suzer, S.; Baykara, M. Z.; Arıkan, O.

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the tribological interaction between polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and silicon oxide surfaces. A simple rig was designed to bring about a friction between the surfaces via sliding a piece of PTFE on a thermally oxidized silicon wafer specimen. A very mild inclination (∼0.5°) along the sliding motion was also employed in order to monitor the tribological interaction in a gradual manner as a function of increasing contact force. Additionally, some patterns were sketched on the silicon oxide surface using the PTFE tip to investigate changes produced in the hydrophobicity of the surface, where the approximate water contact angle was 45° before the transfer. The nature of the transferred materials was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). XPS results revealed that PTFE was faithfully transferred onto the silicon oxide surface upon even at the slightest contact and SEM images demonstrated that stable morphological changes could be imparted onto the surface. The minimum apparent contact pressure to realize the PTFE transfer is estimated as 5 kPa, much lower than reported previously. Stability of the patterns imparted towards many chemical washing processes lead us to postulate that the interaction is most likely to be chemical. Contact angle measurements, which were carried out to characterize and monitor the hydrophobicity of the silicon oxide surface, showed that upon PTFE transfer the hydrophobicity of the SiO{sub 2} surface could be significantly enhanced, which might also depend upon the pattern sketched onto the surface. Contact angle values above 100° were obtained.

  2. Reporting central tendencies of chamber measured surface emission and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Clark, Jeremy; Chanton, Jeffery

    2011-05-15

    Methane emissions, concentrations, and oxidation were measured on eleven MSW landfills in eleven states spanning from California to Pennsylvania during the three year study. The flux measurements were performed using a static chamber technique. Initial concentration samples were collected immediately after placement of the flux chamber. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. When reporting overall surface emissions and percent oxidation for a landfill cover, central tendencies are typically used to report 'averages' of the collected data. The objective of this study was to determine the best way to determine and report central tendencies. Results showed that 89% of the data sets of collected surface flux have lognormal distributions, 83% of the surface concentration data sets are also lognormal. Sixty seven percent (67%) of the isotope measured percent oxidation data sets are normally distributed. The distribution of data for all eleven landfills provides insight of the central tendencies of emissions, concentrations, and percent oxidation. When reporting the 'average' measurement for both flux and concentration data collected at the surface of a landfill, statistical analyses provided insight supporting the use of the geometric mean. But the arithmetic mean can accurately represent the percent oxidation, as measured with the stable isotope technique. We examined correlations between surface CH{sub 4} emissions and surface air CH{sub 4} concentrations. Correlation of the concentration and flux values using the geometric mean proved to be a good fit (R{sup 2} = 0.86), indicating that surface scans are a good way of identifying locations of high emissions.

  3. Rate Law Analysis of Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Water oxidation is a key chemical reaction, central to both biological photosynthesis and artificial solar fuel synthesis strategies. Despite recent progress on the structure of the natural catalytic site, and on inorganic catalyst function, determining the mechanistic details of this multiredox reaction remains a significant challenge. We report herein a rate law analysis of the order of water oxidation as a function of surface hole density on a hematite photoanode employing photoinduced absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals a transition from a slow, first order reaction at low accumulated hole density to a faster, third order mechanism once the surface hole density is sufficient to enable the oxidation of nearest neighbor metal atoms. This study thus provides direct evidence for the multihole catalysis of water oxidation by hematite, and demonstrates the hole accumulation level required to achieve this, leading to key insights both for reaction mechanism and strategies to enhance function. PMID:25936408

  4. Surface Properties of Photo-Oxidized Bituminous Coals: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    Natural weathering has a detrimental effect on the hydrophobic nature of coal, which in turn can influence clean-coal recovery during flotation. Few techniques are available that can establish the quality of coal surfaces and that have a short analysis time to provide input for process control. Luminescence emissions which can be quantified with an optical microscope and photometer system, are measurably influenced by degree of weathering as well as by mild storage deterioration. In addition, it has been shown that when vitrinite is irradiated with a relatively high intensity flux of violet- or ultraviolet- light in the presence of air, photo-oxidation of the surface occurs. The combination of measuring the change in luminescence emission intensity with degree of surface oxidation provided the impetus for the current investigation. The principal aim of this research was to determine whether clear correlations could be established among surface oxygen functionality, hydrophobicity induced by photo-oxidation, and measurements of luminescence intensity and alteration. If successful, the project would result in quantitative luminescence techniques based on optical microscopy that would provide a measure of the changes in surface properties as a function of oxidation and relate them to coal cleanability. Two analytical techniques were designed to achieve these goals. Polished surfaces of vitrain bands or a narrow size fraction of powdered vitrain concentrates were photo-oxidized using violet or ultraviolet light fluxes and then changes in surface properties and chemistry were measured using a variety of near-surface analytical techniques. Results from this investigation demonstrate that quantitative luminescence intensity measurements can be performed on fracture surfaces of bituminous rank coals (vitrains) and that the data obtained do reveal significant variations depending upon the level of surface oxidation. Photo-oxidation induced by violet or ultraviolet light

  5. The oxidation state of the surface of Venus. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, B., Jr.; Klingelhofer, G.; Brackett, R. A.; Izenberg, N.

    1994-01-01

    We present experimental results showing that basalt is oxidized in CO-CO2 gas mixtures having CO number densities close to those (approximately 2 times higher) at the surface of Venus. The results suggest that the red color observed by Pieters et al at the Venera 9 and 10 landing sites is due to subaerial oxidation of Fe(2+)-bearing basalt on the surface of Venus, and that hematite, instead of magnetite, is present on the surface of Venus. Well-characterized basalt powder was iosthermally heated in 1000 ppm CO-CO2 gas mixtures at atmospheric pressure for several days. The starting material and reacted samples were analyzed by Mossbauer spectroscopy to determine the amount of Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) in the samples. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy were also used to characterize samples. The basalt oxidation occurs because the CO and CO2 do not equilibrate in the gas mixture at the low temperatures used. Thus, the basalt reacts with the more abundant CO2 and is oxidized. We propose that the red color of the surface of Venus is due to failure of CO and CO2 to equilibrate with one another in the near-surface atmosphere of Venus, leading to subaerial oxidation of erupted Fe(2+)-bearing basalts. Our interpretation is supported by our studies of magnetite oxidation, which show that synthetic magnetite powders are oxidized to hematite in CO-CO2 gas mixtures inside the magnetite stability field, by our studies of pyrite decomposition, and by independent work on CO-CO2 equilibration in furnace gases.

  6. Surface chemistry dependence of native oxidation formation on silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Liptak, R. W.; Campbell, S. A.; Kortshagen, U.

    2009-09-15

    The growth of silicon oxide on bare and SF{sub 6}-etched silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs), which were synthesized by an all gas phase approach, was investigated by examining the surface chemistry and optical properties of the NCs over time. Consistent with previous work in the low temperature oxidation of silicon, the oxidation follows the Cabrera-Mott mechanism, and the measured data are well fitted to the Elovich equation. The use of the SF{sub 6} plasma is found to reduce the surface Si-H bond density and dramatically increase the monolayer growth rate. This is believed to be due to the much larger volatility of Si-F bonds compared to Si-H bonds on the surface of the NC.

  7. Surface Chemistry and Properties of Oxides as Catalyst Supports

    SciTech Connect

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Contescu, Cristian I

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis relies on metal-oxides as supports for the catalysts. Catalyst supports are an indispensable component of most heterogeneous catalysts, but the role of the support is often minimized in light of the one played by the catalytically active species it supports. The active species of supported catalysts are located on the surface of the support where their contact with liquid or gas phase reactants will be greatest. Considering that support plays a major role in distribution and stability of active species, the absorption and retention of reactive species, and in some cases in catalytic reaction, the properties and chemistry that can occur at the surface of an oxide support are important for understanding their impact on the activity of a supported catalyst. This chapter examines this rich surface chemistry and properties of oxides used as catalyst supports, and explores the influence of their interaction with the active species.

  8. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  9. Mechanical tearing of graphene on an oxidizing metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lijin; Gupta, Aparna; Shaina, P. R.; Das Gupta, Nandita; Jaiswal, Manu

    2015-12-01

    Graphene, the thinnest possible anticorrosion and gas-permeation barrier, is poised to transform the protective coatings industry for a variety of surface applications. In this work, we have studied the structural changes of graphene when the underlying copper surface undergoes oxidation upon heating. Single-layer graphene directly grown on a copper surface by chemical vapour deposition was annealed under ambient atmosphere conditions up to 400 °C. The onset temperature of the surface oxidation of copper is found to be higher for graphene-coated foils. Parallel arrays of graphene nanoripples are a ubiquitous feature of pristine graphene on copper, and we demonstrate that these form crucial sites for the onset of the oxidation of copper, particularly for ˜0.3-0.4 μm ripple widths. In these regions, the oxidation proceeds along the length of the nanoripples, resulting in the formation of parallel stripes of oxidized copper regions. We demonstrate from temperature-dependent Raman spectroscopy that the primary defect formation process in graphene involves boundary-type defects rather than vacancy or sp3-type defects. This observation is consistent with a mechanical tearing process that splits graphene into small polycrystalline domains. The size of these is estimated to be sub-50 nm.

  10. Enhanced photothermal effect of surface oxidized silicon nanocrystals anchored to reduced graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshani, Parichehr; Moussa, Sherif; Atkinson, Garrett; Kisurin, Vitaly Y.; Samy El-Shall, M.

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate the coupling of the photothermal effects of silicon nanocrystals and graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in water. Using laser irradiation (532 nm or 355 nm) of suspended Si nanocrystals in an aqueous solution of GO, the synthesis of surface oxidized Si-reduced GO nanocomposites (SiOx/Si-RGO) is reported. The laser reduction of GO is accompanied by surface oxidation of the Si nanocrystals resulting in the formation of the SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites. The SiOx/Si-RGO nanocomposites are proposed as promising materials for photothermal therapy and for the efficient conversion of solar energy into usable heat for a variety of thermal and thermomechanical applications.

  11. Atomic probes of surface structure and dynamics. Technical progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Heller, E.J.; Jonsson, H.

    1992-12-31

    The following were studied: New semiclassical method for scattering calculations, He atom scattering from defective Pt surfaces, He atom scattering from Xe overlayers, thermal dissociation of H{sub 2} on Cu(110), spin flip scattering of atoms from surfaces, and Car-Parrinello simulations of surface processes.

  12. Sputtered silver oxide layers for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büchel, D.; Mihalcea, C.; Fukaya, T.; Atoda, N.; Tominaga, J.; Kikukawa, T.; Fuji, H.

    2001-07-01

    We present results of reactively sputtered silver oxide thin films as a substrate material for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Herein, we show that deposited layers develop an increasingly strong SERS activity upon photoactivation at 488 nm. A benzoic acid/2-propanol solution was used to demonstrate that the bonding of molecules to SERS active sites at the surface can be followed by investigating temporal changes of the corresponding Raman intensities. Furthermore, the laser-induced structural changes in the silver oxide layers lead to a fluctuating SERS activity at high laser intensities which also affects the spectral features of amorphous carbon impurities.

  13. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses. PMID:26216647

  14. Oxidized Zirconium Bearing Surfaces in Total Knee Arthroplasty: Lessons Learned.

    PubMed

    Schüttler, Karl Friedrich; Efe, Turgay; Heyse, Thomas J; Haas, Steven B

    2015-10-01

    Polyethylene wear in total knee arthroplasty is a still unsolved problem resulting in osteolysis and long-term failure of knee joint replacement. To address the problem of polyethylene wear, research aimed for an optimal implant design and for an optimal combination of bearing surfaces. Oxidized zirconium was introduced to minimize surface wear and thus potentially increase long-term implant survival. This review comprises the current literature related to in vitro and in vivo studies evaluating performance of oxidized zirconium total knee arthroplasty and results from retrieval analyses.

  15. Surface chemistry of black phosphorus under a controlled oxidative environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zemlyanov, Dmitry Y.; Milligan, Cory A.; Du, Yuchen; Yang, Lingming; Wu, Yanqing; Ye, Peide D.

    2016-10-01

    Black phosphorus (BP), the bulk counterpart of monolayer phosphorene, is a relatively stable phosphorus allotrope at room temperature. However, monolayer phosphorene and ultra-thin BP layers degrade in ambient atmosphere. In this paper, we report the investigation of BP oxidation and discuss the reaction mechanism based on the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data. The kinetics of BP oxidation was examined under various well-controlled conditions, namely in 5% O2/Ar, 2.3% H2O/Ar, and 5% O2 and 2.3% H2O/Ar. At room temperature, the BP surface is demonstrated not to be oxidized at a high oxidation rate in 5% O2/Ar nor in 2.3% H2O/Ar, according to XPS, with the thickness of the oxidized phosphorus layer <5 Å for 5 h. On the other hand, in the O2/H2O mixture, a 30 Å thickness oxide layer was detected already after 2 h of the treatment. This result points to a synergetic effect of water and oxygen in the BP oxidation. The oxidation effect was also studied in applications to the electrical measurements of BP field-effect transistors (FETs) with or without passivation. The electrical performance of BP FETs with atomic layer deposition (ALD) dielectric passivation or h-BN passivation formed in a glove-box environment are also presented.

  16. Cr(OH)₃(s) Oxidation Induced by Surface Catalyzed Mn(II) Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, M.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lee, Gie Hyeon

    2014-09-16

    This study examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)₃(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7 – 9 under oxic or anoxic conditions. In the absence of Cr(OH)₃(s), homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O₂ was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 d. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 d and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)₃(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Our results suggest that Cr(OH)₃(s) was readily oxidized by a newly formed Mn oxide as a result of Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)₃(s) surface. XANES analysis of the residual solids after the reaction between 1.0 g/L Cr(OH)₃(s) and 204 μM Mn(II) at pH 9.0 for 22 d revealed that the product of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation resembled birnessite. The rate and extent of Cr(OH)₃(s) oxidation was likely controlled by those of surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation as the production of Cr(VI) increased with increasing pH and initial Mn(II) concentrations. This study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)₃(s) that can be a source of Cr(VI) in the presence of dissolved Mn(II).

  17. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-28

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (E(p), 1.10 ≤ E(p) ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (t(p), 10(0) ≤ t(p) ≤ 10(4) s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (d(ox)). Because X1 > d(ox) for the entire range of E(p), t(p), and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Pt(δ+)-O(δ-) surface dipole (μ(PtO)), and the potential drop (V(ox)) and electric field (E(ox)) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide. PMID:25362330

  18. Surface oxide growth on platinum electrode in aqueous trifluoromethanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuya, Yoshihisa; Mashio, Tetsuya; Ohma, Atsushi; Dale, Nilesh; Oshihara, Kenzo; Jerkiewicz, Gregory

    2014-10-01

    Platinum in the form of nanoparticles is the key and most expensive component of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, while trifluoromethanesulfonic acid (CF3SO3H) is the smallest fluorinated sulfonic acid. Nafion, which acts as both electrolyte and separator in fuel cells, contains -CF2SO3H groups. Consequently, research on the electrochemical behaviour of Pt in aqueous CF3SO3H solutions creates important background knowledge that can benefit fuel cell development. In this contribution, Pt electro-oxidation is studied in 0.1 M aqueous CF3SO3H as a function of the polarization potential (Ep, 1.10 ≤ Ep ≤ 1.50 V), polarization time (tp, 100 ≤ tp ≤ 104 s), and temperature (T, 278 ≤ T ≤ 333 K). The critical thicknesses (X1), which determines the applicability of oxide growth theories, is determined and related to the oxide thickness (dox). Because X1 > dox for the entire range of Ep, tp, and T values, the formation of Pt surface oxide follows the interfacial place-exchange or the metal cation escape mechanism. The mechanism of Pt electro-oxidation is revised and expanded by taking into account possible interactions of cations, anions, and water molecules with Pt. A modified kinetic equation for the interfacial place exchange is proposed. The application of the interfacial place-exchange and metal cation escape mechanisms leads to an estimation of the Ptδ+-Oδ- surface dipole (μPtO), and the potential drop (Vox) and electric field (Eox) within the oxide. The Pt-anion interactions affect the oxidation kinetics by indirectly influencing the electric field within the double layer and the surface oxide.

  19. The reaction of vapor-deposited Al with Cu oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, T.N.; Martin, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    Interfaces formed by controlled deposition of Al on Cu oxides at 300K have been characterized using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). When Al is deposited onto a thin oxide grown on Cu(110) by atmospheric exposure, it completely scavenges the oxygen from the substrate material, increasing the O(1s) binding energy by 2.0 eV to give the value found for atmospheric oxidation of a thin Al film. Similar oxygen behavior is seen for Al deposition on sputter-deposited CuO with an enriched oxygen surface region, where multilayers of Al erase the shakeup satellites in the Cu(2p) region of the XPS spectrum to give features like those exhibited by Cu{sub 2}O or metallic Cu. Having calibrated the fluence of the Al source with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, the attenuation of the Cu 2p{sub 1/2} satellite after approximately one monolayer of Al deposition is associated with the removal of oxygen from the top 20 {angstrom} of the CuO. Approximately 7--8 equivalent monolayers of Al are converted to an oxide in the initial rapid reaction process. Further deposition leads to progressive development of the metallic Al signature in both the XPS and AES spectra. These measurements clearly demonstrate the dominant role played by Al, a strong oxide former, when it is placed in intimate contact with the distinctively weaker Cu oxide. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Interactions of Graphene Oxide Nanomaterials with Natural Organic Matter and Metal Oxide Surfaces

    EPA Science Inventory

    Interactions of graphene oxide (GO) with silica surfaces were investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Both GO deposition and release were monitored on silica- and poly-l-lysine (PLL) coated surfaces as a function of GO concentration a...

  1. Influence of mineral oil and additives on microhardness and surface chemistry of magnesium oxide (001) surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Shigaki, H.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and hardness experiments were conducted with cleaved magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces. The magnesium oxide bulk crystals were cleaved into specimens along the /001/ surface, and indentations were made on the cleaved surface in laboratory air, in nitrogen gas, or in degassed mineral oil with and without an additive while not exposing specimen surface to any other environment. The various additives examined contained sulfur, phosphorus, chlorine, or oleic acid. The sulfur-containing additive exhibited the highest hardness and smallest dislocation patterns evidencing plastic deformation; the chlorine-containing additive exhibited the lowest hardness and largest dislocation patterns evidencing plastic deformation. Hydrocarbon and chloride (MgCl2) films formed on the magnesium oxide surface. A chloride film was responsible for the lowest measured hardness.

  2. Surface modification of nickel based alloys for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2005-02-01

    The present research is aimed at the evaluation of a surface modification treatment to enhance the high temperature stability of nickel-base superalloys. A low Coefficient Thermal Expansion (CTE ~12.5x10-6/°C) alloy based on the composition (in weight %) of Ni-22Mo-12.5Cr was produced by Vacuum Induction Melting and Vacuum Arc Melting and reduced to sheet by conventional thermal-mechanical processing. A surface treatment was devised to enhance the oxidation resistance of the alloys at high temperature. Oxidation tests (in dry and wet air; treated and untreated) were conducted 800°C to evaluate the oxidation resistance of the alloys. The results were compared to the behavior of Haynes 230 (Ni-22Cr) in the treated and untreated conditions. The treatment was not very effective for Haynes 230, as this alloy had similar oxidation behavior in both the treated and untreated conditions. However, the treatment had a significant effect on the behavior of the low CTE alloy. At 800°C, the untreated Ni-12.5Cr alloy was 5 times less oxidation resistant than Haynes 230. However, in the treated condition, the Ni-12.5Cr alloy had comparable oxidation resistance to the Haynes 230 alloy.

  3. Emerging Applications of Liquid Metals Featuring Surface Oxides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Gallium and several of its alloys are liquid metals at or near room temperature. Gallium has low toxicity, essentially no vapor pressure, and a low viscosity. Despite these desirable properties, applications calling for liquid metal often use toxic mercury because gallium forms a thin oxide layer on its surface. The oxide interferes with electrochemical measurements, alters the physicochemical properties of the surface, and changes the fluid dynamic behavior of the metal in a way that has, until recently, been considered a nuisance. Here, we show that this solid oxide “skin” enables many new applications for liquid metals including soft electrodes and sensors, functional microcomponents for microfluidic devices, self-healing circuits, shape-reconfigurable conductors, and stretchable antennas, wires, and interconnects. PMID:25283244

  4. Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation induced by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Namgung, Seonyi; Kwon, Man Jae; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Lee, Giehyeon

    2014-09-16

    We examined the feasibility of Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation mediated by surface catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation under common groundwater pH conditions as a potential pathway of natural Cr(VI) contaminations. Dissolved Mn(II) (50 μM) was reacted with or without synthesized Cr(OH)3(s) (1.0 g/L) at pH 7.0-9.0 under oxic or anoxic conditions. Homogeneous Mn(II) oxidation by dissolved O2 was not observed at pH ≤ 8.0 for 50 days. At pH 9.0, by contrast, dissolved Mn(II) was completely removed within 8 days and precipitated as hausmannite. When Cr(OH)3(s) was present, this solid was oxidized and released substantial amounts of Cr(VI) as dissolved Mn(II) was added into the suspension at pH ≥ 8.0 under oxic conditions. Production of Cr(VI) was attributed to Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation by a newly formed Mn oxide via Mn(II) oxidation catalyzed on Cr(OH)3(s) surface. XANES results indicated that this surface-catalyzed Mn(II) oxidation produced a mixed valence Mn(III/IV) solid phase. Our results suggest that toxic Cr(VI) can be naturally produced via Cr(OH)3(s) oxidation coupled with the oxidation of dissolved Mn(II). In addition, this study evokes the potential environmental hazard of sparingly soluble Cr(OH)3(s), which has been considered the most common and a stable remediation product of Cr(VI) contamination.

  5. Stability and morphology of cerium oxide surfaces in an oxidizing environment: A first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzi, Marco; Soon, Aloysius; Delley, Bernard; Traversa, Enrico; Stampfl, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    We present density functional theory investigations of the bulk properties of cerium oxides (CeO2 and Ce2O3) and the three low index surfaces of CeO2, namely, (100), (110), and (111). For the surfaces, we consider various terminations including surface defects. Using the approach of "ab initio atomistic thermodynamics," we find that the most stable surface structure considered is the stoichiometric (111) surface under "oxygen-rich" conditions, while for a more reducing environment, the same (111) surface, but with subsurface oxygen vacancies, is found to be the most stable one, and for a highly reducing environment, the (111) Ce-terminated surface becomes energetically favored. Interestingly, this latter surface exhibits a significant reconstruction in that it becomes oxygen terminated and the upper layers resemble the Ce2O3(0001) surface. This structure could represent a precursor to the phase transition of CeO2 to Ce2O3.

  6. The surface chemistry of multi-oxide silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Chairat, Claire; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Schott, Jacques

    2009-08-01

    the predominance of SiO 2 in the surface layer of all of these multi-oxide silicates at acidic pH. Taken together, these observations suggest fundamental differences between the surface chemistry of simple versus multi-oxide minerals including (1) a dependency of the number and identity of multi-oxide silicate surface sites on the aqueous solution composition, and (2) the dominant role of metal-proton exchange reactions on the reactivity of multi-oxide mineral surfaces including their dissolution rate variation with aqueous solution composition.

  7. Surface science investigations of oxidative chemistry on gold.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jinlong; Mullins, C Buddie

    2009-08-18

    Because of gold's resistance to oxidation and corrosion, historically chemists have considered this metal inert. However, decades ago, researchers discovered that highly dispersed gold particles on metal oxides are highly chemically active, particularly in low-temperature CO oxidations. These seminal findings spurred considerable interest in investigations and applications of gold-based materials. Since the discovery of gold's chemical activity at the nanoscale, researchers found that bulk gold also has interesting catalytic properties. Thus, it is important to understand and contrast the intrinsic chemical properties of bulk gold with those of nanoparticle Au. Despite numerous studies, the structure and active site of supported Au nanoclusters and the active oxygen species remain elusive, and model studies under well-controlled conditions could help identify these species. The {111} facet has the lowest surface energy and is the most stable and prevalent configuration of most supported gold nanoparticles. Therefore, a molecular-level understanding of the physical properties and surface chemistry of Au(111) could provide mechanistic details regarding the nature of Au-based catalysts and lead to improved catalytic processes. This Account focuses on our current understanding of oxidative chemistry on well-defined gold single crystals, predominantly from recent investigations on Au(111) that we have performed using modern surface science techniques. Our model system strategy allows us to control reaction conditions, which assists in the identification of reaction intermediates, the determination of the elementary reaction steps, and the evaluation of reaction energetics for rate-limiting steps. We have employed temperature-programmed desorption (TPD), molecular beam reactive scattering (MBRS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) to evaluate surface oxidative chemistry. In some cases, we have combined these results with density functional theory (DFT) calculations

  8. Oxidation-reduction induced roughening of platinum (111) surface

    SciTech Connect

    You, H.; Nagy, Z.

    1993-06-01

    Platinum (111) single crystal surface was roughened by repeated cycles of oxidation and reduction to study dynamic evolution of surface roughening. The interface roughens progressively upon repeated cycles. The measured width of the interface was fit to an assumed pow law, W {approximately}t{sup {beta}}, with {beta} = 0.38(1). The results are compared with a simulation based on a random growth model. The fraction of the singly stepped surface apparently saturates to 0. 25 monolayer, which explains the apparent saturation to a steady roughness observed in previous studies.

  9. Electrochemically-Controlled Compositional Oscillations of Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Mutoro, Eva; Crumlin, Ethan; Pöpke, Hendrik; Luerssen, Bjoern; Amati, Matteo; Abyaneh, Majid; Biegalski, Michael D; Christen, Hans M; Gregoratti, Luca; Janek, Jürgen; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Perovskite oxides can exhibit a wide range of interesting characteristics such as being catalytically active and electronically and/or ionically conducting, and thus they have been used in a number of solid-state devices such as solid oxide fuel cells and sensors. As the surface compositions of perovskites can greatly influence the catalytic properties, knowing and controlling their surface chemistries is crucial to enhance device performance. In this study, we demonstrate that the surface strontium (Sr) and cobalt (Co) concentrations of perovskite-based thin films can be controlled reversibly at elevated temperatures by applying small electrical potential biases. The surface chemistry changes of La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC113), LaSrCoO4 (LSC214), and LSC214-decorated LSC113 films (LSC113/214) were investigated in situ by utilizing synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), where the largest changes of surface Sr was found for the LSC113/214 surface. These findings offer the potential of reversibly controlling the surface functionality of perovskites.

  10. The role of probe oxide in local surface conductivity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, C. J.; Kryvchenkova, O.; Wilson, L. S. J.; Maffeis, T. G. G.; Cobley, R. J.; Kalna, K.

    2015-05-07

    Local probe methods can be used to measure nanoscale surface conductivity, but some techniques including nanoscale four point probe rely on at least two of the probes forming the same low resistivity non-rectifying contact to the sample. Here, the role of probe shank oxide has been examined by carrying out contact and non-contact I V measurements on GaAs when the probe oxide has been controllably reduced, both experimentally and in simulation. In contact, the barrier height is pinned but the barrier shape changes with probe shank oxide dimensions. In non-contact measurements, the oxide modifies the electrostatic interaction inducing a quantum dot that alters the tunneling behavior. For both, the contact resistance change is dependent on polarity, which violates the assumption required for four point probe to remove probe contact resistance from the measured conductivity. This has implications for all nanoscale surface probe measurements and macroscopic four point probe, both in air and vacuum, where the role of probe oxide contamination is not well understood.

  11. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  12. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  13. Optimum conditions for fabricating superhydrophobic surface on copper plates via controlled surface oxidation and dehydration processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Wen; Ma, Fumin; Yu, Zhanlong; Ruan, Min; Ding, Yigang; Deng, Xiangyi

    2013-09-01

    The superhydrophobic surfaces on copper substrate were fabricated by direct oxidation and dehydration processes, and the reaction and modification conditions were optimized. Firstly, the oxidation conditions including the concentrations of K2S2O8 and NaOH, the oxidation time were studied. It is found that the superhydrophobicity would be better if the copper plates were oxidized in 0.06 M K2S2O8 and 3.0 M NaOH solution at 65 °C for 35 min. Then, the modification conditions including modifier concentration and modification time were investigated. The results showed that 5 wt% lauric acid and 1 h modification time were suitable modification conditions for preparing copper-based superhydrophobic surfaces. The surface fabricated under optimized conditions displayed excellent superhydrophobicity of high water contact angle of 161.1° and a low contact angle hysteresis of 2.5°. The surface microstructure and composition of the superhydrophobic surfaces were also characterized by SEM and FT-IR. It is found that the highly concentrated micro/nanostructured sheets and the low surface energy materials on the surface should be responsible for the high superhydrophobicity.

  14. Mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Veal, B.W.; Grimsditch, M.; Renusch, D.; Paulikas, A.P.

    1995-05-01

    Corrosion is widely recognized as being important, but an understanding of the underlying phenomena involves factors such as the chemistry and physics of early stages of oxidation, chemistry and bonding at the substrate/oxide interface, role of segregants on the strength of that bond, transport processes through scale, mechanisms of residual stress generation and relief, and fracture behavior at the oxide/substrate interface. Because of this complexity a multilaboratory program has been initiated under the auspices of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials, with strong interactions and cross-leveraging with DOE Fossil Energy and US industry. Objective is to systematically generate the knowledge required to establish a scientific basis for designing and synthesizing improved protective oxide scales/coatings (slow-growing, adherent, sound) on high-temperature materials without compromising the requisite properties of the bulk materials. The objectives of program work at Argonne are to (1) correlate actual corrosion performance with stresses, voids, segregants, interface roughness, initial stages of oxidation, and microstructures; (2) study such behavior in growing or as-grown films; and (3) define prescriptive design and synthesis routes to mechanically reliable surface oxides. Several techniques, such as Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray grazing incidence reflectance, grazing-angle X-ray fluorescence, optical fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy, are used in the studies. Tne project has selected Fe-25 wt.% Cr-20 wt.% Ni and Fe-Cr-Al alloys, which are chromia- and alumina-formers respectively, for the studies. This paper presents some of the results on early stages of oxidation and on surface segregation of elements.

  15. Macromolecular surface design: photopatterning of functional stable nitrile oxides.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ozcan; Glassner, Mathias; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Welle, Alexander; Trouillet, Vanessa; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    The efficient trapping of photogenerated thioaldehydes with functional shelf-stable nitrile oxides in a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a novel and versatile photochemical strategy for polymer end-group functionalization and surface modification under mild and equimolar conditions. The modular ligation in solution was followed in detail by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to analyze the functionalized surfaces, whereas time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the spatial control of the surface functionalization using a micropatterned shadow mask. Polymer brushes were grown from the surface in a spatially confined regime by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as confirmed by TOF-SIMS, XPS as well as ellipsometry. PMID:25784598

  16. Macromolecular surface design: photopatterning of functional stable nitrile oxides.

    PubMed

    Altintas, Ozcan; Glassner, Mathias; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Welle, Alexander; Trouillet, Vanessa; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-05-01

    The efficient trapping of photogenerated thioaldehydes with functional shelf-stable nitrile oxides in a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a novel and versatile photochemical strategy for polymer end-group functionalization and surface modification under mild and equimolar conditions. The modular ligation in solution was followed in detail by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was employed to analyze the functionalized surfaces, whereas time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) confirmed the spatial control of the surface functionalization using a micropatterned shadow mask. Polymer brushes were grown from the surface in a spatially confined regime by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) as confirmed by TOF-SIMS, XPS as well as ellipsometry.

  17. Molecularly imprinted Ru complex catalysts integrated on oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Muratsugu, Satoshi; Tada, Mizuki

    2013-02-19

    Selective catalysis is critical for the development of green chemical processes, and natural enzymes that possess specialized three-dimensional reaction pockets with catalytically active sites represent the most sophisticated systems for selective catalysis. A reaction space in an enzyme consists of an active metal center, functional groups for molecular recognition (such as amino acids), and a surrounding protein matrix to prepare the reaction pocket. The artificial design of such an integrated catalytic unit in a non-enzymatic system remains challenging. Molecular imprinting of a supported metal complex provides a promising approach for shape-selective catalysis. In this process, an imprinted cavity with a shape matched to a template molecule is created in a polymer matrix with a catalytically active metal site. In this Account, we review our studies on molecularly imprinted metal complex catalysts, focusing on Ru complexes, on oxide surfaces for shape-selective catalysis. Oxide surface-attached transition metal complex catalysts not only improve thermal stability and catalyst dispersion but also provide unique catalytic performance not observed in homogeneous precursors. We designed molecularly imprinted Ru complexes by using surface-attached Ru complexes with template ligands and inorganic/organic surface matrix overlayers to control the chemical environment around the active metal complex catalysts on oxide surfaces. We prepared the designed, molecularly imprinted Ru complexes on SiO(2) surfaces in a step-by-step manner and characterized them with solid-state (SS) NMR, diffuse-reflectance (DR) UV-vis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm (BET), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Ru K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The catalytic performances of these Ru complexes suggest that this process of molecular imprinting facilitates the artificial integration of catalytic functions at surfaces. Further advances such

  18. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer.

  19. H₂O Dissociation-Induced Aluminum Oxide Growth on Oxidized Al(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianqian; Tong, Xiao; Zhou, Guangwen

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of water vapor with amorphous aluminum oxide films on Al(111) is studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to elucidate the passivation mechanism of the oxidized Al(111) surfaces. Exposure of the aluminum oxide film to water vapor results in self-limiting Al2O3/Al(OH)3 bilayer film growth via counter-diffusion of both ions, Al outward and OH inward, where a thinner starting aluminum oxide film is more reactive toward H2O dissociation-induced oxide growth because of the thickness-dependent ionic transport in the aluminum oxide film. The aluminum oxide film exhibits reactivity toward H2O dissociation in both low-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 1 × 10(-6) Torr] and intermediate-vapor pressure [p(H2O) = 5 Torr] regimes. Compared to the oxide film growth by exposure to a p(H2O) of 1 × 10(-6) Torr, the exposure to a p(H2O) of 5 Torr results in the formation of a more open structure of the inner Al(OH)3 layer and a more compact outer Al2O3 layer, demonstrating the vapor-pressure-dependent atomic structure in the passivating layer. PMID:26550986

  20. Influence of Surface Morphology on the Antimicrobial Effect of Transition Metal Oxides in Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the physical properties of transition metal oxide surfaces were examined using scanning probe microscopic (SPM) techniques for elucidating the antimicrobial activity of molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), tungsten trioxide (WO3), and zinc oxide (ZnO) embedded into the polymers thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and polypropylene (PP). We utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the contact imaging mode and its derivative single-pass Kelvin probe force microscopy for investigating samples that were presumably identical in their compositions, but showed different antimicrobial activity in bacterial adhesion tests. Our results revealed that surfaces with larger roughness and higher surface potential variation showed stronger antimicrobial activities compared to smoother and homogeneously charge-distributed surfaces. In addition, capacitance gradient (dC/dZ) measurements were performed to elucidate the antimicrobial activity arising from the different dielectric behavior of the transition metal oxides in this heterogeneous polymer surface. We found that the nano-scale exposure of transition metal oxides on polymer surfaces provided strong antimicrobial effects. Applications arising from our studies will be useful for public and healthcare environments.

  1. Influence of Surface Morphology on the Antimicrobial Effect of Transition Metal Oxides in Polymer Surface.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoo Jin; Hubauer-Brenner, Michael; Hinterdorfer, Peter

    2015-10-01

    In this study, the physical properties of transition metal oxide surfaces were examined using scanning probe microscopic (SPM) techniques for elucidating the antimicrobial activity of molybdenum trioxide (MoO3), tungsten trioxide (WO3), and zinc oxide (ZnO) embedded into the polymers thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and polypropylene (PP). We utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) in the contact imaging mode and its derivative single-pass Kelvin probe force microscopy for investigating samples that were presumably identical in their compositions, but showed different antimicrobial activity in bacterial adhesion tests. Our results revealed that surfaces with larger roughness and higher surface potential variation showed stronger antimicrobial activities compared to smoother and homogeneously charge-distributed surfaces. In addition, capacitance gradient (dC/dZ) measurements were performed to elucidate the antimicrobial activity arising from the different dielectric behavior of the transition metal oxides in this heterogeneous polymer surface. We found that the nano-scale exposure of transition metal oxides on polymer surfaces provided strong antimicrobial effects. Applications arising from our studies will be useful for public and healthcare environments. PMID:26726428

  2. Ammonia modification of oxide-free Si(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Tatiana Peixoto; Longo, Roberto C.; Cho, Kyeongjae; Chabal, Yves J.

    2016-08-01

    Amination of surfaces is useful in a variety of fields, ranging from device manufacturing to biological applications. Previous studies of ammonia reaction on silicon surfaces have concentrated on vapor phase rather than wet chemical processes, and mostly on clean Si surfaces. In this work, the interaction of liquid and vapor-phase ammonia is examined on three types of oxide-free surfaces - passivated by hydrogen, fluorine (1/3 monolayer) or chlorine - combining infrared absorption spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations. The resulting chemical composition highly depends on the starting surface; there is a stronger reaction on both F- and Cl-terminated than on the H-terminated Si surfaces, as evidenced by the formation of Si-NH2. Side reactions can also occur, such as solvent reaction with surfaces, formation of ammonium salt by-products (in the case of 0.2 M ammonia in dioxane solution), and nitridation of silicon (in the case of neat and gas-phase ammonia reactions for instance). Unexpectedly, there is formation of Si-H bonds on hydrogen-free Cl-terminated Si(111) surfaces in all cases, whether vapor phase of neat liquid ammonia is used. The first-principles modeling of this complex system suggests that step-edge surface defects may play a key role in enabling the reaction under certain circumstances, despite the endothermic nature for Si-H bond formation.

  3. Electrocatalytic oxygen evolution at surface-oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunyu; Yim, Wai-Leung; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2015-03-01

    Large-scale storage of renewable energy in the form of hydrogen (H2) fuel via electrolytic water splitting requires the development of water oxidation catalysts that are efficient and abundant. Carbon-based nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes have attracted significant applications for use as substrates for anchoring metal-based nanoparticles. We show that, upon mild surface oxidation, hydrothermal annealing and electrochemical activation, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) themselves are effective water oxidation catalysts, which can initiate the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at overpotentials of 0.3 V in alkaline media. Oxygen-containing functional groups such as ketonic C═O generated on the outer wall of MWCNTs are found to play crucial roles in catalyzing OER by altering the electronic structures of the adjacent carbon atoms and facilitates the adsorption of OER intermediates. The well-preserved microscopic structures and highly conductive inner walls of MWCNTs enable efficient transport of the electrons generated during OER.

  4. Interaction of D{sub 2}O with model oxide single crystal surfaces: Clean and oxidized W(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, G.S.; Gallagher, M.C.; Joyce, S.

    1995-12-31

    It has been suggested that the interaction of D{sub 2}O with single crystal oxide surfaces are dominated by defects. To investigate this we have prepared and then characterized oxidized W(110) surfaces with Auger electron spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy. We have also used temperature programmed desorption (TPD) to investigate the interaction of D{sub 2}O with these surfaces. Results indicate that desorption of D{sub 2}O occurs from two states for both the clean and fully oxidized surface. The decomposition of D{sub 2}O was found to occur on the clean surface but not for the fully oxidized surface. This is evident from the observation of residual oxygen remaining on the clean surface after a TPD cycle as well as the observation of two different D{sub 2} desorption features for the clean surface. On the fully oxidized surface neither occur.

  5. Band energy control of molybdenum oxide by surface hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Keith T. Walsh, Aron; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Buckeridge, John; Scanlon, David O.; Bovill, Edward; Lidzey, David

    2015-12-07

    The application of oxide buffer layers for improved carrier extraction is ubiquitous in organic electronics. However, the performance is highly susceptible to processing conditions. Notably, the interface stability and electronic structure is extremely sensitive to the uptake of ambient water. In this study we use density functional theory calculations to asses the effects of adsorbed water on the electronic structure of MoO{sub x}, in the context of polymer-fullerene solar cells based on PCDTBT. We obtain excellent agreement with experimental values of the ionization potential for pristine MoO{sub 3} (010). We find that IP and EA values can vary by as much as 2.5 eV depending on the oxidation state of the surface and that adsorbed water can either increase or decrease the IP and EA depending on the concentration of surface water.

  6. New advanced surface modification technique: titanium oxide ceramic surface implants: long-term clinical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Gyorgy; Kovacs, Lajos; Barabas, Jozsef; Nemeth, Zsolt; Maironna, Carlo

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the background to advanced surface modification technologies and to present a new technique, involving the formation of a titanium oxide ceramic coating, with relatively long-term results of its clinical utilization. Three general techniques are used to modify surfaces: the addition or removal of material and the change of material already present. Surface properties can also be changed without the addition or removal of material, through the laser or electron beam thermal treatment. The new technique outlined in this paper relates to the production of a corrosion-resistant 2000-2500 A thick, ceramic oxide layer with a coherent crystalline structure on the surface of titanium implants. The layer is grown electrochemically from the bulk of the metal and is modified by heat treatment. Such oxide ceramic-coated implants have a number of advantageous properties relative to implants covered with various other coatings: a higher external hardness, a greater force of adherence between the titanium and the oxide ceramic coating, a virtually perfect insulation between the organism and the metal (no possibility of metal allergy), etc. The coated implants were subjected to various physical, chemical, electronmicroscopic, etc. tests for a qualitative characterization. Finally, these implants (plates, screws for maxillofacial osteosynthesis and dental root implants) were applied in surgical practice for a period of 10 years. Tests and the experience acquired demonstrated the good properties of the titanium oxide ceramic-coated implants.

  7. The surface segregation of titania in magnesium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackrodt, W. C.; Tasker, P. W.; Colbourn, E. A.

    1985-04-01

    A theoretical study of the segregation of titania (TiO 2) at the (001) surface of magnesium oxide (MgO) based on atomistic simulation methods is reported. It is suggested that titanium ions in MgO exist almost exclusively as neutral impurity-vacancy pairs. The stability of those at the surface relative to the bulk is estimated, and from this the effective enthalpy of segregation is deduced. Finally the segregation behaviour of TiO 2 in MgO is compared with that of CaO.

  8. Surface Complexation of Actinides with Iron Oxides: Implications for Radionuclide Transport in Near-Surface Aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerden, J. L.; Kropf, A. J.; Tsai, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  9. SURFACE COMPLEXATION OF ACTINIDES WITH IRON OXIDES: IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT IN NEAR-SURFACE AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Jerden Jr.; A.J. Kropf; Y. Tsai

    2005-08-25

    The surface complexation of actinides with iron oxides plays a key role in actinide transport and retardation in geosphere-biosphere systems. The development of accurate actinide transport models therefore requires a mechanistic understanding of surface complexation reactions (i.e. knowledge of chemical speciation at mineral/fluid interfaces). Iron oxides are particularly important actinide sorbents due to their pH dependent surface charges, relatively high surface areas and ubiquity in oxic and suboxic near-surface systems. In this paper we present results from field and laboratory investigations that elucidate the mechanisms involved in binding uranium and neptunium to iron oxide mineral substrates in near neutral groundwaters. The field study involved sampling and characterizing uranium-bearing groundwaters and solids from a saprolite aquifer overlying an unmined uranium deposit in the Virginia Piedmont. The groundwaters were analyzed by inductively coupled mass spectrometry and ion chromatography and the aquifer solids were analyzed by electron microprobe. The laboratory study involved a series of batch sorption tests in which U(VI) and Np(V) were reacted with goethite, hematite and magnetite in simulated groundwaters. The pH, ionic strength, aging time, and sorbent/sorbate ratios were varied in these experiments. The oxidation state and coordination environment of neptunium in solutions and sorbents from the batch tests were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Results from this work indicate that, in oxidizing near-surface aquifers, the dissolved concentration of uranium may be limited to less than 30 parts per billion due to uptake by iron oxide mineral coatings and the precipitation of sparingly soluble U(VI) phosphate minerals. Results from the batch adsorption tests showed that, in near neutral groundwaters, a significant fraction of the uranium and neptunium adsorbed as strongly

  10. Nano- and Micro-Scale Oxidative Patterning of Titanium Implant Surfaces for Improved Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-hye; Son, Jun Sik; Choi, Seok Hwa; Kim, Kyo-han; Kwon, Tae-yub

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable surface modification treatment is demonstrated, in which nano- and microscale features are introduced into the surface of titanium (Ti) substrates by means of a novel and eco-friendly oxidative aqueous solution composed of hydrogen peroxide (H202) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). By immersing mirror-polished Ti discs in an aqueous mixture of 30 wt% H2O2/5 wt% NaHCO3 at 23 +/- 3 degrees C for 4 h, it was confirmed that this mixture is capable of generating microscale topographies on Ti surfaces. It also simultaneously formed nanochannels that were regularly arranged in a comb-like pattern on the Ti surface, thus forming a hierarchical surface structure. Further, these nano/micro-textured Ti surfaces showed great surface roughness and excellent wettability when compared with control Ti surfaces. This study demonstrates that a H2O2/NaHCO3 mixture can be effectively utilized to create reproducible nano/microscale topographies on Ti implant surfaces, thus providing an economical new oxidative solution that may be used effectively and safely as a Ti surface modification treatment.

  11. Nano- and Micro-Scale Oxidative Patterning of Titanium Implant Surfaces for Improved Surface Wettability.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-hye; Son, Jun Sik; Choi, Seok Hwa; Kim, Kyo-han; Kwon, Tae-yub

    2016-02-01

    A simple and scalable surface modification treatment is demonstrated, in which nano- and microscale features are introduced into the surface of titanium (Ti) substrates by means of a novel and eco-friendly oxidative aqueous solution composed of hydrogen peroxide (H202) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3). By immersing mirror-polished Ti discs in an aqueous mixture of 30 wt% H2O2/5 wt% NaHCO3 at 23 +/- 3 degrees C for 4 h, it was confirmed that this mixture is capable of generating microscale topographies on Ti surfaces. It also simultaneously formed nanochannels that were regularly arranged in a comb-like pattern on the Ti surface, thus forming a hierarchical surface structure. Further, these nano/micro-textured Ti surfaces showed great surface roughness and excellent wettability when compared with control Ti surfaces. This study demonstrates that a H2O2/NaHCO3 mixture can be effectively utilized to create reproducible nano/microscale topographies on Ti implant surfaces, thus providing an economical new oxidative solution that may be used effectively and safely as a Ti surface modification treatment. PMID:27433692

  12. The adsorption and oxidation of cyanogen on copper surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carley, A. F.; Chinn, M.; Parkinson, C. R.

    2003-07-01

    The adsorption of cyanogen on clean and oxygen pre-treated graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface, and the co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen on graphite supported copper films, and a polycrystalline copper surface has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cyanogen dissociates on the copper surfaces at 300 K, yielding an adsorbed cyano group, CN (a). On the oxygen pre-treated copper surface cyanogen reacts quantitatively with the adsorbed oxygen at 300 K to form a surface cyanate species, NCO. On annealing to 600 K this species decomposes, leaving only N adatoms and residual adsorbed CN on the surface. The co-adsorption of cyanogen and oxygen from a cyanogen-oxygen mixture enhances the formation of NCO to the extent that all available surface oxygen is consumed to form NCO on annealing at 450 K. In the absence of available atomic surface oxygen NCO does not decompose at temperatures up to 600 K. NCO and NCO 2 are shown to be the intermediates in the oxidation of cyanogen on copper films and a polycrystalline copper foil.

  13. Adsorption of T4 bacteriophages on planar indium tin oxide surface via controlled surface tailoring.

    PubMed

    Liana, Ayu Ekajayanthi; Chia, Ed Win; Marquis, Christopher P; Gunawan, Cindy; Gooding, J Justin; Amal, Rose

    2016-04-15

    The work investigates the influence of surface physicochemical properties of planar indium tin oxide (ITO) as a model substrate on T4 bacteriophage adsorption. A comparative T4 bacteriophage adsorption study shows a significant difference in bacteriophage adsorption observed on chemically modified planar ITO when compared to similarly modified particulate ITO, which infers that trends observed in virus-particle interaction studies are not necessarily transferrable to predict virus-planar surface adsorption behaviour. We also found that ITO surfaces modified with methyl groups, (resulting in increased surface roughness and hydrophobicity) remained capable of adsorbing T4 bacteriophage. The adsorption of T4 onto bare, amine and carboxylic functionalised planar ITO suggests the presence of a unique binding behaviour involving specific functional groups on planar ITO surface beyond the non-specific electrostatic interactions that dominate phage to particle interactions. The paper demonstrates the significance of physicochemical properties of surfaces on bacteriophage-surface interactions.

  14. Inhibition of Sulfide Mineral Oxidation by Surface Coating Agents: Batch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.; Ji, M. K.; Yun, H. S.; Park, Y. T.; Gee, E. D.; Lee, W. R.; Jeon, B.-H.

    2012-04-01

    Mining activities and mineral industries have impacted on rapid oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS2) which leads to Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) formation. Some of the abandoned mines discharge polluted water without proper environmental remediation treatments, largely because of financial constraints in treating AMD. Magnitude of the problem is considerable, especially in countries with a long history of mining. As metal sulfides become oxidized during mining activities, the aqueous environment becomes acid and rich in many metals, including iron, lead, mercury, arsenic and many others. The toxic heavy metals are responsible for the environmental deterioration of stream, groundwater and soils. Several strategies to remediate AMD contaminated sites have been proposed. Among the source inhibition and prevention technologies, microencapsulation (coating) has been considered as a promising technology. The encapsulation is based on inhibition of O2 diffusion by surface coating agent and is expected to control the oxidation of pyrite for a long time. Potential of several surface coating agents for preventing oxidation of metal sulfide minerals from both Young-Dong coal mine and Il-Gwang gold mine were examined by conducting batch experiments and field tests. Powdered pyrite as a standard sulfide mineral and rock samples from two mine outcrops were mixed with six coating agents (KH2PO4, MgO and KMnO4 as chemical agents, and apatite, cement and manganite as mineral agents) and incubated with oxidizing agents (H2O2 or NaClO). Batch experiments with Young-Dong coal mine samples showed least SO42- production in presence of KMnO4 (16% sulfate production compared to no surface coating agents) or cement (4%) within 8 days. In the case of Il-Gwang mine samples, least SO42- production was observed in presence of KH2PO4 (8%) or cement (2%) within 8 days. Field-scale pilot tests at Il-Gwang site also showed that addition of KH2PO4 decreased sulfate production from 200 to

  15. Shape and surface structure of gold nanoparticles under oxidizing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongqing; Stampfl, Catherine

    2008-03-01

    We perform density-functional theory calculations to investigate the adsorption of oxygen at the Au(100) and Au(110) surfaces. For the clean surfaces, we find that the added-row (5×1)/Au(100) structure is more stable than the unreconstructed (1×1)/Au(100) surface and the missing-row (2×1)/Au(110) structure is more stable than the unreconstructed (1×1)/Au(110) surface, which is consistent with experimental results. For oxygen adsorption on Au(100), the most stable structure is predicted to be a low coverage ( ˜0.1 ML) on the added-row reconstructed surface, while for adsorption on Au(110), the most stable configuration of those considered is a (2×1) missing-row structure with 1 ML coverage of oxygen. From these results, together with those of our previous investigations into the O/Au(111) system, we use the Wulff construction to predict the nanoparticle shape as a function of oxygen chemical potential, which we correlate with pressure (p) and temperature (T) . For low values of the oxygen chemical potential ( <-0.6eV , corresponding, e.g., to p=1atm and T>600K ), the nanoparticle consists of clean (111) facets. For slightly higher values, clean (111) facets still dominate but there are small regions of (110) facets, which are covered with the (2×1)-2O reconstruction. With progressively increasing values of the chemical potential (e.g., from -0.4to-0.18eV , corresponding to, e.g., p=1atm and T=420-200K ), the (111) facets become covered with a thin oxide-like structure, and the (110) regions with the (2×1)-2O/(110) surface reconstruction become larger and finally dominate. These findings indicate that for low temperature oxidation reactions, where gold nanoparticles have been reported to be surprisingly active, such thin “surface-oxide-like” structures on the (111) and (110) surfaces could possibly play a role in the behavior of the nanogold catalysts.

  16. Enhanced biogenic emissions of nitric oxide and nitrous oxide following surface biomass burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Iris C.; Levine, Joel S.; Poth, Mark A.; Riggan, Philip J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent measurements indicate significantly enhanced biogenic soil emissions of both nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) following surface burning. These enhanced fluxes persisted for at least six months following the burn. Simultaneous measurements indicate enhanced levels of exchangeable ammonium in the soil following the burn. Biomass burning is known to be an instantaneous source of NO and N2O resulting from high-temperature combustion. Now it is found that biomass burning also results in significantly enhanced biogenic emissions of these gases, which persist for months following the burn.

  17. How strain affects the reactivity of surface metal oxide catalysts.

    PubMed

    Amakawa, Kazuhiko; Sun, Lili; Guo, Chunsheng; Hävecker, Michael; Kube, Pierre; Wachs, Israel E; Lwin, Soe; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Patlolla, Anitha; Hermann, Klaus; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2013-12-16

    Highly dispersed molybdenum oxide supported on mesoporous silica SBA-15 has been prepared by anion exchange resulting in a series of catalysts with changing Mo densities (0.2-2.5 Mo atoms nm(-2) ). X-ray absorption, UV/Vis, Raman, and IR spectroscopy indicate that doubly anchored tetrahedral dioxo MoO4 units are the major surface species at all loadings. Higher reducibility at loadings close to the monolayer measured by temperature-programmed reduction and a steep increase in the catalytic activity observed in metathesis of propene and oxidative dehydrogenation of propane at 8 % of Mo loading are attributed to frustration of Mo oxide surface species and lateral interactions. Based on DFT calculations, NEXAFS spectra at the O-K-edge at high Mo loadings are explained by distorted MoO4 complexes. Limited availability of anchor silanol groups at high loadings forces the MoO4 groups to form more strained configurations. The occurrence of strain is linked to the increase in reactivity. PMID:24259425

  18. Attachment of pathogenic prion protein to model oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kurt H; Kuech, Thomas R; Pedersen, Joel A

    2013-07-01

    Prions are the infectious agents in the class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, which affect humans, deer, sheep, and cattle. Prion diseases of deer and sheep can be transmitted via environmental routes, and soil is has been implicated in the transmission of these diseases. Interaction with soil particles is expected to govern the transport, bioavailability and persistence of prions in soil environments. A mechanistic understanding of prion interaction with soil components is critical for understanding the behavior of these proteins in the environment. Here, we report results of a study to investigate the interactions of prions with model oxide surfaces (Al2O3, SiO2) using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and optical waveguide light mode spectroscopy. The efficiency of prion attachment to Al2O3 and SiO2 depended strongly on pH and ionic strength in a manner consistent with electrostatic forces dominating interaction with these oxides. The presence of the N-terminal portion of the protein appeared to promote attachment to Al2O3 under globally electrostatically repulsive conditions. We evaluated the utility of recombinant prion protein as a surrogate for prions in attachment experiments and found that its behavior differed markedly from that of the infectious agent. Our findings suggest that prions would tend to associate with positively charged mineral surfaces in soils (e.g., iron and aluminum oxides).

  19. Oxide-Confined Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, W. L.; Li, L.; Zhong, J. C.; Zhao, Y. J.; Zeng, L. N.; Yan, C. L.

    Novel distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) with 6-pair-GaAs/AlAs short period superlattice for the oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSEL) are designed. They are for the VCSEL that emits at 840 nm and is grown with 34-period n-type mirrors, three-quantum-well active region, and 22-period p-type mirrors. In addition, a 35-nm-layer of Al0.98Ga0.02As was inserted in the top mirrors for being selectively oxidized. The maximum output power is more than 2 mW with low threshold current of about 2 mA. The fact that the device's threshold current in both CW and pulsed operation depends slightly on the operation temperature shows its higher characteristic temperature (T0).

  20. Reflection spectra and magnetochemistry of iron oxides and natural surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasilewski, P.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic properties and spectral characteristics of iron oxides are distinctive. Diagnostic features in reflectance spectra (0.5 to 2.4 micron) for alpha Fe2O3, gamma Fe2O3, and FeOOH include location of Fe3(+) absorption features, intensity ratios at various wavelengths, and the curve shape between 1.2 micron and 2.4 micron. The reflection spectrum of natural rock surfaces are seldom those of the bulk rock because of weathering effects. Coatings are found to be dominated by iron oxides and clay. A simple macroscopic model of rock spectra (based on concepts of stains and coatings) is considered adequate for interpretation of LANDSAT data. The magnetic properties of materials associated with specific spectral types and systematic changes in both spectra and magnetic properties are considered.

  1. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  2. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  3. Effect of surface roughness on the texture and oxidation behavior of Zircaloy-4 cladding tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhiani, Hamed; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2013-11-01

    Conventional pressure water reactors like CANDU use Zircaloy-4 as a fuel cladding tube. Surface roughness that arises from the manufacturing process, pilgering, may alter these tubes' properties in various ways. This paper presents a comparative study of cladding tubes with different surface conditions in order to investigate their effect on the Zircaloy-4 substrate and oxide textures as well as the oxidation kinetic. The experimental results reveal that surface roughness affects the oxidation rate and weight gain of the cladding tubes. Although surface polishing slightly changes the substrate texture, it induces no significant change in the oxide texture. Moreover, oxidation time does not significantly change the preferred orientation of the zirconium oxide.

  4. Influence of corrosive solutions on microhardness and chemistry of magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishigaki, H.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and hardness experiments were conducted on cleaved magnesium oxide /001/ surfaces. The magnesium oxide bulk crystals were cleaved to specimen size along the /001/ surface, and indentations were made on the cleaved surface in corrosive solutions containing HCl, NaOH, or HNO3 and in water without exposing the specimen to any other environment. The results indicated that chloride (such as MgCl2) and sodium films are formed on the magnesium oxide surface as a result of interactions between an HCl-containing solution and a cleaved magnesium oxide surface. The chloride films soften the magnesium oxide surface. In this case microhardness is strongly influenced by the pH value of the solution. The lower the pH, the lower the microhardness. Sodium films, which are formed on the magnesium oxide surface exposed to an NaOH containing solution, do not soften the magnesium oxide surface.

  5. Asbestos surface provides a niche for oxidative modification.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Hirotaka; Ishihara, Toshikazu; Lee, Wen-Hua; Ohara, Hiroki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Okawa, Katsuya; Toyokuni, Shinya

    2011-12-01

    Asbestos is a potent carcinogen associated with increased risks of malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer in humans. Although the mechanism of carcinogenesis remains elusive, the physicochemical characteristics of asbestos play a role in the progression of asbestos-induced diseases. Among these characteristics, a high capacity to adsorb and accommodate biomolecules on its abundant surface area has been linked to cellular and genetic toxicity. Several previous studies identified asbestos-interacting proteins. Here, with the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry, we systematically identified proteins from various lysates that adsorbed to the surface of commercially used asbestos and classified them into the following groups: chromatin/nucleotide/RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal proteins, cytoprotective proteins, cytoskeleton-associated proteins, histones and hemoglobin. The surfaces of crocidolite and amosite, two iron-rich types of asbestos, caused more protein scissions and oxidative modifications than that of chrysotile by in situ-generated 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal. In contrast, we confirmed the intense hemolytic activity of chrysotile and found that hemoglobin attached to chrysotile, but not silica, can work as a catalyst to induce oxidative DNA damage. This process generates 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and thus corroborates the involvement of iron in the carcinogenicity of chrysotile. This evidence demonstrates that all three types of asbestos adsorb DNA and specific proteins, providing a niche for oxidative modification via catalytic iron. Therefore, considering the affinity of asbestos for histones/DNA and the internalization of asbestos into mesothelial cells, our results suggest a novel hypothetical mechanism causing genetic alterations during asbestos-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. How surface reparation prevents catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide on atomic gold at defective magnesium oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Kai; Tremblay, Jean Christophe

    2016-07-21

    In this contribution, we study using first principles the co-adsorption and catalytic behaviors of CO and O2 on a single gold atom deposited at defective magnesium oxide surfaces. Using cluster models and point charge embedding within a density functional theory framework, we simulate the CO oxidation reaction for Au1 on differently charged oxygen vacancies of MgO(001) to rationalize its experimentally observed lack of catalytic activity. Our results show that: (1) co-adsorption is weakly supported at F(0) and F(2+) defects but not at F(1+) sites, (2) electron redistribution from the F(0) vacancy via the Au1 cluster to the adsorbed molecular oxygen weakens the O2 bond, as required for a sustainable catalytic cycle, (3) a metastable carbonate intermediate can form on defects of the F(0) type, (4) only a small activation barrier exists for the highly favorable dissociation of CO2 from F(0), and (5) the moderate adsorption energy of the gold atom on the F(0) defect cannot prevent insertion of molecular oxygen inside the defect. Due to the lack of protection of the color centers, the surface becomes invariably repaired by the surrounding oxygen and the catalytic cycle is irreversibly broken in the first oxidation step. PMID:27345190

  7. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  8. Covalent attachment of 1-alkenes to oxidized platinum surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Fabre, Bruno; Trilling, Anke K; Scheres, Luc; Franssen, Maurice C R; Zuilhof, Han

    2015-03-10

    We report the formation of covalently bound alkyl layers onto oxidized Pt (PtOx) substrates by reaction with 1-alkenes as a novel way to bind organic molecules to metal surfaces. The organic layers were characterized by static contact angle, infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The grafted alkyl layers display a hydrolytic stability that is comparable to that of alkyl thiols on Au. PtOx-alkene attachment is compatible with terminal ester moieties enabling further anchoring of functional groups, such as redox-active ferrocene, and thus has great potential to extend monolayer chemistry on noble metals.

  9. Electrochemical chlorine evolution at rutile oxide (110) surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Heine A; Man, Isabela C; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations we study the electrochemical chlorine evolution reaction on rutile (110) oxide surfaces. First we construct the Pourbaix surface diagram for IrO(2) and RuO(2), and from this we find the chlorine evolution reaction intermediates and identify the lowest overpotential at which all elementary reaction steps in the chlorine evolution reaction are downhill in free energy. This condition is then used as a measure for catalytic activity. Linear scaling relations between the binding energies of the intermediates and the oxygen binding energies at cus-sites are established for MO(2) (M being Ir, Ru, Pt, Ti). The linear relations form the basis for constructing a generalized surface phase diagram where two parameters, the potential and the binding energy of oxygen, are needed to determine the surface composition. We calculate the catalytic activity as function of the oxygen binding energy, giving rise to a Sabatier volcano. By combining the surface phase diagram and the volcano describing the catalytic activity, we find that the reaction mechanism differs depending on catalyst material. The flexibility in reaction path means that the chlorine evolution activity is high for a wide range of oxygen binding energies. We find that the required overpotential for chlorine evolution is lower than the overpotential necessary for oxygen evolution. PMID:20024470

  10. Layer Control of WSe2 via Selective Surface Layer Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Yang, Sisi; Dhall, Rohan; Kosmowska, Ewa; Shi, Haotian; Chatzakis, Ioannis; Cronin, Stephen B

    2016-07-26

    We report Raman and photoluminescence spectra of mono- and few-layer WSe2 and MoSe2 taken before and after exposure to a remote oxygen plasma. For bilayer and trilayer WSe2, we observe an increase in the photoluminescence intensity and a blue shift of the photoluminescence peak positions after oxygen plasma treatment. The photoluminescence spectra of trilayer WSe2 exhibit features of a bilayer after oxygen plasma treatment. Bilayer WSe2 exhibits features of a monolayer, and the photoluminescence of monolayer WSe2 is completely absent after the oxygen plasma treatment. These changes are observed consistently in more than 20 flakes. The mechanism of the changes observed in the photoluminescence spectra of WSe2 is due to the selective oxidation of the topmost layer. As a result, N-layer WSe2 is reduced to N-1 layers. Raman spectra and AFM images taken from the WSe2 flakes before and after the oxygen treatment corroborate these findings. Because of the low kinetic energy of the oxygen radicals in the remote oxygen plasma, the oxidation is self-limiting. By varying the process duration from 1 to 10 min, we confirmed that the oxidation will only affect the topmost layer of the WSe2 flakes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy shows that the surface layer WOx of the sample can be removed by a quick dip in KOH solution. Therefore, this technique provides a promising way of controlling the thickness of WSe2 layer by layer. PMID:27391161

  11. Surface potential determination in metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moragues, J. M.; Ciantar, E.; Jerisian, R.; Sagnes, B.; Oualid, J.

    1994-11-01

    Different methods using the relationship between surface potential Psi(sub S) and gate bias V(sub G) in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors have been compared. These methods can be applied even if the doping profile is very abrupt and the interface state density very high. The shifts of midgap, flatband, and threshold voltages, observed after Fowler-Nordheim electron injection, and deduced from the various Psi(sub S(V (sub G)) relationships obtained by these different methods, are in good agreement. These shifts give the number of effective oxide trapped charges (N(sub ox)) per unit area and acceptor-like and donor-like interface states (N(sub SS)A and N(sub SS)D) which are created during the electron injection. We reveal that the number of positive charges created in the gate oxide, unlike the number of generated interface states, strongly depends on the position of the post-metallization annealing step in the process. After relaxation of the stressed MOS capacitors, most of the generated positive charges can be attributed, in the MOS capacitors studied, to hydrogen-related species. It seems that the interface states are essentially created by the recombination of holes generated by electron impact.

  12. The electrochemisty of surface modified <10 nm metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Joseph J. P.

    Chapter One provides a general introduction of the research on metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx), highlighting their synthesis, surface modification, and functionalization. Emphasis is given to the different synthetic route for producing small (<10 nm) MOx nanoparticles with narrow size distributions. Different methods for modifying their surface with small organic molecules are discussed with focus given to silanes and phosphates. Furthermore, functionalizing surface modified nanoparticles for specific functions is addressed, with markers for analytically relevant nanoscale quantification being the primary focus. Chapter Two describes in detail the thermal degradation synthesis used for the generation of small MOx nanoparticles. It demonstrates the versatile of the synthesis by successfully synthesizing ZrO 2 and IrO2 nanoparticles. Preliminary work involving the formation of Bi2S3, Bi2O3, and RuO2 nanomaterials is also addressed. The solvothermal synthesis of indium tin oxide (ITO) is also shown for comparison to ITO produced by thermal degradation. Chapter Three details the surface modification of ITO nanoparticles and subsequent electrochemical tagging with a ferrocene moiety. ITO nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal degradation. These nanoparticles underwent a ligand exchange with a covalently binding mondentate silane terminated with a primary amine. Acyl chloride coupling between the amine and chlorocarbonylferrocene provided an electrochemical tag to quantify the level of surface modification. Electrochemisty of the quasi-diffusing nanoparticles was evaluated via cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and mircodisk electrode (microE) experiments. Chapter Four investigates spectroscopic tagging of ITO and ZrO2 nanoparticles as well as electrochemical tagging of ZrO 2 and IrO2 nanoparticles. An unbound azo-dye was synthesized and attempts were made to attach the dye to the surface of ITO nanoparticles. Imine couple between a spectroscopic tag

  13. Oxidic copper on the Au(111) surface: A theoretical surface science approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehun; Lee, Yonghyuk; Kang, Kisung; Soon, Aloysius

    Recently, via reactive Cu deposition in an oxygen ambience, high quality gold-supported cuprous oxide (Cu2O) ultrathin nanofilms have been prepared as a model system to further such catalytic studies. Nonetheless, an accurate atomic picture of these ultrathin Cu2O nanofilms, which largely depends on its immediate oxygen environment, is currently lacking. In this work, we perform density-functional theory (DFT) calculations using the Vienna ab initio Simulation Package in combination with ab initio atomistic thermodynamics to investigate stability of Cu2O thin films on Au(111) as a function of oxygen chemical potential. Our results indeed show that some of the surface structures suggested in Ref. are energetically more stable than the traditional copper oxide thin film structures on copper substrate, and elucidated the electronic structure of these ultrathin copper oxide films on gold, in comparison with available experimental data.

  14. Surface composition of solid-rocket exhausted aluminum oxide particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cofer, Wesley R., III; Winstead, Edward L.; Key, Lawrence E.

    1989-01-01

    Particulate samples of aluminum oxide were collected on Teflon filters from the exhaust plume of the Space Shuttle (STS-61A, October 30, 1985) over the altitude interval 4.6-7.6 km immediately after launch. These particles were analyzed using SEM, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, X-ray fluorescent spectroscopy, and conventional wet-chemical techniques. The samples were 0.6-1.0 percent surface-chlorided (chlorided meaning predominantly aluminum chlorides and oxychlorides, possibly including other adsorbed forms of chloride) by weight. This level of chloriding is about one-third of the amount determined previously from laboratory-prepared alumina and surface site samples of solid-rocket-produced alumina (SRPA) after both had been exposed to moist HCl vapor at temperatures down to ambient. This level is equivalent to previous laboratory results with samples exposed to moist HCl at temperatures above the boiling point of water. It is suggested that the present lower chloriding levels, determined for samples from a 'dry' Shuttle exhaust cloud, underscore the importance of a liquid water/hydrochloric acid phase in governing the extent of surface chloriding of SRPA. The reduced chloriding is not trivial with respect to potential physical/chemical modification of the SRPA particle surfaces and their corresponding interaction with the atmosphere.

  15. Surface evolution at nanoscale during oxidation: A competing mechanism between local curvature effect and stress effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xufei; Li, Yan; Wang, Dan; Lu, Siyuan; Feng, Xue

    2016-04-01

    The process of surface evolution of a chemically etched stepped structure at nanoscale during oxidation at 600 °C is in situ and real time observed using scanning probe microscope, which is integrated in a nanoindentation equipment for high temperature test. Experimental results reveal that this curved stepped structure becomes flat after being oxidized for a short period of time. However, after a longer time of oxidation, it is observed that the originally flat surface near the stepped structure becomes rough. Analysis shows that such a surface evolution is attributed to the competition between the nanoscale curvature effect (related to surface energy) and the stress developed in the oxide film during oxidation (related to strain energy). It is demonstrated that both the surface energy and strain energy can modify the surface chemical potential, which acts as the driving force of the surface diffusion of oxygen and further affects the oxide formation on the surface.

  16. Rapid surface oxidation as a source of surface degradation factor for Bi₂Se₃.

    PubMed

    Kong, Desheng; Cha, Judy J; Lai, Keji; Peng, Hailin; Analytis, James G; Meister, Stefan; Chen, Yulin; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Fisher, Ian R; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Cui, Yi

    2011-06-28

    Bismuth selenide (Bi(2)Se(3)) is a topological insulator with metallic surface states (SS) residing in a large bulk bandgap. In experiments, synthesized Bi(2)Se(3) is often heavily n-type doped due to selenium vacancies. Furthermore, it is discovered from experiments on bulk single crystals that Bi(2)Se(3) gets additional n-type doping after exposure to the atmosphere, thereby reducing the relative contribution of SS in total conductivity. In this article, transport measurements on Bi(2)Se(3) nanoribbons provide additional evidence of such environmental doping process. Systematic surface composition analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal fast formation and continuous growth of native oxide on Bi(2)Se(3) under ambient conditions. In addition to n-type doping at the surface, such surface oxidation is likely the material origin of the degradation of topological SS. Appropriate surface passivation or encapsulation may be required to probe topological SS of Bi(2)Se(3) by transport measurements.

  17. Surface characterization and mechanical property evaluation of thermally oxidized Ti-6Al-4V

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Amit; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna

    2009-06-15

    The present study concerns development of a thin and adherent oxide film on the surface of Ti-6Al-4V by thermal oxidation. Thermal oxidation was carried out over a range of temperature between 400 to 600 deg. C and a time from 25 h to 60 h. A detailed characterization of the surface and cross section of the oxidized surface was carried out by optical/scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Finally, the mechanical properties of the oxidized surface in terms of microindentation hardness and wear resistance were evaluated as a function of oxidation parameters. Surface oxidation of Ti-6Al-4V at 600 deg. C for 36 h offered a defect free oxide scale with improved hardness and wear resistance.

  18. Probing and mapping electrode surfaces in solid oxide fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Blinn, Kevin S; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-20

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen (1-7). The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion(2). Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation(8-12). It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition(8, 10, 13, 14) ("coking") and sulfur poisoning(11, 15) and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation(16). The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM

  19. Probing and Mapping Electrode Surfaces in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Blinn, Kevin S.; Li, Xiaxi; Liu, Mingfei; Bottomley, Lawrence A.; Liu, Meilin

    2012-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are potentially the most efficient and cost-effective solution to utilization of a wide variety of fuels beyond hydrogen 1-7. The performance of SOFCs and the rates of many chemical and energy transformation processes in energy storage and conversion devices in general are limited primarily by charge and mass transfer along electrode surfaces and across interfaces. Unfortunately, the mechanistic understanding of these processes is still lacking, due largely to the difficulty of characterizing these processes under in situ conditions. This knowledge gap is a chief obstacle to SOFC commercialization. The development of tools for probing and mapping surface chemistries relevant to electrode reactions is vital to unraveling the mechanisms of surface processes and to achieving rational design of new electrode materials for more efficient energy storage and conversion2. Among the relatively few in situ surface analysis methods, Raman spectroscopy can be performed even with high temperatures and harsh atmospheres, making it ideal for characterizing chemical processes relevant to SOFC anode performance and degradation8-12. It can also be used alongside electrochemical measurements, potentially allowing direct correlation of electrochemistry to surface chemistry in an operating cell. Proper in situ Raman mapping measurements would be useful for pin-pointing important anode reaction mechanisms because of its sensitivity to the relevant species, including anode performance degradation through carbon deposition8, 10, 13, 14 ("coking") and sulfur poisoning11, 15 and the manner in which surface modifications stave off this degradation16. The current work demonstrates significant progress towards this capability. In addition, the family of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) techniques provides a special approach to interrogate the electrode surface with nanoscale resolution. Besides the surface topography that is routinely collected by AFM and STM

  20. A surface science investigation of silicon carbide: Oxidation, crystal growth and surface structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, J.M.

    1991-11-01

    For the semiconductor SiC to fulfill its potential as an electronic material, methods must be developed to produce insulating surface oxide layers in a reproducible fashion. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to investigate the oxidation of single crystal {alpha}-SiC over a wide temperature and O{sub 2} pressure range. The {alpha}-SiC surface becomes graphitic at high temperatures and low O{sub 2} pressures due to Si and SiO sublimation from the surface. Amorphous SiO{sub 2} surface layers from on {alpha}-SiC at elevated O{sub 2} pressures and temperatures. Both the graphitization and oxidation of {alpha}-SiC appears to be enhanced by surface roughness. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is currently the preferred method of producing single crystal SiC, although the method is slow and prone to contamination. We have attempted to produce SiC films at lower temperatures and higher deposition rates using plasma enhanced CVD with CH{sub 3}SiH{sub 3}. Scanning AES, XPS and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to study the composition and morphology of the deposited Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films as a function of substrate temperature, plasma power and ion flux bombardment of the film during deposition. High energy ion bombardment during deposition was found to increase film density and substrate adhesion while simultaneously reducing hydrogen and oxygen incorporation in the film. Under all deposition conditions the Si{sub x}C{sub y}H{sub z} films were found to be amorphous, with the ion bombarded films showing promise as hard protective coatings. Studies with LEED and AES have shown that {beta}-SiC (100) exhibits multiple surface reconstructions, depending on the surface composition. These surface reconstructions possess substantially different surface reactivities at elevated temperatures, which can complicate the fabrication of metal on SiC junctions.

  1. Metal-oxide-semiconductor characterization of silicon surfaces thermally oxidized after reactive ion etching and magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching

    SciTech Connect

    Settlemyer, K.T. Jr.; Ruzyllo, J.; Hwang, D.K.

    1993-03-01

    In this study the performance of reactive ion etching (RIE) and magnetically enhanced reactive ion etching (MERIE) processes in pregate oxidation etching of the field oxide are compared. The comparison is carried out through metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) characterization of oxides and interfaces formed on etched silicon surfaces. The results revealed differences in the outcome of RIE and MERIE processes with the latter displaying overall superior characteristics. MERIE induced surface damage is shallower, and is mostly removed during oxide growth. RIE damage propagates deeper into the Si bulk and still influences the MOS devices even after the top Si layers are converted into the oxide. The results obtained emphasize the importance of adequate cleaning of silicon surfaces following RIE/MERIE processes. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Cleaning and passivation of copper surfaces to remove surface radioactivity and prevent oxide formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Bachelor, Paula P.; Day, Anthony R.; Edwards, Danny J.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Litke, Kevin E.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Schulte, Shannon M.; Smart, John E.; Warren, Glen A.

    2007-08-21

    High-purity copper is an attractive material for constructing ultra-low-background radiation measurement devices. Many low-background experiments using high-purity copper have indicated surface contamination emerges as the dominant background. Radon daughters plate out on exposed surfaces, leaving a residual 210Pb background that is difficult to avoid. Dust is also a problem; even under cleanroom conditions, the amount of U and Th deposited on surfaces can represent the largest remaining background. To control these backgrounds, a copper cleaning chemistry has been developed. Designed to replace an effective, but overly aggressive concentrated nitric acid etch, this peroxide-based solution allows for a more controlled cleaning of surfaces. The acidified hydrogen peroxide solution will generally target the Cu+/Cu2+ species which are the predominant surface participants, leaving the bulk of copper metal intact. This preserves the critical tolerances of parts and eliminates significant waste disposal issues. Accompanying passivation chemistry has also been developed that protects copper surfaces from oxidation. Using a high-activity polonium surface spike, the most difficult-to-remove daughter isotope of radon, the performance of these methods are quantified. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  3. Giant and switchable surface activity of liquid metal via surface oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammad Rashed; Eaker, Collin B.; Bowden, Edmond F.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method to control the interfacial tension of a liquid alloy of gallium via electrochemical deposition (or removal) of the oxide layer on its surface. In sharp contrast with conventional surfactants, this method provides unprecedented lowering of surface tension (∼500 mJ/m2 to near zero) using very low voltage, and the change is completely reversible. This dramatic change in the interfacial tension enables a variety of electrohydrodynamic phenomena. The ability to manipulate the interfacial properties of the metal promises rich opportunities in shape-reconfigurable metallic components in electronic, electromagnetic, and microfluidic devices without the use of toxic mercury. This work suggests that the wetting properties of surface oxides—which are ubiquitous on most metals and semiconductors—are intrinsic “surfactants.” The inherent asymmetric nature of the surface coupled with the ability to actively manipulate its energetics is expected to have important applications in electrohydrodynamics, composites, and melt processing of oxide-forming materials. PMID:25228767

  4. Behavior of Al on Clean and Oxidized GaAs(110) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyunwoo

    1993-04-01

    The adsorption of Al on clean and oxidized GaAs(110) surfaces was studied. The characteristics of an oxide surface formed in vacuum and during the chemical etching process of the tip have been investigated using the field desorption (FD) cleaning method and the retarding potential analyzer (RPA) equipped with an argon laser. The results obtained for the FD clean surface and on the oxidized surface are discussed in terms of the RPA threshold and work function change. The oxide films formed at relatively low temperatures on the GaAs(110) surface can easily be desorbed by FD. The intrinsic potential drops across the oxide surface disappear suddenly at a certain field value. This may indicate that the desorbed surface region is composed of a metallic species such as Ga. Changes in work function are observed but there is no change in the threshold values (Vth) with deposition of Al on the field-desorbed clean surface. The thick layers of Al on the oxidized surface completely cancel the effect of oxide on Vth, which decreases to the value of a metallic clean surface. In addition, the value of Vth decreases dramatically to that of a metallic clean surface by absorption of the laser beam on the oxidized surface, whereas only the thermal effect is seen on a metallic clean surface.

  5. Enhanced in vitro biological activity generated by surface characteristics of anodically oxidized titanium--the contribution of the oxidation effect.

    PubMed

    Wurihan; Yamada, A; Suzuki, D; Shibata, Y; Kamijo, R; Miyazaki, T

    2015-05-20

    Anodically oxidized titanium surfaces, prepared by spark discharge, have micro-submicron surface topography and nano-scale surface chemistry, such as hydrophilic functional groups or hydroxyl radicals in parallel. The complexity of the surface characteristics makes it difficult to draw a clear conclusion as to which surface characteristic, of anodically oxidized titanium, is critical in each biological event. This study examined the in vitro biological changes, induced by various surface characteristics of anodically oxidized titanium with, or without, release of hydroxyl radicals onto the surface. Anodically oxidized titanium enhanced the expression of genes associated with differentiating osteoblasts and increased the degree of matrix mineralization by these cells in vitro. The phenotypes of cells on the anodically oxidized titanium were the same with, or without, release of hydroxyl radicals. However, the nanomechanical properties of this in vitro mineralized tissue were significantly enhanced on surfaces, with release of hydroxyl radicals by oxidation effects. In addition, the mineralized tissue, produced in the presence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on bare titanium, had significantly weaker nanomechanical properties, despite there being higher osteogenic gene expression levels. We show that enhanced osteogenic cell differentiation on modified titanium is not a sufficient indicator of enhanced in vitro mineralization. This is based on the inferior mechanical properties of mineralized tissues, without either being cultured on a titanium surface with release of hydroxyl radicals, or being supplemented with lysyl oxidase family members.

  6. High surface area, electrically conductive nanocarbon-supported metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Worsley, Marcus A; Han, Thomas Yong-Jin; Kuntz, Joshua D; Cervanted, Octavio; Gash, Alexander E; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr., Joe H

    2014-03-04

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust.

  7. High surface area, electrically conductive nanocarbon-supported metal oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Han, Thomas Yong-Jin; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Cervantes, Octavio; Gash, Alexander E.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2015-07-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust.

  8. Surface modification of Cu metal particles by the chemical reaction between the surface oxide layer and a halogen surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Surface oxides on small (2-5 μm) copper metal particles can be removed by chemical reaction with tris(2,3-dibromopropyl) isocyanurate (TIC) in diethylene glycol mono-n-hexyl ether (DGHE) solution under mild conditions where metal particles are not damaged. Surface oxides convert to copper bromide species and subsequently dissolve into the solvent. It was found that resultant surface species are resistant to re-oxidation due to remaining surface bromides. This finding opens up a possibility to create microclines based on cheap copper nanoparticles.

  9. Molecular-level assemblies on metal oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Schoonover, J.R.; Bignozzi, C.; Meyer, T.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to explore molecular-level assemblies based on polypyridyl transition metal complexes attached to metal oxide surfaces to provide the basis for applications such as energy conversion and electricity generation, photoremediation of hazardous waste, chemical sensors, and optical storage and photorefractive devices for communications and optical computing. We have elucidated the fundamental factors that determine the photochemistry and photophysics of a series of these photoactive inorganic complexes in solution and on metal oxide substrates by exploiting our unique transient laser capabilities. This data is being utilized to design and fabricate molecular-level photonic devices. The rich chemistry of transition metal polypyridyl complexes can be utilized to prepare molecular assemblies having well-defined redox or excited-state properties that can be finely tuned to produce desired materials properties. We plan to explore other novel applications such as photorefractive switches and optical sensors using this molecular engineering approach.

  10. Probing surface band bending of surface-engineered metal oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Ying; Retamal, Jose Ramon Duran; Wu, I-Wen; Lien, Der-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Wei; Ding, Yong; Chueh, Yu-Lun; Wu, Chih-I; He, Jr-Hau

    2012-11-27

    We in situ probed the surface band bending (SBB) by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) in conjunction with field-effect transistor measurements on the incompletely depleted ZnO nanowires (NWs). The diameter range of the NWs is ca. 150-350 nm. Several surface treatments (i.e., heat treatments and Au nanoparticle (NP) decoration) were conducted to assess the impact of the oxygen adsorbates on the SBB. A 100 °C heat treatment leads to the decrease of the SBB to 0.74 ± 0.15 eV with 29.9 ± 3.0 nm width, which is attributed to the removal of most adsorbed oxygen molecules from the ZnO NW surfaces. The SBB of the oxygen-adsorbed ZnO NWs is measured to be 1.53 ± 0.15 eV with 43.2 ± 2.0 nm width. The attachment of Au NPs to the NW surface causes unusually high SBB (2.34 ± 0.15 eV with the wide width of 53.3 ± 1.6 nm) by creating open-circuit nano-Schottky junctions and catalytically enhancing the formation of the charge O(2) adsorbates. These surface-related phenomena should be generic to all metal oxide nanostructures. Our study is greatly beneficial for the NW-based device design of sensor and optoelectronic applications via surface engineering.

  11. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungjin; Kim, Kijeong; Lee, Hangil

    2013-09-02

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation.

  12. The aniline-to-azobenzene oxidation reaction on monolayer graphene or graphene oxide surfaces fabricated by benzoic acid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation of aniline to azobenzene was conducted in the presence of either monolayer graphene (EG) or graphene-oxide-like surface, such as GOx, under ultra-high vacuum conditions maintaining a 365-nm UV light exposure to enhance the oxidation reaction. The surface-bound products were investigated using micro Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution photoemission spectroscopy, and work function measurements. The oxygen carriers present on the GOx surfaces, but not on the EG surfaces, acted as reaction reagents to facilitate the oxidation reaction from aniline to azobenzene. Increasing the aniline concentration at 300 K confirmed that the exchange ratio from the aniline to the azobenzene was enhanced, as determined by the intensity ratio between the aniline- and azobenzene-induced N 1 s core-level spectra. The work function changed dramatically as the aniline concentration increased, indicating that the aniline on the GOx surface conveyed n-type doping characteristics at a low coverage level. A higher aniline concentration increased the p-type doping character by increasing the azobenzene concentration on the GOx surface. A comparison of the oxidation reactivity of aniline molecules on the EG or GOx surfaces revealed the role of the oxygen carriers on the GOx surfaces in the context of catalytic oxidation. PMID:24229051

  13. On the mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation on the surface of gold nanoclusters supported on titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvauri, I. V.; Remar, D. F.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2010-05-01

    The process of carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation on the surface of a system comprising nanodimensional gold clusters deposited onto thin films of titanium oxide of variable stoichiometry formed on a Re(1000) single crystal surface has been studied by methods of thermodesorption, IR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is established that oxygen contained in titanium oxide plays an important role in the conversion of CO into CO2. The efficiency of this process on the Au/TiO x ( x < 2) system surface is significantly higher that that on the Au/TiO2 system.

  14. Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Boffa, A B

    1994-07-01

    The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

  15. Modification of surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing lifetime of neutron tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, A. M. Dvoichenkova, O. A.; Evsin, A. E.

    2015-12-15

    The peculiarities of interaction of hydrogen ions with a titanium target and its surface oxide layer were studied. Two ways of modification of the surface oxide layers of titanium targets for increasing the lifetime of neutron tubes were proposed: (1) deposition of an yttrium oxide barrier layer on the target surface; (2) implementation of neutron tube work regime in which the target is irradiated with ions with energies lower than 1000 eV between high-energy ion irradiation pulses.

  16. Soluble and immobilized graphene oxide activates complement system differently dependent on surface oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Wibroe, Peter P; Petersen, Søren V; Bovet, Nicolas; Laursen, Bo W; Moghimi, S Moein

    2016-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is believed to become applicable in biomedical products and medicine, thereby necessitating appropriate safety evaluation dependent on their applications and the route of administration. We have examined the effect of GO form (in solution versus immobilized) and oxidation state on two related elements of innate immunity: the complement system and interleukin-6 (IL-6) release in human blood. In solution, there was a decrease in GO-mediated complement activation with decreasing surface oxygen content (and altered oxygen functionality), whereas with immobilized GO complement response were reversed and increased with decreasing oxygen content. GO solutions, at concentrations below complement activating threshold, did not induce IL-6 release from human blood leukocytes, and further dampened lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 release in the whole blood. The latter effect became more profound with GO's having higher oxygen content. This protective role of GO solutions, however, disappeared at higher concentrations above complement-activating threshold. We discuss these results in relation to GO surface structure and properties, and implications for local administration and development of GO-based implantable devices.

  17. Characterization of the thrombogenic potential of surface oxides on stainless steel for implant purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chun-Che; Shih, Chun-Ming; Su, Yea-Yang; Chang, Mau-Song; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2003-12-01

    Marketed stents are manufactured from various metals and passivated with different degrees of surface oxidation. The functional surface oxides on the degree of antithrombotic potential were explored through a canine femoral extracorporeal circuit model. Related properties of these oxide films were studied by open-circuit potential, current density detected at open-circuit potential, the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Auger spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and scanning electron microscopy. Experimental evidences showed that blood clot weight after a 30-min follow-up was significantly lower for the stainless steel wire passivated with amorphous oxide (AO) compared to the wire passivated with polycrystalline oxide (PO) or commercial as-received wire coils (AS). Surface characterizations showed that a stable negative current density at open-circuit potential and a significant lower potential were found for the wire surface passivated with AO than for the surface passivated with PO. Time constant of AO is about 25 times larger than that of polycrystalline oxide. Significant difference in oxide grain sizes was found between PO and AO. Surface chemistries revealed by the AES and XPS spectra indicated the presence of a Cr- and oxygen-rich surface oxide for AO, and a Fe-rich and oxygen-lean surface oxide for PO. These remarkable characteristics of AO surface film might have a potential to provide for excellent antithrombotic characteristics for the 316L stainless steel stents.

  18. Interaction of the reactants with the surface of an oxide catalyst under conditions of the oxidative ammonolysis of toluene

    SciTech Connect

    Guseinov, A.B.; Mamedov, E.A.; Pankrat'ev, Y.D.; Rizaev, R.G.

    1985-08-01

    The processes of separate and joint interaction of toluene, oxygen, and ammonia with the surface of a complex oxide catalyst were investigated by a pulsed method under nonsteady-state and steady-state conditions of the oxidative ammonolysis of toluene. It was shown that under steady-state conditions the formation of benzonitrile occurs according to a stepwise redox mechanism, and that of the products of profound oxidation occurs both according to a stepwise and according to associative mechanisms.

  19. Decontamination of U-metal Surface by an Oxidation Etching System

    SciTech Connect

    Stout, R B; Kansa, E J; Shaffer, R J; Weed, H C

    2000-12-18

    A surface oxidation treatment is described to remove surface contamination from uranium (U) metal and/or hydrides of uranium and heavy metals (HM) from U-metal parts. In the case of heavy metal atomic contamination on a surface, and potentially several atomic layers beneath, the surface oxidation treatment combines both chemical and chemically driven mechanical processes. The chemical process is a controlled temperature-time oxidization process that creates a thin film of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2} and higher oxides) on the U-metal surface. The chemically driven mechanical process is strain induced by the volume increase as the U-metal surface transforms to a UO{sub 2} surface film. These volume strains are sufficiently large to cause surface failure spalling/scale formation and thus, removal of a U-oxide film that contains the HM-contaminated surface. The case of a HM-hydride surface contamination layer can be treated similarly by using inert hot gas to decompose the U-hydrides and/or HM-hydrides that are contiguous with the surface. A preliminary analysis to design and to plan for a sequence of tests is developed. The tests will provide necessary and sufficient data to evaluate the effective implementation and operational characteristics of a safe and reliable system. The following description is limited to only a surface oxidation process for HM-decontamination.

  20. Adsorption of carbon oxide and nitrogen oxide molecules on the surface of the Ni/MgO(111) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Pantileev, D. G.

    2009-10-01

    The coadsorption of carbon oxide (CO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) molecules on the surface of nickel nanoclusters formed on a thin magnesium oxide MgO(111) film grown on the Mo(110) face in an ultrahigh vacuum is studied by reflective infrared spectroscopy and thermodesorption spectroscopy (TDS). The adsorption of NO molecules is found to substantially change the state of the initially adsorbed CO molecules. The TDS and IR spectra suggest that the adsorption of NO molecules stimulates the surface migration of CO molecules from the surface of metallic clusters to the cluster-oxide interface, which is accompanied by a decrease in the angle of inclination of the molecular axis to the surface.

  1. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Bare Peat Surfaces on Permafrost Peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repo, M. E.; Pitkämäki, A.; Biasi, C.; Seppälä, M.; Martikainen, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Pronounced warming predicted for the arctic areas may enhance the release of soil carbon and nitrogen as greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. While carbon dioxide and methane fluxes in high-latitude ecosystems have been widely investigated, fewer studies have been published on nitrous oxide (N2O) dynamics in the North. Although most pristine ecosystems in the Arctic do not emit N2O due to strict nitrogen limitation, recent findings show that there are specific surfaces capable of high N2O production and release (Repo et al., 2009). In this study we used a static chamber technique to study N2O emissions from bare peat surfaces on two subarctic permafrost peatland types, peat plateau and palsa mire. The peat plateau site is located in the discontinuous permafrost zone in Komi Republic, Russia (67°03' N, 62°57' E). Field data from this Russian site from snow-free season 2007 showed high emissions from peat circles (bare peat surfaces affected by cryoturbation; 1.9 to 31 mg N2O m-2 d-1) and negligible N2O release from all the vegetated surfaces (Repo et al. 2009). Peat circles were emitting N2O at rates comparable to those measured typically from agricultural and tropical soils. These observations were confirmed by field campaign in 2008. Partly vegetated palsas on the top of the peat plateau, included in the study in 2008, showed also significant N2O emissions, intermediate to those from peat circles and fully vegetated sites. No particularly high peak emissions were observed during cold season from either of the studied surfaces, in contrast to what has been reported from many boreal soils. To get evidence on the spatial coverage of high N2O emissions from subarctic peatlands, N2O emissions were measured from three palsa mires in Finnish Lapland (69°34'-69°50' N, 26°10'-27°10' E) during a short campaign in peak season 2009. The region has less permafrost extent and milder climatic conditions than the Russian site. Bare peat surfaces on palsas, created by wind

  2. Surface modification and chemistry of hematite-based catalysts for water oxidation: Model surfaces, nanomaterials, and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng

    Hematite-based electrocatalysts are widely used for water oxidation, but these catalysts suffer from its low reaction kinetics. To help elucidate detailed reaction mechanisms associated with water oxidation, water chemisorption and reaction as well as structural changes induced by Ni incorporation into the alpha-Fe2O3(0001) surface was studied. Incorporation of Ni into the near-surface region of hematite changes the structure of the (0001) surface by the formation of FeO-like domains on the topmost layer. Electrochemical measurements demonstrated that Ni incorporation leads to higher current density and lower onset potential than the unmodified alpha-Fe 2O3 surface. To extend the surface science study to real catalysts, hematite nanocrystals were synthesized with continuous tuning of the aspect-ratio and fine control of the surface area ratio (from 98% to 30%) of the (0001) facet with respect to other surfaces. Ni doping forms a uniformly doped NixFe 2-xO3 surface overlayer that improves the electrocatalytic activity of water oxidation. The enhancement of water oxidation activity by Ni-doping increased as the surface area ratio of the (0001) facet of hematite nanocrystals increased, consistent with the theoretical predictions and surface science studies. Then, a composite oxide film photoelectrode comprised of alpha-Fe 2O3 and WO3 were prepared, and exhibited a water oxidation photocurrent onset potential as low as 0.43 V vs. RHE. This result represents one of the lowest onset potentials measured for hematite-based PEC water oxidation systems. The composition of the films differs between the surfaces and bulk, with tungsten found to be concentrated in the surface region. Post-reaction Raman spectroscopy characterization demonstrates that water interacts with surface WO3 crystals, an event that is associated with the formation of a hydrated form of the oxide. Lastly, the surface chemistry of H2O on hematite nanoplates is investigated by studying water adsorption and

  3. Surface intermediates in selective olefin oxidation and ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Burrington, J.D.; Kartisek, C.T.; Grasselli, R.K.

    1983-02-01

    An investigation of the mechanism of the oxidation and ammoxidation of propylene was made. The products of the above reactions were acrylonitrile and acrolein for ammoxidation and oxidation, respectively. Also, the ammoxidation and oxidation of allyl alcohol, allyl amine, and their allylic deuterium substituted analogues was studied. It was concluded that oxidation and ammoxidation of propylene have the same rate determining step. Other conclusions about the reaction intermediates were also made.

  4. Improved the Surface Roughness of Silicon Nanophotonic Devices by Thermal Oxidation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zujun; Shao, Shiqian; Wang, Yi

    2011-02-01

    The transmission loss of the silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguide and the coupling loss of the SOI grating are determined to a large extent by the surface roughness. In order to obtain smaller loss, thermal oxidation is a good choice to reduce the surface roughness of the SOI waveguide and grating. Before the thermal oxidation, the root mean square of the surface roughness is over 11 nm. After the thermal oxidation, the SEM figure shows that the bottom of the grating is as smooth as quartz surface, while the AFM shows that the root mean square of the surface is less than 5 nm.

  5. Hydrophobic cotton textile surfaces using an amphiphilic graphene oxide (GO) coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, Nadeeka D.; Wijesena, Ruchira N.; Perera, J. Rangana; de Silva, K. M. Nalin; Amaratunge, Gehan A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report for the first time hydrophobic properties on cotton fabric successfully achieved by grafting graphene oxide on the fabric surface, using a dyeing method. Graphite oxide synthesized by oxidizing natural flake graphite employing improved Hummer's method showed an inter layer spacing of ∼1 nm from XRD. Synthesized graphite oxide was exfoliated in water using ultrasound energy to obtain graphene oxide (GO). AFM data obtained for the graphene oxide dispersed in an aqueous medium revealed a non-uniform size distribution. FTIR characterization of the synthesized GO sheets showed both hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups present on the nano sheets giving them an amphiphilic property. GO flakes of different sizes were successfully grafted on to a cotton fabric surface using a dip dry method. Loading different amounts of graphene oxide on the cotton fiber surface allowed the fabric to demonstrate different degrees of hydrophobicity. The highest observed water contact angle was at 143° with the highest loading of graphene oxide. The fabric surfaces grafted with GO also exhibits adhesive type hydrophobicity. Microscopic characterization of the fiber surface using SEM and AFM reveals the deposition of GO sheets on the fiber surface as a conformal coating. Analysis of the fabric surface using UV-vis absorption allowed identification of the ratio of hydrophobic to hydrophilic domains present on the GO coated cotton fabric surface. Hydrophobic properties on cotton fabric are ascribed to two dimensional amphiphilic properties of deposited GO nano sheets, which successfully lower the interfacial energy of the fabric surface.

  6. Electrospun nickel oxide nanofibers: Microstructure and surface evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Abdullah; Hashaikeh, Raed

    2015-12-01

    Nickel oxide (NiO) nanofibers with controlled microstructure were synthesized through the electrospinning technique using a solution composed of nickel acetate and polyvinyl alcohol. The microstructure of NiO nanofibers was found to be highly dependent on nickel acetate concentration in the solution and the post-heat treatment. As the nickel acetate concentration increases, the crystallinity index of NiO nanofibers increases from nearly 50 percent to 90 percent and the average crystallite size in the nanofibers increases from about 20 nm to 30 nm. Further, it was found that annealing the nanofibers at 1000 °C for 2 h leads to nearly full crystallization of nanofibers with significant increase in the crystallite size to about 50 nm while maintaining the fibrous shape. For low nickel acetate concentration, and because of the small nanofibers size, the surface of the calcined nanofibers showed oxygen deficiency which promises a superior activity of these NiO nanofibers for catalytic and sensing applications.

  7. Study of the active surface on titanium oxide catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Khanmamedov, T.K.; Kalinkin, A.V.; Rakhimova, N.R.

    1989-02-01

    A study was carried out on the change in the composition of a Ti-Mo-W catalyst depending on the conditions for their treatment by H/sub 2/S-SO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S-O/sub 2/ gas mixtures, which serve as models for the technological gases in Klaus apparatuses and the direct catalytic oxidation of H/sub 2/S. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to establish the formation of sulfur as S/sup 2/minus// and S/sup 6+/ on the surface. The presence of S/sup 6+/ along with the changes in E/sub b/ of the electrons in the T-Mo-W catalyst indicates the formation of MoS/sub 2/ and TiO(SO/sub 4/) species.

  8. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  9. In situ atomic scale visualization of surface kinetics driven dynamics of oxide growth on a Ni-Cr surface.

    PubMed

    Luo, Langli; Zou, Lianfeng; Schreiber, Daniel K; Olszta, Matthew J; Baer, Donald R; Bruemmer, Stephen M; Zhou, Guangwen; Wang, Chong-Min

    2016-02-25

    We report the in situ atomic-scale visualization of the dynamic three-dimensional growth of NiO during the initial oxidation of Ni-10at%Cr using environmental transmission electron microscopy. A step-by-step adatom growth mechanism in 3D is observed and a change in the surface planes of growing oxide islands can be induced by local surface kinetic variations. PMID:26815841

  10. Comparative temporal analysis of multiwalled carbon nanotube oxidation reactions: Evaluating chemical modifications on true nanotube surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Flávia G.; Cotta, Alexandre A. C.; Gorgulho, Honória F.; Santos, Adelina P.; Macedo, Waldemar A. A.; Furtado, Clascídia A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of extensive purification on oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotube surface composition was studied through the characterization and differentiation of the actual surface submitted to three oxidation methods: microwave-assisted acid oxidation, hydrogen peroxide reflux, and Fenton reaction. The oxidized samples were purified by a multi-step procedure including the sequential use of basic reflux and dispersion in dimethylformamide (DMF). The results showed a significant increase in the amount of oxidation debris with hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction times longer than 8 h and strong surface characteristic modification. With regard to sample purification, basic reflux led to a reduction in oxygenated group concentration of only 10% in the samples treated by acid oxidation. On the other hand, the subsequent use of DMF led to a further decrease in concentration of 39%, proving to be a more efficient method for the removal of oxidation debris.

  11. A Method to Manipulate Surface Tension of a Liquid Metal via Surface Oxidation and Reduction.

    PubMed

    Eaker, Collin B; Khan, M Rashed; Dickey, Michael D

    2016-01-26

    Controlling interfacial tension is an effective method for manipulating the shape, position, and flow of fluids at sub-millimeter length scales, where interfacial tension is a dominant force. A variety of methods exist for controlling the interfacial tension of aqueous and organic liquids on this scale; however, these techniques have limited utility for liquid metals due to their large interfacial tension. Liquid metals can form soft, stretchable, and shape-reconfigurable components in electronic and electromagnetic devices. Although it is possible to manipulate these fluids via mechanical methods (e.g., pumping), electrical methods are easier to miniaturize, control, and implement. However, most electrical techniques have their own constraints: electrowetting-on-dielectric requires large (kV) potentials for modest actuation, electrocapillarity can affect relatively small changes in the interfacial tension, and continuous electrowetting is limited to plugs of the liquid metal in capillaries. Here, we present a method for actuating gallium and gallium-based liquid metal alloys via an electrochemical surface reaction. Controlling the electrochemical potential on the surface of the liquid metal in electrolyte rapidly and reversibly changes the interfacial tension by over two orders of magnitude ( ̴500 mN/m to near zero). Furthermore, this method requires only a very modest potential (< 1 V) applied relative to a counter electrode. The resulting change in tension is due primarily to the electrochemical deposition of a surface oxide layer, which acts as a surfactant; removal of the oxide increases the interfacial tension, and vice versa. This technique can be applied in a wide variety of electrolytes and is independent of the substrate on which it rests.

  12. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1995-02-28

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. Work during the eighteenth quarter has focused on severe oxidation of coal by thermal and chemical treatment, and on investigating the partition of metal ions between such strongly oxidized coal samples and aqueous solutions. This partitioning behavior is being followed to obtain further information on the chemistry of the coal surfaces after different oxidation treatments, for example, whether partition occurs by an ion-exchange mechanism, or whether the surface is capable of changing the oxidation state of metallic species, with concurrent surface or bulk precipitation.

  13. Mercury Underpotential Deposition to Determine Iridium and Iridium Oxide Electrochemical Surface Areas

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Hurst, Katherine E.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2016-06-02

    Determining the surface areas of electrocatalysts is critical for separating the key properties of area-specific activity and electrochemical surface area from mass activity. Hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide oxidation are typically used to evaluate iridium (Ir) surface areas, but are ineffective on oxides and can be sensitive to surface oxides formed on Ir metals. Mercury underpotential deposition is presented in this study as an alternative, able to produce reasonable surface areas on Ir and Ir oxide nanoparticles, and able to produce similar surface areas prior to and following characterization in oxygen evolution. Reliable electrochemical surface areas allow for comparativemore » studies of different catalyst types and the characterization of advanced oxygen evolution catalysts. Lastly, they also enable the study of catalyst degradation in durability testing, both areas of increasing importance within electrolysis and electrocatalysis.« less

  14. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS2 monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-01

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS2 (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS2 shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS2 surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS2 surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS2 monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  15. Surface Catalysis and Oxidation on Stagnation Point Heat Flux Measurements in High Enthalpy Arc Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, David M.; Terrazas-Salinas

    2013-01-01

    Heat flux sensors are routinely used in arc jet facilities to determine heat transfer rates from plasma plume. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of surface composition changes on these heat flux sensors. Surface compositions can change due to oxidation and material deposition from the arc jet. Systematic surface analyses of the sensors were conducted before and after exposure to plasma. Currently copper is commonly used as surface material. Other surface materials were studied including nickel, constantan gold, platinum and silicon dioxide. The surfaces were exposed to plasma between 0.3 seconds and 3 seconds. Surface changes due to oxidation as well as copper deposition from the arc jets were observed. Results from changes in measured heat flux as a function of surface catalycity is given, along with a first assessment of enthalpy for these measurements. The use of cupric oxide is recommended for future heat flux measurements, due to its consistent surface composition arc jets.

  16. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies of water on metals and oxides at ambient conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Salmeron, Miquel; Yamamoto, S.; Bluhm, H.; Andersson, K.; Ketteler, G.; Ogasawara, H.; Salmeron, M.; Nilsson, A.

    2007-10-29

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a powerful tool for surface and interface analysis, providing the elemental composition of surfaces and the local chemical environment of adsorbed species. Conventional XPS experiments have been limited to ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions due to a short mean free path of electrons in a gas phase. The recent advances in instrumentation coupled with third-generation synchrotron radiation sources enables in-situ XPS measurements at pressures above 5 Torr. In this review, we describe the basic design of the ambient pressure XPS setup that combines differential pumping with an electrostatic focusing. We present examples of the application of in-situ XPS to studies of water adsorption on the surface of metals and oxides including Cu(110), Cu(111), TiO2(110) under environmental conditions of water vapor pressure. On all these surfaces we observe a general trend where hydroxyl groups form first, followed by molecular water adsorption. The importance of surface OH groups and their hydrogen bonding to water molecules in water adsorption on surfaces is discussed in detail.

  17. Influence of controlled surface oxidation on the magnetic anisotropy of Co ultrathin films

    SciTech Connect

    Di, N.; Maroun, F. Allongue, P.; Kubal, J.; Zeng, Z.; Greeley, J.

    2015-03-23

    We studied the influence of controlled surface-limited oxidation of electrodeposited epitaxial Co(0001)/Au(111) films on their magnetic anisotropy energy using real time in situ magneto optical Kerr effect and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. We investigated the Co first electrochemical oxidation step which we demonstrate to be completely reversible and determined the structure of this oxide layer. We show that the interface magnetic anisotropy of the Co film increases by 0.36 erg/cm{sup 2} upon Co surface oxidation. We performed DFT calculations to determine the different surface structures in a wide potential range as well as the charge transfer at the Co surface. Our results suggest that the magnetic anisotropy change is correlated with a positive charge increase of 0.54 e{sup −} for the Co surface atom upon oxidation.

  18. Origin of complex impact craters on native oxide coated silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai; Popok, Vladimir N.; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2008-02-01

    Crater structures induced by impact of keV-energy Arn+ cluster ions on silicon surfaces are measured with atomic force microscopy. Complex crater structures consisting of a central hillock and outer rim are observed more often on targets covered with a native silicon oxide layer than on targets without the oxide layer. To explain the formation of these complex crater structures, classical molecular dynamics simulations of Ar cluster impacts on oxide coated silicon surfaces, as well as on bulk amorphous silica, amorphous Si, and crystalline Si substrates, are carried out. The diameter of the simulated hillock structures in the silicon oxide layer is in agreement with the experimental results, but the simulations cannot directly explain the height of hillocks and the outer rim structures when the oxide coated silicon substrate is free of defects. However, in simulations of 5keV /atom Ar12 cluster impacts, transient displacements of the amorphous silicon or silicon oxide substrate surfaces are induced in an approximately 50nm wide area surrounding the impact point. In silicon oxide, the transient displacements induce small topographical changes on the surface in the vicinity of the central hillock. The comparison of cluster stopping mechanisms in the various silicon oxide and silicon structures shows that the largest lateral momentum is induced in the silicon oxide layer during the impact; thus, the transient displacements on the surface are stronger than in the other substrates. This can be a reason for the higher frequency of occurrence of the complex craters on oxide coated silicon.

  19. Surface x-ray diffraction of complex metal oxide surfaces and interfaces--a new era

    SciTech Connect

    Schlepuetz, C. M.; Willmott, P. R.; Pauli, S. A.; Herger, R.; Martoccia, D.; Bjoerck, M.; Kumah, D.; Clarke, R.; Yacoby, Y.

    2009-01-29

    The availability of high-brilliance hard x-ray synchrotron radiation and the advent of novel photon counting area detectors have brought surface x-ray diffraction (SXRD) into a new era. It is now possible to record large numbers of structure factors with much improved reliability within reasonable beamtime durations. As a result, structural determination of the surfaces and interfaces of complex crystallographic systems and heterostructures has now become feasible, especially in conjunction with phase-retrieval methods. It is thereby hoped that detailed structural information will shed light on the unusual physical properties of these systems. Complex metal oxide systems investigated at the Materials Science beamline of the Swiss Light Source, including the surface of SrTiO{sub 3}, the interface between LaAlO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}, and the structure of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} grown on NdGaO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and (LaSr)(AlTa)O{sub 3} will be presented as examples of what is now possible using SXRD.

  20. Friction-induced surface activity of some hydrocarbons with clean and oxide-covered iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Sliding friction studies were conducted on a clean and oxide-covered iron surface with exposure of that surface to various hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbons included ethane, ethylene ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, and vinyl chloride. Auger cylindrical mirror analysis was used to follow interactions of the hydrocarbon with the iron surface. Results with vinyl chloride indicate friction induced surface reactivity, adsorption to surface oxides, friction sensitivity to concentration and polymerization. Variation in the loads employed influence adsorption and accordingly friction. In contrast with ethyl and vinyl chloride, friction induced surface reactivity was not observed with ethane and ethylene.

  1. Robust hybrid elastomer/metal-oxide superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoshian, S; Jokinen, V; Franssila, S

    2016-08-21

    We introduce a new type of hybrid material: a nanostructured elastomer covered by a hard photoactive metal-oxide thin film resembling the exoskeleton of insects. It has extreme water repellency and fast self-recovery after damage. A new fabrication method for replicating high aspect ratio, hierarchical re-entrant aluminum structures into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. The method is based on a protective titania layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the aluminum template. The ALD titania transfers to the elastomeric scaffold via sacrificial release etching. The sacrificial release method allows for high aspect ratio, even 100 μm deep and successful release of overhanging structures, unlike conventional peeling. The ALD titania conformally covers the 3D multihierarchical structures of the template and protects the polymer during the release etch. Afterwards it prevents the high aspect ratio nanostructures from elasticity based collapse. The resulting nanostructured hybrid PDMS/titania replicas display robust superhydrophobicity without any further fluoro-coating or modification. Their mechanical and thermal robustness results from a thick nanostructured elastomeric layer which is conformally covered by ceramic titania instead of a monolayer hydrophobic coating. We have demonstrated the durability of these replicas against mechanical abrasion, knife scratches, rubbing, bending, peel tape test, high temperature annealing, UV exposure, water jet impingement and long term underwater storage. Though the material loses its superhydrophobicity in oxygen plasma exposure, a fast recovery from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic can be achieved after 20 min UV irradiation. UV-assisted recovery is correlated with the high photoactivity of ALD titania film. This novel hybrid material will be applicable to the large area superhydrophobic surfaces in practical outdoor applications. PMID:27418238

  2. Robust hybrid elastomer/metal-oxide superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hoshian, S; Jokinen, V; Franssila, S

    2016-08-21

    We introduce a new type of hybrid material: a nanostructured elastomer covered by a hard photoactive metal-oxide thin film resembling the exoskeleton of insects. It has extreme water repellency and fast self-recovery after damage. A new fabrication method for replicating high aspect ratio, hierarchical re-entrant aluminum structures into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is presented. The method is based on a protective titania layer deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) on the aluminum template. The ALD titania transfers to the elastomeric scaffold via sacrificial release etching. The sacrificial release method allows for high aspect ratio, even 100 μm deep and successful release of overhanging structures, unlike conventional peeling. The ALD titania conformally covers the 3D multihierarchical structures of the template and protects the polymer during the release etch. Afterwards it prevents the high aspect ratio nanostructures from elasticity based collapse. The resulting nanostructured hybrid PDMS/titania replicas display robust superhydrophobicity without any further fluoro-coating or modification. Their mechanical and thermal robustness results from a thick nanostructured elastomeric layer which is conformally covered by ceramic titania instead of a monolayer hydrophobic coating. We have demonstrated the durability of these replicas against mechanical abrasion, knife scratches, rubbing, bending, peel tape test, high temperature annealing, UV exposure, water jet impingement and long term underwater storage. Though the material loses its superhydrophobicity in oxygen plasma exposure, a fast recovery from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic can be achieved after 20 min UV irradiation. UV-assisted recovery is correlated with the high photoactivity of ALD titania film. This novel hybrid material will be applicable to the large area superhydrophobic surfaces in practical outdoor applications.

  3. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study on the Wetting Behavior of Water on Oxidized and Non-Oxidized atactic Polystyrene Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Selemon; Tsige, Mesfin

    2013-03-01

    All-Atomistic Molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the wetting of oxidized and non-oxidized atactic polystyrene (aPS) thin films by water droplets. The dependence of the contact angle on droplet size has been studied using spherical and hemispherical water droplets of varying sizes. The effect of oxidation of the aPS surface on the contact angle has been studied as a function of oxygen concentration. Oxidation of the aPs has been achieved by randomly replacing the ortho and/or meta hydrogen on the phenyl rings within 1 nm of the aPS surface by oxygen until the desired concentration of oxygen on the surface is reached. The simulated contact angle is found to decrease monotonically with oxygen concentration consistent with recent experimental results. We will present results on the variation of water contact angle with oxygen concentration on the aPS surface. In addition, the effect of oxidization on the roughness of the polystyrene surface, the ordering of the phenyl rings and the water molecules and the number of hydrogen bonding between water molecules and the polystrene at the interface have been investigated and will be presented. This work is supported by the NSF (DMR0847580).

  4. Adsorption of formate species on Cu(h,k,l) low index surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chutia, Arunabhiram; Silverwood, Ian P.; Farrow, Matthew R.; Scanlon, David O.; Wells, Peter P.; Bowker, Michael; Parker, Stewart F.; Catlow, C. Richard A.

    2016-11-01

    We report a density functional theory study on the relative stability of formate species on Cu(h,k,l) low index surfaces using a range of exchange-correlation functionals. We find that these functionals predict similar geometries for the formate molecule adsorbed on the Cu surface. A comparison of the calculated vibrational transition energies of a perpendicular configuration of formate on Cu surface shows an excellent agreement with the experimental spectrum obtained from inelastic neutron spectroscopy. From the calculations on adsorption energy we find that formate is most stable on the Cu(110) surface as compared to Cu(111) and Cu(100) surfaces. Bader analysis shows that this feature could be related to the higher charge transfer from the Cu(110) surface and optimum charge density at the interfacial region due to bidirectional electron transfer between the formate and the Cu surface. Analysis of the partial density of states finds that in the -5.5 eV to -4.0 eV region, hybridization between O p and the non-axial Cu dyz and dxz orbitals takes place on the Cu(110) surface, which is energetically more favourable than on the other surfaces.

  5. Oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617 in high temperature helium environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Sah, Injin; Kim, Donghoon; Kim, Hyunmyung; Jang, Changheui

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of the electron beam surface-treated Alloy 617, which has an Al-rich surface layer, were evaluated in high temperature helium environments. Isothermal oxidation tests were performed in helium (99.999% purity) and VHTR-helium (helium of prototypical VHTR chemistry containing impurities like CO, CO2, CH4, and H2) environments at 900 °C for up to 1000 h. The surface-treated Alloy 617 showed an initial transient oxidation stage followed by the steady-state oxidation in all test environments. In addition, the steady-state oxidation kinetics of the surface-treated Alloy 617 was 2-order of magnitude lower than that of the as-received Alloy 617 in both helium environments as well as in air. The improvement in oxidation resistance was primarily due to the formation of the protective Al2O3 layer on the surface. The weight gain was larger in the order of air, helium, and VHTR-helium, while the parabolic rate constants (kp) at steady-state were similar for all test environments. In both helium environments, the oxide structure consisted of the outer transition Al2O3 with a small amount of Cr2O3 and inner columnar structured Al2O3 without an internal oxide. In the VHTR-helium environment, where the impurities were added to helium, the initial transient oxidation increased but the steady state kinetics was not affected.

  6. Surface segregation and oxidation of Ti in a V-Ti alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Ryo; Hatano, Yuji; Fujii, Katsuhiko; Fukumoto, Ken-ichi; Matsui, Hideki; Watanabe, Kuniaki

    2002-12-01

    The oxidation and reduction of surface oxides of the V-4%Ti alloy were examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A specimen sheet of the alloy covered by oxide films was heated between 513 and 1223 K for 10 min in vacuum. Vanadium oxides started to be reduced to the metallic state at 673 K owing to oxygen dissolution in the bulk, while titanium remained in oxidized states up to 983 K. Titanium segregated to the surface above this temperature, and the surface concentration reached up to 40% at 1223 K. The specimen surface enriched in Ti was thus prepared and oxidized at 573 and 773 K under oxygen pressures between 10 -5 and 10 -3 Pa. At 573 K, titanium was selectively oxidized at 10 -5 Pa, while vanadium remained in a metallic state. Such selective oxidation of Ti took place also at 775 K under the pressure of 10 -4 Pa. Titanium segregating to the surface appeared to provide the barrier effect against tritium inventory and permeation under high temperature, low oxygen partial pressure conditions through selective oxidation.

  7. Effect of Surface Oxidation on Interfacial Water Structure at a Pyrite (100) Surface as Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Jiaqi; Miller, Jan D.; Dang, Liem X.; Wick, Collin D.

    2015-06-01

    In the first part of this paper, a Scanning Electron Microscopy and contact angle study of a pyrite surface (100) is reported describing the relationship between surface oxidation and the hydrophilic surface state. In addition to these experimental results, the following simulated surface states were examined using Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS): fresh unoxidized (100) surface; polysulfide at the (100) surface; elemental sulfur at the (100) surface. Crystal structures for the polysulfide and elemental sulfur at the (100) surface were simulated using Density Functional Theory (DFT) quantum chemical calculations. The well known oxidation mechanism which involves formation of a metal deficient layer was also described with DFT. Our MDS results of the behavior of interfacial water at the fresh and oxidized pyrite (100) surfaces without/with the presence of ferric hydroxide include simulated contact angles, number density distribution for water, water dipole orientation, water residence time, and hydrogen-bonding considerations. The significance of the formation of ferric hydroxide islands in accounting for the corresponding hydrophilic surface state is revealed not only from experimental contact angle measurements but also from simulated contact angle measurements using MDS. The hydrophilic surface state developed at oxidized pyrite surfaces has been described by MDS, on which basis the surface state is explained based on interfacial water structure. The Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), of the DOE funded work performed by Liem X. Dang. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for DOE. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by BES.

  8. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney Allen; Walker, Frederick Joseph

    1998-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  9. Process for growing a film epitaxially upon an oxide surface and structures formed with the process

    DOEpatents

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.

    1995-01-01

    A process and structure wherein a film comprised of a perovskite or a spinel is built epitaxially upon a surface, such as an alkaline earth oxide surface, involves the epitaxial build up of alternating constituent metal oxide planes of the perovskite or spinel. The first layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a small cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel, and the second layer of metal oxide built upon the surface includes a metal element which provides a large cation in the crystalline structure of the perovskite or spinel. The layering sequence involved in the film build up reduces problems which would otherwise result from the interfacial electrostatics at the first atomic layers, and these oxides can be stabilized as commensurate thin films at a unit cell thickness or grown with high crystal quality to thicknesses of 0.5-0.7 .mu.m for optical device applications.

  10. Ab initio atomistic thermodynamics study on the oxidation mechanism of binary and ternary alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shi-Yu; Liu, Shiyang; Li, De-Jun; Wang, Sanwu; Guo, Jing; Shen, Yaogen

    2015-02-14

    Utilizing a combination of ab initio density-functional theory and thermodynamics formalism, we have established the microscopic mechanisms for oxidation of the binary and ternary alloy surfaces and provided a clear explanation for the experimental results of the oxidation. We construct three-dimensional surface phase diagrams (SPDs) for oxygen adsorption on three different Nb-X(110) (X = Ti, Al or Si) binary alloy surfaces. On the basis of the obtained SPDs, we conclude a general microscopic mechanism for the thermodynamic oxidation, that is, under O-rich conditions, a uniform single-phase SPD (type I) and a nonuniform double-phase SPD (type II) correspond to the sustained complete selective oxidation and the non-sustained partial selective oxidation by adding the X element, respectively. Furthermore, by revealing the framework of thermodynamics for the oxidation mechanism of ternary alloys through the comparison of the surface energies of two separated binary alloys, we provide an understanding for the selective oxidation behavior of the Nb ternary alloy surfaces. Using these general microscopic mechanisms, one could predict the oxidation behavior of any binary and multi-component alloy surfaces based on thermodynamics considerations.

  11. Chemically modified Si(111) surfaces simultaneously demonstrating hydrophilicity, resistance against oxidation, and low trap state densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Elizabeth S.; Hlynchuk, Sofiya; Maldonado, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    Chemically modified Si(111) surfaces have been prepared through a series of wet chemical surface treatments that simultaneously show resistance towards surface oxidation, selective reactivity towards chemical reagents, and areal defect densities comparable to unannealed thermal oxides. Specifically, grazing angle attenuated total reflectance infrared and X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectroscopies were used to characterize allyl-, 3,4-methylenedioxybenzene-, or 4-[bis(trimethylsilyl)amino]phenyl-terminated surfaces and the subsequently hydroxylated surfaces. Hydroxylated surfaces were confirmed through reaction with 4-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl bromide and quantified by XP spectroscopy. Contact angle measurements indicated all surfaces remained hydrophilic, even after secondary backfilling with CH3sbnd groups. Surface recombination velocity measurements by way of microwave photoconductivity transients showed the relative defect-character of as-prepared and aged surfaces. The relative merits for each investigated surface type are discussed.

  12. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-01-28

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the fifth quarter, wet chemical and dry oxidation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number sign}2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania.

  13. Effect of surface stresses and morphology modification on cupric oxide nanowire growth in the thermal oxidation of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mema, Rediola

    Exerting in-plane tensile surface stress or modifying the morphology of the metal surface by forcibly propelling a stream of abrasive material into the surface (sandblasting) enhances nanowire growth by increasing the density of nanowires in the case of tensile stress, and increasing the density and length of nanowires in the case of sandblasting. This improved nanowire growth is attributed to the decreased size of the oxide grains and as a result, the increased number of grain boundaries in the underlying oxide layers, thus resulting in a facilitated outward diffusion of Cu ions for enhanced nanowire growth. These two very simple methods offer easy and inexpensive ways to generate dense, ultra-long CuO nanowires with larger aspect ratios, as well as shed more light on the growth mechanism of nanowires in the thermal oxidation of copper, which has been greatly debated thus far.

  14. Surface oxidation effect on the electrical behaviour of Bi2Te2Se nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Pascal; Reusch, Frieder B; Mashhadi, Soudabeh S; Burghard, Marko; Kern, Klaus

    2016-07-15

    Charge transport in topological insulators is notably influenced by moisture and air in the surrounding environment. At present, however, little is known about the detailed composition of the oxidized surface and its impact on the electrical characteristics of these materials. Here, we investigate the surface oxide formation on the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS) and how this affects its electrical behavior. While ambient exposure of BTS nanoplatelets predominantly creates surface hydroxyl groups, oxygen plasma treatment yields a compact, few-nanometer thick surface oxide layer. The plasma causes p-type doping, accompanied by a decrease of the effective platelet thickness, the interplay of which is manifested in a resistance maximum as a function of plasma treatment time. It is furthermore demonstrated that the structural integrity of the plasma-derived surface oxide is sufficient to enable its use as a gate insulator layer in combination with a top gate.

  15. Surface oxidation effect on the electrical behaviour of Bi2Te2Se nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Pascal; Reusch, Frieder B; Mashhadi, Soudabeh S; Burghard, Marko; Kern, Klaus

    2016-07-15

    Charge transport in topological insulators is notably influenced by moisture and air in the surrounding environment. At present, however, little is known about the detailed composition of the oxidized surface and its impact on the electrical characteristics of these materials. Here, we investigate the surface oxide formation on the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS) and how this affects its electrical behavior. While ambient exposure of BTS nanoplatelets predominantly creates surface hydroxyl groups, oxygen plasma treatment yields a compact, few-nanometer thick surface oxide layer. The plasma causes p-type doping, accompanied by a decrease of the effective platelet thickness, the interplay of which is manifested in a resistance maximum as a function of plasma treatment time. It is furthermore demonstrated that the structural integrity of the plasma-derived surface oxide is sufficient to enable its use as a gate insulator layer in combination with a top gate. PMID:27257792

  16. Surface oxidation effect on the electrical behaviour of Bi2Te2Se nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Pascal; Reusch, Frieder B.; Mashhadi, Soudabeh S.; Burghard, Marko; Kern, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Charge transport in topological insulators is notably influenced by moisture and air in the surrounding environment. At present, however, little is known about the detailed composition of the oxidized surface and its impact on the electrical characteristics of these materials. Here, we investigate the surface oxide formation on the topological insulator Bi2Te2Se (BTS) and how this affects its electrical behavior. While ambient exposure of BTS nanoplatelets predominantly creates surface hydroxyl groups, oxygen plasma treatment yields a compact, few-nanometer thick surface oxide layer. The plasma causes p-type doping, accompanied by a decrease of the effective platelet thickness, the interplay of which is manifested in a resistance maximum as a function of plasma treatment time. It is furthermore demonstrated that the structural integrity of the plasma-derived surface oxide is sufficient to enable its use as a gate insulator layer in combination with a top gate.

  17. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shuichi Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-15

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at S{sub B} steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  18. Solid State, Surface and Catalytic Studies of Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kung, H. H.

    2004-11-23

    This project investigates the catalytic properties of oxides for the selective oxidative dehydrogenation of light alkanes and for hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}. Various vanadium oxide based catalysts were investigated to elucidate the relationship between the chemical and structural properties of the catalysts and their selectivity for the formation of alkenes. It was found that vanadium oxide units that are less reducible give higher selectivities. For hydrocarbon reduction of NO{sub x}, it was found that alumina-based catalysts can be effective at higher temperatures than the corresponding zeolite-based catalysts. On some catalysts, such as SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Ag/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the alumina participates directly in the reaction, making the catalyst bifunctional. These results are useful in research to improve the performance of this stress of catalysts.

  19. Titanium oxide modeling and design for innovative biomedical surfaces: a concise review.

    PubMed

    De Nardo, Luigi; Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ebramzadeh, Edward; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2012-09-01

    The natural oxide layer on implantable alloys insulates the reactive underlying metal from the physiological environment, preventing substrate corrosion and device failure. This type of oxide film has had a major role in the minimization of functional failure and toxic response after implantation in the first generation biomaterials. Recent advances in theoretical, computational, and experimental surface engineering tools provide the foundation for the design of novel devices with improved performances in this regard based on conventional implantable metal alloys. An increasing number of technologies provide the possibility of tailoring chemico-physical and morphological parameters of the surface oxide layers. For some applications, such as dental implants, surface modifications result in substantial innovation and economic success. However, the selection of novel surfaces is in general based on experimental studies and has a limited theoretical and computational foundation. In this review, we offer a perspective analysis of the correlation between theoretical studies and chemical surface modification technologies, with a special emphasis on titanium oxide on Ti alloys. Theoretical approaches for the surface behavior at an atomistic level of description are presented, together with some adsorption studies on a rutile surface. The role of chemical and electrochemical surface modification technologies in modifying the TiO(2) structure, morphology, and chemistry to tailor in vivo biological response is then briefly reviewed. Finally, we discuss the role of surface modeling as a powerful design tool for a new generation of implantable devices in which metal oxide surface can be tuned to yield specific biological response.

  20. Composition of Uranium Oxide Surface Layers Analyzed by m-Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Siekhaus, W J

    2003-11-24

    Oxide thickness and composition averaged over a few square millimeter has been measured with nm thickness resolution by diffuse reflectance fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. {mu}-Raman spectroscopy has been done on powders and bulk samples in the past, and can now be done on surfaces layers with {micro}m lateral and depth resolution using con-focal microscopy. Here we apply con-focal-microscopy-based {mu}-Raman spectroscopy to a freshly polished/lightly oxidized and to heavily oxidized uranium to determine its sensitivity. The spectra show that {mu}-Raman spectroscopy does detect oxide thickness and oxide composition with high sensitivity.

  1. Kinetics of Initial Layer-by-Layer Oxidation of Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Kato, Koichi; Uda, Tsuyoshi; Fujita, Ken; Ichikawa, Masakazu; Kawamura, Takaaki; Terakura, Kiyoyuki

    1998-01-01

    Layer-by-layer oxidation of Si(001) surfaces has been studied by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM). The oxidation kinetics of the top and second layers were independently investigated from the change in oxygen Auger peak intensity calibrated from the SREM observation. A barrierless oxidation of the first subsurface layer, as well as oxygen chemisorption onto the top layer, occurs at room temperature. The energy barrier of the second-layer oxidation was found to be 0.3 eV. The initial oxidation kinetics are discussed based on first-principles calculations.

  2. UO2 surface oxidation by mixtures of water vapor and hydrogen as a function of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espriu-Gascon, A.; Llorca, J.; Domínguez, M.; Giménez, J.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) was used to study the effect of water vapor on the UO2 surface as a function of temperature. The experiments were performed in situ inside a high pressure chamber attached to the XPS instrument. UO2 samples were put in contact with either hydrogen or argon streams, saturated with water at room temperature, and the sample surface evolution was analyzed by XPS. In the case of the water vapor/argon experiments, one experiment at 350 °C was performed and, in the case of the water vapor/hydrogen experiments, the temperatures used inside the reactor were 60, 120, 200 and 350 °C. On one hand, in presence of argon, the results obtained showed that the water vapor in the argon stream oxidized 93% of the U(IV) in the sample surface. On the other hand, the degree of UO2 surface oxidation showed a different dependence on the temperature in the experiments performed in the presence of hydrogen: the maximum surface oxidation occurred at 120 °C, where 65.4% of U(IV) in the sample surface was oxidized, while at higher temperatures, the surface oxidation decreased. This observation is attributed to the increase of hydrogen reducing effect when temperature increases which prevents part of the oxidation of the UO2 surface by the water vapor.

  3. Long length oxide template for YBCO coated conductor prepared by surface-oxidation epitaxy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Kaname; Maeda, Toshihiko; Tanigawa, Toru; Hirabayashi, Izumi

    2001-08-01

    A 50 m long, biaxially textured NiO buffer layer for epitaxial growth ofYBa 2Cu 3O 7- δ (YBCO) film has been fabricated on the long cube textured nickel tape using surface-oxidation epitaxy (SOE) method. The SOE-NiO layers were highly {1 0 0} <0 0 1> textured. The full width at half maximum of 10-14.5° from X-ray φ-scan ( Δφ) was in the range of 10-14.5° through the whole length. The critical current density ( Jc) values exceeding 0.3 MA/cm 2 (77 K, 0 T) have been obtained in short samples of YBCO films on NiO/Ni tapes, by using thin MgO cap layer. Thirty meters long Ni-clad Ni-20wt.%Cr (Ni/NiCr) and Ni-clad austenitic stainless steel (Ni/SS) tapes were also prepared for YBCO coated conductors with higher strength and lower magnetism than those of pure nickel tape. Highly {1 0 0} <0 0 1> textured NiO layers were formed on those textured composite tapes by SOE method as same as on cube textured pure nickel tapes. YBCO films with Jc of 0.1 MA/cm 2 (77 K, 0 T) have been obtained on MgO/SOE-NiO layer of short Ni/NiCr composite tape.

  4. Zinc oxide nanorods modified indium tin oxide surface for amperometric urea biosensor.

    PubMed

    Palomera, Netzahualcóyotl; Balaguera, Marcia; Arya, Sunil K; Hernández, Samuel; Tomar, Maharaj S; Ramírez-Vick, Jaime E; Singh, Surinder P

    2011-08-01

    ZnO nanorods (ZnONR) grown onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass surface using zinc nitrate hexahydrate/hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) in aqueous phase has been utilized for urea biosensor. Urease (Urs) was immobilized onto ZnONR/ITO at physiological pH via electrostatic interactions between Urs and ZnO to fabricate Urs/ZnONR/ITO bioelectrode. ZnONR/ITO electrode has been characterized using XRD, FE-SEM techniques and Urs/ZnONR/ITO bioelectrode using electrochemistry. The XRD and FE-SEM measurements confirm the formation of ZnO nanorods in wurtzite structure. Cyclic voltammetric and amperometric measurements on the Urs/ZnONR/ITO biolectrode for urea concentrations in the range of 1-20 mM reveal 0.4 microA mM(-1) sensitivity, with a response time of 3 seconds, and a detection limit of 0.13 mM. The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was calculated to be 9.09 mM. Results indicate that ZnO nanorods provide suitable microenvironment for urease immobilization and can be utilized in biosensor design and other biological applications. PMID:22103068

  5. Structure of ultrathin oxide layers on metal surfaces from grazing scattering of fast atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, H.; Seifert, J.; Blauth, D.; Busch, M.; Schüller, A.; Wethekam, S.

    2009-10-01

    The structure of ultrathin oxide layers grown on metal substrates is investigated by grazing scattering of fast atoms from the film surface. We present three recent experimental techniques which allow us to study the structure of ordered oxide films on metal substrates in detail. (1) A new variant of a triangulation method with fast atoms based on the detection of emitted electrons, (2) rainbow scattering under axial surface channeling conditions, and (3) fast atom diffraction (FAD) for studies on the structure of oxide films. Our examples demonstrate the attractive features of grazing fast atom scattering as a powerful analytical tool in surface physics.

  6. Al-based thermal oxides in vertical cavity surface emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna; Ruvimov, S.; Swider, W.; Washburn, Jack; Li, Meng; Li, Gabriel S.; Chang-Hasnain, Constance J.; Weber, Eicke R.

    1997-01-01

    The microstructure of wet oxidized layers for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELS) was studied by transmission electron microscopy. These oxides were formed by reaction of AlxGa1-xAs(x approximately equals 0 - 0.2) with water vapor at elevated temperatures (approximately 400 - 450 degrees Celsius). Due to the excellent carrier confinement provided by the oxidized layer, VCSELS have very low threshold currents and high efficiencies. This study revealed the accumulation of excess As at the interfaces with the oxidized layers and occasionally at the sample surface. To avoid this As accumulation on the sample surface, GaInP layers were grown on top of AlGaAs/GaAs layers. In this case no As was found at the layer surface. In addition, substantial shrinkage was found after oxidation, and the formation of large pores at the interface between the oxide and the high Al content layer, which might be detrimental for the device performance. The dependence of the oxide and interface quality on the composition of the oxidized layers, oxidation time and temperature are discussed in relation to the optical quality of VCSELs.

  7. Thin film lubrication of hexadecane confined by iron and iron oxide surfaces: A crucial role of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ta, D. T.; Tieu, A. K.; Zhu, H. T. Kosasih, B.

    2015-10-28

    A comparative analysis of thin film lubrication of hexadecane between different iron and its oxide surfaces has been carried out using classical molecular dynamic simulation. An ab initio force-field, COMPASS, was applied for n-hexadecane using explicit atom model. An effective potential derived from density functional theory calculation was utilized for the interfacial interaction between hexadecane and the tribo-surfaces. A quantitative surface parameterization was introduced to investigate the influence of surface properties on the structure, rheological properties, and tribological performance of the lubricant. The results show that although the wall-fluid attraction of hexadecane on pure iron surfaces is significantly stronger than its oxides, there is a considerable reduction of shear stress of confined n-hexadecane film between Fe(100) and Fe(110) surfaces compared with FeO(110), FeO(111), Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001), and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(012). It was found that, in thin film lubrication of hexadecane between smooth iron and iron oxide surfaces, the surface corrugation plays a role more important than the wall-fluid adhesion strength.

  8. Understanding Surface Processes on Mars Through Study of Iron Oxides/Oxyhydroxides: Clues to Surface Alteration and Aqueous Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Dyar, M. D.; Parente, M.; Drief, A.; Lane, M. D.; Murad, E.

    2006-01-01

    We are performing oxidation and reduction reactions on hydrated ferric oxide minerals in order to investigate how these might alter under a variety of conditions on the surface of Mars. Preliminary experiments on ferrihydrite and goethite showed that heating these minerals in a dry oxidizing environment produces fine-grained hematite, while heating these minerals in a reducing environment produces fine-grained magnetite. Under Mars-like oxidation levels this magnetite then oxidizes to maghemite. These reactions are dependent on the presence of water and organic material that can act as a reductant. We are using reflectance and Mossbauer spectroscopy to characterize the reaction products and TEM to analyze the sample texture. Our preliminary results indicate that magnetite and maghemite could be formed in the soil on Mars from ferrihydrite and goethite if organics were present on early Mars.

  9. Effects of additives on volume change on melting, surface tension, and viscosity of liquid aluminum oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, J. L.; Rasmussen, J. J.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of various oxide additives on the volume change on melting, the surface tension, and the viscosity of liquid Al2O3 were studied. Additives of Sm2O3, MgO, and Y2O3 which form solid solutions, compounds, and multiphase solids with Al2O3 were studied. A review of the property data for Al2O3 and Al2O3 containing oxide additives is presented. Oxide additives to Al2O3 reduce the volume change on melting and with the exception of SiO2 lower the viscosity; surface tensions change with oxide additives, but changes vary with different container material. Viscosity and volume change on melting appeared to be significantly more important for studying the properties of liquid oxides than surface tension. Supercooling of 270 K of yttrium aluminum garnet was observed.

  10. The effect of surface oxides on multi-walled carbon nanotube aqueous colloidal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Billy

    Carbonaceous nanomaterials are being produced and integrated into consumer products and specialized applications at an accelerating rate. Recently, however, concerns have increased about the environmental, health and safety risks of these nanomaterials, particularly those chemically functionalized to enhance their aqueous colloidal stability and biocompatibility. In this dissertation research, I have investigated the role that surface-oxide concentration plays in the aqueous colloidal stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a prominent class of engineered nanomaterials. To vary the concentration of surface oxides on the MWCNTs' surface, pristine (unmodified) tubes were treated with a wet-chemical oxidant (e.g., HNO3, H2SO4 /HNO3, KMnO4); the concentration of surface oxides imparted was measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In conjunction with XPS, previously developed chemical derivatization techniques were used to determine the distribution of hydroxyl, carboxyl, and carbonyl functional groups present on the MWCNTs' surface. The length distribution and structural integrity of pristine and oxidized MWCNTs were characterized using atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. To examine the aqueous colloidal stability and aggregation properties of oxidized MWCNTs, sedimentation and time-resolved dynamic light scattering (TR-DLS) experiments were conducted on neat (i.e., ideal) suspensions prepared by prolonged sonication of MWCNTs in Milli-Q water. Over a range of environmentally relevant pH values (4--9) and electrolyte (NaCL, CaCl2) concentrations (0.001--1.000 M), the aggregation and colloidal properties of MWCNTs were found to agree with the basic tenants of DLVO theory, in that ( i) more highly oxidized, negatively charged MWCNTs remained stable over a wider range of solution conditions than lowly oxidized tubes, ( ii) oxidized MWCNTs adhered to the empirical Schulze-Hardy rule, and (iii) in early

  11. The different initial oxidation kinetics of Zr(0001) and Zr(101-0) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakradze, Georgijs; Jeurgens, Lars P. H.; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2011-07-01

    The growth kinetics of thin (thickness <10 nm) oxide films on Zr(0001) and Zr(101-0) single-crystal surfaces were investigated by real-time in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (RISE) and angle-resolved x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (AR-XPS). To this end, clean crystalline Zr(0001) and Zr(101-0) surfaces were prepared under UHV conditions by a cyclic treatment of alternating ion-sputtering and in vacuo annealing steps. The thus-obtained bare Zr surfaces were then exposed to dry O2(g) in the temperature range of 300 - 450 K (at a partial oxygen pressure of 10-4 Pa), while monitoring the growth kinetics by RISE. It was found that the less-densely packed Zr(101-0) surface oxidizes more readily than the densely packed Zr(0001) surface. A near-limiting thickness of the oxide film on both surfaces is attained only at oxidation temperatures T < 375 K. At T ≥ 375 K, the oxidation rate becomes controlled by the thermally activated dissolution and diffusion of oxygen in the α-Zr substrate. The higher oxidation rate of the Zr(101-0) surface for T ≥ 375 K is attributed mainly to the higher oxygen diffusivity in α-Zr along the Zr(101-0) direction than along the Zr(0001) direction.

  12. Influence of surface oxidation on ion dynamics and capacitance in porous and nonporous carbon electrodes

    DOE PAGES

    Dyatkin, Boris; Zhang, Yu; Mamontov, Eugene; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Cummings, Peter T.; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2016-04-07

    Here, we investigate the influence of surface chemistry and ion confinement on capacitance and electrosorption dynamics of room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in supercapacitors. Using air oxidation and vacuum annealing, we produced defunctionalized and oxygen-rich surfaces of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs). While oxidized surfaces of porous CDCs improve capacitance and rate handling abilities of ions, defunctionalized nonporous GNPs improve charge storage densities on planar electrodes. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) probed the structure, dynamics, and orientation of RTIL ions confined in divergently functionalized pores. Oxidized, ionophilic surfaces draw ions closer to pore surfaces andmore » enhance potential-driven ion transport during electrosorption. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations corroborated experimental data and demonstrated the significance of surface functional groups on ion orientations, accumulation densities, and capacitance.« less

  13. Influence of a Cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of type 347 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-04-01

    A surface treatment was applied to the surface of Type 347 stainless steel to enhance oxidation resistance. The treatment consisted of dip coating coupons in a CeO2 and halide activator slurry, followed by a thermal treatment at 900C in an inert atmosphere for 12 hours. Cyclical oxidation tests were conducted at 800C in either dry air or air+3%H2O. In dry air, the treatment reduced the oxidation rate (reduced the magnitude of weight gain) of the alloy by a factor of three. Protective chromium based oxide and spinel ((Mn,Cr)3O4 and (Cr,Fe)2O3) phases formed on the surface of the untreated and treated alloy. More significantly, the treatment suppressed the oxide scale spallation that occurred upon cyclical exposure of this alloy to moist air. In moist air, less protective chromite (FeCr2O4), magnetite (Fe+2Fe2+3O4), and hematite (Fe2O3) formed as oxide products on the surface of the base alloy. The treated alloy did not spall during exposure to moist air, and interestingly, the treated alloy possessed similar oxidation rates (magnitude of weight gain) in both moist and dry air. The same protective chromium based oxide and spinel ((Mn,Cr)3O4 and (Cr,Fe)2O3) phases formed on the surface of the treated alloy exposed to both moist and dry air. In the aggressive moist environment, the Ce surface treatment suppressed the formation of less protective iron-oxides, and concomitant oxide scale spallation during thermal cycling.

  14. Enhanced arsenite removal through surface-catalyzed oxidative coagulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Bland, Garret D; Yan, Weile

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic being a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant is subject to stringent water quality regulations. Coagulation and adsorption are widely used methods to treat arsenic-contaminated water, however, these treatments have been reported to be less efficient for the removal of arsenite (As(III)) than arsenate (As(V)). In this study, the feasibility of in situ oxidation of As(III) during coagulation was investigated in two systems: Fe(II) or H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation treatment using ferric chloride as the coagulant. This setup exploits the catalytic property of the fresh formed Fe(III) hydroxide colloids in coagulation suspension to mediate the production of reactive oxidants capable of As(III) oxidation. Fe(II)-assisted coagulation brought about small improvements in As(III) removal compared to treatment with Fe(III) coagulant alone, however, its arsenic removal efficiency is strongly dependent on pH (observed optimal pH = 7-9). Addition of H2O2 together with ferric chloride led to a significant enhancement in arsenic retention at pH 6-8, with final arsenic concentrations well below the U.S.EPA regulatory limit (10 μg/L). H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation can attain reliable As(III) removal over a broad pH range of 4-9. Radical quenching experiments reveal the participation of superoxide radical in As(III) removal in the oxidative coagulation systems. Phosphate (at > 0.1 mM) strongly suppresses As(III) removal efficiency, whereas carbonate and humic acid pose a minor impact. Overall, the results suggest that a low dose addition of H2O2 along with ferric coagulant is a feasible method for the existing water treatment facilities to achieve improved As(III) removal efficiency. PMID:26897520

  15. Intrinsic stress evolution during amorphous oxide film growth on Al surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Flötotto, D. Wang, Z. M.; Jeurgens, L. P. H.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2014-03-03

    The intrinsic stress evolution during formation of ultrathin amorphous oxide films on Al(111) and Al(100) surfaces by thermal oxidation at room temperature was investigated in real-time by in-situ substrate curvature measurements and detailed atomic-scale microstructural analyses. During thickening of the oxide a considerable amount of growth stresses is generated in, remarkably even amorphous, ultrathin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films. The surface orientation-dependent stress evolutions during O adsorption on the bare Al surfaces and during subsequent oxide-film growth can be interpreted as a result of (i) adsorption-induced surface stress changes and (ii) competing processes of free volume generation and structural relaxation, respectively.

  16. One-sided surface modification of cellulose fabric by printing a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidant.

    PubMed

    Fitz-Binder, Christa; Bechtold, Thomas

    2014-06-15

    One-sided surface oxidation of lyocell type cellulose fabric can be achieved by use of a modified TEMPO-mediated oxidation system. A borate-based buffer was used to maintain stable pH conditions and screen printing was applied to achieve oxidation on the fabric surface only. To formulate an applicable procedure, the TEMPO/NaBr/NaOCl system was split into two treatment steps: firstly, the fabric was impregnated with a buffered TEMPO/NaBr solution and dried, then a thickened NaOCl paste was printed on the fabric. FTIR-ATR spectra and methylene blue sorption experiments demonstrated successful modification on the printed side of the fabric. Substantial increases in carboxylic group content and water retention value were observed. The higher concentration of carboxylic groups on the fabric surface also led to a localised increase in binding capacity for Ca(2+)-ions. This new concept permits controlled oxidation of cellulose surfaces by printing techniques.

  17. Surface Functionalization of Oxide-Covered Zinc and Iron with Phosphonated Phenylethynyl Phenothiazine.

    PubMed

    Rechmann, Julian; Sarfraz, Adnan; Götzinger, Alissa C; Dirksen, Elena; Müller, Thomas J J; Erbe, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    Phenothiazines are redox-active, fluorescent molecules with potential applications in molecular electronics. Phosphonated phenylethynyl phenothiazine can be easily obtained in a four-step synthesis, yielding a molecule with a headgroup permitting surface linkage. Upon modifying hydroxylated polycrystalline zinc and iron, both covered with their respective native oxides, ultrathin organic layers were formed and investigated by use of infrared (IR) reflection spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), contact angle measurement, and ellipsometry. While stable monolayers with upright oriented organic molecules were formed on oxide-covered iron, multilayer formation is observed on oxide-covered zinc. ToF-SIMS measurements reveal a bridging bidentate bonding state of the organic compound on oxide-covered iron, whereas monodentate complexes were observed on oxide-covered zinc. Both organically modified and unmodified surfaces exhibit reactive wetting, but organic modification makes the surfaces initially more hydrophobic. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) indicates redox activity of the multilayers formed on oxide-covered zinc. On the other hand, the monolayers on oxide-covered iron desorb after electrochemical modifications in the state of the oxide, but are stable at open circuit conditions. Exploiting an electronic coupling of phenothiazines to oxides may thus assist in corrosion protection.

  18. Further studies of the effects of oxidation on the surface properties of coal and coal pyrite

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, M.N.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this research was to investigate the oxidation behavior of coal and coal pyrite and to correlate the changes in the surface properties induced by oxidation, along with the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these organic and inorganic materials, with the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. This provide more fundamental knowledge for understanding the way in which different factors interact in a medium as heterogeneous as coal. Fourteen coal samples of different ranks ranging from high to medium sulfur content were studied by dry oxidation tests at different temperatures and humidities, and by wet oxidation tests using different oxidizing agents. The concentration of surface oxygen functional groups was determined by ion-exchange methods. The changes in the coal composition with oxidation were analyzed by spectroscopic techniques. The wettability of as-received and oxidized coal and coal pyrite samples was assessed by film flotation tests. The electrokinetic behavior of different coals and coal pyrite samples was studied by electrokinetic tests using electrophoresis. Possible oxidation mechanisms have been proposed to explain the changes on the coal surface induced by different oxidation treatments.

  19. Dynamic oxidation behavior of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, C. T.; Tenney, D. R.; Herring, H. W.

    1975-01-01

    Oxidation tests of TD-NiCr alloy with different surface pretreatments were conducted in a Mach-5 arc-jet at 1200 C and 0.002 lb/sec flowing air environment. The mechanisms responsible for the observed oxidation behavior are examined. The presence of atomic oxygen in the air stream plays a significant role in determining the oxidation characteristic of the alloy. The rate of Cr2O3 vaporization by formation of volatile CrO3 is greatly enhanced by the flowing conditions. The typical microstructure of oxides formed in the dynamic tests consists of an external layer of NiO with a porous mushroom-type morphology, an intermediate layer of NiO and Cr2O3 oxide mixture, and a continuous inner layer of Cr2O3 in contact with the Cr-depleted alloy substrate. Three basic processes underlying the formation of mushroom-type NiO are identified and discussed. The oxidation rate is determined by the rate of vaporization of NiO. Surface pretreatment has a significant effect on the oxidation behavior of the alloy in the early stage of oxidation, but becomes less important as exposure time increases. Mechanical polishing induces surface recrystallization, but promotes the concurrence of external growth of NiO and internal oxidation of the alloy in the dynamic atmosphere.

  20. Organics on oxidic metal surfaces: a first-principles DFT study of PMDA and ODA fragments on the pristine and mildly oxidized surfaces of Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic hybrid materials are ubiquitous and a fundamental understanding of the hybrid-interface is key for the development of these hybrid material systems. In this work, using first-principles density-functional theory (including van der Waals (vdW) corrections), we study the fundamental physico-chemical properties of the molecular fragments of pyromellitic dianhydride oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA) on pristine Cu(111), as well as oxidic p4:O/Cu(111) in order to investigate the effect of mild oxidation of the metal substrate on PMDA-ODA adsorption. Firstly, we report the most favorable adsorption geometries amongst the various surface models and correlate the adsorption behavior with the electronic structure of the molecular fragments and the substrate layer. PMDA adsorbs weakly on both the clean and mildly oxidized copper surface via vdW forces while ODA adsorbs much stronger with a significant charge transfer between the substrates. Here, the oxidic layer is found to reduce the adsorption strength of both fragments and in particular, the ODA molecule interacts with the substrate via additional hydrogen bonding. Finally, our simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images suggest possible orientations of PMDA and ODA on clean and oxidic Cu surfaces to guide future experiments.

  1. Organics on oxidic metal surfaces: a first-principles DFT study of PMDA and ODA fragments on the pristine and mildly oxidized surfaces of Cu(111).

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Hun; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Soon, Aloysius

    2016-08-01

    Metal-organic hybrid materials are ubiquitous and a fundamental understanding of the hybrid-interface is key for the development of these hybrid material systems. In this work, using first-principles density-functional theory (including van der Waals (vdW) corrections), we study the fundamental physico-chemical properties of the molecular fragments of pyromellitic dianhydride oxydianiline (PMDA-ODA) on pristine Cu(111), as well as oxidic p4:O/Cu(111) in order to investigate the effect of mild oxidation of the metal substrate on PMDA-ODA adsorption. Firstly, we report the most favorable adsorption geometries amongst the various surface models and correlate the adsorption behavior with the electronic structure of the molecular fragments and the substrate layer. PMDA adsorbs weakly on both the clean and mildly oxidized copper surface via vdW forces while ODA adsorbs much stronger with a significant charge transfer between the substrates. Here, the oxidic layer is found to reduce the adsorption strength of both fragments and in particular, the ODA molecule interacts with the substrate via additional hydrogen bonding. Finally, our simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images suggest possible orientations of PMDA and ODA on clean and oxidic Cu surfaces to guide future experiments. PMID:27440308

  2. Oxidation of cell surface thiol groups by contact sensitizers triggers the maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kagatani, Saori; Sasaki, Yoshinori; Hirota, Morihiko; Mizuashi, Masato; Suzuki, Mie; Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has a crucial role in the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by sensitizers. Recently, it has been reported that the oxidation of cell surface thiols by an exogenous impermeant thiol oxidizer can phosphorylate p38 MAPK. In this study, we examined whether sensitizers oxidize cell surface thiols of monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). When cell surface thiols were quantified by flow cytometry using Alexa fluor maleimide, all the sensitizers that we examined decreased cell surface thiols on MoDCs. To examine the effects of decreased cell surface thiols by sensitizers on DC maturation, we analyzed the effects of an impermeant thiol oxidizer, o-phenanthroline copper complex (CuPhen). The treatment of MoDCs with CuPhen decreased cell surface thiols, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and induced MoDC maturation, that is, the augmentation of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, and IL-8 mRNA, as well as the downregulation of aquaporin-3 mRNA. The augmentation of CD86 was significantly suppressed when MoDCs were pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cystein or treated with SB203580. Finally, we showed that epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on mouse skin significantly decreased cell surface thiols of Langerhans cells in vivo. These data suggest that the oxidation of cell surface thiols has some role in triggering DC maturation by sensitizers. PMID:19641517

  3. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  4. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  5. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  6. Surface structure and properties of biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy after Fenton's oxidation.

    PubMed

    Chu, C L; Hu, T; Wu, S L; Dong, Y S; Yin, L H; Pu, Y P; Lin, P H; Chung, C Y; Yeung, K W K; Chu, Paul K

    2007-09-01

    Fenton's oxidation is traditionally used to remove inorganic and organic pollutants from water in waster water treatment. It is an advanced oxidation process in which H2O2 is catalytically decomposed by ferrous irons into hydroxyl radicals (*OH) which have a higher oxidation potential (2.8V) than H2O2. In the work reported here, we for the first time use Fenton's oxidation to modify the surface of biomedical NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA). The influences of Fenton's oxidation on the surface microstructure, blood compatibility, leaching of harmful Ni ions and corrosion resistance in simulated body fluids is assessed using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, electrochemical tests, hemolysis analysis and the blood platelet adhesion test. The mechanical stability of the surface titania film produced by Fenton's oxidation as well as their effects on the shape memory behavior of the SMA are studied by bending tests. Our results show that Fenton's oxidation produces a novel nanostructured titania gel film with a graded structure on the NiTi substrate without an intermediate Ni-rich layer that is typical of high-temperature oxidation. Moreover, there is a clear Ni-free zone near the top surface of the titania film. The surface structural changes introduced by Fenton's oxidation improve the electrochemical corrosion resistance and mitigate Ni release. The latter effects are comparable to those observed after oxygen plasma immersion ion implantation reported previously and better than those of high-temperature oxidation. Aging in boiling water improves the crystallinity of the titania film and further reduces Ni leaching. Blood platelet adhesion is remarkably reduced after Fenton's oxidation, suggesting that the treated SMA has improved thrombo resistance. Enhancement of blood compatibility is believed to stem from the improved hemolysis resistance, the surface wettability and the

  7. Adsorption of V on a Hematite (0001) Surface and its Oxidation: Submonolayer Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.; Ma, X.; Kim, C.-Y.; Ellis, D.E.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    2008-10-06

    The adsorption of submonolayer V on an idealized model hematite (0 0 0 1) surface and subsequent oxidation under atomic O adsorption are studied by density functional theory. The preferred adsorption sites, adsorption energy and configuration changes due to V and O adsorption are investigated. It is found that in most cases V forms threefold bonds with surface O atoms, inducing a large geometry change at the hematite surface and near surface region and a bond stretch between surface Fe and O. The adsorption energy is mainly decided by interplay between adsorbed metal-surface oxygen bonding and adsorbed metal - subsurface metal interaction. The relative energy of subsequent O adsorption and geometry depends on the reformed V/hematite structure. Electronic properties such as projected densities of states and chemical state change upon V adsorption are studied through both periodic slab and embedded cluster localized orbital calculations; both strong vanadium-oxygen and vanadium-iron interactions are found. While V generally donates electrons to a hematite surface, causing nearby Fe to be partially reduced, the Fe and V oxidization state depends very much on the coverage and detailed adsorption configuration. When the V/hematite system is exposed to atomic O, V is further oxidized and surface/near surface Fe is re-oxidized. Our theoretical results are compared with X-ray surface standing wave and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The influence of d-electron correlation on the predicted structures is briefly discussed, making use of the DFT + U scheme.

  8. Rates of oxidative weathering on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.; Fisher, Duncan S.

    1993-01-01

    A model of acid weathering is proposed for the iron-rich basalts on Mars. Aqueous oxidation of iron sulfides released SO4(2-) and H(+) ions that initiated the dissolution of basaltic ferromagnesian silicates and released Fe(2+) ions. The Fe(2+) ions eventually underwent ferrolysis reactions and produced insoluble hydrous ferric oxide phases. Measurements of the time-dependence of acid weathering reactions show that pyrrhotite is rapidly converted to pyrite plus dissolved ferrous iron, the rate of pyrite formation decreasing with rising pH and lower temperatures. On Mars, oxidation rates of dissolved Fe(2+) ions in equatorial melt-waters in contact with the atmosphere are estimated to lie in the range 0.3-3.0 ppb Fe/yr over the pH range 2 to 6. Oxidation of Fe(2+) ions is estimated to be extremely slow in brine eutectic solutions that might be present on Mars and to be negligible in the frozen regolith.

  9. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface.

    PubMed

    Canlas, Christian P; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W; Winans, Randall E; Van Duyne, Richard P; Stair, Peter C; Notestein, Justin M

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al(2)O(3) (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with 'nanocavities' (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO(2) photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations. PMID:23174984

  10. Shape-selective sieving layers on an oxide catalyst surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canlas, Christian P.; Lu, Junling; Ray, Natalie A.; Grosso-Giordano, Nicolas A.; Lee, Sungsik; Elam, Jeffrey W.; Winans, Randall E.; van Duyne, Richard P.; Stair, Peter C.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-12-01

    New porous materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks and mesostructured oxides are of immense practical utility for gas storage, separations and heterogeneous catalysis. Their extended pore structures enable selective uptake of molecules or can modify the product selectivity (regioselectivity or enantioselectivity) of catalyst sites contained within. However, diffusion within pores can be problematic for biomass and fine chemicals, and not all catalyst classes can be readily synthesized with pores of the correct dimensions. Here, we present a novel approach that adds reactant selectivity to existing, non-porous oxide catalysts by first grafting the catalyst particles with single-molecule sacrificial templates, then partially overcoating the catalyst with a second oxide through atomic layer deposition. This technique is used to create sieving layers of Al2O3 (thickness, 0.4-0.7 nm) with ‘nanocavities’ (<2 nm in diameter) on a TiO2 photocatalyst. The additional layers result in selectivity (up to 9:1) towards less hindered reactants in otherwise unselective, competitive photocatalytic oxidations and transfer hydrogenations.

  11. XPS study of nitrogen dioxide adsorption on metal oxide particle surfaces under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen dioxide on gamma aluminium oxide (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and alpha iron oxide (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) particle surfaces under various conditions of relative humidity, presence of molecular oxygen and UV light has been investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to monitor the different surface species that form under these environmental conditions. Adsorption of NO(2) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces results primarily in the formation of surface nitrate, NO(3)(-) with an oxidation state of +5, as indicated by a peak with binding energy of 407.3 eV in the N1s region. An additional minority species, sensitive to the presence of relative humidity and molecular oxygen, is also observed in the N1s region with lower binding energy of 405.9 eV. This peak is assigned to a surface species in the +4 oxidation state. When irradiated with UV light, other species form on the surface. These surface-bound photochemical products all have lower binding energy, between 400 and 402 eV, indicating reduced nitrogen species in the range of N oxidations states spanning +1 to -1. Co-adsorbed water decreases the amount of these reduced surface-bound products while the presence of molecular oxygen completely suppresses the formation of all reduced nitrogen species on aluminum oxide particle surfaces. For NO(2) on iron oxide particle surfaces, photoreduction is enhanced relative to gamma-Al(2)O(3) and surface bound photoreduced species are observed under all environmental conditions. Complementing the experimental data, N1s core electron binding energies (CEBEs) were calculated using DFT for a number of nitrogen-containing species in the gas phase and adsorbed on an Al(8)O(12) cluster. A range of CEBEs is calculated for various nitrogen species in different adsorption modes and oxidation states. These calculated values are discussed in light of the peaks observed in the XPS N1s region and the possible species that form following NO(2) adsorption and

  12. Compositional Control of Surface Oxides on Metal Alloys using Photons: Dynamic Simulations and Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.; Sankaranarayanan, S; Ruzmetov, D; Engelhard, M; Kaxiras, E; Ramanathan, S

    2010-01-01

    We report on the ability to modify the structure and composition of ultrathin oxides grown on Ni and Ni-Al alloy surfaces at room temperature utilizing photon illumination. We find that the nickel-oxide formation is enhanced in the case of oxidation under photo-excitation. The enhanced oxidation kinetics of nickel in 5% Ni-Al alloy is corroborated by experimental and simulation studies of natural and photon-assisted oxide growth on pure Ni(100) surfaces. In case of pure Ni substrates, combined x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, and atomic force microscope current mapping support the deterministic role of the structure of nickel passive-oxide films on their nanoscale corrosion resistance. Atomistic simulations involving dynamic charge transfer predict that the applied electric field overcomes the activation-energy barrier for ionic migration, leading to enhanced oxygen incorporation into the oxide, enabling us to tune the mixed-oxide composition at atomic length scales. Atomic scale control of ultrathin oxide structure and morphology in the case of pure substrates as well as compositional tuning of complex oxide in the case of alloys leads to excellent passivity as verified from potentiodynamic polarization experiments.

  13. Influence of the surface morphology on the early stages of Cu oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Langli; Kang, Yihong; Yang, Judith C.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2012-10-01

    The growth and morphological features of Cu films deposited on NaCl(1 0 0) by e-beam evaporation have been examined to evaluate the effect of various surface morphologies on the initial oxidation of Cu. It is shown that epitaxial Cu films with significantly reduced surface roughness can be achieved by first nucleating Cu seeds at 450 °C that favors epitaxial Cu grains which is followed by subsequent seed growth at 150 °C that favors smooth Cu film. The effect of the variations of the surface morphology of the resulting Cu films by the different growth conditions on the early stages oxidation of Cu films is examined by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the changes in the surface morphologies of the Cu film result in distinct variations in the nucleation density and growth rates of oxide islands. Such correlation between the surface morphology and the initial oxidation behavior of the Cu films provides insights into understanding the microscopic processes of the transient oxidation of metals and for manipulating the initial oxide formation through surface treatments.

  14. Theoretical studies of positron states and annihilation characteristics at the oxidized Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Fazleev, N. G.; Weiss, A. H.

    2013-04-19

    In this work we present the results of theoretical studies of positron surface and bulk states and annihilation probabilities of surface-trapped positrons with relevant core electrons at the oxidized Cu(100) surface under conditions of high oxygen coverage. An ab-initio study of the electronic properties of the Cu(100) missing row reconstructed surface at various on surface and sub-surface oxygen coverages has been performed on the basis of the density functional theory (DFT) using the Dmol3 code and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). Surface structures in calculations have been constructed by adding oxygen atoms to various surface hollow and sub-surface octahedral sites of the 0.5 monolayer (ML) missing row reconstructed phase of the Cu(100) surface with oxygen coverages ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 ML. The charge redistribution at the surface and variations in atomic structure and chemical composition of the topmost layers associated with oxidation and surface reconstruction have been found to affect the spatial extent and localization of the positron surface state wave function and annihilation probabilities of surface trapped positrons with relevant core electrons. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data obtained from studies of oxidation of the Cu(100) surface using positron annihilation induced Auger electron spectroscopy (PAES). It has been shown that positron annihilation probabilities with Cu 3s and 3p core electrons decrease when total (on-surface and sub-surface) oxygen coverage of the Cu(100) surface increases up to 1 ML. The calculations show that for high oxygen coverage when total oxygen coverage is 1. 5 ML the positron is not bound to the surface.

  15. Origin of complex impact craters on native oxide coated silicon surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Samela, Juha; Nordlund, Kai; Popok, Vladimir N.; Campbell, Eleanor E. B.

    2008-02-15

    Crater structures induced by impact of keV-energy Ar{sub n}{sup +} cluster ions on silicon surfaces are measured with atomic force microscopy. Complex crater structures consisting of a central hillock and outer rim are observed more often on targets covered with a native silicon oxide layer than on targets without the oxide layer. To explain the formation of these complex crater structures, classical molecular dynamics simulations of Ar cluster impacts on oxide coated silicon surfaces, as well as on bulk amorphous silica, amorphous Si, and crystalline Si substrates, are carried out. The diameter of the simulated hillock structures in the silicon oxide layer is in agreement with the experimental results, but the simulations cannot directly explain the height of hillocks and the outer rim structures when the oxide coated silicon substrate is free of defects. However, in simulations of 5 keV/atom Ar{sub 12} cluster impacts, transient displacements of the amorphous silicon or silicon oxide substrate surfaces are induced in an approximately 50 nm wide area surrounding the impact point. In silicon oxide, the transient displacements induce small topographical changes on the surface in the vicinity of the central hillock. The comparison of cluster stopping mechanisms in the various silicon oxide and silicon structures shows that the largest lateral momentum is induced in the silicon oxide layer during the impact; thus, the transient displacements on the surface are stronger than in the other substrates. This can be a reason for the higher frequency of occurrence of the complex craters on oxide coated silicon.

  16. Stem cell behavior on tailored porous oxide surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Poxson, David J; Ogievetsky, Nika; Dordick, Jonathan S; Siegel, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale surface topographies are known to have a profound influence on cell behavior, including cell guidance, migration, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. In this study, we have observed the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on a range of tailored porous SiO2 and TiO2 nanostructured surface coatings fabricated via glancing angle electron-beam deposition. By controlling the physical vapor deposition angle during fabrication, we could control systematically the deposited coating porosity, along with associated topographic features. Immunocytochemistry and image analysis quantitatively revealed the number of adherent cells, as well as their basic cellular morphology, on these surfaces. Signaling pathway studies showed that even with subtle changes in nanoscale surface structures, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells was strongly influenced by the precise surface structures of these porous coatings.

  17. X-ray Reflectivity Study of AlPdMn Quasicrystal Fivefold Surface Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Tianqu; Goldman, Alan I.; Pinhero, P. J.

    1997-03-01

    By means of X-ray reflectivity measurement, a fivefold surface of AlPdMn single quasicrystal is studied after being treated in different environments: normal air, humid air and water. An electron density profile of the surface is acquired after each treatment. The difference of the density profile obtained with different treatment indicates that water molecule plays an important role in the oxidation of quasicrystal surface. The surface exposed to normal air has a sharper electron density profile and less surface oxidation thickness than that exposed to humid air and immersed in water. The thickness of the oxidation layer is about 30Åand 58Åfor normal air treatment and humid air and water treatment, respectively.

  18. Oxide formation and alloying elements enrichment on TRIP steel surface during inter-critical annealing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Y F; Birosca, S; Kim, H S; De Cooman, B C

    2008-06-01

    The gas atmosphere in continuous annealing and galvanizing lines alters both composition and microstructure of the surface and sub-surface of sheet steels. The alloying element enrichments and the oxide morphology on transformation-induced plasticity steel surfaces are strongly influenced by the dew point of the furnace atmosphere and annealing temperature. The formation of a thin oxide film and enrichment of the alloying elements during annealing may result in surface defects on galvanized sheet products. The present contribution reports on the use of microanalysis techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy and electron probe micro-analysis for the detailed surface analysis of inter-critically annealed transformation-induced plasticity steel such as oxide phase determination, microstructure and microtexture evolutions.

  19. Repassivation of titanium and surface oxide film regenerated in simulated bioliquid.

    PubMed

    Hanawa, T; Asami, K; Asaoka, K

    1998-06-15

    The change in potential during repassivation of titanium in artificial bioliquids was examined, and the regenerated surface oxide film on titanium was characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy to elucidate the repassivation reaction of titanium in a biological system. The repassivation rate in Hanks' solution was slower than that in saline and was not influenced by the pH of the solution. This indicates that more titanium ions dissolve in a biological system than hitherto was predicted when the surface film is destroyed. Phosphate ions are taken up preferentially in the surface film during regeneration, and the film consists of titanium oxide and titanium oxyhydroxide containing titanium phosphate. Calcium ions and phosphate ions are adsorbed by the film after regeneration, and calcium phosphate or calcium titanium phosphate is formed at the outermost surface. Ions constituting Hanks' solution other than calcium and phosphate were absent from the surface oxide.

  20. Phase composition and structure of femtosecond laser-produced oxide layer on VT6 alloy surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolobov, Yu R.; Zhidkov, M. V.; Golosov, E. V.; Vershinina, T. N.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Makarov, S. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ligachev, A. E.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of femtosecond laser irradiation on the formation of an oxide layer on the surface of VT6 titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) is studied. The structure, chemical and phase composition have been studied by x-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The formation features of an oxide layer, which contains TiO2-rutile, TiO2-anatase Al2TiO5-aluminum titanate, Ti3O5-titanium oxide and TiO-titanium monoxide on the femtosecond laser-irradiation modified surface have been analyzed.

  1. Obtaining composite Zr-Al-O coating on the surface of zirconium by microplasma oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Gubaidulina, Tatiana A. E-mail: ostk@mail2000ru; Kuzmin, Oleg S. E-mail: ostk@mail2000ru; Fedorischva, Marina V. E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru; Kalashnikov, Mark P. E-mail: kmp1980@mail.ru; Sergeev, Viktor P.

    2014-11-14

    The paper describes the application of the microplasma oxidation for production of Zr-Al-O composition on the surface of zirconium. Certification of a new-type power supply for depositing oxide ceramic coatings by microplasma oxidation was also carried out. The growth rate of Zr-Al-O coating amounted around 0.2 nm/s, which around 10 times exceeds that for depositing similar coatings using the similar equipment. We have studied the change of surface morphology and the chemical composition of the formed ceramic coating by means of EVO 50 scanning electron microscope and X-ray spectral analysis.

  2. Exclusively Gas-Phase Passivation of Native Oxide-Free Silicon(100) and Silicon(111) Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye; Hauert, Roland; Degen, Christian L

    2016-05-25

    Reactions in the gas phase are of primary technological importance for applications in nano- and microfabrication technology and in the semiconductor industry. We present exclusively gas-phase protocols to chemically passivate oxide-free Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces with short-chain alkynes. The resulting surfaces showed equal or better oxidation resistance than most existing liquid-phase-derived surfaces and rivaled the outstanding stability of a full-coverage Si(111)-propenyl surface.1,2 The most stable surface (Si(111)-ethenyl) grew one-fifth of a monolayer of oxide (0.04 nm) after 1 month of air exposure. We monitored the regrowth of oxides on passivated Si(111) and Si(100) surfaces by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and observed a significant crystal-orientation dependence of initial rates when total oxide thickness was below approximately one monolayer (0.2 nm). This difference was correlated with the desorption kinetics of residual surface Si-F bonds formed during HF treatment. We discuss applications of the technology and suggest future directions for process optimization. PMID:27153212

  3. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  4. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-06-30

    during the seventh quarter, electrokinetic, humic acid extraction and film flotation tests were done on oxidized samples of Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number sign} 2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis was done to characterize the morphology and composition of the surface of as-received coal, oxidized coal, oxidized coal after extraction of humic acids and humic acid extracted from oxidized coal. In addition, electrochemical studies were done on electrodes prepared from coal pyrite samples.

  5. Ester oxidation on an aluminum surface using chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Meador, Michael A.; Morales, Wilfredo

    1986-01-01

    The oxidation characteristics of a pure ester (trimethyolpropane triheptanoate) were studied by using a chemiluminescence technique. Tests were run in a thin film microoxidation apparatus with an aluminum alloy catalyst. Conditions included a pure oxygen atmosphere and a temperature range of 176 to 206 C. Results indicated that oxidation of the ester (containing .001 M diphenylanthracene as an intensifier) was accompanied by emission of light. The maximum intensity of light emission was a function of the amount of ester, the concentration of intensifier, and the test temperature. The induction period, or the time to reach one-half of maximum intensity was inversely proportional to test temperature. Decreases in light emission at the later stages of a test were caused by depletion of the intensifier.

  6. Isothermal oxidation behavior and microstructure of plasma surface Ta coating on γ-TiAl

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jian; Zhang, Ping-Ze Wei, Dong-Bo; Wei, Xiang-Fei; Wang, Ya

    2014-12-15

    The oxidation behavior of γ-TiAl with Ta surface coating fabricated by double glow plasma surface alloying technology was investigated by thermogravimetric method. Oxidation experiments were carried out at 750 °C and 850 °C in air for 100 h. The modification layer was comprised of deposition layer and diffusion layer, which metallurgically adhered to the substrate. Tantalum element decreased with the case depth. The oxidation morphology was studied by a scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction. The results highlighted that in the oxidizing process of the oxidation, the phase containing Ta-richer may restrain diffusing outward of the element Al in the matrix. Ti diffused outward, and formed the TiO{sub 2} scales, while the middle layer was rich in Al, and formed the continuous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scales after oxidation, which was effective to prevent further infiltration of oxygen atoms, and as a result the oxidation resistance increased immensely. - Highlights: • A Ta modified coating was prepared on γ-TiAl using DGP surface alloying technology. • The modification layer metallurgically adhered to the substrate. • The bonding force is about 60 N, satisfying the demands of practical use. • The oxidation resistance increased immensely at 750 °C and 850 °C.

  7. Investigation of oxygen states and reactivities on a nanostructured cupric oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svintsitskiy, D. A.; Stadnichenko, A. I.; Demidov, D. V.; Koscheev, S. V.; Boronin, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    Nanostructured copper (II) oxide was formed on clean copper foil at room temperature using activated oxygen produced by RF discharge. CuO particles of approximately 10-20 nm were observed on the surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The copper states and oxygen species of the model cupric oxide were studied by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). These oxide particles demonstrated abnormally high reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) at temperatures below 100 °C. The XPS data showed that the interaction of CO with the nanostructured cupric oxide resulted in reduction of the CuO particles to Cu 2O species. The reactivity of the nanostructured cupric oxide to CO was studied at 80 °C using XPS in step-by-step mode. The initial reactivity was estimated to be 5 × 10 -5 and was steadily reduced down to 5 × 10 -9 as the exposure was increased. O1s spectral analysis allowed us to propose that the high initial reactivity was caused by the presence of non-lattice oxygen states on the surface of the nanostructured CuO. We established that reoxidation of the partially reduced nanostructured cupric oxide by molecular oxygen O 2 restored the highly reactive oxygen form on the surface. These results allowed us to propose that the nanostructured cupric oxide could be used for low temperature catalytic CO oxidation. Some hypotheses concerning the nature of the non-lattice oxygen species with high reactivity are also discussed.

  8. Intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of ethylene oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp Hassel, Egon; Hellmann, Robert; Bich, Eckard

    2014-10-28

    A six-dimensional potential energy hypersurface (PES) for two interacting rigid ethylene oxide (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O) molecules was determined from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory was utilized to determine interaction energies for 10178 configurations of two molecules. An analytical site-site potential function with 19 sites per ethylene oxide molecule was fitted to the interaction energies and fine tuned to agree with data for the second acoustic virial coefficient from accurate speed of sound measurements. The PES was validated by computing the second virial coefficient, shear viscosity, and thermal conductivity. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data as they tend to fall within the uncertainty intervals and also obey the experimental temperature functions, except for viscosity, where experimental data are insufficient. Due to the lack of reliable data, especially for the transport properties, our calculated values are currently the most accurate estimates for these properties of ethylene oxide.

  9. Thermal Stress of Surface Oxide Layer on Micro Solder Bumps During Reflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Key Chung, C.; Zhu, Z. X.; Kao, C. R.

    2015-02-01

    Micro-bumps are now being developed with diameters smaller than 10 μm. At these dimensions, only very small amounts of solder are used to form the interconnections. Surface oxidation of such small micro-bumps is a critical issue. The key question is whether the oxide film on the solder bumps acts as a barrier to formation of solder joints. In this work, the mechanical stability of the oxide layer on solder bumps was investigated. Solder bumps with 35- μm radii were heated for different times. Auger electron spectroscopy was used to determine the thickness of the oxide layer on the solder bumps. Solder bumps with known oxide layer thicknesses were then heated in a low-oxygen environment (<50 ppm) until they melted. The mechanical stability of the oxide layer was observed by use of a high-speed camera. Results showed that a 14-nm-thick oxide layer on a solder bump of radius 35 μm was able to withstand the molten solder without cracking, leading to a non-wetting solder joint. A thermal stress model of the surface oxide layer revealed that the stress varied substantially with bump size and temperature, and increased almost linearly with temperature. Upon melting, the thermal stress on the oxide increased abruptly, because of the higher thermal expansion of molten solder compared with its solid state. On the basis of the experimental results and the thermal stress model of the oxide film, the maximum oxide thickness that can be tolerated to form a solder joint was determined, e.g. 14 nm oxide can support liquid solder, and thus lead to a non-wetting condition. This work provided a new method of determination of the maximum stress of oxide film for solder joint formation.

  10. Enhanced magnetic properties of Fe soft magnetic composites by surface oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guoliang; Wu, Chen; Yan, Mi

    2016-02-01

    Fe soft magnetic composites (SMCs) with low core loss were fabricated via surface oxidation of the Fe powders by H2O and O2 at elevated temperatures. Surface oxidation prevents magnetic dilution due to the formation of the ferromagnetic iron oxide coating layer, giving rise to high magnetic flux density and effective permeability of the SMCs compared with those fabricated with traditional phosphate coating. Mechanism of the oxidation process has been investigated where Fe3O4 forms by reactions of Fe with H2O and O2. The Fe3O4 coating layer tends to convert into γ-Fe2O3 with increased oxidation temperature and time. By controlling composition of the coating layer, low core loss of 688.9 mW/cm3 (measured at 50 mT and 100 kHz) and higher effective permeability of 88.3 can be achieved for the Fe SMCs.

  11. Fe(VI) as a Possible Oxidant on the Martian Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Goldfeld, M. G.; McDonald, G. D.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    The essential findings of the three biological experiments (Gas Exchange, Labeled Released, and Pyrolitic Release) aboard the Viking Mars landers were the discovery of the presence of one or more strong oxidants on the Martian surface. The Gas Exchange experiments showed that wetting Martian soil leads to the evolution of oxygen, while in the Labeled Release experiment addition of a nutrient solution containing C-14-labeled formate, glycine, lactate, alanine, and glycolic acid induced CO2 evolution. A general consensus was reached that all data taken together pointed to the presence on Martian surface of a strong oxidant, or most probably several different types of oxidants. Several candidates have been proposed as oxidants, including superoxides, hydrogen peroxide, and iron oxides (possibly gamma-Fe2O3). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Large area nanoscale patterning of silicon surfaces by parallel local oxidation.

    PubMed

    Losilla, N S; Martínez, J; García, R

    2009-11-25

    The homogeneity and the reproducibility of parallel local oxidation have been improved by introducing a thin film of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) between the stamp and the silicon surface. The flexibility of the polymer film enables a homogeneous contact of the stamp with the silicon surface to be achieved. The oxides obtained yield better aspect ratios compared with the ones created with no PMMA layer. The pattern is formed when a bias voltage is applied between the stamp and the silicon surface for 1 min. The patterning can be done by a step and repeat technique and is reproducible across a centimetre length scale. Once the oxide nanostructures have been created, the polymer is removed by etching in acetone. Finally, parallel local oxidation is applied to fabricate silicon nanostructures and templates for the growth of organic molecules.

  13. Simple quantification of surface carboxylic acids on chemically oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Hyejin; Kim, Seong-Taek; Lee, Jong Doo; Yim, Sanggyu

    2013-02-01

    The surface of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was chemically oxidized using nitric acid and sulfuric-nitric acid mixtures. Thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy revealed that the use of acid mixtures led to higher degree of oxidation. More quantitative identification of surface carboxylic acids was carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and acid-base titration. However, these techniques are costly and require very long analysis times to promptly respond to the extent of the reaction. We propose a much simpler method using pH measurements and pre-determined pKa value in order to estimate the concentration of carboxylic acids on the oxidized MWCNT surfaces. The results from this technique were consistent with those obtained from XPS and titration, and it is expected that this simple quantification method can provide a cheap and fast way to monitor and control the oxidation reaction of MWCNT.

  14. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  15. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface.

    PubMed

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a 'volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss. PMID:27295099

  16. Improved chemical and electrochemical stability of perovskite oxides with less reducible cations at the surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Nikolai; Lu, Qiyang; Sun, Lixin; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Yildiz, Bilge

    2016-09-01

    Segregation and phase separation of aliovalent dopants on perovskite oxide (ABO3) surfaces are detrimental to the performance of energy conversion systems such as solid oxide fuel/electrolysis cells and catalysts for thermochemical H2O and CO2 splitting. One key reason behind the instability of perovskite oxide surfaces is the electrostatic attraction of the negatively charged A-site dopants (for example, ) by the positively charged oxygen vacancies () enriched at the surface. Here we show that reducing the surface concentration improves the oxygen surface exchange kinetics and stability significantly, albeit contrary to the well-established understanding that surface oxygen vacancies facilitate reactions with O2 molecules. We take La0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC) as a model perovskite oxide, and modify its surface with additive cations that are more and less reducible than Co on the B-site of LSC. By using ambient-pressure X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy, we proved that the dominant role of the less reducible cations is to suppress the enrichment and phase separation of Sr while reducing the concentration of and making the LSC more oxidized at its surface. Consequently, we found that these less reducible cations significantly improve stability, with up to 30 times faster oxygen exchange kinetics after 54 h in air at 530 °C achieved by Hf addition onto LSC. Finally, the results revealed a `volcano' relation between the oxygen exchange kinetics and the oxygen vacancy formation enthalpy of the binary oxides of the additive cations. This volcano relation highlights the existence of an optimum surface oxygen vacancy concentration that balances the gain in oxygen exchange kinetics and the chemical stability loss.

  17. Surface Composition, Work Function, and Electrochemical Characteristics of Gallium-Doped Zinc Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, E. L.; Sigdel, A. K.; Macech, M. R.; Nebesny, K.; Lee, P. A.; Ginley, D. S.; Armstrong, N. R.; Berry, J. J.

    2012-06-30

    Gallium-doped zinc oxide (GZO) possesses the electric conductivity, thermal stability, and earth abundance to be a promising transparent conductive oxide replacement for indium tin oxide electrodes in a number of molecular electronic devices, including organic solar cells and organic light emitting diodes. The surface chemistry of GZO is complex and dominated by the hydrolysis chemistry of ZnO, which influences the work function via charge transfer and band bending caused by adsorbates. A comprehensive characterization of the surface chemical composition and electrochemical properties of GZO electrodes is presented, using both solution and surface adsorbed redox probe molecules. The GZO surface is characterized using monochromatic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy after the following pretreatments: (i) hydriodic acid etch, (ii) potassium hydroxide etch, (iii) RF oxygen plasma etching, and (iv) high-vacuum argon-ion sputtering. The O 1s spectra for the GZO electrodes have contributions from the stoichiometric oxide lattice, defects within the lattice, hydroxylated species, and carbonaceous impurities, with relative near-surface compositions varying with pretreatment. Solution etching procedures result in an increase of the work function and ionization potential of the GZO electrode, but yield different near surface Zn:Ga atomic ratios, which significantly influence charge transfer rates for a chemisorbed probe molecule. The near surface chemical composition is shown to be the dominant factor in controlling surface work function and significantly influences the rate of electron transfer to both solution and tethered probe molecules.

  18. Deformation behavior of the oxide film on the surface of cold sprayed powder particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shuo; Wang, Xiaofang; Li, Wenya; Liao, Hanlin; Jie, Hongen

    2012-10-01

    In cold spraying, oxide-free interface is an important factor for metal-to-metal contact between powder particles and substrate, which determines the bonding strength and final coating quality. In this study, a systematic finite element analysis (FEA) is performed to examine the deformation behavior of the oxide film on an Al 6061-T6 particle surface after deposition. The simulation results show that the oxide film can be disrupted during the high velocity impact. Part of the cracked oxides remains at the interface and mainly accumulates at the central region after particle deposition. Substrate hardness, particle velocity and spray angle are found to influence the deformation behavior and final state of the oxide film. Besides, interparticle interaction is also investigated in the present work to clarify the deformation behavior of the oxide film inside the coating.

  19. Enhanced Lifetime of Polymer Solar Cells by Surface Passivation of Metal Oxide Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Swaminathan; Ngo, Evan; Khatiwada, Devendra; Zhang, Cheng; Qiao, Qiquan

    2015-07-29

    The role of electron selective interfaces on the performance and lifetime of polymer solar cells were compared and analyzed. Bilayer interfaces consisting of metal oxide films with cationic polymer modification namely poly ethylenimine ethoxylated (PEIE) were found to enhance device lifetime compared to bare metal oxide films when used as an electron selective cathode interface. Devices utilizing surface-modified metal oxide layers showed enhanced lifetimes, retaining up to 85% of their original efficiency when stored in ambient atmosphere for 180 days without any encapsulation. The work function and surface potential of zinc oxide (ZnO) and ZnO/PEIE interlayers were evaluated using Kelvin probe and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) respectively. Kelvin probe measurements showed a smaller reduction in work function of ZnO/PEIE films compared to bare ZnO films when aged in atmospheric conditions. KPFM measurements showed that the surface potential of the ZnO surface drastically reduces when stored in ambient air for 7 days because of surface oxidation. Surface oxidation of the interface led to a substantial decrease in the performance in aged devices. The enhancement in the lifetime of devices with a bilayer interface was correlated to the suppressed surface oxidation of the metal oxide layers. The PEIE passivated surface retained a lower Fermi level when aged, which led to lower trap-assisted recombination at the polymer-cathode interface. Further photocharge extraction by linearly increasing voltage (Photo-CELIV) measurements were performed on fresh and aged samples to evaluate the field required to extract maximum charges. Fresh devices with a bare ZnO cathode interlayer required a lower field than devices with ZnO/PEIE cathode interface. However, aged devices with ZnO required a much higher field to extract charges while aged devices with ZnO/PEIE showed a minor increase compared to the fresh devices. Results indicate that surface modification can act as a

  20. Aqueous phase deposition of dense tin oxide films with nano-structured surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, Yoshitake Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi

    2014-06-01

    Dense tin oxide films were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. The pH of the solutions was controlled to pH 1.3 by addition of HCl. Precise control of solution condition and crystal growth allowed us to obtain dense tin oxide films. Concave–convex surface of fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates was entirely-covered with the continuous films. The films were about 65 nm in thickness and had nano-structured surfaces. Morphology of the films was strikingly different from our previous reported nano-sheet assembled structures. The films were not removed from the substrates by strong water flow or air blow to show strong adhesion strength. The aqueous solution process can be applied to surface coating of various materials such as nano/micro-structured surfaces, particles, fibers, polymers, metals or biomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. They had nano-structured surfaces. Concave-convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films. - Highlights: • Dense tin oxide films of 65 nm were successfully fabricated in an aqueous solution. • They had nano-structured surfaces. • Concave–convex substrates were entirely-covered with the continuous films.

  1. Anomalous hexagonal superstructure of aluminum oxide layer grown on NiAl(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krukowski, Pawel; Chaunchaiyakul, Songpol; Minagawa, Yuto; Yajima, Nami; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2016-11-01

    A modified method for the fabrication of a highly crystallized layer of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface is reported. The fabrication method involves the multistep selective oxidation of aluminum atoms on a NiAl(110) surface resulting from successive oxygen deposition and annealing. The surface morphology and local electronic structure of the novel aluminum oxide layer were investigated by high-resolution imaging using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and current imaging tunneling spectroscopy. In contrast to the standard fabrication method of aluminum oxide on a NiAl(110) surface, the proposed method produces an atomically flat surface exhibiting a hexagonal superstructure. The superstructure exhibits a slightly distorted hexagonal array of close-packed bright protrusions with a periodicity of 4.5 ± 0.2 nm. Atomically resolved STM imaging of the aluminum oxide layer reveals a hexagonal arrangement of dark contrast spots with a periodicity of 0.27 ± 0.02 nm. On the basis of the atomic structure of the fabricated layer, the formation of α-Al2O3(0001) on the NiAl(110) surface is suggested.

  2. Surface Selective Oxidation of Sn-Added CMnSi TRIP Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Lawrence; Seo, Eun Jung; Jung, Geun Su; Suh, Dong Woo; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2016-04-01

    The influence of the addition of Sn on the selective oxidation and the reactive wetting of CMnSi transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by means of galvanizing simulator tests. A reference TRIP steel and TRIP steels containing Sn in the range of 0.05 to 1 wt pct were intercritically annealed at 1093 K (820 °C) in an N2+ 5 pct H2 gas atmosphere with a dew point of -60 °C. The thin-film oxides formed on the surface of the Sn-added CMnSi TRIP steel were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and 3-dimensional atom probe tomography. The addition of Sn (≥0.05 wt pct) changed the morphology of the xMnO·SiO2 surface oxides from a continuous film morphology to a lens-shaped island morphology. It also suppressed the formation of the Mn-rich oxides of MnO and 2MnO·SiO2. The changes in the morphology and chemistry of the surface oxides were clearly related to the surface segregation of Sn, which appeared to result in a decrease of the oxygen permeability at the surface. The formation of lens-shaped oxides improved the wettability of the CMnSi TRIP steel surface by the molten Zn. The improved wetting effect was attributed to an increased area fraction of the surface where the oxide layer was thinner. This enabled a direct, unhindered reaction between Fe and the Al in the liquid Zn and the formation of the inhibition layer in the initial stages of the hot dipping. The addition of a small amount of Sn was also found to decrease significantly the density of Zn-coating defects on CMnSi TRIP steel.

  3. Influence of the Structure of the Titanium Oxide Coating Surface on Immunocompetent Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khlusov, I. A.; Sharkeev, Yu. P.; Pichugin, V. F.; Legostaeva, E. V.; Litvinova, L. S.; Shupletsova, V. V.; Sokhonevich, N. A.; Khaziakhmatova, O. G.; Khlusova, M. Yu.; Gutor, S. S.; Tolkacheva, T. V.

    2016-03-01

    Results of a study of the properties of titanium oxide based coatings deposited on titanium substrates by microarc oxidation are presented that establish a relationship between physical and mechanical properties of the coating surface and their medical and biological properties. The required surface topography is formed by sandblasting of the substrate and is controlled by values of the roughness index Ra. A linear dependence of the amplitude of negative electrostatic potential of the oxide coating on the Ra value is established. The topography of the micro-arc coating surface determines its negative surface potential that apparently reduces the viability of the leukemia T cells of the Jurkat line via electrostatic and biological mechanisms unrelated to the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

  4. Study of water adsorption on activated carbons with different degrees of surface oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Salame, I.I.; Bandosz, T.J. |

    1999-02-15

    A carbon of wood origin was oxidized with different oxidizing agents (nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide, and ammonium persulfate). The microstructural properties of the starting material and the oxidized samples were characterized using sorption of nitrogen. The surface acidity was determined using Boehm titration and potentiometric titration. The changes in the surface chemistry were also studied by diffuse reflectance FTIR. Water adsorption isotherms were measured at three different temperatures close to ambient (relative pressure from 0.001 to 0.3). From the isotherms the heats of adsorption were calculated using a virial equation. The results indicated that the isosteric heats of water adsorption are affected by the surface heterogeneity only at low surface coverage. In all cases the limiting heat of adsorption was equal to the heat of water condensation (45 kJ/mol).

  5. Surface modification of alloys for improved oxidation resistance in SOFC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.; Kung, S.C.

    2006-11-01

    This research is aimed at improving the oxidation behavior of metallic alloys for SOFC application, by the incorporation of rare earths through surface treatments. This paper details the effect of such surface modification on the behavior of Crofer 22 APU, a ferritic steel designed specifically for SOFC application, and Type 430 stainless steel. Two pack cementation like treatments were used to incorporate Ce into the surface of the alloys. After 4000 hours of exposure at 800oC to air+3%H2O, the weight gain of Crofer 22APU samples that were Ce surface modified were less than half that of an unmodified sample, revealing the effectiveness of the treatments on enhancing oxidation resistance. For Type-430, the treatment prevented scale spalling that occurred during oxidation of the unmodified alloy.

  6. Surface Engineering of Core/Shell Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from Microemulsions for Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guandong; Liao, Yifeng; Baker, Ian

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the synthesis and surface engineering of core/shell-type iron/iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy. Iron/iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized from microemulsions of NaBH4 and FeCl3, followed by surface modification in which a thin hydrophobic hexamethyldisilazane layer - used to protect the iron core - replaced the CTAB coating on the particles. Phosphatidylcholine was then assembled on the nanoparticle surface. The resulting nanocomposite particles have a biocompatible surface and show good stability in both air and aqueous solution. Compared to iron oxide nanoparticles, the nanocomposites show much better heating in an alternating magnetic field. They are good candidates for both hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. PMID:21833157

  7. Dynamics of cathode spots in low-pressure arc plasma removing oxide layer on steel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Z. L.; Yang, K.; Liu, H. X.; Zhang, Y. C.; Li, H.; Zhu, X. D.

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of cathode spots has been investigated in low-pressure arc plasma for removing oxide layer on low carbon steel surfaces. The motion of cathode spots was observed with a high speed camera, and the arc voltage was analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The spots move on clean steel surface as a random walk, and the low-frequency components dominated the voltage waveform. However, the spots on steel surfaces with oxide layer tend to burn on the rim of the eroded area formed in the previous arcing, and the low-frequency components decrease correspondingly. The "color" of the colored random noise for arc voltage varies from the approximate brown noise for clean steel surface to pink noise for thick oxide layer, where the edge effect of boundary is considered to play a significant role.

  8. Oxidation of tritium atoms at a stainless steel surface

    SciTech Connect

    Finn, P.A.; VanDeventer, E.H.

    1986-10-01

    The dynamic reaction of oxygen and tritium on a stainless steel surface was studied for low oxygen concentrations (less than 1 ppM oxygen in helium). The oxygen was swept over a stainless surface through which 20 to 90 ..mu..Ci/d of tritium permeated. Dynamic conditions were maintained for three to five days with gas flow rates maintained at 40 to 100 mL/min. The ratio between the tritiated water collected and the tritium gas collected was less than one. At oxygen levels greater than 50 ppM, the ratio of tritiated water to tritium gas appears to be greater than 10.

  9. Modifying zirconia solid electrolyte surface property to enhance oxide transport

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, B.Y.; Song, S.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide (Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, BSCCO) is known for its high T{sub c} superconducting behavior and mixed conducting property. The applicability of similar high T{sub c} cuprates for intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application has been studied recently. We investigated the electrochemical behavior of several Ag{vert_bar}BSCCO{vert_bar}10 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ){vert_bar}Ag and Ag{vert_bar}YSZ{vert_bar}Ag cells using complex impedance spectroscopy. A highly uniform and porous microstructure was observed at the interface of the YSZ and BSCCO. The ionic conductivity determined from the Nyquest plots in the temperature range of 200-700{degrees}C agrees with the values reported in the literature. The specific resistance of the BSCCO{vert_bar}YSZ interface was also determined to be lower than those of the conventional manganite electrode, suggesting that BSCCO seems attractive for cathode applications in SOFC.

  10. Surface energetics of alkaline-earth metal oxides: Trends in stability and adsorption of small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Nørskov, Jens K.; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2015-04-01

    We present a systematic theoretical investigation of the surface properties, stability, and reactivity of rocksalt type alkaline-earth metal oxides including MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The accuracy of commonly used exchange-correlation density functionals (LDA, PBE, RPBE, PBEsol, BEEF-vdW, and hybrid HSE) and random-phase approximation (RPA) is evaluated and compared to existing experimental values. Calculated surface energies of the four most stable surface facets under vacuum conditions, the (100) surface, the metal and oxygen terminated octopolar (111), and the (110) surfaces, exhibit a monotonic increase in stability from MgO to BaO. On the MgO(100) surface, adsorption of CO, NO, and CH4 is characterized by physisorption while H2O chemisorbs, which is in agreement with experimental findings. We further use the on-top metal adsorption of CO and NO molecules to map out the surface energetics of each alkaline-earth metal oxide surface. The considered functionals all qualitatively predict similar adsorption energy trends. The ordering between the adsorption energies on different surface facets can be attributed to differences in the local geometrical surface structure and the electronic structure of the metal constituent of the alkaline-earth metal oxide. The striking observation that CO adsorption strength is weaker than NO adsorption on the (100) terraces as the period of the alkaline-earth metal in the oxide increases is analyzed in detail in terms of charge redistribution within the σ and π channels of adsorbates. Finally, we also present oxygen adsorption and oxygen vacancy formation energies in these oxide systems.

  11. Growth morphology of thin films on metallic and oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Krupski, Aleksander

    2014-02-01

    In this work we briefly review recent investigations concerning the growth morphology of thin metallic films on the Mo(110) and Ni3Al(111) surfaces, and Fe and copper phthalocyanine (C32H16N8Cu) on the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) surface. Comparison of Ag, Au, Sn, and Pb growth on the Mo(110) surface has shown a number of similarities between these adsorption systems, except that surface alloy formation has only been observed in the case of Sn and Au. In the Pb/Mo(110) and Pb/Ni3Al(111) adsorption systems selective formation of uniform Pb island heights during metal thin film growth has been observed and interpreted in terms of quantum size effects. Furthermore, our studies showed that Al2O3 on Ni3Al(111) exhibits a large superstructure in which the unit cell has a commensurate relation with the substrate lattice. In addition, copper phthalocyanine chemisorbed weakly onto an ultra-thin Al2O3 film on Ni3Al(111) and showed a poor template effect of the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) system. In the case of iron cluster growth on Al2O3/Ni3Al(111) the nucleation sites were independent of deposition temperature, yet the cluster shape showed a dependence. In this system, Fe clusters formed a regular hexagonal lattice on the Al2O3/Ni3Al(111). PMID:24445588

  12. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis and surface coating techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Chao; Zhu, Zan-Zan; Hou, Yang-Long; Subbu, S. Venkatraman; Xu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most popular magnetic nanoparticles used in biomedical applications due to their low cost, low toxicity, and unique magnetic property. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), usually exhibit a superparamagnetic property as their size goes smaller than 20 nm, which are often denoted as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and utilized for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapy, and etc. This review article gives a brief introduction on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in terms of their fundamentals of magnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and drug delivery, as well as the synthesis approaches, surface coating, and application examples from recent key literatures. Because the quality and surface chemistry play important roles in biomedical applications, our review focuses on the synthesis approaches and surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We aim to provide a detailed introduction to readers who are new to this field, helping them to choose suitable synthesis methods and to optimize the surface chemistry of iron oxide nanoparticles for their interests.

  13. First Principles Calculation of Intial Oxidation Processes of Si(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuyoshi, Uda; Koichi, Kato; Kiyoyuki, Terakura

    1997-08-01

    Oxidation of the Si(001) surface, one of the most important processes in the modern Si technology, was studied using the first-principles calculation technique with spin-polarized gradient approximation. The spontaneous dissociative chemisorption occurs only in the exceptional case, where incident O2 molecule attacks the center between the two surface dimers with its molecular axis parallel to a dimer row. In other cases, rather large activation energy is needed for dissociative chemisorption of an O2 molecule. It increases as the chemisorption site becomes deeper from the surface. This is in accordance qualitatively with the recent finding by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM) that the oxidation occurs in a layer-by-layer reaction mode. The calculated activation energies, however, are considerably larger than the observed ones. In particular, the calculated barrier energy for backbond oxidation is more than 0.8 eV, while the first sub-surface, including backbonds, is observed to be oxidized with almost no activation energy. We have found that the barrierless backbond oxidation can be realized along a reaction path via the spontaneously chemisorbed meta-stable states on the Si top-layer mentioned earlier. Since this channel is very narrow, our model also explains why the initial sticking coefficient of O2 molecule is small despite of the fact that the barrierless oxidation takes place along this path. This work was partly supported by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

  14. Evidence of alloy formation during reduction of platinized tin oxide surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardner, Steven D.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Davidson, Mark R.; Schryer, David R.

    1989-01-01

    Ion scattering spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis have been used to examine a platinized tin oxide catalyst surface before, during, and after reduction by annealing under vacuum at 250 to 450 C. These techniques were then used to examine the reduced surface after a room-temperature, low-pressure oxygen exposure. The spectral results and the behavior of the reduced surface toward oxygen exposure both indicate that a Pt/Sn alloy is produced during reduction.

  15. The effect of aging and surface modification on the mechanical properties of dense aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Cook, S D; Weinberg, L A

    1984-01-01

    The effect of in vivo aging and surface texturing on the mechanical properties of dense aluminum oxide were studied. The modulus of rupture and Weibull modulus were determined in air and Ringer's solution using a 3-point bend test. The results showed that the in vivo environment sealed off microcracks either chemically or by tissue ingrowth which strengthened the alumina. The surface modification, however, tended to create more microcracks and stress concentrations at the surface indentations which tended to weaken the alumina.

  16. A critical study of the role of the surface oxide layer in titanium bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, S.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The molecular understanding of the role which the surface oxide layer of the adherend plays in titanium bonding is studied. The effects of Ti6-4 adherends pretreatment, bonding conditions, and thermal aging of the lap shear specimens were studied. The use of the SEM/EDAX and ESCA techniques to study surface morphology and surface composition was emphasized. In addition, contact angles and both infrared and visible reflection spectroscopy were used in ancillary studies.

  17. Prebiotic polymerization: Oxidative polymerization of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2, 3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the Fe(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to Fe(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  18. Prebiotic Polymerization: Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercapto-1- Propanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1995-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron(III) hydroxide oxide (Fe(OH)O) yielded polydisulfide oligomers. This polymerization occurred readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron(III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micromole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the FE(OH)O phase. Reactions carried out at the same ratio of dithiol to FE(OH)O but at higher dithiol concentrations gave higher yields of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis is discussed.

  19. Prebiotic Oxidative Polymerization of 2,3 Dimercaptopropanol on the Surface of Iron(III) Hydroxide Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation of 2,3-Dimercapto-1-propanol by ferric ions on the surface of iron (III) hydroxide oxide yielded polydisulfide polymers. This polymerization occured readily at low dithiol concentration under mild aqueous conditions. Polydisulfide polymers up to the 15-mer were synthesized from 1 mM dithiol in 5 ml water reacted with iron (III) hydroxide oxide (20 mg, 160 micro mole Fe) for 3 days under anaerobic conditions at 40 C and pH 4. About 91% of the dithiol was converted to short soluble oligomers and 9% to insoluble larger oligomers that were isolated with the mineral phase. Reactions at higher dithiol concentrations with the same ratio of dithiol to mineral gave a higher yield of the larger insoluble oligomers. The relationship of these results to prebiotic polymer synthesis will be discussed.

  20. Surface oxidation energetics and kinetics on MoS{sub 2} monolayer

    SciTech Connect

    KC, Santosh; Longo, Roberto C.; Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae

    2015-04-07

    In this work, surface oxidation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} (one of the representative semiconductors in transition-metal dichalcogenides) has been investigated using density functional theory method. Oxygen interaction with MoS{sub 2} shows that, thermodynamically, the surface tends to be oxidized. However, the dissociative absorption of molecular oxygen on the MoS{sub 2} surface is kinetically limited due to the large energy barrier at low temperature. This finding elucidates the air stability of MoS{sub 2} surface in the atmosphere. Furthermore, the presence of defects significantly alters the surface stability and adsorption mechanisms. The electronic properties of the oxidized surface have been examined as a function of oxygen adsorption and coverage as well as substitutional impurities. Our results on energetics and kinetics of oxygen interaction with the MoS{sub 2} monolayer are useful for the understanding of surface oxidation, air stability, and electronic properties of transition-metal dichalcogenides at the atomic scale.

  1. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces. PMID:27396288

  2. Rapid Covalent Modification of Silicon Oxide Surfaces through Microwave-Assisted Reactions with Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Austin W H; Gates, Byron D

    2016-07-26

    We demonstrate the method of a rapid covalent modification of silicon oxide surfaces with alcohol-containing compounds with assistance by microwave reactions. Alcohol-containing compounds are prevalent reagents in the laboratory, which are also relatively easy to handle because of their stability against exposure to atmospheric moisture. The condensation of these alcohols with the surfaces of silicon oxides is often hindered by slow reaction kinetics. Microwave radiation effectively accelerates this condensation reaction by heating the substrates and/or solvents. A variety of substrates were modified in this demonstration, such as silicon oxide films of various thicknesses, glass substrates such as microscope slides (soda lime), and quartz. The monolayers prepared through this strategy demonstrated the successful formation of covalent surface modifications of silicon oxides with water contact angles of up to 110° and typical hysteresis values of 2° or less. An evaluation of the hydrolytic stability of these monolayers demonstrated their excellent stability under acidic conditions. The techniques introduced in this article were successfully applied to tune the surface chemistry of silicon oxides to achieve hydrophobic, oleophobic, and/or charged surfaces.

  3. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    PubMed

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes.

  4. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-11-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters through co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and surface water, we investigated Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II) oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer) resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than a week before complete oxidation of Fe(II) is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilization of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation process which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II) is completely depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at redox gradients

  5. Nonthermal desorption from surfaces of ices and other oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madey, Theodore E.

    2001-03-01

    Non-thermal DIET processes at surfaces (desorption induced by electronic transitions) may affect both terrestrial and planetary atmospheres. One case concerns observations of neutral sodium and potassium vapor in the tenuous atmospheres of the planet Mercury and the Moon, as well as Jupiter's icy satellite, Europa. In a series of model experiments, we find strong evidence that non-thermal processes - mainly photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) by UV photons - play a dominant role in desorption of Na atoms from the lunar surface, and may affect Na and K in the other atmospheres also. The second case involves measurements that may impact on understanding the destruction of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in the earth's upper atmosphere, via electron-induced processes on ice particles in polar stratospheric clouds. We observe giant Cl^- and F^- enhancements by several orders of magnitude in electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) of a fractional monolayer of CF_2Cl2 coadsorbed with water ice and ammonia ice on a metal surface at ~25 K, respectively. The negative-ion enhancements are attributed to dissociation of CF_2Cl2 by capture of low-energy secondary electrons trapped by coadsorbed polar water or ammonia.

  6. Studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of perfluoroether reactions on iron and oxidized iron surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Napier, Mary E.; Stair, Peter C.

    1992-01-01

    Polymeric perfluoroalkylethers are being considered for use as lubricants in high temperature applications, but have been observed to catalytically decompose in the presence of metals. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to explore the decomposition of three model fluorinated ethers on clean polycrystalline iron surfaces and iron surfaces chemically modified with oxygen. Low temperature adsorption of the model fluorinated ethers on the clean, oxygen modified and oxidized iron surfaces was molecular. Thermally activated defluorination of the three model compounds was observed on the clean iron surface at remarkably low temperatures, 155 K and below, with formation of iron fluoride. Preferential C-F bond scission occurred at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O, of perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane and perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and at CF3/CF2O of perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane. The reactivity of the clean iron toward perfluoroalkylether decomposition when compared to other metals is due to the strength of the iron fluoride bond and the strong electron donating ability of the metallic iron. Chemisorption of an oxygen overlayer lowered the reactivity of the iron surface to the adsorption and decomposition of the three model fluorinated ethers by blocking active sites on the metal surface. Incomplete coverage of the iron surface with chemisorbed oxygen results in a reaction which resembles the defluorination reaction observed on the clean iron surface. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy ethane reacts on the oxidized iron surface at 138 K, through a Lewis acid assisted cleavage of the carbon oxygen bond, with preferential attack at the terminal fluoromethoxy, CF3O. The oxidized iron surface did not passivate, but became more reactive with time. Perfluoro-1-methoxy-2-ethoxy propane and perfluoro-1,3-diethoxy propane desorbed prior to the observation of decomposition on the oxidized iron surface.

  7. Laser surface treatment of porous ceramic substrate for application in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmod, D. S. A.; Khan, A. A.; Munot, M. A.; Glandut, N.; Labbe, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Laser has offered a large number of benefits for surface treatment of ceramics due to possibility of localized heating, very high heating/cooling rates and possibility of growth of structural configurations only produced under non-equilibrium high temperature conditions. The present work investigates oxidation of porous ZrB2-SiC sintered ceramic substrates through treatment by a 1072 ± 10 nm ytterbium fiber laser. A multi-layer structure is hence produced showing successively oxygen rich distinct layers. The porous bulk beneath these layers remained unaffected as this laser-formed oxide scale and protected the substrate from oxidation. A glassy SiO2 structure thus obtained on the surface of the substrate becomes subject of interest for further research, specifically for its utilization as solid protonic conductor in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs).

  8. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1991-09-24

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical coal cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the fourth quarter, characterization and oxidation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville {number sign}2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. In addition, standard test methods for characterizing pyrite-bearing materials were studied. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Oxidation of coal and coal pyrite mechanisms and influence on surface characteristics. [Coal pyrite electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a mechanistic understanding of the oxidation of coal and coal pyrite, and to correlate the intrinsic physical and chemical properties of these minerals, along with changes resulting from oxidation, with those surface properties that influence the behavior in physical cleaning processes. The results will provide fundamental insight into oxidation, in terms of the bulk and surface chemistry, the microstructure, and the semiconductor properties of the pyrite. During the eighth quarter, wet chemical and dry oxidation tests were done on Upper Freeport coal from the Troutville [number sign]2 Mine, Clearfield County, Pennsylvania. In addition electrochemical experiments were done on electrodes prepared from Upper Freeport coal pyrite and Pittsburgh coal pyrite samples provided by the US Bureau of Mines, Pittsburgh Research Center, Pennsylvania.

  10. Mechanism of Layer-by-Layer Oxidation of Si(001) Surfaces by Two-Dimensional Oxide-Island Nucleation at SiO2/Si Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Heiji; Baba, Toshio; Ichikawa, Masakazu

    2000-04-01

    We have studied the mechanism of layer-by-layer oxidation of Si(001) surfaces. The layer-by-layer oxidation was confirmed and precisely monitored by scanning reflection electron microscopy (SREM). By combining SREM and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) methods, we investigated the change in atomic-scale roughness at SiO2/Si(001) interfaces during the oxidation. We found that, while the oxide interface is atomically flat after the oxidation of each layer is complete, nanometer-scale oxide islands with a single atomic height are densely nucleated at the interface during the oxidation of each layer. We also observed an oscillation in the intensity of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) spots during the top-layer oxidation. These results clearly indicate that the layer-by-layer oxidation proceeds by the nucleation of nanometer-scale oxide islands at the interfaces and by their preferential lateral island growth.

  11. Hot hole-induced dissociation of NO dimers on a copper surface

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Rey, Natalia; Arnolds, Heike

    2011-12-14

    We use reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) to study the photochemistry of NO on Cu(110) in the UV-visible range. We observe that the only photoactive species of NO on Cu(110) is the NO dimer, which is asymmetrically bound to the surface. RAIRS shows that photoinduced dissociation proceeds via breaking of the weak N-N bond of the dimer, photodesorbing one NO{sub g} to the gas phase and leaving one NO{sub ads} adsorbed on the surface in a metastable atop position. We model the measured wavelength-dependent cross sections assuming both electron- and hole-induced processes and find that the photochemistry can be described by either electron attachment to a level 0.3 eV above the Fermi energy E{sub F} or hole attachment to a level 2.2 eV below E{sub F}. While there is no experimental or theoretical evidence for an electron attachment level so close to E{sub F}, an occupied NO-related molecular orbital is known to exist at E{sub F}- 2.52 eV on the Cu(111) surface [I. Kinoshita, A. Misu, and T. Munakata, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 2970 (1995)]. We, therefore, propose that photoinduced dissociation of NO dimers on Cu(110) in the visible wavelength region proceeds by the creation of hot holes at the top of the copper d-band.

  12. Hot hole-induced dissociation of NO dimers on a copper surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Rey, Natalia; Arnolds, Heike

    2011-12-01

    We use reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) to study the photochemistry of NO on Cu(110) in the UV-visible range. We observe that the only photoactive species of NO on Cu(110) is the NO dimer, which is asymmetrically bound to the surface. RAIRS shows that photoinduced dissociation proceeds via breaking of the weak N-N bond of the dimer, photodesorbing one NOg to the gas phase and leaving one NOads adsorbed on the surface in a metastable atop position. We model the measured wavelength-dependent cross sections assuming both electron- and hole-induced processes and find that the photochemistry can be described by either electron attachment to a level 0.3 eV above the Fermi energy EF or hole attachment to a level 2.2 eV below EF. While there is no experimental or theoretical evidence for an electron attachment level so close to EF, an occupied NO-related molecular orbital is known to exist at EF - 2.52 eV on the Cu(111) surface [I. Kinoshita, A. Misu, and T. Munakata, J. Chem. Phys. 102, 2970 (1995)]. We, therefore, propose that photoinduced dissociation of NO dimers on Cu(110) in the visible wavelength region proceeds by the creation of hot holes at the top of the copper d-band.

  13. A microbial-mineralization approach for syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area.

    PubMed

    Yagita, Naoki; Oaki, Yuya; Imai, Hiroaki

    2013-04-01

    Of minerals and microbes: A microbial-mineralization-inspired approach was used to facilitate the syntheses of iron oxides with a high specific surface area, such as 253 m(2)g(-1) for maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)) and 148 m(2)g(-1) for hematite (α-Fe(2)O(3)). These iron oxides can be applied to electrode material of lithium-ion batteries, adsorbents, and catalysts.

  14. The Nature of Surface Oxides on Corrosion-Resistant Nickel Alloy Covered by Alkaline Water

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A nickel alloy with high chrome and molybdenum content was found to form a highly resistive and passive oxide layer. The donor density and mobility of ions in the oxide layer has been determined as a function of the electrical potential when alkaline water layers are on the alloy surface in order to account for the relative inertness of the nickel alloy in corrosive environments. PMID:20672134

  15. Chemically modified electrodes by nucleophilic substitution of chlorosilylated platinum oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Hsien; Hutchison, James H.; Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Richardson, John N.; Murray, R. W.

    1994-07-01

    Chlorosilylated platinum oxide electrode surfaces can be generated by reaction of SiCl4 vapor with an electrochemically prepared monolayer of platinum oxide. A variety of nucleophilic agents (such as alcohols, amines, thiols, and Grignard reagents) can be used to displace chloride and thereby functionalize the metal surface. Electroactive surfaces prepared with ferrocene methanol as the nucleophile show that derivatization by small molecules can achieve coverages on the order of a full monolayer. Surfaces modified with long-chain alkyl groups efficiently block electrode reactions of redox probes dissolved in the contacting solution, but other electrochemical (double layer capacitance and surface coverage) and contact angle measurements suggest that these molecule films are not highly ordered, self-assembled monolayers.

  16. Processing surface sizing starch using oxidation, enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrasonic treatment methods--Preparation and application.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Tobias; Kiessler, Birgit; Radosta, Sylvia; Arndt, Tiemo

    2016-03-15

    The surface application of starch is a well-established method for increasing paper strength. In surface sizing, a solution of degraded starch is applied to the paper. Two procedures have proved valuable for starch degradation in the paper mill: enzymatic and thermo-oxidative degradation. The objective of this study was to determine achievable efficiencies of cavitation in preparing degraded starch for surface application on paper. It was found that ultrasonic-assisted starch degradation can provide a starch solution that is suitable for surface sizing. The molecular composition of starch solutions prepared by ultrasonic treatment differed from that of starch solutions degraded by enzymes or by thermo-oxidation. Compared to commercial degradation processes, this resulted in intensified film formation and in greater penetration during surface sizing and ultimately in a higher starch content of the paper. Paper sized with ultrasonically treated starch solutions show the same strength properties compared to commercially sized paper.

  17. Atomically flat reconstructed rutile TiO2(001) surfaces for oxide film growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Lee, S.; Vilmercati, P.; Lee, H. N.; Weitering, H. H.; Snijders, P. C.

    2016-02-01

    The availability of low-index rutile TiO2 single crystal substrates with atomically flat surfaces is essential for enabling epitaxial growth of rutile transition metal oxide films. The high surface energy of the rutile (001) surface often leads to surface faceting, which precludes the sputter and annealing treatment commonly used for the preparation of clean and atomically flat TiO2(110) substrate surfaces. In this work, we reveal that stable and atomically flat rutile TiO2(001) surfaces can be prepared with an atomically ordered reconstructed surface already during a furnace annealing treatment in air. We tentatively ascribe this result to the decrease in surface energy associated with the surface reconstruction, which removes the driving force for faceting. Despite the narrow temperature window where this morphology can initially be formed, we demonstrate that it persists in homoepitaxial growth of TiO2(001) thin films. The stabilization of surface reconstructions that prevent faceting of high-surface-energy crystal faces may offer a promising avenue towards the realization of a wider range of high quality epitaxial transition metal oxide heterostructures.

  18. Chemical reactions on solid surfaces: Atomistic observations by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madix, R. J.; Crew, W. W.; Guo, X.-C.

    1997-04-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope has been developed which allows manipulation and control of the surface as well as scanning tunneling microscopy without transfer of the crystal off the manipulator to the microscope. The microscope is of the 'Johnnie Walker' type and is lowered onto the crystal, which is itself housed in a versatile transfer carriage. In this fashion surfaces can be ion bombarded, chemically treated, etc. and examined by the microscope at temperatures ranging from 120-400 K with atomic resolution without change in surface temperature. With this microscope we have studied the reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen on Cu(110). At an ambient pressure of 10 -4 Torr carbon monoxide reacts with the p(2 × 1) islands of oxygen at a measurable rate only at 400 K or above. Reaction is approximately 1000 times faster along the (001) direction of the oxide islands than along the (110) direction. Reaction does not occur internal to the island unless there are defects to initiate the reaction. At 400 K the oxide islands do not maintain an equilibrium shape or distribution when reacting with ambient carbon monoxide, though in the presence of a low pressure of oxygen they appear to do so. At 150 K the p(2 × 1) oxide islands are inert to reaction with carbon monoxide and, additionally, short CuO chains are also unreactive. Reaction between pre-adsorbed carbon monoxide and ambient oxygen is observed, implying that mobile oxygen atoms which have not yet formed surface-bound pseudomolecules, can react with adsorbed carbon monoxide.

  19. Hematite Surface Activation by Chemical Addition of Tin Oxide Layer.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Waldemir M; Souza, Flavio L

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of tin (Sn(4+) ) modification on the surface of hematite electrodes synthesized by an aqueous solution route at different times (2, 5, 10, 18, and 24 h) is investigated. As confirmed from X-ray diffraction results, the as-synthesized electrode exhibits an oxyhydroxide phase, which is converted into a pure hematite phase after being subjected to additional thermal treatment at 750 °C for 30 min. The tin-modified hematite electrode is prepared by depositing a solution of Sn(4+) precursor on the as-synthesized electrode, followed by thermal treatment under the same abovementioned conditions. This modification results in an enhancement of the photocurrent response for all hematite electrodes investigated and attains the highest values of around 1.62 and 2.3 mA cm(-2) at 1.23 and 1.4 V versus RHE, respectively, for electrodes obtained in short synthesis times (2 h). Contact angle measurements suggest that the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode provides a more hydrophilic surface, which favors a chemical reaction at the interface between the electrode and electrolyte. This result generates new perspectives for understanding the deposition of Sn(4+) on the hematite electrode surface, which is in contrast with several studies previously reported; these studies state that the enhancement in photocurrent density is related to either the induction of an increased donor charge density or shift in the flat-band potential, which favors charge separation.

  20. Surface passivation limited UO2 oxidative dissolution in the presence of FeS.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yuqiang; Hayes, Kim F

    2014-11-18

    Iron sulfide minerals produced during in situ bioremediation of U can serve as an oxygen scavenger to retard uraninite (UO2) oxidation upon oxygen intrusion. Under persistent oxygen supply, however, iron sulfides become oxidized and depleted, giving rise to elevated dissolved oxygen (DO) levels and remobilization of U(IV). The present study investigated the mechanism that regulates UO2 oxidative dissolution rate in a flow-through system when oxygen breakthrough occurred as a function of mackinawite (FeS) and carbonate concentrations. The formation and evolution of surface layers on UO2 were characterized using XAS and XPS. During FeS inhibition period, the continuous supply of carbonate and calcium in the influent effectively complexed and removed oxidized U(VI) to preserve an intermediate U4O9 surface. When the FeS became depleted by oxidization, a transient, rapid dissolution of UO2 was observed along with DO breakthrough in the reactor. This rate was greater than during the preceding FeS inhibition period and control experiments in the absence of FeS. With increasing DO, the rate slowed and the rate-limiting step shifted from surface oxidation to U(VI) detachment as U(VI) passivation layers developed. In contrast, increasing the carbonate concentrations facilitated detachment of surface-associated U(VI) complexes and impeded the formation of U(VI) passivation layer. This study demonstrates the critical role of U(VI) surface layer formation versus U(VI) detachment in controlling UO2 oxidative dissolution rate during periods of variable oxygen presence under simulated groundwater conditions.

  1. In situ high temperature microscopy study of the surface oxidation and phase transformations in titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Malinov, S; Sha, W; Voon, C S

    2002-09-01

    Two popular commercial titanium alloys, Ti-6Al-4V and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.08Si, were used for in situ high temperature microscopy study. The experiments were performed on an optical microscope equipped with high temperature stage using both normal and florescence lights. Two kinds of experiments were performed, at continuous heating/cooling with different rates and in isothermal conditions at different temperatures. The changes taking place on the sample surface during the experiments were monitored. The morphology of the alpha ==> beta ==> alpha phase transformation was recorded at different heat treatment conditions using the effect of thermal etching. An effect of sample surface oxidation and deoxidation was observed during continuous heating. The appearance and disappearance of ordered titanium oxides Ti3O and Ti2O are discussed based on the phase equilibrium diagram. The kinetics of the surface oxidation was monitored in both isothermal and continuous cooling conditions.

  2. Enhanced electron-hole droplet emission from surface-oxidized silicon photonic crystal nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, Hisashi; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Taniyama, Hideaki; Notomi, Masaya

    2016-01-25

    We have observed electron-hole droplet (EHD) emission enhanced by silicon photonic crystal (Si PhC) nanocavities with a surface oxide. The EHD is employed as a massive emitter that remains inside the nanocavity to achieve efficient cavity-emitter coupling. Time-resolved emission measurements demonstrate that the surface oxide greatly reduces the nonradiative annihilation of the EHDs and maintains them in the PhC nanocavities. It is found that the surface-oxidized Si PhC nanocavity enhances EHD emission in addition to the Purcell enhancement of the resonant cavity, which will contribute to works on Si light emission and the cavity quantum electrodynamics of electron-hole condensates. PMID:26832491

  3. Elucidation of the reaction mechanism during the removal of copper oxide by halogen surfactant at the surface of copper plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although copper nanoparticles have various attractive properties, electrical applications of these was not achieved because of its surface oxide layer which prohibited electrical conduction. Thus, it can be considered that a new elimination method of the oxide on Cu surface, which simultaneously provide the resistance to re-oxidized, should be developed. In this study, the reaction between the metal oxide on Cu plate surface and halogen surfactant was introduced into development as a new elimination method of surface oxide layer. Since electrochemical and surface analysis are effective for analyzing the reaction mechanism which expected to be the reduction reaction of the oxide on metal surface, Cu electrode, which represented material of Cu nanoparticles surface, was used for the reaction mechanism analysis. The oxide is removed by controlling the temperature and selecting the optimal combination of solvents and the halogen surfactant (TIC). Results of electrochemical measurements strongly suggest that the chemical reaction between the oxides on the surface with the halogen surfactant is a substitution reaction which converts Cu oxide to Cu bromide, and continuously formed Cu bromide was dissolved into solvent. Totally, the oxide on the Cu surface was successfully eliminated.

  4. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphate immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater into surface water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, B.; Rozemeijer, J. C.; Griffioen, J.; van der Velde, Y.

    2014-06-01

    The retention of phosphorus in surface waters though co-precipitation of phosphate with Fe-oxyhydroxides during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) rich groundwater is not well understood. We developed an experimental field set-up to study Fe(II) oxidation and P immobilization along the flow-path from groundwater to surface water in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we investigated Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes. The oxidation rate inferred from our field measurements closely agreed with the general rate law for abiotic oxidation of Fe(II) by O2. Seasonal changes in climatic conditions affected the Fe(II) oxidation process. Lower pH and lower temperatures in winter (compared to summer) resulted in low Fe oxidation rates. After exfiltration to the surface water, it took a couple of days to more than one week before complete oxidation of Fe(II) is reached. In summer time, Fe oxidation rates were much higher. The Fe concentrations in the exfiltrated groundwater were low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into a ditch. While the Fe oxidation rates reduce drastically from summer to winter, P concentrations remained high in the groundwater and an order of magnitude lower in the surface water throughout the year. This study shows very fast immobilisation of dissolved P during the initial stage of the Fe(II) oxidation proces which results in P-depleted water before Fe(II) is competly depleted. This cannot be explained by surface complexation of phosphate to freshly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides but indicates the formation of Fe(III)-phosphate precipitates. The formation of Fe(III)-phosphates at redox gradients seems an

  5. Atmospheric and electrochemical oxidation of the surface of chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Q.; Kelsall, G. H.; Vaughan, D. J.; England, K. E. R.

    1995-03-01

    Atmospheric and electrochemical oxidation of the surface of chalcopyrite has been investigated using electrochemical techniques with subsequent surface analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and aqueous phase analysis by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICPAES). The extent of atmospheric oxidation of chalcopyrite was assessed qualitatively by measuring the increase in the open circuit potential; quantitative estimation was made either by comparing the reduction charges of an atmospherically oxidised electrode with an unoxidised electrode and/or by comparing their oxidation charges at potentials less positive than those at which the main decomposition occurred. The oxidation current wave at potentials 0.1 V to 0.6 V vs. S.C.E. consists of two peaks, the charges of which vary with the surface roughness and the peak potentials of which vary with the electrolyte pH in the alkaline region. As the pH of the electrolyte was increased from 0 to 13, the mole ratio of sulfur to sulfate formed during the anodic oxidation decreased from 6:1 to 3.2:1 but remained around 6:1 as the potential was increased from 1.0 V to 1.8 V vs. S.C.E. in acidic electrolytes. A mechanism for the oxidation and passivation of chalcopyrite is proposed.

  6. High temperature oxidation behavior of AISI 304L stainless steel-Effect of surface working operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Swati; Kumar, M. Kiran; Kain, Vivekanand

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of grade 304L stainless steel (SS) subjected to different surface finishing (machining and grinding) operations was followed in situ by contact electric resistance (CER) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements using controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) technique in high purity water (conductivity < 0.1 μS cm-1) at 300 °C and 10 MPa in an autoclave connected to a recirculation loop system. The results highlight the distinct differences in the oxidation behavior of surface worked material as compared to solution annealed material in terms of specific resistivity and low frequency Warburg impedance. The resultant oxide layer was characterized for (a) elemental analyses by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES) and (b) morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Oxide layers with higher specific resistivity and chromium content were formed in case of machined and ground conditions. Presence of an additional ionic transport process has also been identified for the ground condition at the metal/oxide interface. These differences in electrochemical properties and distinct morphological features of the oxide layer as a result of surface working were attributed to the prevalence of heavily fragmented grain structure and presence of martensite.

  7. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Jonathan D.; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L.; Gordon, Mark S.; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NOy) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO2, HNO3, N2O5 and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NOy onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO2 or N2O5 on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO2 in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist. PMID:19620710

  8. Chlorine activation indoors and outdoors via surface-mediated reactions of nitrogen oxides with hydrogen chloride.

    PubMed

    Raff, Jonathan D; Njegic, Bosiljka; Chang, Wayne L; Gordon, Mark S; Dabdub, Donald; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2009-08-18

    Gaseous HCl generated from a variety of sources is ubiquitous in both outdoor and indoor air. Oxides of nitrogen (NO(y)) are also globally distributed, because NO formed in combustion processes is oxidized to NO(2), HNO(3), N(2)O(5) and a variety of other nitrogen oxides during transport. Deposition of HCl and NO(y) onto surfaces is commonly regarded as providing permanent removal mechanisms. However, we show here a new surface-mediated coupling of nitrogen oxide and halogen activation cycles in which uptake of gaseous NO(2) or N(2)O(5) on solid substrates generates adsorbed intermediates that react with HCl to generate gaseous nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) and nitryl chloride (ClNO(2)), respectively. These are potentially harmful gases that photolyze to form highly reactive chlorine atoms. The reactions are shown both experimentally and theoretically to be enhanced by water, a surprising result given the availability of competing hydrolysis reaction pathways. Airshed modeling incorporating HCl generated from sea salt shows that in coastal urban regions, this heterogeneous chemistry increases surface-level ozone, a criteria air pollutant, greenhouse gas and source of atmospheric oxidants. In addition, it may contribute to recently measured high levels of ClNO(2) in the polluted coastal marine boundary layer. This work also suggests the potential for chlorine atom chemistry to occur indoors where significant concentrations of oxides of nitrogen and HCl coexist.

  9. Electrochemical Instability of Phosphonate-Derivatized, Ruthenium(III) Polypyridyl Complexes on Metal Oxide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Jacob T; Hanson, Kenneth; Vannucci, Aaron K; Lapides, Alexander M; Alibabaei, Leila; Norris, Michael R; Meyer, Thomas J; Harrison, Daniel P

    2015-05-13

    The oxidative stability of the molecular components of dye-sensitized photoelectrosynthesis cells for solar water splitting remains to be explored systematically. We report here the results of an electrochemical study on the oxidative stability of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complexes surface-bound to fluorine-doped tin oxide electrodes in acidic solutions and, to a lesser extent, as a function of pH and solvent with electrochemical monitoring. Desorption occurs for the Ru(II) forms of the surface-bound complexes with oxidation to Ru(III) enhancing both desorption and decomposition. Based on the results of long-term potential hold experiments with cyclic voltammetry monitoring, electrochemical oxidation to Ru(III) results in slow decomposition of the complex by 2,2'-bipyridine ligand loss and aquation and/or anation. A similar pattern of ligand loss was also observed for a known chromophore-catalyst assembly for both electrochemical water oxidation and photoelectrochemical water splitting. Our results are significant in identifying the importance of enhancing chromophore stability, or at least transient stability, in oxidized forms in order to achieve stable performance in aqueous environments in photoelectrochemical devices. PMID:25871342

  10. Stable Ag@oxides nanoplates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Ma, Lan; Cao, Yinghui; Li, Di; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhenxin; Sun, Zaicheng

    2014-06-11

    Surface enhancement Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for detecting low-concentration analytes (chemicals and biochemicals). Herein, a high-performance SERS biosensing system has been created by using highly stable Ag@oxides nanoplates as enhancers. The Ag nanoplates were stabilized by coating a uniform ultrathin layer of oxides (SiO2 or TiO2) on the Ag surface through a simple sol-gel route. The thin oxide layer allows the plasmonic property of the original Ag nanoplates to be retained while preventing their contact with external etchants. The oxides provide an excellent platform for binding all kinds of molecules that contain a COOH group in addition to a SH group. We demonstrate that Ag@oxides have high performance with respect to the typical SERS molecule 4-ATP, which contains a typical SH group. Ag@oxides also can be directly employed for the SERS detection of amino acids. The highly stable Ag@oxides nanoplates are believed to hold great promise for fabricating a wide range of biosensors for the detection of many other biomolecules and may also find many interesting opportunities in the fields of biological labeling and imaging.

  11. The influence of fluoride on the physicochemical properties of anodic oxide films formed on titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kong, De-Sheng

    2008-05-20

    The influence of fluoride (and its concentration) on the electrochemical and semiconducting properties of anodic oxide films formed on titanium surfaces was investigated by performing electrochemical measurements (potentiodynamic/pontiostatic polarization, open circuit potential (OCP), and capacitance measurements) for a titanium/oxide film/solution interface system in fluoride-containing 1.0 M HClO(4) solution. On the basis of the Mott-Schottky analysis, and with taking into account both the surface reactions (or, say, the specifically chemical adsorption) of fluoride ions at the oxide film surface and the migration/intercalation of fluoride ions into the oxide film, the changes in the electrochemical behavior of titanium measured in this work (e.g., the blocked anodic oxygen evolution, the increased anodic steady-state current density, the positively shifted flat band potential, and the positively shifted film breakdown potential) were interpreted by the changes in the surface and the bulk physicochemical properties (e.g., the surface charges, surface state density, doping concentration, and the interfacial potential drops) of the anodic films grown on titanium. The fluoride concentrations tested in this work can be divided into three groups according to their effect on the electrochemical behavior of the oxide films: < or =0.001 M, 0.001-0.01 M, and >0.01 M. By tracing the changes of the OCP of the passivated titanium in fluoride-containing solutions, the deleterious/depassive effect of fluoride ions on the titanium oxide films was examined and evaluated with the parameter of the film breakdown time. It was also shown that the films anodically formed on titanium at higher potentials (>2.5 V) exhibited significantly higher stability against the fluoride attack than that either formed at lower potentials (<2.5 V) or formed natively in the air.

  12. Discontinuous ion tracks on silicon oxide on silicon surfaces after grazing-angle heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, A. M. J. F.; Marinoni, M.; Touboul, A. D.; Guasch, C.; Lebius, H.; Ramonda, M.; Bonnet, J.; Saigne, F.

    2007-02-12

    Thin silicon oxide layers on silicon have been characterized by atomic force microscopy before and after swift heavy ion irradiation with 0.63 MeV/u Pb ions at grazing angle of incidence. In this letter, the authors report the observation of extended intermittent tracks at the silicon oxide (SiO{sub 2}) surface. As a result, this raises the question of the discontinuous energy deposition at the nanometric scale. This experimental overlook is of major interest for nanostructuring and surface nanoprocessing as well as with regard to reliability of electronic components and systems.

  13. Iron oxidation kinetics and phosphorus immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Grift, Bas; Rozemeijer, Joachim; Griffioen, Jasper; van der Velde, Ype

    2014-05-01

    Eutrophication of freshwater environments following diffuse nutrient loads is a widely recognized water quality problem in catchments. Fluxes of non-point P sources to surface waters originate from surface runoff and flow from soil water and groundwater into surface water. The availability of P in surface waters is controlled strongly by biogeochemical nutrient cycling processes at the soil-water interface. The mechanisms and rates of the iron oxidation process with associated binding of phosphate during exfiltration of anaerobic Fe(II) bearing groundwater are among the key unknowns in P retention processes in surface waters in delta areas where the shallow groundwater is typically pH-neutral to slightly acid, anoxic, iron-rich. We developed an experimental field set-up to study the dynamics in Fe(II) oxidation and mechanisms of P immobilization at the groundwater-surface water interface in an agricultural experimental catchment of a small lowland river. We physically separated tube drain effluent from groundwater discharge before it entered a ditch in an agricultural field. The exfiltrating groundwater was captured in in-stream reservoirs constructed in the ditch. Through continuous discharge measurements and weekly water quality sampling of groundwater, tube drain water, exfiltrated groundwater, and ditch water, we quantified Fe(II) oxidation kinetics and P immobilization processes across the seasons. This study showed that seasonal changes in climatic conditions affect the Fe(II) oxidation process. In winter time the dissolved iron concentrations in the in-stream reservoirs reached the levels of the anaerobic groundwater. In summer time, the dissolved iron concentrations of the water in the reservoirs are low, indicating that dissolved Fe(II) is completely oxidized prior to inflow into the reservoirs. Higher discharges, lower temperatures and lower pH of the exfiltrated groundwater in winter compared to summer shifts the location of the redox transition zone

  14. Preparation of atomically flat rutile TiO2(001) surfaces for oxide film growth

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yang; Lee, Shinbuhm; Vilmercati, P.; Lee, Ho Nyung; Weitering, Hanno; Snijders, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low-index rutile TiO2 single crystal substrates with atomically flat surfaces is essential for enabling epitaxialgrowth of rutile transition metal oxide films. The high surface energy of the rutile (001) surface often leads to surface faceting, which precludes the sputter and annealing treatment commonly used for the preparation of clean and atomically flat TiO2(110) substrate surfaces. In this work, we reveal that stable and atomically flat rutile TiO2(001) surfaces can be prepared with an atomically ordered reconstructedsurface already during a furnace annealing treatment in air. We tentatively ascribe this result to the decrease in surface energy associated withmore » the surface reconstruction, which removes the driving force for faceting. Despite the narrow temperature window where this morphology can initially be formed, we demonstrate that it persists in homoepitaxialgrowth of TiO2(001) thin films. The stabilization of surface reconstructions that prevent faceting of high-surface-energy crystal faces may offer a promising avenue towards the realization of a wider range of high quality epitaxial transition metal oxide heterostructures.« less

  15. Surface modification of surface sol-gel derived titanium oxide films by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and non-specific protein adsorption studies.

    PubMed

    Advincula, Maria; Fan, Xiaowu; Lemons, Jack; Advincula, Rigoberto

    2005-04-25

    Biological events occurring at the implant-host interface, including protein adsorption are mainly influenced by surface properties of the implant. Titanium alloys, one of the most widely used implants, has shown good biocompatibility primarily through its surface oxide. In this study, a surface sol-gel process based on the surface reaction of metal alkoxides with a hydroxylated surface was used to prepare ultrathin titanium oxide (TiOx) coatings on silicon wafers. The oxide deposited on the surface was then modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of silanes with different functional groups. Interesting surface morphology trends and protein adhesion properties of the modified titanium oxide surfaces were observed as studied by non-specific protein binding of serum albumin. The surface properties were investigated systematically using water contact angle, ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements. Results showed that the surface sol-gel process predominantly formed homogeneous, but rough and porous titanium oxide layers. The protein adsorption was dependent primarily on the silane chemistry, packing of the alkyl chains (extent of van der Waals interaction), morphology (porosity and roughness), and wettability of the sol-gel oxide. Comparison was made with a thermally evaporated TiOx-Ti/Si-wafer substrate (control). This method further extends the functionalization of surface sol-gel derived TiOx layers for possible titanium alloy bioimplant surface modification.

  16. Superhydrophobic surfaces using selected zinc oxide microrod growth on ink-jetted patterns.

    PubMed

    Myint, Myo Tay Zar; Kitsomboonloha, Rungrot; Baruah, Sunandan; Dutta, Joydeep

    2011-02-15

    The synthesis and properties of superhydrophobic surfaces based on binary surface topography made of zinc oxide (ZnO) microrod-decorated micropatterns are reported. ZnO is intrinsically hydrophilic but can be utilized to create hydrophobic surfaces by creating artificial roughness via microstructuring. Micron scale patterns consisting of nanocrystalline ZnO seed particles were applied to glass substrates with a modified ink-jet printer. Microrods were then grown on the patterns by a hydrothermal process without any further chemical modification. Water contact angle (WCA)(1) up to 153° was achieved. Different micro array patterned surfaces with varying response of static contact angle or sessile droplet analysis are reported.

  17. Native oxides on Si surfaces of deep-submicron contact-hole bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoto, Nahomi; Nakamori, Masaharu; Yamasaki, Shinya; Hada, Hiromitsu; Ikarashi, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Koichi; Teraoka, Yuden; Nishiyama, Iwao

    1995-04-01

    The effects of cleaning and treatment on the characteristics of contact-hole-bottom Si surfaces are investigated in order to reveal the origin of the increased contact resistance and to find treatment processes that can be used to obtain low contact resistance. Contact-hole-bottom Si surfaces were analyzed by using thermal desorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Nonpatterned Si surfaces, which roughly simulate the properties of the contact-hole-bottom Si surfaces, were also analyzed by using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is revealed that suboxide-rich native oxide layers are formed on dry-etch-damaged Si surfaces. The oxide layer persists after the samples are cleaned with a mixture of NH4OH, H2O2, and H2O, and with a mixture of HCl, H2O2, and H2O, and even after dipping in diluted HF. The roughly 1.3-nm-thick oxide layer remains at the plugging-poly-Si/Si-substrate interface, increasing the contact resistance. The carbon contamination in the dry-etch-damaged layer contributes less to the increase in contact resistance. The dry-etch-damaged Si layer is removed by chemical dry etching. On the resultant damage-free surfaces, native oxides with low suboxide density appear after NH4OH/H2O2/H2O and HCl/H2O2/H2O cleaning. Such oxides are easily removed by treatment with diluted HF, resulting in low contact resistance. An integrated contact-hole treatment sequence is thus achieved to control the Si surface condition. The resultant low-contact-resistance deep-submicron contact holes, plugged with P-doped poly-Si, can be applied for deep-submicron contacts of 256 Mbit and larger dynamic random access memories.

  18. MicroRNA functionalized microporous titanium oxide surface by lyophilization with enhanced osteogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaimin; Song, Wen; Zhao, Lingzhou; Liu, Mengyuan; Yan, Jun; Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Kjems, Jørgen; Gao, Shan; Zhang, Yumei

    2013-04-10

    Developing biomedical titanium (Ti) implants with high osteogenic ability and consequent rigid osseointegration is a constant requirement from the clinic. In this study, we fabricate novel miRNA functionalized microporous Ti implants by lyophilizing miRNA lipoplexes onto a microporous titanium oxide surface formed by microarc oxidation (MAO). The microporous titanium oxide surface provides a larger surface area for miRNA loading and enables spatial retention of the miRNAs within the pores until cellular delivery. The loading of lipoplexes into the micropores on the MAO Ti surface is facilitated by the superhydrophilicity and Ti-OH groups gathering of the MAO surface after UV irradiation followed by lyophilization. A high miRNA transfection efficiency was observed in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded onto the miRNA functionalized surface with no apparent cytotoxicity. When functionalizing the Ti surface with miR-29b that enhances osteogenic activity and antimiR-138 that inhibits miR-138 inhibition of endogenous osteogenesis, clear stimulation of MSC osteogenic differentiation was observed, in terms of up-regulating osteogenic expression and enhancing alkaline phosphatase production, collagen secretion and ECM mineralization. The novel miRNA functionalized Ti implants with enhanced osteogenic activity promisingly lead to more rapid and robust osseointegration of a clinical bone implant interface. Our study implies that lyophilization may constitute a versatile method for miRNA loading to other biomaterials with the aim of controlling cellular function. PMID:23459382

  19. Morphology of cerium oxide surfaces in an oxidzing enviroment:a first-principles investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fronzi, Marco; Soon, Aloysius; Stampfl, Catherine; Delley, Bernard; Traversa, Enrico

    2007-03-01

    A good understanding of the stability and chemistry of CeO2 surfaces is crucial for a better designing of solid oxide fuel cells. As the first step, we use DFT [1] to study the structural and electronic ground state properties of bulk CeO2. various surface termination of the low-index surface of CeO2 are then investigated, namely the stoichiometric, metal- and oxygen- rich terminations, and defected surfaces. Using the concept of ab initio atomistic thermodynamics&[tilde;2], we calculate the surface free energy phase diagram. This allows us to identify and predict stable, and potentally catalytically important, structures. There is an evidence to suggest an interesting morphological change in the surface structures with varying oxygen concentration. Reaction pathways for methane oxidation on low energy cerium oxide surfaces are being investigated and will be reported.[1] Formulated in the DMol^3 code; B. Delley, J. Chem. Phys. 92, 508 (1990);ibid. 113, 7756 (2000).[2] K. Reuter, C. Stampfl and M. Scheffler, in Handbook of Materials Modeling, Volume 1, Fundamental Models and Methods, Sidney Yip (Ed)(2005).

  20. Aspects of native oxides etching on n-GaSb(1 0 0) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotirlan, C.; Ghita, R. V.; Negrila, C. C.; Logofatu, C.; Frumosu, F.; Lungu, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) is the basis of the most photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems and its innovative technological aspects based on modern ultra-high vacuum techniques are in trend for device achievement. The real surface of GaSb is modified by technological processes that can conduce to problems related to the reproducible control of its surface properties. The GaSb surface is reactive in atmosphere due to oxygen presence and exhibits a native oxide layer. The evolution of native oxides during the ion sputtering, chemical etching and thermal annealing processes for preparing the surface is presented in detailed way. Ratios of surface constituents are obtained by Angle Resolved X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (ARXPS). Moreover, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and Low-Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) are used for characterization. The surface stoichiometry is changed using a specific etchant (e.g. citric acid) at different etching time and is analyzed by ARXPS, SEM, EDS and AFM methods. The experimental results provide useful information regarding surface native oxides characteristics on n-GaSb(1 0 0) to be taken into account for development of low resistance contacts for TPV devices based on GaSb alloy.

  1. Surface effects and phase stability in metal oxides nanoparticles under visible irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ricci, Pier Carlo Carbonaro, C. M. Corpino, R. Chiriu, D. Stagi, L.

    2014-10-21

    The light induced phase transformation between stable phases of metal oxides nanoparticles is analyzed. The surrounding atmosphere as well as the defect density at the surface play a fundamental role. It has been found that in oxygen poor chamber atmosphere the phase transformation is favored, while the phase transition cannot be achieved if the defects at the surface are properly passivated. The phase transition is activated by intragap irradiation, able to activate the F- center at the surface connected to oxygen vacancies, and promoting the activation of the surface and the nucleation of neighboring crystallites. The phase transition was studied in Titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}) and in Iron oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}): Maghemite is subjected to a phase transformation to α−Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (hematite), Anatase nanoparticles converts to Rutile. The general mechanism of the phase transition and, more in general, the possibility to optically control the surface activity of metal oxides is discussed.

  2. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  3. Functionalized titanium oxide surfaces with phosphated carboxymethyl cellulose: characterization and bonelike cell behavior.

    PubMed

    Pasqui, Daniela; Rossi, Antonella; Di Cintio, Federica; Barbucci, Rolando

    2007-12-01

    The performance of dental or orthopedic implants is closely dependent on surface properties in terms of topography and chemistry. A phosphated carboxymethylcellulose containing one phosphate group for each disaccharide unit was synthesized and used to functionalize titanium oxide surfaces with the aim to improve osseointegration with the host tissue. The modified surfaces were chemically characterized by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The investigation of the surface topography was performed by atomic force microscopy measurements before and after the polysaccharide coating. In vitro biological tests using osteoblastlike cells demonstrated that functionalized TiO(2) surfaces modulated cell response, in terms of adhesion, proliferation,and morphology. Phosphated carboxymethylcellulose promoted better cell adhesion and significantly enhanced their proliferation. The morphology of cells was polygonal and more spread on this type of modified surface.These findings suggest that the presence of a phosphate polysaccharide coating promotes osteoblast growth on the surface potentially improving biomaterial osseointegration.

  4. Adsorption of nitrogen oxide molecules to the surface of nanosized nickel clusters formed on the (111) surface of a magnesium oxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remar, D. F.; Turiev, A. M.; Tsidaeva, N. I.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2010-10-01

    The properties of the systems formed on deposition of Ni atoms on the (111) surface of a MgO film of thickness equal to six monomolecular layers grown on a Mo(110) crystal face and the adsorption of NO nitrogen oxide molecules to the system surface have been studied by methods of electron spectroscopy (AES, XPES, LEED, LEIBSS) and reflective infrared absorption spectroscopy. On deposition of Ni atoms on the surface of MgO at a substrate temperature of 600 K, three-dimensional islands of Ni are formed. The subsequent adsorption of NO results in molecule dissociation even at 110 K. The efficiency of this process depends on the morphology of the Ni layer.

  5. Cobalt (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide composites: importance of surface chemical heterogeneity for reactive adsorption of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Mabayoje, Oluwaniyi; Seredych, Mykola; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2012-07-15

    Composites of cobalt (hydr)oxide and graphite oxide (GO) were obtained and evaluated as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide at ambient conditions. The surface properties of the initial and exhausted samples were studied by FTIR, TEM, SEM/EDX, XRD, adsorption of nitrogen, potentiometric titration, and thermal analysis. The results obtained show a significant improvement in their adsorption capacities compared to parent compounds. The importance of the OH groups of cobalt (hydr)oxide/GO composites and new interface chemistry for the adsorption of hydrogen sulfide on these materials is revealed. The oxygen activation by the carbonaceous component resulted in formation of sulfites. Water enhanced the removal process. This is the result of the basic environment promoting dissociation of H(2)S and acid-base reactions. Finally, the differences in the performance of the materials with different mass ratios of GO were linked to the availability of active sites on the surface of the adsorbents, dispersion of these sites, their chemical heterogeneity, and location in the pore system.

  6. Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Espinoza-Rivas, Andrés M; Pérez-Guzmán, Manuel A; Ortega-López, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Summary This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200–1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core–shell Cu–rGO or Cu2O–rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200–1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure. PMID:27547618

  7. Development of highly faceted reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles on a copper foil surface.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Amaya, Rebeca; Matsumoto, Yasuhiro; Espinoza-Rivas, Andrés M; Pérez-Guzmán, Manuel A; Ortega-López, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the formation of reduced graphene oxide-coated copper oxide and copper nanoparticles (rGO-Cu2ONPs, rGO-CuNPs) on the surface of a copper foil supporting graphene oxide (GO) at annealing temperatures of 200-1000 °C, under an Ar atmosphere. These hybrid nanostructures were developed from bare copper oxide nanoparticles which grew at an annealing temperature of 80 °C under nitrogen flux. The predominant phase as well as the particle size and shape strongly depend on the process temperature. Characterization with transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicates that Cu or Cu2O nanoparticles take rGO sheets from the rGO network to form core-shell Cu-rGO or Cu2O-rGO nanostructures. It is noted that such ones increase in size from 5 to 800 nm as the annealing temperature increases in the 200-1000 °C range. At 1000 °C, Cu nanoparticles develop a highly faceted morphology, displaying arm-like carbon nanorods that originate from different facets of the copper crystal structure. PMID:27547618

  8. Effect of annealing temperature on PL spectrum and surface morphology of zinc oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendehnam, A.; Mirzaee, M.; Miri, S.

    2013-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films were produced by thermal oxidation of Zn layers (200 nm thickness) which were coated on Si (1 0 0) substrate by DC magnetron sputtering. In order to study the effect of annealing temperature on photoluminescence (PL) properties and the surface morphology of the ZnO samples, the annealing temperature range of 500-700 °C was employed. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for investigation of surface morphology of the ZnO samples were carried out. The surface statistical characteristics of these ZnO thin films are then evaluated against data which outcome from AFM. SEM and AFM results indicated that the annealing temperature produces larger grains and rough surfaces at higher temperatures. The results of PL spectra represent an increase in interstitial zinc with increasing annealing temperature.

  9. Improved performance of protected catecholic polysiloxanes for bio-inspired wet adhesion to surface oxides

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jinhwa; Kang, Taegon; Jang, Se Gyu; Hwang, Dong Soo; Spruell, Jason M.; Killops, Kato L.; Waite, J. Herbert; Hawker, Craig J.

    2012-01-01

    A facile synthetic strategy for introducing catecholic moieties into polymeric materials based on a readily available precursor – eugenol – and efficient chemistries – tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane catalyzed silation and thiol-ene coupling is reported. Silyl-protection is shown to be critical for the oxidative stability of catecholic moieties during synthesis and processing which allows functionalized polysiloxane derivatives to be fabricated into 3-D microstructures as well as 2-D patterned surfaces. Deprotection gives stable catechol surfaces with adhesion to a variety of oxide surfaces being precisely tuned by the level of catechol incorporation. The advantage of silyl-protection for catechol functionalized polysiloxanes is demonstrated and represents a promising and versatile new platform for underwater surface treatments. PMID:23181614

  10. Functionalization of Oxide Surfaces through Reaction with 1,3-Dialkylimidazolium Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Schernich, Stefan; Laurin, Mathias; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Tsud, Nataliya; Skála, Tomáš; Prince, Kevin C; Taccardi, Nicola; Matolín, Vladimír; Wasserscheid, Peter; Libuda, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Practical applications of ionic liquids (ILs) often involve IL/oxide interfaces, but little is known regarding their interfacial chemistry. The unusual physicochemical properties of ILs, including their exceptionally low vapor pressure, provide access to such interfaces using a surface science approach in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). We have applied synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES) to the study of a thin film of the ionic liquid [C6C1Im][Tf2N] prepared in situ in UHV on ordered stoichiometric CeO2(111) and partially reduced CeO2-x. On the partially reduced surface, we mostly observe decomposition of the anion. On the stoichiometric CeO2(111) surface, however, a layer of surface-anchored organic products with high thermal stability is formed upon reaction of the cation. The suggested acid-base reaction pathway may provide well-defined functionalized IL/solid interfaces on basic oxides.

  11. Photoemission and LEED study of the Sn/Rh(111) surface--early oxidation steps and thermal stability.

    PubMed

    Hanyš, Petr; Píš, Igor; Mašek, Karel; Sutara, František; Matolín, Vladimír; Nehasil, Václav

    2012-01-11

    We have deposited two monolayers of Sn onto Rh(111) single crystal. After the deposition, no ordered structure was revealed by low energy electron diffraction (LEED). We oxidized the obtained system in a low-pressure oxygen atmosphere at 420 K. The oxidized sample was then gradually heated to study the thermal stability of the oxide layer. We characterized the system by synchrotron radiation stimulated photoelectron spectroscopy and LEED. Valence band and core level photoelectron spectra of rhodium, tin and oxygen were used to study the oxidation of the Sn-Rh(111) surface and its behaviour upon annealing. A low stoichiometric oxide of Sn was created on the surface. The oxidation process did not continue towards creation of SnO(2) with higher oxygen dose. The annealing at 970 K caused decomposition of the surface oxide of Sn and creation of an ordered (√3 × √3)R30° Sn-Rh(111) surface alloy. PMID:22095587

  12. Optical properties and Fermi-surface nesting in superconducting oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ruvalds, J.; Virosztek, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Fermi-surface nesting is found to modify the electron-electron scattering and therefore yields an unusual variation of the optical reflectivity. At long wavelengths a Drude form of the dielectric function is derived with a relaxation rate for a nested Fermi liquid (NFL) that is linear in frequency for {omega}{gt}{ital T}. The corresponding Drude mass is also frequency and temperature dependent. Remarkably good fits to the reflectivity of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}, and La{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Sr{sub {ital x}}CuO{sub 4} are achieved using an on-site Coulomb interaction of intermediate strength. The static limit for the NFL conductivity is compatible with the temperature-dependent resistivity of the high-temperature superconductors. Self-energy and vertex corrections yield a long-wavelength susceptibility that is much weaker and different in structure from the response at the nesting wave vector {bold Q}, and the distinctions are relevant to the Raman spectrum. In cases of imperfect nesting, a crossover to conventional Fermi-liquid behavior is possible at a temperature {ital T}{sup *} determined by the quasiparticle orbits. Predictions for the optical response as a function of chemical composition are discussed, with attention to the anomalous resistivity of Nd{sub 2{minus}{ital x}}Ce{sub {ital x}}CuO{sub 4}.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes. Unraveling the Relationship Between Structure, Surface Chemistry and Oxygen Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalan, Srikanth

    2013-03-31

    In this work we have considered oxygen reduction reaction on LSM and LSCF cathode materials. In particular we have used various spectroscopic techniques to explore the surface composition, transition metal oxidation state, and the bonding environment of oxygen to understand the changes that occur to the surface during the oxygen reduction process. In a parallel study we have employed patterned cathodes of both LSM and LSCF cathodes to extract transport and kinetic parameters associated with the oxygen reduction process.

  14. Surface plasmon dispersion analysis in the metal-oxide-metal tunnel diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donohue, J. F.; Wang, E. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed model of surface plasmon dispersion in the metal-oxide-metal tunnel diode is presented in order to clarify the spectral emission from this diode. The model predicts the location of the spectral peaks and the emission between the peaks by considering the effects of retardation on the surface plasmon. A nonradiative mode is found to play a major role in the transition from the visible to UV peaks in the diode spectra.

  15. Determination of photoelectrochemical water oxidation intermediates on haematite electrode surfaces using operando infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Hamann, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor electrodes capable of using solar photons to drive water-splitting reactions, such as haematite (α-Fe2O3), have been the subject of tremendous interest over recent decades. The surface has been found to play a significant role in determining the efficiency of water oxidation with haematite; however, previous works have only allowed hypotheses to be formulated regarding the identity of relevant surface species. Here we investigate the water-oxidation reaction on haematite using infrared spectroscopy under photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-oxidation conditions. A potential- and light-dependent absorption peak at 898 cm‑1 is assigned to a FeIV=O group, which is an intermediate in the PEC water-oxidation reaction. These results provide direct evidence of high-valent iron–oxo intermediates as the product of the first hole-transfer reaction on the haematite surface and represent an important step in establishing the mechanism of PEC water oxidation on semiconductor electrodes.

  16. Determination of photoelectrochemical water oxidation intermediates on haematite electrode surfaces using operando infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandi, Omid; Hamann, Thomas W.

    2016-08-01

    Semiconductor electrodes capable of using solar photons to drive water-splitting reactions, such as haematite (α-Fe2O3), have been the subject of tremendous interest over recent decades. The surface has been found to play a significant role in determining the efficiency of water oxidation with haematite; however, previous works have only allowed hypotheses to be formulated regarding the identity of relevant surface species. Here we investigate the water-oxidation reaction on haematite using infrared spectroscopy under photoelectrochemical (PEC) water-oxidation conditions. A potential- and light-dependent absorption peak at 898 cm-1 is assigned to a FeIV=O group, which is an intermediate in the PEC water-oxidation reaction. These results provide direct evidence of high-valent iron-oxo intermediates as the product of the first hole-transfer reaction on the haematite surface and represent an important step in establishing the mechanism of PEC water oxidation on semiconductor electrodes.

  17. Reduction of a thin chromium oxide film on Inconel surface upon treatment with hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran; Balat-Pichelin, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Inconel samples with a surface oxide film composed of solely chromium oxide with a thickness of approximately 700 nm were exposed to low-pressure hydrogen plasma at elevated temperatures to determine the suitable parameters for reduction of the oxide film. The hydrogen pressure during treatment was set to 60 Pa. Plasma was created by a surfaguide microwave discharge in a quartz glass tube to allow for a high dissociation fraction of hydrogen molecules. Auger electron depth profiling (AES) was used to determine the decay of the oxygen in the surface film and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to measure structural modifications. During hydrogen plasma treatment, the oxidized Inconel samples were heated to elevated temperatures. The reduction of the oxide film started at temperatures of approximately 1300 K (considering the emissivity of 0.85) and the oxide was reduced in about 10 s of treatment as revealed by AES. The XRD showed sharper substrate peaks after the reduction. Samples treated in hydrogen atmosphere under the same conditions have not been reduced up to approximately 1500 K indicating usefulness of plasma treatment.

  18. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, A. J.; Chagarov, E.; Kaufman-Osborn, T.; Kummel, A. C.; Gu, S.; Wu, J.; Asbeck, P. M.; Madisetti, S.; Oktyabrsky, S.

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001)

  19. Preparation of gallium nitride surfaces for atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A J; Chagarov, E; Gu, S; Kaufman-Osborn, T; Madisetti, S; Wu, J; Asbeck, P M; Oktyabrsky, S; Kummel, A C

    2014-09-14

    A combined wet and dry cleaning process for GaN(0001) has been investigated with XPS and DFT-MD modeling to determine the molecular-level mechanisms for cleaning and the subsequent nucleation of gate oxide atomic layer deposition (ALD). In situ XPS studies show that for the wet sulfur treatment on GaN(0001), sulfur desorbs at room temperature in vacuum prior to gate oxide deposition. Angle resolved depth profiling XPS post-ALD deposition shows that the a-Al2O3 gate oxide bonds directly to the GaN substrate leaving both the gallium surface atoms and the oxide interfacial atoms with XPS chemical shifts consistent with bulk-like charge. These results are in agreement with DFT calculations that predict the oxide/GaN(0001) interface will have bulk-like charges and a low density of band gap states. This passivation is consistent with the oxide restoring the surface gallium atoms to tetrahedral bonding by eliminating the gallium empty dangling bonds on bulk terminated GaN(0001).

  20. Surface oxidation of tin chalcogenide nanocrystals revealed by 119Sn-Mössbauer spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Kergommeaux, Antoine; Faure-Vincent, Jérôme; Pron, Adam; de Bettignies, Rémi; Malaman, Bernard; Reiss, Peter

    2012-07-18

    Narrow band gap tin(II) chalcogenide (SnS, SnSe, SnTe) nanocrystals are of high interest for optoelectronic applications such as thin film solar cells or photodetectors. However, charge transfer and charge transport processes strongly depend on nanocrystals' surface quality. Using (119)Sn-Mössbauer spectroscopy, which is the most sensitive tool for probing the Sn oxidation state, we show that SnS nanocrystals exhibit a Sn((IV))/Sn((II)) ratio of around 20:80 before and 40:60 after five minutes exposure to air. Regardless of the tin or sulfur precursors used, similar results are obtained using six different synthesis protocols. The Sn((IV)) content before air exposure arises from surface related SnS(2) and Sn(2)S(3) species as well as from surface Sn atoms bound to oleic acid ligands. The increase of the Sn((IV)) content upon air exposure results from surface oxidation. Full oxidation of the SnS nanocrystals without size change is achieved by annealing at 500 °C in air. With the goal to prevent surface oxidation, SnS nanocrystals are capped with a cadmium-phosphonate complex. A broad photoluminescence signal centered at 600 nm indicates successful capping, which however does not reduce the air sensitivity. Finally we demonstrate that SnSe nanocrystals exhibit a very similar behavior with a Sn((IV))/Sn((II)) ratio of 43:57 after air exposure. In the case of SnTe nanocrystals, the ratio of 55:45 is evidence of a more pronounced tendency for oxidation. These results demonstrate that prior to their use in optoelectronics further surface engineering of tin chalcogenide nanocrystals is required, which otherwise have to be stored and processed under inert atmosphere.

  1. Plasma surface oxidation of 316L stainless steel for improving adhesion strength of silicone rubber coating to metal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, Afrooz; Imani, Mohammad; Khorasani, Mohammad Taghi; Daliri Joupari, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Stainless steel 316L is one of the most widely used materials for fabricating of biomedical devices hence, improving its surface properties is still of great interest and challenging in biomaterial sciences. Plasma oxidation, in comparison to the conventional chemical or mechanical methods, is one of the most efficient methods recently used for surface treatment of biomaterials. Here, stainless steel specimens were surface oxidized by radio-frequency plasma irradiation operating at 34 MHz under pure oxygen atmosphere. Surface chemical composition of the samples was significantly changed after plasma oxidation by appearance of the chromium and iron oxides on the plasma-oxidized surface. A wettable surface, possessing high surface energy (83.19 mN m-1), was observed after plasma oxidation. Upon completion of the surface modification process, silicone rubber was spray coated on the plasma-treated stainless steel surface. Morphology of the silicone rubber coating was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A uniform coating was formed on the oxidized surface with no delamination at polymer-metal interface. Pull-off tests showed the lowest adhesion strength of coating to substrate (0.12 MPa) for untreated specimens and the highest (0.89 MPa) for plasma-oxidized ones.

  2. Direct evidence of active surface reconstruction during oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over VMgO catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pantazidis, A.; Mirodatos, C.; Burrows, A.; Kiely, C.J.

    1998-07-25

    This paper presents a thorough investigation of an optimized VMgO catalyst (14 wt% V) for the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane, carried out in order to elucidate the nature and behavior of the active surface. The catalyst morphology and the surface composition are studied by means of HREM, XPS, UV-vis, XRD, and in-situ electrical conductivity techniques, as a function of the gaseous environments of the catalyst. The active surface is shown to be essentially a monolayer of amorphous VO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}} units scattered over the magnesia as isolated and polymeric species. These surface vanadia units are found to stabilize an unusual polar (111) orientation of MgO up to temperatures of 800 C. A direct and outstanding evidence of a totally reversible phenomenon of order/disorder restructuration of this V overlayer is provided in conjunction with the redox state of the surface depending on the properties of the surrounding atmosphere (reductive or oxidative). These fast surface phenomena are assumed to determine the elementary steps of propane activation within the overall oxidative dehydrogenation of propane (ODHP) process.

  3. Intrinsic activity and poisoning rate for HCOOH oxidation on platinum stepped surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grozovski, Vitali; Climent, Víctor; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2010-08-21

    Pulsed voltammetry has been used to study formic acid oxidation on platinum stepped surfaces to determine the kinetics of the reaction and the role of the surface structure in the reactivity. From the current transients at different potentials, the intrinsic activity of the electrode through the active intermediate reaction path (j(theta = 0)), as well as the rate constant for the CO formation (k(ads)) have been calculated. The kinetics for formic acid oxidation through the active intermediate reaction path is strongly dependent on the surface structure of the electrode, with the highest activity found for the Pt(100) surface. The presence of steps, both on (100) and (111) terraces, does not increase the activity of these surfaces. CO formation only takes place in a narrow potential window very close to the local potential of zero total charge. The extrapolation of the results obtained with stepped surfaces with (111) terraces to zero step density indicates that CO formation should not occur on an ideal Pt(111) electrode. Additionally, the analysis of the Tafel slopes obtained for the different electrodes suggests that the oxidation of formic acid is strongly affected by the presence of adsorbed anions, hydrogen and water. PMID:20539876

  4. In situ transmission infrared spectroscopy of high-kappa oxide atomic layer deposition onto silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Ming-Tsung

    Ultra-thin aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and hafnium oxide (HfO2) layers have been grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using tri-methyl-aluminum (TMA) and tetrakis-ethyl-methyl-amino-hafnium (TEMAH) respectively with heavy water (D2O) as the oxidizing agent. Several different silicon surfaces were used as substrates such as hydrogen terminated silicon (H/Si), SC2 (or RCA 2) cleaned native silicon oxide (SiO 2/Si), and silicon (oxy)nitride. In-situ transmission Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been adopted for the study of the growth mechanisms during ALD of these films. The vibrational spectra of gas phase TEMAH and its reaction byproducts with oxidants have also been investigated. Density functional theory (DFT) normal mode calculations show a good agreement with the experimental data when it is combined with linear wave-number scaling method and Fermi resonance mechanism. Ether (-C-O-C-) and tertiary alkylamine (N(R1R 2R3)) compounds are the two most dominant products of TEMAH reacting with oxygen gas and water. When ozone is used as the oxidant, gas phase CH2O, CH3NO2, CH3-N=C=O and other compounds containing -(C=O)- and --C-O-C- (or --O-C-) segments are observed. With substrate temperatures less than 400°C and 300°C for TMA and TEMAH respectively, Al oxide and Hf oxide ALD can be appropriately performed on silicon surfaces. Thin silicon (oxy)nitride thermally grown in ammonia on silicon substrate can significantly reduce silicon oxide interlayer formation during ALD and post-deposition annealing. The crystallization temperature of amorphous ALD grown HfO2 on nitridized silicon is 600°C, which is 100°C higher than on the other silicon surfaces. When HfO2 is grown on H/Si(111) at 100°C deposition temperature, minimum 5--10 ALD cycles are required for the full surface coverage. The steric effect can be seen by the evolution of the H-Si stretching mode at 2083 cm-1. The observed red shift of H-Si stretching to ˜ 2060 cm-1 can be caused by Si

  5. Surface Mn(II) oxidation actuated by a multicopper oxidase in a soil bacterium leads to the formation of manganese oxide minerals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Zhongming; Chen, Hong; Liu, Jin; Liu, Chang; Ni, Hong; Zhao, Changsong; Ali, Muhammad; Liu, Fan; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, we report that a bacterial multicopper oxidase (MCO266) catalyzes Mn(II) oxidation on the cell surface, resulting in the surface deposition of Mn(III) and Mn(IV) oxides and the gradual formation of bulky oxide aggregates. These aggregates serve as nucleation centers for the formation of Mn oxide micronodules and Mn-rich sediments. A soil-borne Escherichia coli with high Mn(II)-oxidizing activity formed Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxide deposit layers and aggregates under laboratory culture conditions. We engineered MCO266 onto the cell surfaces of both an activity-negative recipient and wild-type strains. The results confirmed that MCO266 governs Mn(II) oxidation and initiates the formation of deposits and aggregates. By contrast, a cell-free substrate, heat-killed strains, and intracellularly expressed or purified MCO266 failed to catalyze Mn(II) oxidation. However, purified MCO266 exhibited Mn(II)-oxidizing activity when combined with cell outer membrane component (COMC) fractions in vitro. We demonstrated that Mn(II) oxidation and aggregate formation occurred through an oxygen-dependent biotic transformation process that requires a certain minimum Mn(II) concentration. We propose an approximate electron transfer pathway in which MCO266 transfers only one electron to convert Mn(II) to Mn(III) and then cooperates with other COMC electron transporters to transfer the other electron required to oxidize Mn(III) to Mn(IV). PMID:26039669

  6. Effect of Reacting Surface Density on the Overall Graphite Oxidation Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung Kim; Jong Lim; Richard Schultz; David Petti

    2009-05-01

    Graphite oxidation in an air-ingress accident is presently a very important issue for the reactor safety of the very high temperature gas cooled-reactor (VHTR), the concept of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) because of its potential problems such as mechanical degradation of the supporting graphite in the lower plenum of the VHTR might lead to core collapse if the countermeasure is taken carefully. The oxidation process of graphite has known to be affected by various factors, including temperature, pressure, oxygen concentration, types of graphite, graphite shape and size, flow distribution, etc. However, our recent study reveals that the internal pore characteristics play very important roles in the overall graphite oxidation rate. One of the main issues regarding graphite oxidation is the potential core collapse problem that may occur following the degradation of graphite mechanical strength. In analyzing this phenomenon, it is very important to understand the relationship between the degree of oxidization and strength degradation. In addition, the change of oxidation rate by graphite oxidation degree characterization by burn-off (ratio of the oxidized graphite density to the original density) should be quantified because graphite strength degradation is followed by graphite density decrease, which highly affects oxidation rates and patterns. Because the density change is proportional to the internal pore surface area, they should be quantified in advance. In order to understand the above issues, the following experiments were performed: (1)Experiment on the fracture of the oxidized graphite and validation of the previous correlations, (2) Experiment on the change of oxidation rate using graphite density and data collection, (3) Measure the BET surface area of the graphite. The experiments were performed using H451 (Great Lakes Carbon Corporation) and IG-110 (Toyo Tanso Co., Ltd) graphite. The reason for the use of those graphite materials is because

  7. Thermodynamic Versus Surface Area Control of Microbial Fe(III) Oxide Reduction Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roden, E. E.

    2003-12-01

    Recent experimental studies of synthetic and natural Fe(III) oxide reduction permit development of conceptual and quantitative models of enzymatic Fe(III) oxide reduction at circumneutral pH that can be compared to and contrasted with established models of abiotic mineral dissolution. The findings collectively support a model for controls on enzymatic reduction that differs fundamentally from those applied to abiotic reductive dissolution as a result of two basic phenomena: (1) the relatively minor influence of oxide mineralogical and thermodynamic properties on surface area-normalized rates of enzymatic reduction compared to abiotic reductive dissolution; and (2) the major limitation which sorption and/or surface precipitation of biogenic Fe(II) on residual oxide and Fe(III)-reducing bacterial cell surfaces poses to enzymatic electron transfer in the presence of excess electron donor. Parallel studies with two major Fe(III)-reducing bacteria genera (Shewanella and Geobacter) lead to common conclusions regarding the importance of these phenomena in regulating the rate and long-term extent of Fe(III) oxide reduction. Although the extent to which these phenomena can be traced to underlying kinetic vs. thermodynamic effects cannot be resolved with current information, models in which rates of enzymatic reduction are limited kinetically by the abundance of "available" oxide surface sites (as controlled by oxide surface area and the abundance of surface-bound Fe(II)) provide an adequate macroscopic description of controls on the initial rate and long-term extent of oxide reduction. In some instances, thermodynamic limitation posed by the accumulation of aqueous reaction end-products (i.e. Fe(II) and alkalinity) must also be invoked to explain observed long-term patterns of reduction. In addition, the abundance of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms plays an important role in governing rates of reduction and needs to be considered in models of Fe(III) reduction in nonsteady

  8. Preparation of Thin Melanin-Type Films by Surface-Controlled Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Salomäki, Mikko; Tupala, Matti; Parviainen, Timo; Leiro, Jarkko; Karonen, Maarit; Lukkari, Jukka

    2016-04-26

    The preparation of thin melanin films suitable for applications is challenging. In this work, we present a new alternative approach to thin melanin-type films using oxidative multilayers prepared by the sequential layer-by-layer deposition of cerium(IV) and inorganic polyphosphate. The interfacial reaction between cerium(IV) in the multilayer and 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) in the adjacent aqueous solution leads to the formation of a thin uniform film. The oxidation of DHI by cerium(IV) proceeds via known melanin intermediates. We have characterized the formed DHI-melanin films using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-vis spectroscopy, and spectroelectrochemistry. When a five-bilayer oxidative multilayer is used, the film is uniform with a thickness of ca. 10 nm. Its chemical composition, as determined using XPS, is typical for melanin. It is also redox active, and its oxidation occurs in two steps, which can be assigned to semiquinone and quinone formation within the indole structural motif. Oxidative multilayers can also oxidize dopamine, but the reaction stops at the dopamine quinone stage because of the limited amount of the multilayer-based oxidizing agent. However, dopamine oxidation by Ce(IV) was studied also in solution by UV-vis spectroscopy and mass spectrometry in order to verify the reaction mechanism and the final product. In solution, the oxidation of dopamine by cerium shows that the indole ring formation takes place already at low pH and that the mass spectrum of the final product is practically identical with that of commercial melanin. Therefore, layer-by-layer formed oxidative multilayers can be used to deposit functional melanin-type thin films on arbitrary substrates by a surface-controlled reaction.

  9. The Surface Science of Catalysis and More, Using Ultrathin Oxide Films as Templates: A Perspective.

    PubMed

    Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-07-27

    Surface science has had a major influence on the understanding of processes at surfaces relevant to catalysis. Real catalysts are complex materials, and in order to approach an understanding at the atomic level, it is necessary in a first step to drastically reduce complexity and then systematically increase it again in order to capture the various structural and electronic factors important for the function of the real catalytic material. The use of thin oxide films as templates to mimic three-dimensional supports as such or for metal particles as well as to model charge barriers turns out to be appropriate to approach an understanding of metal-support interactions. Thin oxide films also exhibit properties in their own right that turn out to be relevant in catalysis. Thin oxide film formation may also be used to create unique two-dimensional materials. The present perspective introduces the subject using case studies and indicates possible routes to further apply this approach successfully.

  10. A charge transport study in diamond, surface passivated by high-k dielectric oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kovi, Kiran Kumar Majdi, Saman; Gabrysch, Markus; Isberg, Jan

    2014-11-17

    The recent progress in the growth of high-quality single-crystalline diamond films has sparked interest in the realization of efficient diamond power electronic devices. However, finding a suitable passivation is essential to improve the reliability and electrical performance of devices. In the current work, high-k dielectric materials such as aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide were deposited by atomic layer deposition on intrinsic diamond as a surface passivation layer. The hole transport properties in the diamond films were evaluated and compared to unpassivated films using the lateral time-of-flight technique. An enhancement of the near surface hole mobility in diamond films of up to 27% is observed when using aluminum oxide passivation.

  11. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL(-1), which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor. PMID:26944998

  12. Gold nanostar-enhanced surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Sun, Ying; Ma, Pinyi; Zhang, Di; Li, Shuo; Wang, Xinghua; Song, Daqian

    2016-03-24

    A new high-sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor based on biofunctional gold nanostars (AuNSs) and carboxyl-functionalized graphene oxide (cGO) sheets was described. Compared with spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), the anisotropic structure of AuNSs, which concentrates the electric charge density on its sharp tips, could enhance the local electromagnetic field and the electronic coupling effect significantly. cGO was obtained by a diazonium reaction of graphene oxide (GO) with 4-aminobenzoic acid. Compared with GO, cGO could immobilize more antibodies due to the abundant carboxylic groups on its surface. Testing results show that there are fairly large improvements in the analytical performance of the SPR biosensor using cGO/AuNSs-antigen conjugate, and the detection limit of the proposed biosensor is 0.0375 μg mL(-1), which is 32 times lower than that of graphene oxide-based biosensor.

  13. Ethanol oxidation on Pt single-crystal electrodes: surface-structure effects in alkaline medium.

    PubMed

    Busó-Rogero, Carlos; Herrero, Enrique; Feliu, Juan M

    2014-07-21

    Ethanol oxidation in 0.1 M NaOH on single-crystal electrodes has been studied using electrochemical and FTIR techniques. The results show that the activity order is the opposite of that found in acidic solutions. The Pt(111) electrode displays the highest currents and also the highest onset potential of all the electrodes. The onset potential for the oxidation of ethanol is linked to the adsorption of OH on the electrode surface. However, small (or even negligible) amounts of CO(ads) and carbonate are detected by FTIR, which implies that cleavage of the C-C bond is not favored in this medium. The activity of the electrodes diminishes quickly upon cycling. The diminution of the activity is proportional to the measured currents and is linked to the formation and polymerization of acetaldehyde, which adsorbs onto the electrode surface and prevents further oxidation. PMID:24782218

  14. Epinephrine electro-oxidation highlights fast electrochemistry at the graphite basal surface.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anisha N; Tan, Sze-yin; Unwin, Patrick R

    2013-10-01

    Macroscale and nanoscale measurements of epinephrine electro-oxidation at graphite electrodes, with different step edge densities, demonstrate unequivocally that the reaction occurs readily at the basal surface, and that step edges are not required for molecular electrocatalysis, in contrast to the current literature model.

  15. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1990-05-22

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed. 2 figs.

  16. Oxidation of carbon fiber surfaces for use as reinforcement in high-temperature cementitious material systems

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1990-01-01

    The interfacial bond characteristics between carbon fiber and a cement matrix, in high temperature fiber-reinforced cementitious composite systems, can be improved by the oxidative treatment of the fiber surfaces. Compositions and the process for producing the compositions are disclosed.

  17. Effects of oxide charge and surface recombination velocity on the excess base current of BJTs

    SciTech Connect

    Kosier, S.L.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Wei, A.; DeLaus, M.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Combs, W.E.

    1993-12-01

    The role of net positive oxide trapped charge and surface recombination velocity on excess base current in BJTs is identified. The effects of the two types of damage can be detected by plotting the excess base current versus base-emitter voltage. Differences and similarities between ionizing-radiation-induced and hot electron-induced degradation are discussed.

  18. Role of surface chemistry in modified ACF (activated carbon fiber)-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shiying; Li, Lei; Xiao, Tuo; Zheng, Di; Zhang, Yitao

    2016-10-01

    A commercial activated carbon fiber (ACF-0) was modified by three different methods: nitration treatment (ACF-N), heat treatment (ACF-H) and heat treatment after nitration (ACF-NH), and the effects of textural and chemical properties on the ability of the metal-free ACF-catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5), an azo dye being difficultly adsorbed onto ACF, in aqueous solution were investigated in this work. Surface density of functional groups, surface area changes, surface morphology and the chemical state inside ACF samples were characterized by Boehm titration, N2 adsorption, scanning electron microscopy in couple with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. XPS spectra deconvolution was applied to figure out the importance of surface nitrogen-containing function groups. We found that π-π, pyridine and amine have promoting effect on the catalytic oxidation while the -NO2 has inhibitory effect on the ACF/PMS systems for RB5 destroy. Sustainability and renewability of the typical ACF-NH for catalytic oxidation of RB5 were also discussed in detail. Information about our conclusions are useful to control and improve the performance of ACF-catalyzed PMS oxidation for organic pollutants in wastewater treatment.

  19. Oxidation of the Ru(0001) surface covered by weakly bound, ultrathin silicate films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmez, Emre; Anibal Boscoboinik, J.; Tenney, Samuel; Sutter, Peter; Shaikhutdinov, Shamil; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Bilayer silicate films grown on metal substrates are weakly bound to the metal surfaces, which allows ambient gas molecules to intercalate the oxide/metal interface. In this work, we studied the interaction of oxygen with Ru(0001) supported ultrathin silicate and aluminosilicate films at elevated O2 pressures (10- 5-10 mbar) and temperatures (450-923 K). The results show that the silicate films stay essentially intact under these conditions, and oxygen in the film does not exchange with oxygen in the ambient. O2 molecules readily penetrate the film and dissociate on the underlying Ru surface underneath. The silicate layer does however strongly passivate the Ru surface towards RuO2(110) oxide formation that readily occurs on bare Ru(0001) under the same conditions. The results indicate considerable spatial effects for oxidation reactions on metal surfaces in the confined space at the interface. Moreover, the aluminosilicate films completely suppress the Ru oxidation, providing some rationale for using crystalline aluminosilicates in anti-corrosion coatings.

  20. Chemical changes in secondary electron emission during oxidation of nickel /100/ and /111/ crystal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, P. H.; Hudson, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Changes in the secondary electron spectra (which include chemical shifts of Auger transitions) between 0-70 eV during the oxidation of both (100) and (111) nickel surfaces are reported. The reaction sequence between oxygen and nickel is also briefly described. Emission rate changes are correlated with changes in the work function of the solid.

  1. Effects of Oxide Surface on the Detonation Initiation of Energetic Materials from First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fenggong; Tsyshevsky, Roman; Kuklja, Maija; UMD Team

    Organic-inorganic interface provides both intrigues and opportunities for designing systems possessing properties and functionalities inaccessible by individual component. The electronic, catalytic, and defect properties of inorganic surfaces can affect the adsorption, chemical reaction, and photo-responsive properties of organic molecules. In particular, the presence of a particular oxide additive prompts the energy absorption for detonation initiation. Here, we choose the highly catalytic oxide TiO2 and explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT) as prototypical examples to explore the role of oxide surface on the detonation initiation of explosives from first principles. We show that the TNT-TiO2 (110) interface induces optical transitions between TiO2 and TNT, shifting the light absorption edge to lower energy. This helps to control the detonation initiation by laser light with a modest optical energy. In addition, the presence of surface oxygen vacancies leads to electron transfer from surface to molecule, facilitating the decomposition of TNT. Our results not only provide guidelines for designing a controllable oxide-explosive formulation that can be initiated by available lasers, but also help to understand interfaces with target properties and functionalities.

  2. Comparative study of metal adsorption on the metal and the oxide surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Vladimirov, G. G.; Remar, D.; Moutinho, A. M. C.

    2002-05-01

    Adsorption of Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Cu atoms at coverage not exceeding two monolayers on the surface of ultrathin (10-15 Å) alumina and magnesia films (γ-Al 2O 3(111) or α-Al 2O 3(1000) and MgO(111) grown on Mo(110) were studied in ultrahigh vacuum by means of electron spectroscopy techniques (Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), work function measurements and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS)). At very low metal coverage and low substrate temperature (85 K) when the film can be viewed as consisting of separate adatoms and/or very small clusters the electronic properties of adatoms on the oxide films, on one hand, and on Mo(110) surface, on the other hand, are quite different. With increasing metal coverage, the properties on both the oxide and the metallic substrates change becoming similar at the coverage close to monolayer. On the Mo(110) surface the electronic properties change gradually with the metal coverage, whereas on the oxide there is a critical coverage of about 0.15 ML separating ionic and metallic adsorption of the metal species. It is shown that the lateral interaction of adatoms on the oxide surface plays a dominant role in the formation of the band-like structure of the adsorbed 2D film.

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine and its derivatives on the surface of metal electrodes in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asazawa, Koichiro; Yamada, Koji; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Taniguchi, Masatoshi; Oguro, Keisuke

    Electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine and its derivatives on the surface of various metal electrodes in alkaline media was investigated. A comparison of various polycrystalline metal electrodes (Ni, Co, Fe, Cu, Ag, Au, and Pt) showed that Co and Ni electrodes have a lower onset potential for hydrazine oxidation than the Pt electrode. The onset oxidation potential of APA (aminopolyacrylamide), a hydrazine derivative (-0.127 V vs. reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE), was similar to that of hydrazine hydrate (-0.178 V vs. RHE) in the case of the Co electrode. APA oxidation was possible because of hydrazine desorption that was caused by APA hydrolysis. The hydrolysis reaction was brought about by a heat treatment. This result suggests that the hydrazine hydrolysis reaction of hydrazine derivatives makes it possible to store hydrazine hydrate safely.

  4. A new strategy to grow polymer brush on graphene oxide surface through microwave assisted polymer synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Su; Ramaraj, B.; Yoon, Kuk Ro

    2012-09-01

    Herein, we report a method for growing polymers directly from the surface of graphene oxide (GPO). In this method, surface-initiated, microwave irradiation supported polymerization of benzyl chloride carrying vinylates was carried out from the surface of graphene oxide (GPO) for tailoring surface properties of GPO. This synthetic method consists of two important steps: first, the graphene was converted into GPO, then vinylbenzyl chloride (VBC) was polymerized on the surface of GPO by microwave induced irradiation polymerization. The structure and properties of the resultant polymeric conjugates were characterized by a range of characterization techniques viz.: Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The FT-IR analysis of polymeric conjugates shows infrared (IR) peaks characteristic of VBC on the surface of GPO. TGA reveals enhanced thermal stability for GPO surface polymerized with VBC. EDX and XPS analysis shows signal corresponding to the chloride with reduction in oxygen percentage and increase in carbon percentage. SEM and TEM images visually show the presence of PVBC polymer layer on GPO surface.

  5. Controllable deposition of platinum layers on oxide surfaces for the synthesis of fuel cell catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Meng, Hui; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2016-09-13

    Reducing the amount of Pt, the most costly component of both anode and cathode fuel cell catalysts, has attracted considerable attention from the research community. An approach is reported herein to deposit sub-monolayer to multilayer amounts of Pt and other noble metals on metal oxides and oxidized carbon materials. The process is exemplified by Pt deposition on RuO2(110). The Pt deposit consists of Pt atoms arranged in a c(2×2) array, that is, a 0.25 monolayer (ML). The deposit has lower catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and similar activity for the hydrogen oxidation reaction compared to Pt(111). Thesemore » activities are explained by a large calculated upshift of the d-band center of Pt atoms and larger Pt–Pt interatomic distances than those of Pt(111). A catalyst with Pt coverage larger than 0.25 ML on oxide surfaces and oxidized carbon materials is shown to be active for the ORR as well as for other electrocatalytic reactions. A PtRhSnO2/C catalyst shows high activity for ethanol oxidation as a result of its ability to effectively cleave the C–C bond in ethanol. Furthermore, Pt deposited on reduced graphene oxide shows high Pt mass ORR activity and good stability.« less

  6. Oxidation and metal-insertion in molybdenite surfaces: evaluation of charge-transfer mechanisms and dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ramana, CV; Becker, U; Shutthanandan, V; Julien, CM

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a layered transition-metal dichalcogenide, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and geotechnical engineering. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. In addition, understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and metal-insertion will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions onto geomedia. The present work was performed to understand thermal oxidation and metal-insertion processes of molybdenite surfaces. The analysis was performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Structural studies using SEM and TEM indicate the local-disordering of the structure as a result of charge-transfer process between the inserted lithium and the molybdenite layer. Selected area electron diffraction measurements indicate the large variations in the diffusivity of lithium confirming that the charge-transfer is different along and perpendicular to the layers in molybdenite. Thermal heating of molybenite surface in air at 400°C induces surface oxidation, which is slow during the first hour of heating and then increases significantly. The SEM results indicate that the crystals formed on the molybdenite surface as a result of thermal oxidation exhibit regular thin-elongated shape. The average size and density of the crystals on the surface is dependent on the time of annealing; smaller size and high density during the first one-hour and significant increase in

  7. Effect of surface roughness on leakage current and corrosion resistance of oxide layer on AZ91 Mg alloy prepared by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Bongyoung; Shin, Ki Ryoung; Hwang, Duck Young; Lee, Dong Heon; Shin, Dong Hyuk

    2010-09-01

    The influence of the surface roughness of Mg alloys on the electrical properties and corrosion resistance of oxide layers obtained by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) were studied. The leakage current in the insulating oxide layer was enhanced by increasing the surface roughness, which is a favorable characteristic for the material when applied to hand-held electronic devices. The variation of corrosion resistance with surface roughness was also investigated. The corrosion resistance was degraded by the increasing surface roughness, which was confirmed with DC polarization and impedance spectroscopy. Pitting corrosion on the passive oxide layer was also analyzed with a salt spray test, which showed that the number of pits was not affected by the surface roughness when the spray time reached 96 h.

  8. Characterization study of polycrystalline tin oxide surfaces before and after reduction in CO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drawdy, Jean E.; Hoflund, Gar B.; Davidson, Mark R.; Schryer, David R.

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline tin oxide surfaces have been examined before and after reduction in 40 Torr of CO at 100 and 175 C using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA), ion scattering spectroscopy (ISS) and electron stimulated desorption (ESD). The changes in the surface composition and chemical states of the surface species generally are subtle for the reductive conditions used. However, significant changes do occur with regard to the amounts and the chemical forms of the hydrogen-containing species remaining after both the 100 and 175 C reductions.

  9. Natural and pyrogenic humic acids at goethite and natural oxide surfaces interacting with phosphate.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Mia, Shamim; Duhaut, Pierre-Benoît; Molleman, Bastiaan

    2013-08-20

    Fulvic and humic acids have a large variability in binding to metal (hydr) oxide surfaces and interact differently with oxyanions, as examined here experimentally. Pyrogenic humic acid has been included in our study since it will be released to the environment in the case of large-scale application of biochar, potentially creating Darks Earths or Terra Preta soils. A surface complexation approach has been developed that aims to describe the competitive behavior of natural organic matter (NOM) in soil as well as model systems. Modeling points unexpectedly to a strong change of the molecular conformation of humic acid (HA) with a predominant adsorption in the Stern layer domain at low NOM loading. In soil, mineral oxide surfaces remain efficiently loaded by mineral-protected organic carbon (OC), equivalent with a layer thickness of ≥ ~0.5 nm that represents at least 0.1-1.0% OC, while surface-associated OC may be even three times higher. In natural systems, surface complexation modeling should account for this pervasive NOM coverage. With our charge distribution model for NOM (NOM-CD), the pH-dependent oxyanion competition of the organo-mineral oxide fraction can be described. For pyrogenic HA, a more than 10-fold increase in dissolved phosphate is predicted at long-term applications of biochar or black carbon. PMID:23875678

  10. Sputtered cadmium oxide as a surface pretreatment for graphite solid-lubricant films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Sputtered films of cadmium oxide were applied to sand blasted AISI 440C HT stainless steel disks as a surface pretreatment for the application of rubbed graphite films. Mixtures of cadmium oxide and graphite were applied to the nonpretreated sandblasted metal and evaluated. The results were compared to graphite films applied to other commercially available surface pretreatments. It is found that sputtered CdO pretreated surfaces increase the endurance lives of the graphite films and decrease the counterface steady state wear rate of the pins almost an order of magnitude compared to commercially available pretreatments. The CdO additions in general improved the tribological properties of graphite. The greatest benefit occurred when it was applied to the substrate rather than mixing it with the graphite and that sputtered films of CdO perform much better than rubbed CdO films.

  11. Sputtered cadmium oxide as a surface pretreatment for graphite solid lubricant films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtered films of cadmium oxide were applied to sand blasted AISI 440C HT stainless steel disks as a surface pretreatment for the application of rubbed graphite films. Mixtures of cadmium oxide and graphite were applied to the nonpretreated sandblasted metal and evaluated. The results were compared to graphite films applied to other commercially available surface pretreatments. It is found that sputtered CdO pretreated surfaces increase the endurance lives of the graphite films and decrease the counterface steady state wear rate of the pins almost an order of magnitude compared to commercially available pretreatments. The CdO additions in general improved the tribological properties of graphite. The greatest benefit occurred when it was applied to the substrate rather than mixing it with the graphite and that sputtered films of CdO perform much better than rubbed CdO films.

  12. Adsorption of V on a Hematite (0001) Surface and its Oxidation: Monolayer Coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, J.; Ma, X.; Kim, C.-Y.; Ellis, D.E.; Bedzyk, M.J.

    2008-10-06

    The adsorption of a monolayer of V on idealized Fe- and oxygen-terminated hematite (0 0 0 1) surfaces and subsequent oxidation under atomic O adsorption are studied by density functional theory. Theoretical results are compared with X-ray surface standing wave and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements, and interpreted in the light of data on sub-monolayer coverages. Near-surface Fe reduction under V adsorption and accompanying structural relaxation are examined. These effects and subsequent response to oxidation, are found to be highly site specific. A full monolayer of oxygen leads to a V{sup 5+} state and reoxidation of subsurface Fe to the trivalent state, seen in both theory and experiment.

  13. Effect of irradiation by argon ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer of zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evsin, A. E.; Begrambekov, L. B.; Gumarov, A. I.; Kashapov, N. F.; Luchkin, A. G.; Vakhitov, I. R.; Yanilkin, I. V.; Tagirov, L. R.

    2016-09-01

    Effect of zirconium irradiation by 1 keV Ar+ ions on hydrogen transport through the surface oxide layer is studied. It is shown that deuterium trapping under subsequent irradiation of the Ar-treated sample by deuterium atoms of thermal energies in D2 + 30at.% O2 gas mixture is 2 times less than trapping in the untreated sample. Besides, irradiation of the untreated sample by D-atoms provokes desorption of ≈25% of hydrogen contained therein, whereas hydrogen desorption from the ion-treated zirconium surface does not occur. It is proposed that oxygen depletion of the surface oxide layer, caused by ion bombardment, is a reason of mitigation of the hydrogen transport through this layer in both directions.

  14. Laboratory evaluation of wipe testing based on lead oxide surface contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Chavalitnitikul, C.; Levin, L.

    1984-05-01

    Although wipe testing has been used extensively as a measure of surface contamination in industrial hygiene, few scientific studies have been reported to validate the procedure with respect to quantitative recovery, repeatability or methodology. Consequently, a laboratory evaluation of wipe testing with particular attention to the OSHA procedure was undertaken using lead oxide dust as the test contaminant. A dust dispersion system was devised using a Wright dust feeder to produce relatively uniform surface concentrations in an aerosol chamber. Wipe materials included moistened filter paper, commercial paper towels, adhesive paper labels and adhesive tape. The quantitative recovery and repeatability of the wipe procedures were related to surface concentrations and the operational and material variables. Significant improvements in recoveries of up to 90% can be obtained with good repeatability for removable lead oxide dust on non-porous surfaces using moist paper on a fixed test surface area. For porous surfaces, which show significantly lower recovery by all methods, adhesive sampling materials applied at maximum pressure provided an optimum recovery of 77%. The importance of reliable surface contamination measurements in assessing potential health hazards underscores the desirability of improving the demonstrated deficiencies of the OSHA and other wipe sampling procedures.

  15. Reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide on the Al-Mo(110) surface alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorkina, G. S.; Tvauri, I. V.; Kaloeva, A. G.; Burdzieva, O. G.; Sekiba, D.; Ogura, S.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    Coadsorption and reaction of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) on Al-Mo(110) surface alloy have been studied by means of Auger electron, reflection-absorption infrared and temperature programmed desorption spectroscopies (AES, RAIRS, TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and work function measurements. The Al-Mo(110) surface alloy was obtained by thermal annealing at 800 K of aluminum film deposited on Mo(110) held at room temperature. Upon annealing Al penetrates the surface, most likely forming stoichiometric hexagonal surface monolayer of the compound Al2Mo. The NO and CO adsorb molecularly on this alloy surface at 200 K, unlike totally dissociative adsorption on bare Mo(110) and Al(111) film. Adsorption of CO on NO precovered Al-Mo(110) substrate dramatically affects the state of NO molecules, most probably displacing them to higher-coordinated sites with their simultaneous tilting to the surface plane. Heating to about room temperature (320 K) causes reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide, yielding CO2, and substrate nitridation. This behavior can be associated with the surface reconstruction providing additional Al/Mo interface reaction sites and change of the d-band upon alloying.

  16. Oxidation of elemental mercury by chlorine: Gas phase, Surface,and Photo-induced reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Nai-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Heng; Chang, Shih-Ger

    2004-10-22

    Accurate oxidation rate constants of mercury gas are needed for determining its dispersion and lifetime in the atmosphere. They would also help in developing a technology for the control of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. However, it is difficult to establish the accurate rate constants primarily due to the fact that mercury easily adsorbs on solid surface and its reactions can be catalyzed by the surface. We have demonstrated a procedure that allows the determination of gas phase, surface-induced, and photo-induced contributions in the kinetic study of the oxidation of mercury by chlorine gas. The kinetics was studied using reactors with various surface to volume ratios. The effect of the surface and the photo irradiation on the reaction was taken into consideration. The pressure dependent study revealed that the gas phase oxidation was a three-body collision process. The third order rate constant was determined to be 7.5({+-}0.2) x 10{sup -39} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -2}s{sup -1} with N{sub 2} as the third body at 297 {+-} 1 K. The surface induced reaction on quartz window was second order and the rate constant was 2.7 x 10{sup -17} mL{sup 2} molecules{sup -1} cm{sup -2} sec. Meanwhile, the 253.7 nm photon employed for mercury detection was found to accelerate the reaction. The utilization efficiency of 253.7 nm photon for Hg{sup 0} oxidation was 6.7 x 10{sup -4} molecules photon{sup -1} under the conditions employed in this study.

  17. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry.

    PubMed

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-04-21

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications.

  18. Role of an Oxidant Mixture as Surface Modifier of Porous Silicon Microstructures Evaluated by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    PubMed Central

    Montiel-González, Zeuz; Escobar, Salvador; Nava, Rocío; del Río, J. Antonio; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Current research on porous silicon includes the construction of complex structures with luminescent and/or photonic properties. However, their preparation with both characteristics is still challenging. Recently, our group reported a possible method to achieve that by adding an oxidant mixture to the electrolyte used to produce porous silicon. This mixture can chemically modify their microstructure by changing the thickness and surface passivation of the pore walls. In this work, we prepared a series of samples (with and without oxidant mixture) and we evaluated the structural differences through their scanning electron micrographs and their optical properties determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The results showed that ellipsometry is sensitive to slight variations in the porous silicon structure, caused by changes in their preparation. The fitting process, based on models constructed from the features observed in the micrographs, allowed us to see that the mayor effect of the oxidant mixture is on samples of high porosity, where the surface oxidation strongly contributes to the skeleton thinning during the electrochemical etching. This suggests the existence of a porosity threshold for the action of the oxidant mixture. These results could have a significant impact on the design of complex porous silicon structures for different optoelectronic applications. PMID:27097767

  19. Influence of substrate preparation on the shaping of the topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bara, Marek; Kubica, Marek

    2014-02-01

    The paper discusses the shaping mechanism and changes occurring in the structure and topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers during their formation. The paper presents the influence of substrate preparation on the surface topography of oxide layers. The layers were produced via hard anodizing on the EN AW-5251 aluminum alloy. The layers obtained were subjected to microscope examinations, image and chemical composition analyses, and stereometric examinations. Heredity of substrate properties in the topography of the surface of nanoceramic oxide layers formed as a result of electrochemical oxidation has been shown.

  20. [Distribution and Diversity of Ammonium-oxidizing Archaea and Ammonium-oxidizing Bacteria in Surface Sediments of Oujiang River].

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Huang, Fu-yi; Su, Jian-qiang; Hong, You-wei; Yu, Shen

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play important roles in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Rivers are important ecosystems containing a large number of functional microbes in nitrogen cycle. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE ) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) technology were used to analyze the distribution and diversity of AOA and AOB in sediments from Oujiang. The results showed that the AOA community structure was similar among various sites, while the AOB community structure was significantly different, in which all detected AOB sequences were classified into Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas, and 90% affiliated to Nitrosospira. The community composition of AOA was influenced by NH₄⁺ and TS, in addition, the AOB composition was affected by NH₄⁺, EC, pH, NO₃⁻, TC and TN. Total sulfur (TS) and electrical conductivity (EC) were the major factors influencing the diversity of AOA and AOB, respectively. AOA abundance was significantly higher than that of AOB. EC, NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N were the main environmental factors affecting the abundance of AOA and AOB. This study indicated that the community composition and diversity of AOA and AOB were significantly influenced by environmental factors, and AOA might be dominant drivers in the ammonia oxidation process in Oujiang surface sediment. PMID:27012006

  1. [Distribution and Diversity of Ammonium-oxidizing Archaea and Ammonium-oxidizing Bacteria in Surface Sediments of Oujiang River].

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Huang, Fu-yi; Su, Jian-qiang; Hong, You-wei; Yu, Shen

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) play important roles in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle. Rivers are important ecosystems containing a large number of functional microbes in nitrogen cycle. In this study, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE ) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) technology were used to analyze the distribution and diversity of AOA and AOB in sediments from Oujiang. The results showed that the AOA community structure was similar among various sites, while the AOB community structure was significantly different, in which all detected AOB sequences were classified into Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas, and 90% affiliated to Nitrosospira. The community composition of AOA was influenced by NH₄⁺ and TS, in addition, the AOB composition was affected by NH₄⁺, EC, pH, NO₃⁻, TC and TN. Total sulfur (TS) and electrical conductivity (EC) were the major factors influencing the diversity of AOA and AOB, respectively. AOA abundance was significantly higher than that of AOB. EC, NH₄⁺-N and NO₃⁻-N were the main environmental factors affecting the abundance of AOA and AOB. This study indicated that the community composition and diversity of AOA and AOB were significantly influenced by environmental factors, and AOA might be dominant drivers in the ammonia oxidation process in Oujiang surface sediment.

  2. Early stages of the oxidation of metal surfaces. [photoelectron spectroscopy of zinc oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatos, H. C.; Johnson, K. H.

    1978-01-01

    Photoemission cross sections were calculated for the ZnO4(-6) cluster using the self consistent-chi alpha- scattered wave theory to display the main features of the ultraviolet and X-ray photoemission data from ZnO. A solid model is suggested for an absolute photoemission intensity comparison resulting in chi alpha intensities which are roughly 70% of the experimental values. Together with the experimental data, the calculations allow a complete determination of the electronic structure of a ZnO surface.

  3. Propene oxidation over Cu[sub 2]O single-crystal surfaces: A surface science study of propene activation at 1 atm and 300 K

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, K.H.; Cox, D.F. )

    1993-10-01

    Propene oxidation was studied on Cu[sub 2]O single-crystal surfaces using XPS and TDS in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) following propene exposures at 300 K and atmospheric pressure. Three different Cu[sub 2]O surfaces were examined: A Cu[sup +]-terminated (100) surface, an oxygen-terminated (100) surface, and a (111) surface with accessible copper cations and lattice oxygen. Selective oxidation to acrolein is promoted by coordinately unsaturated surface lattice oxygen. No clear correlation between the formation of partial oxidation products and oxygen coordination was observed. Both selective and nonselective oxidation products are formed from lattice oxygen. The propene oxidation pathway proceeds through an allyloxy (CH[sub 2][double bond]CHCH[sub 2]O-) species where oxygen insertion occurs prior to the second hydrogen abstraction over Cu[sub 2]O. This conclusion was reached by comparing the propene TDS results from atmospheric pressure exposures with UHV allyl alcohol and acrolein thermal desorption data. The selective oxidation process over Cu[sub 2]O is subject to a [open quotes]pressure gap[close quotes] at 300 K with oxygen insertion occurring at higher pressures, presumably because of translational and collisional activation. However, the subsequent steps in the selective oxidation pathway can be effectively modeled by dissociative adsorption of oxygenates under UHV to simulate the oxygenated surface intermediates. 34 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Surface Binding and Organization of Sensitizing Dyes on Metal Oxide Single Crystal Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Parkinson, Bruce

    2010-06-04

    Even though investigations of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductors in solar cells has dominated research on dye-sensitized semiconductors over the past two decades. Single crystal electrodes represent far simpler model systems for studying the sensitization process with a continuing train of studies dating back more than forty years. Even today single crystal surfaces prove to be more controlled experimental models for the study of dye-sensitized semiconductors than the nanocrystalline substrates. We analyzed the scientific advances in the model sensitized single crystal systems that preceded the introduction of nanocrystalline semiconductor electrodes. It then follows the single crystal research to the present, illustrating both their striking simplicity of use and clarity of interpretation relative to nanocrystalline electrodes. Researchers have employed many electrochemical, photochemical and scanning probe techniques for studying monolayer quantities of sensitizing dyes at specific crystallographic faces of different semiconductors. These methods include photochronocoulometry, electronic spectroscopy and flash photolysis of dyes at potential-controlled semiconductor electrodes and the use of total internal reflection methods. In addition, we describe the preparation of surfaces of single crystal SnS2 and TiO2 electrodes to serve as reproducible model systems for charge separation at dye sensitized solar cells. This process involves cleaving the SnS2 electrodes and a photoelectrochemical surface treatment for TiO2 that produces clean surfaces for sensitization (as verified by AFM) resulting in near unity yields for electron transfer from the molecular excited dyes into the conduction band.

  5. Surface cleaning effects on reliability for devices with ultrathin oxides or oxynitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Kafai; Hao, Ming-Yin; Chen, Wei-Ming; Lee, Jack C.

    1994-09-01

    A new wafer cleaning procedure has been developed for ultra-thin thermal oxidation process (oxides (48 angstrom) and oxynitrides grown in N2O (42 angstrom) were prepared using this new cleaning and other commonly used cleaning methods to investigate the effects of surface preparation on dielectric integrity. It has been found that this two-dip method produces dielectrics with reduced leakage current and stress-induced leakage current, which are believed to be the critical parameters for ultrathin oxides. Furthermore, this new cleaning procedure improves both intrinsic and defect-related breakdown as well as the uniformity of the current- voltage characteristics across a 4-inch wafer. The methanol/HF dip time has also been optimized. The improvement is believed to be due to enhanced silicon surface passivation by hydrogen, the reduced surface micro-roughness and the absence of native oxide.

  6. Surface reaction mechanisms during ozone and oxygen plasma assisted atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Rai, Vikrant R; Vandalon, Vincent; Agarwal, Sumit

    2010-09-01

    We have elucidated the reaction mechanism and the role of the reactive intermediates in the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of aluminum oxide from trimethyl aluminum in conjunction with O(3) and an O(2) plasma. In situ attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data show that both -OH groups and carbonates are formed on the surface during the oxidation cycle. These carbonates, once formed on the surface, are stable to prolonged O(3) exposure in the same cycle. However, in the case of plasma-assisted ALD, the carbonates decompose upon prolonged O(2) plasma exposure via a series reaction kinetics of the type, A (CH(3)) --> B (carbonates) --> C (Al(2)O(3)). The ratio of -OH groups to carbonates on the surface strongly depends on the oxidizing agent, and also the duration of the oxidation cycle in plasma-assisted ALD. However, in both O(3) and O(2) plasma cycles, carbonates are a small fraction of the total number of reactive sites compared to the hydroxyl groups.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Flows in an Oxidation Ditch Driven by a New Surface Aerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weidong; Li, Kun; Wang, Gan; Wang, Yingzhe

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we present a newly designed inverse umbrella surface aerator, and tested its performance in driving flow of an oxidation ditch. Results show that it has a better performance in driving the oxidation ditch than the original one with higher average velocity and more uniform flow field. We also present a computational fluid dynamics model for predicting the flow field in an oxidation ditch driven by a surface aerator. The improved momentum source term approach to simulate the flow field of the oxidation ditch driven by an inverse umbrella surface aerator was developed and validated through experiments. Four kinds of turbulent models were investigated with the approach, including the standard k−ɛ model, RNG k−ɛ model, realizable k−ɛ model, and Reynolds stress model, and the predicted data were compared with those calculated with the multiple rotating reference frame approach (MRF) and sliding mesh approach (SM). Results of the momentum source term approach are in good agreement with the experimental data, and its prediction accuracy is better than MRF, close to SM. It is also found that the momentum source term approach has lower computational expenses, is simpler to preprocess, and is easier to use. PMID:24302850

  8. Production of hydroxyapatite layers on the plasma electrolytically oxidized surface of titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Lugovskoy, Alex; Lugovskoy, Svetlana

    2014-10-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is a bioactive material that is widely used for improving the osseointegration of titanium dental implants. Titanium can be coated with HA by various methods, such as chemical vapor deposition (CVD), thermal spray, or plasma spray. HA coatings can also be grown on titanium surfaces by hydrothermal, chemical, and electrochemical methods. Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO), or microarc oxidation (MAO), is an electrochemical method that enables the production of a thick porous oxide layer on the surface of a titanium implant. If the electrolyte in which PEO is performed contains calcium and phosphate ions, the oxide layer produced may contain hydroxyapatite. The HA content can then be increased by subsequent hydrothermal treatment. The HA thus produced on titanium surfaces has attractive properties, such as a high porosity, a controllable thickness, and a considerable density, which favor its use in dental and bone surgery. This review summarizes the state of the art and possible further development of PEO for the production of HA on Ti implants.

  9. Oxidative stress and antioxidants at biosurfaces: plants, skin, and respiratory tract surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cross, C E; van der Vliet, A; Louie, S; Thiele, J J; Halliwell, B

    1998-10-01

    Atmospheric pollutants represent an important source of oxidative and nitrosative stress to both terrestrial plants and to animals. The exposed biosurfaces of plants and animals are directly exposed to these pollutant stresses. Not surprisingly, living organisms have developed complex integrated extracellular and intracellular defense systems against stresses related to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), including O3 and NO2. Plant and animal epithelial surfaces and respiratory tract surfaces contain antioxidants that would be expected to provide defense against environmental stress caused by ambient ROS and RNS, thus ameliorating their injurious effects on more delicate underlying cellular constituents. Parallelisms among these surfaces with regard to their antioxidant constituents and environmental oxidants are presented. The reactive substances at these biosurfaces not only represent an important protective system against oxidizing environments, but products of their reactions with ROS/RNS may also serve as biomarkers of environmental oxidative stress. Moreover, the reaction products may also induce injury to underlying cells or cause cell activation, resulting in production of proinflammatory substances including cytokines. In this review we discuss antioxidant defense systems against environmental toxins in plant cell wall/apoplastic fluids, dead keratinized cells/interstitial fluids of stratum corneum (the outermost skin layer), and mucus/respiratory tract lining fluids.

  10. Surface analysis reveals biogenic oxidation of sub-bituminous coal by Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed

    Hazrin-Chong, Nur Hazlin; Marjo, Christopher E; Das, Theerthankar; Rich, Anne M; Manefield, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Direct analysis of the colonised surface on coal using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) revealed the nature of bacteria-mediated oxidation at the coal surface. Unique oxidation peaks generated by the presence of Pseudomonas fluorescens on coal was shown through ATR-FTIR measurements, and ATR-FTIR imaging illustrated that this peak was only observed within the region of coal colonised by bacteria. Contact angle measurements and surface free energy of adhesion calculations showed that the adhesion between P. fluorescens and coal was thermodynamically favourable, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) exhibited individual cell or monolayer cluster attachment on coal. Furthermore, Gaussian peak fitting of peroxidase-treated coal ATR-FTIR spectra revealed that peroxidase or related enzymes produced by P. fluorescens may be responsible for coal oxidation. This study demonstrated the usefulness and practicality of ATR-FTIR for analysing coal oxidation by P. fluorescens and may well be applied to other microbe-driven modifications of coal for its rapidity and reliability.

  11. Interaction and reactivity of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on ruthenium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quick, E.E.

    1980-03-01

    A multifaceted investigation of the reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide using a ruthenium (102) single crystal catalyst in the pressure range 10/sup -3/ to 10 Torr and temperature range of 300 to 475/sup 0/C has been undertaken. Kinetic and isotopic results indicate that the reaction products CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ were produced via two reaction mechanisms. Using a reducing gas mixture (low P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) a two site mechanism was operative involving NO dissociation. The carbon monoxide kinetic order varied from +1 to -3 and the nitric oxide order varied from +1 to 0. The catalyst under these conditions was determined to be metallic ruthenium with oxygen bonded within the first surface layer. The oxygen was unreactive and formed a (1 x 3)-0 LEED pattern. Under oxidizing conditions (high P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) the catalyst was ruthenium dioxide and the functional mechanism under these reaction conditions yielded a nitric oxide order of +2 to -4. Inclusion of a site poisoning mechanism under reducing conditions and an RuO/sub 2/ growth mechanism involving ruthenium cation transfer under oxidizing conditions into the kinetic rate laws led to an overall rate law which could be fit to the carbon monoxide and nitric oxide order plots. Using isotopically oxygen labelled reactants, it was observed that the three possible isotopes of carbon dioxide were produced. A ..gamma..-CO surface species is postulated as an intermediate in the exchange process. The reaction was observed to be initially surface structure insensitive and the reaction kinetics were derived using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood formalism.

  12. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  13. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Senanayake, S. D.; Pappoe, N. A.; Nguyen-Phan, T. -D.; Luo, S.; Li, Y.; Xu, W.; Liu, Z.; Mudiyanselage, K.; Johnston-Peck, A. C.; Frenkel, A. I.; et al

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO+0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5wt% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) and Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface statesmore » or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure was also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggests that a surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.« less

  14. Surface characterization of InP trenches embedded in oxide using scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannarino, Manuel; Chintala, Ravi; Moussa, Alain; Merckling, Clement; Eyben, Pierre; Paredis, Kristof; Vandervorst, Wilfried

    2015-12-01

    Metrology for structural and electrical analyses at device level has been identified as one of the major challenges to be resolved for the sub-14 nm technology nodes. In these advanced nodes, new high mobility semiconductors, such as III-V compounds, are grown in narrow trenches on a Si substrate. Probing the nature of the defects, the defect density, and the role of processing steps on the surface of such structures are prime metrology requirements. In order to enable defect analysis on a (III-V) surface, a proper sample preparation for oxide removal is of primary importance. In this work, the effectiveness of different chemical cleanings and thermal annealing procedures is investigated on both blanket InP and oxide embedded InP trenches by means of scanning probe microscopy techniques. It is found that the most effective approach is a combination of an HCl-based chemical cleaning combined with a low-temperature thermal annealing leading to an oxide free surface with atomically flat areas. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been the preferred method for such investigations on blanket films due to its intrinsic sub-nm spatial resolution. However, its application on oxide embedded structures is non-trivial. To perform STM on the trenches of interest (generally <20 nm wide), we propose a combination of non-contact atomic force microscopy and STM using the same conductive atomic force microscopy tip Our results prove that with these procedures, it is possible to perform STM in narrow InP trenches showing stacking faults and surface reconstruction. Significant differences in terms of roughness and terrace formation are also observed between the blanket and the oxide embedded InP.

  15. Surface characterization of InP trenches embedded in oxide using scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mannarino, Manuel E-mail: manuelmannarino@gmail.com; Chintala, Ravi; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Moussa, Alain; Merckling, Clement; Eyben, Pierre; Paredis, Kristof

    2015-12-14

    Metrology for structural and electrical analyses at device level has been identified as one of the major challenges to be resolved for the sub-14 nm technology nodes. In these advanced nodes, new high mobility semiconductors, such as III–V compounds, are grown in narrow trenches on a Si substrate. Probing the nature of the defects, the defect density, and the role of processing steps on the surface of such structures are prime metrology requirements. In order to enable defect analysis on a (III–V) surface, a proper sample preparation for oxide removal is of primary importance. In this work, the effectiveness of different chemical cleanings and thermal annealing procedures is investigated on both blanket InP and oxide embedded InP trenches by means of scanning probe microscopy techniques. It is found that the most effective approach is a combination of an HCl-based chemical cleaning combined with a low-temperature thermal annealing leading to an oxide free surface with atomically flat areas. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) has been the preferred method for such investigations on blanket films due to its intrinsic sub-nm spatial resolution. However, its application on oxide embedded structures is non-trivial. To perform STM on the trenches of interest (generally <20 nm wide), we propose a combination of non-contact atomic force microscopy and STM using the same conductive atomic force microscopy tip Our results prove that with these procedures, it is possible to perform STM in narrow InP trenches showing stacking faults and surface reconstruction. Significant differences in terms of roughness and terrace formation are also observed between the blanket and the oxide embedded InP.

  16. Oxide/Water Interfaces: How the Surface Chemistry Modifies the Electronic Energy Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprik, Michiel

    2014-03-01

    The minimum of the d-electron conduction band of an aqueous transition metal oxide electrode is typically no more than a few 100 mV away from the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). Because of this favourable alignment of the electronic energy levels (near) metallic transition metal oxides with partly filled d bands can be used as electrocatalysts while the compounds with finite electronic gap can be used as photocatalysts. However, because of their ionic character, transition metal-oxide surfaces also show amphiphilic acid-base activity. At low pH the basic sites are protonated and at high pH the acidic sites deprotonated creating an electrical double layer with corresponding surface potential. The alignment of the electronic energy levels, and by implication their redox activity, is therefore pH dependent. In fact, even in absence of protonic surface charge, the coordination with water molecules is already capable of shifting the electronic energy levels of the oxide by 1 eV or more. Computation of the electronic energies in transition metal oxide electrodes requires therefore a detailed modeling of their aqueous surface chemistry. The solvation energy of the proton is the common energy reference for both redox potentials on the SHE scale and acidity constants (pKa). Computation of the H+ solvation energy is therefore a key component in a unified treatment of redox and acid-base chemistry. In this talk we outline the Density Functional Theory based Molecular Dynamics (DFTMD) method we have developed for this purpose. The central tool of our approach is a method for reversible insertion of protons in the aqueous part of the DFTMD model system. As an illustration we discuss the application to the rutile TiO2/water and MnO2/water interface.

  17. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by surface coating: a long-term field study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chan-Ung; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Park, Seong-Sook; Kang, Jin-Soo; Kim, Kang-Ho; Kim, Dong-Kwan; Choi, Ui-Kyu; Kim, Sun-Joon

    2016-10-01

    Pyrite and other iron sulfides are readily oxidized by dissolved oxygen in aqueous phase, producing acidity and Fe(2+), which causes significant environmental problems. Applications of surface coating agents (Na2SiO3 and KH2PO4) were conducted at Boeun (Chungbuk, South Korea) outcrop site, and their efficiencies to inhibit the oxidation of sulfide minerals were monitored for a long-term period (449 days). The rock sample showed positive Net Acid Production Potential (NAPP = 20.23) and low Net Acid Generation pH (NAGpH = 2.42) values, suggesting that the rock sample was categorized in the potential acid-forming group. For the monitored time period (449 days), field study results showed that the application of Na2SiO3 effectively inhibited the pyrite oxidation as compared to KH2PO4. Na2SiO3 as a surface coating agent maintained pH 5-6 and reduced oxidation of pyrite surface up to 99.95 and 97.70 % indicated by Fe(2+) and SO4 (2-) release, respectively. The scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer analysis indicated that the morphology of rock surface was completely changed attributable to formation of iron silicate coating. The experimental results suggested that the treatment with Na2SiO3 was highly effective and it might be applicable on field for inhibition of iron sulfide oxidation. PMID:26493832

  18. Influence of surface functionalization via chemical oxidation on the properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiuling; Chen, Qinghai; Ma, Qing

    2012-03-15

    The surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was functionalized in different chemical oxidants, hydrogen peroxide, mixed concentrated HNO(3)/H(2)SO(4) and acidic KMnO(4) solution. The influences on the properties of CNTs were systematically investigated, such as the structure, the kinds and the contents of the formed surface oxygen-containing functional groups, the pH(PZC) values and the surface hydrophilicity using XRD, HREM, FTIR and chemical titration. The results show that the kinds and the contents of the surface oxygen-containing groups are dependent on the functionalization methods. The formation of the oxygen-containing groups can decrease pH(PZC) values and improve surface hydrophilicity of CNTs. The dispersion of the supported Pd-Pt particles on the functionalized CNTs and their catalytic activity in the profile reaction of naphthalene hydrogenation to tetralin are both promoted due to the presence of these oxygen-containing groups. PMID:22280791

  19. Sputtering and native oxide formation on (110) surfaces of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Te

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neff, H.; Lay, K. Y.; Abid, B.; Lange, P.; Lucovsky, G.

    1986-01-01

    Native oxides on the surface of Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Te (X between 0 and 0.7) have been analyzed on the basis of X-ray photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Depth profile analysis revealed a significant increase in the thickness at higher Mn concentrations and a strong Mn segregation to the surface, respectively. Sputter-induced damage on cleaved (110)-oriented surfaces was analyzed by photoreflectance and photoluminescence measurements. The damage was found to be larger on CdTe than on the alloy. Thermal annealing showed nearly complete restoration for the surface of the alloy, while CdTe revealed irreversible modifications in the near-surface regime upon sputtering and post annealing.

  20. The surface hydro-oxidation of LaNiO(3-delta) thin films.

    PubMed

    Mickevicius, S; Grebinskij, S; Bondarenka, V; Lisauskas, V; Sliuziene, K; Tvardauskas, H; Vengalis, B; Orlowski, B A; Osinniy, V; Drube, W

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure and possible hydro-oxidation of LaNiO(3-delta) films were studied by means of tuneable high-energy X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation. It was shown that the hydroxyl-containing phase, located near the film surface, may be attributed to the lanthanum and nickel hydroxide species. The thickness of a hydroxide-enriched layer was estimated from the oxide/hydroxide ratio measured at normal and grazing conditions. The hydroxide layer thickness was about 2 nm for step and/or exponential hydroxide spatial distribution.

  1. Surface-inspired molecular vanadium oxide catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation of alcohols: evidence for metal cooperation and peroxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Werncke, C Gunnar; Limberg, Christian; Knispel, Christina; Mebs, Stefan

    2011-10-17

    On the basis that thiacalix[4]arene (H(4)T4A) complex (PPh(4) )(2) [H(2)T4A(VO(2))](2) (Ia) was found to be an adequate functional model for surface species occurring on vanadium oxide based catalysts and itself catalyses the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alcohols, an analogue containing 2,2'-thiobis(2,4-di-tert-butylphenolate), (S)L(2-), as ligand, namely, (PPh(4))(2)[(S)LVO(2)](2) (II) was investigated in the same context. Despite the apparent similarity of Ia and II, studies on II revealed several novel insights, which are also valuable in connection with surfaces of vanadia catalysts: 1) For Ia and II similar turnover numbers (TONs) were found for the ODH of activated alcohols, which indicates that the additional OH units inherent to Ia do not contribute particularly to the activity of this complex, for instance, through prebinding of the alcohol. 2) On dissolution II enters into an equilibrium with a monomeric form, which is the predominant species in solution; nevertheless, ODH proceeds exclusively at the dimeric form, and this stresses the need for cooperation of two vanadium centres. 3) By omitting O(2) from the system during the oxidation of 9-fluorenol, the reduced form of the catalyst could be isolated and fully characterised (including single-crystal X-ray analysis). The corresponding intermediate had been elusive in case of thiacalixarene system Ia. 4) Reoxidation was found to proceed via a peroxide intermediate that also oxidises one alcohol equivalent. As the peroxide can also perform mono- and dioxygenation of the thioether group in II, after a number of turnovers the active catalyst contains a sulfone group. The reduced form of this ultimate catalyst was also isolated and structurally characterised. Possible implications of 1)-4) for the function of heterogeneous vanadia catalysts are discussed. PMID:21915928

  2. Cerium oxides and cerium-platinum surface alloys on Pt(111) single-crystal surfaces studied by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Ulrich; Schierbaum, Klaus-Dieter

    2002-06-01

    Three-dimensional clusters of metallic Ce are deposited on Pt(111) surfaces by thermal evaporation in ultrahigh vacuum. Different reactions occur upon heating of the sample in ultrahigh vacuum and during the exposure of oxygen that lead to distinct well-ordered surface phases. Their geometric structures are determined by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). A two-dimensional ordered surface alloy of Pt5Ce is obtained by annealing at 1000 K. It forms two different incommensurate overlayers on Pt(111) with long-distance spacings in the moiré patterns (13.7 and 14.8 Å). Hexagonally shaped two-dimensional islands are formed upon heating the Pt(111) single crystal with a submonolayer coverage of Ce at 900 K. They are localized at step edges. STM reveals a local 2×2 structure with respect to Pt(111). It is assigned to a precursor state of alloy formation. Ordered CeO2 phases result from annealing the alloy at 1000 K in oxygen. The surface structure is consistent with oxygen-terminated fluorite-type CeO2(111). During decomposition of CeO2 at 900 K, an oxide structure is identified which is attributed to an ultrathin ordered phase of surface-Ce2O3.

  3. The growth and evolution of thin oxide films on delta-plutonium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia Flores, Harry G; Pugmire, David L

    2009-01-01

    The common oxides of plutonium are the dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) and the sesquioxide (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3}). The structure of an oxide on plutonium metal under air at room temperature is typically described as a thick PuO{sub 2} film at the gas-oxide interface with a thinner PuO{sub 2} film near the oxide-metal substrate interface. In a reducing environment, such as ultra high vacuum, the dioxide (Pu{sup 4+}; O/Pu = 2.0) readily converts to the sesquioxide (Pu{sup 3+}; O/Pu = 1.5) with time. In this work, the growth and evolution of thin plutonium oxide films is studied with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) under varying conditions. The results indicate that, like the dioxide, the sesquioxide is not stable on a very clean metal substrate under reducing conditions, resulting in substoichiometric films (Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y}). The Pu{sub 2}O{sub 3-y} films prepared exhibit a variety of stoichiometries (y = 0.2-1) as a function of preparation conditions, highlighting the fact that caution must be exercised when studying plutonium oxide surfaces under these conditions and interpreting resulting data.

  4. The Surface Dynamics of the Initial Oxidation Behavior of CuNi Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziemack, Steve; Sun, Li; Yang, Judith; Eastman, Jeff; Zhou, Guangwen

    2009-03-01

    As an extension of our previous work on the initial oxidation stages of pure Cu and CuAu alloy, we are currently visualizing the oxidation of CuNi alloys by in-situ ultra high vacuum transmission electron microscope (UHV-TEM) and X-ray diffraction. We investigated systematically a range of CuNi (001) compositions, including 2,8,15 and 24 at%Ni at P (O2) =5x10-4 torr and T=500-700^oC. The initial oxidation behavior is similar to that of Cu (001) AND CuAu (001), where oxide islands rapidly nucleate, grow and coalesce. However, remarkable differences exist: 1) a second rapid nucleation of compact and dense oxide islands occurred and 2) polycrystalline oxides formed, where only cube-on-cube epitaxial Cu2O islands nucleated on Cu (001) and CuAu (001) for all temperature and pressures studied. The surface segregation behavior of Cu and Ni may explain these surprising results.

  5. Low-temperature CO oxidation on Ni(111) and on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Jan; Merte, Lindsay R; Peng, Guowen; Vang, Ronnie T; Resta, Andrea; Laegsgaard, Erik; Andersen, Jesper N; Mavrikakis, Manos; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-08-24

    From an interplay between scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature programmed desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations we have studied low-temperature CO oxidation on Au/Ni(111) surface alloys and on Ni(111). We show that an oxide is formed on both the Ni(111) and the Au/Ni(111) surfaces when oxygen is dosed at 100 K, and that CO can be oxidized at 100 K on both of these surfaces in the presence of weakly bound oxygen. We suggest that low-temperature CO oxidation can be rationalized by CO oxidation on O(2)-saturated NiO(111) surfaces, and show that the main effect of Au in the Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is to block the formation of carbonate and thereby increase the low-temperature CO(2) production.

  6. Density functional theory study of the oxidation of ammonia on the IrO2(110) surface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Ching; Siao, Shih Syong; Jiang, Jyh-Chiang

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we employed density functional theory (DFT) to investigate the oxidation of ammonia (NH(3)) on the IrO(2)(110) surface. We characterized the possible reaction pathways for the dehydrogenation of NH(x) species (x = 1-3) and for the formation of the oxidation products N(2), N(2)O, NO, NO(2), and H(2)O. The presence of oxygen atoms on coordinatively unsaturated sites (O(cus)) of the oxygen-rich IrO(2)(110) surface promotes the oxidation of NH(3) on the surface. In contrast, NH(3) molecules prefer undergoing desorption over oxidation on the stoichiometric IrO(2)(110) surface. Moreover, the O(cus) atoms are also the major oxidants leading to the formation of oxidation products; none of the oxidations mediated by the bridge oxygen atoms were favorable reactions. The energy barrier for formation of H(2)O as a gaseous oxidation product on the IrO(2)(110) surface is high (from 1.83 to 2.29 eV), potentially leading to the formation of nitrogen-atom-containing products at high temperature. In addition, the selectivity toward the nitrogen-atom-containing products is dominated by the coverage of O(cus) atoms on the surface; for example, a higher coverage of O(cus) atoms results in greater production of nitrogen oxides (NO, NO(2)). PMID:22047008

  7. Hydrogen Spillover between Single Gold Nanorods and Metal Oxide Supports: A Surface Plasmon Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sean S E; Cittadini, Michela; Pecharromán, Carlos; Martucci, Alessandro; Mulvaney, Paul

    2015-08-25

    We used dark field spectroscopy to monitor the dissociation of hydrogen on single gold nanoparticles embedded in metal oxide supports. Individual gold nanorods were monitored in real time to reveal the peak position, the full width at half-maximum, and the relative intensity of the surface plasmon resonances during repeated N2-H2-N2 and air-H2-air cycles. Shifts in the spectra are shown to be due to changes in electron density and not to refractive index shifts in the environment. We demonstrate that hydrogen does not dissociate on gold nanorods (13 nm × 40 nm) at room temperature when in contact with silica and that electrons or hydrogen atoms migrate from Pt nanoparticles to Au nanoparticles through the supporting metal oxide at room temperature. However, this spillover mechanism only occurs for semiconducting oxides (anatase TiO2 and ZnO) and does not occur for Au and Pt nanoparticles embedded in silica. Finally, we show that hydrogen does dissociate directly on anatase surfaces at room temperature during air-H2-air cycles. Our results show that hydrogen spillover, surface dissociation of reactants, and surface migration of chemical intermediates can be detected and monitored in real time at the single particle level.

  8. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Chi, Dongzhi; Bhatia, Charanjit S.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiOx) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiOx films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiOx films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiOx films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiOx has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiOx in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  9. Excellent c-Si surface passivation by low-temperature atomic layer deposited titanium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Baochen; Hoex, Bram; Aberle, Armin G.; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Chi, Dongzhi

    2014-06-23

    In this work, we demonstrate that thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) titanium oxide (TiO{sub x}) films are able to provide a—up to now unprecedented—level of surface passivation on undiffused low-resistivity crystalline silicon (c-Si). The surface passivation provided by the ALD TiO{sub x} films is activated by a post-deposition anneal and subsequent light soaking treatment. Ultralow effective surface recombination velocities down to 2.8 cm/s and 8.3 cm/s, respectively, are achieved on n-type and p-type float-zone c-Si wafers. Detailed analysis confirms that the TiO{sub x} films are nearly stoichiometric, have no significant level of contaminants, and are of amorphous nature. The passivation is found to be stable after storage in the dark for eight months. These results demonstrate that TiO{sub x} films are also capable of providing excellent passivation of undiffused c-Si surfaces on a comparable level to thermal silicon oxide, silicon nitride, and aluminum oxide. In addition, it is well known that TiO{sub x} has an optimal refractive index of 2.4 in the visible range for glass encapsulated solar cells, as well as a low extinction coefficient. Thus, the results presented in this work could facilitate the re-emergence of TiO{sub x} in the field of high-efficiency silicon wafer solar cells.

  10. Electric field effects in transition metal oxides, their surfaces and heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Karsten

    2015-03-01

    Modern computational tools such as density functional theory and its merger with dynamical mean field theory are nowadays inevitable for the modeling and understanding of oxides, their heterostructures and surfaces. In this talk, I will concentrate on the impact of electric fields, how they affect the physical properties and how to make use of them. Substantial internal electric fields are created at polar surfaces, and even for an isopolar-interface the electronic reconstruction can lead to a charge transfer and hence a dipole field. Such internal fields can be employed to efficiently separate electrons and holes in a oxide solar cell. Even if the polar dipole field is compensated by a surface reconstruction, a local surface potential remains, and makes SrTiO3 (110) the arguably simplest 2 dimensional electron gas (2DEG). External electric fields, on the other hand, can trigger ``gigantic'' responses, since correlated oxides are prone to small perturbations. For example, a field effect Mott transistor can be realized in a few layers of SrVO3 with ideal on-off (metal-insulator) switching properties; and interfacing a ferroelectric, BaTiO3, plus a 2DEG with large spin-orbit coupling, BaOsO3, allows for a giant switchable Rashba effect. Support by the ERC through Grant Agreement No. 306447 is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Surface oxidation of GaN(0001): Nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning for ultrahigh vacuum applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gangopadhyay, Subhashis; Schmidt, Thomas Kruse, Carsten; Figge, Stephan; Hommel, Detlef; Falta, Jens

    2014-09-01

    The cleaning of metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxial GaN(0001) template layers grown on sapphire has been investigated. Different procedures, performed under ultrahigh vacuum conditions, including degassing and exposure to active nitrogen from a radio frequency nitrogen plasma source have been compared. For this purpose, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy have been employed in order to assess chemical as well as structural and morphological surface properties. Initial degassing at 600 °C under ultrahigh vacuum conditions only partially eliminates the surface contaminants. In contrast to plasma assisted nitrogen cleaning at temperatures as low as 300 °C, active-nitrogen exposure at temperatures as high as 700 °C removes the majority of oxide species from the surface. However, extended high-temperature active-nitrogen cleaning leads to severe surface roughening. Optimum results regarding both the removal of surface oxides as well as the surface structural and morphological quality have been achieved for a combination of initial low-temperature plasma-assisted cleaning, followed by a rapid nitrogen plasma-assisted cleaning at high temperature.

  12. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela C; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Nørskov, Jens K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-10-28

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, we electrochemically characterize the nanostructured α-Mn(2)O(3) and find that it undergoes oxidation in two potential regions: initially, between 0.5 V and 0.8 V, a potential region relevant to the ORR and, subsequently, between 0.8 V and 1.0 V, a potential region between the ORR and the OER relevant conditions. Next, we perform density function theory (DFT) calculations to understand the changes in the MnO(x) surface as a function of potential and to elucidate reaction mechanisms that lead to high activities observed in the experiments. Using DFT, we construct surface Pourbaix and free energy diagrams of three different MnO(x) surfaces and identify 1/2 ML HO* covered Mn(2)O(3) and O* covered MnO(2), as the active surfaces for the ORR and the OER, respectively. Additionally, we find that the ORR occurs through an associative mechanism and that its overpotential is highly dependent on the stabilization of intermediates through hydrogen bonds with water molecules. We also determine that OER occurs through direct recombination mechanism and that its major source of overpotential is the scaling relationship between HOO* and HO* surface intermediates. Using a previously developed Sabatier model we show that the theoretical predictions of catalytic activities match the experimentally determined onset potentials for the ORR and the OER, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Consequently, the combination of first-principles theoretical analysis and experimental methods offers an understanding of manganese oxide oxygen electrocatalysis at the atomic level, achieving fundamental insight that can potentially be

  13. Physics and chemistry on well-defined semiconductor and oxide surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peijun

    1992-12-31

    High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and other surface spectroscopic techniques have been employed to investigate the following two classes of surface/interface phenomena on well-defined semiconductor and oxide surfaces: (i) the fundamental physical and chemical processes involved in gas-solid interaction on silicon single crystal surfaces, and (ii) the physical and chemical properties of metal-oxide interfaces. The particular systems reported in this dissertation are: NH{sub 3}, PH{sub 3} and B{sub 10}H{sub 14} on Si(111)-(7 x 7); NH{sub 3} on Si(100)-(2 x 1); atomic H on Si(111)-(7 x 7) and boron-modified Si(111); Al on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Sn on SiO{sub 2}. On silicon surfaces, the surface dangling bonds function as the primary adsorption sites where surface chemical processes take place. The unambiguous identification of surface species by vibrational spectroscopy allow the elementary steps involved in these surface chemical processes to be followed on a molecular level. For adsorbate such as NH{sub 3} and PH{sub 3}, the nature of the initial low temperature (100-300 K) adsorption is found to be dissociative, while that for B{sub 10}H{sub 14} is non-dissociative. This has been deduced based upon the presence (or absence) of specific characteristic vibrational mode(s) on surface. By following the evolution of surface species as a function of temperature, the elementary steps leading to silicon nitride thin film growth and doping of silicon are elucidated. In the case of NH{sub 3} on Si(111)-(7 x7) and Si(100)-(2 x 1), a detailed understanding on the role of substrate surface structure is controlling the surface reactivity has been gained on the basis of a Si adatom backbond-strain relief mechanism on the Si(111)-(7 x 7). The electronic modification to Si(111) surface by subsurface boron doping has been shown to quench its surface chemistry, even for the most aggressive atomic H.

  14. Adsorption and dissociation of methanol on the fully oxidized and partially reduced (111) cerium oxide surface: dependence on the configuration of the cerium 4f electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Beste, Ariana; Mullins, David R; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H; Harrison, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and dissociation of methanol on the fully oxidized and partially reduced (111) cerium oxide surface is studied using the PW91 functional as well as the PW91+U scheme. We investigate the influence of the detailed electronic structure of the Ce 4f band on the chemistry of methanol on the surface. For the partially reduced surface we obtain a spin delocalized, a ferromagnetic, and an anti-ferromagnetic solution. We find that the qualitative conclusions are independent of the surface type used. Methanol adsorption is exothermic on the fully oxidized as well as on the partially reduced surface. Also dissociation of methanol on the surface is exothermic but strongly enhanced by the presence of a vacancy. We localize an on-top methoxy species as a dissociation product on the fully oxidized surface and a triply bridged methoxy species on the partially reduced surface where the methoxy oxygen partly fills the oxygen vacancy in the surface. Adsorption energies are influenced by the introduction of the repulsive Hubbard (U) term. On the other hand, relative surface stabilities like dissociation energies are less sensitive.

  15. Photoemission of the Oxidation of Cerium Overlayers on GaSb(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qi; Wu, Jian-xin; Ji, Ming-rong; Ma, Mao-sheng; Liu, Xian-ming; Zhang, Yu-heng

    1997-10-01

    We have used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to study the oxidation of cerium overlayers on a semiconductor GaSb(110) surface. A GaSb(110) sample covered with 10 monolayers Ce was used to adsorb oxygen. When the exposure of O2 was up to 50 L, the oxide of cerium, Ce2O3, began to change into unstable CeO2. The dissociation of CeO2 resulted in strong oxidation of the substrate. The main products are Ga2O3, Sb2O3, and then Sb2O5. After annealing, a part of the oxygen atoms transferred from cerium dioxide toward Ga and Sb.

  16. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy evidence for oxidation-induced decomposition of graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Frank J.

    2015-06-01

    It has been proposed that reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide could be a potential method for producing large quantities of graphene. Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy are used to show that oxidation of graphite and exfoliated graphite significantly increases the defect structure of both materials. This would likely lead to a heavily defected graphene structure when oxygen is removed. To insure the observed decomposition is not due to the laser light, the effect of laser intensity on the materials was investigated. It was found that at the highest laser intensity (1.4 × 108 W/M2) there was a significant increase in defects. However, lower laser intensity was found which did not produce defects and was used in the studies of the effect of oxidation on the spectra.

  17. Power dissipation in oxide-confined 980-nm vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guo-Zhu; Guan, Bao-Lu; Li, Shuo; Wang, Qiang; Shen, Guang-Di

    2013-01-01

    We presented 980-nm oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) with a 16-μm oxide aperture. Optical power, voltage, and emission wavelength are measured in an ambient temperature range of 5 °C-80 °C. Measurements combined with an empirical model are used to analyse the power dissipation in the device and the physical mechanism contributing to the thermal rollover phenomenon in VCSEL. It is found that the carrier leakage induced self-heating in the active region and the Joule heating caused by the series resistance are the main sources of power dissipation. In addition, carrier leakage induced self-heating increases as the injection current increases, resulting in a rapid decrease of the internal quantum efficiency, which is a dominant contribution to the thermal rollover of the VCSEL at a larger current. Our study provides useful guidelines to design a 980-nm oxide-confined VCSEL for thermal performance enhancement.

  18. Analysis of protein solvent accessible surfaces by photochemical oxidation and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Joshua S; Becker, Jeffrey M; Hettich, Robert L

    2004-02-01

    Protein surfaces are important in most biological processes, including protein-protein interactions, enzymatic catalysis, and protein-ligand binding. We report a method in which hydroxyl radicals generated by a rapid-UV irradiation of a 15% hydrogen peroxide solution were utilized to oxidize specific amino acid side chains of two model proteins (lysozyme, beta-lactoglobulin A), according to the residues' chemical reactivities and the solvent accessibility of the reactive carbons and sulfurs in the residue. Oxidized peptides generated by tryptic digestion were identified by electrospray-Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The specific sites of the stable modification were then identified by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled to quadropole ion trap tandem mass spectrometry. The solvent accessibility of the residue was shown to directly affect the rate of oxidation by this method (with the exception of methionine), supporting its use as a rapid measure of the solvent accessibility of specific residues, and in some cases, individual atoms. PMID:14750862

  19. Oxidation and Metal-Insertion in Molybdenite Surfaces: Evaluation of Charge-Transfer Mechanisms and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Ramana, Chintalapalle V.; Becker, U.; Shutthanandan, V.; Julien, C. M.

    2008-06-05

    Molybdenum sulfide (MoS2), an important representative member of the layered transition-metal dichalcogenides, has been of special importance to the research community of geochemistry, materials and environmental chemistry, and industrial science and technology. Understanding the oxidation behavior and charge-transfer mechanisms in MoS2 is important to gain better insight into the degradation of this mineral in the environment. On the other hand understanding the insertion of metals into molybdenite and evaluation of charge-transfer mechanism and dynamics is quite important to utilize these minerals in technological applications. Furthermore, such a detailed investigation of thermal oxidation behavior and intercalation process will provide a basis to further explore and model the mechanism of adsorption of metal ions on to geomedia. Therefore, the present work was performed to understand the oxidation and intercalation processes of molybdenite surfaces. The results obtained, using a wide variety of analytical techniques, are presented and discussed in this paper.

  20. Experimental simulations of oxidizing conditions and organic decomposition on the surface of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C. R.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Mckay, Christopher P.

    1988-01-01

    One important scientific objective of a Mars Rover Sample Return mission would be to look for traces of living and extinct life on Mars. An instrument to search for organic carbon may be the simplest instrument that could screen samples which are interesting from a biological point of view. An experimental program is described which would help to understand the nature of the oxidizing soil on Mars and the mechanism responsible for organic degradation on the Martian surface. This is approached by lab simulations of the actual conditions that occur on Mars, particularly the oxidant production by atmospheric photochemistry, and the combined effects of UV light and oxidants in decomposing organic compounds. The results will be used to formulate models of the photochemistry of the atmospheric, the atmosphere-soil interaction, and the diffusion of reactive compounds into the soils. This information will provide insights and constraints on the design of a sampling strategy to search for organic compounds on Mars.

  1. Surface Analysis of Stressed and Control Tin Oxide Thin Films on Soda Lime Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Pankow, J. W.

    2003-05-01

    Surface analysis techniques have been used to investigate tin oxide-coated soda lime glass specimens prior and subsequent to their exposure to DC bias, heat, and humidity. All specimens reported here comprise the following layered structure: tin oxide/silicon oxycarbide/glass. Depth profiling using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) clearly shows the interfacial regions in both control samples and samples exposed to the above-mentioned conditions (stressed). Control samples show distinct and relatively compact interfacial regions as well as an intact silicon oxycarbide diffusion barrier. Stressed films, however, show more diffuse interfacial regions and a physically and chemically altered silicon oxycarbide diffusion barrier. This deterioration of the diffusion barrier is proposed to be a pre-requisite event to enable tin oxide delamination.

  2. Effects of electrolyzed oxidizing water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengchu; Duan, Jingyun; Su, Yi-Cheng

    2006-02-15

    The effects of electrolyzed oxidizing (EO) water on reducing Listeria monocytogenes contamination on seafood processing surfaces were studied. Chips (5 x 5 cm(2)) of stainless steel sheet (SS), ceramic tile (CT), and floor tile (FT) with and without crabmeat residue on the surface were inoculated with L. monocytogenes and soaked in tap or EO water for 5 min. Viable cells of L. monocytogenes were detected on all chip surfaces with or without crabmeat residue after being held at room temperature for 1 h. Soaking contaminated chips in tap water resulted in small-degree reductions of the organism (0.40-0.66 log cfu/chip on clean surfaces and 0.78-1.33 log cfu/chip on dirty surfaces). Treatments of EO water significantly (p<0.05) reduced L. monocytogenes on clean surfaces (3.73 log on SS, 4.24 log on CT, and 5.12 log on FT). Presence of crabmeat residue on chip surfaces reduced the effectiveness of EO water on inactivating Listeria cells. However, treatments of EO water also resulted in significant reductions of L. monocytogenes on dirty surfaces (2.33 log on SS and CT and 1.52 log on FT) when compared with tap water treatments. The antimicrobial activity of EO water was positively correlated with its chlorine content. High oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of EO water also contributed significantly to its antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EO water was more effective than chlorine water on inactivating L. monocytogenes on surfaces and could be used as a chlorine alternative for sanitation purpose. Application of EO water following a thorough cleaning process could greatly reduce L. monocytogenes contamination in seafood processing environments. PMID:16219378

  3. Efficient chemisorption of organophosphorous redox probes on indium tin oxide surfaces under mild conditions.

    PubMed

    Forget, Amélie; Limoges, Benoît; Balland, Véronique

    2015-02-17

    We report a mild and straightforward one-step chemical surface functionalization of indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes by redox-active molecules bearing an organophosphoryl anchoring group (i.e., alkyl phosphate or alkyl phosphonate group). The method takes advantage of simple passive adsorption in an aqueous solution at room temperature. We show that organophosphorus compounds can adsorb much more strongly and stably on an ITO surface than analogous redox-active molecules bearing a carboxylate or a boronate moiety. We provide evidence, through quantitative electrochemical characterization (i.e., by cyclic voltammetry) of the adsorbed organophosphoryl redox-active molecules, of the occurrence of three different adsorbate fractions on ITO, exhibiting different stabilities on the surface. Among these three fractions, one is observed to be strongly chemisorbed, exhibiting high stability and resistance to desorption/hydrolysis in a free-redox probe aqueous buffer. We attribute this remarkable stability to the formation of chemical bonds between the organophosphorus anchoring group and the metal oxide surface, likely occurring through a heterocondensation reaction in water. From XPS analysis, we also demonstrate that the surface coverage of the chemisorbed molecules is highly affected by the degree of surface hydroxylation, a parameter that can be tuned by simply preconditioning the freshly cleaned ITO surfaces in water. The lower the relative surface hydroxide density on ITO, the higher was the surface coverage of the chemisorbed species. This behavior is in line with a chemisorption mechanism involving coordination of a deprotonated phosphoryl oxygen atom to the non-hydroxylated acidic metal sites of ITO.

  4. First Principles Study of a-U2N3 Surfaces and its Anti-oxidant Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Mengting; Zhang, Yanning

    With the advantages over oxides as fuel materials for fast nuclear reactors, actinide nitrides have been extensively studied in experiments. In particular, a-U2N3 is also the main composition of surface layer obtained by surface nitriding for the enhancement of oxidation resistance of uranium in ambient conditions.[1-4] However, the anti-oxidant mechanism behind is still unclear, which hinders the further development of surface treatment technologies for uranium. Here we perform extensive ab initio studies on the geometric, magnetic and electronic properties of a-U2N3 bulk and (001) surfaces. Then the adsorption and diffusion of O2 near the stable a-U2N3(001) surface will be discussed, focusing on the local atomic arrangements of U-N and U-N-O that cannot be observed easily in experiments. Our theoretical results may give some insights in understanding the anti-oxidant mechanism of surface nitriding.

  5. Possible oxidants at Mars surface and their impact on organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblet, A.; Coll, P. J.; Szopa, C.; Stalport, F.

    2010-12-01

    In 1976, the Viking probes did not provide any results demonstrating the presence of extant life or even organic molecules in the soil samples collected at their landing sites, unlikely to what it could be expected at that time. The results obtained by the biological experiments on board of Viking probes have been discussed for a long time. The most relevant hypothesis is the presence of oxidants in the martian soil. Klein et al. (1978) proposed different oxidizing agents among which “superoxides”, hydrogen peroxide and iron oxides. The presence of H2O2 has been confirmed by its detection in the atmosphere (Clancy et al. 2004; Encrenaz et al. 2004). Moreover, the recent detection of perchlorate by the Phoenix mission confirms the oxidants hypothesis (Hecht et al. 2009). We propose here a review of oxidants potentially present in the martian environment, focusing on their formation pathways and their reactivity on organic molecules. It appears that a synergy between atmosphere, soil, UV radiation and water ice content in the soil could lead to the formation of very reactive species able to degrade organic matter at the surface. Several oxidants could diffuse or directly be formed in the subsurface and thus potentially lead to organic degradation in depth (see the figure). This review work could give guidelines on the oxidizing potential of the martian surface/subsurface and could estimate the stability of organic matter under these conditions. Based on this review work, we have developed an experimental device (MOMIE for Martian Organic Molecules Irradiation and Evolution) to simulate the formation of oxidants in the martian environment and their impact on organic matter. This laboratory experiment will help to determine the fate of organic matter at the martian surface and to define the most relevant detection protocol to highlight organic molecules at Mars by the future in-situ missions. Clancy, R.T., et al., 2004. Icarus 168:116-121 ; Encrenaz, T., et al

  6. Sub-surface oxide features at the aluminum-sapphire interface after low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Sreya

    This work focuses on the formation of sub-surface oxide features that form at the aluminum-sapphire interface during a low temperature heat-treatment. The features consist of two parts, stable alpha-alumina ridges on the substrate, and faceted pyramidal structures composed of thin, low-temperature oxide shells that are bounded by the ridges. It is surprising to observe the formation of thermodynamically stable alpha-alumina at a low temperature. The ridges are epitaxial with the (0001) sapphire substrate and the overlying metal. The pyramidal features resemble closely the Wulff shape in aluminum. Experiments show that these features are underlying the annealing hillocks. This work is a detailed study of such oxide interfacial features associated with hollow hillocks. At the annealing temperatures (below the melting point of aluminum), the aluminum thin film is subjected to compressive stresses arising from the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch and this is aided by dewetting at the aluminum-sapphire interface. Creep cavitation and grain boundary sliding are postulated to help in the cavity formation. Annealing holes are also observed in the thin films. Two different types of holes are seen: dendritic branched holes and hexagonal faceted holes (drums). At lower temperature and thickness, dendritic holes are seen to be formed at the grain boundaries. The drums form within the grains at higher temperatures and in thicker films. The drums have a surface oxide layer suspended on the top. It is postulated that clustering of vacancies due to the presence of irregularities, defects, and dislocations at the interface as well as dewetting causes the nucleation of the drums at the interface. Numerous hillock-hole couples were seen. Thinning of the metal in areas near the hillocks could possibly aid in the hole formation process. It is speculated that the hole growth occurred during the cooling stage when the film was subjected to tensile stresses. Another interesting

  7. Insulating to metallic transition of an oxidized boron nitride nanosheet coating by tuning surface oxygen adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yufeng; Guo, Wanlin

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification and functionalization are of fundamental importance in actual application of insulating coating, such as hexagon boron nitride (h-BN) nanosheet. Our first-principles calculations reveal that an oxidized h-BN monolayer supported by a Cu substrate exhibits metallic properties when O adatom vertically bonds with the B atom. This is mainly due to the hybridization of the p orbital of the BN layer and O adatom around the Fermi level. Charge transfer from the Cu substrate to the O atom stabilizes the formation of the vertical O-B bond. Injecting negative charges could trigger the migration of the O adatom from the B-N bond to B atom for metal or insulator-supported h-BN monolayer, which will lead to a metallic transition in the oxidized h-BN nanosheet. Our results provide a viable way to tune the electronic properties of surface h-BN coating through charge injection mediated O adsorption.

  8. Surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles and their conjuntion with water soluble polymers for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanh Huong, Nguyen; Thi Kieu Giang, Lam; Thanh Binh, Nguyen; Minh, Le Quoc

    2009-09-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) coated with suitable bio-compatible substances have been used in biomedicine, particularly in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), tissue engineering, and hyperthermia and drug delivery. In this study, we describe the synthesis of SPION and its surface modification for in-vitro experiments. The particle diameter and structure were estimated by FESEM, TEM, XRD analyses. The saturation magnetization was characterized. SPION with a mean size of 12 nm have been prepared under N2 atmosphere, with support of natural polymeric starch, by controlling chemical coprecipitation of magnetite phase from aqueous solutions containing suitable salts ratios of Fe2+ and Fe3+. The surface of SPION-nanoparticles was treated with a coordinatable agent for higher dispersion ability in water and remaining the superparamagnetic behavior. The prepared iron oxide nanoparticles were coated with starch, dextran, PEG or MPEG to extend the application potential in the quite different engineering field of nano biomedicine.

  9. Biocompatible silicon surfaces through orthogonal click chemistries and a high affinity silicon oxide binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Hassert, Rayk; Pagel, Mareen; Ming, Zhou; Häupl, Tilmann; Abel, Bernd; Braun, Klaus; Wiessler, Manfred; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2012-10-17

    Multifunctionality is gaining more and more importance in the field of improved biomaterials. Especially peptides feature a broad chemical variability and are versatile mediators between inorganic surfaces and living cells. Here, we synthesized a unique peptide that binds to SiO(2) with nM affinity. We equipped the peptide with the bioactive integrin binding c[RGDfK]-ligand and a fluorescent probe by stepwise Diels-Alder reaction with inverse electron demand and copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. For the first time, we report the generation of a multifunctional peptide by combining these innovative coupling reactions. The resulting peptide displayed an outstanding binding to silicon oxide and induced a significant increase in cell spreading and cell viability of osteoblasts on the oxidized silicon surface.

  10. Prediction of Surface and pH-Specific Binding of Peptides to Metal and Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Lin, Tzu-Jen; Emami, Fateme Sadat; Ramezani-Dakhel, Hadi; Naik, Rajesh; Knecht, Marc; Perry, Carole C.; Huang, Yu

    2015-03-01

    The mechanism of specific peptide adsorption onto metallic and oxidic nanostructures has been elucidated in atomic resolution using novel force fields and surface models in comparison to measurements. As an example, variations in peptide adsorption on Pd and Pt nanoparticles depending on shape, size, and location of peptides on specific bounding facets are explained. Accurate computational predictions of reaction rates in C-C coupling reactions using particle models derived from HE-XRD and PDF data illustrate the utility of computational methods for the rational design of new catalysts. On oxidic nanoparticles such as silica and apatites, it is revealed how changes in pH lead to similarity scores of attracted peptides lower than 20%, supported by appropriate model surfaces and data from adsorption isotherms. The results demonstrate how new computational methods can support the design of nanoparticle carriers for drug release and the understanding of calcification mechanisms in the human body.

  11. Computational Database of Metal-Oxide Surface Reactivities for Catalyst Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajdich, Michal; Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2014-03-01

    We study surface reactivity of low index facets of MO, MO2 and ABO3 oxide groups using small atoms and molecules (O, OH, CO, NO, CH3, NH3). The computed database of adsorption and activation energies will be used to identify possible correlations with other quantities such as surface energies or electronic structure in order to establish scaling relations for future high-throughput screening efforts. A comparison will be made between DFT functionals of various levels of accuracy, e.g., GGA, GGA+U, GGA+vdW and GGA-hybrid, meta-GGA and hybrid meta-GGA, and compared to available experiments. This effort is part of the ``Predictive Theory of Transition Metal Oxide Catalysis'' funded through the DOE Materials Genome Project. This work is supported by DOE under Contract DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  12. Effect of GaAs native oxide upon the surface morphology during GaAs MBE growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ageev, O. A.; Solodovnik, M. S.; Balakirev, S. V.; Mikhaylin, I. A.; Eremenko, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The GaAs native oxide effect upon the surface morphology of the GaAs epitaxial layer was studied with taking into account the main growth parameters of MBE technology: substrate temperature, effective As4/Ga flux ratio and growth rate. The MBE modes of atomically smooth and rough surfaces and surfaces with Ga droplet array formation were determined. The possibility of the obtaining of GaAs nanowires via GaAs native oxide layer was shown.

  13. The oxidation of Ba dosed Mo(100) surfaces with O/sub 2/ at moderately high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W. Jr.; Blair, D.S.; Paffett, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    The oxidation of Mo(100) and Ba-covered Mo(100) by O/sub 2/ have been examined at moderately high temperature (700 to 1400/sup 0/K) using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results indicate that the Ba or BaO overlayer retards but does not prevent oxidation of the underlying Mo surface. The high temperature surface chemistry of the O/Ba/Mo surface is described. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  14. The Performance of Ce Surface Treated Ferritic Stainless Steels for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnects

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-09-01

    This research deals with the effect of a Ce surface treatment on the behavior of Fe-Cr-Mn ferritic stainless steels which may have application in SOFC technology. This treatment consisted of applying a slurry of CeO2 and a halide activator to the surface of coupons. After the slurry dried the coupons were heated to 900C in a controlled atmosphere furnace for 12 hours. The effectiveness of the treatment on commercial (Type 409 (12Cr), Type 430 (18Cr), Crofer 22APU (22Cr), Type 446(26Cr)) and experimental (NETL F9 (12Cr) and NETL F5 (22Cr)) alloys as a function of Cr content will be presented. The oxidation behavior of the alloys was assessed by exposing coupons (untreated and treated) to moist air at 800C. Area specific resistance (ASR) was measured at 800C. In general, the rare earth treatment effectively reduced the oxidation rate, resulting in thinner oxide scales and less internal oxidation.

  15. Surface modification of Ti{sub 3}Al for improved oxidation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Vaidya, R.U.; Zurek, A.K.; Castro, R.; Sin, Y.W.; Subramanian, K.N.

    1993-08-01

    Ti{sub 3}Al has very attractive properties such as low density and high temperature mechanical strength for elevated temperature structural applications. Its major drawback however, is poor oxidation resistance at temperatures above 600{degrees}C. Potential use of Ti{sub 3}Al in high temperature applications depends on its protection from excessive oxidation. To this effect, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Ti were selected as coating materials chemically compatible with Ti{sub 3}Al. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} acts as a protective layer on the surface of Ti{sub 3}Al and is impervious to oxygen diffusion. Al{sub 3}Ti is resistant to high temperatures and also protects the Ti{sub 3}Al substrate by forming an oxide layer consisting primarily of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In this study, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was plasma sprayed onto the surface of Ti{sub 3}Al, while the Al{sub 3}Ti was applied by laser melting. Effectiveness of the coatings were investigated after 10 hours of cyclic oxidation.

  16. Solubility and Surface Adsorption Characteristics of Metal Oxides to High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Wesolowski; M.L. Machesky; S.E. Ziemniak; C. Xiao; D.A. Palmer; L.M. Anovitz; P. Benezeth

    2001-05-04

    The interaction of high temperature aqueous solutions with mineral surfaces plays a key role in many aspects of fossil, geothermal and nuclear energy production. This is an area of study in which the subsurface geochemical processes that determine brine composition, porosity and permeability changes, reservoir integrity, and fluid flow rates overlap with the industrial processes associated with corrosion of metal parts and deposition of solids in pipes and on heat exchanger surfaces. The sorption of ions on mineral surfaces is also of great interest in both the subsurface and ''above ground'' regimes of power production, playing a key role in subsurface migration of contaminants (nuclear waste disposal, geothermal brine re-injection, etc.) and in plant operations (corrosion mitigation, migration of radioactive metals from reactor core to heat exchanger, etc.). In this paper, results of the solubility and surface chemistry of metal oxides relevant to both regimes are summarized.

  17. Plastic deformation of a magnesium oxide 001-plane surface produced by cavitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hattori, S.; Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.; Okada, T.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to examine plastic deformation of a cleaved single-crystal magnesium oxide 001-plane surface exposed to cavitation. Cavitation damage experiments were