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Sample records for oxidizing enzymes elucidating

  1. Elucidating nitric oxide synthase domain interactions by molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hollingsworth, Scott A; Holden, Jeffrey K; Li, Huiying; Poulos, Thomas L

    2016-02-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is a multidomain enzyme that catalyzes the production of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidizing L-Arg to NO and L-citrulline. NO production requires multiple interdomain electron transfer steps between the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and heme domain. Specifically, NADPH-derived electrons are transferred to the heme-containing oxygenase domain via the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and FMN containing reductase domains. While crystal structures are available for both the reductase and oxygenase domains of NOS, to date there is no atomic level structural information on domain interactions required for the final FMN-to-heme electron transfer step. Here, we evaluate a model of this final electron transfer step for the heme-FMN-calmodulin NOS complex based on the recent biophysical studies using a 105-ns molecular dynamics trajectory. The resulting equilibrated complex structure is very stable and provides a detailed prediction of interdomain contacts required for stabilizing the NOS output state. The resulting equilibrated complex model agrees well with previous experimental work and provides a detailed working model of the final NOS electron transfer step required for NO biosynthesis.

  2. Mechanism elucidation of the radical SAM enzyme spore photoproduct lyase (SPL)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Spore photoproduct lyase (SPL) repairs a special thymine dimer 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, which is commonly called spore photoproduct or SP at the bacterial early germination phase. SP is the exclusive DNA photo-damage product in bacterial endospores; its generation and swift repair by SPL are responsible for the spores’ extremely high UV resistance. The early in vivo studies suggested that SPL utilizes a direct reversal strategy to repair the SP in the absence of light. The research in the past decade further established SPL as a radical SAM enzyme, which utilizes a tri-cysteine CXXXCXXC motif to harbor a [4Fe-4S] cluster. At the 1+ oxidation state, the cluster provides an electron to the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which binds to the cluster in a bidentate manner as the fourth and fifth ligands, to reductively cleave the C-S bond associated with the sulfonium ion in SAM, generating a reactive 5′-deoxyadenosyl (5′-dA) radical. This 5′-dA radical abstracts the proR hydrogen atom from the C6 carbon of SP to initiate the repair process; the resulting SP radical subsequently fragments to generate a putative thymine methyl radical, which accepts a back-donated H atom to yield the repaired TpT. SAM is suggested to be regenerated at the end of each catalytic cycle; and only a catalytic amount of SAM is needed in the SPL reaction. The H atom source for the back donation step is suggested to be a cysteine residue (C141 in B. subtilis SPL), and the H-atom transfer reaction leaves a thiyl radical behind on the protein. This thiyl radical thus must participate in the SAM regeneration process; however how the thiyl radical abstracts an H atom from the 5′-dA to regenerate SAM is unknown. This paper reviews and discusses the history and the latest progress in the mechanistic elucidation of SPL. Despite some recent breakthroughs, more questions are raised in the mechanistic understanding of this intriguing DNA repair enzyme. PMID:22197590

  3. The Mismetallation of Enzymes during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear iron enzymes can tightly bind non-activating metals. How do cells avoid mismetallation? The model bacterium Escherichia coli may control its metal pools so that thermodynamics favor the correct metallation of each enzyme. This system is disrupted, however, by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These species oxidize ferrous iron and thereby displace it from many iron-dependent mononuclear enzymes. Ultimately, zinc binds in its place, confers little activity, and imposes metabolic bottlenecks. Data suggest that E. coli compensates by using thiols to extract the zinc and by importing manganese to replace the catalytic iron atom. Manganese resists oxidants and provides substantial activity. PMID:25160623

  4. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  5. Constructing Kinetic Network Models to Elucidate Mechanisms of Functional Conformational Changes of Enzymes and Their Recognition with Ligands.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Jiang, H; Sheong, F K; Pardo-Avila, F; Cheung, P P-H; Huang, X

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes are biological macromolecules that catalyze complex reactions in life. In order to perform their functions effectively and efficiently, enzymes undergo conformational changes between different functional states. Therefore, elucidating the dynamics between these states is essential to understand the molecular mechanisms of enzymes. Although experimental methods such as X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron microscopy can produce high-resolution structures, the detailed conformational dynamics of many enzymes still remain obscure. While molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are able to complement the experiments by providing structure-based dynamics at atomic resolution, it is usually difficult for them to reach the biologically relevant timescales (hundreds of microseconds or longer). Kinetic network models (KNMs), in particular Markov state models (MSMs), hold great promise to overcome this challenge because they can bridge the timescale gap between MD simulations and experimental observations. In this chapter, we review the procedure of constructing KNMs to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of enzymes. First, we will give a general introduction of MSMs, including the methods to construct and validate MSMs. Second, we will present the applications of KNMs to study two important enzymes: the human Argonaute protein and the RNA polymerase II. We conclude by discussing the future perspectives regarding the potential of KNMs to investigate the dynamics of enzymes' functional conformational changes.

  6. Bleaching with lignin-oxidizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Pratima; Anand, Aradhna; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2006-01-01

    General concern about the environmental impact of chlorine bleaching effluents has led to a trend towards elementary chlorine-free or totally chlorine free bleaching methods. Considerable interest has been focused on the use of biotechnology in pulp bleaching, as large number of microbes and the enzymes produced by them are known to be capable of preferential degradation of native lignin and complete degradation of wood. Enzymes of the hemicellulolytic type, particularly xylan-attacking enzymes xylanases are now used commercially in the mills for pulp treatment and subsequent incorporation into bleach sequences. Certain white-rot fungi can delignify Kraft pulps increasing their brightness and their responsiveness to brightening with chemicals. The fungal treatments are too slow but the enzymes produced from the fungi can also delignify pulps and these enzymatic processes are likely to be easier to optimize and apply than the fungal treatments. This article presents an overview of the developments in the application of lignin-oxidizing enzymes in bleaching of chemical pulps. The present knowledge of the mechanisms on the action of enzymes as well as the practical results and advantages obtained on the laboratory and industrial scale are discussed.

  7. [Oxidative inactivation of angiotensin-converting enzyme].

    PubMed

    Sakharov, I Iu; Dukhanina, E A; Puchnina, E A; Danilov, S M; Muzykantov, V R

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivates the purified human angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) in vitro; the inactivating effect of H2O2 is eliminated by an addition of catalase. The lung and kidney ACE are equally sensitive to the effect of hydrogen peroxide. After addition of oxidants (H2O2 alone or H2O2 + ascorbate or H2O2 + Fe2+ mixtures) to the membranes or homogenates of the lung, the inactivation of membrane-bound ACE is far less pronounced despite the large-scale accumulation of lipid peroxidation products. The marked inactivation of ACE in the membrane fraction (up to 55% of original activity) was observed during ACE incubation with a glucose:glucose oxidase:Fe2+ mixture. Presumably the oxidative potential of H2O2 in tissues in consumed, predominantly, for the oxidation of other components of the membrane (e.g., lipids) rather than for ACE inactivation.

  8. Structures of benzylsuccinate synthase elucidate roles of accessory subunits in glycyl radical enzyme activation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Michael A.; Judd, Evan T.; Marsh, E. Neil G.; Elliott, Sean J.; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of the environmental pollutant toluene is initiated by the glycyl radical enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (BSS), which catalyzes the radical addition of toluene to fumarate, forming benzylsuccinate. We have determined crystal structures of the catalytic α-subunit of BSS with its accessory subunits β and γ, which both bind a [4Fe-4S] cluster and are essential for BSS activity in vivo. We find that BSSα has the common glycyl radical enzyme fold, a 10-stranded β/α-barrel that surrounds the glycyl radical cofactor and active site. Both accessory subunits β and γ display folds related to high potential iron–sulfur proteins but differ substantially from each other in how they interact with the α-subunit. BSSγ binds distally to the active site, burying a hydrophobic region of BSSα, whereas BSSβ binds to a hydrophilic surface of BSSα that is proximal to the active site. To further investigate the function of BSSβ, we determined the structure of a BSSαγ complex. Remarkably, we find that the barrel partially opens, allowing the C-terminal region of BSSα that houses the glycyl radical to shift within the barrel toward an exit pathway. The structural changes that we observe in the BSSαγ complex center around the crucial glycyl radical domain, thus suggesting a role for BSSβ in modulating the conformational dynamics required for enzyme activity. Accompanying proteolysis experiments support these structural observations. PMID:24982148

  9. Thymidine kinase 2 enzyme kinetics elucidate the mechanism of thymidine-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ren; Wang, Liya

    2014-10-07

    Mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 (TK2) is a nuclear gene-encoded protein, synthesized in the cytosol and subsequently translocated into the mitochondrial matrix, where it catalyzes the phosphorylation of thymidine (dT) and deoxycytidine (dC). The kinetics of dT phosphorylation exhibits negative cooperativity, but dC phosphorylation follows hyperbolic Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The two substrates compete with each other in that dT is a competitive inhibitor of dC phosphorylation, while dC acts as a noncompetitive inhibitor of dT phosphorylation. In addition, TK2 is feedback inhibited by dTTP and dCTP. TK2 also phosphorylates a number of pyrimidine nucleoside analogues used in antiviral and anticancer therapy and thus plays an important role in mitochondrial toxicities caused by nucleoside analogues. Deficiency in TK2 activity due to genetic alterations causes devastating mitochondrial diseases, which are characterized by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion or multiple deletions in the affected tissues. Severe TK2 deficiency is associated with early-onset fatal mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome, while less severe deficiencies result in late-onset phenotypes. In this review, studies of the enzyme kinetic behavior of TK2 enzyme variants are used to explain the mechanism of mtDNA depletion caused by TK2 mutations, thymidine overload due to thymidine phosphorylase deficiency, and mitochondrial toxicity caused by antiviral thymidine analogues.

  10. Isolation, structural elucidation, and biological evaluation of a 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural derivative, asfural, from enzyme-treated asparagus extract.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tomohiro; Sato, Atsuya; Ono, Tomoko; Goto, Kazunori; Maeda, Takahiro; Takanari, Jun; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Kenichi; Matsuura, Hideyuki

    2013-09-25

    A novel 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (HMF; 1) derivative, which is named asfural (compound 2), was isolated from enzyme-treated asparagus extract (ETAS) along with HMF (1) as a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) inducible compound. The structure of compound 2 was elucidated on the basis of its spectroscopic data from HREIMS and NMR, whereas the absolute configuration was determined using chiral HPLC analysis, compared to two synthesized compounds, (S)- and (R)-asfural. As a result, compound 2 derived from ETAS was assigned as (S)-(2-formylfuran-5-yl)methyl 5-oxopyrrolidine-2-carboxylate. When compound 2, synthesized (S)- and (R)-asfural, and HMF (1) were evaluated in terms of HSP70 mRNA expression-enhancing activity in HL-60 cells, compound 2 and (S)-asfural significantly increased the expression level in a concentration-dependent manner. HMF (1) also showed significant activity at 0.25 mg/mL.

  11. Foot of the Wave Analysis for Mechanistic Elucidation and Benchmarking Applications in Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Matheu, Roc; Neudeck, Sven; Meyer, Franc; Sala, Xavier; Llobet, Antoni

    2016-12-08

    The description of the foot of the wave analysis (FOWA) applied to the electrocatalytic oxidation of water to dioxygen is reported for cases where the rate determining step is first order and second order with regard to catalyst concentration, coinciding mechanistically with the so-called water nucleophilic attack (WNA) and the interaction of two M-O units (I2M, where M represents the metal center of the catalyst), respectively. The newly adapted equations are applied to a range of relevant molecular catalysts, both in homogeneous and heterogeneous phase, and the kinetic parameters are determined, including apparent rate constants and turnover frequencies. In this respect, the application of FOWA at different catalyst concentrations allows elucidation of the reaction mechanism that operates in each case. In addition, catalytic Tafel plots are used for assessing the performance of several molecular water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) as a function of overpotential under analogous conditions, and thus can be used for benchmarking purposes. This analysis was carried out earlier for oxide-based WOCs; however, this is the first report using molecular WOCs.

  12. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacchi, Isabella A.; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by

  13. Glycosylation of resveratrol protects it from enzymic oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Regev-Shoshani, Gilly; Shoseyov, Oded; Bilkis, Itzhak; Kerem, Zohar

    2003-01-01

    Plant polyphenols, including dietary polyphenols such as resveratrol, are important components in the plant antioxidant and defence systems. They are also known to exert beneficial effects on human health through diet. As they are produced, these polyphenols may be subjected to deleterious enzymic oxidation by the plant polyphenol oxidases. They are generally synthesized as glycosides like 5,4'-dihydroxystilbene-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, the 3-glucoside of resveratrol. The effects of the glycosylation and methylation of the parent resveratrol on its enzymic oxidation were studied. Methyl and glucosyl derivatives were synthesized using simple one-step methodologies. The kinetics of their enzymic oxidation by tyrosinases were defined. Substitution at the p-hydroxy group, by either glucose or methyl, abolished enzymic oxidation by both mushroom and grape tyrosinases. Substitution at the m-hydroxy group with methyl had a small effect, but substitution with glucose resulted in a much lower affinity of the enzymes for the glycoside. We suggest that glycosylation of polyphenols in nature helps to protect these vital molecules from enzymic oxidation, extending their half-life in the cell and maintaining their beneficial antioxidant capacity and biological properties. PMID:12697026

  14. Chemical reactivity of graphene oxide towards amines elucidated by solid-state NMR.

    PubMed

    Vacchi, Isabella A; Spinato, Cinzia; Raya, Jésus; Bianco, Alberto; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia

    2016-07-14

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an attractive nanomaterial for many applications. Controlling the functionalization of GO is essential for the design of graphene-based conjugates with novel properties. But, the chemical composition of GO has not been fully elucidated yet. Due to the high reactivity of the oxygenated moieties, mainly epoxy, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups, several derivatization reactions may occur concomitantly. The reactivity of GO with amine derivatives has been exploited in the literature to design graphene-based conjugates, mainly through amidation. However, in this study we undoubtedly demonstrate using magic angle spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR that the reaction between GO and amine functions occurs via ring opening of the epoxides, and not by amidation. We also prove that there is a negligible amount of carboxylic acid groups in two GO samples obtained by a different synthesis process, hence eliminating the possibility of amidation reactions with amine derivatives. This work brings additional insights into the chemical reactivity of GO, which is fundamental to control its functionalization, and highlights the major role of MAS NMR spectroscopy for a comprehensive characterization of derivatized GO.

  15. Genetic Elucidation of Nitric Oxide Signaling in Incompatible Plant-Pathogen Interactions[w

    PubMed Central

    Zeier, Jürgen; Delledonne, Massimo; Mishina, Tatiana; Severi, Emmanuele; Sonoda, Masatoshi; Lamb, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Recent experiments indicate that nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in disease resistance and several other physiological processes in plants. However, most of the current information about the function of NO in plants is based on pharmacological studies, and additional approaches are therefore required to ascertain the role of NO as an important signaling molecule in plants. We have expressed a bacterial nitric oxide dioxygenase (NOD) in Arabidopsis plants and/or avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato to study incompatible plant-pathogen interactions impaired in NO signaling. NOD expression in transgenic Arabidopsis resulted in decreased NO levels in planta and attenuated a pathogen-induced NO burst. Moreover, NOD expression in plant cells had very similar effects on plant defenses compared to NOD expression in avirulent Pseudomonas. The defense responses most affected by NO reduction during the incompatible interaction were decreased H2O2 levels during the oxidative burst and a blockage of Phe ammonia lyase expression, the key enzyme in the general phenylpropanoid pathway. Expression of the NOD furthermore blocked UV light-induced Phe ammonia lyase and chalcone synthase gene expression, indicating a general signaling function of NO in the activation of the phenylpropanoid pathway. NO possibly functions in incompatible plant-pathogen interactions by inhibiting the plant antioxidative machinery, and thereby ensuring locally prolonged H2O2 levels. Additionally, albeit to a lesser extent, we observed decreases in salicylic acid production, a diminished development of hypersensitive cell death, and a delay in pathogenesis-related protein 1 expression during these NO-deficient plant-pathogen interactions. Therefore, this genetic approach confirms that NO is an important regulatory component in the signaling network of plant defense responses. PMID:15347797

  16. pH-Controlled Oxidation of an Aromatic Ketone: Structural Elucidation of the Products of Two Green Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, C. Eric

    2010-01-01

    A laboratory experiment emphasizing the structural elucidation of organic compounds has been developed as a discovery exercise. The "unknown" compounds are the products of the pH-controlled oxidation of 4'-methoxyacetophenone with bleach. The chemoselectivity of this reaction is highly dependent on the pH of the reaction media: under basic…

  17. Ferulic Acid Orchestrates Anti-Oxidative Properties of Danggui Buxue Tang, an Ancient Herbal Decoction: Elucidation by Chemical Knock-Out Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Amy G. W.; Huang, Vincent Y.; Wang, Huai Y.; Lin, Huang Q.; Dong, Tina T. X.; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2016-01-01

    Ferulic acid, a phenolic acid derived mainly from a Chinese herb Angelica Sinensis Radix (ASR), was reported to reduce the formation of free radicals. Danggui Buxue Tang (DBT), a herbal decoction composing of Astragali Radix (AR) and ASR, has been utilized for more than 800 years in China having known anti-oxidative property. Ferulic acid is a major active ingredient in DBT; however, the role of ferulic acid within the herbal mixture has not been resolved. In order to elucidate the function of ferulic acid within this herbal decoction, a ferulic acid-depleted herbal decoction was created and named as DBTΔfa. The anti-oxidative properties of chemically modified DBT decoction were systemically compared in cultured H9C2 rat cardiomyoblast cell line. The application of DBT and DBTΔfa into the cultures showed functions in (i) decreasing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, detected by laser confocal; (ii) increasing of the activation of Akt; (iii) increasing the transcriptional activity of anti-oxidant response element (ARE); and (iv) increasing the expressions of anti-oxidant enzymes, i.e. NQO1 and GCLM. In all scenario, the aforementioned anti-oxidative properties of DBTΔfa in H9C2 cells were significantly reduced, as compared to authentic DBT. Thus, ferulic acid could be an indispensable chemical in DBT to orchestrate multi-components of DBT as to achieve maximal anti-oxidative functions. PMID:27824860

  18. Graphene oxide immobilized enzymes show high thermal and solvent stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanová, Soňa; Zarevúcká, Marie; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2015-03-01

    The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed lipase achieved over 100% of the initial activity in a series of organic solvents. These findings, showing enhanced thermal stability and solvent tolerance of graphene oxide immobilized enzyme, will have a profound impact on practical industrial scale uses of enzymes for the conversion of lipids into fuels.The thermal and solvent tolerance of enzymes is highly important for their industrial use. We show here that the enzyme lipase from Rhizopus oryzae exhibits exceptionally high thermal stability and high solvent tolerance and even increased activity in acetone when immobilized onto a graphene oxide (GO) nanosupport prepared by Staudenmaier and Brodie methods. We studied various forms of immobilization of the enzyme: by physical adsorption, covalent attachment, and additional crosslinking. The activity recovery was shown to be dependent on the support type, enzyme loading and immobilization procedure. Covalently immobilized lipase showed significantly better resistance to heat inactivation (the activity recovery was 65% at 70 °C) in comparison with the soluble counterpart (the activity recovery was 65% at 40 °C). Physically adsorbed

  19. Enzymic oxidation of monoclonal antibodies by soluble and immobilized bifunctional enzyme complexes.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B; Koppel, R; Schwartz, F; Fleminger, G

    1990-06-27

    Site-specific modification of monoclonal antibodies was achieved by oxidation of the carbohydrate moieties of antibodies which are located remote from the antigen binding sites. Sialic acid and galactose are terminal sugars of these carbohydrate chains. Concomitant treatment of the antibodies with neuraminidase and galactose oxidase generated aldehyde groups in the oligosaccharide moieties of immunoglobulins which reacted selectively with amino or hydrazide groups of the matrix. Subsequent immobilization of neuraminidase and galactose oxidase on Eupergit C-adipic dihydrazide proved to be an efficient and selective system for the enzymic oxidation of the monoclonal antibodies without impairing their immunological activity. Oriented immobilization of enzymically oxidized monoclonal antibodies on hydrazide or amino Eupergit C derivatives thus leads to the formation of antibody matrix conjugates which possess high antigen-binding activities.

  20. Isolation, structure elucidation and enzyme inhibition studies of a new hydroxy ester and other compounds from Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid stem.

    PubMed

    Alamzeb, Muhammad; Khan, M Rafiullah; Mamoon-Ur-Rashid; Ali, Saqib; Khan, Ashfaq Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Bioassay-guided isolation and fractionation of Berberis jaeschkeana Schneid var. jaeschkeana stem resulted in the isolation and characterisation of a new long chain hydroxy ester named as berberinol (1) along with six known compounds (2-7). All the structures were established from 1D and 2D spectroscopic data. Crude extract, sub-fractions and all the isolated compounds were evaluated for their anti-fungal and urease enzyme inhibition properties. All of the sub-fractions and compounds showed good anti-fungal and urease enzyme inhibition properties. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were calculated for all active samples in case of urease enzyme inhibition. MICs values were found to be in the range of 39.03-49.78 μg/mL for urease enzyme inhibition.

  1. The Bremner factor for elucidation of nitrous oxide evolution from soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well established that agricultural emissions of nitrous oxide are an important source of atmospheric green house gas loading implicated in global climate change. The atmospheric concentration of nitrous oxide has increased by 17% since the 1800’s and continues to increase at an exponential r...

  2. Enzyme kinetics of oxidative metabolism: cytochromes P450.

    PubMed

    Korzekwa, Ken

    2014-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) are the most important enzymes in the oxidative metabolism of hydrophobic drugs and other foreign compounds (xenobiotics). The versatility of these enzymes results in some unusual kinetic properties, stemming from the simultaneous interaction of multiple substrates with the CYP active site. Often, the CYPs display kinetics that deviate from standard hyperbolic saturation or inhibition kinetics. Non-Michaelis-Menten or "atypical" saturation kinetics include sigmoidal, biphasic, and substrate inhibition kinetics (see Chapter 3 ). Interactions between substrates include competitive inhibition, noncompetitive inhibition, mixed inhibition, partial inhibition, activation, and activation followed by inhibition (see Chapter 4 ). Models and equations that can result in these kinetic profiles will be presented and discussed.

  3. Network Inference Algorithms Elucidate Nrf2 Regulation of Mouse Lung Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Mudita; Malhotra, Deepti; Biswal, Shyam

    2008-01-01

    A variety of cardiovascular, neurological, and neoplastic conditions have been associated with oxidative stress, i.e., conditions under which levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are elevated over significant periods. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) regulates the transcription of several gene products involved in the protective response to oxidative stress. The transcriptional regulatory and signaling relationships linking gene products involved in the response to oxidative stress are, currently, only partially resolved. Microarray data constitute RNA abundance measures representing gene expression patterns. In some cases, these patterns can identify the molecular interactions of gene products. They can be, in effect, proxies for protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions. Traditional techniques used for clustering coregulated genes on high-throughput gene arrays are rarely capable of distinguishing between direct transcriptional regulatory interactions and indirect ones. In this study, newly developed information-theoretic algorithms that employ the concept of mutual information were used: the Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR). These algorithms captured dependencies in the gene expression profiles of the mouse lung, allowing the regulatory effect of Nrf2 in response to oxidative stress to be determined more precisely. In addition, a characterization of promoter sequences of Nrf2 regulatory targets was conducted using a Support Vector Machine classification algorithm to corroborate ARACNE and CLR predictions. Inferred networks were analyzed, compared, and integrated using the Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) plug-in of Cytoscape. Using the two network inference algorithms and one machine learning algorithm, a number of both previously known and novel targets of Nrf2 transcriptional activation were identified. Genes predicted as

  4. Elucidating the Chemical Complexity of Organic Aerosol Constituents Measured During the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, L.; Isaacman, G. A.; Spielman, S. R.; Worton, D. R.; Zhang, H.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Thousands of volatile organic compounds are uniquely created in the atmosphere, many of which undergo chemical transformations that result in more highly-oxidized and often lower vapor pressure species. These species can contribute to secondary organic aerosol, a complex mixture of organic compounds that is still not chemically well-resolved. Organic aerosol collected on filters taken during the Southeastern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) constitute hundreds of unique chemical compounds. Some of these include known anthropogenic and biogenic tracers characterized using standardized analytical techniques (e.g. GC-MS, UPLC, LC-MS), but the majority of the chemical diversity has yet to be explored. By employing analytical techniques involving sample derivatization and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) with high-resolution-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-MS), we elucidate the chemical complexity of the organic aerosol matrix along the volatility and polarity grids. Further, by utilizing both electron impact (EI) and novel soft vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ionization mass spectrometry, a greater fraction of the organic mass is fully speciated. The GC x GC-HR-ToF-MS with EI/VUV technique efficiently provides an unprecedented level of speciation for complex ambient samples. We present an extensive chemical characterization and quantification of organic species that goes beyond typical atmospheric tracers in the SOAS samples. We further demonstrate that complex organic mixtures can be chemically deconvoluted by elucidation of chemical formulae, volatility, functionality, and polarity. These parameters provide insight into the sources (anthropogenic vs. biogenic), chemical processes (oxidation pathways), and environmental factors (temperature, humidity), controlling organic aerosol growth in the Southeastern United States.

  5. An XPS analytical approach for elucidating the microbially mediated enargite oxidative dissolution.

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, M; Rossi, G; Elsener, B; Loi, G; Atzei, D; Rossi, A

    2009-04-01

    In this work, the microbe-mediated oxidative dissolution of enargite surfaces (Cu(3)AsS(4)) was studied on powdered samples exposed to 9K nutrient solution (pH 2.3) inoculated by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans initially adapted to arsenopyrite. These conditions simulate the acid mine environment. The redox potential of the inoculated solutions increased up to +0.72 V vs normal hydrogen electrode (NHE), indicating the increase of the Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) ratio, and correspondingly the pH decreased to values as low as 1.9. In the sterile 9K control, the redox potential and pH remained constant at +0.52 V NHE and 2.34, respectively. Solution analyses showed that in inoculated medium Cu and As dissolved stoichiometrically with a dissolution rate of about three to five times higher compared to the sterile control. For the first time, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was carried out on the bioleached enargite powder with the aim of clarifying the role of the microorganisms in the dissolution process. XPS results provide evidence of the formation of a thin oxidized layer on the mineral surface. Nitrogen was also detected on the bioleached surfaces and was attributed to the presence of an extracellular polymer substance layer supporting a mechanism of bacteria attachment via the formation of a biofilm a few nanometers thick, commonly known as nanobiofilm.

  6. Elucidation of Xylem-Specific Transcription Factors and Absolute Quantification of Enzymes Regulating Cellulose Biosynthesis in Populus trichocarpa.

    PubMed

    Loziuk, Philip L; Parker, Jennifer; Li, Wei; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Wang, Jack P; Li, Quanzi; Sederoff, Ronald R; Chiang, Vincent L; Muddiman, David C

    2015-10-02

    Cellulose, the main chemical polymer of wood, is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature.1 The ability to perturb the abundance and structure of cellulose microfibrils is of critical importance to the pulp and paper industry as well as for the textile, wood products, and liquid biofuels industries. Although much has been learned at the transcript level about the biosynthesis of cellulose, a quantitative understanding at the proteome level has yet to be established. The study described herein sought to identify the proteins directly involved in cellulose biosynthesis during wood formation in Populus trichocarpa along with known xylem-specific transcription factors involved in regulating these key proteins. Development of an effective discovery proteomic strategy through a combination of subcellular fractionation of stem differentiating xylem tissue (SDX) with recently optimized FASP digestion protocols, StageTip fractionation, as well as optimized instrument parameters for global proteomic analysis using the quadrupole-orbitrap mass spectrometer resulted in the deepest proteomic coverage of SDX protein from P. trichocarpa with 9,146 protein groups being identified (1% FDR). Of these, 20 cellulosic/hemicellulosic enzymes and 43 xylem-specific transcription factor groups were identified. Finally, selection of surrogate peptides led to an assay for absolute quantification of 14 cellulosic proteins in SDX of P. trichocarpa.

  7. Elucidating Quantum Confinement in Graphene Oxide Dots Based On Excitation-Wavelength-Independent Photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Te-Fu; Huang, Wei-Lun; Chung, Chung-Jen; Chiang, I-Ting; Chen, Liang-Che; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Su, Wu-Chou; Cheng, Ching; Chen, Shean-Jen; Teng, Hsisheng

    2016-06-02

    Investigating quantum confinement in graphene under ambient conditions remains a challenge. In this study, we present graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) that show excitation-wavelength-independent photoluminescence. The luminescence color varies from orange-red to blue as the GOQD size is reduced from 8 to 1 nm. The photoluminescence of each GOQD specimen is associated with electron transitions from the antibonding π (π*) to oxygen nonbonding (n-state) orbitals. The observed quantum confinement is ascribed to a size change in the sp(2) domains, which leads to a change in the π*-π gap; the n-state levels remain unaffected by the size change. The electronic properties and mechanisms involved in quantum-confined photoluminescence can serve as the foundation for the application of oxygenated graphene in electronics, photonics, and biology.

  8. Elucidation of stability determinants of cold-adapted monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from a psychrophilic bacterium, Colwellia maris, by construction of chimeric enzymes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Seiya; Yasutake, Yoshiaki; Tanaka, Isao; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2005-04-01

    To elucidate determinants of differences in thermostability between mesophilic and psychrophilic monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs) from Azotobacter vinelandii (AvIDH) and Colwellia maris (CmIDH), respectively, chimeric enzymes derived from the two IDHs were constructed based on the recently resolved three-dimensional structure of AvIDH, and several characteristics of the two wild-type and six chimeric IDHs were examined. These characteristics were then compared with those of dimeric IDH from Escherichia coli (EcIDH). All recombinant enzymes with a (His)(6)-tag attached to the N-terminal were overexpressed in the E. coli cells and purified by Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography. The catalytic activity (k(cat)) and catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) of the wild-type AvIDH and CmIDH were higher than those of EcIDH, implying that an improved catalytic rate more than compensates for the loss of a catalytic site in the former two IDHs due to monomerization. Analyses of the thermostability and kinetic parameters of the chimeric enzymes indicated that region 2, corresponding to domain II, and particularly region 3 located in the C-terminal part of domain I, are involved in the thermolability of CmIDH, and that the corresponding two regions of AvIDH are important for exhibiting higher catalytic activity and affinity for isocitrate than CmIDH. The relationships between the stability, catalytic activity and structural characteristics of AvIDH and CmIDH are discussed.

  9. Role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Marisa; Moret, Inés; Rausell, Francisco; Bastida, Guillermo; Aguas, Mariam; Cerrillo, Elena; Nos, Pilar; Beltrán, Belén

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing interest in oxidative stress being a potential aetiological factor and/or a triggering factor in Crohn's disease, rather than a concomitant occurrence during the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent research has shown that the immune mononuclear cells of Crohn's disease patients are induced to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Similarly, the regulation of antioxidant enzymes during disease in these cells has been unravelled, showing that SOD (superoxide dismutase) activity and GPx (glutathione peroxidase) activity is increased during active disease and returns to normal in remission phases. However, catalase remains constantly inhibited which supports the idea that catalase is not a redox-sensitive enzyme, but a regulator of cellular processes. ROS (reactive oxygen species) can be produced under the stimulus of different cytokines such as TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α). It has been shown in different experimental models that they are also able to regulate apoptosis and other cellular processes. The status of oxidative stress elements in Crohn's disease and their possible implications in regulating cellular processes are reviewed in the present paper.

  10. Oxidative enzyme changes in sorghum infested by shoot fly.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, P G; Shwetha, B L; Swetha, G; Patil, J V

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the role of oxidative enzymes in the defense response of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Poales: Poaceae), to the sorghum shoot fly, Atherigona soccata Rondani (Diptera: Muscidae). Changes in polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activity and total protein content were observed in resistant and susceptible sorghum genotypes in response to A. soccata feeding. Resistant plants exhibited higher levels of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities and total protein content compared with susceptible plants. Peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities and total protein content in the infested resistant and susceptible genotypes were higher when compared with their control plants, respectively. These findings suggest that resistant genotypes may be able to tolerate shoot fly feeding by increasing their peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities. Among the enzymes examined, differences in isozyme profiles for peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were detected between control and infested IS 18551, M35-1, 296B, SSV 84, and DJ 6514 plants. Differences in protein profiles were observed between A. soccata infested and their respective uninfested controls of all the genotypes. In conclusion, this study revealed that these defense enzymes and proteins might attribute to the resistance mechanisms in sorghum plants against A. soccata infestation.

  11. Extended friction elucidates the breakdown of fast water transport in graphene oxide membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montessori, A.; Amadei, C. A.; Falcucci, G.; Sega, M.; Vecitis, C. D.; Succi, S.

    2016-12-01

    The understanding of water transport in graphene oxide (GO) membranes stands out as a major theoretical problem in graphene research. Notwithstanding the intense efforts devoted to the subject in the recent years, a consolidated picture of water transport in GO membranes is yet to emerge. By performing mesoscale simulations of water transport in ultrathin GO membranes, we show that even small amounts of oxygen functionalities can lead to a dramatic drop of the GO permeability, in line with experimental findings. The coexistence of bulk viscous dissipation and spatially extended molecular friction results in a major decrease of both slip and bulk flow, thereby suppressing the fast water transport regime observed in pristine graphene nanochannels. Inspection of the flow structure reveals an inverted curvature in the near-wall region, which connects smoothly with a parabolic profile in the bulk region. Such inverted curvature is a distinctive signature of the coexistence between single-particle zero-temperature (noiseless) Langevin friction and collective hydrodynamics. The present mesoscopic model with spatially extended friction may offer a computationally efficient tool for future simulations of water transport in nanomaterials.

  12. Effects of sodium tungstate on oxidative stress enzymes in rats.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Sherry; Kushwaha, Pramod; Flora, S J S

    2013-09-01

    Tungsten, due to its distinguished physical properties, has wide industrial and military applications. Environmental exposure to tungsten, which mainly occurs through various sources like food, water, soil, etc., is of growing concern as various toxic effects have recently been reported. In this study, we investigated the effects of oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of sodium tungstate on various biochemical variables indicative of oxidative stress in erythrocytes and soft tissue damage in rats. Male rats were administered to 119 mg, 238 mg/kg of sodium tungstate orally or 20 mg and 41 mg/kg through i.p. route, for 14 consecutive days. The results demonstrated a significant increase in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and an increase in catalase and glutathione peroxidase antioxidant enzymes activities in erythrocytes. Erythrocyte glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity showed significant inhibition, while tissue ROS and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance levels increased accompanied by a decreased reduced glutathione, oxidized glutathione (GSH:GSSG) ratio. These changes were supported by an increase in plasma transaminases activities, creatinine, and urea levels, suggesting hepatic and renal injury. These biochemical alterations were prominent in rats intraperitoneally administrated with sodium tungstate than oral administration, suggesting more pronounced toxicity. The study also suggests oxidative stress as one of the major mechanism involved in the toxic manifestations of sodium tungstate.

  13. Modulation of angiotensin-converting enzyme by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, A; Fernández-Alfonso, M S; Sánchez de Rojas, R; Ortega, T; Paul, M; González, C

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity.A biochemical study was performed in order to analyse the effect of the NO-donors, SIN-1 and diethylamine/NO (DEA/NO), and of an aqueous solution of nitric oxide on the ACE activity in plasma from 3-month old male Sprague-Dawley rats and on ACE purified from rabbit lung. SIN-1 significantly inhibited the activity of both enzymes in a concentration-dependent way between 1 and 100 μM. DEA/NO inhibited the activity of purified ACE from 0.1 μM to 10 μM and plasma ACE, with a lower potency, between 1 and 100 μM. An aqueous solution of NO (100 and 150 μM) also inhibited significantly the activity of both enzymes. Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated an apparent competitive inhibition of Hip-His-Leu hydrolysis by NO-donors.Modulation of ACE activity by NO was also assessed in the rat carotid artery by comparing contractions elicited by angiotensin I (AI) and AII. Concentration-response curves to both peptides were performed in arteries with endothelium in the presence of the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (10 μM), and the inhibitor of NO formation, L-NAME (0.1 mM). NO, which is still released from endothelium in the presence of 10 μM ODQ, elicited a significant inhibition of AI contractions at low concentrations (1 and 5 nM). In the absence of endothelium, 1 μM SIN-1 plus 10 μM ODQ, as well as 10 μM DEA/NO plus 10 μM ODQ induced a significant inhibition on AI-induced contractions at 1 and 5 nM and at 1–100 nM, respectively.In conclusion, we demonstrated that (i) NO and NO-releasing compounds inhibit ACE activity in a concentration-dependent and competitive way and that (ii) NO release from endothelium physiologically reduces conversion of AI to AII. PMID:9641545

  14. Alkane Oxidation: Methane Monooxygenases, Related Enzymes, and Their Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent C-C; Maji, Suman; Chen, Peter P-Y; Lee, Hung Kay; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2017-02-16

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) mediate the facile conversion of methane into methanol in methanotrophic bacteria with high efficiency under ambient conditions. Because the selective oxidation of methane is extremely challenging, there is considerable interest in understanding how these enzymes carry out this difficult chemistry. The impetus of these efforts is to learn from the microbes to develop a biomimetic catalyst to accomplish the same chemical transformation. Here, we review the progress made over the past two to three decades toward delineating the structures and functions of the catalytic sites in two MMOs: soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). sMMO is a water-soluble three-component protein complex consisting of a hydroxylase with a nonheme diiron catalytic site; pMMO is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme with a unique tricopper cluster as the site of hydroxylation. The metal cluster in each of these MMOs harnesses O2 to functionalize the C-H bond using different chemistry. We highlight some of the common basic principles that they share. Finally, the development of functional models of the catalytic sites of MMOs is described. These efforts have culminated in the first successful biomimetic catalyst capable of efficient methane oxidation without overoxidation at room temperature.

  15. Oxidative phenols in forage crops containing polyphenol oxidase enzymes.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Ifat; Threadgill, Michael D; Moorby, Jon M; Winters, Ana

    2010-02-10

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-containing enzymes that catalyze oxidation of endogenous monophenols to ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds and of ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds to ortho-quinones. Subsequent nucleophilic addition reactions of phenols, amino acids, and proteins with the electrophilic ortho-quinones form brown-, black-, or red-colored secondary products associated with the undesired discolouration of fruit and vegetables. Several important forage plants also exhibit significant PPO activity, and a link with improved efficiency of ruminant production has been established. In ruminant animals, extensive degradation of forage proteins, following consumption, can result in high rates of excretion of nitrogen, which contributes to point-source and diffuse pollution. Reaction of quinones with forage proteins leads to the formation of protein-phenol complexes that are resistant to proteolytic activity during ensilage and during rumen fermentation. Thus, PPO in red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been shown to improve protein utilization by ruminants. While PPO activity has been demonstrated in a number of forage crops, little work has been carried out to identify substrates of PPO, knowledge of which would be beneficial for characterizing this trait in these forages. In general, a wide range of 1,2-dihydroxyarenes can serve as PPO substrates because these are readily oxidized because of the ortho positioning of the hydroxy groups. Naturally occurring phenols isolated from forage crops with PPO activity are reviewed. A large number of phenols, which may be directly or indirectly oxidized as a consequence of PPO activity, have been identified in several forage grass, legume, cereal, and brassica species; these include hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamates, and flavonoids. In conclusion, a number of compounds are known or postulated to enable PPO activity in important PPO-expressing forage crops. Targeting the matching of these compounds with PPO activity

  16. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  17. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  18. Effect of deuterium oxide on neutrophil oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release

    SciTech Connect

    Tsan, M.F.; Turkall, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    We have previously shown that deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) enhances the oxidation of methionine, a myeloperoxidase (MPO) -mediated reaction, by human neutrophils during phagocytosis. However, D/sub 2/O has no effect on the oxidation of methionine by the purified MPO-H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-Cl- system. To explain this observation, we studied the effect of D/sub 2/O on the oxidative metabolism, phagocytosis, and lysosomal enzyme release by human neutrophils. D/sub 2/O stimulated the hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity of resting neutrophils in a dose-response fashion. In the presence of latex particles or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), D/sub 2/O brought about an exaggerated stimulation of the HMS activity. This enhancement of the HMS activity by D/sub 2/O was markedly reduced when neutrophils form two patients with X-linked chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) were used, either in the presence or absence of latex particles or PMA. Superoxide and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production by neutrophils in the presence of latex particles or PMA were also stimulated by D/sub 2/O. In contrast, D/sub 2/O inhibited the ingestion of latex particles. D/sub 2/O enhanced the extracellular release of MPO, but not lactate dehydrogenase, by neutrophils only in the simultaneous presence of cytochalasin B and latex particles. The enhancement of HMS activity and MPO release by D/sub 2/O was partially inhibited by colchicine. Our results suggest that enhancement of neutrophil oxidative metabolism by D/sub 2/O may in part explain the stimulation of methionine oxidation by phagocytosing neutrophils.

  19. Clinical consequences of urea cycle enzyme deficiencies and potential links to arginine and nitric oxide metabolism.

    PubMed

    Scaglia, Fernando; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Kleppe, Soledad; Marini, Juan; Carter, Susan; Garlick, Peter; Jahoor, Farook; O'Brien, William; Lee, Brendan

    2004-10-01

    Urea cycle disorders (UCD) are human conditions caused by the dysregulation of nitrogen transfer from ammonia nitrogen into urea. The biochemistry and the genetics of these disorders were well elucidated. Earlier diagnosis and improved treatments led to an emerging, longer-lived cohort of patients. The natural history of some of these disorders began to point to pathophysiological processes that may be unrelated to the primary cause of acute morbidity and mortality, i.e., hyperammonemia. Carbamyl phosphate synthetase I single nucleotide polymorphisms may be associated with altered vascular resistance that becomes clinically relevant when specific environmental stressors are present. Patients with argininosuccinic aciduria due to a deficiency of argininosuccinic acid lyase are uniquely prone to chronic hepatitis, potentially leading to cirrhosis. Moreover, our recent observations suggest that there may be an increased prevalence of essential hypertension. In contrast, hyperargininemia found in patients with arginase 1 deficiency is associated with pyramidal tract findings and spasticity, without significant hyperammonemia. An intriguing potential pathophysiological link is the dysregulation of intracellular arginine availability and its potential effect on nitric oxide (NO) metabolism. By combining detailed natural history studies with the development of tissue-specific null mouse models for urea cycle enzymes and measurement of nitrogen flux through the cycle to urea and NO in UCD patients, we may begin to dissect the contribution of different sources of arginine to NO production and the consequences on both rare genetic and common multifactorial diseases.

  20. Radiation effects on rat testes. IX. Studies on oxidative enzymes after partial body gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, G S; Bawa, S R

    1975-08-01

    Oxidative enzymes in the rat testes have been studied after gamma irradiation. The role of these enzymes in relation to spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis after radiation injury to testis has been discussed. Loss of succinic dehydrogenase and sorbitol dehydrogenase reflects the losts of germ cell population. Malic enzyme and malic dehydrogenase seem to the related to the deficiency of steroid hormones, whereas increase in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and NADP isocitric dehydrogenase is due to secondary stimulation of pituitary.

  1. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Thomas J.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2017-01-01

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16–13 s−1, these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock. PMID:27366961

  2. Elucidation of the reaction mechanism during the removal of copper oxide by halogen surfactant at the surface of copper plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Shun; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Itoh, Takashi; Motomiya, Kenichi; Tohji, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although copper nanoparticles have various attractive properties, electrical applications of these was not achieved because of its surface oxide layer which prohibited electrical conduction. Thus, it can be considered that a new elimination method of the oxide on Cu surface, which simultaneously provide the resistance to re-oxidized, should be developed. In this study, the reaction between the metal oxide on Cu plate surface and halogen surfactant was introduced into development as a new elimination method of surface oxide layer. Since electrochemical and surface analysis are effective for analyzing the reaction mechanism which expected to be the reduction reaction of the oxide on metal surface, Cu electrode, which represented material of Cu nanoparticles surface, was used for the reaction mechanism analysis. The oxide is removed by controlling the temperature and selecting the optimal combination of solvents and the halogen surfactant (TIC). Results of electrochemical measurements strongly suggest that the chemical reaction between the oxides on the surface with the halogen surfactant is a substitution reaction which converts Cu oxide to Cu bromide, and continuously formed Cu bromide was dissolved into solvent. Totally, the oxide on the Cu surface was successfully eliminated.

  3. Enzymic oxidation of some alkylbenzenes in insects and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chakroborty, J; Smith, J N

    1967-02-01

    1. Oxidation rates of alkylbenzenes have been measured in 10000g supernatants of vertebrate livers, locust fat bodies and housefly abdomens. 2. Activity per g. of insect was greater in fly than locust preparations but both were of the same order as a range of vertebrate species. 3. Methyl groups of toluene and p-nitrotoluene were oxidized more rapidly than the side chains of higher homologues. 4. In the higher homologues hydroxylation occurred most readily at the alpha-methylene group and less readily at penultimate methylene and terminal methyl groups. 5. Oxidations in both vertebrates and insects were inhibited by piperonylbutoxide and similar synergists. 6. Oxidation activity was stimulated by pretreatment of rats, but not locusts, with phenobarbitone or 3,4-benzopyrene.

  4. Oxidative bioelectrocatalysis: From natural metabolic pathways to synthetic metabolons and minimal enzyme cascades.

    PubMed

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2016-05-01

    Anodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells are more complex than cathodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells, because laccase and bilirubin oxidase can individually catalyze four electron reduction of oxygen to water, whereas most anodic enzymes only do a single two electron oxidation of a complex fuel (i.e. glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone while generating 2 electrons of the total 24 electrons), so enzyme cascades are typically needed for complete oxidation of the fuel. This review article will discuss the lessons learned from natural metabolic pathways about multi-step oxidation and how those lessons have been applied to minimal or artificial enzyme cascades. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  5. Nitric Oxide Measurement from Purified Enzymes and Estimation of Scavenging Activity by Gas Phase Chemiluminescence Method.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Aprajita; Gupta, Alok Kumar; Mishra, Sonal; Wany, Aakanksha; Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitrate reductase (NR) is a key enzyme that produces nitric oxide (NO) using nitrite as a substrate. Lower plants such as algae are shown to have nitric oxide synthase enzyme and higher plants contain NOS activity but enzyme responsible for NO production in higher plants is subjected to debate. In plant nitric oxide research, it is very important to measure NO very precisely in order to determine its functional role. A significant amount of NO is being scavenged by various cell components. The net NO production depends in production minus scavenging. Here, we describe methods to measure NO from purified NR and inducible nitric oxide synthase from mouse (iNOS), we also describe a method of measure NO scavenging by tobacco cell suspensions and mitochondria from roots.

  6. Modeling nitrous oxide production and reduction in soil through explicit representation of denitrification enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jianqiu; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-02-17

    An enzyme-explicit denitrification model with representations for pre- and de novo synthesized enzymes was developed to improve predictions of nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulations in soil and emissions from the surface. The metabolic model of denitrification is based on dual-substrate utilization and Monod growth kinetics. Enzyme synthesis/activation was incorporated into each sequential reduction step of denitrification to regulate dynamics of the denitrifier population and the active enzyme pool, which controlled the rate function. Parameterizations were developed from observations of the dynamics of N2O production and reduction in soil incubation experiments. The model successfully reproduced the dynamics of N2O and N2 accumulation in the incubations and revealed an important regulatory effect of denitrification enzyme kinetics on the accumulation of denitrification products. Pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes contributed 20, 13, 43, and 62% of N2O that accumulated in 48 h incubations of soil collected from depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-15, and 15-25 cm, respectively. An enzyme activity function (E) was defined to estimate the relative concentration of active enzymes and variation in response to environmental conditions. The value of E allows for activities of pre-synthesized denitrification enzymes to be differentiated from de novo synthesized enzymes. Incorporating explicit representations of denitrification enzyme kinetics into biogeochemical models is a promising approach for accurately simulating dynamics of the production and reduction of N2O in soils.

  7. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barioni, Éric Diego; de Oliveira Duro, Stephanie; Ratto Tempestini Horliana, Anna Carolina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Marcourakis, Tânia; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days) and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure). Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment. PMID:27293324

  8. Technical decision making with higher order structure data: utilization of differential scanning calorimetry to elucidate critical protein structural changes resulting from oxidation.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Kelly K; Dinh, Nikita; Gabrielson, John P

    2015-04-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is a useful tool for monitoring thermal stability of the molecular conformation of proteins. Here, we present an example of the sensitivity of DSC to changes in stability arising from a common chemical degradation pathway, oxidation. This Note is part of a series of industry case studies demonstrating the application of higher order structure data for technical decision making. For this study, six protein products from three structural classes were evaluated at multiple levels of oxidation. For each protein, the melting temperature (Tm ) decreased linearly as a function of oxidation; however, differences in the rate of change in Tm , as well as differences in domain Tm stability were observed across and within structural classes. For one protein, analysis of the impact of oxidation on protein function was also performed. For this protein, DSC was shown to be a leading indicator of decreased antigen binding suggesting a subtle conformation change may be underway that can be detected using DSC prior to any observable impact on product potency. Detectable changes in oxidized methionine by mass spectrometry (MS) occurred at oxidation levels below those with a detectable conformational or functional impact. Therefore, by using MS, DSC, and relative potency methods in concert, the intricate relationship between a primary structural modification, changes in conformational stability, and functional impact can be elucidated.

  9. Go it alone: four-electron oxidations by mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes.

    PubMed

    Peck, Spencer C; van der Donk, Wilfred A

    2017-04-01

    This review discusses the current mechanistic understanding of a group of mononuclear non-heme iron-dependent enzymes that catalyze four-electron oxidation of their organic substrates without the use of any cofactors or cosubstrates. One set of enzymes acts on α-ketoacid-containing substrates, coupling decarboxylation to oxygen activation. This group includes 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase, 4-hydroxymandelate synthase, and CloR involved in clorobiocin biosynthesis. A second set of enzymes acts on substrates containing a thiol group that coordinates to the iron. This group is comprised of isopenicillin N synthase, thiol dioxygenases, and enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of ergothioneine and ovothiol. The final group of enzymes includes HEPD and MPnS that both carry out the oxidative cleavage of the carbon-carbon bond of 2-hydroxyethylphosphonate but generate different products. Commonalities amongst many of these enzymes are discussed and include the initial substrate oxidation by a ferric-superoxo-intermediate and a second oxidation by a ferryl species.

  10. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH) in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver. PMID:26798419

  11. The reduction of graphene oxide with hydrazine: elucidating its reductive capability based on a reaction-model approach.

    PubMed

    Chua, Chun Kiang; Pumera, Martin

    2016-01-04

    We have performed an experimental investigation on the effects of hydrazine treatment on graphene oxide via a reaction-model approach. Hydrazine was reacted with small conjugated aromatic compounds containing various oxygen functional groups to mimic the structure of graphene oxide. The hydroxyl and carboxylic groups were not readily removed while carbonyl groups reacted with hydrazine to form the corresponding hydrazone complexes. In the presence of adjacent hydroxyl groups, carboxyl groups underwent thermal decarboxylation.

  12. Mutagenicity screening of reaction products from the enzyme-catalyzed oxidation of phenolic pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, I.J.; Aitken, M.D.; Ball, L.M.; Heck, P.E. . Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering)

    1994-11-01

    Phenol-oxidizing enzymes such as peroxidases, laccases, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase are capable of catalyzing the oxidation of a wide range of phenolic pollutants. Although the use of these enzymes in waste-treatment applications has been proposed by a number of investigators, little information exists on the toxicological characteristics of the oxidation products. The enzymes chloroperoxidase, horseradish peroxidase, lignin peroxidase, and mushroom polyphenol oxidase were used in this study to catalyze the oxidation of phenol, several mono-substituted phenols, and pentachlorophenol. Seventeen reaction mixtures representing selected combinations of enzyme and parent phenol were subjected to mutagenicity screening using the Ames Salmonella typhimurium plate incorporation assay; five selected mixtures were also incubated with the S9 microsomal preparation to detect the possible presence of promutagens. The majority of reaction mixtures tested were not directly mutagenic, and none of those tested with S9 gave a positive response. Such lack of mutagenicity of enzymatic oxidation products provides encouragement for establishing the feasibility of enzyme-catalyzed oxidation as a waste-treatment process. The only positive responses were obtained with reaction products from the lignin peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of 2-nitrophenol and 4-nitrophenol. Clear positive responses were observed when strain TA100 was incubated with 2-nitrophenol reaction-product mixtures, and when strain TA98 was incubated with the 4-nitrophenol reaction mixture. Additionally, 2,4-dinitrophenol was identified as a reaction product from 4-nitrophenol, and preliminary evidence indicates that both 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrophenol are produced from the oxidation of 2-nitrophenol. Possible mechanism by which these nitration reactions occur are discussed.

  13. Regio- and stereodivergent antibiotic oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sydor, Paulina K.; Barry, Sarah M.; Odulate, Olanipekun M.; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W.; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L.

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in nature. Here, we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio- and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by non-haem iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio- and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective man-made C-H activation catalysts.

  14. Regio and Stereodivergent Antibiotic Oxidative Carbocyclizations Catalyzed by Rieske Oxygenase-Like Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sydor, Paulina K.; Barry, Sarah M.; Odulate, Olanipekun M.; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W.; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically-powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in Nature. Here we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalyzed by non-heme iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective manmade C-H activation catalysts. PMID:21505498

  15. Regio- and stereodivergent antibiotic oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sydor, Paulina K; Barry, Sarah M; Odulate, Olanipekun M; Barona-Gomez, Francisco; Haynes, Stuart W; Corre, Christophe; Song, Lijiang; Challis, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Oxidative cyclizations, exemplified by the biosynthetic assembly of the penicillin nucleus from a tripeptide precursor, are arguably the most synthetically powerful implementation of C-H activation reactions in nature. Here, we show that Rieske oxygenase-like enzymes mediate regio- and stereodivergent oxidative cyclizations to form 10- and 12-membered carbocyclic rings in the key steps of the biosynthesis of the antibiotics streptorubin B and metacycloprodigiosin, respectively. These reactions represent the first examples of oxidative carbocyclizations catalysed by non-haem iron-dependent oxidases and define a novel type of catalytic activity for Rieske enzymes. A better understanding of how these enzymes achieve such remarkable regio- and stereocontrol in the functionalization of unactivated hydrocarbon chains will greatly facilitate the development of selective man-made C-H activation catalysts.

  16. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge.

  17. Elucidating the mechanism of Cr(VI) formation upon the interaction with metal oxides during coal oxy-fuel combustion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juan; Jiao, Facun; Zhang, Lian; Yao, Hong; Ninomiya, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-15

    The thermodynamics underpinning the interaction of Cr-bearing species with basic metal oxides, i.e. K2O, Fe2O3, MgO and CaO, during the air and oxy-fuel combustion of coal have been examined. The synchrotron-based X-ray adsorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) was used for Cr speciation. For the oxides tested, Cr(VI) formation is dominated by the reduction potential of the metals. The oxides of Ca(2+) with high reduction potential favored the oxidation of Cr(III), same for K(+). The other two basic metals, Fe2O3 and MgO with lower reduction potentials reacted with Cr(III) to form the corresponding chromites at the temperatures above 600°C. Coal combustion experiments in drop-tube furnace have confirmed the rapid capture of Cr vapors, either trivalent or hexavalent, by CaO into solid ash. The existence of HCl in flue gas favored the vaporization of Cr as CrO2Cl2, which was in turn captured by CaO into chromate. Both Fe2O3 and MgO exhibited less capability on scavenging the Cr(VI) vapor. Particularly, MgO alone exhibited a low capability for capturing the vaporized Cr(III) vapors. However, its co-existence with CaO in the furnace inhibited the Cr(VI) formation. This is beneficial for minimizing the toxicity of Cr in the coal combustion-derived fly ash.

  18. Functionalized Anodic Aluminum Oxide Membrane–Electrode System for Enzyme Immobilization

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A nanoporous membrane system with directed flow carrying reagents to sequentially attached enzymes to mimic nature’s enzyme complex system was demonstrated. Genetically modified glycosylation enzyme, OleD Loki variant, was immobilized onto nanometer-scale electrodes at the pore entrances/exits of anodic aluminum oxide membranes through His6-tag affinity binding. The enzyme activity was assessed in two reactions—a one-step “reverse” sugar nucleotide formation reaction (UDP-Glc) and a two-step sequential sugar nucleotide formation and sugar nucleotide-based glycosylation reaction. For the one-step reaction, enzyme specific activity of 6–20 min–1 on membrane supports was seen to be comparable to solution enzyme specific activity of 10 min–1. UDP-Glc production efficiencies as high as 98% were observed at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, at which the substrate residence time over the electrode length down pore entrances was matched to the enzyme activity rate. This flow geometry also prevented an unwanted secondary product hydrolysis reaction, as observed in the test homogeneous solution. Enzyme utilization increased by a factor of 280 compared to test homogeneous conditions due to the continuous flow of fresh substrate over the enzyme. To mimic enzyme complex systems, a two-step sequential reaction using OleD Loki enzyme was performed at membrane pore entrances then exits. After UDP-Glc formation at the entrance electrode, aglycon 4-methylumbelliferone was supplied at the exit face of the reactor, affording overall 80% glycosylation efficiency. The membrane platform showed the ability to be regenerated with purified enzyme as well as directly from expression crude, thus demonstrating a single-step immobilization and purification process. PMID:25025628

  19. Functionalized anodic aluminum oxide membrane-electrode system for enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Jianjun; Singh, Shanteri; Peltier-Pain, Pauline; Thorson, Jon S; Hinds, Bruce J

    2014-08-26

    A nanoporous membrane system with directed flow carrying reagents to sequentially attached enzymes to mimic nature’s enzyme complex system was demonstrated. Genetically modified glycosylation enzyme, OleD Loki variant, was immobilized onto nanometer-scale electrodes at the pore entrances/exits of anodic aluminum oxide membranes through His6-tag affinity binding. The enzyme activity was assessed in two reactions—a one-step “reverse” sugar nucleotide formation reaction (UDP-Glc) and a two-step sequential sugar nucleotide formation and sugar nucleotide-based glycosylation reaction. For the one-step reaction, enzyme specific activity of 6–20 min(–1) on membrane supports was seen to be comparable to solution enzyme specific activity of 10 min(–1). UDP-Glc production efficiencies as high as 98% were observed at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min, at which the substrate residence time over the electrode length down pore entrances was matched to the enzyme activity rate. This flow geometry also prevented an unwanted secondary product hydrolysis reaction, as observed in the test homogeneous solution. Enzyme utilization increased by a factor of 280 compared to test homogeneous conditions due to the continuous flow of fresh substrate over the enzyme. To mimic enzyme complex systems, a two-step sequential reaction using OleD Loki enzyme was performed at membrane pore entrances then exits. After UDP-Glc formation at the entrance electrode, aglycon 4-methylumbelliferone was supplied at the exit face of the reactor, affording overall 80% glycosylation efficiency. The membrane platform showed the ability to be regenerated with purified enzyme as well as directly from expression crude, thus demonstrating a single-step immobilization and purification process.

  20. Nitric oxide synthase during early embryonic development in silkworm Bombyx mori: Gene expression, enzyme activity, and tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Kitta, Ryo; Kuwamoto, Marina; Yamahama, Yumi; Mase, Keisuke; Sawada, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    To elucidate the mechanism for embryonic diapause or the breakdown of diapause in Bombyx mori, we biochemically analyzed nitric oxide synthase (NOS) during the embryogenesis of B. mori. The gene expression and enzyme activity of B. mori NOS (BmNOS) were examined in diapause, non-diapause, and HCl-treated diapause eggs. In the case of HCl-treated diapause eggs, the gene expression and enzyme activity of BmNOS were induced by HCl treatment. However, in the case of diapause and non-diapause eggs during embryogenesis, changes in the BmNOS activity and gene expressions did not coincide except 48-60 h after oviposition in diapause eggs. The results imply that changes in BmNOS activity during the embryogenesis of diapause and non-diapause eggs are regulated not only at the level of transcription but also post-transcription. The distribution and localization of BmNOS were also investigated with an immunohistochemical technique using antibodies against the universal NOS; the localization of BmNOS was observed mainly in the cytoplasm of yolk cells in diapause eggs and HCl-treated diapause eggs. These data suggest that BmNOS has an important role in the early embryonic development of the B. mori.

  1. Differential expression of genes encoding anti-oxidant enzymes in Sydney rock oysters, Saccostrea glomerata (Gould) selected for disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Green, Timothy J; Dixon, Tom J; Devic, Emilie; Adlard, Robert D; Barnes, Andrew C

    2009-05-01

    Sydney rock oysters (Saccostrea glomerata) selectively bred for disease resistance (R) and wild-caught control oysters (W) were exposed to a field infection of disseminating neoplasia. Cumulative mortality of W oysters (31.7%) was significantly greater than R oysters (0.0%) over the 118 days of the experiment. In an attempt to understand the biochemical and molecular pathways involved in disease resistance, differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between R and W S. glomerata hemocytes were identified using the PCR technique, suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH). Sequencing of 300 clones from two SSH libraries revealed 183 distinct sequences of which 113 shared high similarity to sequences in the public databases. Putative function could be assigned to 64 of the sequences. Expression of nine ESTs homologous to genes previously shown to be involved in bivalve immunity was further studied using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR). The base-line expression of an extracellular superoxide dismutase (ecSOD) and a small heat shock protein (sHsP) were significantly increased, whilst peroxiredoxin 6 (Prx6) and interferon inhibiting cytokine factor (IK) were significantly decreased in R oysters. From these results it was hypothesised that R oysters would be able to generate the anti-parasitic compound, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) faster and to higher concentrations during respiratory burst due to the differential expression of genes for the two anti-oxidant enzymes of ecSOD and Prx6. To investigate this hypothesis, protein extracts from hemolymph were analysed for oxidative burst enzyme activity. Analysis of the cell free hemolymph proteins separated by native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) failed to detect true superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity by assaying dismutation of superoxide anion in zymograms. However, the ecSOD enzyme appears to generate hydrogen peroxide, presumably via another process, which is yet to be elucidated. This

  2. Elucidation of the factors affecting the oxidative activity of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase by an electrochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenichi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-07

    Steady-state kinetics of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase toward p-hydroquinone derivatives have been examined by using an electrochemical analysis based on the theory of steady-state bioelectrocatalysis. The electrochemical technique has enabled one to examine the influence of electronic and chemical properties of substrates on the activity. It was proven that the oxidative activity of ascorbate oxidase was dominated by the highly selective substrate-binding affinity based on electrostatic interaction beyond the one-electron redox potential difference between ascorbate oxidase's type 1 copper site and substrate.

  3. Elucidation of the factors affecting the oxidative activity of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase by an electrochemical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Kenichi; Nakamura, Nobuhumi Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-07

    Steady-state kinetics of Acremonium sp. HI-25 ascorbate oxidase toward p-hydroquinone derivatives have been examined by using an electrochemical analysis based on the theory of steady-state bioelectrocatalysis. The electrochemical technique has enabled one to examine the influence of electronic and chemical properties of substrates on the activity. It was proven that the oxidative activity of ascorbate oxidase was dominated by the highly selective substrate-binding affinity based on electrostatic interaction beyond the one-electron redox potential difference between ascorbate oxidase's type 1 copper site and substrate.

  4. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah; Lang, Matti A.; Abu-Bakar, A'edah

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  5. Evidence for the transport function of uricase, an oxidative enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Pordy, W.T.; Lipkowitz, M.S.; Abramson, R.G. )

    1987-10-01

    (2-{sup 14}C)urate uptake was examined in proteoliposomes prepared with phosphatidylcholine and either pig liver uricase or albumin, and in protein-free liposomes. Urate uptake was only evident in proteoliposomes that contained active uricase. Uptakes were indistinguishable in the presence and absence of inwardly directed gradients of sodium, potassium, or choline chloride or outwardly directed hydroxyl gradients. Both urate and allantoin accumulated within proteoliposomes during urate uptake; however, (2-{sup 14}C)allantoin was not taken up by proteoliposomes. Urate uptake was accelerated in the presence of unlabeled urate in the trans position, saturable, and competitively inhibited by oxonate, findings consistent with carrier-mediated transport. Finally, the kinetics of urate uptake and oxidation were virtually identical, implying that the transporter is uricase. Thus, these studies provide evidence that uricase can function as a transport protein for urate when inserted in a lipid bilayer: transport via uricase is neither cation dependent (not a cotransporter) nor dependent on an exchangeable anion (not a urate/anion exchanger). Additionally, these studies demonstrate that neither urate nor allantoin cross lipid bilayers by simple or nonionic diffusion.

  6. Nucleotide sequencing and characterization of the genes encoding benzene oxidation enzymes of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Irie, S; Doi, S; Yorifuji, T; Takagi, M; Yano, K

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the genes from Pseudomonas putida encoding oxidation of benzene to catechol was determined. Five open reading frames were found in the sequence. Four corresponding protein molecules were detected by a DNA-directed in vitro translation system. Escherichia coli cells containing the fragment with the four open reading frames transformed benzene to cis-benzene glycol, which is an intermediate of the oxidation of benzene to catechol. The relation between the product of each cistron and the components of the benzene oxidation enzyme system is discussed. Images PMID:3667527

  7. Purine utilization by Klebsiella oxytoca M5al: genes for ring-oxidizing and -opening enzymes.

    PubMed

    Pope, Scott D; Chen, Li-Ling; Stewart, Valley

    2009-02-01

    The enterobacterium Klebsiella oxytoca uses a variety of inorganic and organic nitrogen sources, including purines, nitrogen-rich compounds that are widespread in the biosphere. We have identified a 23-gene cluster that encodes the enzymes for utilizing purines as the sole nitrogen source. Growth and complementation tests with insertion mutants, combined with sequence comparisons, reveal functions for the products of these genes. Here, we report our characterization of 12 genes, one encoding guanine deaminase and the others encoding enzymes for converting (hypo)xanthine to allantoate. Conventionally, xanthine dehydrogenase, a broadly distributed molybdoflavoenzyme, catalyzes sequential hydroxylation reactions to convert hypoxanthine via xanthine to urate. Our results show that these reactions in K. oxytoca are catalyzed by a two-component oxygenase (HpxE-HpxD enzyme) homologous to Rieske nonheme iron aromatic-ring-hydroxylating systems, such as phthalate dioxygenase. Our results also reveal previously undescribed enzymes involved in urate oxidation to allantoin, catalyzed by a flavoprotein monooxygenase (HpxO enzyme), and in allantoin conversion to allantoate, which involves allantoin racemase (HpxA enzyme). The pathway also includes the recently described PuuE allantoinase (HpxB enzyme). The HpxE-HpxD and HpxO enzymes were discovered independently by de la Riva et al. (L. de la Riva, J. Badia, J. Aguilar, R. A. Bender, and L. Baldoma, J. Bacteriol. 190:7892-7903, 2008). Thus, several enzymes in this K. oxytoca purine utilization pathway differ from those in other microorganisms. Isofunctional homologs of these enzymes apparently are encoded by other species, including Acinetobacter, Burkholderia, Pseudomonas, Saccharomyces, and Xanthomonas.

  8. Structure and Mechanism of ORF36, an Amino Sugar Oxidizing Enzyme in Everninomicin Biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vey, Jessica L.; Al-Mestarihi, Ahmad; Hu, Yunfeng; Funk, Michael A.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M.

    2010-12-07

    Everninomicin is a highly modified octasaccharide that belongs to the orthosomycin family of antibiotics and possesses potent Gram-positive antibiotic activity, including broad-spectrum efficacy against multidrug resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Among its distinctive structural features is a nitro sugar, L-evernitrose, analogues of which decorate a variety of natural products. Recently, we identified a nitrososynthase enzyme encoded by orf36 from Micromonospora carbonacea var. africana that mediates the flavin-dependent double oxidation of synthetically generated thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-L-epi-vancosamine to the corresponding nitroso sugar. Herein, we utilize a five-enzyme in vitro pathway both to verify that ORF36 catalyzes oxidation of biogenic TDP-L-epi-vancosamine and to determine whether ORF36 exhibits catalytic competence for any of its biosynthetic progenitors, which are candidate substrates for nitrososynthases in vivo. Progenitors solely undergo single-oxidation reactions and terminate in the hydroxylamine oxidation state. Performing the in vitro reactions in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} establishes that molecular oxygen, rather than oxygen from water, is incorporated into ORF36-generated intermediates and products and identifies an off-pathway product that correlates with the oxidation product of a progenitor substrate. The 3.15 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of ORF36 reveals a tetrameric enzyme that shares a fold with acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and class D flavin-containing monooxygenases, including the nitrososynthase KijD3. However, ORF36 and KijD3 have unusually open active sites in comparison to these related enzymes. Taken together, these studies map substrate determinants and allow the proposal of a minimal monooxygenase mechanism for amino sugar oxidation by ORF36.

  9. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  10. Crystal structures of protein phosphatase-1 bound to motuporin and dihydromicrocystin-LA: elucidation of the mechanism of enzyme inhibition by cyanobacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Maynes, Jason T; Luu, Hue A; Cherney, Maia M; Andersen, Raymond J; Williams, David; Holmes, Charles F B; James, Michael N G

    2006-02-10

    The microcystins and nodularins are tumour promoting hepatotoxins that are responsible for global adverse human health effects and wildlife fatalities in countries where drinking water supplies contain cyanobacteria. The toxins function by inhibiting broad specificity Ser/Thr protein phosphatases in the host cells, thereby disrupting signal transduction pathways. A previous crystal structure of a microcystin bound to the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1c) showed distinct changes in the active site region when compared with protein phosphatase-1 structures bound to other toxins. We have elucidated the crystal structures of the cyanotoxins, motuporin (nodularin-V) and dihydromicrocystin-LA bound to human protein phosphatase-1c (gamma isoform). The atomic structures of these complexes reveal the structural basis for inhibition of protein phosphatases by these toxins. Comparisons of the structures of the cyanobacterial toxin:phosphatase complexes explain the biochemical mechanism by which microcystins but not nodularins permanently modify their protein phosphatase targets by covalent addition to an active site cysteine residue.

  11. Enzyme induction and histopathology elucidate aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated versus non-aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated effects of Aroclor 1268 in American mink (Neovison vison).

    PubMed

    Folland, William R; Newsted, John L; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Fuchsman, Phyllis C; Bradley, Patrick W; Kern, John; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Zwiernik, Matthew J

    2016-03-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations reported in preferred prey and blubber of bottlenose dolphins from the Turtle-Brunswick River estuary (Georgia, USA) suggest the potential for adverse effects. However, PCBs in Turtle-Brunswick River estuary dolphins are primarily derived from Aroclor 1268, and predicting toxic effects of Aroclor 1268 is uncertain because of the mixture's unique composition and associated physiochemical characteristics. These differences suggest that toxicity benchmarks for other PCB mixtures may not be relevant to dolphins exposed to Aroclor 1268. American mink (Neovison vison) were used as a surrogate model for cetaceans to characterize mechanisms of action associated with Aroclor 1268 exposure. Mink share similarities in phylogeny and life history with cetaceans and are characteristically sensitive to PCBs, making them an attractive surrogate species for marine mammals in ecotoxicity studies. Adult female mink and a subsequent F1 generation were exposed to Aroclor 1268 through diet, and effects on enzyme induction, histopathology, thyroid hormone regulation, hematology, organ weights, and body condition index were compared to a negative control and a 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-positive control. Aroclor 1268 dietary exposure concentrations ranged from 1.8 µg/g wet weight to 29 µg/g wet weight. Anemia, hypothyroidism, and hepatomegaly were observed in mink exposed to Aroclor 1268 beyond various dietary thresholds. Cytochrome P450 induction and squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions were low in Aroclor 1268 treatments relative to the positive control. Differences in enzyme induction and the development of squamous epithelial proliferation jaw lesions between Aroclor 1268 treatments and the positive control, coupled with effects observed in Aroclor 1268 treatments not observed in the positive control, indicate that mechanisms additional to the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated pathway are associated with

  12. Oxidative stress in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type II before and during enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Filippon, Letícia; Vanzin, Camila S; Biancini, Giovana B; Pereira, Izabela N; Manfredini, Vanusa; Sitta, Angela; Peralba, Maria do Carmo R; Schwartz, Ida V D; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen R

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase, responsible for the degradation of glycosaminoglycans dermatan and heparan sulfate. Once the generation of free radicals is involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including some inborn errors of metabolism, the aim of this study was to evaluate blood oxidative stress parameters in MPS II patients, before and during 6 months of enzyme replacement therapy. We found significantly increased levels of malondialdehyde and carbonyl groups in plasma as well as erythrocyte catalase activity in patients before treatment compared to the control group. Plasma sulfhydryl group content and total antioxidant status were significantly reduced before treatment, while superoxide dismutase enzyme was not altered at this time when compared to controls. During enzyme replacement therapy, there was a significant reduction in levels of malondialdehyde when compared to pretreatment. Sulfhydryl groups were significantly increased until three months of treatment in MPS II patients in comparison to pretreatment. There were no significant alterations in plasma total antioxidant status and carbonyl groups as well as in catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during treatment in relation to pretreatment. The results indicate that MPS II patients are subject to lipid and protein oxidative damage and present reduction in non-enzymatic antioxidants, suggesting a possible involvement of free radicals in the pathophysiology of this disease. Also, the results may suggest that enzyme replacement therapy seems to protect against lipid peroxidation and protein damage in these patients.

  13. Effect of acute vs chronic H2O2-induced oxidative stress on antioxidant enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Fernanda; Augusto, Amanda C; Gurgueira, Sonia A

    2009-04-01

    H2O2 can freely crosses membranes and in the presence of Fe2+ (or Cu+) it is prone to participate in Fenton reaction. This study evaluated the concentration and time-dependent effects of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on MnSOD, Se:GPx and catalase and on aconitase. Acute and chronic H2O2 treatments were able to induce oxidative stress in HeLa cells as they significantly decreased aconitase activity and also caused a very significant decrease on antioxidant enzyme activities. The inhibition of enzyme activities was time- and concentration-dependent. Chronic treatment with 5 microM H2O2/h after 24 h was able to decrease all enzyme activities almost at the same level as the acute treatment. Acute and chronic treatments on antioxidant enzyme activities were prevented by cell treatment with ascorbic acid or N-acetylcysteine. These results indicate that antioxidant enzymes can also be affected by the same ROS they produce or neutralize if the time of exposure is long enough.

  14. Prometryne-induced oxidative stress and impact on antioxidant enzymes in wheat.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lei; Yang, Hong

    2009-09-01

    Prometryne is one of the herbicides widely used for controlling weed/grass in agricultural practice. However, whether it has an adverse effect on crops is unknown. In this study, we investigated prometryne-induced oxidative stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum). Wheat plants were grown in soils with prometryne at 0-24 mgkg(-1) soil. The growth of wheat treated with prometryne was inhibited. Chlorophyll content significantly decreased even at the low level of prometryne (4 mgkg(-1) soil). Accumulation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), an indicator of cellular peroxidation, increased, suggesting oxidative damage to the plants. The prometryne-induced oxidative stress triggered significant changes in activities of a variety of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Activities of the enzymes showed a general increase at low prometryne concentrations but a decrease at high levels. Analysis of non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) confirmed the results. To get an insight into the molecular response, a qRT-PCR-based assay was performed to analyze the transcript abundance of Cu/Zn-SOD and GST with prometryne exposure. Our analysis revealed that both genes displayed up-regulated expression patterns similar to the activities of the two enzymes. These data imply that prometryne-induced oxidative stress was responsible for the disturbance of the growth and antioxidant defensive systems in wheat plants.

  15. Bromo-oxidation reaction in enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow microfibers.

    PubMed

    Asthana, Amit; Lee, Kwang Ho; Shin, Su-Jung; Perumal, Jayakumar; Butler, Lauren; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2011-06-01

    In this article, the authors present the fabrication of an enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow fiber using a microfluidic device. Further use of enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow fibers as a biocatalytic microchemical reactor for chemical synthesis is also deliberated in this article. To ensure that there is no enzyme leaching from the fiber, fiber surfaces were coated with chitosan. To confine the mobility of reactants and products within the porous hollow fibers the entire fibers were embedded into a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix which also works as a support matrix. A vanadium-containing bromoperoxidase enzyme isolated from Corallina confusa was used as a model enzyme to demonstrate the use of these alginate hollow-fiber reactors in bromo-oxidation of phenol red to bromophenol blue at different dye flow rates. Stability of the entrapped enzyme at different temperatures and the effect of the chitosan coating on the reaction conversion were also studied. It was observed that molecules as big as 27 kDa can be retained in the matrix after coating with chitosan while molecules with molecular-weight of around 378 Da can still diffuse in and out of the matrix. The kinetic conversion rate in this microfluidic bioreactor was more than 41-fold faster when compared with the standard test-tube procedure.

  16. Bromo-oxidation reaction in enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow microfibers

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, Amit; Lee, Kwang Ho; Shin, Su-Jung; Perumal, Jayakumar; Butler, Lauren; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Dong-Pyo

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors present the fabrication of an enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow fiber using a microfluidic device. Further use of enzyme-entrapped alginate hollow fibers as a biocatalytic microchemical reactor for chemical synthesis is also deliberated in this article. To ensure that there is no enzyme leaching from the fiber, fiber surfaces were coated with chitosan. To confine the mobility of reactants and products within the porous hollow fibers the entire fibers were embedded into a transparent polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) matrix which also works as a support matrix. A vanadium-containing bromoperoxidase enzyme isolated from Corallina confusa was used as a model enzyme to demonstrate the use of these alginate hollow-fiber reactors in bromo-oxidation of phenol red to bromophenol blue at different dye flow rates. Stability of the entrapped enzyme at different temperatures and the effect of the chitosan coating on the reaction conversion were also studied. It was observed that molecules as big as 27 kDa can be retained in the matrix after coating with chitosan while molecules with molecular-weight of around 378 Da can still diffuse in and out of the matrix. The kinetic conversion rate in this microfluidic bioreactor was more than 41-fold faster when compared with the standard test-tube procedure. PMID:21799723

  17. The inhibition of human farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase by nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates. Elucidating the role of active site threonine 201 and tyrosine 204 residues using enzyme mutants☆

    PubMed Central

    Tsoumpra, Maria K.; Muniz, Joao R.; Barnett, Bobby L.; Kwaasi, Aaron A.; Pilka, Ewa S.; Kavanagh, Kathryn L.; Evdokimov, Artem; Walter, Richard L.; Von Delft, Frank; Ebetino, Frank H.; Oppermann, Udo; Russell, R. Graham G.; Dunford, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase (FPPS) is the major molecular target of nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BPs), used clinically as bone resorption inhibitors. We investigated the role of threonine 201 (Thr201) and tyrosine 204 (Tyr204) residues in substrate binding, catalysis and inhibition by N-BPs, employing kinetic and crystallographic studies of mutated FPPS proteins. Mutants of Thr201 illustrated the importance of the methyl group in aiding the formation of the Isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) binding site, while Tyr204 mutations revealed the unknown role of this residue in both catalysis and IPP binding. The interaction between Thr201 and the side chain nitrogen of N-BP was shown to be important for tight binding inhibition by zoledronate (ZOL) and risedronate (RIS), although RIS was also still capable of interacting with the main-chain carbonyl of Lys200. The interaction of RIS with the phenyl ring of Tyr204 proved essential for the maintenance of the isomerized enzyme-inhibitor complex. Studies with conformationally restricted analogues of RIS reaffirmed the importance of Thr201 in the formation of hydrogen bonds with N-BPs. In conclusion we have identified new features of FPPS inhibition by N-BPs and revealed unknown roles of the active site residues in catalysis and substrate binding. PMID:26318908

  18. Relationship of hemoxygenase-1 and prolidase enzyme activity with oxidative stress in papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Terzioglu, D; Teksoz, S; Arikan, AE; Uslu, E; Yılmaz, E; Eren, B

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Recent studies associate thyroid cancer with oxidative stress. We aim to clarify the relation between papillary thyroid cancer, oxidative stress, hemoxygenase-1, prolidase enzymes and investigate the availability of these enzymes as markers for diagnosis, success of treatment, and follow-up. Methods: Thirty-one patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma and 25 healthy control subjects were included in this study. Hemoxygenase-1, prolidase (oxidant stress indicator), malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and superoxide dismutase (an indicator of antioxidant defense system) were measured pre-operatively and 30 days after thyroidectomy. Results: There was a significant decrease in serum levels of malondialdehyde and superoxide dismutase (p <0.001 for both) after thyroidectomy in papillary thyroid carcinoma group. In addition, there was a significant difference in the postoperative serum levels of prolidase, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and superoxide dismutase between papillary thyroid carcinoma and control groups (p =0.024, p <0.001, p =0.002, and p =0.016, respectively) beside significant difference of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, hemoxygenase-1, and superoxide dismutase pre-operative serum levels (p <0.001, p =0.003, p =0.006, and p =0.025, respectively). Conclusion: When the unquestionable role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cancer is considered, in the future it is expected to associate parametric changes in the serum of patients caused by oxidative stress to papillary thyroid cancer. Hippokratia 2016, 20(1): 55-59 PMID:27895444

  19. Nanoporous aluminum oxide as a novel support material for enzyme biosensors.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, A; Teuscher, N; Kiesow, A; Janasek, D; Spohn, U

    2003-10-01

    To construct novel amperometric sensors for the detection of hydrogen peroxide and pyruvate, peroxidase and pyruvate oxidase were immobilized in self-supporting nanoporous alumina membranes those made by anodic oxidation. Pyruvate oxidase and other enzymes were enclosed in poly(carbamoylsulfonate) hydrogel and sucked into the nanoporous alumina structure before polymerization. The alumina membranes were investigated by scanning electron microscopy before and after the enzyme immobilization. In an amperometric flow detector cell, pyruvate and hydrogen peroxide were detected under flow injection analysis conditions in concentration ranges from 1 microM to 100 microM and 5 microM to 500 microM, respectively. The achieved operational stability showed that alumina membranes can be used to construct enzyme-modified electrodes.

  20. An oxidative N-demethylase reveals PAS transition from ubiquitous sensor to enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ortmayer, Mary; Lafite, Pierre; Menon, Binuraj R K; Tralau, Tewes; Fisher, Karl; Denkhaus, Lukas; Scrutton, Nigel S; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-11-24

    The universal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain functions as a signal transduction module involved in sensing diverse stimuli such as small molecules, light, redox state and gases. The highly evolvable PAS scaffold can bind a broad range of ligands, including haem, flavins and metal ions. However, although these ligands can support catalytic activity, to our knowledge no enzymatic PAS domain has been found. Here we report characterization of the first PAS enzyme: a haem-dependent oxidative N-demethylase. Unrelated to other amine oxidases, this enzyme contains haem, flavin mononucleotide, 2Fe-2S and tetrahydrofolic acid cofactors, and specifically catalyses the NADPH-dependent oxidation of dimethylamine. The structure of the α subunit reveals that it is a haem-binding PAS domain, similar in structure to PAS gas sensors. The dimethylamine substrate forms part of a highly polarized oxygen-binding site, and directly assists oxygen activation by acting as both an electron and proton donor. Our data reveal that the ubiquitous PAS domain can make the transition from sensor to enzyme, suggesting that the PAS scaffold can support the development of artificial enzymes.

  1. Facet Energy versus Enzyme-like Activities: The Unexpected Protection of Palladium Nanocrystals against Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cuicui; Fang, Ge; Shen, Xiaomei; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Gao, Xingfa; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-11-22

    To develop nanomaterials as artificial enzymes, it is necessary to better understand how their physicochemical properties affect their enzyme-like activities. Although prior research has demonstrated that nanomaterials exhibit tunable enzyme-like activities depending on their size, structure, and composition, few studies have examined the effect of surface facets, which determine surface energy or surface reactivity. Here, we use electron spin-resonance spectroscopy to report that lower surface energy {111}-faceted Pd octahedrons have greater intrinsic antioxidant enzyme-like activity than higher surface energy {100}-faceted Pd nanocubes. Our in vitro experiments found that those same Pd octahedrons are more effective than Pd nanocubes at scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Those reductions in ROS preserve the homogeneity of mitochondrial membrane potential and attenuate damage to important biomolecules, thereby allowing a substantially higher number of cells to survive oxidative challenges. Our computations of molecular mechanisms for the antioxidant activities of {111}- and {100}-faceted Pd nanocrystals, as well as their activity order, agree well with experimental observations. These findings can guide the design of antioxidant-mimicking nanomaterials, which could have therapeutic or preventative potential against oxidative stress related diseases.

  2. Investigating the oxidation of alkenes by non-heme iron enzyme mimics.

    PubMed

    Barry, Sarah M; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Rutledge, Peter J

    2012-09-28

    Iron is emerging as a key player in the search for efficient and environmentally benign methods for the functionalisation of C-H bonds. Non-heme iron enzymes catalyse a diverse array of oxidative chemistry in nature, and small-molecule complexes designed to mimic the non-heme iron active site have great potential as C-H activation catalysts. Herein we report the synthesis of a series of organic ligands that incorporate key features of the non-heme iron active site. Iron(II) complexes of these ligands have been generated in situ and their ability to promote hydrocarbon oxidation has been investigated. Several of these systems promote the biomimetic dihydroxylation of cyclohexene at low levels, when hydrogen peroxide is used as the oxidant; allylic oxidation products are also observed. An investigation of ligand stability reveals formation of several breakdown products under the conditions of the oxidative turnover reactions. These products arise via oxidative decarboxylation, dehydration and deamination reactions. Taken together these results indicate that competing mechanisms are at play with these systems: biomimetic hydroxylation involving high-valent iron species, and allylic oxidation via Fenton chemistry and Haber-Weiss radical pathways.

  3. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    PubMed

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations.

  4. Electrocatalytic tuning of biosensing response through electrostatic or hydrophobic enzyme-graphene oxide interactions.

    PubMed

    Baptista-Pires, Luis; Pérez-López, Briza; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Morales-Narváez, Eden; Domingo, Neus; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Merkoçi, Arben

    2014-11-15

    The effect of graphene oxidative grades upon the conductivity and hydrophobicity and consequently the influence on an enzymatic biosensing response is presented. The electrochemical responses of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been compared with the responses obtained from the oxide form (oGO) and their performances have been accordingly discussed with various evidences obtained by optical techniques. We used tyrosinase enzyme as a proof of concept receptor with interest for phenolic compounds detection through its direct adsorption onto a screen-printed carbon electrode previously modified with oGO or rGO with a carbon-oxygen ratio of 1.07 or 1.53 respectively. Different levels of oGO directly affect the (bio)conjugation properties of the biosensor due to changes at enzyme/graphene oxide interface coming from the various electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions with biomolecules. The developed biosensor was capable of reaching a limit of detection of 0.01 nM catechol. This tuning capability of the biosensor response can be of interest for building several other biosensors, including immunosensors and DNA sensors for various applications.

  5. Confining a bi-enzyme inside the nanochannels of a porous aluminum oxide membrane for accelerating the enzymatic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shangguan, Li; Wei, Yuanqing; Liu, Xu; Yu, Jiachao; Liu, Songqin

    2017-02-28

    An artificial metabolon with high conversion efficiency was constructed by confining a bi-enzyme into porous aluminum oxide nanochannels, which accelerated enzymatic reactions by minimizing the diffusion loss of intermediate species.

  6. DNA damage in fish (Anguilla anguilla) exposed to a glyphosate-based herbicide -- elucidation of organ-specificity and the role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, S; Gaivão, I; Santos, M A; Pacheco, M

    2012-03-18

    Organophosphate herbicides are among the most dangerous agrochemicals for the aquatic environment. In this context, Roundup(®), a glyphosate-based herbicide, has been widely detected in natural water bodies, representing a potential threat to non-target organisms, namely fish. Thus, the main goal of the present study was to evaluate the genotoxic potential of Roundup(®) in the teleost fish Anguilla anguilla, addressing the possible causative involvement of oxidative stress. Fish were exposed to environmentally realistic concentrations of this herbicide (58 and 116 μgL(-1)) during one or three days. The standard procedure of the comet assay was applied to gill and liver cells in order to determine organ-specific genetic damage. Since liver is a central organ in xenobiotic metabolism, nucleoids of hepatic cells were also incubated with a lesion-specific repair enzyme (formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase - FPG), in order to recognise oxidised purines. Antioxidants were determined in both organs as indicators of pro-oxidant state. In general, both organs displayed an increase in DNA damage for the two Roundup(®) concentrations and exposure times, although liver showed to be less susceptible to the lower concentration. The enzyme-modified comet assay showed the occurrence of FPG-sensitive sites in liver only after a 3-day exposure to the higher Roundup(®) concentration. The antioxidant defences were in general unresponsive, despite a single increment of catalase activity in gills (116 μgL(-1), 3-day) and a decrease of superoxide dismutase activity in liver (58 μgL(-1), 3-day). Overall, the mechanisms involved in Roundup(®)-induced DNA strand-breaks showed to be similar in both organs. Nevertheless, it was demonstrated that the type of DNA damage varies with the concentration and exposure duration. Hence, after 1-day exposure, an increase on pro-oxidant state is not a necessary condition for the induction of DNA-damaging effects of Roundup(®). By increasing the

  7. Crystal structures of nitric oxide reductases provide key insights into functional conversion of respiratory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tosha, Takehiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu

    2013-03-01

    Respiration is an essential biological process to get bioenergy, ATP, for all kingdoms of life. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) plays central role in aerobic respiration, catalyzing the reduction of O(2) coupled with pumping proton across the biological membrane. Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) involved in anaerobic nitrate respiration is suggested to be evolutionary related to COX and share the same progenitor with COX, on the basis of the amino acid sequence homology. Contrary to COX, NOR catalyzes the reduction of nitric oxide and shows no proton pumping ability. Thus, the respiratory enzyme acquires (or loses) proton pumping ability in addition to the conversion of the catalytic property along with the environmental change on earth. Recently, we solved the structures of two types of NORs, which provides novel insights into the functional conversion of the respiratory enzymes. In this review, we focus on the structural similarities and differences between COXs and NORs and discuss possible mechanism for the functional conversion of these enzymes during molecular evolution.

  8. Evaluation of gender-related differences in various oxidative stress enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Ji, Li-Li; Liu, Tian-Yu; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2011-12-31

    Oxidative stress caused by redundant free radical, lipid oxygen and peroxide usually results in the pathogenesis of various diseases, which can be alleviated by cellular antioxidant enzymes. According to statistics, there are different incidence rates of some diseases depending on the gender. The present study aimed to investigate potential gender-related differences of antioxidant enzymes in mice. The activities of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in the kidney, brain, lung and heart of both male and female mice were determined. Our results showed that GPx and GCL activities were higher in female kidney and brain than those in male. On the other hand, the activities of SOD were higher in female brain and lung than those in male. Moreover, female kidney appeared to show higher activities of CAT than the male kidney. But the activities of GCL and GPx were higher in male heart than those in female. Taken together, our results demonstrate that there are gender-related differences in the activities of cellular antioxidant enzymes in various important organs in mice. Variations in such enzymes may be the explanation for some gender-related diseases.

  9. Induction by leptin of uncoupling protein-2 and enzymes of fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Ting; Shimabukuro, Michio; Koyama, Kazunori; Lee, Young; Wang, May-Yun; Trieu, Falguni; Newgard, Christopher B.; Unger, Roger H.

    1997-01-01

    We have studied mechanisms by which leptin overexpression, which reduces body weight via anorexic and thermogenic actions, induces triglyceride depletion in adipocytes and nonadipocytes. Here we show that leptin alters in pancreatic islets the mRNA of the genes encoding enzymes of free fatty acid metabolism and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In animals infused with a recombinant adenovirus containing the leptin cDNA, the levels of mRNAs encoding enzymes of mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation rose 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA encoding an enzyme of esterification declined in islets from hyperleptinemic rats. Islet UCP-2 mRNA rose 6-fold. All in vivo changes occurred in vitro in normal islets cultured with recombinant leptin, indicating direct extraneural effects. Leptin overexpression increased UCP-2 mRNA by more than 10-fold in epididymal, retroperitoneal, and subcutaneous fat tissue of normal, but not of leptin–receptor-defective obese rats. By directly regulating the expression of enzymes of free fatty acid metabolism and of UCP-2, leptin controls intracellular triglyceride content of certain nonadipocytes, as well as adipocytes. PMID:9177227

  10. Effect of spaceflight on oxidative and antioxidant enzyme activity in rat diaphragm and intercostal muscles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Mona D.; Tuttle, Ronald; Girten, Beverly

    1995-01-01

    There are limited data regarding changes in oxidative and antioxidant enzymes induced by simulated or actual weightlessness, and any additional information would provide insight into potential mechanisms involving other changes observed in muscles from animals previously flown in space. Thus, the NASA Biospecimen Sharing Program was an opportunity to collect valuable information. Oxidative and antioxidant enzyme levels, as well as lipid peroxidation, were measured in respiratory muscles from rates flown on board Space Shuttle mission STS-54. The results indicated that there was an increasing trend in citrate synthase activity in the flight diaphragm when compared to ground based controls, and there were no significant changes observed in the intercostal muscles for any of the parameters. However, the lipid peroxidation was significantly (p less than 0.05) decreased in the flight diaphragm. These results indicate that 6 day exposure to microgravity may have a different effect on oxidative and antioxidant activity in rat respiratory muscles when compared to data from previous 14 day hindlimb suspension studies.

  11. Vascular peroxidase 1: a novel enzyme in promoting oxidative stress in cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qi-Lin; Zhang, Guo-Gang; Peng, Jun

    2013-07-01

    Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1) is a recently identified novel family member of peroxidases in cardiovascular system. As an enzyme that is downstream of NADPH oxidases (NOX), VPO1 functions to utilize NOX - derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a strong oxidant which is believed to greatly promote oxidative stress. Under multiple conditions, NOX is activated concomitantly with an increase in superoxide anion (O2(.-)) and H2O2 production. The latter is converted to HOCl by VPO1. In this process (O2(.-) → H2O2 → HOCl), the oxidant reactivities of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are significantly increased and therefore the oxidative stress is dramatically amplified. Several lines of evidence suggest that the NOX/VPO1 pathway - mediated oxidative stress plays an important role in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury, endothelial cell apoptosis and/or smooth muscle cell proliferation. In addition, VPO1 can be secreted into the extracellular space to participate in extracellular matrix formation, suggesting that VPO1 may also play a role in cardiovascular remodeling (such as fibrosis). This function is independent of the peroxidase activity of VPO1.

  12. Inhibition effect of graphene oxide on the catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Variations in the enzyme activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the presence of the nano-material, graphene oxide (GO), were investigated with the use of molecular spectroscopy UV-visible and fluorescence methods. From these studies, important kinetic parameters of the enzyme were extracted; these were the maximum reaction rate, Vm , and the Michaelis constant, Km . A comparison of these parameters indicated that GO inhibited the catalytic activity of the AChE because of the presence of the AChE-GO complex. The formation of this complex was confirmed with the use of fluorescence data, which was resolved with the use of the MCR-ALS chemometrics method. Furthermore, it was found that the resonance light-scattering (RLS) intensity of AChE changed in the presence of GO. On this basis, it was demonstrated that the relationship between AChE and GO was linear and such models were used for quantitative analyses of GO.

  13. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  14. Protective effects of zinc on oxidative stress enzymes in liver of protein-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Pardeep; Garg, M L; Dhawan, D K

    2005-01-01

    Persons afflicted with protein malnutrition are generally deficient in a variety of essential micronutrients like zinc, copper, iron, and selenium, which in turn affects number of metabolic processes in the body. To evaluate the protective effects of zinc on the enzymes involved in oxidative stress induced in liver of protein-deficient rats, the current study was designed. Zinc sulfate at a dose level of 227 mg/L zinc in drinking water was administered to female Sprague-Dawley normal control as well as protein-deficient rats for a total duration of 8 weeks. The effects of zinc treatment in conditions of protein deficiency were studied on rat liver antioxidant enzymes, which included catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reduced (GSH), and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Protein deficiency in normal rats resulted in a significant increase in hepatic activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase and the levels of lipid peroxidation. A significant inhibition in the levels of reduced glutathione and the enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase has been observed after protein deficiency in normal rats. Interestingly, Zn treatment to protein-deficient animals lowered already raised activity catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase and levels of lipid peroxidation to significant levels when compared to protein-deficient animals. Also, Zn treatment to the protein-deficient animals resulted in a significant elevation in the levels of GSH and SOD activity as compared to their respective controls, thereby indicating its effectiveness in regulating their levels in adverse conditions. It has also been observed that concentrations of zinc, copper, iron, and selenium were found to be decreased significantly in protein-deficient animals. However, the levels of these elements came back to within normal limits when zinc was administrated

  15. Dynamic electrochemical investigations of hydrogen oxidation and production by enzymes and implications for future technology.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Fraser A; Belsey, Natalie A; Cracknell, James A; Goldet, Gabrielle; Parkin, Alison; Reisner, Erwin; Vincent, Kylie A; Wait, Annemarie F

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review describes studies of hydrogen production and oxidation by biological catalysts--metalloenzymes known as hydrogenases--attached to electrodes. It explains how the electrocatalytic properties of hydrogenases are studied using specialised electrochemical techniques and how the data are interpreted to allow assessments of catalytic rates and performance under different conditions, including the presence of O2, CO and H2S. It concludes by drawing some comparisons between the enzyme active sites and platinum catalysts and describing some novel proof-of-concept applications that demonstrate the high activities and selectivities of these 'alternative' catalysts for promoting H2 as a fuel.

  16. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes.

  17. Removal of hydantoin products of 8-oxoguanine oxidation by the Escherichia coli DNA repair enzyme, FPG.

    PubMed

    Leipold, M D; Muller, J G; Burrows, C J; David, S S

    2000-12-05

    An intriguing feature of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (OG) is that it is highly reactive toward further oxidation. Indeed, OG has been shown to be a "hot spot" for oxidative damage and susceptible to oxidation by a variety of cellular oxidants. Recent work has identified two new DNA lesions, guanidinohydantoin (Gh) and spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp), resulting from one-electron oxidation of OG. The presence of Gh and Sp lesions in DNA templates has been shown to result in misinsertion of G and A by DNA polymerases, and therefore, both are potentially mutagenic DNA lesions. The base excision repair (BER) glycosylases Fpg and MutY serve to prevent mutations associated with OG in Escherichia coli, and therefore, we have investigated the ability of these two enzymes to process DNA duplex substrates containing the further oxidized OG lesions, Gh and Sp. The Fpg protein, which removes OG and a variety of other oxidized purine base lesions, was found to remove Gh and Sp efficiently opposite all four of the natural DNA bases. The intrinsic rate of damaged base excision by Fpg was measured under single-turnover conditions and was found to be highly dependent upon the identity of the base opposite the OG, Gh, or Sp lesion; as expected, OG is removed more readily from an OG:C- than an OG:A-containing substrate. However, when adenine is paired with Gh or Sp, the rate of removal of these damaged lesions by Fpg was significantly increased relative to the rate of removal of OG from an OG:A mismatch. The adenine glycosylase MutY, which removes misincorporated A residues from OG:A mismatches, is unable to remove A paired with Gh or Sp. Thus, the activity of Fpg on Gh and Sp lesions may dramatically influence their mutagenic potential. This work suggests that, in addition to OG, oxidative products resulting from further oxidation of OG should be considered when evaluating oxidative DNA damage and its associated effects on DNA mutagenesis.

  18. Isotopomeric characterization of nitrous oxide produced by reaction of enzymes extracted from nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Hozuki, T.; Arai, K.; Toyoda, S.; Koba, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and produced in denitrification and nitrification by various microorganisms. Site preference (SP) of 15N in N2O, which is defined as the difference in the natural abundance of isotopomers 14N15NO and 15N14NO relative to 14N14NO, has been reported to be a useful tool to quantitatively distinguish N2O production pathways. To determine representative SP values for each microbial process, we firstly measured SP of N2O produced in the enzyme reaction of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) purified from two species of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus oceani, and that of nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans. The SP value for NOR reaction (-5.9 ± 2.1‰) showed nearly the same value as that reported for N2O produced by P. denitrificans in pure culture. In contrast, SP value for HAO reaction (36.3 ± 2.3‰) was a little higher than the values reported for N2O produced by AOB in aerobic pure culture. Using the SP values obtained by HAO and NOR reactions, we calculated relative contribution of the nitrite (NO2-) reduction (which is followed by NO reduction) to N2O production by N. oceani incubated under different O2 availability. Our calculations revealed that previous in vivo studies might have underestimated the SP value for the NH2OH oxidation pathway possibly due to a small contribution of NO2- reduction pathway. Further evaluation of isotopomer signatures of N2O using common enzymes of other processes related to N2O would improve the isotopomer analysis of N2O in various environments.

  19. Isotopomeric characterization of nitrous oxide produced by reaction of enzymes extracted from nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, T.; Hozuki, T.; Arai, K.; Toyoda, S.; Koba, K.; Fujiwara, T.; Yoshida, N.

    2013-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent greenhouse gas and produced in denitrification and nitrification in environmental nitrogen cycle by various microorganism. Site preference (SP) of 15N in N2O, which is defined as the difference in the natural abundance of isotopomers 14N15NO and 15N14NO relative to 14N14NO, has been reported to be a useful tool to quantitatively distinguish N2O production pathway. To determine representative SP value for each microbial process, we firstly measured SP of N2O produced in the enzyme reaction of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) purified from two species of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB), Nitrosomonas europaea and Nitrosococcus oceani, and that of nitric oxide reductase (NOR) from Paracoccus denitrificans, respectively. The SP value for NOR reaction (-5.9 ± 2.1‰) showed nearly the same value as that reported for N2O produced by P. denitrificans in pure culture. In contrast, SP value for HAO reaction (36.3 ± 2.3‰) was a little higher than the values reported for N2O produced by AOB in aerobic pure culture. Using the SP values obtained by HAO and NOR reactions, we calculated relative contribution of the nitrite (NO2-) reduction (which is followed by NO reduction) to N2O production by N. oceani incubated under different O2 availability. Our calculations revealed that previous in vivo studies might have underestimated the SP value for NH2OH oxidation pathway possibly due to a small contribution of NO2- reduction pathway. Further evaluation of isotopomer signatures of N2O using common enzymes of other processes related to N2O would improve the isotopomer analysis of N2O in various environments.

  20. Brown propolis attenuates cerebral ischemia-induced oxidative damage via affecting antioxidant enzyme system in mice.

    PubMed

    Bazmandegan, Gholamreza; Boroushaki, Mohammad Taher; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Ayoobi, Fatemeh; Hakimizadeh, Elham; Allahtavakoli, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in ischemic brain injury. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) are the enzymes underlying the endogenous antioxidant mechanisms affected by stroke and are considered as oxidative stress biomarkers. Brown propolis (BP) is a bioactive natural product with a set of biological activities that in turn may differ depending on the area from which the substance is originated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of water-extracted brown propolis (WEBPs), from two regions of Iran, against cerebral ischemia-induced oxidative injury in a mouse model of stroke. Experimentally, the chemical characterization and total polyphenol content were determined using GC/MS and Folin-Ciocalteu assay respectively. Seventy-two adult male mice were randomly divided into the surgical sham group, control group (treated with vehicle), and four groups of WEBPs-treated animals. The WEBPs were administered at the doses of 100 and 200mg/kg IP, during four different time points. Oxidative stress biomarkers (SOD and GPx activity, SOD/GPx ratio), lipid peroxidation (LPO) index (malondialdehyde content) and infarct volume were measured 48h post stroke. Behavioral tests were evaluated 24 and 48h after stroke. WEBPs treatment resulted in significant restoration of antioxidant enzymes activity and a subsequent decrease in LPO as well as the infarct volume compared to the control group. Sensory-motor impairment and neurological deficits were improved significantly as well. These results indicate that Iranian BP confers neuroprotection on the stroke-induced neuronal damage via an antioxidant mechanism which seems to be mediated by the endogenous antioxidant system.

  1. The effect of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) on oxidative stress response enzymes of the macrophyte Ceratophyllum demersum.

    PubMed

    Esterhuizen-Londt, M; Pflugmacher, S; Downing, T G

    2011-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are known to produce bioactive secondary metabolites such as hepatotoxins, cytotoxins and neurotoxins. The newly recognized neurotoxin β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA) is a naturally occurring non-protein amino acid found in the majority of cyanobacterial genera tested. Evidence that exists for implication of BMAA in neurodegenerative disorders relies on bioaccumulation and biomagnification from symbiotic cyanobacteria. Uptake and accumulation of free BMAA by various non-symbiotic organisms, including aquatic macrophytes, has been documented but to date limited evidence of ecotoxicology exists. We therefore investigated the effect of BMAA on the oxidative stress responses of the macrophyte, Ceratophyllum demersum. Markers for oxidative stress in this study are the antioxidative enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase. We found that BMAA had an inhibitory effect on all the oxidative stress response enzymes tested in plants exposed to BMAA. However enzymes not related to oxidative stress response were not affected by BMAA in in vitro experiments. Binding studies in the presence of BMAA showed reduced enzyme specific activity over time compared to the control. This study shows that BMAA causes oxidative stress indirectly as it inhibits antioxidant enzymes required to combat reactive oxygen species that cause damage to cells. Further investigations are required to fully understand the inhibitory effect of BMAA on these enzymes.

  2. Use of chemical auxiliaries to control p450 enzymes for predictable oxidations at unactivated C-h bonds of substrates.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Karine; Polic, Vanja

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes (P450s) have the ability to oxidize unactivated C-H bonds of substrates with remarkable regio- and stereoselectivity. Comparable selectivity for chemical oxidizing agents is typically difficult to achieve. Hence, there is an interest in exploiting P450s as potential biocatalysts. Despite their impressive attributes, the current use of P450s as biocatalysts is limited. While bacterial P450 enzymes typically show higher activity, they tend to be highly selective for one or a few substrates. On the other hand, mammalian P450s, especially the drug-metabolizing enzymes, display astonishing substrate promiscuity. However, product prediction continues to be challenging. This review discusses the use of small molecules for controlling P450 substrate specificity and product selectivity. The focus will be on two approaches in the area: (1) the use of decoy molecules, and (2) the application of substrate engineering to control oxidation by the enzyme.

  3. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2016-12-04

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not completely understood. In the present study we have addressed the potential impact of oxidatively modified proteins on the altered metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a modified proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during the replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome appeared to be a likely contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Metabolic and functional analyses revealed an impaired glucose metabolism in senescent cells. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates such as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated an increased turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Taken together, these results support a link between oxidative protein modifications and the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype of human myoblasts.

  4. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD. PMID:26637123

  5. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Baraibar, Martín A.; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not completely understood. In the present study we have addressed the potential impact of oxidatively modified proteins on the altered metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a modified proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during the replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome appeared to be a likely contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Metabolic and functional analyses revealed an impaired glucose metabolism in senescent cells. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates such as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated an increased turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Taken together, these results support a link between oxidative protein modifications and the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype of human myoblasts. PMID:27922824

  6. Electrochemical enzyme-less urea sensor based on nano-tin oxide synthesized by hydrothermal technique.

    PubMed

    Ansari, S G; Fouad, H; Shin, Hyung-Shik; Ansari, Z A

    2015-12-05

    Nano-Tin oxide was synthesized using hydrothermal method at 150 °C for 6 h and then thin films were deposited by electrophoretic method at an optimized voltage of 100 V for 5 min on electropolished aluminum substrate. Spherical particles of about 30-50 nm diameters are observed with partial agglomeration when observed under electron microscope, which are tetragonal rutile structure. XPS results showed peaks related to Sn 4d, Sn 3d, O 1s & C 1s with spin-orbit splitting of 8.4 eV for Sn 3d. Feasibility studies of enzyme less urea sensing characteristics of nano-tin oxide thin films are exhibited herein. The deposited films have been used for enzyme less urea sensing from 1 to 20 mM concentration in buffer solution. The sensors were characterized electrochemically to obtain cyclic voltammogram as a function of urea concentration and scan rate. The sensitivity is estimated as 18.9 μA/mM below 5 mM and 2.31 μA/mM above 5 mM with a limit of detection of 0.6 mM.

  7. Oxidation of aliphatic olefins by toluene dioxygenase: enzyme rates and product identification.

    PubMed Central

    Lange, C C; Wackett, L P

    1997-01-01

    Toluene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida F1 has been studied extensively with aromatic substrates. The present work examined the toluene dioxygenase-catalyzed oxidation of various halogenated ethenes, propenes, butenes and nonhalogenated cis-2-pentene, an isomeric mix of 2-hexenes, cis-2-heptene, and cis-2-octene as substrates for toluene dioxygenase. Enzyme specific activities were determined for the more water-soluble C2 to C5 compounds and ranged from <4 to 52 nmol per min per mg of protein. Trichloroethene was oxidized at a rate of 33 nmol per min per mg of protein. Products from enzyme reactions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proton and carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of compounds from whole-cell incubation confirmed the identity of products. Substrates lacking a halogen substituent on sp2 carbon atoms were dioxygenated, while those with halogen and one or more unsubstituted allylic methyl groups were monooxygenated to yield allylic alcohols. 2,3-Dichloro-1-propene, containing both a halogenated double bond and a halogenated allylic methyl group, underwent monooxygenation with allylic rearrangement to yield an isomeric mixture of cis- and trans-2,3-dichloro-2-propene-1-ol. PMID:9190800

  8. Energetics of proton release on the first oxidation step in the water-oxidizing enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Keisuke; William Rutherford, A.; Ishikita, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    In photosystem II (PSII), the Mn4CaO5 cluster catalyses the water splitting reaction. The crystal structure of PSII shows the presence of a hydrogen-bonded water molecule directly linked to O4. Here we show the detailed properties of the H-bonds associated with the Mn4CaO5 cluster using a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical approach. When O4 is taken as a μ-hydroxo bridge acting as a hydrogen-bond donor to water539 (W539), the S0 redox state best describes the unusually short O4–OW539 distance (2.5 Å) seen in the crystal structure. We find that in S1, O4 easily releases the proton into a chain of eight strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The corresponding hydrogen-bond network is absent for O5 in S1. The present study suggests that the O4-water chain could facilitate the initial deprotonation event in PSII. This unexpected insight is likely to be of real relevance to mechanistic models for water oxidation. PMID:26442814

  9. Nitric Oxide Mitigates Salt Stress by Regulating Levels of Osmolytes and Antioxidant Enzymes in Chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A.; Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Gucel, Salih; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    This work was designed to evaluate whether external application of nitric oxide (NO) in the form of its donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) could mitigate the deleterious effects of NaCl stress on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. SNAP (50 μM) was applied to chickpea plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions (50 and 100 mM NaCl). Salt stress inhibited growth and biomass yield, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and chlorophyll content of chickpea plants. High salinity increased electrolyte leakage, carotenoid content and the levels of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, soluble proteins and soluble sugars), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase in chickpea plants. Expression of the representative SOD, CAT and APX genes examined was also up-regulated in chickpea plants by salt stress. On the other hand, exogenous application of NO to salinized plants enhanced the growth parameters, LRWC, photosynthetic pigment production and levels of osmolytes, as well as the activities of examined antioxidant enzymes which is correlated with up-regulation of the examined SOD, CAT and APX genes, in comparison with plants treated with NaCl only. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 and MDA contents showed decline in salt-stressed plants supplemented with NO as compared with those in NaCl-treated plants alone. Thus, the exogenous application of NO protected chickpea plants against salt stress-induced oxidative damage by enhancing the biosyntheses of antioxidant enzymes, thereby improving plant growth under saline stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NO has capability to mitigate the adverse effects of high salinity on chickpea plants by improving LRWC, photosynthetic pigment biosyntheses, osmolyte accumulation and antioxidative defense system. PMID:27066020

  10. Effects of Microgravity On Oxidative and Antioxidant Enzymes In Mouse Hindlimb Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girten, B.; Hoopes, R.; Steele, M.; Morony, S.; Bateman, T. A.; Sun, S. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Gastrocnemius muscle of mice were analyzed in order to examine the effects of 12 days of microgravity on the oxidative enzyme climate synthase (CS) and the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD). The female C57BL/6J mice utilized for this study were part of the Commercial Biomedical Testing Module (CBTM) payload that flew aboard STS-108. Mice were housed in Animal Enclosure Modules (AEMs) provided by NASA Ames. The flight (FLT) group and the ground control (CON) group each had 12 mice per group. The AEMs that held the CON group operated on a 48-hour delay from the FLT group and were located inside the Orbital Environmental Simulator (OES) at Kennedy Space Center. The temperature, CO2 and relative humidity inside the OES was regulated based on downlinked information from the shuttle middeck. Student T tests were used to compare groups and a p < 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. Results indicated that CS levels for the FLT group were significantly lower than the CON group while the SOD levels were significantly higher. The CS FLT mean was 19% lower and the SOD FLT mean was 17% higher than the respective CON group means. Although these findings are among the first muscle enzyme values reported for mice from a shuttle mission, these results are similar to some results previously reported for rats exposed to microgravity or hindlimb suspension. The changes seen during the CBTM payload are reflective of the deconditioning that takes place with disuse of the hindlimbs and indicate that muscle enzyme changes induced by disuse deconditioning are similar in both rodent species.

  11. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by upregulating antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the upregulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-Isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited five-fold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both mRNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by AhR and Nrf2 proteins were upregulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126 which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants. PMID:24378064

  12. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of damaged macromolecules, including irreversibly oxidized proteins, is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing. Failure of protein homesotasis is a major contributor to the age-related accumulation of damaged proteins. In skeletal muscle, tissue maintenance and regeneration is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed in senescent cells. In addition, phospho-and glycerolipids metabolism was altered. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated augmented turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Such changes reflect alterations in membrane composition and dysregulation of sphingolipids signaling during senescence. This study establishes a new concept connecting oxidative protein modifications with the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype. In addition, these findings highlight the molecular mechanisms implicated in satellite cells dysfunction during ageing, paving the road for future therapeutic interventions

  13. Human erythrocyte delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase inhibition by monosaccharides is not mediated by oxidation of enzyme sulfhydryl groups.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, D; Pivetta, L; Folmer, V; Soares, J C M; Augusti, G R; Nogueira, C W; Zeni, G; Rocha, J B T

    2005-08-01

    The heme pathway enzyme delta-aminolevulinate dehydratase is a good marker for oxidative stress and metal intoxication. This sulfhydryl enzyme is inhibited in such oxidative pathologies as lead, mercury and aluminum intoxication, exposure to selenium organic species and diabetes. Oxidative stress is a complicating factor in diabetes, inducing non-enzymatic glucose-mediated reactions that change protein structures and impair enzyme functions. We have studied the effects of high glucose, fructose and ribose concentrations on delta-ALA-D activity in vitro. These reducing sugars inhibited delta-ALA-D with efficacies in the order fructose=ribose>glucose. The possible mechanism of glucose inhibition was investigated using lysine, DTT, and t-butylamine. Oxidation of the enzyme's critical sulfhydryl groups was not involved because DTT had no effect. We concluded that high concentrations of reducing sugars or their autoxidation products inhibit delta-ALA-D by a mechanism not related to thiol oxidation. Also, we are not able to demonstrate that the formation of a Schiff base with the critical lysine residue of the enzyme is involved in the inhibition of delta-ALA-D by hexoses.

  14. The structural analysis of the pro-oxidant copper-binding site of denatured apo-H43R SOD1 and the elucidation of the origin of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Fujimaki, Nobuhiro; Miura, Takashi; Nakabayashi, Takakazu

    2016-02-14

    The pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is associated with mutations of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1), which is a representative antioxidant enzyme. A previous study showed that the denatured apo-form of an ALS-linked mutant of human SOD1, His43 → Arg (H43R), obtains pro-oxidant activity as the reverse behavior of the native antioxidant activity by rebinding Cu(2+), which is considered to be closely related to the development of ALS. The Cu(2+)-binding site in denatured apo-H43R can be regarded as the center of the pro-oxidant activity, causing cellular oxidative stress. In the present study, the structure of the Cu(2+)-binding site of denatured apo-H43R was investigated to clarify the mechanism of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity. His residues constructing the Cu(2+)-binding site in denatured apo-H43R were experimentally assigned by absorption and fluorescence-based assays of SOD1 mutants, in which each of the seven His residues in H43R SOD1 is replaced with Ala. It was found that His120 is not involved with the Cu(2+)-binding site after denaturation, although the other His residues constructing the metal-binding site remain constant after denaturation. The disappearance of His120 from the Cu(2+)-binding site is therefore considered to be one of the important factors in obtaining the pro-oxidant activity. The mechanism of the acquisition of the pro-oxidant activity is discussed based on the results obtained.

  15. Enzyme-catalysed synthesis and reactions of benzene oxide/oxepine derivatives of methyl benzoates.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Derek R; Sharma, Narain D; Harrison, John S; Malone, John F; McRoberts, W Colin; Hamilton, John T G; Harper, David B

    2008-04-07

    A series of twelve benzoate esters was metabolised, by species of the Phellinus genus of wood-rotting fungi, to yield the corresponding benzyl alcohol derivatives and eight salicylates. The isolation of a stable oxepine metabolite, from methyl benzoate, allied to evidence of the migration and retention of a carbomethoxy group (the NIH Shift), during enzyme-catalysed ortho-hydroxylation of alkyl benzoates to form salicylates, is consistent with a mechanism involving an initial arene epoxidation step. This mechanism was confirmed by the isolation of a remarkably stable, optically active, substituted benzene oxide metabolite of methyl 2-(trifluoromethyl)benzoate, which slowly converted into the racemic form. The arene oxide was found to undergo a cycloaddition reaction with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to yield a crystalline cycloadduct whose structure and racemic nature was established by X-ray crystallography. The metabolite was also found to undergo some novel benzene oxide reactions, including epoxidation to give an anti-diepoxide, base-catalysed hydrolysis to form a trans-dihydrodiol and acid-catalysed aromatisation to yield a salicylate derivative via the NIH Shift of a carbomethoxy group.

  16. The key nickel enzyme of methanogenesis catalyses the anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Boecher, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2010-06-03

    Large amounts (estimates range from 70 Tg per year to 300 Tg per year) of the potent greenhouse gas methane are oxidized to carbon dioxide in marine sediments by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, and thus are prevented from escaping into the atmosphere. Indirect evidence indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of methane might proceed as the reverse of archaeal methanogenesis from carbon dioxide with the nickel-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) as the methane-activating enzyme. However, experiments showing that MCR can catalyse the endergonic back reaction have been lacking. Here we report that purified MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis converts methane into methyl-coenzyme M under equilibrium conditions with apparent V(max) (maximum rate) and K(m) (Michaelis constant) values consistent with the observed in vivo kinetics of the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulphate. This result supports the hypothesis of 'reverse methanogenesis' and is paramount to understanding the still-unknown mechanism of the last step of methanogenesis. The ability of MCR to cleave the particularly strong C-H bond of methane without the involvement of highly reactive oxygen-derived intermediates is directly relevant to catalytic C-H activation, currently an area of great interest in chemistry.

  17. Intracellular oxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme defense system, and cell senescence in fibroblasts with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS.

  18. Attenuation of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor induced cough by iron supplementation: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Payal; Singh, Narinder Pal; Ravi, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The present study examined whether (1) the cough associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor therapy is attenuated by oral intake of iron and anti-oxidants, and (2) nitric oxide (NO) has any role in this attenuation. Of the 100 patients under investigation, cough occurred in 28 of them with preponderance in females. All the 28 patients were followed up for six weeks: the first two weeks were the observation period and the remaining four weeks the experimentation period. After the observation period, 11 patients received a single oral dose of ferrous sulphate (200 mg), eight received vitamin E (200 mg, o.d.) and vitamin C (150 mg, o.d.) and nine were given placebo during the experimentation period. Cough scoring, serum NO and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were determined during both the periods. While there were significant decreases in cough scores, NO and MDA levels between these two periods in the iron group, cough scores and MDA level decreased significantly in the anti-oxidant group. None of these parameters changed in the control group. NO level was found to be increased significantly in patients who developed cough (n = 28) compared with those who did not cough (n = 72). These results suggest that iron supplementation suppresses cough in patients on ACE-I therapy through its effect on NO generation.

  19. Minerals Masquerading As Enzymes: Abiotic Oxidation Of Soil Organic Matter In An Iron-Rich Humid Tropical Forest Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.

    2010-12-01

    Oxidative reactions play an important role in decomposing soil organic matter fractions that resist hydrolytic degradation, and fundamentally affect the cycling of recalcitrant soil carbon across ecosystems. Microbial extracellular oxidative enzymes (e.g. lignin peroxidases and laccases) have been assumed to provide a dominant role in catalyzing soil organic matter oxidation, while other potential oxidative mechanisms remain poorly explored. Here, we show that abiotic reactions mediated by the oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe(II)) could explain high potential oxidation rates in humid tropical forest soils, which often contain high concentrations of Fe(II) and experience rapid redox fluctuations between anaerobic and aerobic conditions. These abiotic reactions could provide an additional mechanism to explain high rates of decomposition in these ecosystems, despite frequent oxygen deficits. We sampled humid tropical forest soils in Puerto Rico, USA from various topographic positions, ranging from well-drained ridges to riparian valleys that experience broad fluctuations in redox potential. We measured oxidative activity by adding the model humic compound L-DOPA to soil slurries, followed by colorimetric measurements of the supernatant solution over time. Dilute hydrogen peroxide was added to a subset of slurries to measure peroxidative activity. We found that oxidative and peroxidative activity correlated positively with soil Fe(II) concentrations, counter to prevailing theory that low redox potential should suppress oxidative enzymes. Boiling or autoclaving sub-samples of soil slurries to denature any enzymes present typically increased peroxidative activity and did not eliminate oxidative activity, further suggesting the importance of an abiotic mechanism. We found substantial differences in the oxidation products of the L-DOPA substrate generated by our soil slurries in comparison with oxidation products generated by a purified enzyme (mushroom tyrosinase

  20. Novel insights into the fungal oxidation of monoaromatic and biarylic environmental pollutants by characterization of two new ring cleavage enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schlüter, Rabea; Lippmann, Ramona; Hammer, Elke; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    The phenol-degrading yeast Trichosporon mucoides can oxidize and detoxify biarylic environmental pollutants such as dibenzofuran, diphenyl ether and biphenyl by ring cleavage. The degradation pathways are well investigated, but the enzymes involved are not. The high similarity of hydroxylated biphenyl derivatives and phenol raised the question if the enzymes of the phenol degradation are involved in ring cleavage or whether specific enzymes are necessary. Purification of enzymes from T. mucoides with catechol cleavage activity demonstrated the existence of three different enzymes: a classical catechol-1,2-dioxygenase (CDO), not able to cleave the aromatic ring system of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, and two novel enzymes with a high affinity towards 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The comparison of the biochemical characteristics and mass spectrometric sequence data of these three enzymes demonstrated that they have different substrate specificities. CDO catalyzes the ortho-cleavage of dihydroxylated monoaromatic compounds, while the two novel enzymes carry out a similar reaction on biphenyl derivatives. The ring fission of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl by the purified enzymes results in the formation of (5-oxo-3-phenyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)acetic acid. These results suggest that the ring cleavage enzymes catalyzing phenol degradation are not involved in the ring cleavage of biarylic compounds by this yeast, although some intermediates of the phenol metabolism may function as inducers.

  1. Correlation between Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Free Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation in Four Lines of Korean Native Chicken Meat

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Chang-Yeon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe the association between antioxidant enzyme activity, free iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chicken (KNC) meat during refrigerated storage. Four lines of KNC (Yeonsan ogye, Hyunin black, Hoengseong yakdak and Hwangbong) were raised under similar conditions. A total of 16 roosters were randomly sampled and slaughtered at the age of 12 mon. The breast and thigh meats were stored aerobically for 10 d at 4℃. Although thigh meat had higher antioxidant enzyme activity, it was more susceptible to lipid oxidation and released more iron during storage than breast meat. Aerobic refrigerated storage for 10 d significantly decreased the activity of antioxidant enzymes and increased the amount of free iron and malondialdehyde. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were negatively correlated with lipid oxidation, whereas that of catalase was not. The amount of free iron was positively associated with lipid oxidation. We concluded that chicken line did not affect strongly on antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid oxidation in breast meat of KNC. However, the thigh meat of Hwangbong and Hyunin black had higher SOD and GSH-Px activity, respectively, and lower malondialdehyde contents than that of other chickens. SOD, GSH-Px and free iron play significant roles in meat lipid oxidation during refrigerated storage. PMID:27499663

  2. Metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Yuuki; Usami, Atsushi; Rangsunvigit, Pramoch; Malakul, Pomthong; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide was investigated using human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes for the first time. Both isomers of rose oxide were incubated with human liver microsomes, and the formation of the respective 9-oxidized metabolite were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Of 11 different recombinant human P450 enzymes used, CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 were the primary enzymes catalysing the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide. CYP1A2 also efficiently oxidized (-)-cis-rose oxide at the 9-position but not (-)-trans-rose oxide. α-Naphthoflavone (a selective CYP1A2 inhibitor), thioTEPA (a CYP2B6 inhibitor) and anti-CYP2B6 antibody inhibited (-)-cis-rose oxide 9-hydroxylation catalysed by human liver microsomes. On the other hand, the metabolism of (-)-trans-rose oxide was suppressed by thioTEPA and anti-CYP2B6 at a significant level in human liver microsomes. However, omeprazole (a CYP2C19 inhibitor) had no significant effects on the metabolism of both isomers of rose oxide. Using microsomal preparations from nine different human liver samples, (-)-9-hydroxy-cis- and (-)-9-hydroxy-trans-rose oxide formations correlated with (S)-mephenytoin N-demethylase activity (CYP2B6 marker activity). These results suggest that CYP2B6 plays important roles in the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide in human liver microsomes.

  3. A dual enzyme functionalized nanostructured thulium oxide based interface for biomedical application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jay; Roychoudhury, Appan; Srivastava, Manish; Solanki, Pratima R; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Seung Hee; Malhotra, B D

    2014-01-21

    In this paper, we present results of the studies related to fabrication of a rare earth metal oxide based efficient biosensor using an interface based on hydrothermally prepared nanostructured thulium oxide (n-Tm2O3). A colloidal solution of prepared nanorods has been electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The n-Tm2O3 nanorods are found to provide improved sensing characteristics to the electrode interface in terms of electroactive surface area, diffusion coefficient, charge transfer rate constant and electron transfer kinetics. The structural and morphological studies of n-Tm2O3 nanorods have been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. This interfacial platform has been used for fabrication of a total cholesterol biosensor by immobilizing cholesterol esterase (ChEt) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) onto a Tm2O3 nanostructured surface. The results of response studies of the fabricated ChEt-ChOx/n-Tm2O3/ITO bioelectrode show a broad linear range of 8-400 mg dL(-1), detection limit of 19.78 mg (dL cm(-2))(-1), and high sensitivity of 0.9245 μA (mg per dL cm(-2))(-1) with a response time of 40 s. Further, this bioelectrode has been utilized for estimation of total cholesterol with negligible interference (3%) from analytes present in human serum samples. The utilization of this n-Tm2O3 modified electrode for enzyme-based biosensor analysis offers an efficient strategy and a novel interface for application of the rare earth metal oxide materials in the field of electrochemical sensors and bioelectronic devices.

  4. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  5. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  6. A dual enzyme functionalized nanostructured thulium oxide based interface for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jay; Roychoudhury, Appan; Srivastava, Manish; Solanki, Pratima R.; Lee, Dong Won; Lee, Seung Hee; Malhotra, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we present results of the studies related to fabrication of a rare earth metal oxide based efficient biosensor using an interface based on hydrothermally prepared nanostructured thulium oxide (n-Tm2O3). A colloidal solution of prepared nanorods has been electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate. The n-Tm2O3 nanorods are found to provide improved sensing characteristics to the electrode interface in terms of electroactive surface area, diffusion coefficient, charge transfer rate constant and electron transfer kinetics. The structural and morphological studies of n-Tm2O3 nanorods have been carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic techniques. This interfacial platform has been used for fabrication of a total cholesterol biosensor by immobilizing cholesterol esterase (ChEt) and cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) onto a Tm2O3 nanostructured surface. The results of response studies of the fabricated ChEt-ChOx/n-Tm2O3/ITO bioelectrode show a broad linear range of 8-400 mg dL-1, detection limit of 19.78 mg (dL cm-2)-1, and high sensitivity of 0.9245 μA (mg per dL cm-2)-1 with a response time of 40 s. Further, this bioelectrode has been utilized for estimation of total cholesterol with negligible interference (3%) from analytes present in human serum samples. The utilization of this n-Tm2O3 modified electrode for enzyme-based biosensor analysis offers an efficient strategy and a novel interface for application of the rare earth metal oxide materials in the field of electrochemical sensors and bioelectronic devices.In this paper, we present results of the studies related to fabrication of a rare earth metal oxide based efficient biosensor using an interface based on hydrothermally prepared nanostructured thulium oxide (n-Tm2O3). A colloidal solution of prepared

  7. Anti-oxidative enzyme changes associated with chickpea calli tolerant to Ascochyta rabiei culture filtrate.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prabhat; Sangwan, M S; Mehta, Naresh; Kumar, Santosh

    2014-05-01

    Ascochyta blight caused by Ascochyta rabiei (Pass.) Labrousse is a major biotic constraint in production of chickpea. In the present investigation, all chickpea genotypes [E100Y (m), Gaurav, Pb-7 and L550] induced 100% callus on standard medium with greenish colour and fragile structure. These calli were used for in vitro screening against pathogen, A. rabiei culture filtrate at 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentrations. Survival rate of calli in all chickpea's genotypes were reduced significantly at higher concentration (15%) of culture filtrate. The culture filtrate concentration of 20 % was lethal for calli of all chickpea's genotypes. Hence, biochemical changes viz. total soluble proteins and activities of anti-oxidative enzymes (polyphenol oxidase, peroxidase and catalase) were estimated at 15% and below concentration of culture filtrate. Tolerant calli of resistant genotype, E100 Y (m) revealed significantly higher total soluble proteins (10.04 mg g⁻¹ f.wt. of callus) and activity of anti-oxidative enzymes, polyphenol oxidase (9.0 unit absorbance change min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein) and peroxidase (19.09 unit absorbance change min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein) and lower catalase (18.65 μ moles of H2O2 utilized min⁻¹ mg⁻¹ protein) at higher (15%) concentration of culture filtrate followed by moderately resistant (Gaurav), and susceptible genotypes (Pb-7 and L550). Thus, higher polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase and lower catalase activity in chickpea's genotypes against culture filtrate of A. rabiei could be used as parameters for screening resistant genotypes to pathogen, A. rabiei.

  8. Unravelling the Interactions between Hydrolytic and Oxidative Enzymes in Degradation of Lignocellulosic Biomass by Sporothrix carnis under Various Fermentation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ogunyewo, Olusola A.; Olajuyigbe, Folasade M.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism underlying the action of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass remains unclear; hence, it is crucial to investigate enzymatic interactions involved in the process. In this study, degradation of corn cob by Sporothrix carnis and involvement of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation were investigated over 240 h cultivation period. About 60% degradation of corn cob was achieved by S. carnis at the end of fermentation. The yields of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were higher than oxidative enzymes, laccase and peroxidase, over 144 h fermentation period. Maximum yields of cellulase (854.4 U/mg) and xylanase (789.6 U/mg) were at 96 and 144 h, respectively. Laccase and peroxidase were produced cooperatively with maximum yields of 489.06 U/mg and 585.39 U/mg at 144 h. Drastic decline in production of cellulase at 144 h (242.01 U/mg) and xylanase at 192 h (192.2 U/mg) indicates that they play initial roles in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass while laccase and peroxidase play later roles. Optimal degradation of corn cob (76.6%) and production of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes were achieved with 2.5% inoculum at pH 6.0. Results suggest synergy in interactions between the hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes which can be optimized for improved biodegradation. PMID:26881077

  9. The relationship between coenzyme Q10, oxidative stress, and antioxidant enzymes activities and coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Ko, Ya-Wen; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A higher oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coenzyme Q10 concentration and lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities and the risk of CAD. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery were assigned to the case group (n = 51). The control group (n = 102) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were measured. Subjects with CAD had significant lower plasma coenzyme Q10, CAT and GPx activities and higher MDA and SOD levels compared to those of the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 was positively correlated with CAT and GPx activities and negatively correlated with MDA and SOD. However, the correlations were not significant after adjusting for the potential confounders of CAD with the exception of SOD. A higher level of plasma coenzyme Q10 (≥ 0.52 μmol/L) was significantly associated with reducing the risk of CAD. Our results support the potential cardioprotective impact of coenzyme Q10.

  10. Oxidation of naphthalene by a multicomponent enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816.

    PubMed Central

    Ensley, B D; Gibson, D T; Laborde, A L

    1982-01-01

    The initial reactions in the oxidation of naphthalene by Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816 involves the enzymatic incorporation of one molecule of oxygen into the aromatic nucleus to form (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. The enzyme catalyzing this reaction, naphthalene dioxygenase, was resolved into three protein components, designated A, B, and C, by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Incubation of naphthalene with components A, B, and C in the presence of NADH resulted in the formation of (+)-cis-(1R,2S)-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydronaphthalene. The ratio of oxygen and NADH utilization to product formation was 1:1:1. NADPH also served as an electron donor for naphthalene oxygenation. However, its activity was less than 50% of that observed with NADH. Component A showed NAD(P)H-cytochrome c reductase activity which was stimulated by the addition of flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide. A similar stimulation was observed when these flavin nucleotides were added to the naphthalene dioxygenase assay system. These preliminary observations indicate that naphthalene dioxygenase has properties in common with both monooxygenase and dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme systems. Images PMID:7037744

  11. Antioxidant enzymes activities of Burkholderia spp. strains-oxidative responses to Ni toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dourado, M N; Franco, M R; Peters, L P; Martins, P F; Souza, L A; Piotto, F A; Azevedo, R A

    2015-12-01

    Increased agriculture production associated with intense application of herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides leads to soil contamination worldwide. Nickel (Ni), due to its high mobility in soils and groundwater, constitutes one of the greatest problems in terms of environmental pollution. Metals, including Ni, in high concentrations are toxic to cells by imposing a condition of oxidative stress due to the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. This study aimed to characterize the Ni antioxidant response of two tolerant Burkholderia strains (one isolated from noncontaminated soil, SNMS32, and the other from contaminated soil, SCMS54), by measuring superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities. Ni accumulation and bacterial growth in the presence of the metal were also analyzed. The results showed that both strains exhibited different trends of Ni accumulation and distinct antioxidant enzymes responses. The strain from contaminated soil (SCMS54) exhibited a higher Ni biosorption and exhibited an increase in SOD and GST activities after 5 and 12 h of Ni exposure. The analysis of SOD, CAT, and GR by nondenaturing PAGE revealed the appearance of an extra isoenzyme in strain SCMS54 for each enzyme. The results suggest that the strain SCMS54 isolated from contaminated soil present more plasticity with potential to be used in soil and water bioremediation.

  12. A highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for catechol using conducting polymer reduced graphene oxide-metal oxide enzyme modified electrode.

    PubMed

    Sethuraman, V; Muthuraja, P; Anandha Raj, J; Manisankar, P

    2016-10-15

    The fabrication, characterization and analytical performances were investigated for a catechol biosensor, based on the PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The graphene oxide (GO) doped conducting polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was prepared through electrochemical polymerization by potential cycling. Reduction of PEDOT-GO was carried out by amperometric method. Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol by hydrothermal method. The mixture of Fe2O3, PPO and glutaraldehyde was casted on the PEDOT-rGO electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrodes was studied by FE-SEM and AFM. Cyclic voltammetric studies of catechol on the enzyme modified electrode revealed higher reduction peak current. Determination of catechol was carried out successfully by Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) technique. The fabricated biosensor investigated shows a maximum current response at pH 6.5. The catechol biosensor exhibited wide sensing linear range from 4×10(-8) to 6.20×10(-5)M, lower detection limit of 7×10(-9)M, current maxima (Imax) of 92.55µA and Michaelis-Menten (Km) constant of 30.48µM. The activation energy (Ea) of enzyme electrode is 35.93KJmol(-1) at 50°C. There is no interference from d-glucose and l-glutamic acid, ascorbic acid and o-nitrophenol. The PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO biosensor was stable for at least 75 days when stored in a buffer at about 4°C.

  13. Oxidation of Monolignols by Members of the Berberine Bridge Enzyme Family Suggests a Role in Plant Cell Wall Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Bastian; Pavkov-Keller, Tea; Steiner, Barbara; Dordic, Andela; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Sensen, Christoph W.; van der Graaff, Eric; Wallner, Silvia; Gruber, Karl; Macheroux, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a large number of genes encoding for berberine bridge enzyme (BBE)-like enzymes. Despite the widespread occurrence and abundance of this protein family in the plant kingdom, the biochemical function remains largely unexplored. In this study, we have expressed two members of the BBE-like enzyme family from Arabidopsis thaliana in the host organism Komagataella pastoris. The two proteins, termed AtBBE-like 13 and AtBBE-like 15, were purified, and their catalytic properties were determined. In addition, AtBBE-like 15 was crystallized and structurally characterized by x-ray crystallography. Here, we show that the enzymes catalyze the oxidation of aromatic allylic alcohols, such as coumaryl, sinapyl, and coniferyl alcohol, to the corresponding aldehydes and that AtBBE-like 15 adopts the same fold as vanillyl alcohol oxidase as reported previously for berberine bridge enzyme and other FAD-dependent oxidoreductases. Further analysis of the substrate range identified coniferin, the glycosylated storage form of coniferyl alcohol, as a substrate of the enzymes, whereas other glycosylated monolignols were rather poor substrates. A detailed analysis of the motifs present in the active sites of the BBE-like enzymes in A. thaliana suggested that 14 out of 28 members of the family might catalyze similar reactions. Based on these findings, we propose a novel role of BBE-like enzymes in monolignol metabolism that was previously not recognized for this enzyme family. PMID:26037923

  14. A specific affinity reagent to distinguish aldehyde dehydrogenases and oxidases. Enzymes catalyzing aldehyde oxidation in an adult moth

    SciTech Connect

    Tasayco, M.L.; Prestwich, G.D. )

    1990-02-25

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and oxidase (AO) enzymes from the tissue extracts of male and female tobacco budworm moth (Heliothis virescens) were identified after electrophoretic protein separation. AO activity was visualized using formazan- or horseradish peroxidase-mediated staining coupled to the AO-catalyzed oxidation of benzaldehyde. A set of six soluble AO enzymes with isoelectric points from pI 4.6 to 5.3 were detected primarily in the antennal extracts. Partially purified antennal AO enzymes also oxidized both (Z)-9-tetradecenal and (Z)-11-hexadecenal, the two major pheromone components of this moth. ALDH activity was detected using a tritium-labeled affinity reagent based on a known irreversible inhibitor of this enzyme. This labeled vinyl ketone, (3H)(Z)-1,11-hexadecadien-3-one, was synthesized and used to covalently modify the soluble ALDH enzymes from tissue extracts. Molecular subunits of potential ALDH enzymes were visualized in the fluorescence autoradiograms of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis-separated proteins of the antenna, head, and leg tissues. Covalent modification of these protein subunits decreased specifically in the presence of excess pheromone aldehyde or benzaldehyde. Labeled vinyl ketones are thus novel tools for the identification of molecular subunits of ALDH enzymes.

  15. Zinc oxide nanoparticles cause inhibition of microbial denitrification by affecting transcriptional regulation and enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Liu, Kun; Li, Mu; Yin, Daqiang

    2014-12-02

    Over the past few decades, human activities have accelerated the rates and extents of water eutrophication and global warming through increasing delivery of biologically available nitrogen such as nitrate and large emissions of anthropogenic greenhouse gases. In particular, nitrous oxide (N2O) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, because it has a 300-fold higher global warming potential than carbon dioxide. Microbial denitrification is a major pathway responsible for nitrate removal, and also a dominant source of N2O emissions from terrestrial or aquatic environments. However, whether the release of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) into the environment affects microbial denitrification is largely unknown. Here we show that the presence of ZnO NPs lead to great increases in nitrate delivery (9.8-fold higher) and N2O emissions (350- and 174-fold higher in the gas and liquid phases, respectively). Our data further reveal that ZnO NPs significantly change the transcriptional regulations of glycolysis and polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, which causes the decrease in reducing powers available for the reduction of nitrate and N2O. Moreover, ZnO NPs substantially inhibit the gene expressions and catalytic activities of key denitrifying enzymes. These negative effects of ZnO NPs on microbial denitrification finally cause lower nitrate removal and higher N2O emissions, which is likely to exacerbate water eutrophication and global warming.

  16. Coupling osmium complexes to epoxy-functionalised polymers to provide mediated enzyme electrodes for glucose oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ó Conghaile, Peter; Pöller, Sascha; MacAodha, Domhnall; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Leech, Dónal

    2013-05-15

    Newly synthesised osmium complex-modified redox polymers were tested for potential application as mediators in glucose oxidising enzyme electrodes for application to biosensors or biofuel cells. Coupling of osmium complexes containing amine functional groups to epoxy-functionalised polymers of variable composition provides a range of redox polymers with variation possible in redox potential and physicochemical properties. Properties of the redox polymers as mediators for glucose oxidation were investigated by co-immobilisation onto graphite with glucose oxidase or FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase using a range of crosslinkers and in the presence and absence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Electrodes prepared by immobilising [P20-Os(2,2'-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl].PF6, carbon nanotubes and glucose oxidase exhibit glucose oxidation current densities as high as 560μAcm(-2) for PBS containing 100mM glucose at 0.45V vs. Ag/AgCl. Films prepared by crosslinking [P20-Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine)Cl].PF6, an FAD-dependent glucose dehydrogenase, and carbon nanotubes achieve current densities of 215μAcm(-2) in 5mM glucose at 0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl, showing some promise for application to glucose oxidising biosensors or biofuel cells.

  17. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress.

  18. Dynamic changes of anti-oxidative enzymes of 10 wheat genotypes at soil water deficits.

    PubMed

    Shao, Hong Bo; Liang, Zong Suo; Shao, Ming An; Sun, Qun

    2005-05-25

    Drought is a world-spread problem seriously influencing crop production and quality, the loss of which is the total for other natural disasters, with increasing global climate change making the situation more serious. Wheat is the staple food for more than 35% of world population, so wheat anti-drought physiology study is of importance to wheat production and biological breeding for the sake of coping with abiotic and biotic conditions. Much research is involved in this hot topic, but the pace of progress is not so large because of drought resistance being a multiple-gene-control quantitative character and wheat genome being larger (16,000 Mb). On the other hand, stress adaptive mechanisms are quite different, with stress degree, different growth and developmental stages, time course, materials and experimental plots, thus increasing the complexity of the issue in question. Additionally, a little study is related to the whole life circle of wheat, which cannot provide a comprehensive understanding of its anti-drought machinery. We selected 10 kinds of wheat genotypes as materials, which have potential to be applied in practice, and measured change of relative physiological indices through wheat whole growing developmental circle (i.e. seedling, tillage and maturing). Here, we reported the dynamic anti-oxidative results of whole stage (i.e. seedling, tillage and maturing) in terms of activities of POD, SOD, CAT of 10 wheat genotypes as follows: (1) 10 wheat genotypes can be grouped into three kinds (A, B and C, respectively) according to their changing trend of the measured indices; (2) A group performed better resistance drought under the condition of treatment level 1, whose activities of anti-oxidative enzymes (POD, SOD, CAT) were higher; (3) B group exhibited stronger anti-drought under treatment level 2, whose activities of anti-oxidative enzymes were higher; (4) C group expressed anti-drought to some extent under treatment level 3, whose activities of anti-oxidative

  19. [1-butanol synthesis by Escherichia coli cells through butyryl-CoA formation by heterologous enzymes of clostridia and native enzymes of fatty acid beta-oxidation].

    PubMed

    Gulevich, A Iu; Skorokhodova, A Iu; Morzhakova, A A; Antonova, S V; Sukhozhenko, A V; Shakulov, R S; Debabov, V G

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic biosynthesis of 1-butanol from glucose is investigated in recombinant Escherichia coli strains which form butyryl-CoA using the heterologous enzyme complex of clostridia or as a result of a reversal in the action of native enzymes of the fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway. It was revealed that when the basic pathways of acetic and lactic acid formation are inactivated due to deletions in the ackA, pta, poxB, and ldhA genes, the efficiency of butyryl-CoA biosynthesis and its reduced product, i.e., 1-butanol, by two types of recombinant stains is comparable. The limiting factor for 1-butanol production by the obtained strains is the low substrate specificity of the basic CoA-dependent alcohol/aldehyde AdhE dehydrogenase from E. coli to butyryl-CoA. It was concluded that, in order to construct an efficient 1-butanol producer based on a model strain synthesizing butyryl-CoA as a result of a reversal in fatty acid beta-oxidation enzymes, it is necessary to provide intensive formation of acetyl-CoA and enhanced activity of alternative alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases in the cells of a strain.

  20. The clinical research for Ganoderan's effect on preventing and treating cerebral arteriosclerosis through inhibiting NADPH oxidizing enzyme expression.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhang Li; Fang, Teng Jun; Qian, Yuan Xue; Rong, Wang Huan

    2014-07-01

    A lot of researches have verified that produced excessive reactive oxygen is one of the hazard factors causing atherosclerosis. NADPH oxidase is the main protease of vascular cell's producing reactive oxygen, the expression of its relevant subunits is closely correlated with the occurring and development process of atherosclerosis. Oxidizing reaction could damage organism tissue cells, ganoderan has very significant effect on the anti-oxidizing function of cell. The pharmaceutical research of ganoderan has significant meaning in curing diabetes mellitus, preventing and controlling arteriosclerosis. This paper is mainly to discuss the effect of anoderan's inhibiting NADPH oxidizing enzyme expression on preventing and treating cerebral arteriosclerosis and its action mechanism.

  1. Electrochemically reduced graphene and iridium oxide nanoparticles for inhibition-based angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor detection.

    PubMed

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Rivas, Lourdes; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-02-15

    In this work, a novel biosensor based on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles for the detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor drug, captopril, is presented. For the preparation of the biosensor, tyrosinase is immobilized onto screen printed electrode by using 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling reagents, in electrochemically reduced graphene oxide and iridium oxide nanoparticles matrix. Biosensor response is characterized towards catechol, in terms of graphene oxide concentration, number of cycles to reduce graphene oxide, volume of iridium oxide nanoparticles and tyrosinase solution. The designed biosensor is used to inhibit tyrosinase activity by Captopril, which is generally used to treat congestive heart failure. It is an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor that operates via chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation. The captopril detections using both inhibition ways are very sensitive with low limits of detection: 0.019µM and 0.008µM for chelating copper at the active site of tyrosinase and thioquinone formation, respectively. The proposed methods have been successfully applied in captopril determination in spiked human serum and pharmaceutical dosage forms with acceptable recovery values.

  2. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women.

  3. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    PubMed

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  4. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  5. Oxidations of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic aliphatic amines by horseradish peroxidase: the indole ring binds to the enzyme and mediates electron-transfer amine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Ling, Ke-Qing; Li, Wen-Shan; Sayre, Lawrence M

    2008-01-23

    Although oxidations of aromatic amines by horseradish peroxidase (HRP) are well-known, typical aliphatic amines are not substrates of HRP. In this study, the reactions of N-benzyl and N-methyl cyclic amines with HRP were found to be slow, but reactions of N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines were 2-3 orders of magnitude faster. Analyses of pH-rate profiles revealed a dominant contribution to reaction by the amine-free base forms, the only species found to bind to the enzyme. A metabolic study on a family of congeneric N-(3-indoleethyl) cyclic amines indicated competition between amine and indole oxidation pathways. Amine oxidation dominated for the seven- and eight-membered azacycles, where ring size supports the change in hybridization from sp3 to sp2 that occurs upon one-electron amine nitrogen oxidation, whereas only indole oxidation was observed for the six-membered ring congener. Optical difference spectroscopic binding data and computational docking simulations suggest that all the arylalkylamine substrates bind to the enzyme through their aromatic termini with similar binding modes and binding affinities. Kinetic saturation was observed for a particularly soluble substrate, consistent with an obligatory role of an enzyme-substrate complexation preceding electron transfer. The significant rate enhancements seen for the indoleethylamine substrates suggest the ability of the bound indole ring to mediate what amounts to medium long-range electron-transfer oxidation of the tertiary amine center by the HRP oxidants. This is the first systematic investigation to document aliphatic amine oxidation by HRP at rates consistent with normal metabolic turnover, and the demonstration that this is facilitated by an auxiliary electron-rich aromatic ring.

  6. ION COMPOSITION ELUCIDATION (ICE)

    EPA Science Inventory



    Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer to simultaneously determine exact masses and relative isotopic abundances from mass peak profiles. These can be determined more accurately and at higher sensitivity ...

  7. Iron oxide filled magnetic carbon nanotube-enzyme conjugates for recycling of amyloglucosidase: toward useful applications in biofuel production process.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wei Jiang; Makam, Venkata S; Hu, Jun; Kang, Lifeng; Zheng, Minrui; Yoong, Sia Lee; Udalagama, Chammika N B; Pastorin, Giorgia

    2012-12-11

    Biofuels are fast advancing as a new research area to provide alternative sources of sustainable and clean energy. Recent advances in nanotechnology have sought to improve the efficiency of biofuel production, enhancing energy security. In this study, we have incorporated iron oxide nanoparticles into single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to produce magnetic single-walled carbon nanotubes (mSWCNTs). Our objective is to bridge both nanotechnology and biofuel production by immobilizing the enzyme, Amyloglucosidase (AMG), onto mSWCNTs using physical adsorption and covalent immobilization, with the aim of recycling the immobilized enzyme, toward useful applications in biofuel production processes. We have demonstrated that the enzyme retains a certain percentage of its catalytic efficiency (up to 40%) in starch prototype biomass hydrolysis when used repeatedly (up to ten cycles) after immobilization on mSWCNTs, since the nanotubes can be easily separated from the reaction mixture using a simple magnet. The enzyme loading, activity, and structural changes after immobilization onto mSWCNTs were also studied. In addition, we have demonstrated that the immobilized enzyme retains its activity when stored at 4 °C for at least one month. These results, combined with the unique intrinsic properties of the nanotubes, pave the way for greater efficiency in carbon nanotube-enzyme bioreactors and reduced capital costs in industrial enzyme systems.

  8. A Thermostable Bilirubin-Oxidizing Enzyme from Activated Sludge Isolated by a Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Nobutada; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    A gene coding for a multicopper oxidase (BopA) was identified through the screening of a metagenomic library constructed from wastewater treatment activated sludge. The recombinant BopA protein produced in Escherichia coli exhibited oxidation activity toward 2,2′-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) in the presence of copper, suggesting that BopA is laccase. A bioinformatic analysis of the bopA gene sequence indicated that it has a phylogenetically bacterial origin, possibly derived from a bacterium within the phylum Deinococcus-Thermus. Purified BopA exhibited maximum activity at pH 7.5 with bilirubin as its substrate and was found to be active over a markedly broad pH range from 6 to 11. It also showed notable thermostability; its activity remained intact even after a heat treatment at 90°C for 60 min. This enzyme is a thermostable-bilirubin oxidase that exhibits markedly higher thermostability than that previously reported for laccases. PMID:27885197

  9. In vitro effects of alloxan/copper combinations on lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Albena; Petrov, L; Kessiova, Mila; Kirkova, Margarita

    2007-12-01

    The in vitro effects of alloxan and the product of its reduction dialuric acid (alone or in combination with copper ions) on lipid peroxidation, carbonyl content, GSH level and antioxidant enzyme activities in rat liver and kidney have been studied. The effects of Cu2+/alloxan and Cu2+/dialuric acid were compared with those of Fe3+/alloxan and Fe3+/dialuric acid. Unlike alloxan, dialuric acid increased liver and kidney lipid peroxidation; similar effects were registered in the presence of Fe3+. In the presence of Cu2+/dialuric acid, the lipid peroxidation was strongly inhibited and vice versa--the liver protein oxidation was increased. Alloxan and dialuric acid, as well as their combinations with Fe3+ had no effect on the total GSH level. Both substances did not affect the Cu2+-induced changes in GSH level, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and gluthatione reductase activities. In contrast, Cu2+ had no effect on dialuric-acid induced changes in gluthatione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. The present in vitro results, concerning the metal dependence of the effects of alloxan and dialuric acid, are a premise for in vivo study of alloxan effects in metal-loaded animals.

  10. Oxidative stress enzyme status and frequency of micronuclei in heroin addicts in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Soykut, Buğra; Eken, Ayşe; Erdem, Onur; Akay, Cemal; Aydın, Ahmet; Çetin, Mustafa Kemal; Dilbaz, Nesrin

    2013-11-01

    Heroin is among the most widely used and dangerous addictive opiate. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimated that more than 15 million people are under the influence of opiate addiction. The aim of this study was to investigate copper zinc-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), catalase (CAT) and selenium-dependent glutathione peroxidase (Se-GPx) antioxidant enzyme activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and the frequency of micronuclei (MN) in addicts using heroin, the most commonly abused opiate in Turkey. Addicts were defined as individuals diagnosed according to "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV)" criteria by the "Alcohol and Substance Abuse Treatment and Education Centre-Ankara (AMATEM)". The control group had no addiction. In comparisons between the groups, a significant decrease in Cu,Zn-SOD activity and increases in MDA levels and MN frequency were observed in addicts. It can be concluded that opiates may cause oxidative stress and that antioxidant supplementation, in addition to pharmacological and psychiatric approaches, can reduce the toxicological effects of these opiates.

  11. Mechanistic investigation of trimethylamine-N-oxide reduction catalysed by biomimetic molybdenum enzyme models.

    PubMed

    Fortino, M; Marino, T; Russo, N; Sicilia, E

    2016-03-28

    In this paper, we report a theoretical investigation of the reduction reaction mechanism of Me3NO using molybdenum containing systems that are functional and structural analogues of trimethylamine N-oxide reductase mononuclear molybdenum enzyme. The reactivity of the monooxomolybdenum(IV) benzenedithiolato complex and its derivatives to carbamoyl (t-BuNHCO) and acylamino (t-BuCONH) substituents on the benzene rings in both cis and trans arrangements was explored. The calculated energy profiles describing the steps of two mechanisms of attack considered viable (named cis- and trans-attack) by the Me3NO substrate at cis and trans positions with respect to the oxo ligand show that the attack on cis is energetically more favourable than the attack on trans. Along the pathway for the cis-attack the first step of the reaction, that is rate-determining for all the studied compounds, is the approach of the substrate to the Mo centre in cis to the oxo ligand that causes a distortion of the initial square-pyramidal geometry of the complex. The reaction steps involved in the trans position attack were also explored. Calculations confirm that, as previously suggested, the introduction of ligands able to form intramolecular NH···S hydrogen bonds accelerates the reduction of the Me3NO substrate and contributes to the tuning of the reactivity of molybdoenzyme models.

  12. Altered expression and activities of enzymes involved in thiamine diphosphate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under oxidative and osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kujda, Marta; Wolak, Natalia; Kozik, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) serves as a cofactor for enzymes engaged in pivotal carbohydrate metabolic pathways, which are known to be modulated under stress conditions to ensure the cell survival. Recent reports have proven a protective role of thiamine (vitamin B(1)) in the response of plants to abiotic stress. This work aimed at verifying a hypothesis that also baker's yeast, which can synthesize thiamine de novo similarly to plants and bacteria, adjust thiamine metabolism to adverse environmental conditions. Our analyses on the gene expression and enzymatic activity levels generally showed an increased production of thiamine biosynthesis enzymes (THI4 and THI6/THI6), a TDP synthesizing enzyme (THI80/THI80) and a TDP-requiring enzyme, transketolase (TKL1/TKL) by yeast subjected to oxidative (1 mM hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic (1 M sorbitol) stress. However, these effects differed in magnitude, depending on yeast growth phase and presence of thiamine in growth medium. A mutant thi4Δ with increased sensitivity to oxidative stress exhibited enhanced TDP biosynthesis as compared with the wild-type strain. Similar tendencies were observed in mutants yap1Δ and hog1Δ defective in the signaling pathways of the defense against oxidative and osmotic stress, respectively, suggesting that thiamine metabolism can partly compensate damages of yeast general defense systems.

  13. Effect of commercially available green and black tea beverages on drug-metabolizing enzymes and oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Hsu, Ya-Ru; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Chang, Keng-Hao; Yang, Hui-Ting

    2014-08-01

    The effect of commercially available green tea (GT) and black tea (BT) drinks on drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a laboratory chow diet and GT or BT drink for 5 weeks. Control rats received de-ionized water instead of the tea drinks. Rats received the GT and BT drinks treatment for 5 weeks showed a significant increase in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1A2, and a significant decrease in CYP2C, CYP2E1 and CYP3A enzyme activities. Results of immunoblot analyses of enzyme protein contents showed the same trend with enzyme activity. Significant increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity and reduced glutathione content in liver and lungs were observed in rats treated with both tea drinks. A lower lipid peroxide level in lungs was observed in rats treated with GT drink. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that both tea drinks decreased pregnane X receptor binding to DNA and increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 binding to DNA. These results suggest that feeding of both tea drinks to rats modulated DME activities and reduced oxidative stress in liver and lungs. GT drink is more effective on reducing oxidative stress than BT drink.

  14. Identification of Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Sphingobacterium sp. T2 as a Novel Bacterial Enzyme for Lignin Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Goran M M; Taylor, Charles R; Liu, Yangqingxue; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Rea, Dean; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2015-10-16

    The valorization of aromatic heteropolymer lignin is an important unsolved problem in the development of a biomass-based biorefinery, for which novel high-activity biocatalysts are needed. Sequencing of the genomic DNA of lignin-degrading bacterial strain Sphingobacterium sp. T2 revealed no matches to known lignin-degrading genes. Proteomic matches for two manganese superoxide dismutase proteins were found in partially purified extracellular fractions. Recombinant MnSOD1 and MnSOD2 were both found to show high activity for oxidation of Organosolv and Kraft lignin, and lignin model compounds, generating multiple oxidation products. Structure determination revealed that the products result from aryl-Cα and Cα-Cβ bond oxidative cleavage and O-demethylation. The crystal structure of MnSOD1 was determined to 1.35 Å resolution, revealing a typical MnSOD homodimer harboring a five-coordinate trigonal bipyramidal Mn(II) center ligated by three His, one Asp, and a water/hydroxide in each active site. We propose that the lignin oxidation reactivity of these enzymes is due to the production of a hydroxyl radical, a highly reactive oxidant. This is the first demonstration that MnSOD is a microbial lignin-oxidizing enzyme.

  15. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  16. Association of erythrocytes antioxidant enzymes and their cofactors with markers of oxidative stress in patients with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Naama, Lamia M.; Hassan, Mea'ad K.; Mehdi, Jawad K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disease with known complications as a result of certain pathophysiological dysfunctions. It has been suggested that an increase in oxidative stress contributes to the incidence of these changes. Objectives: This study investigated the oxidant/antioxidant status of patients with SCA, and evaluated the effect of SCA on antioxidant enzymes and their cofactors. Methods: The study included 42 patients with SCA (in steady state), and a control group of 50 age-matched individuals without SCA. Serum malondialdehyde (MDA), copper, zinc, ferritin and iron levels, red blood cell (RBC) superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase levels were measured for the SCA and control groups. Results: Significantly lower levels of antioxidant enzymes (RBC SOD and catalase) and higher serum MDA levels (biomarker of oxidative stress) were found in SCA patients compared to the control group (all p < 0.001). Increased levels of serum ferritin, iron and copper and decreased zinc concentrations were also found in the SCA patients compared to the control group (all p < 0.001). In the SCA group, there were significant negative correlations between MDA levels and RBC SOD, RBC catalase, and serum zinc levels (p < 0.01), while a significant positive correlation between MDA with serum copper and iron levels (p < 0.01) was observed. Conclusion: SCA is associated with alterations in markers of oxidative stress including an increased MDA level, decreased antioxidant enzyme levels, and altered levels of enzyme cofactors (zinc, copper, and iron). This suggests that these antioxidant enzymes could be used as effective therapeutic targets for the treatment of this disease and supplementation of patients with substances with antioxidant properties may reduce the complications of this disease. PMID:26835411

  17. The pathways of glutamate and glutamine oxidation by tumor cell mitochondria. Role of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    Little evidence has been available on the oxidative pathways of glutamine and glutamate, the major respiratory substrates of cancer cells. Glutamate formed from glutamine by phosphate-dependent glutaminase undergoes quantitative transamination by aerobic tumor mitochondria to yield aspartate. However, when malate is also added there is a pronounced decrease in aspartate production and a large formation of citrate and alanine, in both state 3 and 4 conditions. In contrast, addition of malate to normal rat heart, liver, or kidney mitochondria oxidizing glutamate causes a marked increase in aspartate production. Further analysis showed that extramitochondrial malate is oxidized almost quantitatively to pyruvate + CO2 by NAD(P)+-linked malic enzyme, present in the mitochondria of all tumors tested, but absent in heart, liver, and kidney mitochondria. On the other hand intramitochondrial malate generated from glutamate is oxidized quantitatively to oxalacetate by mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase of tumors. Acetyl-CoA derived from extramitochondrial malate via pyruvate and oxalacetate derived from glutamate via intramitochondrial malate are quantitatively converted into citrate, which is extruded. No evidence was found that malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria converts glutamate-derived malate into pyruvate as postulated in other reports. Possible mechanisms for the integration of mitochondrial malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase activities in tumors are discussed.

  18. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    PubMed

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena.

  19. Molecular analysis of the distribution and phylogeny of the soxB gene among sulfur-oxidizing bacteria - evolution of the Sox sulfur oxidation enzyme system.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Birte; Imhoff, Johannes F; Kuever, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The soxB gene encodes the SoxB component of the periplasmic thiosulfate-oxidizing Sox enzyme complex, which has been proposed to be widespread among the various phylogenetic groups of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) that convert thiosulfate to sulfate with and without the formation of sulfur globules as intermediate. Indeed, the comprehensive genetic and genomic analyses presented in the present study identified the soxB gene in 121 phylogenetically and physiologically divergent SOB, including several species for which thiosulfate utilization has not been reported yet. In first support of the previously postulated general involvement of components of the Sox enzyme complex in the thiosulfate oxidation process of sulfur-storing SOB, the soxB gene was detected in all investigated photo- and chemotrophic species that form sulfur globules during thiosulfate oxidation (Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, Thiobacillus, invertebrate symbionts and free-living relatives). The SoxB phylogeny reflected the major 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic lineages of the investigated SOB, although topological discrepancies indicated several events of lateral soxB gene transfer among the SOB, e.g. its independent acquisition by the anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophic lineages from different chemotrophic donor lineages. A putative scenario for the proteobacterial origin and evolution of the Sox enzyme system in SOB is presented considering the phylogenetic, genomic (sox gene cluster composition) and geochemical data.

  20. Titania-coated gold nanorods with expanded photocatalytic response. Enzyme-like glucose oxidation under near-infrared illumination.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Liebana, M C; Hueso, J L; Arenal, R; Santamaria, J

    2017-02-02

    Gold nanorods coated with a uniform titanium dioxide nanoshell have been prepared and used as glucose-oxidase surrogates. Remarkably, this core-shell photocatalytic nanostructure has been able to induce complete oxidation of glucose at near room temperature (32-34 °C) in a wide range of pH values with the aid of a near-infrared (NIR) irradiation source. In contrast, the uncoated gold nanorods exhibit negligible photo-oxidation response under identical experimental conditions thereby proving the photoactivity of the titania shell towards glucose oxidation. The process takes place via in situ photo-generation of singlet oxygen or hydroxyl radicals as reactive oxidative species (ROS). This underlines the role played by the core nanorods as plasmonic light harvesters in the NIR range and constitutes the first example of a NIR-activated enzyme-like catalyst.

  1. Radical intermediates in the catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons by bacterial and human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yongying; He, Xiang; Ortiz de Montellano, Paul R

    2006-01-17

    Cytochromes P450cam and P450BM3 oxidize alpha- and beta-thujone into multiple products, including 7-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 7,8-dehydro-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 4-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 2-hydroxy-alpha-(or beta-)thujone, 5-hydroxy-5-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one, 4,10-dehydrothujone, and carvacrol. Quantitative analysis of the 4-hydroxylated isomers and the ring-opened product indicates that the hydroxylation proceeds via a radical mechanism with a radical recombination rate ranging from 0.7 +/- 0.3 x 10(10) s(-1) to 12.5 +/- 3 x 10(10) s(-1) for the trapping of the carbon radical by the iron-bound hydroxyl radical equivalent. 7-[2H]-alpha-Thujone has been synthesized and used to amplify C-4 hydroxylation in situations where uninformative C-7 hydroxylation is the dominant reaction. The involvement of a carbon radical intermediate is confirmed by the observation of inversion of stereochemistry of the methyl-substituted C-4 carbon during the hydroxylation. With an L244A mutation that slightly increases the P450(cam) active-site volume, this inversion is observed in up to 40% of the C-4 hydroxylated products. The oxidation of alpha-thujone by human CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP2E1, and CYP3A4 occurs with up to 80% C-4 methyl inversion, in agreement with a dominant radical hydroxylation mechanism. Three minor desaturation products are produced, with at least one of them via a cationic pathway. The cation involved is proposed to form by electron abstraction from a radical intermediate. The absence of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on product distribution in the P450cam reaction precludes a significant role for the P450 ferric hydroperoxide intermediate in substrate hydroxylation. The results indicate that carbon hydroxylation is catalyzed exclusively by a P450 ferryl species via radical intermediates whose detailed properties are substrate- and enzyme-dependent.

  2. Oxidative metabolism in guinea pig ventricular myocytes protected from proteolytic enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Bailey, L E; Carlos, H; Amian, A; Moon, K E

    1987-07-01

    Surface structures on guinea pig ventricular myocytes were protected from proteolytic enzyme activity with 100 KIU.ml-2 aprotinin during mechanical disaggregation. Intact myocytes, approximately 7.5 X 10(6) cells.g-1 ventricular wet weight, were separated from debris and damaged cells using Cytodex I tissue culture supports. Cellular ultrastructure did not differ from that observed in intact tissue. Neither spontaneous contractions nor contracture were ever observed in these myocytes in calcium concentrations of 10 mmol.litre-1. Dinitrophenol (0.2 mmol. litre-1) uncoupled respiration in the myocytes but only after the sarcolemma had been disrupted with Triton X100. The adenosine diphosphate to oxygen ratio of mitochondria isolated from the myocytes was 2.4(0.2) and the respiratory control index 2.6(0.3). Calcium (1.8 mmol.litre-1) increased oxygen uptake in the presence of 10 mmol.litre-1 pyruvate or 11 mmol.litre-1 glucose but not 17 mmol. litre-1 succinate. Succinate dependent oxygen consumption was greater than pyruvate dependent oxygen consumption (1090.0(190.0) and 40.1(0.8) nl.min-1.mg-1 protein respectively). The Crabtree effect was present. Oxidative metabolism was normal in cells stored at 10 degrees C for seven days but deteriorated rapidly thereafter. The results indicate that myocytes disaggregated by this procedure retain many of the morphological and metabolic characteristics of intact cardiac muscle cells and are relatively homogeneous with respect to calcium tolerance and metabolic function.

  3. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase and Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms in Migraine Patients

    PubMed Central

    SİPAHİ, Tammam; GÜLDİKEN, Babürhan; KABAYEL, Levent; PALABIYIK, Orkide; ÖZKAN, Hülya; KILIÇ, Tülay Okman; SÜT, Necdet; TURGUT, Nilda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In this study, we investigated the association of migraine with the Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR), repeated as 27 base pair, gene polymorphism in intron 4 of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the insertion/deletion of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) gene polymorphisms. Methods One hundred and five migraine and ninety seven healthy female control subjects were enrolled in the study. The patients were subdivided as migraine with aura and without aura, and the frequency and severity of migraine headaches were recorded. The eNOS VNTR (eNOS 4 a/b) and ACE insertion/deletion gene polymorphisms (ACE I/D) were assessed by polymerase chain reactions. Result The allele and genotype frequencies of eNOS 4 a/b gene polymorphism showed no difference between the migraine and control groups. The genotypic distribution of the ACE I/D gene polymorphism in the migraine group significantly differed from that in the control group. The DD and ID genotype increased the risk of migraine as much as 2.571 (95% CI-1.138–5.811) and 4.453 (95% CI-2.006–9.883) compared to the II genotype. The same increased risk sustained for both genotypes in the migraine with aura subgroup, but only the ID genotype remained as the risk factor in the migraine without aura subgroup (OR-3.750, 95% CI-1.493–9.420). No association of gene polymorphisms with migraine frequency and severity was observed. Conclusion Our findings support the relationship between migraine and the ACE I/D gene polymorphism. However, no association was found between migraine and the eNOS 4 a/b gene polymorphism.

  4. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte multilayer assemblies on reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Esteban; Bliem, Christina; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Battaglini, Fernando; Azzaroni, Omar; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2017-06-15

    We present the construction of layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyethylenimine and urease onto reduced-graphene-oxide based field-effect transistors (rGO FETs) for the detection of urea. This versatile biosensor platform simultaneously exploits the pH dependency of liquid-gated graphene-based transistors and the change in the local pH produced by the catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The use of an interdigitated microchannel resulted in transistors displaying low noise, high pH sensitivity (20.3µA/pH) and transconductance values up to 800 µS. The modification of rGO FETs with a weak polyelectrolyte improved the pH response because of its transducing properties by electrostatic gating effects. In the presence of urea, the urease-modified rGO FETs showed a shift in the Dirac point due to the change in the local pH close to the graphene surface. Markedly, these devices operated at very low voltages (less than 500mV) and were able to monitor urea in the range of 1-1000µm, with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 1µm, fast response and good long-term stability. The urea-response of the transistors was enhanced by increasing the number of bilayers due to the increment of the enzyme surface coverage onto the channel. Moreover, quantification of the heavy metal Cu(2+)(with a LOD down to 10nM) was performed in aqueous solution by taking advantage of the urease specific inhibition.

  5. Sodium chloride enhances cadmium tolerance through reducing cadmium accumulation and increasing anti-oxidative enzyme activity in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Lin; Shang, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Tao; Jabeen, Zahra; Zhang, Guo-Ping

    2013-06-01

    The effect of sodium chloride (NaCl) on cadmium (Cd) uptake, translocation, and oxidative stress was investigated using 2 tobacco cultivars differing in Cd tolerance. The growth inhibition of the tobacco plants exposed to Cd toxicity was in part alleviated by moderate addition of NaCl in the culture solution. Cadmium concentration of shoots and roots in the 2 cultivars increased with increasing Cd levels in the solution and decreased with the addition of NaCl. The addition of NaCl could alleviate the oxidative stress caused by Cd toxicity, as reflected by reduced production of malondialdehyde and recovered or enhanced activities of antioxidative enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase. The results also showed that the enhancement of antioxidative enzyme activity by NaCl for the tobacco plants exposed to Cd stress is related to induced Ca signaling.

  6. Isolation and characterization of a 4-nitrotoluene-oxidizing enzyme from activated sludge by a metagenomic approach.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Nobutada; Sakai, Kayoko; Nakamura, Kazunori

    2010-01-01

    To isolate a biocatalytic enzyme, metagenomic libraries were constructed in fosmids from samples of activated sludge used to treat coke plant wastewater. Six indigo-producing clones were isolated from approximately 40,000 metagenomic clones in the search for the oxygenase responsible. In vitro mutagenesis and whole-sequencing revealed one open reading frame to be responsible for the production of indigo in the fosmid clones. The deduced sequence of the gene product showed 60% identity with 2-naphthoate monooxygenase from Burkholderia sp. JT1500. Subclones carrying this open reading frame (icpA) retained indigo production, and indigo-producing enzymes expressed from subclones catalyzed the oxidization of 4-nitrotoluene to form 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol. These results suggested that the icp product is an enzyme involved in catalyzing 4-nitrotoluene's oxygenation.

  7. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  8. Mechanistic aspects of CYP74 allene oxide synthases and related cytochrome P450 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Brash, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    The existence of CYP5, CYP8A, and the CYP74 enzymes specialized for reaction with fatty acid peroxide substrates presents opportunities for a “different look” at the catalytic cycle of the cytochrome P450s. This review considers how the properties of the peroxide-metabolizing enzymes are distinctive, and how they tie in with those of the conventional monooxygenase enzymes. Some unusual reactions of each class have parallels in the other. As new enzyme reactions and new P450 structures emerge there will be possibilities for finding their special properties and edging this knowledge into the big picture. PMID:19747698

  9. Novel Fluorescence Arginine Analogue as a Sensor for Direct Identification and Imaging of Nitric Oxide Synthase-like Enzymes in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kang; Guo, Tongtong; Li, Pengfei; Liu, Yin; Xu, Yufang; Fang, Yuda; Qian, Xuhong

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide synthase like enzyme (NOS-like enzyme), which produces nitric oxide, participates in many biological processes. However it remains unidentified and highly controversial that plants do possess a NOS-like enzyme. In this paper, a novel arginine analogue NP1 was designed and developed for the direct identification and real time tracking of NOS-like enzymes in plant by fluorescence sensing. It could bind NOS-like enzyme efficiently and enter the cell successfully. In vivo fluorescence response results directly proved that NOS-like enzymes did exist in tobacco leaf and would be stimulated by pathogen infection, which also provided a useful chemical tool for the study of the function of NOS-like enzyme in plants. PMID:27586270

  10. Trace Metal Requirements for Microbial Enzymes Involved in the Production and Consumption of Methane and Nitrous Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Jennifer B.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluxes of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere are heavily influenced by microbiological activity. Microbial enzymes involved in the production and consumption of greenhouse gases often contain metal cofactors. While extensive research has examined the influence of Fe bioavailability on microbial CO2 cycling, fewer studies have explored metal requirements for microbial production and consumption of the second- and third-most abundant greenhouse gases, methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O). Here we review the current state of biochemical, physiological, and environmental research on transition metal requirements for microbial CH4 and N2O cycling. Methanogenic archaea require large amounts of Fe, Ni, and Co (and some Mo/W and Zn). Low bioavailability of Fe, Ni, and Co limits methanogenesis in pure and mixed cultures and environmental studies. Anaerobic methane oxidation by anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) likely occurs via reverse methanogenesis since ANME possess most of the enzymes in the methanogenic pathway. Aerobic CH4 oxidation uses Cu or Fe for the first step depending on Cu availability, and additional Fe, Cu, and Mo for later steps. N2O production via classical anaerobic denitrification is primarily Fe-based, whereas aerobic pathways (nitrifier denitrification and archaeal ammonia oxidation) require Cu in addition to, or possibly in place of, Fe. Genes encoding the Cu-containing N2O reductase, the only known enzyme capable of microbial N2O conversion to N2, have only been found in classical denitrifiers. Accumulation of N2O due to low Cu has been observed in pure cultures and a lake ecosystem, but not in marine systems. Future research is needed on metalloenzymes involved in the production of N2O by enrichment cultures of ammonia oxidizing archaea, biological mechanisms for scavenging scarce metals, and possible links between metal bioavailability and greenhouse gas fluxes in anaerobic environments where metals may be limiting due to sulfide

  11. Measuring Intracellular Enzyme Concentrations: Assessing the Effect of Oxidative Stress on the Amount of Glyoxalase I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Hugo Vicente; Ferreira, Antonio E. N.; Quintas, Alexandre; Cordeiro, Carlos; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2008-01-01

    Enzymology is one of the fundamental areas of biochemistry and involves the study of the structure, kinetics, and regulation of enzyme activity. Research in this area is often conducted with purified enzymes and extrapolated to "in vivo" conditions. The specificity constant, k[subscript S], is the ratio between k[subscript cat] (the catalytic…

  12. Ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced by solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Orsolya Erzsebet; Csiszar, Emilia; Toth, Karolina; Szakacs, George; Koczka, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic and hydrolytic enzymes were produced with six selected fungi on flax substrate by solid state fermentation (SSF). The extracellular enzyme production of the organisms in two SSF media was evaluated by measuring the soluble protein concentration and the filter paper, endoxylanase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, 1,4-β-d-endoglucanase, polygalacturonase, lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase activities of the clear culture solutions produced by conventional extraction from the SSF materials. The SSF material of the best enzyme producer (Trichoderma virens TUB F-498) was further investigated to enhance the enzyme recovery by low frequency ultrasound treatment. Performance of both the original and ultrasound macerated crude enzyme mixtures was evaluated in degradation of the colored lignin-containing and waxy materials of raw linen fabric. Results proved that sonication (at 40%, 60% and 80% amplitudes, for 60min) did not result in reduction in the filter paper, lignin peroxidase and laccase activities of the crude enzyme solution, but has a significant positive effect on the efficiency of enzyme extraction from the SSF material. Depending on the parameters of sonication, the enzyme activities in the extracts obtained can be increased up to 129-413% of the original activities measured in the control extracts recovered by a common magnetic stirrer. Sonication also has an effect on both the enzymatic removal of the lignin-containing color materials and hydrophobic surface layer from the raw linen.

  13. Edaravone mitigates hexavalent chromium-induced oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidant enzymes while estrogen restores antioxidant enzymes in the rat ovary in F1 offspring.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jone A; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Arosh, Joe A; Burghardt, Robert C; Banu, Sakhila K

    2014-07-01

    Environmental contamination of drinking water with chromium (Cr) has been increasing in more than 30 cities in the United States. Previous studies from our group have shown that Cr affects reproductive functions in female Sprague Dawley rats. Although it is impossible to completely remove Cr from the drinking water, it is imperative to develop effective intervention strategies to inhibit Cr-induced deleterious health effects. Edaravone (EDA), a potential inhibitor of free radicals, has been clinically used to treat cancer and cardiac ischemia. This study evaluated the efficacy of EDA against Cr-induced ovarian toxicity. Results showed that maternal exposure to CrVI in rats increased follicular atresia, decreased steroidogenesis, and delayed puberty in F1 offspring. CrVI increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant (AOX) enzyme levels in the ovary. CrVI increased follicle atresia by increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, and decreased expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. EDA mitigated or inhibited the effects of CrVI on follicle atresia, pubertal onset, steroid hormone levels, and AOX enzyme activity, as well as the expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. In a second study, CrVI treatment was withdrawn, and F1 rats were injected with estradiol (E₂) (10 μg in PBS/ethanol per 100 g body weight) for a period of 2 wk to evaluate whether E₂ treatment will restore Cr-induced depletion of AOX enzymes. E₂ restored CrVI-induced depletion of glutathione peroxidase 1, catalase, thioredoxin 2, and peroxiredoxin 3 in the ovary. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effects of EDA against any toxicant in the ovary.

  14. Edaravone Mitigates Hexavalent Chromium-Induced Oxidative Stress and Depletion of Antioxidant Enzymes while Estrogen Restores Antioxidant Enzymes in the Rat Ovary in F1 Offspring1

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jone A.; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K.; Arosh, Joe A.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Environmental contamination of drinking water with chromium (Cr) has been increasing in more than 30 cities in the United States. Previous studies from our group have shown that Cr affects reproductive functions in female Sprague Dawley rats. Although it is impossible to completely remove Cr from the drinking water, it is imperative to develop effective intervention strategies to inhibit Cr-induced deleterious health effects. Edaravone (EDA), a potential inhibitor of free radicals, has been clinically used to treat cancer and cardiac ischemia. This study evaluated the efficacy of EDA against Cr-induced ovarian toxicity. Results showed that maternal exposure to CrVI in rats increased follicular atresia, decreased steroidogenesis, and delayed puberty in F1 offspring. CrVI increased oxidative stress and decreased antioxidant (AOX) enzyme levels in the ovary. CrVI increased follicle atresia by increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, and decreased expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. EDA mitigated or inhibited the effects of CrVI on follicle atresia, pubertal onset, steroid hormone levels, and AOX enzyme activity, as well as the expression of Bcl2 and Bcl2l1 in the ovary. In a second study, CrVI treatment was withdrawn, and F1 rats were injected with estradiol (E2) (10 μg in PBS/ethanol per 100 g body weight) for a period of 2 wk to evaluate whether E2 treatment will restore Cr-induced depletion of AOX enzymes. E2 restored CrVI-induced depletion of glutathione peroxidase 1, catalase, thioredoxin 2, and peroxiredoxin 3 in the ovary. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effects of EDA against any toxicant in the ovary. PMID:24804965

  15. 2-Benzoxazolinone (BOA) induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and changes in some antioxidant enzyme activities in mung bean (Phaseolus aureus).

    PubMed

    Batish, D R; Singh, H P; Setia, N; Kaur, S; Kohli, R K

    2006-01-01

    2-Benzoxazolinone (BOA), a well-known allelochemical with strong phytotoxicity, is a potential herbicidal candidate. The aim of the present study was to determine whether phytotoxicity of BOA is due to induction of oxidative stress caused by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the changes in levels of antioxidant enzymes induced in response to BOA. Effect of BOA was studied on electrolyte leakage, lipid peroxidation (LP), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generation, proline (PRO) accumulation, and activities of antioxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase (SOD, 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (APX, 1.11.1.11), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, 1.11.1.7), catalase (CAT, 1.11.1.6) and glutathione reductase (GR, 1.6.4.2) in Phaseolus aureus (mung bean). BOA significantly enhanced malondialdehyde (MDA) content, a product of LP, in both leaves and roots of mung bean. The amount of H(2)O(2), a product of oxidative stress, and endogenous PRO increased many-fold in response to BOA. Accumulation of PRO, MDA and H(2)O(2) indicates the cellular damage in the target tissue caused by ROS generated by BOA. In response to BOA, there was a significant increase in the activities of scavenging enzymes SOD, APX, GPX, CAT, and GR in root and leaf tissue of mung bean. At 5 mM BOA, GR activity in roots showed a nearly 22-fold increase over that in control. The present study concludes that BOA induces oxidative stress in mung bean through generation of ROS and upregulation of activities of various scavenging enzymes.

  16. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity, Iron Content and Lipid Oxidation of Raw and Cooked Meat of Korean Native Chickens and Other Poultry

    PubMed Central

    Muhlisin; Utama, Dicky Tri; Lee, Jae Ho; Choi, Ji Hye; Lee, Sung Ki

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to observe antioxidant enzyme activity, iron content and lipid oxidation of Korean native chickens and other poultry. The breast and thigh meat of three Korean native chicken breeds including Woorimatdak, Hyunin black and Yeonsan ogye, and three commercial poultry breeds including the broiler, White Leghorn and Pekin duck (Anasplatyrhyncos domesticus) were studied. The analyses of the antioxidant enzymes activity, iron content and lipid oxidation were performed in raw and cooked samples. The activity of catalase (CAT) in the thigh meat was higher than that of the breast meat of three Korean native chickens and the broiler, respectively. The activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the uncooked thigh meat of three Korean native chickens was higher than that of the breasts. The breast meat of Woorimatdak and Pekin duck had higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity than the others, while only the thigh meat of Pekin duck had the highest activity. Cooking inactivated CAT and decreased the activity of GPx and SOD. The thigh meat of Woorimatdak, White Leghorn, Yeonsan ogye and Hyunin black contained more total iron than the breast meat of those breeds. The heme-iron lost during cooking ranged from 3.2% to 14.8%. It is noted that the thigh meat had higher thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values than the breast in all chicken breeds. Though Woorimatdak showed higher antioxidant enzyme activity and lower released-iron percentage among Korean native chickens, no differences were found on lipid oxidation. We confirm that the dark meat of poultry exhibited higher antioxidant enzyme activity and contained more iron than the white meat. PMID:26954148

  17. Increased Oxidative Stress and Imbalance in Antioxidant Enzymes in the Brains of Alloxan-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ceretta, Luciane B.; Réus, Gislaine Z.; Abelaira, Helena M.; Ribeiro, Karine F.; Zappellini, Giovanni; Felisbino, Francine F.; Steckert, Amanda V.; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is associated with pathological changes in the central nervous system (SNC) as well as alterations in oxidative stress. Thus, the main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of the animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan on memory and oxidative stress. Diabetes was induced in Wistar rats by using a single injection of alloxan (150 mg/kg), and fifteen days after induction, the rats memory was evaluated through the use of the object recognition task. The oxidative stress parameters and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured in the rat brain. The results showed that diabetic rats did not have alterations in their recognition memory. However, the results did show that diabetic rats had increases in the levels of superoxide in the prefrontal cortex, and in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) production in the prefrontal cortex and in the amygdala in submitochondrial particles. Also, there was an increase in protein oxidation in the hippocampus and striatum, and in TBARS oxidation in the striatum and amygdala. The SOD activity was decreased in diabetic rats in the striatum and amygdala. However, the CAT activity was increased in the hippocampus taken from diabetic rats. In conclusion, our findings illustrate that the animal model of diabetes induced by alloxan did not cause alterations in the animals' recognition memory, but it produced oxidants and an imbalance between SOD and CAT activities, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of diabetes. PMID:22645603

  18. Transformation products of pharmaceuticals in surface waters and wastewater formed during photolysis and advanced oxidation processes - degradation, elucidation of byproducts and assessment of their biological potency.

    PubMed

    Fatta-Kassinos, D; Vasquez, M I; Kümmerer, K

    2011-10-01

    The significance of transformation products of pharmaceuticals resulting from the parent compounds during natural and technical photolytic processes and advanced oxidation processes has only recently started to attract the interest of the scientific community. Even though relevant studies have now started to produce important knowledge, still many gaps exist that hinder the in-depth and broad understanding of the extent of the potential problems stemming from the presence of such compounds in the environment and the applicability of such techniques for wastewater and potable water treatment. The great diversity of pharmaceutical compounds, the variety of processes and conditions applied by the various research groups active in the field, and the endless list of potential biological endpoints that could potentially be explored, coupled with the limitations related to the analytical capabilities presently available, are some of the crucial parameters that characterize this challenging research direction. This review paper tries to highlight some of the most relevant studies performed so far and to summarize the parameters that prevent scientists from reaching comprehensive conclusions in relation to the formation, fate, and effects of transformation products of pharmaceutical compounds during photo-driven and advanced oxidation processes.

  19. Induction of phase 2 enzymes by serum oxidized polyamines through activation of Nrf2: effect of the polyamine metabolite acrolein.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Casero, Robert A

    2003-06-06

    The naturally occurring polycationic polyamines including putrescine, spermidine, and spermine play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, and gene expression. However, circulating polyamines are potential substrates for several oxidizing enzymes including copper-containing serum amine oxidase. These enzymes are capable of oxidizing serum polyamines to several toxic metabolites including aldehydes and H(2)O(2). In this study, we investigated the effects of polyamines as inducers of phase 2 enzymes and other genes that promote cell survival in a cell culture system in the presence of bovine serum. Spermidine and spermine (50 microM) increased NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activity up to 3-fold in murine keratinocyte PE cells. Transcript levels for glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1, GST M1, NQO1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase regulatory subunit, and UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A6 were significantly increased by spermidine and this effect was mediated through the antioxidant response element (ARE). The ARE from the mouse GST A1 promoter was activated about 9-fold by spermine and 5-fold by spermidine treatment, but could be inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine, suggesting that acrolein or hydrogen peroxide generated from polyamines by serum amine oxidase may be mediators for phase 2 enzyme induction. Elevations of ARE-luciferase expression and NQO1 enzyme activity by spermidine were not affected by catalase, while both were completely repressed by aldehyde dehydrogenase treatment. Direct addition of acrolein to PE cells induced multiple phase 2 genes and elevated nuclear levels of Nrf2, a transcription factor that binds to the ARE. Expression of mutant Nrf2 repressed the activation of the ARE-luciferase reporter by polyamines and acrolein. These results indicate that spermidine and spermine increase the expression of phase 2 genes in cells grown in culture through activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway by generating the sulfhydryl

  20. Spectroscopic identification of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) impurities and elucidation of their roles in cadmium selenide quantum-wire growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Tang, Rui; Kao, Jeff L-F; Dingman, Sean D; Buhro, William E

    2009-04-08

    Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) is the most commonly used solvent for the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals. Here we show that the use of different batches of commercially obtained TOPO solvent introduces significant variability into the outcomes of CdSe quantum-wire syntheses. This irreproducibility is attributed to varying amounts of phosphorus-containing impurities in the different TOPO batches. We employ (31)P NMR to identify 10 of the common TOPO impurities. Their beneficial, harmful, or negligible effects on quantum-wire growth are determined. The impurity di-n-octylphosphinic acid (DOPA) is found to be the important beneficial TOPO impurity for the reproducible growth of high-quality CdSe quantum wires. DOPA is shown to beneficially modify precursor reactivity through ligand substitution. The other significant TOPO impurities are ranked according to their abilities to similarly influence precursor reactivity. The results are likely of general relevance to most nanocrystal syntheses conducted in TOPO.

  1. Enhancement of the activity of enzyme immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles by rational orientation of formate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ni, Kefeng; Zhao, Chengcheng; Ren, Yuhong; Wei, Dongzhi

    2014-10-20

    Immobilization of enzymes onto nanoparticles and retention of their structure and activity, which may be related to the orientation of enzymes on nanoparticles, remain a challenge. Here, we developed a novel enzyme-orientation strategy to enhance the activity of formate dehydrogenase immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles via site-directed mutation. Seven mutants were constructed based on homology modeling of formate dehydrogenase and immobilized on polydopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles to investigate the influence of these mutations on immobilization. The immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C demonstrated the highest immobilization yield and retained 90% of its initial activity, which was about 3-fold higher than that of wild-type formate dehydrogenase. Moreover, co-immobilization of formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase was performed for the synthesis of l-tert-leucine. The catalytic efficiency of the co-immobilized mutant C242A/C275V/C363V/K389C and leucine dehydrogenase increased by more than 4-fold compared to that of co-immobilized wild-type formate dehydrogenase and leucine dehydrogenase.

  2. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease—age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network. PMID:26378592

  3. Myogenin Induces a Shift of Enzyme Activity from Glycolytic to Oxidative Metabolism in Muscles of Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Simon M.; Chi, Maggie M.-Y.; Lowry, Oliver H.; Gundersen, Kristian

    1999-01-01

    Physical training regulates muscle metabolic and contractile properties by altering gene expression. Electrical activity evoked in muscle fiber membrane during physical activity is crucial for such regulation, but the subsequent intracellular pathway is virtually unmapped. Here we investigate the ability of myogenin, a muscle-specific transcription factor strongly regulated by electrical activity, to alter muscle phenotype. Myogenin was overexpressed in transgenic mice using regulatory elements that confer strong expression confined to differentiated post-mitotic fast muscle fibers. In fast muscles from such mice, the activity levels of oxidative mitochondrial enzymes were elevated two- to threefold, whereas levels of glycolytic enzymes were reduced to levels 0.3–0.6 times those found in wild-type mice. Histochemical analysis shows widespread increases in mitochondrial components and glycogen accumulation. The changes in enzyme content were accompanied by a reduction in fiber size, such that many fibers acquired a size typical of oxidative fibers. No change in fiber type-specific myosin heavy chain isoform expression was observed. Changes in metabolic properties without changes in myosins are observed after moderate endurance training in mammals, including humans. Our data suggest that myogenin regulated by electrical activity may mediate effects of physical training on metabolic capacity in muscle. PMID:10225962

  4. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions.

    PubMed

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-09-10

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease-age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network.

  5. Superoxide dismutase and catalase conjugated to polyethylene glycol increases endothelial enzyme activity and oxidant resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Beckman, J.S.; Minor, R.L. Jr.; White, C.W.; Repine, J.E.; Rosen, G.M.; Freeman, B.A.

    1988-05-15

    Covalent conjugation of superoxide dismutase and catalase with polyethylene glycol (PEG) increases the circulatory half-lives of these enzymes from <10 min to 40 h, reduced immunogenicity, and decreases sensitivity to proteolysis. Because PEG has surface active properties and can induce cell fusion, the authors hypothesized that PEG conjugation could enhance cell binding and association of normally membrane-impermeable enzymes. Incubation of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with /sup 125/I-PEG-catalase or /sup 125/I-PEG-superoxide dismutase produced a linear, concentration-dependent increase in cellular enzyme activity and radioactivity. Fluorescently labeled PEG-superoxide dismutase incubated with endothelial cells showed a vesicular localization. Mechanical injury to cell monolayers, which is known to stimulate endocytosis, further increased the uptake of fluorescent PEG-superoxide dismutase. Addition of PEG and PEG-conjugated enzymes perturbed the spin-label binding environment, indicative of producing an increase in plasma membrane fluidity. Thus, PEG conjugation to superoxide dismutase and catalase enhances cell association of these enzymes in a manner which increases cellular enzyme activities and provides prolonged protection from partially reduced oxygen species.

  6. Nitric oxide inhibits specific enzymes in the Krebs cycle and the respiratory chain of rat hepatocyte mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Stadler, J.; Billiar, T.R.; Curran, R.D.; Kim, R.; Simmons, R.L. )

    1990-02-26

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a highly-reactive molecule produced from L-arginine as recently described. In macrophages and tumor cells, NO inhibits specific mitochondrial enzymes presumably by attacking their intrinsic 4Fe-4S centers. The susceptible enzymes include aconitase of the Krebs cycle and oxidoreductase (complex II) of the electron transport chain. The authors have recently demonstrated that hepatocytes (HC) produce NO in large amounts in response to endotoxin and inflammatory cytokines. To determine whether HC suffer a similar enzyme inhibition, the authors exposed rat HC to increasing concentrations of NO solutions for 5 minutes. The activity of aconitase, complex 1, complex 2, and complex 4 (cytochrome oxidase) was determined by measuring O{sub 2} consumption after addition of enzyme-specific substrates. An NO concentration-dependent inhibition of aconitase, complex 1, and complex 2 was measured. After exposure to 0.6 mM solution, the activity of aconitase was blocked to non-measurable values while complex 1 was reduced to 11 + 8%, and complex 2 to 36 + 2% of the activity of control HC. Complex 4 of the respiratory chain remained intact at 100 + 8%. These data indicate that HC, like other cell types, are susceptible to inhibition of important steps of energy production by NO. As NO is produced in response to septic stimuli, this mechanism may play a role in the metabolic dysfunction of HC in sepsis.

  7. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A. M.; Olthuis, Wouter; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Franssen, Maurice C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH2-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  8. Oxidative release of nitrite from 2-nitrotoluene by a three-component enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42.

    PubMed

    An, D; Gibson, D T; Spain, J C

    1994-12-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42 utilizes 2-nitrotoluene (2NT) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Intact cells catalyze the oxidation of 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite in a reaction that requires molecular oxygen. Cell extracts oxidized 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite in the presence of NAD(P)H and ferrous iron. Ion-exchange chromatography yielded three protein fractions (A, B, and C) which were all required for the oxidation of 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite. Component B (reductase2NT) catalyzed a NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of cytochrome c. Solutions of component A (ISP2NT) were brown and showed absorption maxima at 458 and 324 nm. Two major bands with M(r)s 52,500 and 28,000 were observed when ISP2NT was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Component C could be replaced by ferredoxin NAP from the Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 naphthalene dioxygenase system and was given the designation ferredoxin2NT. Experiments with 18O2 showed that both oxygen atoms were added to the aromatic ring of 2NT to yield 3-methylcatechol. The enzyme is a new multicomponent enzyme system which we have designated 2NT 2,3-dioxygenase.

  9. Oxidative release of nitrite from 2-nitrotoluene by a three-component enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42.

    PubMed Central

    An, D; Gibson, D T; Spain, J C

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain JS42 utilizes 2-nitrotoluene (2NT) as the sole source of carbon and energy for growth. Intact cells catalyze the oxidation of 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite in a reaction that requires molecular oxygen. Cell extracts oxidized 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite in the presence of NAD(P)H and ferrous iron. Ion-exchange chromatography yielded three protein fractions (A, B, and C) which were all required for the oxidation of 2NT to 3-methylcatechol and nitrite. Component B (reductase2NT) catalyzed a NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of cytochrome c. Solutions of component A (ISP2NT) were brown and showed absorption maxima at 458 and 324 nm. Two major bands with M(r)s 52,500 and 28,000 were observed when ISP2NT was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Component C could be replaced by ferredoxin NAP from the Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9816-4 naphthalene dioxygenase system and was given the designation ferredoxin2NT. Experiments with 18O2 showed that both oxygen atoms were added to the aromatic ring of 2NT to yield 3-methylcatechol. The enzyme is a new multicomponent enzyme system which we have designated 2NT 2,3-dioxygenase. Images PMID:8002568

  10. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  11. Effect of Cell Phone Use on Salivary Total Protein, Enzymes and Oxidative Stress Markers in Young Adults: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Jasmi; Sunitha, Venkatesh; Rai, Manoj P.; Rao, Suresh; Nambranathayil, Shafeeque; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The present study aimed to assess the levels of salivary enzymes, protein and oxidant-antioxidant system in young college-going cell phone users. Materials and Methods: The cell users (students) were categorized in to two groups – less mobile users and high mobile users, based on the duration and frequency of cell use. Unstimulated whole saliva samples of the volunteers were analysed for amylase, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), malondialdehdye (MDA) and glutathione (GSH). Results: High mobile users had significantly higher levels of amylase (p = 0.001), LDH (p = 0.002) and MDA (p = 0.002) in saliva, when compared to less mobile users. The marginal decrease in salivary total proteins, GSH and flow rate were statistically not significant (p >0.05). Conclusion: Significant changes in salivary enzymes and MDA suggest adverse effect of high use of cell phones on cell health. PMID:25859446

  12. Carnosic acid biosynthesis elucidated by a synthetic biology platform

    PubMed Central

    Ignea, Codruta; Athanasakoglou, Anastasia; Ioannou, Efstathia; Georgantea, Panagiota; Trikka, Fotini A.; Loupassaki, Sofia; Roussis, Vassilios; Makris, Antonios M.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic biology approaches achieving the reconstruction of specific plant natural product biosynthetic pathways in dedicated microbial “chassis” have provided access to important industrial compounds (e.g., artemisinin, resveratrol, vanillin). However, the potential of such production systems to facilitate elucidation of plant biosynthetic pathways has been underexplored. Here we report on the application of a modular terpene production platform in the characterization of the biosynthetic pathway leading to the potent antioxidant carnosic acid and related diterpenes in Salvia pomifera and Rosmarinus officinalis. Four cytochrome P450 enzymes are identified (CYP76AH24, CYP71BE52, CYP76AK6, and CYP76AK8), the combined activities of which account for all of the oxidation events leading to the biosynthesis of the major diterpenes produced in these plants. This approach develops yeast as an efficient tool to harness the biotechnological potential of the numerous sequencing datasets that are increasingly becoming available through transcriptomic or genomic studies. PMID:26976595

  13. Production of Oxidative and Hydrolytic Enzymes by Coprinus cinereus (Schaeff.) Gray from Sisal Wastes Supplemented with Cow Dung Manure

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Prosper; Mshandete, Anthony Manoni; Kajumulo Kivaisi, Amelia

    2015-01-01

    The activity of oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes of the edible and medicinal white rot fungi Coprinus cinereus (Schaeff.) Gray mushroom was observed during mycelia growth and fruiting body development in solid substrate fermentation using sisal waste fractions amended with cow dung manure as supplement. Laccase had the highest titre value among the five detected enzymes. Its activity was higher during mycelia growth compared to fruiting phase, with 10% supplemented substrate formulation unmixed sisal leaf decortication residues [abbreviated SL : SB (100 : 0)] displaying the highest activity of 39.45 ± 12.05 Ug−1. Lignin peroxidase (LiP) exhibited a characteristic wave-like pattern with the highest peaks found either during full mycelia colonization or soon after first flush harvest; the highest activity of 1.93 ± 0.62 Ug−1 was observed on unsupplemented SL : SB (100 : 0) substrate formulation during mycelia colonization. For hydrolytic enzymes, the highest carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase) activity of 2.03 ± 0.70 Ug−1 was observed on 20% supplemented SL : SB (0 : 100) after first flush; that of pectinase (1.90 ± 0.32 Ug−1) was revealed after third flush on 10% supplemented SL : SB (0 : 100) substrate formulation while 10% supplemented SL : SB (25 : 75) exhibited the highest xylanase activity (1.23 ± 0.12 Ug−1) after first flush. These findings show that the activities of both oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes were regulated in line with developmental phase of growth of Coprinus cinereus. PMID:26664748

  14. Synthesis, structure elucidation and redox properties of 99Tc complexes of lacunary Wells Dawson polyoxometalates: insights into molecular 99Tc - metal oxide interactions

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Donna; Burton-Pye, Benjamin P.; Howell, Robertha C.; Mbomekalle, Israel M.; Lukens Jr, Wayne W.; Bian, Fang; Mausolf, Edward; Poineau, Frederic; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Francesconi, Lynn C.

    2011-01-10

    The isotope 99Tc (beta max: 250 keV, half-life: 2 x 105 year) is an abundant product of uranium-235 fission in nuclear reactors and is present throughout the radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford and Savannah River. Understanding and controlling the extensive redox chemistry of 99Tc is important to identify tunable strategies to separate 99Tc from spent fuel and from waste tanks and once separated, to identify and develop an appropriately stable waste-form for 99Tc. Polyoxometalates (POMs), nanometer sized models for metal oxide solid-state materials, are used in this study to provide a molecular level understanding of the speciation and redox chemistry of incorporated 99Tc. In this study, 99Tc complexes of the (alpha 2-P2W17O61)10- and (alpha 1-P2W17O61)10- isomers were prepared. Ethylene glycol was used as a"transfer ligand" to minimize the formation of TcO2 cdot xH2O. The solution structures, formulations, and purity of TcVO(alpha 1/alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- were determined by multinuclear NMR. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of the complexes are in agreement with the formulation and structures determined from 31P and 183W NMR. Preliminary electrochemistry results are consistent with the EXAFS results, showing a facile reduction of the TcVO(alpha 1-P2W17O61)7- species compared to the TcVO(alpha 2-P2W17O61)7- analog. The alpha1- defect is unique in that a basic oxygen atom is positioned toward the alpha1- site and the TcVO center appears to form a dative metal-metal bond with a framework W site. These attributes may lead to the assistance of protonation events that facilitate reduction. Electrochemistry comparison shows that the ReV analogs are about 200 mV more difficult to reduce in accordance with periodic trends.

  15. Time course study of oxidative and nitrosative stress and antioxidant enzymes in K2Cr2O7-induced nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Barrera, Diana; Medina-Campos, Omar N; Carvajal, Raymundo C; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Macías-Ruvalcaba, Norma A; Maldonado, Perla D; Salcedo, Marcos I; Tapia, Edilia; Saldívar, Liliana; Castilla, María E; Ibarra-Rubio, María E

    2005-01-01

    Background Potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7)-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this study we investigated the relation between the time course of the oxidative and nitrosative stress with kidney damage and alterations in the following antioxidant enzymes: Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD), Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT). Methods Nephrotoxicity was induced in rats by a single injection of K2Cr2O7. Groups of animals were sacrificed on days 1,2,3,4,6,8,10, and 12. Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by histological studies and by measuring creatinine clearance, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and total protein. Oxidative and nitrosative stress were measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 3-nitrotyrosine, respectively. Cu, Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, and CAT were studied by immunohistochemical localization. The activity of total SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR was also measured as well as serum and kidney content of chromium and urinary excretion of NO2 -/NO3-. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance followed by a post hoc test. Results Serum and kidney chromium content increased reaching the highest value on day 1. Nephrotoxicity was made evident by the decrease in creatinine clearance (days 1–4) and by the increase in serum creatinine (days 1–4), BUN (days 1–6), urinary excretion of NAG (days 1–4), and total protein (day 1–6) and by the structural damage to the proximal tubules (days 1–6). Oxidative and nitrosative stress were clearly evident on days 1–8. Urinary excretion of NO2-/NO3- decreased on days 2–6. Mn-SOD and Cu, Zn-SOD, estimated by immunohistochemistry, and total SOD activity remained unchanged. Activity of GPx decreased on days 3–12 and those of GR and CAT on days 2–10. Similar findings were observed by immunohistochemistry of CAT. Conclusion These

  16. Increased fructose absorption and oxidation after oral supplementation with sucraid enzyme: Implications for fructose malabsorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The value of Sucraid enzyme supplements for correction of sucrase deficiency in CSID is well documented. Sucraid is an invertase derived from brewer’s yeast which has been characterized as hydrolyzing sucrose to glucose and fructose. However, sacrosidase may have another role: conversion of fructose...

  17. Temperature stress, anti-oxidative enzyme activity and virus acquisition in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most eukaryotic systems, antioxidants provide protection when cells are exposed to stressful environmental conditions. Antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase, function in a stepwise series with SOD initially preventing oxidative damage by conve...

  18. Antioxidant enzyme activities are affected by salt content and temperature and influence muscle lipid oxidation during dry-salted bacon processing.

    PubMed

    Jin, Guofeng; He, Lichao; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Jianhao; Ma, Meihu

    2013-12-01

    Fresh pork bacon belly was used as material and manufactured into dry-salted bacon through salting and drying-ripening. During processing both oxidative stability and antioxidant enzyme stability were evaluated by assessing peroxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and their correlations were also analysed. The results showed that all antioxidant enzyme activities decreased (p<0.05) until the end of process; GSH-Px was the most unstable one followed by catalase. Antioxidant enzyme activities were negatively correlated with TBARS (p<0.05), but the correlations were decreased with increasing process temperature. Salt showed inhibitory effect on all antioxidant enzyme activities and was concentration dependent. These results indicated that when process temperature and salt content were low at the same time during dry-salted bacon processing, antioxidant enzymes could effectively control lipid oxidation.

  19. Epoxidation of the methamphetamine pyrolysis product, trans-phenylpropene, to trans-phenylpropylene oxide by CYP enzymes and stereoselective glutathione adduct formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sanga, Madhu; Younis, Islam R.; Tirumalai, Padma S.; Bland, Tina M.; Banaszewska, Monica; Konat, Gregory W.; Tracy, Timothy S.; Gannett, Peter M.; Callery, Patrick S. . E-mail: pcallery@hsc.wvu.edu

    2006-03-01

    Pyrolytic products of smoked methamphetamine hydrochloride are well established. Among the various degradation products formed, trans-phenylpropene (trans-{beta}-methylstyrene) is structurally similar to styrene analogues known to be bioactivated by CYP enzymes. In human liver microsomes, trans-phenylpropene was converted to the epoxide trans-phenylpropylene oxide (trans-2-methyl-3-phenyloxirane) and cinnamyl alcohol. Incubation of trans-phenylpropene with microsomes in the presence of enzyme-specific P450 enzyme inhibitors indicated the involvement of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 enzymes. Both (R,R)-phenylpropylene oxide and (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide were formed in human liver microsomal preparations. Enantiomers of trans-phenylpropylene oxide were stereoselectively and regioselectively conjugated in a Phase II drug metabolism reaction catalyzed by human liver cytosolic enzymes consisting of conjugation with glutathione. The structure of the phenylpropylene oxide-glutathione adduct is consistent with nucleophilic ring-opening by attack at the benzylic carbon. Exposure of cultured C6 glial cells to (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide produced a cytotoxic response in a concentration-dependent manner based on cell degeneration and death.

  20. Epoxidation of the methamphetamine pyrolysis product, trans-phenylpropene, to trans-phenylpropylene oxide by CYP enzymes and stereoselective glutathione adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Madhu; Younis, Islam R; Tirumalai, Padma S; Bland, Tina M; Banaszewska, Monica; Konat, Gregory W; Tracy, Timothy S; Gannett, Peter M; Callery, Patrick S

    2006-03-01

    Pyrolytic products of smoked methamphetamine hydrochloride are well established. Among the various degradation products formed, trans-phenylpropene (trans-beta-methylstyrene) is structurally similar to styrene analogues known to be bioactivated by CYP enzymes. In human liver microsomes, trans-phenylpropene was converted to the epoxide trans-phenylpropylene oxide (trans-2-methyl-3-phenyloxirane) and cinnamyl alcohol. Incubation of trans-phenylpropene with microsomes in the presence of enzyme-specific P450 enzyme inhibitors indicated the involvement of CYP2E1, CYP1A2, and CYP3A4 enzymes. Both (R,R)-phenylpropylene oxide and (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide were formed in human liver microsomal preparations. Enantiomers of trans-phenylpropylene oxide were stereoselectively and regioselectively conjugated in a Phase II drug metabolism reaction catalyzed by human liver cytosolic enzymes consisting of conjugation with glutathione. The structure of the phenylpropylene oxide-glutathione adduct is consistent with nucleophilic ring-opening by attack at the benzylic carbon. Exposure of cultured C6 glial cells to (S,S)-phenylpropylene oxide produced a cytotoxic response in a concentration-dependent manner based on cell degeneration and death.

  1. Role of anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in the development of cataract : study of serum levels in patients with senile and diabetic cataracts.

    PubMed

    Maurya, O P S; Mohanty, Lipa; Bhaduri, Gautam; Chandra, Abhishek

    2006-07-01

    Cataract is a universal phenomenon in old age and the most common cause of blindness worldover. Oxidative stress is believed to be a key factor in the gradual loss of transparency of lens. Free radicals formed result in derangement and opacification of lens fibres. Superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase are major anti-oxidant enzymes, which protect against free radicals. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of anti-oxidant enzymes - superoxide dismutase and catalase in the development of cataract in senile and diabetic persons. Serum levels of major anti-oxidant enzymes-superoxide dismutase and catalase were estimated in 20 patients with diabetic cataract, and matched with another 20 patients of senile cataract taken as control. Estimation of superoxide dismutase was done by improved spectrophotometric assay based on epinephrine auto-oxidation at 480nm, while catalase estimation was done by the method of Hugo Aebi. The mean serum levels of superoxide dismutase and catalase were lower as age increased. These enzymes were also significantly lower in diabetic cataracts (9.13 and 16.42 units/ml) as compared to senile cataracts (25.30 and 57.27units/ml). Oxidative stress is one of the major factors contributing to cataract formation. In diabetics where there is increased oxidative stress, the serum levels of the major anti-oxidant enzymes decrease, which lead to early cataract formation. It may be concluded that oxidative stress is an important factor in the development of diabetic cataracts and anti-oxidants may have a role in decreasing the incidence of cataract.

  2. Oxidised low density lipoprotein causes human macrophage cell death through oxidant generation and inhibition of key catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Katouah, Hanadi; Chen, Alpha; Othman, Izani; Gieseg, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Oxidised low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is thought to be a significant contributor to the death of macrophage cells observed in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Using human-derived U937 cells we have examined the effect of cytotoxic oxLDL on oxidative stress and cellular catabolism. Within 3h of the addition of oxLDL, there was a rapid, concentration dependent rise in cellular reactive oxygen species followed by the loss of cellular GSH, and the enzyme activity of both glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and aconitase. The loss of these catabolic enzymes was accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP and lower lactate generation. Addition of the macrophage antioxidant 7,8-dihydroneopterin inhibited the ROS generation, glutathione loss and catabolic inactivation. NOX was shown to be activated by oxLDL addition while apocynin inhibited the loss of GSH and cell viability. The data suggests that oxLDL triggers an excess of ROS production through NOX activation, and catabolic failure through thiol oxidation resulting in cell death.

  3. Organization of the Escherichia coli aerobic enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation in dynamic domains within the cytoplasmic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Erhardt, Heiko; Dempwolff, Felix; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Riehle, Marc; Schäfer, Caspar; Pohl, Thomas; Graumann, Peter; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    The Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane contains the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Not much is known about their supramolecular organization and their dynamics within the membrane in this model organism. In mitochondria and other bacteria, it was demonstrated by nondenaturing electrophoretic methods and electron microscopy that the OXPHOS complexes are organized in so-called supercomplexes, stable assemblies with a defined number of the individual enzyme complexes. To investigate the organization of the E. coli enzyme complexes of aerobic OXPHOS in vivo, we established fluorescent protein fusions of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the cytochrome bd-I, and the cytochrome bo3 terminal oxidases, and the FoF1 ATP-synthase. The fusions were integrated in the chromosome to prevent artifacts caused by protein overproduction. Biochemical analysis revealed that all modified complexes were fully assembled, active, and stable. The distribution of the OXPHOS complexes in living cells was determined using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The dynamics within the membrane were detected by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. All aerobic OXPHOS complexes showed an uneven distribution in large mobile patches within the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. It is discussed whether the individual OXPHOS complexes are organized as clustered individual complexes, here called “segrazones.” PMID:24729508

  4. Fabrication of carbon-felt-based multi-enzyme immobilized anodes to oxidize sucrose for biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Handa, Yutaka; Yamagiwa, Kiyofumi; Ikeda, Yutaro; Yanagisawa, Yuichi; Watanabe, Shinya; Yabuuchi, Naoaki; Komaba, Shinichi

    2014-07-21

    A carbon-felt-based multi-enzyme immobilized bioanode for biofuel cells has been successfully developed. The combination of four enzymes, namely, invertase, mutarotase, glucose oxidase, and fructose dehydrogenase, makes it possible to use sucrose--a disaccharide--as fuel for the bioanode. The new electrode exhibits a high oxidation current density of about 12 mA cm(-2) (0.25 V vs. Ag/AgCl) in a McIlvaine buffer solution containing sucrose at pH 6.0 in the half-cell configuration. A sucrose/O(2) biofuel cell composed of the bioanode and an opposite biocathode, including bilirubin oxidase as the enzymatic electrocatalyst, was fabricated, and the new device demonstrated a maximum power density of 2.90 mW cm(-2) with an open-circuit voltage of 0.69 V in the McIlvaine buffer solution. The biofuel cell fabricated using our multi-enzyme anode operates in commercially available beverages that contain only sugar, even without glucose.

  5. Enzymatic fuel cells based on electrodeposited graphite oxide/cobalt hydroxide/chitosan composite-enzyme electrode.

    PubMed

    Uk Lee, Hee; Young Yoo, Hah; Lkhagvasuren, Tseveg; Seok Song, Yoon; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Jungbae; Wook Kim, Seung

    2013-04-15

    Enzymatic fuel cells (EFCs) use redox enzymes with high electron transfer rates that lead to high power density from bioavailable substrates. However, EFCs are limited by the difficult electrical wiring of the enzymes to the electrode. Therefore, deposition of Co(OH)₂ onto graphite oxide (GO) was improved for efficient wiring of the enzymes. The GO/Co(OH)₂/chitosan composites were electrodeposited for immobilization of glucose oxidase (GOD) or laccase on an Au electrode, respectively. The electrical properties of the bioelectrode according to cyclic voltammetry were improved using GO/Co(OH)₂/chitosan composites. The anode and cathode system was composed of GOD and laccase as biocatalysts and glucose/oxygen as substrates under ambient conditions (pH 7.0 and 25 °C). The EFC using GO/Co(OH)₂/chitosan composites with a mediator delivered a high power density of up to 517±3.3 μW/cm² at 0.46 V and open circuit voltage of 0.60 V. These results provide a promising direction for further development and application of EFCs.

  6. Enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on methylene blue and the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Gorachand; Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Lapidus, Lisa J; Lillehoj, Peter B

    2017-06-15

    Enzyme-free electrochemical sensors enable rapid, high sensitivity measurements without the limitations associated with enzyme reporters. However, the performance of non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors tends to suffer from slow electrode kinetics and poor signal stability. We report a new enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on a unique competitive detection scheme using methylene blue (MB), hydrazine and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). This scheme is coupled with a robust immunosandwich format employing a MB-labelled detection antibody as a non-enzymatic reporter. In the presence of the target antigen, surface-immobilized MB consumes interfacial hydrazine thereby diminishing the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt NPs. Thus, the concentration of the antigen is directly proportional to the reduction in the electrochemical signal. For proof-of-concept, this sensor was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), an important malaria biomarker, in unadulterated human saliva samples. Chronocoulometric measurements showed that this platform exhibits pM-range sensitivity, high specificity and good reproducibility, making it well suited for many biosensing applications including noninvasive diagnostic testing.

  7. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  8. Hypersalinity and hydrogen peroxide upregulation of gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in Ulva fasciata against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ming-Shiuan; Hsu, Yi-Ting; Hsu, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Tzure-Meng; Lee, Tse-Min

    2009-01-01

    The modulation of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), FeSOD, ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) gene expression and activities and antioxidants in Ulva fasciata against hypersalinity (90 per thousand)-induced oxidative stress was studied. Increases in H(2)O(2) contents but no changes in lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl group contents suggest oxidative damage did not occur in 90 per thousand condition. Antioxidants were consumed for reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging indicated by decreased ascorbate and glutathione contents by 90 per thousand. Antioxidant enzymes were differently expressed by 90 per thousand for ROS removal. MnSOD activity and transcript increased 1 h after 90 per thousand treatment with a peak at hour 3, while FeSOD activity increased fast to the plateau after 1 h and its transcript increased after 3 h. APX activity increased 1 h after 90 per thousand but its transcript rose till 3 h, and GR activity increased after 1 h with a peak at hour 3 but its transcript increased till 3 h. CAT activity and transcript increased after 12 h. Enzyme activity is transcriptionally regulated by 90 per thousand except a fast increase in FeSOD, APX, and GR activities during 1 h. APX is responsible for early H(2)O(2) decomposition while CAT scavenges H(2)O(2) in the later period. The inhibition of 90 per thousand induced increase of H(2)O(2) content and FeSOD activity and transcript by treatment of a H(2)O(2) scavenger, dimethylthiourea, and the increase of FeSOD transcript of 30 per thousand grown thalli by H(2)O(2) treatment suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates the upregulation of FeSOD by hypersalinity while other enzymes is modulated by factors other than H(2)O(2).

  9. Oxidation of biphenyl by a multicomponent enzyme system from Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400.

    PubMed Central

    Haddock, J D; Nadim, L M; Gibson, D T

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400 grows on biphenyl as the sole carbon and energy source. This organism also cooxidizes several chlorinated biphenyl congeners. Biphenyl dioxygenase activity in cell extract required addition of NAD(P)H as an electron donor for the conversion of biphenyl to cis-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydrobiphenyl. Incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the substrate was shown with 18O2. The nonlinear relationship between enzyme activity and protein concentration suggested that the enzyme is composed of multiple protein components. Ion-exchange chromatography of the cell extract gave three protein fractions that were required together to restore enzymatic activity. Similarities with other multicomponent aromatic hydrocarbon dioxygenases indicated that biphenyl dioxygenase may consist of a flavoprotein and iron-sulfur proteins that constitute a short electron transport chain involved in catalyzing the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen into the aromatic ring. Images PMID:8419290

  10. A study of renaturation of reduced hen egg white lysozyme. Enzymically active intermediates formed during oxidation of the reduced protein.

    PubMed

    Acharya, A S; Taniuchi, H

    1976-11-25

    The material obtained from reduced hen egg white lysozyme after complete air oxidation at pH 8.0 and 37 degrees has yielded, by gel filtration on a Bio-Gel P-30 column, enzymically active species and an enzymically inactive form which eluted sooner than the active species but later than expected for a dimer of lysozyme. Reduced lysozyme also elutes at the same position as this inactive material. Examination of the fragments produced on CNBr cleavage of the inactive form indicates that at least 24% of the population contains incorrect disulfide bonds involving half-cystine residues 6, 30, 115, and 127. Tryptophan fluorescence and the intrinsic viscosity of the inactive form show an enlarged molecular domain with a disordered conformation. The yield of the inactive form increases as the oxidation of reduced lysozyme is accelerated using cupric ion. In the presence of 4 X 10(-5) M cupric ion, reduced lysozyme forms almost quantitatively the inactive form, which is almost completely converted to the native form by sulfhydryl-disulfide interchange catalyzed by thiol groups of either reduced lysozyme or beta-mercaptoethanol. The material trapped by alkylation of the free sulfhydryl groups with [1-14C]iodoacetic acid during the early stage of air oxidation of reduced lysozyme was fractionated by gel filtration to permit separation of the active species from the inactive form. Ion exchange chromatography of the active species yielded completely renatured lysozyme and three major enzymically active radioactive derivatives. Two of these derivatives contained approximately 2 mol of S-carboxymethylcysteine. Isolation and characterization of radioactive tryptic peptides from each of the three active forms, permitted the identification of Cys 6 and Cys 127, Cys 76 and 94, and Cys 80 as the sulfhydryl groups alkylated in these three incompletely oxidized, partially active forms. Thus, it appears that the interatomic interactions maintaining the compact three-dimensional structure

  11. Kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects in the oxidation of putrescine catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Pałka, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the kinetic isotope effects and solvent isotope effects in the reaction of the deamination of [(1R)-(2)H ] putrescine--catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6)--were determined using a non-competitive spectroscopic method. Putrescine, stereospecifically labelled with deuterium, was obtained by enzymatic decarboxylation of l-ornithine that was carried out in a fully deuteriated incubation medium.

  12. Oxidation of methyl groups by grass grubs and vertebrate liver enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hook, G E; Smith, J N

    1967-02-01

    1. Oxidation rates of p-nitrotoluene, p-acetamidotoluene and p-toluidine by intact grass grubs and vertebrate liver preparations were measured. 2. The effect of p-substitution in increasing the rate of conversion of the methyl into a carboxy group was in the order acetamido> nitro[unk] amino in mice and grass grubs. 3. Rates of oxidation of the N-methyl group in some alkylaryl N-methylcarbamates was measured and the effect of ring substituents in increasing the rate was in the order hydrogen> o-methyl or o-isopropyl> p-methyl or p-isopropyl> m-methyl or m-isopropyl. 4. Rates of oxidation of the N-methyl groups were similar to those of the p-substituted toluenes.

  13. Selenium ameliorates arsenic induced oxidative stress through modulation of antioxidant enzymes and thiols in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Awasthi, Surabhi; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice is a major problem for South-East Asia. In the present study, the effect of selenium (Se) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants exposed to As was studied in hydroponic culture. Arsenic accumulation, plant growth, thiolic ligands and antioxidative enzyme activities were assayed after single (As and Se) and simultaneous supplementations (As + Se). The results indicated that the presence of Se (25 µM) decreased As accumulation by threefold in roots and twofold in shoots as compared to single As (25 µM) exposed plants. Arsenic induced oxidative stress in roots and shoots was significantly ameliorated by Se supplementation. The observed positive response was found associated with the increased activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx; EC 1.11.1.9) and induced levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in As + Se exposed plants as compared to single As treatment. Selenium supplementation modulated the thiol metabolism enzymes viz., γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS; EC 6.3.2.2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS; EC 2.3.2.15). Gene expression analysis of several metalloid responsive genes (LOX, SOD and MATE) showed upregulation during As stress, however, significant downregulation during As + Se exposure as compared to single As treatment. Gene expressions of enzymes of antioxidant and GSH and PC biosynthetic systems, such as APX, CAT, GPx, γ-ECS and PCS were found to be significantly positively correlated with their enzyme activities. The findings suggested that Se supplementation could be an effective strategy to reduce As accumulation and toxicity in rice plants.

  14. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by up-regulating antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the up-regulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited fivefold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both messenger RNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 proteins were up-regulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea-supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126, which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants.

  15. Role of Myeloperoxidase Oxidants in the Modulation of Cellular Lysosomal Enzyme Function: A Contributing Factor to Macrophage Dysfunction in Atherosclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, Fahd O.; Barrett, Tessa J.; Sheipouri, Diba; Brown, Bronwyn E.; Davies, Michael J.; Hawkins, Clare L.

    2016-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the major source of lipid within atherosclerotic lesions. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is present in lesions and forms the reactive oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN). These oxidants modify LDL and have been strongly linked with the development of atherosclerosis. In this study, we examined the effect of HOCl, HOSCN and LDL pre-treated with these oxidants on the function of lysosomal enzymes responsible for protein catabolism and lipid hydrolysis in murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells. In each case, the cells were exposed to HOCl or HOSCN or LDL pre-treated with these oxidants. Lysosomal cathepsin (B, L and D) and acid lipase activities were quantified, with cathepsin and LAMP-1 protein levels determined by Western blotting. Exposure of J774A.1 cells to HOCl or HOSCN resulted in a significant decrease in the activity of the Cys-dependent cathepsins B and L, but not the Asp-dependent cathepsin D. Cathepsins B and L were also inhibited in macrophages exposed to HOSCN-modified, and to a lesser extent, HOCl-modified LDL. No change was seen in cathepsin D activity or the expression of the cathepsin proteins or lysosomal marker protein LAMP-1. The activity of lysosomal acid lipase was also decreased on treatment of macrophages with each modified LDL. Taken together, these results suggest that HOCl, HOSCN and LDL modified by these oxidants could contribute to lysosomal dysfunction and thus perturb the cellular processing of LDL, which could be important during the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:27997605

  16. Effect of fat feeding on pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant enzyme systems in rat intestine: possible role in the turnover of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Turan, Aasma; Gill, Ravinder; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Mohan, Harsh; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2009-06-01

    Immature epithelial cells generated in the crypt base undergo differentiation while progressing to the villus tip, where the cells upon apoptosis are detached from the underlying muscular tissue. We previously reported that lipid peroxidation might be involved in the turnover of enterocytes across the crypt-villus axis in rat intestine (Dig Dis Sci 52:1840-1844, 2007). To examine whether long-term feeding of fat with different fatty-acid composition influences this process, in the present study we investigated the effect of feeding fish oil (n - 3) and corn oil (n - 6) polyunsaturated fatty acids on lipid per-oxidation and anti-oxidant systems in different epithelial cell fractions isolated in rat intestine. Feeding fish oil or corn oil markedly enhanced lipid per-oxidation levels of enterocytes throughout villus height compared with control, but there was no difference in the distribution profile of pro- and anti-oxidant enzyme systems and lipid per-oxidation across the crypt-villus axis under these conditions. Analysis of lipid peroxidation levels in different cell fractions revealed that the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were 9- to 11-fold higher at the villus tip compared with at the crypt base. The activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase were 2- to 5-fold higher in villus tip compared to the crypt region. However, the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were 6- to 8-fold high at the crypt base compared with at villus tip cells. Immunocytolocalization of superoxide dismutase showed high staining in crypt base compared with that in villus, tip cells. These findings further suggest that generation of reactive oxygen species in enterocytes across the crypt-villus axis may be involved in turnover of enterocytes across the crypt-villus unit in rat intestine.

  17. An Improved Method for Studying the Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation of Glucose Using Luminescent Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bare, William D.; Pham, Chi V.; Cuber, Matthew; Demas, J. N.

    2007-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring the rate of the oxidation of glucose in the presence of glucose oxidase. The improved method employs luminescence measurements to directly determine the concentration of oxygen in real time, thus obviating complicated reaction schemes employed in previous methods. Our method has been used to determine…

  18. Oxidation of Acenaphthene and Acenaphthylene by Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Takenaka, Shigeo; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kim, Joo-Hwan; Kim, Donghak; Yoshimoto, Francis K.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Komori, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Acenaphthene and acenaphthylene, two known environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollutants, were incubated at 50 µM concentrations in a standard reaction mixture with human P450s 2A6, 2A13, 1B1, 1A2, 2C9, and 3A4 and the oxidation products were determined using HPLC and LC-MS. HPLC analysis showed that P450 2A6 converted acenaphthene and acenaphthylene to several mono- and di-oxygenated products. LC-MS analysis of acenaphthene oxidation by P450s indicated the formation of 1-acenaphthenol as a major product, with turnover rates of 6.7, 4.5, and 3.6 nmol product formed/min/nmol P450 for P450 2A6, 2A13, and 1B1, respectively. Acenaphthylene oxidation by P450 2A6 showed the formation of 1,2-epoxyacenaphthene as a major product (4.4 nmol epoxide formed/min/nmol P450) and also several mono- and di-oxygenated products. P450 2A13, 1B1, 1A2, 2C9, and 3A4 formed 1,2-epoxyacenaphthene at rates of 0.18, 5.3 2.4, 0.16, and 3.8 nmol/min nmol P450, respectively. 1-Acenaphthenol, which induced Type I binding spectra with P450 2A13, was further oxidized by P450 2A13 but not P450 2A6. 1,2-Epoxyacenaphthene induced Type I binding spectra with P450 2A6 and 2A13 (Ks 1.8 and 0.16 µM, respectively) and was also oxidized to several oxidation products by these P450s. Molecular docking analysis suggested different orientations of acenaphthene, acenaphthylene, 1-acenaphthenol, and 1,2-epoxyacenaphthene in their interactions with P450 2A6 and 2A13. Neither these four PAHs induced umu gene expression in a Salmonella typhimurium NM tester strain. These results suggest, for the first time, that acenaphthene and acenaphthylene are oxidized by human P450s 2A6 and 2A13 and other P450s to form several mono- and di-oxygenated products. The results are of use in considering the biological and toxicological significance of these environmental PAHs in humans. PMID:25642975

  19. Oxidative stress and inflammation in mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA patients treated with enzyme replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Donida, Bruna; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Biancini, Giovana B; Deon, Marion; Manini, Paula R; da Rosa, Helen T; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Bender, Fernanda; Burin, Maira G; Coitinho, Adriana S; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA (MPS IVA) is an inborn error of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) catabolism due to the deficient activity of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase that leads to accumulation of the keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate in body fluids and in lysosomes. The pathophysiology of this lysosomal storage disorder is not completely understood. The aim of this study was to investigate oxidative stress parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokine and GAG levels in MPS IVA patients. We analyzed urine and blood samples from patients under ERT (n=17) and healthy age-matched controls (n=10-15). Patients presented a reduction of antioxidant defense levels, assessed by a decrease in glutathione content and by an increase in superoxide dismutase activity in erythrocytes. Concerning lipid and protein damage, it was verified increased urine isoprostanes and di-tyrosine levels and decreased plasma sulfhydryl groups in MPS IVA patients compared to controls. MPS IVA patients showed higher DNA damage than control group and this damage had an oxidative origin in both pyrimidine and purine bases. Interleukin 6 was increased in patients and presented an inverse correlation with GSH levels, showing a possible link between inflammation and oxidative stress in MPS IVA disease. The data presented suggest that pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant states occur in MPS IVA patients even under ERT. Taking these results into account, supplementation of antioxidants in combination with ERT can be a tentative therapeutic approach with the purpose of improving the patient's quality of life. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study relating MPS IVA patients with oxidative stress.

  20. Effects of dietary sodium selenite and selenium yeast on antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Hussain; Tian, Jinke; Wang, Jianjun; Khan, Muhammad Ammar; Wang, Yuanxiao; Zhang, Lili; Wang, Tian

    2012-07-25

    The effects of sodium selenite (SS) and selenium yeast (SY) alone and in combination (MS) on the selenium (Se) content, antioxidant enzyme activities (AEA), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat were investigated. The results showed that the highest (p < 0.05) glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was found in the SS-supplemented chicken breast meat; however, SY and MS treatments significantly increased (p < 0.05) the Se content and the activities of catalase (CAT), total superoxide dismutase (T-SOD), and TAC, but decreased (p < 0.05) the malondialdehyde (MDA) content at 42 days of age. Twelve days of storage at 4 °C decreased (p < 0.05) the activity of the GSH-Px, but CAT, T-SOD, and TAC remained stable. SY decreased the lipid oxidation more effectively in chicken breast meat. It was concluded that SY and MS are more effective than SS in increasing the AEA, TAC, and oxidative stability of chicken breast meat.

  1. Oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes activities in the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, experimentally challenged with Escherichia coli and Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Joseph A

    2014-04-01

    The impacts of bacterial infection on cultivated fish species, African catfish, were investigated using oxidative stress biomarkers [lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation] and the activities of important antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes [catalase and glutathione S-transferase (GST)]. Fish were inoculated via oral gavage with one of the following treatments: 1 × 10(5) CFU/ml of Escherichia coli (EC1), 2 × 10(5) CFU/ml of E. coli (EC2), 1 × 10(5) CFU/ml of Vibrio fischeri (V1), 2 × 10(5) CFU/ml of V. fischeri (V2), gavaged with distilled water and not gavaged. Fish were maintained in the laboratory for 7 days after the bacterial inoculation, and the levels of LPO, protein carbonylation, GST, and catalase activities were determined in the muscle, gills, and liver of fish. Fish inoculated with bacteria (either E. coli or V. fischeri) had a significant higher levels of tissue LPO, protein carbonylation, and GST activities in a tissue-specific pattern (liver > muscle > gills). This appears to be related with the levels of bacterial inoculation, with effects more pronounced in fish inoculated with either EC2 or V2. The catalase activity did not differ significantly between the inoculated and fish that were not inoculated. The results of this study indicate that bacterial inoculation could result in oxidative stress in fish, and liver has a higher rate of oxidative stress per mg tissue compared to the gills and the muscle.

  2. A highly sensitive enzyme-amplified immunosensor based on a nanoporous niobium oxide (Nb2O5) electrode.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Kwon, Dohyoung; Yoo, Jeng Eun; Lee, Byung Gun; Choi, Jinsub; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2010-01-01

    We report on the development of an enzyme-amplified sandwich-type immunosensor based on a thin gold film sputtered on an anodic nanoporous niobium oxide (Au@Nb(2)O(5)) electrode. The electrocatalytic activity of enzymatically amplified electroactive species and a stable electrode consisting of Au@Nb(2)O(5) were used to obtain a powerful signal amplification of the electrochemical immunobiosensor. The method using this electrochemical biosensor based on an Au@Nb(2)O(5) electrode provides a much better performance than those based on conventional bulk gold or niobium oxide electrodes. Our novel approach does not require any time-consuming cleaning steps to yield reproducible electrochemical signals. In addition, the strong adhesion of gold films on the niobium oxide electrodes offers a very stable substrate during electrochemical biosensing. Cyclic voltammetry measurements indicate that non-specific binding of proteins to the modified Au@Nb(2)O(5) surface is sufficiently low to be ignored in the case of our novel system. Finally, we demonstrated the ability of the biosensor based on an Au@Nb(2)O(5) offering the enhanced performance with a high resolution and sensitivity. Therefore, it is expected that the biosensor based on an Au@Nb(2)O(5) has great potential for highly efficient biological devices.

  3. Zebrafish high-throughput screening to study the impact of dissolvable metal oxide nanoparticles on the hatching enzyme, ZHE1.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sijie; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Ear, Jason; Chang, Chong Hyun; Zhang, Haiyuan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Yamada, Kristin; Meng, Huan; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Godwin, Hilary A; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E

    2013-05-27

    The zebrafish is emerging as a model organism for the safety assessment and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials. In this Communication, the implementation of a roboticized high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with automated image analysis is demonstrated to assess the impact of dissolvable oxide nanoparticles on embryo hatching. It is further demonstrated that this hatching interference is mechanistically linked to an effect on the metalloprotease, ZHE 1, which is responsible for degradation of the chorionic membrane. The data indicate that 4 of 24 metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, Cr2 O3 , and NiO) could interfere with embryo hatching by a chelator-sensitive mechanism that involves ligation of critical histidines in the ZHE1 center by the shed metal ions. A recombinant ZHE1 enzymatic assay is established to demonstrate that the dialysates from the same materials responsible for hatching interference also inhibit ZHE1 activity in a dose-dependent fashion. A peptide-based BLAST search identifies several additional aquatic species that express enzymes with homologous histidine-based catalytic centers, suggesting that the ZHE1 mechanistic paradigm could be used to predict the toxicity of a large number of oxide nanoparticles that pose a hazard to aquatic species.

  4. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marta S; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A; Pörtner, Hans O; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems.

  5. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Marta S.; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A.; Pörtner, Hans O.; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems. PMID:26221723

  6. Structures of reduced and ligand-bound nitric oxide reductase provide insights into functional differences in respiratory enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sato, Nozomi; Ishii, Shoko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hino, Tomoya; Fukumori, Yoshihiro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the generation of nitrous oxide (N2O) via the reductive coupling of two nitric oxide (NO) molecules at a heme/non-heme Fe center. We report herein on the structures of the reduced and ligand-bound forms of cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a resolution of 2.3-2.7 Å, to elucidate structure-function relationships in NOR, and compare them to those of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) that is evolutionarily related to NOR. Comprehensive crystallographic refinement of the CO-bound form of cNOR suggested that a total of four atoms can be accommodated at the binuclear center. Consistent with this, binding of bulky acetaldoxime (CH3-CH=N-OH) to the binuclear center of cNOR was confirmed by the structural analysis. Active site reduction and ligand binding in cNOR induced only ∼0.5 Å increase in the heme/non-heme Fe distance, but no significant structural change in the protein. The highly localized structural change is consistent with the lack of proton-pumping activity in cNOR, because redox-coupled conformational changes are thought to be crucial for proton pumping in CCO. It also permits the rapid decomposition of cytotoxic NO in denitrification. In addition, the shorter heme/non-heme Fe distance even in the bulky ligand-bound form of cNOR (∼4.5 Å) than the heme/Cu distance in CCO (∼5 Å) suggests the ability of NOR to maintain two NO molecules within a short distance in the confined space of the active site, thereby facilitating N-N coupling to produce a hyponitrite intermediate for the generation of N2O.

  7. Biomimetic oxidation studies. 9. Mechanistic aspects of the oxidation of alcohols with functional,active site methane monooxygenase enzyme models in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rabion, A. ||; Chen, S.; Wang, J.; Buchanan, R.M.; Seris, J.L.; Fish, R.H. |

    1995-12-13

    The syntheses of biomimetic complexes that mimic the major structural features of the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase enzyme (MMO) and, more importantly, that provide similar alkane functionalization activity, in the presence of an oxidant, have been of great interest to the discipline of bioinorganic chemistry. In this communication, we will demonstrate the feasibility of conducting biomimetic oxidation studies in H{sub 2}O with soluble substrates, i.e., alcohols (cyclohexanol, benzyl alcohol), using H{sub 2}O-stable MMO mimics at pH 4.2, and the oxidant, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). Both the Mitusunobu procedure and the mesylate displacement reaction proceeded with complete inversion of the stereo-center and provided optically pure penultimate intermediate (>99.9% ee). The synthesis was completed by reduction of the nitro group under standard conditions to deliver LY300164 in 87%. In summary, we have developed an efficient and environmentally benign synthesis of the 5H-2,3-benzodiazepine LY300164 that provides the optically pure compound in 51% overall yield. Intramolecular hydrazone alkylation led to a remarkably facile and selective formation of the benzodiazepine. Furthermore, the application of resins to whole-cell-based biotransformations should find general utility for similar reactions that are complicated by component inhibition and product isolation. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  8. Association of serum paraoxonase enzyme activity and oxidative stress markers with dyslipidemia in obese adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Moushira Erfan; El-Bassyouni, Hala; Kamal, Sanaa; El-Gammal, Mona; Youness, Eman

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) concentration and oxidative stress markers and assess its relations with the biochemical parameters in obese adolescents. Materials and Methods: One hundred and fifty obese adolescents (range 16-18 years) and 150 healthy age- and sex-matched controls were enrolled in the study. The data were extracted from a project entitled “Obesity among Youth: Lifestyle and Genetic Factors” funded by the Science and Technology Development Fund, Egypt. Serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1), nitric oxide (NO), and malonaldehyde were measured. Anthropometry, fasting glucose, insulin concentrations, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein–cholesterol, low density lipoprotein–cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were measured. Insulin resistance was determined by Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Diagnostic accuracy of oxidative markers to identify dyslipidemia was calculated with ROC analysis. Results: The study showed that PON1 activity was significantly lower in obese adolescents than controls. Obese adolescents had significant lower NO level and significant increased MA values as compared to controls. PON1 was negatively correlated with MAD and body mass index in obese subjects. Obese adolescents showed dyslipidemia and increased blood pressure and HOMA-IR values. PON1 had high area under the curve in ROC analysis for identifying dyslipidemia in obese subjects. Conclusions: Our results indicate that obese subjects have increased oxidative stress and decreased PON1 activity. The lower paraoxonase level might contribute to the greater risk of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, high blood pressure that are considered as important components in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome in obese adolescents. PMID:24944928

  9. Quercetin changes purinergic enzyme activities and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Zanini, Daniela; Cardoso, Andréia M; Abadalla, Fátima H; Thomé, Gustavo R; Murussi, Camila; Polachini, Carla R N; Delenogare, Diéssica P; Loro, Vania L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-12-01

    Diseases related to thyroid hormones have been extensively studied because affect a large number of individuals, and these hormones participate in the regulation of the whole organism homeostasis. However, little is known about the involvement of purinergic signaling related to oxidative stress in hypothyroidism and possible therapeutic adjuncts for treatment of this disorder. Thus, the present study investigates the effects of quercetin on NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities, platelet aggregation and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism. Methimazole at a concentration of 20mg/100mL was administered for 90days. From the second month the animals received quercetin 10 or 25mg/kg for 60days. Results showed that: Ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity decreased in methimazole/water group and the treatment with quercetin 25mg/kg decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities. Moreover, platelet aggregation increased in methimazole/water group. Lipid peroxidation increased while superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased, but, interestingly, the treatment with quercetin reversed these changes. These results demonstrated that quercetin modulates adenine nucleotide hydrolysis decreasing the ADP formation and adenosine deamination. At the same time quercetin improves the oxidative profile, as well as reduces platelet aggregation, which together with the modulation in the nucleotides levels can contribute to the prevention of platelet disorders.

  10. Thiamine biosensor based on oxidative trapping of enzyme-substrate intermediate.

    PubMed

    Halma, Matilte; Doumèche, Bastien; Hecquet, Laurence; Prévot, Vanessa; Mousty, Christine; Charmantray, Franck

    2017-01-15

    In the present work, we describe a new thiamine amperometric biosensor based on thiamine pyrophosphate (ThDP)-dependent transketolase (TK)-catalyzed reaction, followed by the oxidative trapping of TK intermediate α,β-dihydroxyethylthiamine diphosphate (DHEThDP) within the enzymatic active site. For the biosensor design purpose, TK from Escherichia coli (TKec) was immobilized in Mg2Al-NO3 Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) and the electrochemical detection was achieved with the TKec/LDH modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The transduction process was based on the ability of Fe(CN)6(3-) to oxidize DHEThDP to glycolic acid along with ThDP regeneration. The released Fe(CN)6(4-) was re-oxidized at +0.5V vs Ag-AgCl and the reaction was followed by chronoamperometry. The TKec/LDH/GCE biosensor was optimized using the best TK donor substrates, namely l-erythrulose and d-fructose-6-phosphate. ThDP was assayed with great sensitivity (3831mAM(-1)cm(-2)) over 20-400nM linear range.

  11. Crosslinked redox polymer enzyme electrodes containing carbon nanotubes for high and stable glucose oxidation current.

    PubMed

    MacAodha, Domhnall; Ferrer, Maria Luisa; Conghaile, Peter Ó; Kavanagh, Paul; Leech, Dónal

    2012-11-14

    Co-immobilisation approaches for preparation of glucose-oxidising films of [Os(2,2'-bipyridine)(2)(poly-vinylimidazole)(10)Cl] and glucose oxidase on glassy carbon electrodes are compared. Electrodes prepared by crosslinking using glutaraldehyde vapour, without and with a NaBH(4) reduction, provide higher glucose oxidation current than those prepared using a well-established diepoxide method. Addition of multi walled carbon nanotubes to the film deposition solutions produces an enhanced glucose oxidation current density of 5 mA cm(-2) at 0.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl, whilst improving the operational stability of the current signal. Carbon nanotube, glutaraldehyde vapour crosslinked, films on electrodes, reduced by NaBH(4), retain 77% of initial catalytic current over 24 hours of continuous amperometric testing in a 37 °C, 50 mM phosphate buffer solution containing 150 mM NaCl and 100 mM glucose. Potential application of this approach to implantable enzymatic biofuel cells is demonstrated by production of glucose oxidation currents, under pseudo-physiological conditions, using mediating films with lower redox potentials.

  12. Lipid peroxidation, proteins modifications, anti-oxidant enzymes activities and selenium deficiency in the plasma of hashitoxicosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Mseddi, Malek; Ben Mansour, Riadh; Mnif, Fatma; Gargouri, Bochra; Abid, Mohamed; Guermazi, Fadhel; Attia, Hamadi; Lassoued, Saloua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the oxidative stress profile in hashitoxicosis (HTX) and to compare it with that of healthy subjects. Patients and methods: Spectrophotometric methods were used to evaluate the oxidative stress markers. The selenium level was investigated by atomic absorption. Results: High levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and conjugated dienes were found in HTX patients (p = 0.034 and p = 0.043, respectively) compared with healthy controls. For antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities increased, whereas that of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decreased (p = 0.000, p = 0.014, p = 0.000, respectively) compared with controls. A reduction in the level of selenium (p = 0.029) and thiol groups (p = 0.008) were shown in patients; however, levels of carbonyl group and malondialdehyde (MDA) protein adducts decreased (p = 0.000) compared with controls. Positive correlation was shown between levels of free thyroxine (FT4) and TBARS (r = 0.711, p = 0.048) and between FT4 level and SOD activity (r = 0.713, p = 0.047). Conversely, GPx activity presented a negative correlation with FT4 and free triiodothyronine (FT3) levels (r = –0.934, p = 0.001; r = –0.993, p = 0.000, respectively). In addition, GPx activity showed positive correlation with selenium level (r = 0.981, p = 0.019) and the FT3 level correlated negatively with the level of thiol groups (r = –0.892, p = 0.017). Conclusions: This study shows the presence of an oxidative stress and selenium deficiency in HTX patients and suggests that the hyperthyroid state is strongly implicated in the establishment of this disturbed oxidative profile. PMID:26445640

  13. Saikosaponin-D attenuates heat stress-induced oxidative damage in LLC-PK1 cells by increasing the expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and HSP72.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bao-Zhen; Guo, Xiao-Tong; Chen, Jian-Wei; Zhao, Yuan; Cong, Xia; Jiang, Zhong-Ling; Cao, Rong-Feng; Cui, Kai; Gao, Shan-Song; Tian, Wen-Ru

    2014-01-01

    Heat stress stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which cause oxidative damage in the kidney. This study clarifies the mechanism by which saikosaponin-d (SSd), which is extracted from the roots of Bupleurum falcatum L, protects heat-stressed pig kidney proximal tubular (LLC-PK1) cells against oxidative damage. SSd alone is not cytotoxic at concentrations of 1 or 3 μg/mL as demonstrated by a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. To assess the effects of SSd on heat stress-induced cellular damage, LLC-PK1 cells were pretreated with various concentrations of SSd, heat stressed at 42°C for 1 h, and then returned to 37°C for 9 h. DNA ladder and MTT assays demonstrated that SSd helped to prevent heat stress-induced cellular damage when compared to untreated cells. Additionally, pretreatment with SSd increased the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) but decreased the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) in a dose-dependent manner when compared to controls. Furthermore, real-time PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated that SSd significantly increased the expression of copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD-1), CAT, GPx-1 and heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) at both the mRNA and protein levels. In conclusion, these results are the first to demonstrate that SSd ameliorates heat stress-induced oxidative damage by modulating the activity of anti-oxidant enzymes and HSP72 in LLC-PK1 cells.

  14. Enzyme monolayer- and bilayer-modified tin oxide electrodes for the determination of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsuma, Tetsu; Okawa, Yusuke; Watanabe, Tadashi )

    1989-11-01

    An enzyme-based amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was developed, employing a horseradish peroxidase (HRP) monolayer covalently attached to a tin oxide electrode and a dissolved electron mediator. The sensor can determine hydrogen peroxide at levels down to 10{sup {minus}8} M and can be applied to a flow system. Stability of the electrode, kinetics of the surface process, and the efficiencies of different mediators were studied. As an extension, glucose oxidase (GOx) was chemically bound to the HRP-modified electrode. A GOx/HRP bilayer-modified electrode thus obtained exhibits much better performance in glucose detection limit, sensitivity, and response speed than previously reported GOx monolayer-modified electrodes.

  15. Oxidative metabolism of flunarizine and cinnarizine by microsomes from B-lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kariya, S; Isozaki, S; Uchino, K; Suzuki, T; Narimatsu, S

    1996-11-01

    The oxidative metabolism of cinnarizine [(E)-1-(diphenylmethyl)-4-(3-phenyl-2-propyl)piperazine, CZ] and flunarizine [(E)-1-[bis(4-fluorophenyl)methyl]-4-(3-phenyl-2-propyl)piperazine, FZ] was examined in microsomes from lymphoblastoid cells that expressed human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. Among 10 kinds of CYP enzymes examined, only CYP2D6 catalyzed p-hydroxylation of the cinnamyl phenyl ring of CZ (C-2 formation) and FZ (F-2 formation), and only CYP2B6 exhibited activity for p-hydroxylation (C-4 formation) of the diphenylmethyl group of CZ at a substrate concentration of 50 microM. On the other hand, CYP2C9 together with CYP1A1, -1A2 and/or -2A6 mediated N-desalkylation at the 1- and 4-positions of the piperazine ring of the two drugs that formed C-1 and C-3 from CZ and F-1 and F-3 from FZ, respectively, whereas CYP2C8, -2C19, -2E1 or -3A4 did not show detectable activity for these reactions under the conditions used. We then examined kinetics for the oxidative metabolism of CZ and FZ using CYP2B6 and -2D6 that have considerable activities. CYP2D6 with Km values of 2 to 4 microM had intrinsic clearance values (Vmax/Km) of 0.31 and 0.14 ml/min/nmol CYP for C-2 and F-2 formation, respectively, while CYP2B6 with a Km value of 17 microM exhibited the clearance value of 0.10 ml/min/nmol CYP for C-4 formation. These results suggest that CYP2D6 mainly mediates p-hydroxylation of the cinnamyl phenyl rings of CZ and FZ, and CYP2B6 mediates that of the diphenylmethyl group of CZ.

  16. The catabolism of 2,4-xylenol and p-cresol share the enzymes for the oxidation of para-methyl group in Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Fei; Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 utilizes p-cresol or 2,4-xylenol as a sole carbon and energy source. Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of the para-methyl group of p-cresol have been studied in detail. However, those responsible for the oxidation of the para-methyl group in 2,4-xylenol catabolism are still not reported. In this study, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated pchC- and pchF-encoded p-cresol methylhydroxylase (PCMH) and pchA-encoded p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (PHBDD) in p-cresol catabolism were also likely involved in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol. Enzyme activity assays and intermediate identification indicated that the PCMH and PHBDD catalyzed the oxidations of 2,4-xylenol to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, respectively. Furthermore, the PCMH-encoding gene pchF was found to be necessary for the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol, whereas the PHBDD-encoding gene pchA was not essential for the catabolism by gene knockout and complementation. Analyses of the maximum specific growth rate (μ m) and specific activity of the gene-knockout strain to different intermediates revealed the presence of other enzyme(s) with PHBDD activity in strain 9866. However, PHBDD played a major role in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol in contrast to the other enzyme(s).

  17. Role of DNA repair enzymes in the cellular resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Laval, J

    1996-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in cells when the equilibrium between prooxidant and antioxidant species is broken in favor of the prooxidant state. It is due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated either by the cellular metabolism such as phagocytosis, mitochondrial respiration, xenobiotic detoxification, or by exogenous factors such as ionizing radiation or chemical compounds performing red-ox reactions. Some ROS are extremely reactive and interact with all the macromolecules including lipids, nucleic acids and proteins. Cells have numerous defence systems to counteract the deleterious effects of ROS. Proteins and small molecules specifically eliminate ROS when they are formed. There are three species of superoxyde dismutases which transform the superoxyde anion O2- in hydrogen peroxyde H2O2 which in turn will be destroyed by peroxysomal catalase or by various peroxydases. There are numerous small molecules in the cell such as glutathion, alpha-tocopherol, vitamines A and C, melanine, etc. which are antioxydant molecules. ROS escaping destruction generate various lesions in DNA such as base modifications, degradation products of deoxyribose, chain breaks. These various lesions have been characterized and it is possible to quantitate them in the DNA of cells which have been irradiated or treated by free radical generating systems. The biological properties of the bases modified by ROS have been established. For example C8-hydroxyguanine (8-oxoG) is promutagenic since, if present in DNA during replication, it leads to incorporation of dAMP residues, leading to transversion mutation (GC-->TA). Purines whose imidazole ring is opened (Fapy residues) are stops for the DNA polymerase during DNA replication and are therefore potentially lethal lesions for the cell. Oxidized pyrimidines have comparable coding properties. Efficient DNA repair mechanisms remove these oxidized bases. In Escherichia coli cells, endonuclease III (NTH protein) and endonuclease VIII (NEI protein

  18. Characterization of YqjM, an Old Yellow Enzyme homolog from Bacillus subtilis involved in the oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Teresa B; Amrhein, Nikolaus; Macheroux, Peter

    2003-05-30

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a protein from Bacillus subtilis (YqjM) shares many characteristic biochemical properties with the homologous yeast Old Yellow Enzyme (OYE); the enzyme binds FMN tightly but noncovalently, preferentially uses NADPH as a source of reducing equivalents, and forms charge transfer complexes with phenolic compounds such as p-hydroxybenzaldehyde. Like yeast OYE and other members of the family, YqjM catalyzes the reduction of the double bond of an array of alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes and ketones including nitroester and nitroaromatic compounds. Although yeast OYE was the first member of this family to be discovered in 1933 and was the first flavoenzyme ever to be isolated, the physiological role of the family still remains obscure. The finding that alpha,beta-unsaturated compounds are substrates provoked speculation that the OYE family might be involved in reductive degradation of xenobiotics or lipid peroxidation products. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate on the protein level that whereas YqjM shows a basal level of expression in B. subtilis, the addition of the toxic xenobiotic, trinitrotoluene, leads to a rapid induction of the protein in vivo denoting a role in detoxification. Moreover, we show that YqjM is rapidly induced in response to oxidative stress as exerted by hydrogen peroxide, demonstrating a potential physiological role for this enigmatic class of proteins.

  19. A plasma membrane-bound enzyme of tobacco roots catalyses the formation of nitric oxide from nitrite.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, C; Strube, F; Marx, G; Ullrich, W R; Rockel, P

    2001-04-01

    Purified plasma membranes (PMs) of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Samsun) roots exhibited a nitrite-reducing enzyme activity that resulted in nitric oxide (NO) formation. This enzyme activity was not detected in soluble protein fractions or in PM vesicles of leaves. At the pH optimum of pH 6.0, nitrite was reduced to NO with reduced cytochrome c as electron donor at a rate comparable to the nitrate-reducing activity of root-specific succinate-dependent PM-bound nitrate reductase (PM-NR). The hitherto unknown PM-bound nitrite: NO-reductase (NI-NOR) was insensitive to cyanide and anti-NR IgG and thereby proven to be different from PM-NR. Furthermore, PM-NR and NI-NOR were separated by gel-filtration chromatography and apparent molecular masses of 310 kDa for NI-NOR and 200 kDa for PM-NR were estimated. The PM-associated NI-NOR may reduce the apoplastic nitrite produced by PM-NR in vivo and may play a role in nitrate signalling via NO formation.

  20. Decolorization of industrial dyes by a Brazilian strain of Pleurotus pulmonarius producing laccase as the sole phenol-oxidizing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zilly, A; Souza, C G M; Barbosa-Tessmann, I P; Peralta, R M

    2002-01-01

    The ability of a Brazilian strain of Pleurotus pulmonarius to decolorize structurally different synthetic dyes (including azo, triphenylmethane, heterocyclic and polymeric dyes) was investigated in solid and submerged cultures. Both were able to decolorize completely or partially 8 of 10 dyes (Amido Black, Congo Red, Trypan Blue, Methyl Green, Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Methyl Violet, Ethyl Violet, Brilliant Cresyl Blue). No decolorization of Methylene Blue and Poly R 478 was observed. Of the four phenol-oxidizing enzymes tested in culture filtrates (lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase, aryl alcohol oxidase, laccase), P. pulmonarius produced only laccase. Both laccase activity and dye decolorization were related to glucose and ammonium starvation or to induction by ferulic acid. The decolorization in vivo was tested using three dyes--Remazol Brilliant Blue R, Trypan Blue and Methyl Green. All of them were completely decolorized by crude extracellular extracts. Decolorization and laccase activity were equally affected by pH and temperature. Laccase can thus be considered to be the major enzyme involved in the ability of P. pulmonarius to decolorize industrial dyes.

  1. Testicular toxicity in cannabis extract treated mice: association with oxidative stress and role of antioxidant enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Tapas K; Das, Nildari S

    2010-02-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of cannabis extract at low doses (total doses ranging from 40 mg to 60 mg per mouse) induced adverse effect on testes and oxidative stress. At low doses, there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in testicular lipid content, but the effects were significantly less at higher doses and at the withdrawal of cannabis treatment (recovery dose). There was a marked decrease in antioxidant enzyme profiles (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione content at low doses, but these effects were higher at higher dose and at withdrawal of the treatment (recovery effect). Histology revealed significant shrinkage of tubular diameter and detrimental changes in seminiferous epithelium of testis with resulting lowered serum testosterone and pituitary gonadotropins (follicular stimulating [FSH] and luteinizing hormones [LH]) levels at low doses. But at higher doses and particularly at withdrawal of the treatment, regression of various germ cell layers of testes through the revival of testosterone hormone and pituitary gonadotropins (FSH and LH) were observed, indicating that recovery effects on testes became operative possibly through the corrective measure of endogenous testicular antioxidant enzymes profiles and pituitary gonadotropins hormones feedback mechanisms.

  2. Role of β-Oxidation Enzymes in γ-Decalactone Production by the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    PubMed Central

    Waché, Yves; Aguedo, Mario; Choquet, Armelle; Gatfield, Ian L.; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Belin, Jean-Marc

    2001-01-01

    Some microorganisms can transform methyl ricinoleate into γ-decalactone, a valuable aroma compound, but yields of the bioconversion are low due to (i) incomplete conversion of ricinoleate (C18) to the C10 precursor of γ-decalactone, (ii) accumulation of other lactones (3-hydroxy-γ-decalactone and 2- and 3-decen-4-olide), and (iii) γ-decalactone reconsumption. We evaluated acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase activity (encoded by the POX1 through POX5 genes) in Yarrowia lipolytica in lactone accumulation and γ-decalactone reconsumption in POX mutants. Mutants with no acyl-CoA oxidase activity could not reconsume γ-decalactone, and mutants with a disruption of pox3, which encodes the short-chain acyl-CoA oxidase, reconsumed it more slowly. 3-Hydroxy-γ-decalactone accumulation during transformation of methyl ricinoleate suggests that, in wild-type strains, β-oxidation is controlled by 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. In mutants with low acyl-CoA oxidase activity, however, the acyl-CoA oxidase controls the β-oxidation flux. We also identified mutant strains that produced 26 times more γ-decalactone than the wild-type parents. PMID:11722925

  3. Role of beta-oxidation enzymes in gamma-decalactone production by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Waché, Y; Aguedo, M; Choquet, A; Gatfield, I L; Nicaud, J M; Belin, J M

    2001-12-01

    Some microorganisms can transform methyl ricinoleate into gamma-decalactone, a valuable aroma compound, but yields of the bioconversion are low due to (i) incomplete conversion of ricinoleate (C(18)) to the C(10) precursor of gamma-decalactone, (ii) accumulation of other lactones (3-hydroxy-gamma-decalactone and 2- and 3-decen-4-olide), and (iii) gamma-decalactone reconsumption. We evaluated acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase activity (encoded by the POX1 through POX5 genes) in Yarrowia lipolytica in lactone accumulation and gamma-decalactone reconsumption in POX mutants. Mutants with no acyl-CoA oxidase activity could not reconsume gamma-decalactone, and mutants with a disruption of pox3, which encodes the short-chain acyl-CoA oxidase, reconsumed it more slowly. 3-Hydroxy-gamma-decalactone accumulation during transformation of methyl ricinoleate suggests that, in wild-type strains, beta-oxidation is controlled by 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. In mutants with low acyl-CoA oxidase activity, however, the acyl-CoA oxidase controls the beta-oxidation flux. We also identified mutant strains that produced 26 times more gamma-decalactone than the wild-type parents.

  4. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodenius, Michael; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E.; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2012-09-01

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-biotin surface groups (SPIO-PEG-biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid-PEG-biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC14:0PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω -N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl-PEG (NHS-PEG-biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG-biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of - 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and - 14 mV (PEG-biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62-73 emu g-1 Fe3O4 and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r2 relaxivities and moderately high r1 values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP.

  5. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes.

    PubMed

    Hodenius, Michael; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2012-09-07

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-biotin surface groups (SPIO-PEG-biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid-PEG-biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC(14:0)PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω -N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl-PEG (NHS-PEG-biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG-biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of - 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and - 14 mV (PEG-biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62-73 emu g(-1) Fe(3)O(4) and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r(2) relaxivities and moderately high r(1) values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP.

  6. Involvement of a plastid terminal oxidase in plastoquinone oxidation as evidenced by expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana enzyme in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Joët, Thierry; Genty, Bernard; Josse, Eve-Marie; Kuntz, Marcel; Cournac, Laurent; Peltier, Gilles

    2002-08-30

    Chlororespiration has been defined as a respiratory electron transport chain in interaction with photosynthetic electron transport involving both non-photochemical reduction and oxidation of plastoquinones. Different enzymatic activities, including a plastid-encoded NADH dehydrogenase complex, have been reported to be involved in the non-photochemical reduction of plastoquinones. However, the enzyme responsible for plasquinol oxidation has not yet been clearly identified. In order to determine whether the newly discovered plastid oxidase (PTOX) involved in carotenoid biosynthesis acts as a plastoquinol oxidase in higher plant chloroplasts, the Arabidopsis thaliana PTOX gene (At-PTOX) was expressed in tobacco under the control of a strong constitutive promoter. We showed that At-PTOX is functional in tobacco chloroplasts and strongly accelerates the non-photochemical reoxidation of plastoquinols; this effect was inhibited by propyl gallate, a known inhibitor of PTOX. During the dark to light induction phase of photosynthesis at low irradiances, At-PTOX drives significant electron flow to O(2), thus avoiding over-reduction of plastoquinones, when photo- synthetic CO(2) assimilation was not fully induced. We proposed that PTOX, by modulating the redox state of intersystem electron carriers, may participate in the regulation of cyclic electron flow around photosystem I.

  7. Astaxanthin, canthaxanthin and beta-carotene differently affect UVA-induced oxidative damage and expression of oxidative stress-responsive enzymes.

    PubMed

    Camera, Emanuela; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Fabbri, Claudia; Daubrawa, Felicitas; Picardo, Mauro; Sies, Helmut; Stahl, Wilhelm

    2009-03-01

    Carotenoids are used for systemic photoprotection in humans. Regarding mechanisms underlying photoprotective effects of carotenoids, here we compared the modulation of UVA-related injury by carotenoids. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were exposed to moderate doses of UVA, which stimulated apoptosis, increased levels of reactive oxygen species and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, decreased antioxidant enzymes activities, promoted membrane perturbation, and induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). The carotenoids astaxanthin (AX), canthaxanthin (CX) and beta-carotene (betaC) were delivered to HDF 24 h before exposure to UVA. Astaxanthin exhibited a pronounced photoprotective effect and counteracted all of the above-mentioned UVA-induced alterations to a significant extent. beta-Carotene only partially prevented the UVA-induced decline of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, but it increased membrane damage and stimulated HO-1 expression. Moreover, betaC dose-dependently induced caspase-3 activity following UVA exposure. In contrast, CX had no effect on oxidative damage, except for HO-1 expression, which was augmented. Uptake of AX by fibroblasts was higher than that of the other two carotenoids. The photostability of the three compounds in fibroblasts was AX > CX > betaC. The data indicate that the oxo-carotenoid AX has a superior preventive effect towards photo-oxidative changes in cell culture.

  8. Intracellular antioxidant enzymes are not globally upregulated during hibernation in the major oxidative tissues of the 13-lined ground squirrel Spermophilus tridecemlineatus.

    PubMed

    Page, Melissa M; Peters, Craig W; Staples, James F; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2009-01-01

    Hibernating mammals exhibit oxidative stress resistance in brain, liver and other tissues. In many animals, cellular oxidative stress resistance is associated with enhanced expression of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Intracellular antioxidant capacity may be upregulated during hibernation to protect against oxidative damage associated with the ischemia-reperfusion that occurs during transitions between torpor and arousal. We tested the hypothesis that the 13-lined ground squirrel (Spermophilus tridecemlineatus), upregulates intracellular antioxidant enzymes in major oxidative tissues during hibernation. The two major intracellular isoforms of superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and CuZnSOD), which catalyze the first step in superoxide detoxification, were quantified in heart, brain and liver tissue using immunodetection and an in-gel activity assay. However, no differences in SOD protein expression or activity were found between active and hibernating squirrels. Measurements of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase, which catalyze hydrogen peroxide removal, were not broadly upregulated during hibernation. The activity of catalase, which catalyzes an alternative hydrogen peroxide detoxification pathway, was higher in heart and brain of torpid squirrels, but lower in liver. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that hibernation is associated with enhanced oxidative stress resistance due to an upregulation of intracellular antioxidant enzymes in the major oxidative tissues.

  9. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase or histone deacetylase protects retinal pigment epithelial cells from DNA damage induced by oxidative stress by the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-04-05

    Epigenetic modifications influence DNA damage response (DDR). In this study we explored the role of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in DDR in cells challenged with acute or chronic oxidative stress. We used retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which natively are exposed to oxidative stress due to permanent exposure to light and high blood flow. We employed a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor - RG108 (RG), or a histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid (VA). ARPE-19 cells were exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, an acute oxidative stress inducer, or glucose oxidase, which slowly liberates low-doses of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of glucose, creating chronic conditions. VA and RG reduced level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in ARPE-19 cells in normal condition and in oxidative stress. This protective effect of VA and RG was associated with the up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme genes: CAT, GPx1, GPx4, SOD1 and SOD2. RG decreased the number of cells in G2/M checkpoint in response to chronic oxidative stress. Neither RG nor VA changed the DNA repair or apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, certain epigenetic manipulations may protect ARPE-19 cells from detrimental effects of oxidative stress by modulation of antioxidative enzyme gene expression, which may be further explored in pharmacological studies on oxidative stress-related eye diseases.

  10. Oxidative stress as a risk factor for osteoporosis in elderly Mexicans as characterized by antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Rodríguez, Martha A; Ruiz-Ramos, Mirna; Correa-Muñoz, Elsa; Mendoza-Núñez, Víctor Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress (OxS) has recently been linked with osteoporosis; however, we do not know the influence of OxS as an independent risk factor for this disease. Methods We conducted a case-control study in 94 subjects ≥60 years of age, 50 healthy and 44 with osteoporosis. We measured total antioxidant status, plasma lipid peroxides, antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and calculated the SOD/GPx ratio. Bone mineral density was obtained at the peripheral DXA in calcaneus using a portable Norland Apollo Densitometer®. Osteoporosis was considered when subjects had a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the mean value for young adults. Results GPx antioxidant activity was significantly lower in the group of subjects with osteoporosis in comparison with the group of healthy subjects (p < 0.01); in addition, the SOD/GPx ratio was significantly higher in the group of individuals with osteoporosis (p < 0.05). In logistic regression analysis, we found OxS to be an independent risk factor for osteoporosis (odds ratio [OR] = 2.79; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.08–7.23; p = 0.034). Conclusion Our findings suggest that OxS is an independent risk factor for osteoporosis linked to increase of SOD/GPx ratio. PMID:18088440

  11. Bio-inspired artificial functional photocatalyst: biomimetic enzyme-like TiO2/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite with excellent molecular recognition ability.

    PubMed

    Li, Wentao; Pei, Xule; Deng, Fang; Luo, Xubiao; Li, Fengcong; Xiao, Yong

    2015-05-01

    An enzyme-like TiO(2)/reduced graphene oxide (enzyme-TiO(2)/rGO) nanocomposite with molecular recognition ability was fabricated by biomimicking the geometrical and chemical complementation of the enzyme and substrate. The anatase TiO(2) nanocrystals were densely dispersed on rGO nanosheets with close interfacial contacts. With geometrical and chemical matching of target molecules and memorized cavities, the adsorption capacity of enzyme-TiO(2)/rGO nanocomposites for 4-nitrophenol (4.71 mg g(-1)) is about six times that of control TiO(2)/rGO without the enzyme-like feature (0.79 mg g(-1)), and the enzyme-TiO(2)/rGO shows a relative selectivity coefficient of 7.24. Moreover, enzyme-TiO(2)/rGO exhibits molecular recognitive photocatalytic degradation for a particular contaminant. The results demonstrate that enzyme-substrate recognition provides a convenient and powerful basis on which to biomimic and construct efficient photocatalysts with high selectivity.

  12. Single-walled carbon nanotube release affects the microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds in nature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    The question how microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds (LMCs) are affected by the release of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) into the environment remains to be addressed at the molecular level. We have, therefore concentrated the effects of SWCNT on some important properties associated with enzyme activity and function during microbial oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, acenaphthene and anthracene), LMCs (2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol and veratryl alcohol) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane, including the behaviour of water molecules, hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions (HYs) between ligand and the enzyme, and conformational dynamics in N- and C-terminus. Our study revealed that SWCNT significantly affected the behaviour of water molecules within 5 Å of both these substrates and their respective enzymes during oxidation (p < 0.01), by increasing or decreasing the water number near them. SWCNT tended to significantly enhance or reduce the stability of atom pairs that formed the HBs and HYs (p < 0.01). N- and C-terminus conformations underwent transitions between positive and negative states or between positive state or between negative state in all analyzed complexes. Significant conformational transitions were found for all C-terminus, but only for a part of N-terminus after the inclusion of the SWCNT. These results showed that SWCNT release would significantly affect the microbial enzyme-catalyzed processes of organic pollutants and LMCs in nature.

  13. Structural evidence for the partially oxidized dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms of the cofactor of porphobilinogen deaminase: structures of the Bacillus megaterium enzyme at near-atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Azim, N; Deery, E; Warren, M J; Wolfenden, B A A; Erskine, P; Cooper, J B; Coker, A; Wood, S P; Akhtar, M

    2014-03-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor, which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue (Cys241 in the Bacillus megaterium enzyme). The cofactor is extended during the reaction by the sequential addition of the four substrate molecules, which are released as a linear tetrapyrrole product. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of B. megaterium PBGD has permitted the X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution, showing that the cofactor becomes progressively oxidized to the dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms. In previously solved PBGD structures, the oxidized cofactor is in the dipyromethenone form, in which both pyrrole rings are approximately coplanar. In contrast, the oxidized cofactor in the B. megaterium enzyme appears to be in the dipyrromethanone form, in which the C atom at the bridging α-position of the outer pyrrole ring is very clearly in a tetrahedral configuration. It is suggested that the pink colour of the freshly purified protein is owing to the presence of the dipyrromethene form of the cofactor which, in the structure reported here, adopts the same conformation as the fully reduced dipyrromethane form.

  14. Use of response surface methodology to study the combined effects of UV-C and thermal process on vegetable oxidative enzymes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of ultraviolet processing (UV-C) (temperature, exposure time, and wavelength) and an environmental parameter (pH) were studied on three oxidative enzymes, namely, lipoxygenase (LOX), peroxidase (POD) and polyphenoloxidase (PPO) by using a central composite design. An initial screening de...

  15. Polysaccharide-based biomaterials with on-demand nitric oxide releasing property regulated by enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Jimin; Song, Lijie; Ji, Qing; Yao, Yao; Cui, Yun; Shen, Jie; Wang, Peng George; Kong, Deling

    2013-11-01

    The regulatory role of nitric oxide (NO) in cell signaling has been well recognized. Clinically, NO deficiency is known to be associated with severe vascular disorders, especially in patients with long-term diabetes. Exogenous compensation of NO is a promising therapeutic strategy, although the lack of stable NO compounds often lead to unsatisfactory clinical outcomes. In the present study, we report a stable comb-shaped polymer (CS-NO) using glycosylated NO compound as pendent chains and chitosan (CS) as backbone for controlled NO release. The on-demand release of NO is achieved by controlling the decomposition process of the CS-NO polymer, which is blocked by galactose and only occurs in the presence of glycosidase, making the NO releasing kinetic closely correlate with the glycosidase concentration. In addition, due to its high stability, the CS-NO polymers can also be processed into supportive membrane or injectable hydrogel, further demonstrating its clinical potential. Indeed, we report that the NO-releasing membrane inhibited platelet adhesion, prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) as shown in the platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) assay. We also observe enhanced human umbilical vein endothelial cell growth yet suppressed vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation on the NO-contained membrane in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo administration of CS-NO solution significantly enhanced angiogenesis in diabetic mice with hind-limb ischemia. Protective effect of CS-NO was also observed against limb necrosis. Given the physiological importance of NO, the CS-NO polymer may be considered a promising option in therapeutic development against vascular disorders and diabetic feet.

  16. Increased 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in plasma and decreased mRNA expression of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1, anti-oxidant enzymes, mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins and glycolytic enzymes in leucocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H-T; Lin, C-S; Lee, C-S; Tsai, C-Y; Wei, Y-H

    2014-04-01

    We measured plasma levels of the oxidative DNA damage marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and leucocyte mRNA expression levels of the genes encoding the 8-OHdG repair enzyme human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1), the anti-oxidant enzymes copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1), GPx-4, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione synthetase (GS), the mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins mtDNA-encoded ND 1 polypeptide (ND1), ND6, ATPase 6, mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam), nuclear respiratory factor 1(NRF-1), pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 component alpha subunit (PDHA1), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoenzyme 1 (PDK-1) and hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the glycolytic enzymes hexokinase-II (HK-II), glucose 6-phosphate isomerase (GPI), phosphofructokinase (PFK), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHa). We analysed their relevance to oxidative damage in 85 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, four complicated SLE patients undergoing rituximab treatment and 45 healthy individuals. SLE patients had higher plasma 8-OHdG levels (P < 0·01) but lower leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1(P < 0·01), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) than healthy individuals. The increase in plasma 8-OHdG was correlated positively with the elevation of leucocyte expression of the genes encoding hOGG1 (P < 0·05), anti-oxidant enzymes (P < 0·05), several mitochondrial biogenesis-related proteins (P < 0·05) and glycolytic enzymes (P < 0·05) in lupus patients. The patients, whose leucocyte mtDNA harboured D310 heteroplasmy, exhibited a positive correlation between the mtDNA copy number and expression of ND1, ND6 and ATPase 6 (P < 0·05) and a negative correlation between mt

  17. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L

    2009-06-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase super-family, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  18. Prediction of novel families of enzymes involved in oxidative and other complex modifications of bases in nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Tahiliani, Mamta; Rao, Anjana; Aravind, L.

    2010-01-01

    Modified bases in nucleic acids present a layer of information that directs biological function over and beyond the coding capacity of the conventional bases. While a large number of modified bases have been identified, many of the enzymes generating them still remain to be discovered. Recently, members of the 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase superfamily, which modify diverse substrates from small molecules to biopolymers, were predicted and subsequently confirmed to catalyze oxidative modification of bases in nucleic acids. Of these, two distinct families, namely the AlkB and the kinetoplastid base J binding proteins (JBP) catalyze in situ hydroxylation of bases in nucleic acids. Using sensitive computational analysis of sequences, structures and contextual information from genomic structure and protein domain architectures, we report five distinct families of 2-oxoglutarate- and iron(II)-dependent dioxygenase that we predict to be involved in nucleic acid modifications. Among the DNA-modifying families, we show that the dioxygenase domains of the kinetoplastid base J-binding proteins belong to a larger family that includes the Tet proteins, prototyped by the human oncogene Tet1, and proteins from basidiomycete fungi, chlorophyte algae, heterolobosean amoeboflagellates and bacteriophages. We present evidence that some of these proteins are likely to be involved in oxidative modification of the 5-methyl group of cytosine leading to the formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. The Tet/JBP homologs from basidiomycete fungi such as Laccaria and Coprinopsis show large lineage-specific expansions and a tight linkage with genes encoding a novel and distinct family of predicted transposases, and a member of the Maelstrom-like HMG family. We propose that these fungal members are part of a mobile transposon. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a eukaryotic transposable element that encodes its own DNA-modification enzyme with a

  19. Mycorrhiza-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes in trifoliate orange roots under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying-Ning; Huang, Yong-Ming; Wu, Qiang-Sheng; He, Xin-Hua

    2015-02-01

    Mechanisms of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM)-induced lower oxidative burst of host plants under drought stress (DS) are not elucidated. A noninvasive microtest technology (NMT) was used to investigate the effects of Funneliformis mosseae on net fluxes of root hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and calcium ions (Ca2+) in 5-month-old Poncirus trifoliata, in combination with catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities as well as tissue superoxide radical (O2•-) and H2O2 concentrations under DS and well-watered (WW) conditions. A 2-month DS (55% maximum water holding capacity of growth substrates) significantly inhibited AM fungal root colonization, while AM symbiosis significantly increased plant biomass production, irrespective of water status. F. mosseae inoculation generally increased SOD and CAT activity but decreased O2•- and H2O2 concentrations in leaves and roots under WW and DS. Compared with non-AM seedlings, roots of AM seedlings had significantly higher net H2O2 effluxes and net Ca2+ influxes, especially in the meristem zone, but lower net H2O2 efflux in the elongation zone. Net Ca2+ influxes into roots were significantly positively correlated with root net H2O2 effluxes but negatively with root H2O2 concentrations. Results from this study suggest that AM-induced lower oxidative burst is related with higher antioxidant enzyme activities, root net H2O2 effluxes, and Ca2+ influxes under WW and DS.

  20. Oxidative Stress and Genetic Variants of Xenobiotic-Metabolising Enzymes Associated with COPD Development and Severity in Serbian Adults.

    PubMed

    Malic, Zivka; Topic, Aleksandra; Francuski, Djordje; Stankovic, Marija; Nagorni-Obradovic, Ljudmila; Markovic, Bojan; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2017-02-01

    The genetic and non-genetic factors that contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are still poorly understood. We investigated the potential role of genetic variants of xenobiotic-metabolising enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase M1, GSTM1; glutathione-S-transferase T1, GSTT1; microsomal epoxide hydrolase, mEH), oxidative stress (assessed by urinary 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-oxodG/creatinine), sex, ageing and smoking habits on susceptibility to development of COPD and its severity in Serbian population. The investigated population consisted of 153 healthy subjects (85 males and 68 females) and 71 patients with COPD (33 males and 38 females). Detection of GSTM1*null, GSTT1*null, mEH Tyr113His and mEH His139Arg gene variants was performed by PCR/RFLP method. Urinary 8-oxodG was determined using HPLC-MS/MS, and expressed as 8-oxodG/creatinine. We revealed that increased urinary 8-oxodG/creatinine and leucocytosis are the strongest independent predictors for COPD development. Increased level of oxidative stress increased the risk for COPD in males [odds ratio (OR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.42, 2.26-31.28], more than in females (OR, 95% CI: 3.60, 1.37-9.45). Additionally, independent predictors for COPD were ageing in males (OR, 95% CI: 1.29, 1.12-1.48), while in females they were at least one GSTM1 or GSTT1 gene deletion in combination (OR, 95% CI: 23.67, 2.62-213.46), and increased cumulative cigarette consumption (OR, 95% CI: 1.09, 1.01-1.16). Severity of COPD was associated with the combined effect of low mEH activity phenotype, high level of oxidative stress and heavy smoking. In conclusion, early identification of GSTM1*null or GSTT1*null genotypes in females, low mEH activity phenotype in heavy smokers and monitoring of oxidative stress level can be useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  1. Oxidative stress determined through the levels of antioxidant enzymes and the effect of N-acetylcysteine in aluminum phosphide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Avinash; Robo, Roto; Jain, Nirdesh; Gutch, Manish; Consil, Shuchi; Kumar, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The primary objective of this study was to determine the serum level of antioxidant enzymes and to correlate them with outcome in patients of aluminum phosphide (ALP) poisoning and, secondly, to evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) given along with supportive treatment of ALP poisoning. Design: We conducted a cohort study in patients of ALP poisoning hospitalized at a tertiary care center of North India. The treatment group and control group were enrolled during the study period of 1 year from May 2011 to April 2012. Interventions: Oxidative stress was evaluated in each subject by estimating the serum levels of the enzymes, viz. catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione reductase (GR). The treatment group comprised of patients who were given NAC in addition to supportive treatment (magnesium sulfate and vasopressors, if required), while in the control group, only supportive treatment was instituted. The primary endpoint of the study was the survival of the patients. Measurements and Results: The baseline catalase (P = 0.008) and SOD (P < 0.01) levels were higher among survivors than non-survivors. Of the total patients in the study, 31 (67.4%) expired and 15 (32.6%) survived. Among those who expired, the mean duration of survival was 2.92 ± 0.40 days in the test group and 1.82 ± 0.33 days in the control group (P = 0.043). Conclusions: This study suggests that the baseline level of catalase and SOD have reduced in ALP poisoning, but baseline GR level has not suppressed but is rather increasing with due time, and more so in the treatment group. NAC along with supportive treatment may have improved survival in ALP poisoning. PMID:25316977

  2. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  3. Structural evidence for the partially oxidized dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms of the cofactor of porphobilinogen deaminase: structures of the Bacillus megaterium enzyme at near-atomic resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Azim, N.; Deery, E.; Warren, M. J.; Wolfenden, B. A. A.; Erskine, P.; Cooper, J. B. Coker, A.; Wood, S. P.; Akhtar, M.

    2014-03-01

    The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses a key early step in the biosynthesis of tetrapyrroles in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. Two near-atomic resolution structures of PBGD from B. megaterium are reported that demonstrate the time-dependent accumulation of partially oxidized forms of the cofactor, including one that possesses a tetrahedral C atom in the terminal pyrrole ring. The enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD; hydroxymethylbilane synthase; EC 2.5.1.61) catalyses an early step of the tetrapyrrole-biosynthesis pathway in which four molecules of the monopyrrole porphobilinogen are condensed to form a linear tetrapyrrole. The enzyme possesses a dipyrromethane cofactor, which is covalently linked by a thioether bridge to an invariant cysteine residue (Cys241 in the Bacillus megaterium enzyme). The cofactor is extended during the reaction by the sequential addition of the four substrate molecules, which are released as a linear tetrapyrrole product. Expression in Escherichia coli of a His-tagged form of B. megaterium PBGD has permitted the X-ray analysis of the enzyme from this species at high resolution, showing that the cofactor becomes progressively oxidized to the dipyrromethene and dipyrromethanone forms. In previously solved PBGD structures, the oxidized cofactor is in the dipyromethenone form, in which both pyrrole rings are approximately coplanar. In contrast, the oxidized cofactor in the B. megaterium enzyme appears to be in the dipyrromethanone form, in which the C atom at the bridging α-position of the outer pyrrole ring is very clearly in a tetrahedral configuration. It is suggested that the pink colour of the freshly purified protein is owing to the presence of the dipyrromethene form of the cofactor which, in the structure reported here, adopts the same conformation as the fully reduced dipyrromethane form.

  4. Kinetics of conjugation and oxidation of nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Rickert, D E; deBethizy, J D; Glover, M R; Kedderis, G L

    1985-12-01

    Previous work has suggested that quantitative differences in the in vitro and in vivo metabolism of mononitrotoluene isomers are a result of differences in the hepatic conjugation and oxidation of the first metabolic intermediates, the mononitrobenzyl alcohols. We have determined the steady-state kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km and V/K, for the metabolism of the nitrobenzyl alcohols by rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase, glucuronyltransferase, and sulfotransferase. 3-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase (Vmax = 1.48 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 3.15 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 503 microM). Vmax and Km values for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol were similar, but V/K was about 60% of that for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was not metabolized by the alcohol dehydrogenase preparation used here, but it was metabolized to 2-nitrobenzoic acid by a rat liver mitochondrial preparation. 2-Nitrobenzyl alcohol was the best substrate for microsomal glucuronyltransferase (Vmax = 3.59 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 11.28 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 373 microM). The Vmax for 3-nitrobenzyl alcohol was similar, but the V/K was about half and the Km was about twice that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The Vmax for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol was about 40% and the V/K was about half that for 2-nitrobenzyl alcohol. The best substrate for cytosolic sulfotransferase was 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol (Vmax = 1.69 nmoles/min/mg protein, V/K = 37.21 X 10(-3) nmoles/min/mg protein/microM, Km = 48 microM). The Vmax values for the other two benzyl alcohols were similar, but the V/K and Km values were about 11 and 400%, respectively, of those for 4-nitrobenzyl alcohol. These data are in qualitative agreement with results obtained when the nitrobenzyl alcohols were incubated with isolated hepatocytes, but they do not allow quantitative modeling of the data from hepatocytes.

  5. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake () response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min−1 kg−1) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ∼65% -max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ∼85% -max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P < 0.05) and COX-4 (P < 0.01) was lower, whereas PFK was higher (P < 0.001) than in slow-twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW−1 min−1) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW−1) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW−1) at 6 min of INT (P < 0.05) after compared to before HIT. A period of intensified training with a volume reduction did not increase the content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change kinetics. PMID:26152692

  6. Electron pathways in catalase and peroxidase enzymic catalysis. Metal and macrocycle oxidations of iron porphyrins and chlorins

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, L.K.; Chang, C.K.; Davis, M.S.; Fajer, J.

    1981-02-11

    Charge iterative extended Hueckel calculations are presented for compound II, the one-electron oxidation intermediate of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), and for compounds I, the two-electron oxidation transients of HRP and catalase (CAT) observed in the catalytic cycles of the hydroperoxidase enzymes. Compound II is described in terms of a ferryl configuration (O = Fe/sup IV/), and compounds I are described as ferrylporphyrin ..pi..-cation radicals. The validity of the iron ..pi..-cation calculations is supported by favorable comparison of parallel computations for porphyrin ..pi.. cations of diamagnetic metals with new and previously reported ESR results for radicals of zinc tetrabenz-, meso-tetramethyl, (/sup 14/N and /sup 15/N) tetraphenyl-, and magnesium (/sup 1/H and /sup 2/H) octaethylporphyrins. The calculated electronic configurations and unpaired spin density profiles for the ferryl ..pi.. cations satisfactorily account for the physical properties reported for compounds I of HRP (in the native protoporphyrin IX form or reconstituted with deuteroporphyrin), chloroperoxidase, and CAT. The ground states of the ..pi.. cations, a/sub 1u/ or a/sub 2u/, are determined by peripheral substitution and axial ligation, and the axial ligand of CAT I is predicted to differ from that of HRP I. The combination of model studies and calculations suggests that /sup 2/H, /sup 13/C, and /sup 15/N NMR studies of isotopically substituted proto and deutero HRP I would confirm the electronic profiles predicted. /sup 15/N NMR in particular would clearly discriminate between a/sub 1u/ and a/sub 2u/ configurations. As an additional test of the ferryl ..pi..-cation hypothesis, calculations are presented for a proposed ferrylchlorin ..pi.. cation of Neurospora crassa catalase, which contains an iron chlorin prosthetic group. Compound I of this unusual heme is predicted to occupy an a/sub 2/ ground state with the spin distribution and optical spectra reported here for synthetic chlorin

  7. Amelioration of ozone-induced oxidative damage in wheat plants grown under high carbon dioxide: Role of antioxidant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.V.; Hale, B.A.; Ormrod, D.P.

    1995-10-01

    O{sub 3}-induced in growth, oxidative damage to protein, and specific activities of certain antioxidant enzymes were investigated in wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv Roblin) grown under ambient or high CO{sub 2}. High CO{sub 2} enhanced shoot biomass. The shoot biomass was relatively unaffected in plants grown under a combination of high CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. O{sub 3} exposure under ambient CO{sub 2} decreased photosynthetic pigments, soluble proteins, and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase protein and enhanced oxidative damage to proteins, but these effects were not observed in plants exposed to O{sub 3} under high CO{sub 2}. O{sub 3} exposure initially enhanced the specific activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase irrespective of growth in ambient or high CO{sub 2}. O{sub 3} exposure initially enhanced the specific activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase irrespective of growth in ambient or high CO{sub 2}. However, the specific activities decreased in plants with prolonged exposure to O{sub 3} under ambient CO{sub 2} but not in plants exposed to O{sub 3} under high CO{sub 2}. Native gels revealed preferential changes in the isoform composition of superoxide dismutase, peroxidases, and ascorbate peroxidase of plants grown under a combination of high CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3}. Furthermore, growth under high CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} led to the synthesis of one new isoform of glutathione reductase. This could explain why plants grown under a combination of high CO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} are capable of resisting O{sub 3}-induced damage to growth and proteins compared to plants exposed to O{sub 3} under ambient CO{sub 2}. 66 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Mechanisms of nitric oxide crosstalk with reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes during abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Arora, Dhara; Jain, Prachi; Singh, Neha; Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts in a concentration and redox-dependent manner to counteract oxidative stress either by directly acting as an antioxidant through scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions (O(2)(-)*), to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) or by acting as a signaling molecule, thereby altering gene expression. NO can interact with different metal centres in proteins, such as heme-iron, zinc-sulfur clusters, iron-sulfur clusters, and copper, resulting in the formation of a stable metal-nitrosyl complex or production of varied biochemical signals, which ultimately leads to modification of protein structure/function. The thiols (ferrous iron-thiol complex and nitrosothiols) are also involved in the metabolism and mobilization of NO. Thiols bind to NO and transport it to the site of action whereas nitrosothiols release NO after intercellular diffusion and uptake into the target cells. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) also has the ability to transnitrosylate proteins. It is an NO˙ reservoir and a long-distance signaling molecule. Tyrosine nitration of proteins has been suggested as a biomarker of nitrosative stress as it can lead to either activation or inhibition of target proteins. The exact molecular mechanism(s) by which exogenous and endogenously generated NO (or reactive nitrogen species) modulate the induction of various genes affecting redox homeostasis, are being extensively investigated currently by various research groups. Present review provides an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms by which NO interacts with and modulates the activity of various ROS scavenging enzymes, particularly accompanying ROS generation in plants in response to varied abiotic stress.

  9. Magnaporthe oryzae Effector AVR-Pii Helps to Establish Compatibility by Inhibition of the Rice NADP-Malic Enzyme Resulting in Disruption of Oxidative Burst and Host Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raksha; Dangol, Sarmina; Chen, Yafei; Choi, Jihyun; Cho, Yoon-Seong; Lee, Jea-Eun; Choi, Mi-Ok; Jwa, Nam-Soo

    2016-05-31

    Plant disease resistance occurs as a hypersensitive response (HR) at the site of attempted pathogen invasion. This specific event is initiated in response to recognition of pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) and subsequent PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI). Both PTI and ETI mechanisms are tightly connected with reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and disease resistance that involves distinct biphasic ROS production as one of its pivotal plant immune responses. This unique oxidative burst is strongly dependent on the resistant cultivars because a monophasic ROS burst is a hallmark of the susceptible cultivars. However, the cause of the differential ROS burst remains unknown. In the study here, we revealed the plausible underlying mechanism of the differential ROS burst through functional understanding of the Magnaporthe oryzae (M. oryzae) AVR effector, AVR-Pii. We performed yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screening using AVR-Pii as bait and isolated rice NADP-malic enzyme2 (Os-NADP-ME2) as the rice target protein. To our surprise, deletion of the rice Os-NADP-ME2 gene in a resistant rice cultivar disrupted innate immunity against the rice blast fungus. Malic enzyme activity and inhibition studies demonstrated that AVR-Pii proteins specifically inhibit in vitro NADP-ME activity. Overall, we demonstrate that rice blast fungus, M. oryzae attenuates the host ROS burst via AVR-Pii-mediated inhibition of Os-NADP-ME2, which is indispensable in ROS metabolism for the innate immunity of rice. This characterization of the regulation of the host oxidative burst will help to elucidate how the products of AVR genes function associated with virulence of the pathogen.

  10. Hazardous effect of organophosphate compound, dichlorvos in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (hsp70-lacZ): induction of hsp70, anti-oxidant enzymes and inhibition of acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Subash Chandra; Siddique, Hifzur Rahman; Saxena, Daya Krishna; Chowdhuri, Debapratim Kar

    2005-08-30

    We tested a working hypothesis that stress genes and anti-oxidant enzyme machinery are induced by the organophosphate compound dichlorvos in a non-target organism. Third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster transgenic for hsp70 were exposed to 0.1 to 100.0 ppb dichlorvos and 5.0 mM CuSO(4) (an inducer of oxidative stress and stress genes) and hsp70, and activities of acetylcholinesterase (AchE), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) product were measured. The study was further extended to examine tissue damage, if any, under such conditions. A concentration- and time-dependent increase in hsp70 and anti-oxidant enzymes was observed in the exposed organism as compared to control. A comparison of stress gene expression with SOD, CAT activities and LPO product under similar experimental conditions revealed that induction of hsp70 precedes the anti-oxidant enzyme activities in the exposed organism. Further, concomitant with a significant inhibition of AChE activity, significant induction of hsp70 was observed following chemical exposure. Mild tissue damage was observed in the larvae exposed to 10.0 ppb dichlorvos for 48 h when hsp70 expression reaches plateau. Dichlorvos at 0.1 ppb dietary concentration did not evoke significant hsp70 expression, anti-oxidant enzymes and LPO and AchE inhibition in the exposed organism, and thereby, was found to be non-hazardous to D. melanogaster. Conversely, 1.0 ppb of the test chemical stimulated a significant induction of hsp70 and anti-oxidant enzymes and significant inhibition of AchE; hence this concentration of test chemical was hazardous to the organism. The present study suggests that (a) both stress genes and anti-oxidant enzymes are stimulated as indices of cellular defense against xenobiotic hazard in D. melanogaster with hsp70 being proposed as first-tier bio-indicator of cellular hazard, (b) 0.1 ppb of the test chemical may be regarded as No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL), and

  11. Gelatin-encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles for platinum (IV) prodrug delivery, enzyme-stimulated release and MRI.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ziyong; Dai, Yunlu; Kang, Xiaojiao; Li, Chunxia; Huang, Shanshan; Lian, Hongzhou; Hou, Zhiyao; Ma, Pingan; Lin, Jun

    2014-08-01

    A facile method for transferring hydrophobic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) from chloroform to aqueous solution via encapsulation of FITC-modified gelatin based on the hydrophobic-hydrophobic interaction is described in this report. Due to the existence of large amount of active groups such as amine groups in gelatin, the fluorescent labeling molecules of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and platinum (IV) prodrug functionalized with carboxylic groups can be conveniently conjugated on the IONPs. The nanoparticles carrying Pt(IV) prodrug exhibit good anticancer activities when the Pt(IV) complexes are reduced to Pt(II) in the intracellular environment, while the pure Pt(IV) prodrug only presents lower cytotoxicity on cancer cells. Meanwhile, fluorescence of FITC on the surface of nanoparticles was completely quenched due to the possible Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) mechanism and showed a fluorescence recovery after gelatin release and detachment from IONPs. Therefore FITC as a fluorescence probe can be used for identification, tracking and monitoring the drug release. In addition, adding pancreatic enzyme can effectively promote the gelatin release from IONPs owing to the degradation of gelatin. Noticeable darkening in magnetic resonance image (MRI) was observed at the tumor site after in situ injection of nanoparticles, indicating the IONPs-enhanced T2-weighted imaging. Our results suggest that the gelatin encapsulated Fe3O4 nanoparticles have potential applications in multi-functional drug delivery system for disease therapy, MR imaging and fluorescence sensor.

  12. Phenolic Extract from Moringa oleifera Leaves Inhibits Key Enzymes Linked to Erectile Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Rats' Penile Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.; Ademosun, Ayokunle O.; Olasehinde, Tosin A.; Oyeleye, Sunday I.; Boligon, Aline A.; Athayde, Margareth L.

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the antioxidant properties and inhibitory effects of extract from Moringa oleifera leaves on angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) and arginase activities in vitro. The extract was prepared and phenolic (total phenols and flavonoid) contents, radical (nitric oxide (NO), hydroxyl (OH)) scavenging abilities, and Fe2+-chelating ability were assessed. Characterization of the phenolic constituents was done via high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the extract on Fe2+-induced MDA production in rats' penile tissue homogenate as well as its action on ACE and arginase activities were also determined. The extract scavenged NO∗, OH∗, chelated Fe2+, and inhibited MDA production in a dose-dependent pattern with IC50 values of 1.36, 0.52, and 0.38 mg/mL and 194.23 µg/mL, respectively. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the leaf extract. The extract also inhibited ACE and arginase activities in a dose-dependent pattern and their IC50 values were 303.03 and 159.59 µg/mL, respectively. The phenolic contents, inhibition of ACE, arginase, and Fe2+-induced MDA production, and radical (OH∗, NO∗) scavenging and Fe2+-chelating abilities could be some of the possible mechanisms by which M. oleifera leaves could be used in the treatment and/or management of erectile dysfunction. PMID:26557995

  13. Prevention of cumene hydroperoxide induced oxidative stress in cultured neonatal rat myocytes by scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Persoon-Rothert, M; Egas-Kenniphaas, J M; van der Valk-Kokshoorn, E J; Mauve, I; van der Laarse, A

    1990-10-01

    Oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide was studied in cultured neonatal rat myocytes. A progressive increase of irreversible cell injury as determined by leakage of the cytoplastic enzyme alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (alpha-HBDH) from the cells was noted at concentrations ranging from 25-100 microM cumene hydroperoxide (incubation time 90 min). Cumene hydroperoxide-induced damage was reduced or prevented by several compounds: the application of Trolox C, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, and of phospholipase A2 inhibitors chlorpromazine and (to a lesser extent) quinacrine prevented alpha-HBDH release. ICRF-159, a chelator of divalent cations, ascorbic acid, a potent antioxidant, and the cysteine protease inhibitor leupeptin did not reduce the cumene hydroperoxide-induced cytotoxicity. Detoxification of hydroperoxides by the glutathione peroxidase system results in an increased flux through the pentose phosphate shunt and loss of NADPH. Glucose inhibited the cumene hydroperoxide-induced alpha-HBDH release, probably by replenishing NADPH. These results indicate that cumene hydroperoxide, after exhaustion of the glutathione system, induces irreversible injury in cultured myocytes by a mechanism that depends to a large extent on deterioration of cellular membranes caused by lipid peroxidation and phospholipase activation.

  14. The effect of heavy metal-induced oxidative stress on the enzymes in white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihua; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Guiqiu; Yan, Min; Chen, Anwei; Du, Jianjian; Huang, Jian; Yi, Bin; Zhou, Ying; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Prevalence of heavy metals in the living environment causes chemical stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium). However, the mechanisms involved in ROS defense are still under investigation. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of lead- and cadmium-induced oxidative stress on the activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and manganese peroxidase (MnP). A time-dependent change in all enzyme activities was observed following exposure to 50 μM cadmium and 25 μM lead. The lowest values were recorded at 4 h after exposure. Both cadmium and lead inhibited CAT and POD. The cytochrome P450 (CYP450) levels increased under 50-100 μM cadmium or lead exposure and decreased when heavy metal concentration was under 50 μM; this suggested that ROS is not the only factor that alters the CYP450 levels. The cadmium removal rate in the sample containing 900 μM taxifolin (inhibitor of CYP450) and 100 μM cadmium was reduced to 12.34 %, 9.73 % lower than that of 100 μM cadmium-induced sample, indicating CYP450 may play an indirect but key role in the process of clearance of heavy metals. The pH of the substrate solution decreased steadily during the incubation process.

  15. Effects of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride on oxidative stress-related parameters and drug metabolizing enzymes in mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amarjit; Kalla, Natwar R; Sharma, Raj P; Sharma, Rajeshwar

    2007-01-01

    Hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride has been advocated as a potential anticarcinogenic compound. There is no information on the effects of this compound on oxidative stress-related parameters in animals. In the present study the effects of administration of hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride in drinking water to balb/c male mice at doses of 25, 50, and 100 ppm for 14 weeks were examined. The tissue distribution of the compound was seen in liver, kidney, lung, intestine, blood, and spleen. The effects of the compound were monitored on levels of lipid peroxidation, GSH content, and activities of SOD, catalase, GST, and Cyt P450, along with the liver and kidney function tests. The results show that the cobalt accumulated maximally in kidney followed by liver, intestine, blood, spleen, and lung in decreasing order, in a dose-dependent manner. GSH and GST also showed increase in a dose-dependent manner while SOD and catalase showed increase with the highest dose only. Liver and kidney function tests showed no untoward change with any dose at the end of the study. The results suggest an antioxidant potentiating effect of the hexaammine cobalt (III) chloride besides nontoxicity to liver and kidney. Since the ability to induce an increase of GSH and GST along with other detoxifying enzymes by anticarcinogenic agents has been reported to correlate with the inhibition of tumorigenesis, the cobalt complex might qualify as a potential cancer chemopreventive agent.

  16. Real time monitoring of layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte deposition and bacterial enzyme detection in nanoporous anodized aluminum oxide.

    PubMed

    Krismastuti, Fransiska Sri Herwahyu; Bayat, Haider; Voelcker, Nicolas H; Schönherr, Holger

    2015-04-07

    Porous anodized aluminum oxide (pAAO) is a nanostructured material, which due to its optical properties lends itself to the design of optical biosensors where interactions in the pores of this material are transduced into interferometric reflectance shifts. In this study, a pAAO-based biosensor was developed as a biosensing platform to detect proteinase K, an enzyme which is a readily available model system for the proteinase produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The pAAO pore walls are decorated by means of the layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition technique using poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate) and poly-l-lysine as negatively and positively charged polyelectrolytes, respectively. Interferometric reflectance spectroscopy utilized to observe the optical properties of pAAO during LbL deposition shows that the deposition of the polyelectrolyte onto the pore walls increases the net refractive index, thus red-shifting the effective optical thickness (EOT). Upon incubation with proteinase K, a conspicuous blue shift of the EOT is observed, which is attributed to the destabilization of the LbL film upon enzymatic degradation of the poly-l-lysine components. This result is confirmed by scanning electron microscopy results. Finally, as a proof-of-principle, we demonstrate the ability of the label-free pAAO-based biosensing platform to detect the presence of the proteinase K in human wound fluid, highlighting the potential for detection of bacterial infections in chronic wounds.

  17. Spearmint induced hypothalamic oxidative stress and testicular anti-androgenicity in male rats - altered levels of gene expression, enzymes and hormones.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikas; Kural, Mool Raj; Pereira, B M J; Roy, Partha

    2008-12-01

    Mentha spicata Labiatae, commonly known as spearmint, can be used for various kinds of illnesses in herbal medicines and food industries. One of the prominent functions of this plant extract is its anti-androgenic activity. The present study investigated the probable correlation between oxidative stress in hypothalamic region and anti-androgenic action of this plant's aqueous extract on rats. Decreased activities of enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in hypothalamus of treated rats indicated spearmint induced oxidative stress. Further RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis demonstrated the decreased expression of some of the steroidogenic enzymes, cytochrome P450scc, cytochrome P450C17, 3beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD), 17beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-HSD) and other related proteins like, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, androgen receptor and scavenger receptor class B-1. Further, in vitro enzyme assays demonstrated depressed activities of testicular 3beta-HSD and 17beta-HSD enzymes. Histopathology indicated a decreased sperm density in cauda epididymis and degeneration of ductus deference. Our study suggested that spearmint probably induced oxidative stress in hypothalamus resulting in decreased synthesis of LH and FSH which in turn down-regulated the production of testicular testosterone through the disruption of a number of intermediate cascades.

  18. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from <1 microm to 1 mm. An organic extract of BDS is both cytotoxic and genotoxic to normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Based on the oxidizing potential of BDS, we hypothesized that an organic extract of this particulate matter would (1) cause enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  19. NiCl2-down-regulated antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression causes oxidative damage in the broiler(')s kidney.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongrui; Wu, Bangyuan; Cui, Hengmin; Peng, Xi; Fang, Jing; Zuo, Zhicai; Deng, Junliang; Wang, Xun; Deng, Jie; Yin, Shuang; Li, Jian; Tang, Kun

    2014-12-01

    The kidney serves as a major organ of nickel (Ni) excretion and is a target organ for acute Ni toxicity due to Ni accumulation. There are no studies on the Ni or Ni compound-regulated antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression in animals and human beings at present. This study was conducted to investigate the pathway of nickel chloride (NiCl2)-caused renal oxidative damage by the methods of biochemistry, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Two hundred and eighty one-day-old broilers were randomly divided into four groups and fed on a control diet and three experimental diets supplemented with 300, 600, and 900 mg/kg of NiCl2 for 42 days. Dietary NiCl2 elevated the malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO), 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) contents, and reduced the ability to inhibit hydroxy radical in the NiCl2-treated groups. Also, the renal inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and mRNA expression levels were increased. The total antioxidant (T-AOC) and activities of antioxidant enzymes including copper zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), and glutathione-s-transferase (GST) were decreased, and the glutathione (GSH) contents as well were decreased in the kidney. Concurrently, the renal CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, GST, and GR mRNA expression levels were decreased. The above-mentioned results showed that dietary NiCl2 in excess of 300 mg/kg caused renal oxidative damage by reducing mRNA expression levels and activities of antioxidant enzymes, and then enhancing free radicals generation, lipid peroxidation, and DNA oxidation.

  20. Dietary supplementation of green synthesized manganese-oxide nanoparticles and its effect on growth performance, muscle composition and digestive enzyme activities of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Asaikkutti, Annamalai; Bhavan, Periyakali Saravana; Vimala, Karuppaiya; Karthik, Madhayan; Cheruparambath, Praseeja

    2016-05-01

    The green synthesized Mn3O4 nanoparticles (manganese-oxide nanoparticles) using Ananas comosus (L.) peel extract was characterized by various techniques. HR-SEM photograph showed that manganese-oxide nanoparticles (Mn-oxide NPs) were spherical in shape, with an average size of 40-50 nm. The Zeta potential revealed the surface charge of Mn-oxide NPs to be negative. Further, the Mn-oxide NPs were dietary supplemented for freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The experimental basal diets were supplemented with Mn-oxide NPs at the rates of 0 (control), 3.0, 6.0, 9.0, 12, 15 and 18 mg/kg dry feed weight. The as-supplemented Mn-oxide NPs were fed in M. rosenbergii for a period of 90 days. The experimental study demonstrated that prawns fed with diet supplemented with 3-18 mg Mn-oxide NPs/kg shows enhanced (P<0.05) growth performance, including final weight and weight gain (WG). Significant differences (P<0.05) in feed conversion ratio (FCR) were observed in prawn fed with different diets. Additionally, prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets achieved significant (P<0.05) improvement in growth performance, digestive enzyme activities and muscle biochemical compositions, while, the prawns fed with 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs showed enhanced performance. Prawns fed on diet supplemented with 16 mg/kg Mn-oxide NPs showed significantly (P<0.05) higher total protein level. The antioxidants enzymatic activity (SOD and CAT) metabolic enzymes status in muscle and hepatopancreas showed no significant (P>0.05) alterations in prawns fed with 3.0-18 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs supplemented diets. Consequently, the present work proposed that 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs could be supplemented for flexible enhanced survival, growth and production of M. rosenbergii. Therefore, the data of the present study recommend the addition of 16 mg/kg of Mn-oxide NPs diet to developed prawn growth and antioxidant defense system.

  1. Use of isotope effects to determine the chemical mechanism of oxidative decarboxylases: NADP malic enzyme and NADP isocitrate dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Grisson, C.B.

    1985-01-01

    The chemical mechanism of the NADP-linked oxidative decarboxylases chicken liver malic enzyme and pig heart isocitrate dehydrogenase has been examined using carbon and deuterium isotope effects and their variation with pH, metal ions, and solution viscosity. The following /sup 13/C isotope effects on V/K for malate are observed with the stated metal ion at pH 8.0 and 25/sup 0/C: Mg/sup 2 +/, 1.0336; Mn/sup 2 +/, 1.0365; Cd/sup 2 +/, 1.0366; Zn/sup 2 +/, 1.03373; Co/sup 2 +/, 1.0283; and Ni/sup 2 +/, 1.025. The /sup 13/C isotope effect on nonenzymatic decarboxylation of dibasic oxalacetate at 25/sup 0/C and the stated metal ion is : Mg/sup 2 +/, 1.0489; Mn/sup 2 +/, 1.0505; Ni/sup 2 +/, 1.044; Cd/sup 2 +/, 1.0492; Zn/sup 2 +/, 1.0504; and Co/sup 2 +/, 1.0480. By quantitating the partitioning of the 2-ketocarboxylic acid reaction intermediate between reverse hydride transfer and decarboxylation, it is possible to solve for the intrinsic isotope effects in both reactions. With malic enzyme activated by Mg/sup 2 +/, the partitioning ratio of oxalacetate between pyruvate and malate formation is 0.47. This gives an intrinsic deuterium and /sup 13/C isotope effect of 5.6 and 1.0493, respectively. The /sup 13/C isotope effect for the Mg/sup 2 +/ catalyzed nonenzymatic decarboxylation of oxalacetate is 1.0489, thereby suggesting a similarity of transition states between the enzymatic and nonenzymatic processes. The observed /sup 13/C primary isotope effect for isocitrate in the isocitrate dehydrogenase reaction is obscured by the stickiness of isocitrate at neutral pH. At low pH, the external commitment is eliminated and the observed /sup 13/C isotope effect increases to a limiting value of 1.0353. The pK of the pH dependence of /sup 13/(V/K) is 4.7.

  2. [Oxidative stress, rRNA genes, and antioxidant enzymes in pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism: modeling and clinical advices].

    PubMed

    Porokhovnik, L N; Pasekov, V P; Egolina, N A; Tsvetkova, T G; Kosiakova, N V; Gorbachevskaia, N L; Sukhotina, N K; Kozlovskaia, G V; Sorokin, A B; Korovina, N Iu; Liapunova, N A

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal genes (RG), or genes for rRNA, are represented by multiple tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes, and just a part of them is transcriptionally active. The quantity of active copies is a stable genome feature which determines the cell's capability for rapid synthesis of proteins, necessary to cope with stress conditions. Low number of active RG copies leads to reduced stress resistance and elevated risk of multifactorial disorders (MFD). Oxidative stress (OS) in the brain cells is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of infantile autism (IA) and schizophrenia, i.e., MFDs with a manifested genetic predisposition. With autism, OS markers are found almost in every research, whilst with schizophrenia, the OS data are contradictory. Earlier, in a sample of patients with schizophrenia, we have found significantly higher quantity of active RG copies than at the average in healthy population. Here we have estimated the number of active RG copies in a sample of patients with IA (n = 51) and revealed significantly lower mean value than in healthy population. A novel mathematical model of the dynamic pattern of OS has been proposed. The model is realized as an ordinary differential equation system, supposing induction of antioxidant protection enzymes being mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the subsequent decrease of ROS content in a cell. The rate of synthesis of antioxidant protection enzymes is limited by the ribosome synthesis rate which depends on the number of active RG copies. Analysis of the model showed that the system always approaches a single stable equilibrium point along a damped oscillation trajectory, which in some degree resembles the dynamics of 'predator-prey' interaction in Lotka-Volterra model. The stationary ROS level inversely depends on the number of active RG copies. Our study explains the inconsistency of clinical data of OS in schizophrenia and suggests a novel criterion for discriminative cytogenetic diagnostics of

  3. Epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed enantioselective conversion of trans-stilbene oxide: Insights into the reaction mechanism from steady-state and pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Archelas, Alain; Zhao, Wei; Faure, Bruno; Iacazio, Gilles; Kotik, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A detailed kinetic study based on steady-state and pre-steady-state measurements is described for the highly enantioselective epoxide hydrolase Kau2. The enzyme, which is a member of the α/β-hydrolase fold family, preferentially reacts with the (S,S)-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) with an E value of ∼200. The enzyme follows a classical two-step catalytic mechanism with formation of an alkyl-enzyme intermediate in the first step and hydrolysis of this intermediate in a rate-limiting second step. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching during TSO conversion appears to correlate with alkylation of the enzyme. The steady-state data are consistent with (S,S) and (R,R)-TSO being two competing substrates with marked differences in k(cat) and K(M) values. The high enantiopreference of the epoxide hydrolase is best explained by pronounced differences in the second-order alkylation rate constant (k2/K(S)) and the alkyl-enzyme hydrolysis rate k3 between the (S,S) and (R,R)-enantiomers of TSO. Our data suggest that during conversion of (S,S)-TSO the two active site tyrosines, Tyr(157) and Tyr(259), serve mainly as electrophilic catalysts in the alkylation half-reaction, polarizing the oxirane oxygen of the bound epoxide through hydrogen bond formation, however, without fully donating their hydrogens to the forming alkyl-enzyme intermediate.

  4. Cu-ZSM-5: A biomimetic inorganic model for methane oxidation.

    PubMed

    Vanelderen, Pieter; Hadt, Ryan G; Smeets, Pieter J; Solomon, Edward I; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F

    2011-12-01

    The present work highlights recent advances in elucidating the methane oxidation mechanism of inorganic Cu-ZSM-5 biomimic and in identifying the reactive intermediates that are involved. Such molecular understanding is important in view of upgrading abundantly available methane, but also to comprehend the working mechanism of genuine Cu-containing oxidation enzymes.

  5. Effect of bromine oxidation on high-performance thin-layer chromatography multi-enzyme inhibition assay detection of organophosphates and carbamate insecticides.

    PubMed

    Akkad, Rami; Schwack, Wolfgang

    2011-05-13

    Following high-performance thin-layer chromatography, thiophosphate pesticides, which inhibit choline esterases, are detectable using a multi-enzyme inhibition assay (HPTLC-EI) based on rabbit liver esterase (RLE), Bacillus subtilis (BS2) esterase, or cutinase (from Fusarium solani pisi). Because choline esterase inhibition is more effective after conversion of thiophosphate thions into their corresponding oxons, a pre-oxidation step was added to the HPTLC-EI assay. Bromine vapour was found to be more effective than iodine or UV irradiation for oxidation. Following oxidation, the inhibitory strength of parathion, parathion-methyl, chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, and malathion, expressed as HPTLC enzyme inhibition factors (f(i)), increased by approximately 2 orders of magnitude. In contrast, bromine oxidation of organophosphate and carbamate insecticides resulted in a slight reduction in their inhibition factors, due to partial bromination and degradation of the parent compounds, while bromine oxidation increased the inhibition factors for demeton-S-methyl and propoxur. Apple juice and water samples spiked with paraoxon (0.001 mg/L), parathion (0.05 mg/L), and chlorpyrifos (0.5 mg/L) were used to test the HPTLC-EI system, resulting in mean recoveries of 95-106% and 91-102% for RLE and cutinase, respectively.

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors reduce oxidative stress intensity in hyperglicemic conditions in rats independently from bradykinin receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Mikrut, Kinga; Kupsz, Justyna; Koźlik, Jacek; Krauss, Hanna; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate whether bradykinin-independent antioxidative effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) exist in acute hyperglycemia. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into the normoglycemic group (n = 40) and the hyperglycemic group (n = 40). Hyperglycemia was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 65 mg/kg body weight) dissolved in 0.1 mol/L citrate buffer (pH 4.5) 72 hours before sacrifice. The normoglycemic group received the same volume of citrate buffer. Each group was divided into five subgroups (n = 8): control group, captopril group, captopril + bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists group, enalapril group, and enalapril + bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists group. Captopril, enalapril, B1 and B2 receptor antagonists, or 0.15 mol/L NaCl were given at 2 and 1 hour before sacrifice. Oxidative status was determined by measuring the concentration of malondialdehyde and H2O2, and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Results In STZ-induced hyperglycemic rats ACEIs significantly reduced H2O2 and MDA concentration, while they significantly enhanced SOD and GPx activity. The hyperglycemic group treated simultaneously with ACEIs and bradykinin B1 and B2 receptor antagonists showed a significant decrease in H2O2 concentration compared to the control hyperglycemic group. Conclusion These results suggest the existence of additional antioxidative effect of ACEIs in hyperglycemic conditions, which is not related to the bradykinin mediation and the structure of the drug molecule. PMID:27586552

  7. Comparative analysis of genes encoding key steroid core oxidation enzymes in fast-growing Mycobacterium spp. strains.

    PubMed

    Bragin, E Yu; Shtratnikova, V Yu; Dovbnya, D V; Schelkunov, M I; Pekov, Yu A; Malakho, S G; Egorova, O V; Ivashina, T V; Sokolov, S L; Ashapkin, V V; Donova, M V

    2013-11-01

    A comparative genome analysis of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D, 1816D and 1817D strains used for efficient production of key steroid intermediates (androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, AD, androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, ADD, 9α-hydroxy androst-4-ene-3,17-dione, 9-OH-AD) from phytosterol has been carried out by deep sequencing. The assembled contig sequences were analyzed for the presence putative genes of steroid catabolism pathways. Since 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (KSH) and 3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase (Δ(1) KSTD) play key role in steroid core oxidation, special attention was paid to the genes encoding these enzymes. At least three genes of Δ(1) KSTD (kstD), five genes of KSH subunit A (kshA), and one gene of KSH subunit B of 3-ketosteroid-9α-hydroxylases (kshB) have been found in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D. Strains of Mycobacterium spp. VKM Ac-1815D and 1816D were found to possess at least one kstD, one kshB and two kshA genes. The assembled genome sequence of Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1817D differs from those of 1815D and 1816D strains, whereas these last two are nearly identical, differing by 13 single nucleotide substitutions (SNPs). One of these SNPs is located in the coding region of a kstD gene and corresponds to an amino acid substitution Lys (135) in 1816D for Ser (135) in 1815D. The findings may be useful for targeted genetic engineering of the biocatalysts for biotechnological application.

  8. Suppression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and TCA enzymes in discrete brain regions of mice exposed to high fluoride: amelioration by Panax ginseng (Ginseng) and Lagerstroemia speciosa (Banaba) extracts.

    PubMed

    Mahaboob Basha, P; Saumya, S M

    2013-04-01

    Chronic fluoride intoxication results in pathophysiological complications pertaining to soft tissues, called non-skeletal fluorosis. This study examined whether fluoride-induced alterations in selected parameters that are indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction accompany the toxic effects of fluoride in discrete brain regions in vivo and also explored the possibility of treatment with Ginseng (GE) and Banaba (BLE) either alone or with their co-exposure which is capable of reversing parameters indicative of fluoride-induced impairments in mitochondrial function. Swiss mice, Mus musculus, were given 270 ppm fluoride (600 ppm NaF) in their drinking water for 30 days, while continuing the fluoride exposure, toxicated animals were given differential doses (50-250 mg/kg body wt) of phytoextracts through oral gavage for 2 weeks. Discrete brain regions separated from dissected animals to perform biochemical assessments. Disturbances in mitochondrial enzyme complexes (I-IV) and decrements in TCA enzymes (ICDH, SDH, and aconitase) were noted in discrete brain regions upon F exposure, suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, a significant reduction in oxidative stress indices with increased MDA content as well as decrease in reduced glutathione content and increases in catalase and SOD enzyme activity suggests the involvement of severe oxidative stress affecting the mitochondrial function(s). Treatment with either GE or BLE reversed F-induced alterations in augmenting the suppressed complex enzymes followed by TCA enzymes and oxidative stress indices in a dose independent manner. However, the co-exposure of GE and BLE at a dose of 150 mg/kgbw appeared to restore mitochondrial functioning. These results provide in vivo evidence supporting the hypothesis that fluoride induces impairments in mitochondrial function, which can be reversed by treatment with GE and BLE as well their co-exposure at 150 mg/kgbw.

  9. 4-O-methylhonokiol attenuated memory impairment through modulation of oxidative damage of enzymes involving amyloid-β generation and accumulation in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Im Seop; Lee, Young-Jung; Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Yong Kyung; Lee, Yeun Hee; Kim, Ki Ho; Kim, Young Heui; Jeon, Young Ho; Kim, Eun Hee; Han, Sang Bae; Jung, Jae Kyung; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Oh, Ki-Wan; Hwang, Dae Youn; Hong, Jin Tae

    2011-01-01

    Accumulations of amyloid-β (Aβ) and oxidative damage are critical pathological mechanisms in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We previously found that 4-O-methylhonokiol, a compound extracted from Magnolia officinalis, improved memory dysfunction in Aβ-injected and presenilin 2 mutant mice through the reduction of accumulated Aβ. To investigate mechanisms of the reduced Aβ accumulation, we examined generation, degradation, efflux and aggregation of Aβ in Swedish AβPP AD model (AβPPsw) mice pre-treated with 4-O-methylhonokiol (1.0 mg/kg) for 3 months. 4-O-methylhonokiol treatment recovered memory impairment and prevented neuronal cell death. This memory improving activity was associated with 4-O-methylhonokiol-induced reduction of Aβ1-42 accumulation in the brains of AβPPsw mice. According to the reduction of Aβ1-42 accumulation, 4-O-methylhonkiol modulated oxidative damage sensitive enzymes. 4-O-methylhonkiol decreased expression and activity of brain beta-site AβPP cleaving enzyme (BACE1), but increased clearance of Aβ in the brain through an increase of expressions and activities of Aβ degradation enzymes; insulin degrading enzyme and neprilysin. 4-O-methylhonkiol also increased expression of Aβ transport molecule, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 in the brain and liver. 4-O-methylhonkiol decreased carbonyl protein and lipid peroxidation, but increased glutathione levels in the brains of AβPPsw mice suggesting that oxidative damage of protein and lipid is critical in the impairment of those enzyme activities. 4-O-methylhonokiol treatment also prevented neuronal cell death in the AβPPsw mousee brain through inactivation of caspase-3 and BAX. These results suggest that 4-O-methylhonokiol might prevent the development and progression of AD by reducing Aβ accumulation through an increase of clearance and decrease of Aβ generation via antioxidant mechanisms.

  10. Toluene-4-monooxygenase, a three-component enzyme system that catalyzes the oxidation of toluene to p-cresol in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    PubMed Central

    Whited, G M; Gibson, D T

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 grows on toluene as a sole carbon and energy source. A multicomponent oxygenase was partially purified from toluene-grown cells and separated into three protein components. The reconstituted enzyme system, in the presence of NADH and Fe2+, oxidized toluene to p-cresol as the first detectable product. Experiments with p-deutero-toluene led to the isolation of p-cresol which retained 68% of the deuterium initially present in the parent molecule. When the reconstituted enzyme system was incubated with toluene in the presence of 18O2, the oxygen in p-cresol was shown to be derived from molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate that P. mendocina KR1 initiates degradation of toluene by a multicomponent enzyme system which has been designated toluene-4-monooxygenase. PMID:2019563

  11. A reversed genetic approach reveals the coenzyme specificity and other catalytic properties of three enzymes putatively involved in anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulfate.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Moll, Johanna; Kahnt, Jörg; Fukui, Manabu; Shima, Seigo

    2014-11-01

    Consortia of anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea and delta-proteobacteria anaerobically oxidize methane coupled to sulfate reduction to sulfide. The metagenome of ANME-1 archaea contains genes homologous to genes otherwise only found in methanogenic archaea, and transcription of some of these genes in ANME-1 cells has been shown. We now have heterologously expressed three of these genes in Escherichia coli, namely those homologous to genes for formylmethanofuran : tetrahydromethanopterin formyltransferase, methenyltetrahydromethanopterin cyclohydrolase (Mch) and coenzyme F420 -dependent methylenetetrahydromethanopterin dehydrogenase (Mtd), and have characterized the overproduced enzymes with respect to their coenzyme specificity and other catalytic properties. The three enzymes from ANME-1 were found to catalyse the same reactions and with similar specific activities using identical coenzymes as the respective enzymes in methanogenic archaea, the apparent Km for their substrates being in the same concentration range. The results support the proposal that anaerobic oxidation of methane to CO₂in ANME involves the same enzymes and coenzymes as CO₂reduction to methane in methanogenic archaea. Interestingly, the activity of Mch and the stability of Mtd from ANME-1 were found to be dependent on the presence of 0.5-1.0 M potassium phosphate, which suggested that ANME-1 archaea contain high concentrations of lyotropic salts, presumably as compatible solutes.

  12. Investigating the effect of gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin complexes on the structure, function and oxidative stability of the peroxidase enzyme and their anticancer and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Jahangoshaei, Parisa; Hassani, Leila; Mohammadi, Fakhrossadat; Hamidi, Akram; Mohammadi, Khosro

    2015-10-01

    Curcumin has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antiproliferative, antimicrobial and anticancer activities. Complexation of curcumin with metals has gained attention in recent years for improvement of its stability. In this study, the effect of gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin on the structure, function and oxidative stability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme were evaluated by spectroscopic techniques. In addition to the enzymatic investigation, the cytotoxic effect of the complexes was assessed on bladder, MCF-7 breast cancer and LNCaP prostate carcinoma cell lines by MTT assay. Furthermore, antibacterial activity of the complexes against S. aureus and E. coli was explored by dilution test method. The results showed that the complexes improve activity of HRP and also increase its tolerance against the oxidative condition. After addition of the complexes, affinity of HRP for hydrogen peroxide substrate decreases, while the affinity increases for phenol substrate. Circular dichroism, intrinsic and synchronous fluorescence spectra showed that the enzyme structure around the catalytic heme group becomes less compact and also the distance between the heme group and tryptophan residues increases due to binding of the complexes to HRP. On the whole, it can be concluded that the change in the enzyme structure upon binding to the gallium curcumin and gallium diacetylcurcumin complexes results in an increase in the antioxidant efficiency and activity of the peroxidise enzyme. The result of anticancer and antibacterial activities suggested that the complexes exhibit the potential for cancer treatment, but they have no significant antibacterial activity.

  13. Oxidative metabolism of the bioactive and naturally occurring beta-carboline alkaloids, norharman and harman, by human cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Herraiz, Tomás; Guillén, Hugo; Arán, Vicente J

    2008-11-01

    Norharman and harman are naturally occurring beta-carboline alkaloids exhibiting a wide range of biological, psychopharmacological, and toxicological actions. They occur in foods and tobacco smoke and also appear endogenously in humans. In this research, metabolic and kinetic studies with cytochrome P450 enzymes and human liver microsomes showed that beta-carbolines were efficiently oxidized to several ring-hydroxylated and N-oxidation products that were subsequently identified and quantified. 6-Hydroxy- beta-carboline (6-hydroxynorharman and 6-hydroxyharman) was a major metabolite efficiently produced (high kcat and low Km) by P450 1A2 and 1A1 and to a minor extent by P450 2D6, 2C19 and 2E1. 3-Hydroxy-beta-carboline (3-hydroxynorharman and 3-hydroxyharman), another major metabolite, was specifically produced by P450 1A2 and 1A1, whereas beta-carboline-N(2)-oxide (harman-2-oxide and norharman-2-oxide) was produced by P450 2E1. The same pattern of metabolism was confirmed for human liver microsomes. Oxidative metabolism for harman was slightly higher than norharman, but norharman showed lower Km values. The oxidation of beta-carbolines is a detoxication route performed mainly by P450 1A2 and 1A1, with the participation of P450 2D6, 2C19, and 2E1, as additional contributors. Then, individual variations in the levels and activity of these P450s may influence biotransformation of beta-carboline alkaloids and their ultimate biological effects. beta-Carbolines were previously reported as comutagens and/or inhibitors of mutagens activated by P450 1A enzymes such as heterocyclic amines and polycyclic hydrocarbons. Results in this work show that beta-carbolines are good ligands and substrates for P450 1A2/1A1, contributing to the explanation of some of their toxicological effects.

  14. Molecular cloning, heterologous expression, and primary structure of the structural gene for the copper enzyme nitrous oxide reductase from denitrifying Pseudomonas stutzeri.

    PubMed Central

    Viebrock, A; Zumft, W G

    1988-01-01

    The nos genes of Pseudomonas stutzeri are required for the anaerobic respiration of nitrous oxide, which is part of the overall denitrification process. A nos-coding region of ca. 8 kilobases was cloned by plasmid integration and excision. It comprised nosZ, the structural gene for the copper-containing enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, genes for copper chromophore biosynthesis, and a supposed regulatory region. The location of the nosZ gene and its transcriptional direction were identified by using a series of constructs to transform Escherichia coli and express nitrous oxide reductase in the heterologous background. Plasmid pAV5021 led to a nearly 12-fold overexpression of the NosZ protein compared with that in the P. stutzeri wild type. The complete sequence of the nosZ gene, comprising 1,914 nucleotides, together with 282 nucleotides of 5'-flanking sequences and 238 nucleotides of 3'-flanking sequences was determined. An open reading frame coded for a protein of 638 residues (Mr, 70,822) including a presumed signal sequence of 35 residues for protein export. The presequence is in conformity with the periplasmic location of the enzyme. Another open reading frame of 2,097 nucleotides, in the opposite transcriptional direction to that of nosZ, was excluded by several criteria from representing the coding region for nitrous oxide reductase. Codon usage for nosZ of P. stutzeri showed a high G + C content in the degenerate codon position (83.9% versus an average of 60.2%) and relaxed codon usage for the Glu codon, characteristic features of Pseudomonas genes from other species. E. coli nitrous oxide reductase was purified to homogeneity. It had the Mr of the P. stutzeri enzyme but lacked the copper chromophore. Images PMID:3049543

  15. Coordination modes of tyrosinate-ligated catalase-type heme enzymes: magnetic circular dichroism studies of Plexaura homomalla allene oxide synthase, Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis protein-2744c, and bovine liver catalase in their ferric and ferrous states.

    PubMed

    Bandara, D M Indika; Sono, Masanori; Bruce, Grant S; Brash, Alan R; Dawson, John H

    2011-12-01

    Bovine liver catalase (BLC), catalase-related allene oxide synthase (cAOS) from Plexaura homomalla, and a recently isolated protein from the cattle pathogen Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP-2744c (MAP)) are all tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes whose crystal structures have been reported. cAOS and MAP have low (<20%) sequence similarity to, and significantly different catalytic functions from, BLC. cAOS transforms 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid to an allene epoxide, whereas the MAP protein is a putative organic peroxide-dependent peroxidase. To elucidate factors influencing the functions of these and related heme proteins, we have investigated the heme iron coordination properties of these tyrosinate-ligated heme enzymes in their ferric and ferrous states using magnetic circular dichroism and UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The MAP protein shows remarkable spectral similarities to cAOS and BLC in its native Fe(III) state, but clear differences from ferric proximal heme ligand His93Tyr Mb (myoglobin) mutant, which may be attributed to the presence of an Arg(+)-N(ω)-H···¯O-Tyr (proximal heme axial ligand) hydrogen bond in the first three heme proteins. Furthermore, the spectra of Fe(III)-CN¯, Fe(III)-NO, Fe(II)-NO (except for five-coordinate MAP), Fe(II)-CO, and Fe(II)-O(2) states of cAOS and MAP, but not H93Y Mb, are also similar to the corresponding six-coordinate complexes of BLC, suggesting that a tyrosinate (Tyr-O¯) is the heme axial ligand trans to the bound ligands in these complexes. The Arg(+)-N(ω)-H to ¯O-Tyr hydrogen bond would be expected to modulate the donor properties of the proximal tyrosinate oxyanion and, combined with the subtle differences in the catalytic site structures, affect the activities of cAOS, MAP and BLC.

  16. Modulation of hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes and oxidative status by rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) and Honeybush (Cyclopia intermedia), green and black (Camellia sinensis) teas in rats.

    PubMed

    Marnewick, Jeanine L; Joubert, Elizabeth; Swart, Pieter; Van Der Westhuizen, Francois; Gelderblom, Wentzel C

    2003-12-31

    Rooibos and honeybush teas significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the activity of cytosolic glutathione S-transferase alpha. A significant (P < 0.05) to marginal (P < 0.1) increase in the activity of the microsomal UDP-glucuronosyl transferase was obtained with unprocessed rooibos and honeybush teas, respectively. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) levels were significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the liver of all tea treated rats while reduced glutathione (GSH) was markedly increased in the liver of the herbal tea treated rats. These changes resulted in a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the GSH/GSSG ratio by the unprocessed, processed rooibos and unprocessed honeybush teas. Green and black teas markedly to significantly decreased the oxygen radical absorbance capacity in liver homogenates, respectively. Modulation of phase II drug metabolizing enzymes and oxidative status in the liver may be important events in the protection against adverse effects related to mutagenesis and oxidative damage.

  17. Chloride salt type/ionic strength and refrigeration effects on antioxidant enzymes and lipid oxidation in cattle, camel and chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Gheisari, Hamid Reza; Motamedi, Hossien

    2010-10-01

    The effects of NaCl and KCl at varying ionic strengths on catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities and lipid oxidation in ground Longissimus dorsi (LD) of cattle and camel and breast muscle of chicken during refrigerated storage were studied. NaCl and KCl significantly increased 2-thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values. TBARS and peroxide values increased and GSH-Px activity decreased during 4 day storage in the 4 degrees C, but catalase activity was stable. Salt type had no consistent effect on GSH-Px and catalase activities. Chicken samples had lower enzyme activities and TBARS content than cattle and camel. Their peroxide values were lower than camel samples. Camel meat showed higher catalase activity and TBARS content than cattle meat. Results indicated that negative correlation between lipid oxidation and GSH-Px activity and the accelerated lipid oxidation in salted meat may be partly related to a decrease in GSH-Px activity.

  18. Association between maternal micronutrient status, oxidative stress, and common genetic variants in antioxidant enzymes at 15 weeks׳ gestation in nulliparous women who subsequently develop preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Hiten D; Gill, Carolyn A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Seed, Paul T; Hesketh, John E; Méplan, Catherine; Schomburg, Lutz; Chappell, Lucy C; Morgan, Linda; Poston, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific condition affecting 2-7% of women and a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Deficiencies of specific micronutrient antioxidant activities associated with copper, selenium, zinc, and manganese have previously been linked to preeclampsia at the time of disease. Our aims were to investigate whether maternal plasma micronutrient concentrations and related antioxidant enzyme activities are altered before preeclampsia onset and to examine the dependence on genetic variations in these antioxidant enzymes. Predisease plasma samples (15±1 weeks׳ gestation) were obtained from women enrolled in the international Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study who subsequently developed preeclampsia (n=244) and from age- and BMI-matched normotensive controls (n=472). Micronutrient concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; associated antioxidant enzyme activities, selenoprotein-P, ceruloplasmin concentration and activity, antioxidant capacity, and markers of oxidative stress were measured by colorimetric assays. Sixty-four tag-single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes and selenoprotein-P were genotyped using allele-specific competitive PCR. Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations were modestly but significantly elevated in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia (both P<0.001) compared to controls (median (IQR), copper, 1957.4 (1787, 2177.5) vs 1850.0 (1663.5, 2051.5) µg/L; ceruloplasmin, 2.5 (1.4, 3.2) vs 2.2 (1.2, 3.0) µg/ml). There were no differences in other micronutrients or enzymes between groups. No relationship was observed between genotype for SNPs and antioxidant enzyme activity. This analysis of a prospective cohort study reports maternal micronutrient concentrations in combination with associated antioxidant enzymes and SNPs in their encoding genes in women at 15 weeks׳ gestation that subsequently

  19. Association between maternal micronutrient status, oxidative stress, and common genetic variants in antioxidant enzymes at 15 weeks׳ gestation in nulliparous women who subsequently develop preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Hiten D.; Gill, Carolyn A.; Kurlak, Lesia O.; Seed, Paul T.; Hesketh, John E.; Méplan, Catherine; Schomburg, Lutz; Chappell, Lucy C.; Morgan, Linda; Poston, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific condition affecting 2–7% of women and a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Deficiencies of specific micronutrient antioxidant activities associated with copper, selenium, zinc, and manganese have previously been linked to preeclampsia at the time of disease. Our aims were to investigate whether maternal plasma micronutrient concentrations and related antioxidant enzyme activities are altered before preeclampsia onset and to examine the dependence on genetic variations in these antioxidant enzymes. Predisease plasma samples (15±1 weeks׳ gestation) were obtained from women enrolled in the international Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study who subsequently developed preeclampsia (n=244) and from age- and BMI-matched normotensive controls (n=472). Micronutrient concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; associated antioxidant enzyme activities, selenoprotein-P, ceruloplasmin concentration and activity, antioxidant capacity, and markers of oxidative stress were measured by colorimetric assays. Sixty-four tag–single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes and selenoprotein-P were genotyped using allele-specific competitive PCR. Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations were modestly but significantly elevated in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia (both P<0.001) compared to controls (median (IQR), copper, 1957.4 (1787, 2177.5) vs 1850.0 (1663.5, 2051.5) µg/L; ceruloplasmin, 2.5 (1.4, 3.2) vs 2.2 (1.2, 3.0) µg/ml). There were no differences in other micronutrients or enzymes between groups. No relationship was observed between genotype for SNPs and antioxidant enzyme activity. This analysis of a prospective cohort study reports maternal micronutrient concentrations in combination with associated antioxidant enzymes and SNPs in their encoding genes in women at 15 weeks׳ gestation that subsequently

  20. Bioavailability of catechins from guaraná (Paullinia cupana) and its effect on antioxidant enzymes and other oxidative stress markers in healthy human subjects.

    PubMed

    Yonekura, Lina; Martins, Carolina Aguiar; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Monteiro, Marcela Piedade; César, Luiz Antônio Machado; Mioto, Bruno Mahler; Mori, Clara Satsuki; Mendes, Thaíse Maria Nogueira; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Arçari, Demetrius Paiva; Torres, Elizabeth Aparecida Ferraz da Silva

    2016-07-13

    We assessed the effects of guaraná (Paullinia cupana) consumption on plasma catechins, erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and biomarkers of oxidative stress (ex vivo LDL oxidation, plasma total antioxidant status and ORAC, and lymphocyte single cell gel electrophoresis) in healthy overweight subjects. Twelve participants completed a 15-day run-in period followed by a 15-day intervention with a daily intake of 3 g guaraná seed powder containing 90 mg (+)-catechin and 60 mg (-)-epicatechin. Blood samples were taken on the first and last day of the intervention period, fasting and 1 h post-dose. The administration of guaraná increased plasma ORAC, while reducing ex vivo LDL oxidation (only in the first study day) and hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in lymphocytes, at 1 h post-dose. Plasma catechin (0.38 ± 0.12 and 0.44 ± 0.18 nmol mL(-1)), epicatechin (0.59 ± 0.18 and 0.64 ± 0.25 nmol mL(-1)) and their methylated metabolites were observed at 1 h post-dose but were almost negligible after overnight fasting. The activities of catalase (in both study days) and glutathione peroxidase (in the last intervention day) increased at 1 h post-dose. Furthermore, the activity of both enzymes remained higher than the basal levels in overnight-fasting individuals on the last intervention day, suggesting a prolonged effect of guaraná that continues even after plasma catechin clearance. In conclusion, guaraná catechins are bioavailable and contribute to reduce the oxidative stress of clinically healthy individuals, by direct antioxidant action of the absorbed phytochemicals and up-regulation of antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes.

  1. Enhanced and selective delivery of enzyme therapy to 9L-glioma tumor via magnetic targeting of PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    The stability of enzyme-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in plasma is of great importance for in vivo delivery of the conjugated enzyme. In this study, β-glucosidase was conjugated on aminated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the glutaraldehyde method (β-Glu-MNP), and further PEGylated via N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-immobilized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG-β-Glu-MNPs) were characterized by hydrodynamic diameter distribution, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. The results showed that the multidomain structure and magnetization properties of these nanoparticles were conserved well throughout the synthesis steps, with an expected diameter increase and zeta potential shifts. The Michaelis constant was calculated to evaluate the activity of conjugated β-glucosidase on the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating 73.0% and 65.4% of enzyme activity remaining for β-Glu-MNP and PEG-β-Glu-MNP, respectively. Both magnetophoretic mobility analysis and pharmacokinetics showed improved in vitro/in vivo stability of PEG-β-Glu-MNP compared with β-Glu-MNP. In vivo magnetic targeting of PEG-β-Glu-MNP was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and electron spin resonance analysis in a mouse model of subcutaneous 9L-glioma. Satisfactory accumulation of PEG-β-Glu-MNP in tumor tissue was successfully achieved, with an iron content of 627±45 nmol Fe/g tissue and β-glucosidase activity of 32.2±8.0 mU/g tissue. PMID:24959078

  2. Hypothyroidism attenuates protein tyrosine nitration, oxidative stress and renal damage induced by ischemia and reperfusion: effect unrelated to antioxidant enzymes activities

    PubMed Central

    Tenorio-Velázquez, Verónica M; Barrera, Diana; Franco, Martha; Tapia, Edilia; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Medina-Campos, Omar Noel; Pedraza-Chaverri, José

    2005-01-01

    Background It has been established that hypothyroidism protects rats against renal ischemia and reperfusion (IR) oxidative damage. However, it is not clear if hypothyroidism is able to prevent protein tyrosine nitration, an index of nitrosative stress, induced by IR or if antioxidant enzymes have involved in this protective effect. In this work it was explored if hypothyroidism is able to prevent the increase in nitrosative and oxidative stress induced by IR. In addition the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was studied. Control and thyroidectomized (HTX) rats were studied 24 h of reperfusion after 60 min ischemia. Methods Male Wistar rats weighing 380 ± 22 g were subjected to surgical thyroidectomy. Rats were studied 15 days after surgery. Euthyroid sham-operated rats were used as controls (CT). Both groups of rats underwent a right kidney nephrectomy and suffered a 60 min left renal ischemia with 24 h of reperfusion. Rats were divided in four groups: CT, HTX, IR and HTX+IR. Rats were sacrificed and samples of plasma and kidney were obtained. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine were measured in blood plasma. Kidney damage was evaluated by histological analysis. Oxidative stress was measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal modified proteins. The protein carbonyl content was measured using antibodies against dinitrophenol (DNP)-modified proteins. Nitrosative stress was measured by immunohistochemical analysis of 3-nitrotyrosine modified proteins. The activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase was measured by spectrophotometric methods. Multiple comparisons were performed with ANOVA followed by Bonferroni t test. Results The histological damage and the rise in plasma creatinine and BUN induced by IR were significantly lower in HTX+IR group. The increase in protein carbonyls and in 3-nitrotyrosine and 4

  3. The isolation and purification of a specific "protector" protein which inhibits enzyme inactivation by a thiol/Fe(III)/O2 mixed-function oxidation system.

    PubMed

    Kim, K; Kim, I H; Lee, K Y; Rhee, S G; Stadtman, E R

    1988-04-05

    Mixed-function oxidation systems comprised of Fe3+, O2, and electron donors such as thiol compounds, ascorbate, NAD(P)H/NAD(P)H oxidase, and xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine, catalyze the inactivation of many enzymes. This report describes the isolation and purification of a soluble protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which specifically inhibits the inactivation of various enzymes by a nonenzymatic Fe3+/O2/thiol mixed-function oxidase system. When thiol is replaced with another electron donor (e.g. ascorbate), this specific protein no longer protects against iron (or copper)/O2-dependent radical-induced enzyme inactivation. Purification steps included a polyethylene glycol precipitation followed sequentially by a chromatography on DE52 and high pressure liquid chromatography on phenyl, DEAE, and gel-filtrated columns. The final gel filtration step yielded two protein peaks exhibiting protector activity and possessing a Mr of 500,000 and 90,000. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of these two fractions gave a single band at 27 kDa suggesting that these protein species simply represent different oligomeric structures. The protector protein did not possess catalase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, or iron chelation activities. Since the protection activity reported herein is specific for mixed-function oxidation systems containing thiols, we propose that the protector protein functions as a sulfur radical scavenger.

  4. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-07

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  5. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E.; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-01

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde. PMID:25574602

  6. FRET microscopy demonstrates molecular association of non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsL-TP) with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in peroxisomes.

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, F S; Bastiaens, P I; Wirtz, K W; Jovin, T M

    1998-01-01

    The fate of fluorescently labeled pre-nsL-TP (Cy3-pre-nsL-TP) microinjected into BALB/c 3T3 fibroblasts was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The protein exhibited a distinct punctate fluorescence pattern and colocalized to a high degree with the immunofluorescence pattern for the peroxisomal enzyme acyl-CoA oxidase. Proteolytic removal of the C-terminal leucine of the putative peroxisomal targeting sequence (AKL) resulted in a diffuse cytosolic fluorescence. These results indicate that microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP is targeted to peroxisomes. The association of nsL-TP with peroxisomal enzymes was investigated in cells by measuring fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the microinjected Cy3-pre-nsL-TP and Cy5-labeled antibodies against the peroxisomal enzymes acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase, bifunctional enzyme, PMP70 and catalase. The technique of photobleaching digital imaging microscopy (pbDIM), used to quantitate the FRET efficiency on a pixel-by-pixel basis, revealed a specific association of nsL-TP with acyl-CoA oxidase, 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase and bifunctional enzyme in the peroxisomes. These observations were corroborated by subjecting a peroxisomal matrix protein fraction to affinity chromatography on Sepharose-immobilized pre-nsL-TP. Acyl-CoA oxidase was retained. These studies provide strong evidence for a role of nsL-TP in the regulation of peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation, e.g. by facilitating the presentation of substrates and/or stabilization of the enzymes. PMID:9857175

  7. Rational enzyme redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Protein engineering is first a means of elucidating structure-function relations in an enzyme, and second, a means of changing a protein to make it serve a different, but generally related, purpose. In principle, one may change the functional characteristics of an enzyme by altering its substrate specificity, kinetics, optimum range of activity, and chemical mechanism. Obviously one cannot make all possible combinations of amino acid changes for even the smallest enzyme, so the essential question is which changes to make. The intent of rational protein/enzyme redesign is to alter a protein/enzyme in a timely and premeditated fashion. This article provides an outline of the process of rational enzyme redesign.

  8. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  9. Complex I assembly function and fatty acid oxidation enzyme activity of ACAD9 both contribute to disease severity in ACAD9 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Schiff, Manuel; Haberberger, Birgit; Xia, Chuanwu; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Goetzman, Eric S.; Wang, Yudong; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Karunanidhi, Anuradha; Prabhu, Dolly; Alharbi, Hana; Prochownik, Edward V.; Haack, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Munnich, Arnold; Rötig, Agnes; Taylor, Robert W.; Nicholls, Robert D.; Kim, Jung-Ja; Prokisch, Holger; Vockley, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is an assembly factor for mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I (CI), and ACAD9 mutations are recognized as a frequent cause of CI deficiency. ACAD9 also retains enzyme ACAD activity for long-chain fatty acids in vitro, but the biological relevance of this function remains controversial partly because of the tissue specificity of ACAD9 expression: high in liver and neurons and minimal in skin fibroblasts. In this study, we hypothesized that this enzymatic ACAD activity is required for full fatty acid oxidation capacity in cells expressing high levels of ACAD9 and that loss of this function is important in determining phenotype in ACAD9-deficient patients. First, we confirmed that HEK293 cells express ACAD9 abundantly. Then, we showed that ACAD9 knockout in HEK293 cells affected long-chain fatty acid oxidation along with Cl, both of which were rescued by wild type ACAD9. Further, we evaluated whether the loss of ACAD9 enzymatic fatty acid oxidation affects clinical severity in patients with ACAD9 mutations. The effects on ACAD activity of 16 ACAD9 mutations identified in 24 patients were evaluated using a prokaryotic expression system. We showed that there was a significant inverse correlation between residual enzyme ACAD activity and phenotypic severity of ACAD9-deficient patients. These results provide evidence that in cells where it is strongly expressed, ACAD9 plays a physiological role in fatty acid oxidation, which contributes to the severity of the phenotype in ACAD9-deficient patients. Accordingly, treatment of ACAD9 patients should aim at counteracting both CI and fatty acid oxidation dysfunctions. PMID:25721401

  10. Complex I assembly function and fatty acid oxidation enzyme activity of ACAD9 both contribute to disease severity in ACAD9 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Manuel; Haberberger, Birgit; Xia, Chuanwu; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Goetzman, Eric S; Wang, Yudong; Uppala, Radha; Zhang, Yuxun; Karunanidhi, Anuradha; Prabhu, Dolly; Alharbi, Hana; Prochownik, Edward V; Haack, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Munnich, Arnold; Rötig, Agnes; Taylor, Robert W; Nicholls, Robert D; Kim, Jung-Ja; Prokisch, Holger; Vockley, Jerry

    2015-06-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase 9 (ACAD9) is an assembly factor for mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I (CI), and ACAD9 mutations are recognized as a frequent cause of CI deficiency. ACAD9 also retains enzyme ACAD activity for long-chain fatty acids in vitro, but the biological relevance of this function remains controversial partly because of the tissue specificity of ACAD9 expression: high in liver and neurons and minimal in skin fibroblasts. In this study, we hypothesized that this enzymatic ACAD activity is required for full fatty acid oxidation capacity in cells expressing high levels of ACAD9 and that loss of this function is important in determining phenotype in ACAD9-deficient patients. First, we confirmed that HEK293 cells express ACAD9 abundantly. Then, we showed that ACAD9 knockout in HEK293 cells affected long-chain fatty acid oxidation along with Cl, both of which were rescued by wild type ACAD9. Further, we evaluated whether the loss of ACAD9 enzymatic fatty acid oxidation affects clinical severity in patients with ACAD9 mutations. The effects on ACAD activity of 16 ACAD9 mutations identified in 24 patients were evaluated using a prokaryotic expression system. We showed that there was a significant inverse correlation between residual enzyme ACAD activity and phenotypic severity of ACAD9-deficient patients. These results provide evidence that in cells where it is strongly expressed, ACAD9 plays a physiological role in fatty acid oxidation, which contributes to the severity of the phenotype in ACAD9-deficient patients. Accordingly, treatment of ACAD9 patients should aim at counteracting both CI and fatty acid oxidation dysfunctions.

  11. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    PubMed

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J H

    1983-11-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Cellex D, Sephadex G-150, and orange A dye-ligand affinity gels. Extracts prepared from cells cultured anaerobically with tetrathionate or aerobically with thiosulfate followed by oxygen deprivation showed an 11- to 30-fold increase in TTR activity, with no increase in TSO activity. The inducible TTR resided in both the ultracentrifuge pellet and supernatant fractions and was readily separated from constitutive TSO and TTR in the latter by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. Inducible TTR exhibited TSR activity, which was also located in both membrane and soluble extract fractions and which cochromatographed with inducible TTR. The results indicate that constitutive TSO and TTR in marine heterotroph 16B represent reverse activities of the same enzyme whose major physiological function is thiosulfate oxidation. Evidence is also presented which suggests a possible association of inducible TTR and TSR in strain 16B.

  12. Arsenite stress variably stimulates pro-oxidant enzymes, anatomical deformities, photosynthetic pigment reduction, and antioxidants in arsenic-tolerant and sensitive rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Preeti; Singh, Rana Pratap; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2015-07-01

    Contamination of arsenic (As) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) paddies and subsequent uptake by rice plants is a serious concern, because rice is a staple crop for millions of people. Identification of As toxicity and detoxification mechanisms in paddy rice cultivars would help to reduce As-associated risk. Arsenic tolerance and susceptibility mechanisms were investigated in 2 differential As-accumulating rice genotypes, Triguna and IET-4786, selected from initial screening of 52 rice cultivars as an As-tolerant and an As-sensitive cultivar, respectively, on the basis of root and shoot length during various arsenite (AsIII) exposures (0-50 μM). Indicators of oxidative stress, such as pro-oxidant enzymes (reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate [NADPH] oxidase and ascorbate oxidase) and nitric oxide, were more numerous in the sensitive cultivar than in the tolerant cultivar. Arsenic-induced anatomical deformities were frequent in the sensitive cultivar, showing more distorted and flaccid root cells than the tolerant cultivar. Chlorophyll and carotenoid synthesis were inhibited in both cultivars, although the decline was more prominent in the sensitive cultivar at higher doses of As. Furthermore, the tolerant cultivar tolerated As stress by producing more antioxidants, such as proline, sustaining the ratio of ascorbate, dehydroascorbate, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity as well as As detoxifying enzymes arsenate reductase, whereas these respective metabolic activities declined in sensitive cultivar, resulting in greater susceptibility to As toxicity.

  13. Thiamine increases the resistance of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against oxidative, osmotic and thermal stress, through mechanisms partly independent of thiamine diphosphate-bound enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Natalia; Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have established a hypothesis that thiamine (vitamin B1 ) is involved in the responses of different organisms against stress, also suggesting that underlying mechanisms are not limited to the universal role of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) in the central cellular metabolism. The current work aimed at characterising the effect of exogenously added thiamine on the response of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the oxidative (1 mM H2 O2 ), osmotic (1 M sorbitol) and thermal (42 °C) stress. As compared to the yeast culture in thiamine-free medium, in the presence of 1.4 μM external thiamine, (1) the relative mRNA levels of major TDP-dependent enzymes under stress conditions vs. unstressed control (the 'stress/control ratio') were moderately lower, (2) the stress/control ratio was strongly decreased for the transcript levels of several stress markers localised to the cytoplasm, peroxisomes, the cell wall and (with the strongest effect observed) the mitochondria (e.g. Mn-superoxide dismutase), (3) the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions was markedly decreased, with the significant alleviation of concomitant protein oxidation. The results obtained suggest the involvement of thiamine in the maintenance of redox balance in yeast cells under oxidative stress conditions, partly independent of the functions of TDP-dependent enzymes.

  14. Responses of soil hydrolytic enzymes, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to nitrogen applications in a temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyu; Tang, Yuqian; Shi, Yao; He, Nianpeng; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Qiang; Zheng, Chunyu; Sun, Xiaomin; Qiu, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    We used a seven-year urea gradient applied field experiment to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N) applications on soil N hydrolytic enzyme activity and ammonia-oxidizing microbial abundance in a typical steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia. The results showed that N additions inhibited the soil N-related hydrolytic enzyme activities, especially in 392 kg N ha−1 yr−1 treatment. As N additions increased, the amoA gene copy ratios of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased from 1.13 to 0.65. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the AOA gene copies were negatively related with NH4+-N content. However, the AOB gene copies were positively correlated with NO3−-N content. Moderate N application rates (56–224 kg N ha−1 yr−1) accompanied by P additions are beneficial to maintaining the abundance of AOB, as opposed to the inhibition of highest N application rate (392 kg N ha−1 yr−1) on the abundance of AOB. This study suggests that the abundance of AOB and AOA would not decrease unless N applications exceed 224 kg N ha−1 yr−1 in temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia. PMID:27596731

  15. Responses of soil hydrolytic enzymes, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to nitrogen applications in a temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Tang, Yuqian; Shi, Yao; He, Nianpeng; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Qiang; Zheng, Chunyu; Sun, Xiaomin; Qiu, Weiwen

    2016-09-01

    We used a seven-year urea gradient applied field experiment to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N) applications on soil N hydrolytic enzyme activity and ammonia-oxidizing microbial abundance in a typical steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia. The results showed that N additions inhibited the soil N-related hydrolytic enzyme activities, especially in 392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 treatment. As N additions increased, the amoA gene copy ratios of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased from 1.13 to 0.65. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the AOA gene copies were negatively related with NH4+-N content. However, the AOB gene copies were positively correlated with NO3‑-N content. Moderate N application rates (56–224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) accompanied by P additions are beneficial to maintaining the abundance of AOB, as opposed to the inhibition of highest N application rate (392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) on the abundance of AOB. This study suggests that the abundance of AOB and AOA would not decrease unless N applications exceed 224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 in temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia.

  16. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress parameters and enzyme activity in tissues of Cape River crab (Potamanautes perlatus) following exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP).

    PubMed

    Walters, Chavon R; Cheng, Paul; Pool, Edmund; Somerset, Vernon

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been widely used in environmental assessments to evaluate the effects of exposure of aquatic organisms to contaminants from various anthropogenic sources. Silver nanoparticles (AgNP), the most produced NP worldwide and used in several consumer products, are known to produce oxidative stress in aquatic organisms. Similarly, temperature is also known to affect reactive oxygen species (ROS) by influencing the inputs of contaminants into the environment, as well as altering behavior, fate, and transport. Aquatic ecosystems are affected by both anthropogenic releases of contaminants and increased temperature. To test this hypothesis, the influence of AgNP and temperature in the response to multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress was studied in the gills and hepatopancreas of the Cape River crab Potamonautes perlatus. Responses were assessed through activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the nonenzymatic antioxidant glutathione S-transferase (GST). The response of the oxidative stress biomarkers analyzed was always higher in hepatopancreas than in gills. Elevated temperatures (28°C) induced oxidative stress by increasing SOD, CAT, and GST activities, particularly at 100 µg/ml AgNP. These data indicate that AgNP-mediated toxicity to P. perlatus is modulated by elevated temperatures, but this relationship is not linear. Co-effects of AgNP and temperature are reported for the first time in P. perlatus.

  17. The effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ayse Gul

    2013-03-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits that the accumulation of macromolecular damage induced by toxic reactive oxygen species plays a central role in the aging process. Therefore consumption of dietary antioxidants appears to be of great importance. Wheat germ have strong antioxidant properties. Aim of this study is investigate the effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in Drosophila. Current results suggested that dietary wheat germ enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes in Drosophila. There was no statistically difference in mtDNA damage and mtDNA copy number results of "Wheat Germ" and "Refined White Flour" feed groups. mtDNA damage slightly increased with aging in both groups but these changes were no statistically different.

  18. The biological effects of vanadyl curcumin and vanadyl diacetylcurcumin complexes: the effect on structure, function and oxidative stability of the peroxidase enzyme, antibacterial activity and cytotoxic effect.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Akram; Hassani, Leila; Mohammadi, Fakhrossadat; Jahangoshayi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Khosro

    2016-12-01

    Curcumin has multiple pharmacological effects, but it has poor stability. Complexation of curcumin with metals improves its stability. Here, the effects of vanadyl curcumin and vanadyl diacetylcurcumin on the function and structure of horseradish peroxidase enzyme were evaluated by spectroscopic techniques. Cytotoxic effect of the complexes was also assessed on MCF-7 breast cancer, bladder and LNCaP prostate carcinoma cell line. The results showed that the complexes improve catalytic activity of HRP, and also increase its tolerance against the oxidative condition. The result also indicated that the affinity of HRP for hydrogen peroxide substrate decreases, while the affinity increases for phenol substrate. Circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies showed that compactness of the enzyme structure around the catalytic heme group and the distance between the heme group and tryptophan residue decreases after the binding. The antibacterial and cytotoxic results indicated that the complexes have anticancer potential, but they have no considerable antibacterial activity.

  19. Improving the direct electron transfer in monolithic bioelectrodes prepared by immobilization of FDH enzyme on carbon-coated anodic aluminum oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Muñiz, Alberto; Hoshikawa, Yasuto; Komiyama, Hiroshi; Nakayama, Wataru; Itoh, Tetsuji; Kyotani, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    The present work reports the preparation of binderless carbon-coated porous films and the study of their performance as monolithic bioanodes. The films were prepared by coating anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) films with a thin layer of nitrogen-doped carbon by chemical vapor deposition. The films have cylindrical straight pores with controllable diameter and length. These monolithic films were used directly as bioelectrodes by loading the films with D-fructose dehydrogenase (FDH), an oxidoreductase enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of D-fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose. The immobilization of the enzymes was carried out by physical adsorption in liquid phase and with an electrostatic attraction method. The latter method takes advantage of the fact that FDH is negatively charged during the catalytic oxidation of fructose. Thus the immobilization was performed under the application of a positive voltage to the CAAO film in a FDH-fructose solution in McIlvaine buffer (pH 5) at 25 ºC. As a result, the FDH modified electrodes with the latter method show much better electrochemical response than that with the conventional physical adsorption method. Due to the singular porous structure of the monolithic films, which consists of an array of straight and parallel nanochannels, it is possible to rule out the effect of the diffusion of the D-fructose into the pores. Thus the improvement in the performance upon using the electrostatic attraction method can be ascribed not only to a higher uptake, but also to a more appropriate molecule orientation of the enzyme units on the surface of the electrodes.

  20. Effects of cerium oxide supplementation to laying hen diets on performance, egg quality, some antioxidant enzymes in serum and lipid oxidation in egg yolk.

    PubMed

    Bölükbaşı, S C; Al-Sagan, A A; Ürüşan, H; Erhan, M K; Durmuş, O; Kurt, N

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary cerium oxide levels (0, 100, 200, 300 or 400 mg/kg) on the laying performance, egg quality, some blood serum parameters and egg lipid peroxidation of laying hen. In total, one hundred and twenty 22-week-old brown Lohman LSL laying hens were randomly assigned to five groups equally (n = 24). Each treatment was replicated six times. Dietary supplementation of cerium oxide had no significant effect on feed intake and egg weight. The addition of cerium oxide to the laying hens' feed improved feed conversion ratio and increased (p < 0.05) egg production. Quality criteria of egg for except shell breaking strength were not affected by supplementing cerium oxide. In particular, supplementation of 200 and 300 mg/kg cerium oxide to the laying hens feed led to a significant (p < 0. 01) increase in egg shell breaking strength. Calcium and phosphorus concentration of serum increased significantly (p < 0.05) with supplementation of 100 mg/kg cerium oxide to laying hen diets. It was also observed that serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration decreased significantly with supplementation of cerium oxide in diets. Inclusion of cerium oxide resulted in a significant reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values in egg yolk in this study. It can be concluded that the addition of cerium oxide had positive effects on egg production, feed conversion ratio and egg shelf life. Based on the results of this study, it could be advised to supplement laying hens feed with cerium oxide as feed additives.

  1. Decoration of reduced graphene oxide with rhodium nanoparticles for the design of a sensitive electrochemical enzyme biosensor for 17β-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Povedano, Eloy; Cincotto, Fernando H; Parrado, Concepción; Díez, Paula; Sánchez, Alfredo; Canevari, Thiago C; Machado, Sergio A S; Pingarrón, José M; Villalonga, Reynaldo

    2017-03-15

    A novel nanocomposite material consisting of reduced graphene oxide/Rh nanoparticles was prepared by a one-pot reaction process. The strategy involved the simultaneous reduction of RhCl3 and graphene oxide with NaBH4 and the in situ deposition of the metal nanoparticles on the 2D carbon nanomaterial planar sheets. Glassy carbon electrode coated with this nanocomposite was employed as nanostructured support for the cross-linking of the enzyme laccase with glutaraldehyde to construct a voltammperometric biosensor for 17β-estradiol in the 0.9-11 pM range. The biosensor showed excellent analytical performance with high sensitivity of 25.7AµM(-1)cm(-1), a very low detection limit of 0.54pM and high selectivity. The biosensor was applied to the rapid and successful determination of the hormone in spiked synthetic and real human urine samples.

  2. Efficient synthesis of 2-amino-6-arylbenzothiazoles via Pd(0) Suzuki cross coupling reactions: potent urease enzyme inhibition and nitric oxide scavenging activities of the products.

    PubMed

    Gull, Yasmeen; Rasool, Nasir; Noreen, Mnaza; Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Yaqoob, Asma; Kousar, Shazia; Rasheed, Umer; Bukhari, Iftikhar Hussain; Zubair, Muhammad; Islam, Md Saiful

    2013-07-25

    In general, benzothiazole derivatives have attracted great interest due to thier pharmaceutical and biological importance. New 2-amino-6-arylbenzothiazoles were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields via Suzuki cross coupling reactions using various aryl boronic acids and aryl boronic acid pinacol esters and the antiurease and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of the products were also examined. The most active compound concerning urease enzyme inhibition was 6-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole-2-amine 3e, with an IC₅₀ value of 26.35 µg/mL. Compound 3c, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl) benzo[d]thiazole-2-amine, exhibited the highest nitric oxide percentage scavenging at 100 µg/mL.

  3. Responses of Aspergillus flavus to Oxidative Stress Are Related to Fungal Development Regulator, Antioxidant Enzyme, and Secondary Metabolite Biosynthetic Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fountain, Jake C.; Bajaj, Prasad; Nayak, Spurthi N.; Yang, Liming; Pandey, Manish K.; Kumar, Vinay; Jayale, Ashwin S.; Chitikineni, Anu; Lee, Robert D.; Kemerait, Robert C.; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-01-01

    The infection of maize and peanut with Aspergillus flavus and subsequent contamination with aflatoxin pose a threat to global food safety and human health, and is exacerbated by drought stress. Drought stress-responding compounds such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with fungal stress responsive signaling and secondary metabolite production, and can stimulate the production of aflatoxin by A. flavus in vitro. These secondary metabolites have been shown to possess diverse functions in soil-borne fungi including antibiosis, competitive inhibition of other microbes, and abiotic stress alleviation. Previously, we observed that isolates of A. flavus showed differences in oxidative stress tolerance which correlated with their aflatoxin production capabilities. In order to better understand these isolate-specific oxidative stress responses, we examined the transcriptional responses of field isolates of A. flavus with varying levels of aflatoxin production (NRRL3357, AF13, and Tox4) to H2O2-induced oxidative stress using an RNA sequencing approach. These isolates were cultured in an aflatoxin-production conducive medium amended with various levels of H2O2. Whole transcriptomes were sequenced using an Illumina HiSeq platform with an average of 40.43 million filtered paired-end reads generated for each sample. The obtained transcriptomes were then used for differential expression, gene ontology, pathway, and co-expression analyses. Isolates which produced higher levels of aflatoxin tended to exhibit fewer differentially expressed genes than isolates with lower levels of production. Genes found to be differentially expressed in response to increasing oxidative stress included antioxidant enzymes, primary metabolism components, antibiosis-related genes, and secondary metabolite biosynthetic components specifically for aflatoxin, aflatrem, and kojic acid. The expression of fungal development-related genes including aminobenzoate degradation genes and conidiation

  4. Dietary soya protein intake and exercise training have an additive effect on skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation enzyme activities and mRNA levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Morifuji, Masashi; Sanbongi, Chiaki; Sugiura, Katsumi

    2006-09-01

    Exercise training and regular physical activity increase oxidation of fat. Enhanced oxidation of fat is important for preventing lifestyle diseases such as hypertension and obesity. The aim of the present study in rats was to determine whether intake of dietary soya protein and exercise training have an additive effect on the activity and mRNA expression of enzymes involved in skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n 32) were assigned randomly into four groups (eight rats per group) and then divided further into sedentary or exercise-trained groups fed either casein or soya protein diets. Rats in the exercise groups were trained for 2 weeks by swimming for 120 min/d, 6 d/week. Exercise training decreased hepatic triacylglycerol levels and retroperitoneal adipose tissue weight and increased skeletal muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) activity and mRNA expression of CPT1, beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD), acyl-CoA oxidase, PPARgamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC1alpha) and PPARalpha. Soya protein significantly decreased hepatic triacylglycerol levels and epididymal adipose tissue weight and increased skeletal muscle CPT1 activity and CPT1, HAD, acyl-CoA oxidase, medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, PGC1alpha and PPARalpha mRNA levels. Furthermore, skeletal muscle HAD activity was the highest in exercise-trained rats fed soya protein. We conclude that exercise training and soya protein intake have an important additive role on induction of PPAR pathways, leading to increased activity and mRNA expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle and reduced accumulation of body fat.

  5. Angiotensin-(1-7) prevents systemic hypertension, attenuates oxidative stress and tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and normalizes renal angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 and Mas receptor expression in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yixuan; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Padda, Ranjit; Abdo, Shaaban; Chenier, Isabelle; Filep, Janos G; Ingelfinger, Julie R; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S D

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the relationship between Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] action, sHTN (systolic hypertension), oxidative stress, kidney injury, ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme-2) and MasR [Ang-(1-7) receptor] expression in Type 1 diabetic Akita mice. Ang-(1-7) was administered daily [500 μg/kg of BW (body weight) per day, subcutaneously] to male Akita mice from 14 weeks of age with or without co-administration of an antagonist of the MasR, A779 (10 mg/kg of BW per day). The animals were killed at 20 weeks of age. Age-matched WT (wild-type) mice served as controls. Ang-(1-7) administration prevented sHTN and attenuated kidney injury (reduced urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, glomerular hyperfiltration, renal hypertrophy and fibrosis, and tubular apoptosis) without affecting blood glucose levels in Akita mice. Ang-(1-7) also attenuated renal oxidative stress and the expression of oxidative stress-inducible proteins (NADPH oxidase 4, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, haem oxygenase 1), pro-hypertensive proteins (angiotensinogen, angiotensin-converting enzyme, sodium/hydrogen exchanger 3) and profibrotic proteins (transforming growth factor-β1 and collagen IV), and increased the expression of anti-hypertensive proteins (ACE2 and MasR) in Akita mouse kidneys. These effects were reversed by A779. Our data suggest that Ang-(1-7) plays a protective role in sHTN and RPTC (renal proximal tubular cell) injury in diabetes, at least in part, through decreasing renal oxidative stress-mediated signalling and normalizing ACE2 and MasR expression.

  6. Comprehensive study of the valence band of standard alkali-metal and indium phosphorus oxide salts through x-ray photoemission spectroscopy and extended Hückel theory tight-binding analysis: A contribution towards the elucidation of local order in oxides on InP surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Beuze, A.; Lissillour, R.; Quemerais, A.; Agliz, D.; Marchand, R.; Chermette, H.

    1989-05-01

    The evolution of the valence-band shape of the homogeneous series of phosphate compounds from the orthophosphates Na3PO4 and InPO4 to condensed phosphates such as Na4P2O7, of linear polyphosphates NaPO3 and In(PO3)3, of three-dimensional phosphorous oxides P2O5, and of phosphorus oxynitride PON have been investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and extended Hückel theory tight-binding band-structure calculations. This study is based partly on an accurate comparison of the experimental and calculated spectra, the latter being corrected by cross-section factors, and partly (by means of calculated partial densities of states and crystal orbital overlap population curves) on the elucidation of the main orbital interactions that generate the specific features of each valence band. Emphasis has been placed not only on the convergence behavior of the shape of the valence bands when PO4 tetrahedra are condensed, eventually yielding infinite covalent networks, but also on the contribution of the cation, especially In3+.

  7. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  8. Genomics: Applications in Mechanism Elucidation

    PubMed Central

    Gresham, Venita; McLeod, Howard L.

    2009-01-01

    The inability to predict the pharmacology and toxicology of drug candidates in preclinical studies has led to the decline in the number of new drugs which make it to market and the rise in cost associated with drug development. Identifying molecular interactions associated with therapeutic and toxic drug effects early in development is a top priority. Traditional mechanism elucidation strategies are narrow, often focusing on the identification of solely the molecular target. Methods which can offer additional insight into wide-ranging molecular interactions required for drug effect and the biochemical consequences of these interactions are in demand. Genomic strategies have made impressive advances in defining a more global view of drug action are expected to increasingly be used a complimentary tool in drug discovery and development. PMID:19166886

  9. CO oxidation on PdO catalysts with perfect and defective rutile-TiO2 as supports: Elucidating the role of oxygen vacancy in support by DFT calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Sun, Xiongfei; Xu, Xianglan; Liu, Wenming; Peng, Honggen; Fang, Xiuzhong; Wang, Hongming; Wang, Xiang

    2017-04-01

    To explore metal oxide-oxide support interactions and their effects, the mechanism of CO oxidation on PdO catalysts with rutile TiO2 or TiO2-x (TiO2 with a bridging oxygen vacancy) as the support, was studied by density functional theory calculations, compared with that on pure PdO surface. For TiO2 as the support, support effect leads to the change of the preferential CO adsorption sites from the coordinatively unsaturated Pd (Pdcus) site on pure PdO surface to the bridging site of coordinatively unsaturated Pd and O atoms (Pdcus and Ocus), thus altering the reaction pathway of CO oxidation, whereas the support effect has little influence on the energy barrier. However, for TiO2-x as the support, the presence of the oxygen vacancy leads to the energy barrier remarkably decreased compared with that on pure or TiO2-supported PdO surface. The change of Bader charges indicates the oxygen vacancy in the support can tune the oxidizability of PdO surface active oxygen Ocus, thus adjusting the CO adsorption strength at the bridging site of Pdcus and Ocus to be favorable for the extraction process of Ocus. Tuning oxygen vacancies in supports can be used as a new perspective to design improved supported oxide catalysts.

  10. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Delles, Rebecca M; Xiong, Youling L; True, Alma D; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A

    2014-06-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity.

  11. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity1

    PubMed Central

    Delles, Rebecca M.; Xiong, Youling L.; True, Alma D.; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P < 0.05) with an antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity. PMID:24879706

  12. Evaluation of Various Packaging Systems on the Activity of Antioxidant Enzyme, and Oxidation and Color Stabilities in Sliced Hanwoo (Korean Cattle) Beef Loin during Chill Storage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Sun Moon; Kang, Geunho; Seong, Pil-Nam; Park, Beomyoung; Cho, Soohyun

    2014-01-01

    The effects of various packaging systems, vacuum packaging (VACP), medium oxygen-modified atmosphere packaging (50% O2/20% CO2/30% N2, MOMAP), MOMAP combined with vacuum skin packaging (VSP-MOMAP), high oxygen-MAP (80% O2/20% CO2/0% N2, HOMAP), and HOMAP combined with VSP (VSP-HOMAP), on the activity of antioxidant enzyme, and oxidation and color stabilities in sliced Hanwoo (Korean cattle) beef loin were investigated at 4°C for 14 d. Higher (p<0.05) superoxide dismutase activity and total reducing ability were maintained in VSP-MOMAP beef than in HOMAP beef. Lipid oxidation (2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) was significantly (p<0.05) retarded in MOMAP, VSP-MOMAP, and VSP-HOMAP beef compared with HOMAP beef. Production of nonheme iron content was lower (p<0.05) in VSP-MOMAP beef than in HOMAP beef. Red color (a*) was kept higher (p<0.05) in VSP-MOMAP beef compared with MOMAP, HOMAP, and VSP-HOMAP beef. However, VACP beef was found to have the most positive effects on the antioxidant activity, oxidation and red color stabilities among the various packaged beef. These findings suggested that VSP-MOMAP was second to VACP in improving oxidation and color stabilities in sliced beef loin during chill storage. PMID:25178378

  13. Oxidants downstream from superoxide inhibit nitric oxide production by vascular endothelium--a key role for selenium-dependent enzymes in vascular health.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    Although superoxide can directly quench endothelium-generated nitric oxide (NO), there is considerable evidence that oxidants derived from superoxide--notably peroxides and their further derivatives--can also impair NO bioactivity. In part, this reflects inhibition of NO synthase activity, perhaps mediated by the oxidation of labile sulfhydryl groups, as well as the activation of protein kinase C. Selenium deficiency exacerbates these effects, presumably owing to the crucial role of selenium-dependent thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidases in preventing and reversing oxidant damage to proteins. High-normal homocyst(e)ine levels may induce an 'effective selenium deficiency' by suppressing glutathione peroxidase transcription in endothelial cells. Considerable epidemiology, primarily of European origin, points to mediocre selenium nutrition as a significant vascular risk factor; the risk associated with elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine levels is now well established. In addition to preventing LDL oxidation, vitamin E can be expected to minimize the contribution of lipid peroxides to endothelial dysfunction. Lipoic acid, which can function in vivo as a versatile antioxidant and sulfhydryl reductant, may have particular value for protecting endothelium from oxidants; its clinical utility in diabetic neuropathy may reflect this benefit. Good selenium status, as well as supra-nutritional intakes of lipoic acid, may down-regulate cytokine-mediated endothelial activation by helping to maintain the proper structure of oxidant-labile proteins--such as tyrosine phosphatases--that modulate this signaling. It can be concluded that a number of supplemental nutrients--including selenium, vitamin E, lipoic acid, and the vitamins that promote catabolism of homocysteine--have the potential to promote vascular health by mitigating the adverse impact of superoxide-derived oxidants on endothelial function.

  14. Vitamin E and C supplementation reduces oxidative stress, improves antioxidant enzymes and positive muscle work in chronically loaded muscles of aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Michael J.; Dudash, Holly J.; Docherty, Megan; Geronilla, Kenneth B.; Baker, Brent A.; Haff, G. Gregory; Cutlip, Robert G.; Alway, Stephen E.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative stress. Muscle levels of oxidative stress are further elevated with exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if dietary antioxidant supplementation would improve muscle function and cellular markers of oxidative stress in response to chronic repetitive loading in aging. The dorsiflexors of the left limb of aged and young adult Fischer 344 Brown x Norway rats were loaded 3 times weekly for 4.5 weeks using 80 maximal stretch-shortening contractions per session. The contralateral limb served as the intra-animal control. The rats were randomly assigned to a diet supplemented with Vitamin E and Vitamin C or normal non-supplemented rat chow. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in the tibialis anterior muscle. Repetitive loading exercise increased maximal isometric force, negative and positive work in the dorsiflexors of young adult rats. Only positive work increased in the aged animals that were supplemented with Vitamin E and C. Markers of oxidative stress (H2O2, total GSH, GSH/GSSG ratio, malondialdehyde and 8-OHdG) increased in the tibialis anterior muscles from aged and young adult animals with repetitive loading, but Vitamin E and C supplements attenuated this increase. MnSOD activity increased with supplementation in the young adult animals. CuZnSOD and catalase activity increased with supplementation in young adult and aged animals and GPx activity increased with exercise in the non-supplemented young adult and aged animals. The increased levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes after Vitamin E and C supplementation appear to be regulated by post-transcriptional modifications that are affected differently by age, exercise, and supplementation. These data suggest that antioxidant supplementation improves indices of oxidative stress associated with repetitive loading exercise and aging and improve the positive work output of muscles in aged rodents. PMID:20705127

  15. Vitamin E and C supplementation reduces oxidative stress, improves antioxidant enzymes and positive muscle work in chronically loaded muscles of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Michael J; Dudash, Holly J; Docherty, Megan; Geronilla, Kenneth B; Baker, Brent A; Haff, G Gregory; Cutlip, Robert G; Alway, Stephen E

    2010-11-01

    Aging is associated with increased oxidative stress. Muscle levels of oxidative stress are further elevated with exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine if dietary antioxidant supplementation would improve muscle function and cellular markers of oxidative stress in response to chronic repetitive loading in aging. The dorsiflexors of the left limb of aged and young adult Fischer 344 Brown×Norway rats were loaded 3 times weekly for 4.5 weeks using 80 maximal stretch-shortening contractions per session. The contra-lateral limb served as the intra-animal control. The rats were randomly assigned to a diet supplemented with Vitamin E and Vitamin C or normal non-supplemented rat chow. Biomarkers of oxidative stress were measured in the tibialis anterior muscle. Repetitive loading exercise increased maximal isometric force, negative work and positive work in the dorsiflexors of young adult rats. Only positive work increased in the aged animals that were supplemented with Vitamin E and C. Markers of oxidative stress (H(2)O(2), total GSH, GSH/GSSG ratio, malondialdehyde and 8-OHdG) increased in the tibialis anterior muscles from aged and young adult animals with repetitive loading, but Vitamin E and C supplements attenuated this increase. MnSOD activity increased with supplementation in the young adult animals. CuZnSOD and catalase activity increased with supplementation in young adult and aged animals and GPx activity increased with exercise in the non-supplemented young adult and aged animals. The increased levels of endogenous antioxidant enzymes after Vitamin E and C supplementation appear to be regulated by post-transcriptional modifications that are affected differently by age, exercise, and supplementation. These data suggest that antioxidant supplementation improves indices of oxidative stress associated with repetitive loading exercise and aging and improves the positive work output of muscles in aged rodents.

  16. In vitro metabolism of α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist AZD0328 and enzyme identification for its N-oxide metabolite.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Diansong; Zhang, Minli; Ye, Xiaomei; Gu, Chungang; Piser, Timothy M; Lanoue, Bernard A; Schock, Sara A; Cheng, Yi-Fang; Grimm, Scott W

    2011-03-01

    1. AZD0328 was pharmacologically characterized as a α7 neuronal nicotinic receptor agonist intended for treatment of Alzheimer's disease. In vitro AZD0328 cross species metabolite profile and enzyme identification for its N-oxide metabolite were evaluated in this study. 2. AZD0328 was very stable in the human hepatocyte incubation, whereas extensively metabolized in rat, dog and guinea pig hepatocyte incubations. The N-oxidation metabolite (M6) was the only metabolite detected in human hepatocyte incubations, and it also appeared to be the major in vitro metabolic pathway in a number of preclinical species. In addition, N-glucuronide metabolite of AZD0328 was observed in human liver microsomes. 3. Other metabolic pathways in the preclinical species include hydroxylation in azabicyclo octane or furopyridine part of the molecule. Pyridine N-methylation of AZD0328 (M2) was identified as a dog specific metabolite, not observed in human or other preclinical species. 4. Multiple enzymes including CYP2D6, CYP3A4/5, FMO1 and FMO3 catalyzed AZD0328 metabolism. The potential for AZD0328 to be inhibited clinically by co-administered drugs or genetic polymorphism is relative low.

  17. Recyclable enzyme mimic of cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles loaded on graphene oxide-dispersed carbon nanotubes with enhanced peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua; Li, Shuai; Si, Yanmei; Sun, Zhongzhao; Li, Shuying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles as nanocatalysts may present peroxidase-like catalysis activities and high electrocatalysis if loaded on conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) supports; however, their catalysis performances in an aqueous system might still be challenged by the poor aqueous dispersion of hydrophobic carbon supports and/or low stability of loaded iron catalysts. In this work, amphiphilic graphene oxide nanosheets were employed as “surfactant” to disperse CNTs to create stable graphene oxide-dispersed CNT (GCNT) supports in water for covalently loading cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with improved distribution and binding efficiency. Compared with original Fe3O4 nanos and CNT-loaded Fe3O4 nanocomplex, the prepared GCNT–Fe3O4 nanocomposite could achieve higher aqueous stability and, especially, much stronger peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis to H2O2, presumably resulting from the synergetic effects of two conductive carbon supports and cubic Fe3O4 nanocatalysts effectively loaded. Colorimetric and direct electrochemical detections of H2O2 and glucose using the GCNT–Fe3O4 nanocomposite were conducted with high detection sensitivities, demonstrating the feasibility of practical sensing applications. Such a magnetically recyclable “enzyme mimic” may circumvent some disadvantages of natural protein enzymes and common inorganic catalysts, featuring the multi-functions of high peroxidase-like catalysis, strong electrocatalysis, magnetic separation/recyclability, environmental stability, and direct H2O2 electrochemistry.

  18. The effects of oral zinc sulphate during radiotherapy on anti-oxidant enzyme activities in patients with head and neck cancer: a prospective, randomised, placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, M V; Koç, M; Karslioğlu, I; Sezen, O; Taysi, S; Bakan, N

    2004-07-01

    The purpose was to determine the effects of oral zinc sulphate along with radiotherapy on anti-oxidant enzyme activities in patients with head and neck cancer. Thirty patients with head and neck cancer were randomly assigned to receive either zinc sulphate capsules (including 50 mg zinc) (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15) three times a day, starting on the day of the first radiotherapy fraction and continuing throughout the scheduled radiotherapy course including weekends and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. The patients were treated with telecobalt radiation at conventional fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction and five fractions/ week in 20-35 fractions for a period of 4-7 weeks. Blood samples for biochemical parameters were collected after an overnight fast (12 h) before radiotherapy, the first day and 6 weeks after radiotherapy. In the placebo group, three patients were excluded. No difference was detected in any final measurement activities of erythrocyte anti-oxidant enzyme such as copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in the direct comparison between the zinc sulphate and the placebo group, except erythrocyte SOD activities measured the first day after radiotherapy (p < 0.03). In the respective measurement analysis of the groups in themselves, in the zinc sulphate group, while the statistical analysis for the activities of erythrocyte CAT and GSH-Px were significantly different (chi2 = 12.4, p < 0.05; chi2 = 8.9, p < 0.05, respectively) before radiotherapy, the first day and 6 weeks after radiotherapy, the activities of SOD did not differ (chi2 = 4.2, p > 0.05). In these three measurements, there was no statistical significance in the activities of enzymes in erythrocyte Cu-Zn SOD, CAT and GSH-Px in the placebo group. Before radiotherapy, plasma zinc levels were normal in 16 patients (59.2%) and were lower in 11 patients (40.8%) compared with laboratory levels. It would be worthwhile studying the effect of oral zinc

  19. Iron mediates catalysis of nucleic acid processing enzymes: support for Fe(II) as a cofactor before the great oxidation event.

    PubMed

    Okafor, C Denise; Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Athavale, Shreyas S; Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-03-15

    Life originated in an anoxic, Fe2+-rich environment. We hypothesize that on early Earth, Fe2+ was a ubiquitous cofactor for nucleic acids, with roles in RNA folding and catalysis as well as in processing of nucleic acids by protein enzymes. In this model, Mg2+ replaced Fe2+ as the primary cofactor for nucleic acids in parallel with known metal substitutions of metalloproteins, driven by the Great Oxidation Event. To test predictions of this model, we assay the ability of nucleic acid processing enzymes, including a DNA polymerase, an RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase, to use Fe2+ in place of Mg2+ as a cofactor during catalysis. Results show that Fe2+ can indeed substitute for Mg2+ in catalytic function of these enzymes. Additionally, we use calculations to unravel differences in energetics, structures and reactivities of relevant Mg2+ and Fe2+ complexes. Computation explains why Fe2+ can be a more potent cofactor than Mg2+ in a variety of folding and catalytic functions. We propose that the rise of O2 on Earth drove a Fe2+ to Mg2+ substitution in proteins and nucleic acids, a hypothesis consistent with a general model in which some modern biochemical systems retain latent abilities to revert to primordial Fe2+-based states when exposed to pre-GOE conditions.

  20. Neutralizing a Surface Charge on the FMN Subdomain Increases the Activity of Neuronal Nitric-oxide Synthase by Enhancing the Oxygen Reactivity of the Enzyme Heme-Nitric Oxide Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Fadlalla, Mohammed; Wang, Zhi-Qiang; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Panda, Koustubh; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    Nitric-oxide synthases (NOSs) are calmodulin-dependent flavoheme enzymes that oxidize l-Arg to nitric oxide (NO) and l-citrulline. Their catalytic behaviors are complex and are determined by their rates of heme reduction (kr), ferric heme-NO dissociation (kd), and ferrous heme-NO oxidation (kox). We found that point mutation (E762N) of a conserved residue on the enzyme's FMN subdomain caused the NO synthesis activity to double compared with wild type nNOS. However, in the absence of l-Arg, NADPH oxidation rates suggested that electron flux through the heme was slower in E762N nNOS, and this correlated with the mutant having a 60% slower kr. During NO synthesis, little heme-NO complex accumulated in the mutant, compared with ∼50–70% of the wild-type nNOS accumulating as this complex. This suggested that the E762N nNOS is hyperactive because it minimizes buildup of an inactive ferrous heme-NO complex during NO synthesis. Indeed, we found that kox was 2 times faster in the E762N mutant than in wild-type nNOS. The mutational effect on kox was independent of calmodulin. Computer simulation and experimental measures both indicated that the slower kr and faster kox of E762N nNOS combine to lower its apparent Km,O2 for NO synthesis by at least 5-fold, which in turn increases its V/Km value and enables it to be hyperactive in steady-state NO synthesis. Our work underscores how sensitive nNOS activity is to changes in the kox and reveals a novel means for the FMN module or protein-protein interactions to alter nNOS activity. PMID:19473991

  1. Influence of salicylic acid on H2O2 production, oxidative stress, and H2O2-metabolizing enzymes. Salicylic acid-mediated oxidative damage requires H2O2.

    PubMed Central

    Rao, M V; Paliyath, G; Ormrod, D P; Murr, D P; Watkins, C B

    1997-01-01

    We investigated how salicylic acid (SA) enhances H2O2 and the relative significance of SA-enhanced H2O2 in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA treatments enhanced H2O2 production, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative damage to proteins, and resulted in the formation of chlorophyll and carotene isomers. SA-enhanced H2O2 levels were related to increased activities of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase and were independent of changes in catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities. Prolonging SA treatments inactivated catalase and ascorbate peroxidase and resulted in phytotoxic symptoms, suggesting that inactivation of H2O2-degrading enzymes serves as an indicator of hypersensitive cell death. Treatment of leaves with H2O2 alone failed to invoke SA-mediated events. Although leaves treated with H2O2 accumulated in vivo H2O2 by 2-fold compared with leaves treated with SA, the damage to membranes and proteins was significantly less, indicating that SA can cause greater damage than H2O2. However, pretreatment of leaves with dimethylthiourea, a trap for H2O2, reduced SA-induced lipid peroxidation, indicating that SA requires H2O2 to initiate oxidative damage. The relative significance of the interaction among SA, H2O2, and H2O2-metabolizing enzymes with oxidative damage and cell death is discussed. PMID:9306697

  2. DJ-1 Interacts with and Regulates Paraoxonase-2, an Enzyme Critical for Neuronal Survival in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Parsanejad, Mohammad; Bourquard, Noam; Qu, Dianbo; Zhang, Yi; Huang, En; Rousseaux, Maxime W. C.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Irrcher, Isabella; Callaghan, Steve; Vaillant, Dominique C.; Kim, Raymond H.; Slack, Ruth S.; Mak, Tak W.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Figeys, Daniel; Park, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) gene account for about 1% of all familial Parkinson's disease (PD). While its physiological function(s) are not completely clear, DJ-1 protects neurons against oxidative stress in both in vitro and in vivo models of PD. The molecular mechanism(s) through which DJ-1 alleviates oxidative stress-mediated damage remains elusive. In this study, we identified Paraoxonase-2 (PON2) as an interacting target of DJ-1. PON2 activity is elevated in response to oxidative stress and DJ-1 is crucial for this response. Importantly, we showed that PON2 deficiency hypersensitizes neurons to oxidative stress induced by MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium). Conversely, over-expression of PON2 protects neurons in this death paradigm. Interestingly, PON2 effectively rescues DJ-1 deficiency-mediated hypersensitivity to oxidative stress. Taken together, our data suggest a model by which DJ-1 exerts its antioxidant activities, at least partly through regulation of PON2. PMID:25210784

  3. Alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects indicate hydrogen tunneling and coupled motion occur in the oxidation of L-malate by NAD-malic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Karsten, W E; Hwang, C C; Cook, P F

    1999-04-06

    The NAD-malic enzyme from Ascaris suum catalyzes the divalent metal ion-dependent oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate to give pyruvate and CO2, with NAD+ as the oxidant. Alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects were measured with NAD+ or APAD+ and L-malate-2-H(D) and several different divalent metal ions. The alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are slightly higher than 1 with NAD+ and L-malate as substrates, much larger than the expected inverse isotope effect for a hybridization change from sp2 to sp3. The alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are reduced to values near 1 with L-malate-2-D as the substrate, regardless of the metal ion that is used. Data suggest the presence of quantum mechanical tunneling and coupled motion in the malic enzyme reaction when NAD+ and malate are used as substrates. Isotope effects were also measured using the D/T method with NAD+ and Mn2+ as the substrate pair. A Swain-Schaad exponent of 2.2 (less than the value of 3.26 expected for strictly semiclassical behavior) is estimated, suggesting the presence of other slow steps along the reaction pathway. With APAD+ and Mn2+ as the substrate pair, inverse alpha-secondary tritium kinetic isotope effects are observed, and a Swain-Schaad exponent of 3.3 is estimated, consistent with rate-limiting hydride transfer and no quantum mechanical tunneling or coupled motion. Data are discussed in terms of the malic enzyme mechanism and the theory developed by Huskey for D/T isotope effects as an indicator of tunneling [Huskey, W. P. (1991) J. Phys. Org. Chem. 4, 361-366].

  4. Dual-Enzyme Characteristics of Polyvinylpyrrolidone-Capped Iridium Nanoparticles and Their Cellular Protective Effect against H2O2-Induced Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Su, Hua; Liu, Dan-Dan; Zhao, Meng; Hu, Wei-Liang; Xue, Shan-Shan; Cao, Qian; Le, Xue-Yi; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2015-04-22

    Polyvinylpyrrolidone-stabilized iridium nanoparticles (PVP-IrNPs), synthesized by the facile alcoholic reduction method using abundantly available PVP as protecting agents, were first reported as enzyme mimics showing intrinsic catalase- and peroxidase-like activities. The preparation procedure was much easier and more importantly, kinetic studies found that the catalytic activity of PVP-IrNPs was comparable to previously reported platinum nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization indicated that PVP-IrNPs had the average size of approximately 1.5 nm and mainly consisted of Ir(0) chemical state. The mechanism of PVP-IrNPs' dual-enzyme activities was investigated using XPS, Electron spin resonance (ESR) and cytochrome C-based electron transfer methods. The catalase-like activity was related to the formation of oxidized species Ir(0)@IrO2 upon reaction with H2O2. The peroxidase-like activity originated from their ability acting as electron transfer mediators during the catalysis cycle, without the production of hydroxyl radicals. Interestingly, the protective effect of PVP-IrNPs against H2O2-induced cellular oxidative damage was investigated in an A549 lung cancer cell model and PVP-IrNPs displayed excellent biocompatibility and antioxidant activity. Upon pretreatment of cells with PVP-IrNPs, the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in response to H2O2 was decreased and the cell viability increased. This work will facilitate studies on the mechanism and biomedical application of nanomaterials-based enzyme mimic.

  5. Role of oxidative stress and the activity of ethylene biosynthetic enzymes on the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

    PubMed

    Nagamani, J E; Shivashankara, K S; Roy, T K

    2010-06-01

    Spongy tissue formation in 'Alphonso' mangoes (Mangifera indica L) is a major national problem leading to loss for farmers and traders. Spongy tissue is whitish sponge like tissue formed near the seed with insipid taste and off odour. Lipid peroxidation of membranes as studied by malondialdehyde formation was significantly higher in spongy tissue. Activities of antioxidative enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were lower in spongy tissue. Among the antioxidative enzymes, activities of catalase and peroxidases were severely reduced leading to membrane damage in spongy tissue. A significant reduction in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase and accumulation of ACC was also observed in spongy tissue. However, ACC synthase activity in spongy tissue was more compared to healthy tissue. Results indicate that the membrane peroxidation leading to lower activity of ACC oxidase might lead to the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

  6. Amyloid-graphene oxide as immobilization platform of Au nanocatalysts and enzymes for improved glucose-sensing activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaochen; Li, Mingjie; Li, Zehui; Lv, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Li, Chaoxu

    2017-03-15

    Two-dimensional GO nanosheets and one-dimensional lysozyme nanofibrils were hybridized through electrostatic interaction to get a novel amyloid-GO composite, which promised a biocompatible immobilization platform for Au nanocatalysts as well as enzymes. The immobilization platform could load a large and tunable amount of Au NPs while maintaining their high catalytic activity. The immobilized catalysts showed high electrochemical behaviors, being ideal as glucose sensing systems. Furthermore, enzymes could also be immobilized on the residual bare surfaces of amyloid-GO, and served by a colorimetric method for a sensitive and selective analytical glucose-detecting platform. The introduction of amyloid fibrils with super large aspect ratios (>10(3)) on GO nanosheets offers an unprecedented possibility of designing and developing novel biomimetic catalysts for broad applications in biotechnology.

  7. In vitro inhibitory effect of 1-aminobenzotriazole on drug oxidations catalyzed by human cytochrome P450 enzymes: a comparison with SKF-525A and ketoconazole.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Chie; Murase, Shigeo; Sawada, Yasufusa; Jones, Barry C; Iwasaki, Kazuhide

    2003-01-01

    1-Aminobenzotriazole (ABT) is widely used as a non-specific inhibitor of animal cytochrome P450 (CYP). In the present study, the inhibitory effect of ABT was investigated on drug oxidations catalyzed by human CYP isoforms. This inhibitory effect was compared with that of SKF-525A, another non-specific inhibitor, and ketoconazole, a potent inhibitor of CYP3A. Bacurovirus-expressed recombinant human CYP isoforms were used as an enzyme source. The specific activities for human CYP isoforms are: phenacetin O-deethylation, for CYP1A2; diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation, for CYP2C9; S-mephenytoin 4'-hydroxylation, for CYP2C19; bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation, for CYP2D6; chlorzoxazone 6-hydroxylation, for CYP2E1; testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation, nifedipine oxidation, and midazolam 1'-hydroxylation, for CYP3A4. ABT inhibited both CYP1A2-dependent activity (Ki=330 microM) and CYP2E1-dependent activity (Ki=8.7 microM). In contrast, SKF-525A weakly inhibited CYP1A2-dependent activities (46% inhibition at 1200 microM) and CYP2E1-dependent activities (65% inhibition at 1000 microM). ABT exhibited the highest Ki value for CYP2C9-dependent diclofenac 4'-hydroxylation among those determined by this assay (Ki=3500 microM). Moreover, SKF-525A showed strong inhibition of CYP2D6-dependent bufuralol 1'-hydroxylation (Ki=0.043 microM). Ketoconazole inhibited all tested drug oxidations, however, its inhibitory effect on CYP1A2-dependent activities was very weak (50% inhibition at 120 microM). ABT, SKF-525A, and ketoconazole showed different selectivity and had a wide range of Ki values for the drug oxidations catalyzed by human CYP enzymes. Therefore, we conclude that inhibitory studies designed to predict the contribution of CYP enzymes to the metabolism of certain compounds should be performed using multiple CYP inhibitors, such as ABT, SKF-525A, and ketoconazole.

  8. Molecular Phylogeny and Intricate Evolutionary History of the Three Isofunctional Enzymes Involved in the Oxidation of Protoporphyrinogen IX

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Koichi; Masuda, Tatsuru; Tajima, Naoyuki; Wada, Hajime; Sato, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles such as heme and chlorophyll are essential for biological processes, including oxygenation, respiration, and photosynthesis. In the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis pathway, protoporphyrinogen IX oxidase (Protox) catalyzes the formation of protoporphyrin IX, the last common intermediate for the biosynthesis of heme and chlorophyll. Three nonhomologous isofunctional enzymes, HemG, HemJ, and HemY, for Protox have been identified. To reveal the distribution and evolution of the three Protox enzymes, we identified homologs of each along with other heme biosynthetic enzymes by whole-genome clustering across three domains of life. Most organisms possess only one of the three Protox types, with some exceptions. Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed that HemG is mostly limited to γ-Proteobacteria whereas HemJ may have originated within α-Proteobacteria and transferred to other Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria. In contrast, HemY is ubiquitous in prokaryotes and is the only Protox in eukaryotes, so this type may be the ancestral Protox. Land plants have a unique HemY homolog that is also shared by Chloroflexus species, in addition to the main HemY homolog originating from Cyanobacteria. Meanwhile, organisms missing any Protox can be classified into two groups; those lacking most heme synthetic genes, which necessarily depend on external heme supply, and those lacking only genes involved in the conversion of uroporphyrinogen III into heme, which would use a precorrin2-dependent alternative pathway. However, hemN encoding coproporphyrinogen IX oxidase was frequently found in organisms lacking Protox enzyme, which suggests a unique role of this gene other than in heme biosynthesis. PMID:25108393

  9. Unraveling Δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate-Proline Cycle in Plants by Uncoupled Expression of Proline Oxidation Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Gad; Honig, Arik; Stein, Hanan; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Mittler, Ron; Zilberstein, Aviah

    2009-01-01

    The two-step oxidation of proline in all eukaryotes is performed at the inner mitochondrial membrane by the consecutive action of proline dehydrogenase (ProDH) that produces Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) and P5C dehydrogenase (P5CDH) that oxidizes P5C to glutamate. This catabolic route is down-regulated in plants during osmotic stress, allowing free Pro accumulation. We show here that overexpression of MsProDH in tobacco and Arabidopsis or impairment of P5C oxidation in the Arabidopsis p5cdh mutant did not change the cellular Pro to P5C ratio under ambient and osmotic stress conditions, indicating that P5C excess was reduced to Pro in a mitochondrial-cytosolic cycle. This cycle, involving ProDH and P5C reductase, exists in animal cells and now demonstrated in plants. As a part of the cycle, Pro oxidation by the ProDH-FAD complex delivers electrons to the electron transport chain. Hyperactivity of the cycle, e.g. when an excess of exogenous l-Pro is provided, generates mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) by delivering electrons to O2, as demonstrated by the mitochondria-specific MitoSox staining of superoxide ions. Lack of P5CDH activity led to higher ROS production under dark and light conditions in the presence of Pro excess, as well as rendered plants hypersensitive to heat stress. Balancing mitochondrial ROS production during increased Pro oxidation is therefore critical for avoiding Pro-related toxic effects. Hence, normal oxidation of P5C to Glu by P5CDH is key to prevent P5C-Pro intensive cycling and avoid ROS production from electron run-off. PMID:19635803

  10. Mössbauer Spectroscopy on Respiratory Complex I: The Iron–Sulfur Cluster Ensemble in the NADH-Reduced Enzyme Is Partially Oxidized

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In mitochondria, complex I (NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) couples electron transfer to proton translocation across an energy-transducing membrane. It contains a flavin mononucleotide to oxidize NADH, and an unusually long series of iron–sulfur (FeS) clusters that transfer the electrons to quinone. Understanding electron transfer in complex I requires spectroscopic and structural data to be combined to reveal the properties of individual clusters and of the ensemble. EPR studies on complex I from Bos taurus have established that five clusters (positions 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7 along the seven-cluster chain extending from the flavin) are (at least partially) reduced by NADH. The other three clusters, positions 4 and 6 plus a cluster on the other side of the flavin, are not observed in EPR spectra from the NADH-reduced enzyme: they may remain oxidized, have unusual or coupled spin states, or their EPR signals may be too fast relaxing. Here, we use Mössbauer spectroscopy on 57Fe-labeled complex I from the mitochondria of Yarrowia lipolytica to show that the cluster ensemble is only partially reduced in the NADH-reduced enzyme. The three EPR-silent clusters are oxidized, and only the terminal 4Fe cluster (position 7) is fully reduced. Together with the EPR analyses, our results reveal an alternating profile of higher and lower potential clusters between the two active sites in complex I; they are not consistent with the consensus picture of a set of isopotential clusters. The implications for intramolecular electron transfer along the extended chain of cofactors in complex I are discussed. PMID:22122402

  11. Elucidating Mechanisms of Extensive Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egolf, David A.; Melnikov, Ilarion V.; Pesch, Werner; Ecke, Robert E.

    2001-06-01

    We report studies of the mechanism for the generation of chaotic disorder in a phenomenon found in nature, Rayleigh-Bénard convection (RBC), in a regime exhaustively studied experimentally. Through large-scale, parallel-computational studies of the detailed space-time evolution of the dynamical degrees of freedom, we find that the Spiral Defect Chaos (SDC) state of RBC is spatially- and temporally- localized to defect creation/annihilation events (D.A. Egolf, I.V. Melnikov, W. Pesch, and R.E. Ecke, Nature, 404:733--736, 2000), and we elucidate how these divergent, but very brief, events lead to eventual macroscopic differences between initially similar flow patterns. We also demonstrate that SDC is extensively chaotic, in that the number of dynamical degrees of freedom (the fractal dimension) is proportional to the system size, suggesting the possibility for a hydrodynamic-like description of the long-wavelength properties of SDC. The computational technique employed shows promise for analyzing a wide variety of extended dynamical systems.

  12. Nanolayered manganese oxide/poly(4-vinylpyridine) as a biomimetic and very efficient water oxidizing catalyst: toward an artificial enzyme in artificial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Haghighi, Behzad; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Sedigh, Davood Jafarian

    2013-10-09

    Nanolayered Mn oxide/poly(4-vinylpyridine) as a model for Mn cluster in photosystem II was synthesized and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis). The compound is a very efficient water oxidizing catalyst, and sizable oxygen evolution was detected at 50 mV overpotential at near neutral pH. The number is as low as the overpotential is used by nature in photosystem II of cyanobacteria, algae and green plants for similar reactions.

  13. Oxidative and nitrative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients: effect of long-term enzyme replacement therapy and relation with glycosaminoglycan accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Donida, Bruna; Mescka, Caroline P; Rodrigues, Daiane G B; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Bitencourt, Fernanda H; Burin, Maira G; de Souza, Carolina F M; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The main treatment for MPS II is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previous studies described potential benefits of six months of ERT against oxidative stress in patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate oxidative, nitrative and inflammatory biomarkers in MPS II patients submitted to long term ERT. It were analyzed urine and blood samples from patients on ERT (mean time: 5.2years) and healthy controls. Patients presented increased levels of lipid peroxidation, assessed by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane and plasmatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Concerning to protein damage, urinary di-tyrosine (di-Tyr) was increased in patients; however, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups in plasma were not altered. It were also verified increased levels of urinary nitrate+nitrite and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) in MPS II patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were increased in treated patients. GAG levels were correlated to di-Tyr and nitrate+nitrite. Furthermore, IL-1β was positively correlated with TNF-α and NO. Contrastingly, we did not observed alterations in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, in reduced glutathione content and in the plasmatic antioxidant capacity. Although some parameters were still altered in MPS II patients, these results may suggest a protective role of long-term ERT against oxidative stress, especially upon oxidative damage to protein and enzymatic and non-enzymatic defenses. Moreover, the redox imbalance observed in treated patients seems to be GAG- and pro-inflammatory cytokine-related.

  14. Localized and Controlled Delivery of Nitric Oxide to the Conventional Outflow Pathway via Enzyme Biocatalysis: Toward Therapy for Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Chandrawati, Rona; Chang, Jason Y H; Reina-Torres, Ester; Jumeaux, Coline; Sherwood, Joseph M; Stamer, W Daniel; Zelikin, Alexander N; Overby, Darryl R; Stevens, Molly M

    2017-02-21

    Nitric oxide (NO) is able to lower intraocular pressure (IOP); however, its therapeutic effects on outflow physiology are location- and dose-dependent. An NO delivery platform that directly targets the resistance-generating region of the conventional outflow pathway and locally liberates a controlled dose of NO is reported. An increase in outflow facility (decrease in IOP) is demonstrated in a mouse model.

  15. Spectroscopic analyses of the biofuels-critical phytochemical coniferyl alcohol and its enzyme-catalyzed oxidation products.

    PubMed

    Achyuthan, Komandoor Elayavalli; Adams, Paul David; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Singh, Anup Kumar

    2009-11-23

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudokinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 microL volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 muM respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 microg/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 microg/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 microM coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 microM when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 microg/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  16. Spectroscopic Analyses of the Biofuels-Critical Phytochemical Coniferyl Alcohol and Its Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation Products

    SciTech Connect

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Adams, Paul; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Anup

    2011-07-13

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudo-kinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 mu L volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 mu M respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 mu g/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 mu g/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 mu M coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 mu M when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 mu g/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  17. Nitric Oxide and Antioxidant Enzymes in Venous and Cord Blood of Late Preterm and Term Omani Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Abiaka, Clifford; Machado, Lovina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This study assessed the role of oxidative stress in parturition in Omani mothers following growing reports that late preterm neonates were at greater risk than term neonates of perinatal death. Methods: Venous blood samples were collected during labour, and cord (neonatal) blood samples were taken after childbirth in late preterm and term from women at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman. Plasma nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, erythrocyte catalase (CAT). Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities were measured using spectrophotometric methods. Results: When compared with term mothers, late preterm mothers had markedly higher NO concentrations (μmol/L) 17.1 ± 3.3 versus 11.0 ± 5.5 (P <0.0001), and lower GPx values (U/g Hb) 94.1 ± 12.9 versus 110.4 ± 12.3 (P <0.0001). Late preterm mothers were significantly younger (P = 0.027) than term mothers and had neonates that weighed significantly less (P <0.0001) than term neonates. GPx activity was significantly reduced (P = 0.001) in late preterm neonates as compared to term neonates. CAT showed no change in activity in any comparison. Conclusion: Distinctly higher values of NO and lower GPx activity were found in late preterm mothers relative to term mothers; also, lower GPx in late preterm neonates relative to term neonates suggested a pro-oxidant-antioxidant imbalance due to the greater oxidative burden in late preterm parturition. PMID:22912922

  18. Virgin Olive Oil Enriched with Its Own Phenols or Complemented with Thyme Phenols Improves DNA Protection against Oxidation and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in Hyperlipidemic Subjects.

    PubMed

    Romeu, Marta; Rubió, Laura; Sánchez-Martos, Vanessa; Castañer, Olga; de la Torre, Rafael; Valls, Rosa M; Ras, Rosa; Pedret, Anna; Catalán, Úrsula; López de las Hazas, María del Carmen; Motilva, María J; Fitó, Montserrat; Solà, Rosa; Giralt, Montserrat

    2016-03-09

    The effects of virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with its own phenolic compounds (PC) and/or thyme PC on the protection against oxidative DNA damage and antioxidant endogenous enzymatic system (AEES) were estimated in 33 hyperlipidemic subjects after the consumption of VOO, VOO enriched with its own PC (FVOO), or VOO complemented with thyme PC (FVOOT). Compared to pre-intervention, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (a marker for DNA damage) decreased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in olive and thyme phenolic metabolites. Superoxide dismutase (AEES enzyme) significantly increased in the FVOO intervention and to a greater extent in the FVOOT with a parallel significant increase in thyme phenolic metabolites. When all three oils were compared, FVOOT appeared to have the greatest effect in protecting against oxidative DNA damage and improving AEES. The sustained intake of a FVOOT improves DNA protection against oxidation and AEES probably due to a greater bioavailability of thyme PC in hyperlipidemic subjects.

  19. Enzymological and structural studies of the mechanism of promiscuous substrate recognition by the oxidative DNA repair enzyme AlkB

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bomina; Hunt, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis–Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this “kcat/Km compensation,” which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding. PMID:19706517

  20. Enzymological and Structural Studies of the Mechanism of Promiscuous Substrate Recognition by the Oxidative DNA Repair Enzyme AlkB

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, B.; Hunt, J

    2009-01-01

    Promiscuous substrate recognition, the ability to catalyze transformations of chemically diverse compounds, is an evolutionarily advantageous, but poorly understood phenomenon. The promiscuity of DNA repair enzymes is particularly important, because it enables diverse kinds of damage to different nucleotide bases to be repaired in a metabolically parsimonious manner. We present enzymological and crystallographic studies of the mechanisms underlying promiscuous substrate recognition by Escherichia coli AlkB, a DNA repair enzyme that removes methyl adducts and some larger alkylation lesions from endocyclic positions on purine and pyrimidine bases. In vitro Michaelis-Menten analyses on a series of alkylated bases show high activity in repairing N1-methyladenine (m1A) and N3-methylcytosine (m3C), comparatively low activity in repairing 1,N6-ethenoadenine, and no detectable activity in repairing N1-methylguanine or N3-methylthymine. AlkB has a substantially higher kcat and Km for m3C compared with m1A. Therefore, the enzyme maintains similar net activity on the chemically distinct substrates by increasing the turnover rate of the substrate with nominally lower affinity. Cocrystal structures provide insight into the structural basis of this 'kcat/Km compensation,' which makes a significant contribution to promiscuous substrate recognition by AlkB. In analyzing a large ensemble of crystal structures solved in the course of these studies, we observed 2 discrete global conformations of AlkB differing in the accessibility of a tunnel hypothesized to control diffusion of the O2 substrate into the active site. Steric interactions between a series of protein loops control this conformational transition and present a plausible mechanism for preventing O2 binding before nucleotide substrate binding.

  1. Assessing Jasminum grandiflorum L. authenticity by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) and effects on physiological enzymes and oxidative species.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Grosso, Clara; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2014-01-01

    The dried flower buds of Jasminum grandiflorum L. are widely consumed as infusion and used in traditional medicine for psychiatric disorders. It is important to have a well-established method for the chemical characterization of J. grandiflorum since there are resemblances with a toxic species, Gelsemium sempervirens (L.) Jaume Saint-Hilaire. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) analysis allowed identifying six phenolic compounds for the first time. Moreover, the evaluation of in vitro activity against central nervous system (CNS) related enzymes was undertaken for the first time, as well as against reactive species in order to support the efficacy towards CNS disorders.

  2. Coordinated Changes in Antioxidative Enzymes Protect the Photosynthetic Machinery from Salinity Induced Oxidative Damage and Confer Salt Tolerance in an Extreme Halophyte Salvadora persica L.

    PubMed Central

    Rangani, Jaykumar; Parida, Asish K.; Panda, Ashok; Kumari, Asha

    2016-01-01

    Salinity-induced modulations in growth, photosynthetic pigments, relative water content (RWC), lipid peroxidation, photosynthesis, photosystem II efficiency, and changes in activity of various antioxidative enzymes were studied in the halophyte Salvadora persica treated with various levels of salinity (0, 250, 500, 750, and 1000 mM NaCl) to obtain an insight into the salt tolerance ability of this halophyte. Both fresh and dry biomass as well as leaf area (LA) declined at all levels of salinity whereas salinity caused an increase in leaf succulence. A gradual increase was observed in the Na+ content of leaf with increasing salt concentration up to 750 mM NaCl, but at higher salt concentration (1000 mM NaCl), the Na+ content surprisingly dropped down to the level of 250 mM NaCl. The chlorophyll and carotenoid contents of the leaf remained unaffected by salinity. The photosynthetic rate (PN), stomatal conductance (gs), the transpiration rate (E), quantum yield of PSII (ΦPSII), photochemical quenching (qP), and electron transport rate remained unchanged at low salinity (250 to 500 mM NaCl) whereas, significant reduction in these parameters were observed at high salinity (750 to 1000 mM NaCl). The RWC% and water use efficiency (WUE) of leaf remained unaffected by salinity. The salinity had no effect on maximum quantum efficiency of PS II (Fv/Fm) which indicates that PS II is not perturbed by salinity-induced oxidative damage. Analysis of the isoforms of antioxidative enzymes revealed that the leaves of S. persica have two isoforms each of Mn-SOD and Fe-SOD and one isoform of Cu-Zn SOD, three isoforms of POX, two isoforms of APX and one isoform of CAT. There was differential responses in activity and expression of different isoforms of various antioxidative enzymes. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content (a product of lipid peroxidation) of leaf remained unchanged in S. persica treated with various levels of salinity. Our results suggest that the absence of pigment

  3. The in vivo infusion of hydrogen peroxide induces oxidative stress and differentially affects the activities of small intestinal carbohydrate digestive enzymes in the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Mine, Y; Widowski, T; Archbold, T; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by persistent and relapsing fatigue that involves oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that a decrease in key carbohydrate-digesting enzyme activity in the gut is one of the major biological mechanisms of developing CFS in liquid formula-fed neonatal pigs with in vivo infusion of H(2)O(2). Piglets at 7 to 10 d of age were fitted with an intraperitoneal catheter, allowed a 3-d post surgical recovery, and infused with either H(2)O(2) at 5 mmol/kg BW (PER; n = 8) or the same volume of saline (CON; n = 8) in six 20-ml doses daily for a period of 10 d. During this period, animal behavior was monitored, blood samples collected, and jejunal enzyme activity kinetic experiments for lactase, sucrase, maltase, and maltase-glucoamylase were conducted. Plasma concentration of reduced glutathione remained similar (P > 0.05) to the pre-infusion level over the study duration in the CON group whereas this was 65% lower (P < 0.05) than the pre-infusion level in the PER group. Piglets experiencing oxidative stress had an overall lower (P < 0.05) physical mobility and the maximal jejunal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] for lactase (PER, 6.54 ± 0.68 vs. CON, 12.65 ± 0.69) and maltase (PER, 57.39 ± 1.02 vs. CON, 75.60 ± 1.04), respectively. However, differences were not observed (P > 0.05) in the maximal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] of sucrase (PER, 10.50 ± 1.37 vs. CON, 12.40 ± 1.55) and maltase-glucoamylase (PER, 0.71 ± 0.08 vs. CON, 0.70 ± 0.07) between the 2 groups. In conclusion, infusion of a suitable dose of H(2)O(2) induced CFS in the neonatal pigs. Oxidative stress in vivo differentially affected the maximal activities of important small intestinal carbohydrate-digesting enzymes in neonatal pigs fed a dairy milk-based liquid formula.

  4. Effect of Aloe vera gel extract on antioxidant enzymes and azoxymethane-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Anilakumar, K R; Sudarshanakrishna, K R; Chandramohan, G; Ilaiyaraja, N; Khanum, Farhath; Bawa, A S

    2010-08-01

    The present work was undertaken with a view to study the effect of oral feeding of 2% Aloe vera gel extract (AGE) for 30 days on azoxymethane (AOM)-induced oxidative stress in rats. It was observed that AOM administration resulted in a significant increase in malondialdehyde and conjugated dienes, with reduction in hepatic glutathione (GSH), vitamin A and uric acid contents. AOM-induced reduction in hepatic GSH and uric acid was brought back to normal by AGE. There was a significant raise in hepatic catalase, superoxide dismutase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) activities as a result of feeding of the extract. Ingestion of the extract effected reduction in AOM-induced colonic GSH-peroxidase, G-6-PD and glutathione S-transferase and femur bone marrow micronuclei formation. Hence, it is suggested that Aloe vera gel extract possess the ability to reduce AOM- induced oxidative stress and toxicity in liver.

  5. Enzyme-free Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide from Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Immobilized on Poly(4-vinylpyridine) Self-Assembled Monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Gaynor, James D.; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Inerbaev, Talgat; Sanghavi, Shail P.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Shutthanandan, V.; Seal, Sudipta; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai

    2013-05-02

    A single layer of oxygen-deficient cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) are immobilized on microscopic glass slide using poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). A specific colorimetric property of CNPs when reacted with hydrogen peroxide allows for the direct, single-step peroxide detection which can be used in medical diagnosis and explosives detection. Multiple PVP-CNP immobilized layers improve sensitivity of detection and the sensor can be regenerated for reuse.

  6. Impact of myeloperoxidase-LDL interactions on enzyme activity and subsequent posttranslational oxidative modifications of apoB-100

    PubMed Central

    Delporte, Cédric; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Noyon, Caroline; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Nuyens, Vincent; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Madhoun, Philippe; Desmet, Jean-Marc; Raynal, Pierre; Dufour, Damien; Koyani, Chintan N.; Reyé, Florence; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Ducobu, Jean; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Nève, Jean; Vanhamme, Luc; Obinger, Christian; Malle, Ernst; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-chloride system is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The present study aimed at investigating the interaction of MPO with native and modified LDL and at revealing posttranslational modifications on apoB-100 (the unique apolipoprotein of LDL) in vitro and in vivo. Using amperometry, we demonstrate that MPO activity increases up to 90% when it is adsorbed at the surface of LDL. This phenomenon is apparently reflected by local structural changes in MPO observed by circular dichroism. Using MS, we further analyzed in vitro modifications of apoB-100 by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system or added as a reagent. A total of 97 peptides containing modified residues could be identified. Furthermore, differences were observed between LDL oxidized by reagent HOCl or HOCl generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system. Finally, LDL was isolated from patients with high cardiovascular risk to confirm that our in vitro findings are also relevant in vivo. We show that several HOCl-mediated modifications of apoB-100 identified in vitro were also present on LDL isolated from patients who have increased levels of plasma MPO and MPO-modified LDL. In conclusion, these data emphasize the specificity of MPO to oxidize LDL. PMID:24534704

  7. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  8. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (p<0.05 respectively) and TB (p<0.001) were higher in SCA subjects than in NSCA subjects. [R] and [NOx] were higher in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 and p<0.05 respectively). Supplementation caused greater percent increases in [R], and [NOX] in SCA than in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). l-Arginine caused greater percent reductions in ALT and AST in SCA subjects but greater percent reduction in ALP in NSCA subjects (p<0.001 in each case). Changes in [MDA] and [TB] in the two groups were similar. Study shows that chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine improved liver function, oxidative stress, plasma arginine concentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects.

  9. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms.

  10. Effect of prochloraz fungicide on biotransformation enzymes and oxidative stress parameters in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.).

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Wilfried; Piccini, Benjamin; Porcher, Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize biomarker responses in three-spined sticklebacks exposed to prochloraz (Pcz). For this purpose, adult sticklebacks were exposed for 2 weeks to prochloraz at 0, 10, 50, 100 and 500 microg/L prior to one week of depuration in clean water. At days 7, 14 and 21, several hepatic biomarkers were measured including 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), total glutathione (GSH) content and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS). Pcz induced a transient increase of antioxidant enzymes and a depletion of glutathione content during the first 7 days of exposure. This study showed that EROD activity and antioxidants were disrupted in a transient manner. GST was rapidly induced in a dose-dependent manner and this induction was persistent and observed also after depuration. GST appeared as a valuable biomarker to assess the exposure to Pcz.

  11. Oxidative injury and antioxidant enzymes regulation in arsenic-exposed seedlings of four Brassica napus L. cultivars.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad A; Li, Lan; Ali, Basharat; Gill, Rafaqat A; Wang, Jian; Ali, Shafaqat; Gill, Muhammad B; Zhou, Weijun

    2015-07-01

    Environmental contamination due to arsenic (As) has become a major risk throughout the world; this affects plant growth and productivity. Its accumulation in food chain may pose a severe threat to organisms. The present study was carried out to observe the toxic effects of As (0, 50, 100, and 200 μM) on physiological and biochemical changes in four Brassica napus cultivars (ZS 758, Zheda 619, ZY 50, and Zheda 622). Results showed that As toxicity provoked a significant inhibition in growth parameters of B. napus cultivars and this reduction was more obvious in cultivar Zheda 622. The highest concentration of MDA, H2O2, and O2 (-) contents in both leaf and root tissues were observed at 200 μM As level, and a gradual decrease was observed at lower concentrations. Increasing As concentration gradually decreased chlorophyll and carotenoids contents. Activity of antioxidant enzymes such as SOD, CAT, APX, GR, and GSH was positively correlated with As treatments in all cultivars. The microscopic study of leaves and roots at 200 μM As level showed the disorganization in cell organelles. Disturbance in the morphology of chloroplast, broken cell wall, increase in size, and number of starch grains and immature nucleus were found in leaf ultrastructures under higher concentration of As. Moreover, damaged nucleus, diffused cell wall, enlarged vacuoles, and a number of mitochondria were observed in root tip cells at 200 μM As level. These results suggest that B. napus cultivars have efficient mechanism to tolerate As toxicity, as evidenced by an increased level of antioxidant enzymes.

  12. The impact of individual cytochrome P450 enzymes on oxidative metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene in human livers.

    PubMed

    Šulc, Miroslav; Indra, Radek; Moserová, Michaela; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Arlt, Volker M; Stiborová, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In this study human recombinant CYPs (CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2E1, 3A4, and 3A5) were expressed in Supersomes™ together with their reductases, NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase, epoxide hydrolase and cytochrome b5 , to investigate BaP metabolism. Human CYPs produced up to eight BaP metabolites. Among these, BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol and BaP-9-ol, which are intermediates in BaP-derived DNA adduct formation, were mainly formed by CYP1A1 and 1B1, and to a lesser extent by CYP2C19 and 3A4. BaP-3-ol, a metabolite that is a 'detoxified' product of BaP, was formed by most human CYPs tested, although CYP1A1 and 1B1 produced it the most efficiently. Based on the amounts of the individual BaP metabolites formed by these CYPs and their expression levels in human liver, we determined their contributions to BaP metabolite formation in this organ. Our results indicate that hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP2C19 are most important in the activation of BaP to BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol, whereas CYP2C19, 3A4, and 1A1 are the major enzymes contributing to the formation of BaP-9-ol. BaP-3-ol is predominantly formed by hepatic CYP3A4, while CYP1A1 and 2C19 are less active.

  13. Priming of pathogenesis related-proteins and enzymes related to oxidative stress by plant growth promoting rhizobacteria on rice plants upon abiotic and biotic stress challenge.

    PubMed

    García-Cristobal, J; García-Villaraco, A; Ramos, B; Gutierrez-Mañero, J; Lucas, J A

    2015-09-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were tested to evaluate their capacity to prime rice seedlings against stress challenge (salt and Xanthomonas campestris infection). As is accepted that plants respond to biotic and abiotic stresses by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), enzyme activities related to oxidative stress (ascorbate peroxidase (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX, EC 1.11.1.7), glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.6.4.2) and superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1)) as well as the pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) ß-1,3-glucanase (PR2, EC 3.2.1.6) and chitinase (PR3, EC 3.2.1.14) were measured at 3 time points after stress challenge. In addition, photosynthetic parameters related with fluorescence emission of photosystem II (F0, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII and NPQ) were also measured although they were barely affected. Both strains were able to protect rice seedlings against salt stress. AMG272 reduced the salt symptoms over 47% with regard to control, and L81 over 90%. Upon pathogen challenge, 90% protection was achieved by both strains. All enzyme activities related to oxidative stress were modified by the two PGPR, especially APX and SOD upon salinity stress challenge, and APX and GR upon pathogen presence. Both bacteria induced chitinase activity 24 and 48 h after pathogen inoculation, and L81 induced ß-1,3-Glucanase activity 48 h after pathogen inoculation, evidencing the priming effect. These results indicate that these strains could be used as bio-fortifying agents in biotechnological inoculants in order to reduce the effects of different stresses, and indirectly reduce the use of agrochemicals.

  14. Kinetic studies on enzyme-catalyzed reactions: oxidation of glucose, decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and their combination.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Raffel, Ryan A; Souid, Abdul-Kader; Goodisman, Jerry

    2009-04-08

    The kinetics of the glucose oxidase-catalyzed reaction of glucose with O2, which produces gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the catalase-assisted breakdown of hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen, have been measured via the rate of O2 depletion or production. The O2 concentrations in air-saturated phosphate-buffered salt solutions were monitored by measuring the decay of phosphorescence from a Pd phosphor in solution; the decay rate was obtained by fitting the tail of the phosphorescence intensity profile to an exponential. For glucose oxidation in the presence of glucose oxidase, the rate constant determined for the rate-limiting step was k = (3.0 +/- 0.7) x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at 37 degrees C. For catalase-catalyzed H2O2 breakdown, the reaction order in [H2O2] was somewhat greater than unity at 37 degrees C and well above unity at 25 degrees C, suggesting different temperature dependences of the rate constants for various steps in the reaction. The two reactions were combined in a single experiment: addition of glucose oxidase to glucose-rich cell-free media caused a rapid drop in [O2], and subsequent addition of catalase caused [O2] to rise and then decrease to zero. The best fit of [O2] to a kinetic model is obtained with the rate constants for glucose oxidation and peroxide decomposition equal to 0.116 s(-1) and 0.090 s(-1) respectively. Cellular respiration in the presence of glucose was found to be three times as rapid as that in glucose-deprived cells. Added NaCN inhibited O2 consumption completely, confirming that oxidation occurred in the cellular mitochondrial respiratory chain.

  15. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of different dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics ( Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  16. Juniperus communis Linn oil decreases oxidative stress and increases antioxidant enzymes in the heart of rats administered a diet rich in cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Gumral, Nurhan; Kumbul, Duygu Doguc; Aylak, Firdevs; Saygin, Mustafa; Savik, Emin

    2015-01-01

    It has been asserted that consumption of dietary cholesterol (Chol) raises atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases and that Chol causes an increase in free radical production. Hypercholesterolemic diet has also been reported to cause changes in the antioxidant system. In our study, different doses of Juniperus communis Linn (JCL) oil, a tree species growing in Mediterranean and Isparta regions and having aromatic characteristics, were administered to rats; and the levels of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), catalase (CAT), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay (TBARS) were examined in the heart tissue of rats. In this study, 35 Wistar Albino male adult rats weighing approximately 250-300 g were used. The rats were divided into five groups of seven each. The control group was administered normal pellet chow, and the Chol group was administered pellet chow including 2% Chol, while 50 JCL, 100 JCL, and 200 JCL groups were administered 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg JCL oil dissolved in 0.5% sodium carboxy methyl cellulose, respectively, in addition to the pellet chow containing 2% Chol, by gavage. After 30 days, the experiment was terminated and the antioxidant enzyme activities were examined in the heart tissue of rats. While consumption of dietary Chol decreases the activities of SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT in heart tissue of rats (not significant), administeration of 200 mg/kg JCL oil in addition to Chol led to a significant increase in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. Administering Chol led to a significant increase in TBARS level. Administering 100 and 200 mg/kg JCL oil together with Chol prevented significantly the increase in lipid peroxides. As a result of the study, JCL oil showed oxidant-antioxidant effect in the heart tissue of rats.

  17. Changes of platelet antioxidative enzymes during oxidative stress: the protective effect of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa and grape seeds.

    PubMed

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław; Erler, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Aronia melanocarpa fruits (Rosaceae) and grape seeds (seeds of Vitis vinifera, Vitaceae) are two of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances, and they have been shown to have various biological activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the action of phenolic extracts (at concentrations 5-100 µg/mL) of two different plants, berries of A. melanocarpa (chokebbery) and grape seeds, on the activities of various antioxidative enzymes, the amount of glutathione (as an important component of redox status) in control the platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2) (the strong physiological oxidant) in vitro. The properties of these two tested extracts were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative and antiplatelet commercial monomeric polyphenol - resveratrol. The extract from berries of A. melanocarpa, like the extract from grape seeds, reduced the changes in activities of different antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase) in platelets treated with H(2)O(2). The action of the two tested plant extracts and H(2)O(2) evoked a significant increase of reduced glutathione in platelets compared with platelets treated with H(2)O(2) only. Comparative studies indicate that the two tested plant extracts had similar antioxidative properties, and were found to be more reactive in blood platelets than the solution of resveratrol.

  18. Real-time and in situ enzyme inhibition assay for the flux of hydrogen sulfide based on 3D interwoven AuPd-reduced graphene oxide network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Li, Li; Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lina; Ge, Shenguang; Yu, Jinghua

    2017-01-15

    A highly sensitive enzyme inhibition analytical platform was established firstly based on paper-supported 3D interwoven AuPd-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) network (NW) for real-time and in situ analysis of H2S released from cancer cells. The novel paper working electrode (PWE) with large electric conductivity, effective surface area and unusual biocompatibility, was fabricated via controllably assembling rGO and AuPd alloy nanoparticles onto the surface of cellulose fibers and into the macropores of paper, which was employed as affinity matrix for horseradish peroxidase (HRP) loading and cells capture. It was the superior performances of AuPd-rGO-NW-PWE that made the loaded HRP exhibit excellent electrocatalytic behavior to H2O2, bring the rapid enhancement of current response. After releasing H2S, the current response would be obviously decreased due to the efficient inhibition effect of H2S on HRP activity. The inhibition degree of HRP was directly proportional to the amount of H2S, and so, the flux of H2S released from cells could be recorded availably. Thus, this proposed enzyme inhibition cyto-sensor could be applied for efficient recording of the release of H2S, which had potential utility to cellular biology and pathophysiology.

  19. Macromolecular crowding effect upon in vitro enzyme kinetics: mixed activation-diffusion control of the oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Cristina; Pastor, Isabel; Vilaseca, Eudald; Madurga, Sergio; Cascante, Marta; Mas, Francesc

    2014-04-17

    Enzyme kinetics studies have been usually designed as dilute solution experiments, which differ substantially from in vivo conditions. However, cell cytosol is crowded with a high concentration of molecules having different shapes and sizes. The consequences of such crowding in enzymatic reactions remain unclear. The aim of the present study is to understand the effect of macromolecular crowding produced by dextran of different sizes and at diverse concentrations in the well-known reaction of oxidation of NADH by pyruvate catalyzed by L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Our results indicate that the reaction rate is determined by both the occupied volume and the relative size of dextran obstacles with respect to the enzyme present in the reaction. Moreover, we analyzed the influence of macromolecular crowding on the Michaelis-Menten constants, vmax and Km. The obtained results show that only high concentrations and large sizes of dextran reduce both constants suggesting a mixed activation-diffusion control of this enzymatic reaction due to the dextran crowding action. From our knowledge, this is the first experimental study that depicts mixed activation-diffusion control in an enzymatic reaction due to the effect of crowding.

  20. Do Antioxidant Enzymes and Glutathione Play Roles in the Induction of Hepatic Oxidative Stress in Mice upon Subchronic Exposure to Mixtures of Dichloroacetate and Trichloroacetate?

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar; Cearfoss, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) are water chlorination byproducts, and their mixtures were previously found to induce additive to greater than additive effects on hepatic oxidative stress (OS) induction in mice after subchronic exposure. To investigate the roles of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione (GSH) in those effects, livers of B6C3F1 mice treated by gavage with 7.5, 15, or 30 mg DCA/kg/day, 12.5, 25, or 50 mg TCA/kg/day, and mixtures (Mix I, Mix II and Mix III) at DCA:TCA ratios corresponding to 7.5:12.5, 15:25 and 25:50 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 13 weeks. Livers were assayed for superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as for GSH levels. In general, DCA suppressed SOD and GSH-Px activities and GSH levels but caused no changes in CAT activity; TCA increased SOD and CAT activities, suppressed GSH-Px activity, but did not change GSH levels; mixtures of DCA and TCA increased SOD and CAT activities and suppressed GSH-Px activity and GSH levels. In conclusion, antioxidant enzymes contribute to DCA-, TCA- and mixtures-induced OS, but not to changes from additive to greater than additive effects produced by different mixture compositions of the compounds. GSH on the hand may contribute to these changes. PMID:25530655

  1. Enzymic degradation of plasma arginine using arginine deiminase inhibits nitric oxide production and protects mice from the lethal effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J Brandon; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Ensor, C Mark; Bomalaski, John S; Clark, Mike A

    2002-01-01

    Septic shock is mediated in part by nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha). NO is synthesized primarily from extracellular arginine. We tested the ability of an arginine-degrading enzyme to inhibit NO production in mice and to protect mice from the hypotension and lethality that occur after the administration of TNFalpha or endotoxin. Treatment of BALB/c mice with arginine deiminase (ADI) formulated with succinimidyl succinimide polyethylene glycol of M(r) 20000 (ADI-SS PEG(20000)) eliminated all measurable plasma arginine (from normal levels of approximately 155 microM arginine to 2 microM). In addition, ADI-SS PEG(20000) also inhibited the production of NO, as quantified by plasma nitrate+nitrite. Treatment of mice with TNFalpha or endotoxin resulted in a dose-dependent increase in NO production and lethality. Pretreatment of mice with ADI-SS PEG(20000) resulted in increased resistance to the lethal effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin. These observations are consistent with NO production resulting, to some extent, from the metabolism of extracellular arginine. The toxic effects of TNFalpha and endotoxin may be partially inhibited by enzymic degradation of plasma arginine by ADI-SS PEG(20000). Interestingly, pretreatment with ADI-SS PEG(20000) did not inhibit the anti-tumour activity of TNFalpha in vitro or in vivo. This treatment may allow greater amounts of TNFalpha, as well as other cytokines, to be administered while abrogating side effects such as hypotension and death. PMID:11964159

  2. Evolution of enzyme superfamilies.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Margaret E; Gerlt, John A; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2006-10-01

    Enzyme evolution is often constrained by aspects of catalysis. Sets of homologous proteins that catalyze different overall reactions but share an aspect of catalysis, such as a common partial reaction, are called mechanistically diverse superfamilies. The common mechanistic steps and structural characteristics of several of these superfamilies, including the enolase, Nudix, amidohydrolase, and haloacid dehalogenase superfamilies have been characterized. In addition, studies of mechanistically diverse superfamilies are helping to elucidate mechanisms of functional diversification, such as catalytic promiscuity. Understanding how enzyme superfamilies evolve is vital for accurate genome annotation, predicting protein functions, and protein engineering.

  3. Enzyme assays.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  4. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Rishpon, Judith; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  5. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna; Safarik, Ivo

    2015-04-01

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (-20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties.

  6. The impact of individual cytochrome P450 enzymes on oxidative metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene in human livers

    PubMed Central

    Šulc, Miroslav; Indra, Radek; Moserová, Michaela; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Frei, Eva; Arlt, Volker M.; White, P.

    2016-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a human carcinogen that covalently binds to DNA after metabolic activation by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. In this study human recombinant CYPs (CYP1A1, 1A2, 1B1, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2E1, 3A4, and 3A5) were expressed in Supersomes™ together with their reductases, NADPH:CYP oxidoreductase, epoxide hydrolase and cytochrome b5, to investigate BaP metabolism. Human CYPs produced up to eight BaP metabolites. Among these, BaP‐7,8‐dihydrodiol and BaP‐9‐ol, which are intermediates in BaP‐derived DNA adduct formation, were mainly formed by CYP1A1 and 1B1, and to a lesser extent by CYP2C19 and 3A4. BaP‐3‐ol, a metabolite that is a ‘detoxified’ product of BaP, was formed by most human CYPs tested, although CYP1A1 and 1B1 produced it the most efficiently. Based on the amounts of the individual BaP metabolites formed by these CYPs and their expression levels in human liver, we determined their contributions to BaP metabolite formation in this organ. Our results indicate that hepatic CYP1A1 and CYP2C19 are most important in the activation of BaP to BaP‐7,8‐dihydrodiol, whereas CYP2C19, 3A4, and 1A1 are the major enzymes contributing to the formation of BaP‐9‐ol. BaP‐3‐ol is predominantly formed by hepatic CYP3A4, while CYP1A1 and 2C19 are less active. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:229–235, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26919089

  7. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Amiri Behzadi, Alidad; Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Ahmadi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. (U. dioica) has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica. Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. Results: The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:28078249

  8. In vitro antidiabetic and inhibitory potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa L) rhizome against cellular and LDL oxidation and angiotensin converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Lekshmi, P C; Arimboor, Ranjith; Nisha, V M; Menon, A Nirmala; Raghu, K G

    2014-12-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa L) rhizome extracts were evaluated for their antidiabetic, antihypertensive and antioxidant potentials. α-Glucosidase (0.4 μg/mL) and α-amylase (0.4 μg/mL) inhibitory potential of turmeric ethyl acetate extract was significantly higher than those of the reference drug acarbose (17.1 μg/mL and 290.6 μg/mL respectively). Protein glycation inhibitory potential of ethyl acetate extract was 800 times higher than that of ascorbic acid. High potential of ethyl acetate extract to scavenge free radicals and to reduce LDL oxidation and cellular oxidative stress was also revealed. The positive correlation obtained between the free radical scavenging capacity of the extracts and their antiglycation potential further confirmed the role of antioxidants in controlling glycation reactions. Ethyl acetate extract was also found as effective in reducing hypertension by inhibiting angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antidiabetic, ACE inhibitory and antioxidant capacities of the extracts were in the order of their curcumin contents.

  9. An electric detection of immunoglobulin G in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using an indium oxide nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Cui, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) are used to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles were layer-by-layer self-assembled with the oppositely charged polyelectrolyte as the electrochemical transducer and antibody immobilization site, respectively. The assay was conducted on a novel platform of indium oxide nanoparticle ISFETs, where the electric signals are generated in response to the concentration of target IgG using the labeled detecting antibody. The sandwiched ELISA structure catalyzed the conversion of the acidic substrate into neutral substance with the aid of horseradish peroxidase. The pH change in the substrate solution was detected by nanoparticle ISFETs. Normal rabbit IgG was used as a model antigen whose detection limit of 0.04 ng ml-1 was found. The facile electric detection in the conventional assay through the semiconducting nanoparticle ISFET has potential applications as a point-of-care detection or a sensing element in a lab-on-a-chip system.

  10. Spectroscopic and crystallographic characterization of "alternative resting" and "resting oxidized" enzyme forms of bilirubin oxidase: implications for activity and electrochemical behavior of multicopper oxidases.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Christian H; Durand, Fabien; Tasca, Federico; Qayyum, Munzarin F; Kauffmann, Brice; Gounel, Sébastien; Suraniti, Emmanuel; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Mano, Nicolas; Solomon, Edward I

    2012-03-28

    While there is broad agreement on the catalytic mechanism of multicopper oxidases (MCOs), the geometric and electronic structures of the resting trinuclear Cu cluster have been variable, and their relevance to catalysis has been debated. Here, we present a spectroscopic characterization, complemented by crystallographic data, of two resting forms occurring in the same enzyme and define their interconversion. The resting oxidized form shows similar features to the resting form in Rhus vernicifera and Trametes versicolor laccase, characterized by "normal" type 2 Cu electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) features, 330 nm absorption shoulder, and a short type 3 (T3) Cu-Cu distance, while the alternative resting form shows unusually small A(||) and high g(||) EPR features, lack of 330 nm absorption intensity, and a long T3 Cu-Cu distance. These different forms are evaluated with respect to activation for catalysis, and it is shown that the alternative resting form can only be activated by low-potential reduction, in contrast to the resting oxidized form which is activated via type 1 Cu at high potential. This difference in activity is correlated to differences in redox states of the two forms and highlights the requirement for efficient sequential reduction of resting MCOs for their involvement in catalysis.

  11. Antioxidant-enzyme reaction to the oxidative stress due to alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    PubMed

    Chahid, Karim; Laglaoui, Amin; Zantar, Said; Ennabili, Abdeslam

    2015-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) becomes one of the world's foremost vegetables, and its world production and consumption have increased fairly quickly. The capacity to induce oxidative stress in tomato plant, exposed to three xenobiotics such as alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb, was investigated by the evaluation of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) rate; also, we studied the response of tomato to this stress by assessing the response of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). The effect of the insecticides was observed using four concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) for germinating seeds and only the recommended concentration in agriculture (100%) for growing plants. Our results show an important accumulation of MDA, demonstrating the increase of lipid peroxidation in consequence of the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to insecticide treatment. In response to this oxidative stress in tomato seedlings and plants, the activities of antioxidant-enzyme system were generally enhanced. The electrophoretic analysis showed also the apparition of new isoenzymes as the case for CAT and POD.

  12. The multifunctional DNA repair/redox enzyme Ape1/Ref-1 promotes survival of neurons after oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Vasko, Michael R; Guo, Chunlu; Kelley, Mark R

    2005-03-02

    Although correlative studies demonstrate a reduction in the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease/redox effector factor (Ape1/Ref-1 or Ape1) in neural tissues after neuronal insult, the role of Ape1 in regulating neurotoxicity remains to be elucidated. To address this issue, we examined the effects of reducing Ape1 expression in primary cultures of hippocampal and sensory neurons on several endpoints of neurotoxicity induced by H2O2. Ape1 is highly expressed in hippocampal and sensory neurons grown in culture as indicated by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and activity. Exposing hippocampal or sensory neuronal cultures to 25 or 50 nM small interfering RNA to Ape1 (Ape1siRNA), respectively, for 48 h, causes a reduction in immunoreactive Ape1 by approximately 65 and 54%, and an equivalent loss in endonuclease activity. The reduced expression of Ape1 is maintained for up to 5 days after the siRNA in the medium is removed, whereas exposing cultures to scrambled sequence siRNA (SCsiRNA) has no effect of Ape1 protein levels. The reduction in Ape1 significantly reduces cell viability in cultures 24 h after a 1-h exposure to 25-300 microM H2O2, compared to SCsiRNA treated controls. In cells treated with SCsiRNA, exposure to 300 microM H2O2 reduced cell viability by 40 and 30% in hippocampal and sensory neuronal cultures, respectively, whereas cultures treated with Ape1siRNA lost 93 and 80% of cells after the peroxide. Reduced Ape1 levels also increase caspase-3 activity in the cells, 2-3-fold, 60min after a 1-h exposure to 100 microM H2O2 in the cultures. Exposing neuronal cultures with reduced expression of Ape1 to 65 microM H2O2 (hippocampal) or 300 microM H2O2 (sensory) for 1h results in a 3-fold and 1.5-fold increase in the phosphorylation of histone H2A.X compared to cells exposed to SCsiRNA. Overexpressing wild-type Ape1 in hippocampal and sensory cells using adenoviral expression constructs results in significant increase in cell viability after

  13. Kinetic analysis of the mitochondrial quinol-oxidizing enzymes during development of thermogenesis in Arum maculatum L.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, G R; Krab, K; Whitehouse, D G; Moore, A L

    1996-01-01

    The dependence of the rate of oxygen uptake upon the ubiquinone (Q)-pool reduction level in mitochondria isolated during the development of thermogenesis of Arum maculatum spadices has been investigated. At the alpha-stage of development, the respiratory rate was linearly dependent upon the reduction level of the Q-pool (Qr) both under state-3 and -4 conditions. Progression through the beta/gamma to the delta-stage resulted in a non-linear dependence of the state-4 rate on Qr. In the delta-stage of development, both state-3 and -4 respiratory rates were linearly dependent upon Qr due to a shift in the engagement of the alternative oxidase to lower levels of Qr. Western blot analysis revealed that increased alternative oxidase activity could be correlated with expression of a 35 kDa protein. Respiratory control was only observed with mitochondria in the alpha-stage of development. At the beta/gamma-stage of development, the addition of ADP resulted in a significant oxidation of the Q-pool which was accompanied by a decrease in the respiratory rate. This was due either to decreased contribution of the alternative pathway to the overall respiratory rate under state 3 or by deactivation of succinate dehydrogenase activity by ADP. Cold-storage of the spadices at the beta-stage of development led to increased activity of both the cytochrome pathway and succinate dehydrogenase, without any change in alternative oxidase activity. Results are discussed in terms of how changes in the activation level of the alternative oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase influence the activity and engagement of the quinol-oxidizing pathways during the development of thermogenesis in A. maculatum. PMID:8694781

  14. The effect of sumatriptan on nitric oxide synthase enzyme production after iatrogenic inflammation in the brain stem of adolescent rats: A randomized, controlled, experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Demirpence, Savas; Kurul, Semra Hiz; Kiray, Müge; Tugyan, Kazim; Yilmaz, Osman; Köse, Galip

    2009-01-01

    Background: Migraine is a common disabling disorder of childhood and adolescence. Despite advances in the understanding of migraine pathophysiology, treatment remains a challenge. Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the production of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes in the brain stem of adolescent rats, using an experimental model of migraine, and the effect of sumatriptan pretreatment on the production of the NOS enzymes. Methods: Male adolescent (aged ~2 months) Wistar rats were used in the study. The animals were anesthetized using pentobarbital. The trigeminovascular system was stimulated by injecting a proinflammatory molecule, carrageenan, into the cis-terna magna of the anesthetized rats. The animals were divided into 3 groups of equal size: (1) the study group, in which the rats were treated with sumatriptan succinate 2 hours before intracisternal carrageenan injection; (2) the sham group, in which the rats were not administered intracisternal carrageenan injection or sumatriptan pretreatment; and (3) the control group, in which the rats were administered intracisternal carrageenan injection but were not pretreated with sumatriptan. In the control and study groups, the rats were euthanized using ether anesthesia 1 hour after intracisternal carrageenan injection. Rats in the sham group were euthanized 1 hour after intracisternal catheterization. Brain tissue was removed and endothelial NOS (eNOS), neuronal NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS) immunohistochemistry was performed. Results: Twenty-one rats were randomized into 3 groups of 7. The mean values of the immunolabeling intensities for eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS enzymes in the brain stem were significantly lower in the sham group compared with the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.002, and P = 0.001, respectively). The mean values of the immunolabeling intensities of eNOS, nNOS, and iNOS in the brain stem were significantly lower in the study group compared with the control group (P = 0

  15. Effect of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokines, oxidative stress, and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ande, Anusha; McArthur, Carole; Ayuk, Leo; Awasom, Charles; Achu, Paul Ngang; Njinda, Annette; Sinha, Namita; Rao, P S S; Agudelo, Marisela; Nookala, Anantha Ram; Simon, Stephen; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Mild-to-moderate tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, and is known to exacerbate HIV pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the specific effects of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokine production, and oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 (CYP) pathways in HIV-infected individuals who have not yet received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-two human subjects were recruited and assigned to four different cohorts as follows: a) HIV negative non-smokers, b) HIV positive non-smokers, c) HIV negative mild-to-moderate smokers, and d) HIV positive mild-to-moderate smokers. Patients were recruited in Cameroon, Africa using strict selection criteria to exclude patients not yet eligible for ART and not receiving conventional or traditional medications. Those with active tuberculosis, hepatitis B or with a history of substance abuse were also excluded. Our results showed an increase in the viral load in the plasma of HIV positive patients who were mild-to-moderate smokers compared to individuals who did not smoke. Furthermore, although we did not observe significant changes in the levels of most pro-inflammatory cytokines, the cytokine IL-8 and MCP-1 showed a significant decrease in the plasma of HIV-infected patients and smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Importantly, HIV-infected individuals and smokers showed a significant increase in oxidative stress compared with HIV negative non-smoker subjects in both plasma and monocytes. To examine the possible pathways involved in increased oxidative stress and viral load, we determined the mRNA levels of several antioxidant and cytochrome P450 enzymes in monocytes. The results showed that the levels of most antioxidants are unaltered, suggesting their inability to counter oxidative stress. While CYP2A6 was induced in smokers, CYP3A4 was induced in HIV and HIV positive smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Overall, the findings suggest a possible

  16. Mixed-function oxidase enzyme activity and oxidative stress in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) exposed to 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126)

    SciTech Connect

    Palace, V.P.; Klaverkamp, J.F.; Lockhart, W.L. |; Metner, D.A.; Muir, D.C.G.; Brown, S.B.

    1996-06-01

    Juvenile lake trout were intraperitoneally injected with corn oil containing nominal concentrations of 0, 0.6, 6.3, or 25 {micro}g [{sup 14}C]-3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126) per gram of body weight. The PCB-126 accumulated in liver in a dose-dependent manner to a sustained concentration by 6 weeks and remained elevated for the 30-week experimental period. Mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme activity was elevated in the two highest dose groups relative to the control group, but not in the low-dose group throughout the 30 weeks. Oxidative stress, measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances test, was correlated with ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and was elevated in liver of the two highest PCB dose groups but not the low-dose group. The activities of the enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidant tocopherol was depleted to approximately 75% of the control concentration in liver of all three PCB-dosed groups. Hepatic ascorbic acid levels were not different in any of the treatment groups. Retinol was depleted by greater than an order of magnitude in liver of the two highest dose groups but not in the los-dose group. This study demonstrates a correlation between hepatic MFO activity and oxidative stress in PCB-exposed lake trout. Tocopherol and retinol may be important mediators of oxidative stress but additional study is required to confirm the antioxidant activity of retinol.

  17. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  18. Enzyme mimics of spinel-type Co(x)Ni(1-x)Fe2O4 magnetic nanomaterial for eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liqiang; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Fang; Si, Xiaojing; Ding, Yaping; Deng, Dongmei; Wang, Tianlin

    2013-07-25

    A series of spinel-type Co(x)Ni(1-x)Fe2O4 (x=0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) magnetic nanomaterials were solvothermally synthesized as enzyme mimics for the eletroctrocatalytic oxidation of H2O2. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope were employed to characterize the composition, structure and morphology of the material. The electrochemical properties of spinel-type Co(x)Ni(1-x)Fe2O4 with different (Co/Ni) molar ratio toward H2O2 oxidation were investigated, and the results demonstrated that Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4 modified carbon paste electrode (Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE) possessed the best electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 oxidation. Under optimum conditions, the calibration curve for H2O2 determination on Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE was linear in a wide range of 1.0×10(-8)-1.0×10(-3)M with low detection limit of 3.0×10(-9)M (S/N=3). The proposed Co0.5Ni0.5Fe2O4/CPE was also applied to the determination of H2O2 in commercial toothpastes with satisfactory results, indicating that Co(x)Ni(1-x)Fe2O4 is a promising hydrogen peroxidase mimics for the detection of H2O2.

  19. Changes of anti-oxidative enzymes and MDA content under soil water deficits among 10 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) genotypes at maturation stage.

    PubMed

    HongBo, Shao; ZongSuo, Liang; MingAn, Shao

    2005-09-25

    Drought is a world-spread problem seriously influencing grain production and quality, the loss of which is the total for other natural disasters, with increasing global climate change making the situation more serious. Wheat is the staple food for more than 35% of world population, so wheat anti-drought physiology study is of importance to wheat production and biological breeding for the sake of coping with abiotic and biotic conditions. Much research is involved in this hot topic, but the pace of progress is not so large because of drought resistance being a multiple-gene-control quantitative character and wheat genome being larger (16,000Mb). On the other hand, stress adaptive mechanisms are quite different, with stress degree, time course, materials, soil quality status and experimental plots, thus increasing the complexity of the issue in question. Additionally, a little study is related to the whole life circle of wheat, which cannot provide a comprehensive understanding of its anti-drought machinery. We selected 10 kinds of wheat genotypes as materials, which have potential to be applied in practice, and measured change of relative physiological indices through wheat whole growing-developmental circle (i.e. seedling, tillering and maturing). Here, we reported the anti-oxidative results of maturation stage (the results of seedling and tillering stage have been published) in terms of activities of POD, SOD, CAT and MDA content as follows: (1) 10 wheat genotypes can be grouped into three kinds (A-C, respectively) according to their changing trend of the measured indices; (2) A group performed better resistance drought under the condition of treatment level 1 (appropriate level), whose activities of anti-oxidative enzymes (POD, SOD, CAT) were higher and MDA lower; (3) B group exhibited stronger anti-drought under treatment level 2 (light-stress level), whose activities of anti-oxidative enzymes were higher and MDA lower; (4) C group expressed anti-drought to some

  20. Synthesis and structure of tridentate bis(phosphinic amide)-phosphine oxide complexes of yttrium nitrate. Applications of 31P,89Y NMR methods in structural elucidation in solution.

    PubMed

    Popovici, Cristinel; Fernández, Ignacio; Oña-Burgos, Pascual; Roces, Laura; García-Granda, Santiago; Ortiz, Fernando López

    2011-07-07

    The synthesis and characterisation of a tridentate ligand containing two diphenylphosphinic amide side-arms connected through the ortho position to a phenylphosphine oxide moiety and the 1:1 and 2:1 complexes formed with yttrium nitrate are reported for the first time. The free ligand (R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11 is obtained diastereoselectively by reaction of ortho-lithiated N,N-diisopropyl-P,P-diphenylphosphinic amide with phenylphosphonic dichloride. Complexes [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(NO(3))(3)] and [Y((R(P1)*,S(P3)*)-11)(2)(NO(3))](NO(3))(2) were isolated by mixing ligand 11 with Y(NO(3))(3)·6H(2)O in acetonitrile at room temperature in a ligand to metal molar ratio of 1:1 and 2:1, respectively. The 1:1 derivative is the product of thermodynamic control when a molar ratio of ligand to yttrium salt of 1:1 is used. The new compounds have been characterised both as the solid (X-ray diffraction) and in solution (multinuclear magnetic resonance). In both yttrium complexes the ligand acts as a tridentate chelate. The arrangement of the two ligands in the 2:1 complex affords a pseudo-meso structure. Tridentate chelation of yttrium(III) in both complexes is retained in solution as evidenced by (89)Y NMR data obtained via(31)P,(89)Y-HMQC, and (89)Y,(31)P-DEPT experiments. The investigation of the solution behaviour of the Y(III) complexes through PGSE NMR diffusion measurements showed that average structures in agreement with the 1:1 and 1:2 stoichiometries are retained in acetonitrile.

  1. Effect of Piper betle on cardiac function, marker enzymes, and oxidative stress in isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Arya, Dharamvir Singh; Arora, Sachin; Malik, Salma; Nepal, Saroj; Kumari, Santosh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2010-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective potential of Piper betle (P. betle) against isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial infarction in rats. Rats were randomly divided into eight groups viz. control, ISP, P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) + ISP treated group. P. betle leaf extract (75, 150, or 300 mg/kg) or saline was orally administered for 30 days. ISP (85 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered at an interval of 24 h on the 28(th) and 29(th) day and on day 30 the functional and biochemical parameters were measured. ISP administration showed a significant decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP, MAP), heart rate (HR), contractility (+LVdP/dt), and relaxation (-LVdP/dt) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). ISP also caused significant decrease in myocardial antioxidants; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), and myocyte injury marker enzymes; creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) along with enhanced lipid peroxidation; thiobarbituric acid reacting species (TBARS) in heart. Pre-treatment with P. betle favorably modulated hemodynamic (SAP, DAP, and MAP) and ventricular function parameters (-LVdP/dt and LVEDP). P. betle pre-treatment also restored SOD, CAT, GSH, and GPx, reduced the leakage of CK-MB isoenzyme and LDH along with decreased lipid peroxidation in the heart. Taken together, the biochemical and functional parameters indicate that P. betle 150 and 300 mg/kg has a significant cardioprotective effect against ISP-induced myocardial infarction. Results of the present study suggest the cardioprotective potential of P. betle.

  2. Plaque growth-inhibiting effects of an abrasive fluoride-chlorhexidine toothpaste and a fluoride toothpaste containing oxidative enzymes.

    PubMed

    Etemadzadeh, H; Ainamo, J; Murtomaa, H

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this 4 times cross-over double-blind clinical trial was to test the plaque-inhibiting effect of 2 fluoride-containing toothpastes. One toothpaste contained 0.8% chlorhexidine together with amine fluoride (0.1% F degrees) and a suitable abrasive agent. The other contained 1.7 U/g glucose oxidase and 8.0 U/g amyloglucosidase, added to an amine fluoride (0.1% F degrees) toothpaste. 1% Hibitane dental gel was used as a positive and a conventional fluoride toothpaste (Vademecum MFP Fluor) as a negative control. 9 dental students, in a randomized sequence, applied the 4 dentifrices twice daily from Monday afternoon to Friday morning with cap splints, designed to cover the teeth and about 2 mm of gingiva. No other oral hygiene measures were allowed during the 4 test periods. On Fridays, the teeth were cleaned professionally and good oral hygiene was maintained during the week-ends. At the beginning and at the end of each test period, per student plaque thickness was recorded using the plaque index, the visible plaque index, and plaque fresh weight as parameters, and the area of plaque as related to the area of the tooth surface was recorded planimetrically and according to the PLQ index. The best plaque growth-inhibiting effect was recorded for the positive control (CHX) with the test chlorhexidine toothpaste (TX) as next best. The enzyme-containing toothpaste (TE) did not differ significantly from the negative control (C). All the significant differences in anti-plaque effect between the 4 toothpastes were obtained by recordings of plaque thickness and none on the basis of area of plaque.

  3. Comparison of enzymically glucuronidated flavonoids with flavonoid aglycones in an in vitro cellular model of oxidative stress protection.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, David E; Cooney, Janine M; Jensen, Dwayne J; Wibisono, Reginald; Adaim, Aselle; Skinner, Margot A; Zhang, Jingli

    2008-01-01

    This study modeled, in vitro, the potential effect of conjugative (phase II) metabolism on the cytoprotective capacity of fruit flavonoids against oxidative stress. Flavonoid aglycones were compared with their corresponding isomeric mixtures of glucuronides for their ability to enhance the survival of cultured human Jurkat T and neuroblastoma cells stressed with hydrogen peroxide. Various polyphenolic compounds were tested as substrates in vitro for an ovine liver glucuronyl transferase preparation. Flavonoids and their glycoside derivatives were found to be good substrates, whereas phenolic acids were either poor or nonsubstrates. Five common flavonoids were glucuronidated to prepare mixtures for bioassay testing. Glucuronidation generally weakened the cytoprotective capacities of flavonoids (in the presence of H(2)O(2)), but some compounds were weakened much more than others. The concentration that halved cell death was well below 0.5 microM for most flavonoids tested, but glucuronidation increased median effective concentration values to a range of 1-16 microM. This compares with the generally accepted physiological range (0.1-10 microM) for circulating dietary polyphenolics detected in the body. Therefore, some flavonoids may retain a reduced cytoprotective capacity in vitro, after glucuronidation, whereas others may be effectively inactivated.

  4. Toward structural elucidation of the gamma-secretase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Wolfe, M. S.; Selkoe, D. J.

    2009-03-11

    {gamma}-Secretase is an intramembrane protease complex that mediates the Notch signaling pathway and the production of amyloid {beta}-proteins. As such, this enzyme has emerged as an important target for development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and cancer. Great progress has been made in the identification and characterization of the membrane complex and its biological functions. One major challenge now is to illuminate the structure of this fascinating and important protease at atomic resolution. Here, we review recent progress on biochemical and biophysical probing of the structure of the four-component complex and discuss obstacles and potential pathways toward elucidating its detailed structure.

  5. Toward structural elucidation of the γ-secretase complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huilin; Wolfe, Michael S.; Selkoe, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    γ-Secretase is an intramembrane protease complex that mediates the Notch signaling pathway and the production of amyloid β-proteins. As such, this enzyme has emerged as an important target for development of novel therapeutics for Alzheimer disease and cancer. Great progress has been made in the identification and characterization of the membrane complex and its biological functions. One major challenge now is to illuminate the structure of this fascinating and important protease at atomic resolution. Here, we review recent progress on biochemical and biophysical probing of the structure of the four-component complex and discuss barriers and potential pathways toward elucidating its detailed structure. PMID:19278647

  6. Arginase enzymes in isolated airways from normal and nitric oxide synthase 2-knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin

    SciTech Connect

    Bratt, Jennifer M.; Franzi, Lisa M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Kenyon, Nicholas J. Last, Jerold A.

    2009-02-01

    Arginase has been suggested to compete with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) for their common substrate, L-arginine. To study the mechanisms underlying this interaction, we compared arginase expression in isolated airways and the consequences of inhibiting arginase activity in vivo with NO production, lung inflammation, and lung function in both C57BL/6 and NOS2 knockout mice undergoing ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation, a mouse model of asthma. Arginases I and II were measured by western blot in isolated airways from sensitized C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. Physiological and biochemical responses - inflammation, lung compliance, airway hyperreactivity, exhaled NO concentration, arginine concentration - were compared with the responses of NOS2 knockout mice. NOS2 knockout mice had increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity. Both arginase I and arginase II were constitutively expressed in the airways of normal C57BL/6 mice. Arginase I was up-regulated approximately 8-fold in the airways of C57BL/6 mice exposed to ovalbumin. Expression of both arginase isoforms were significantly upregulated in NOS2 knockout mice exposed to ovalbumin, with about 40- and 4-fold increases in arginases I and II, respectively. Arginine concentration in isolated airways was not significantly different in any of the groups studied. Inhibition of arginase by systemic treatment of C57BL/6 mice with a competitive inhibitor, N{omega}-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA), significantly decreased the lung inflammatory response to ovalbumin in these animals. We conclude that NOS2 knockout mice are more sensitive to ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation and its sequelae than are C57BL/6 mice, as determined by increased total cells in lung lavage, decreased lung compliance, and increased airway hyperreactivity, and that these findings are strongly correlated with increased expression of both arginase isoforms in the airways of the

  7. Metabolic analyses elucidate non-trivial gene targets for amplifying dihydroartemisinic acid production in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ashish; Conway, Matthew F.; Johnnie, Joseph; Qureshi, Tabish M.; Lige, Bao; Derrick, Anne M.; Agbo, Eddy C.; Sriram, Ganesh

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic biology enables metabolic engineering of industrial microbes to synthesize value-added molecules. In this, a major challenge is the efficient redirection of carbon to the desired metabolic pathways. Pinpointing strategies toward this goal requires an in-depth investigation of the metabolic landscape of the organism, particularly primary metabolism, to identify precursor and cofactor availability for the target compound. The potent antimalarial therapeutic artemisinin and its precursors are promising candidate molecules for production in microbial hosts. Recent advances have demonstrated the production of artemisinin precursors in engineered yeast strains as an alternative to extraction from plants. We report the application of in silico and in vivo metabolic pathway analyses to identify metabolic engineering targets to improve the yield of the direct artemisinin precursor dihydroartemisinic acid (DHA) in yeast. First, in silico extreme pathway (ExPa) analysis identified NADPH-malic enzyme and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) as mechanisms to meet NADPH demand for DHA synthesis. Next, we compared key DHA-synthesizing ExPas to the metabolic flux distributions obtained from in vivo 13C metabolic flux analysis of a DHA-synthesizing strain. This comparison revealed that knocking out ethanol synthesis and overexpressing glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP (gene YNL241C) or the NADPH-malic enzyme ME2 (YKL029C) are vital steps toward overproducing DHA. Finally, we employed in silico flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment on a yeast genome-scale model to identify gene knockouts for improving DHA yields. The best strategy involved knockout of an oxaloacetate transporter (YKL120W) and an aspartate aminotransferase (YKL106W), and was predicted to improve DHA yields by 70-fold. Collectively, our work elucidates multiple non-trivial metabolic engineering strategies for improving DHA yield in yeast. PMID:23898325

  8. Diminution of Hepatic Response to 7, 12-dimethylbenz(α)anthracene by Ethyl Acetate Fraction of Acacia catechu Willd. through Modulation of Xenobiotic and Anti-Oxidative Enzymes in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Kaur, Rajbir; Singh, Amrit Pal; Arora, Saroj

    2014-01-01

    Background Liver is the primary metabolizing site of body and is prone to damage by exogenous as well as endogenous intoxicants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as 7, 12- dimethylbenz(α)anthracene (DMBA) is an exogenous hepatotoxin, which is well known for modulating phase I, II and anti-oxidative enzymes of liver. Plants contain plethora of polyphenolic compounds which can reverse the damaging effect of various xenobiotics. The present study investigated protective role of the ethyl acetate fraction of Acacia catechu Willd. (EAF) against DMBA induced alteration in hepatic metabolizing and anti-oxidative enzymes in rats. Methodology and Principal Findings The rats were subjected to hepatic damage by treating with DMBA for 7 weeks on alternative days and treatment schedule was terminated at the end of 14 weeks. The rats were euthanized at the end of protocol and livers were homogenized. The liver homogenates were used to analyse phase I (NADPH-cytochrome P450 reducatse, NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase, cytochrome P420, cytochrome b5), phase II (glutathione-S-transferase, DT diaphorase and γ-Glutamyl transpeptidase) and antioxidative enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, guiacol peroxidase and lactate dehydrogenase). Furthermore, other oxidative stress parameters (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, lipid hydroperoxides and conjugated dienes and reduced glutathione) and liver marker enzymes (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase and alkaline phosphatase) were also studied. The DMBA induced significant changes in activity of hepatic enzymes that was reversed by treatment with three dose levels of EAF. Conclusion It is concluded that EAF affords hepato-protection against DMBA in rats through modulation of phase I, II and anti-oxidative enzymes. PMID:24587216

  9. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peter M; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Thomassen, Martin; Wilkerson, Daryl P; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-07-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake (V˙O2) response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the V˙O2 slow component and muscle metabolic perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50% reduction in volume. Both before and after HIT the content in fast-twitch fibers of CS (P < 0.05) and COX-4 (P < 0.01) was lower, whereas PFK was higher (P < 0.001) than in slow-twitch fibers. Content of CS, COX-4, and PFK in homogenate and fast-twitch fibers was unchanged with HIT. Maximal activity (μmol g DW(-1) min(-1)) of CS (56 ± 8 post-HIT vs. 59 ± 10 pre-HIT), HAD (27 ± 6 vs. 29 ± 3) and PFK (340 ± 69 vs. 318 ± 105) and the capillary to fiber ratio (2.30 ± 0.16 vs. 2.38 ± 0.20) was unaltered following HIT. V˙O2 kinetics was unchanged with HIT and the speed of the primary response did not differ between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW(-1)) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW(-1)) at 6 min of INT (P < 0.05) after compared to before HIT. A period of intensified training with a volume reduction did not increase the content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch fibers, and did not change V˙O2 kinetics.

  10. L-carnitine Mediated Reduction in Oxidative Stress and Alteration in Transcript Level of Antioxidant Enzymes in Sheep Embryos Produced In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Mishra, A; Reddy, I J; Gupta, P S P; Mondal, S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the effect of L-carnitine on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development, with L-carnitine-mediated alteration if any in transcript level of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) in oocytes and developing sheep embryos produced in vitro. Different concentrations of L-carnitine (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm, 7.5 mm and 10 mm) were used in maturation medium. Oocytes matured with 10 mm L-carnitine showed significantly (p < 0.05) higher cleavage (66.80% vs 39.66, 41.76, 44.64, 64.31%), morula (48.50% vs 20.88, 26.01, 26.99, 44.72%) and blastocyst (33.22% vs 7.66, 9.19, 10.71, 28.57%) percentage as compared to lower concentrations (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm and 7.5 mm). Cleavage percentage between 10 mm and 7.5 mm L-carnitine were not significantly different. Maturation rate was not influenced by supplementation of any experimental concentration of L-carnitine. There was a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in intracellular ROS and increase in intracellular GSH in 10 mm L-carnitine-treated oocytes and embryos than control group. Antioxidant effect of L-carnitine was proved by culturing oocytes and embryos with H2O2 in the presence of L-carnitine which could be able to protect oocytes and embryos from H2O2-induced oxidative damage. L-carnitine supplementation significantly (p < 0.05) upregulated the expression of GPx and downregulated the expression of SOD2 genes, whereas the expression pattern of SOD1 and GAPDH (housekeeping gene) genes was unaffected in oocytes and embryos. It was concluded from the study that L-carnitine supplementation during in vitro maturation reduces oxidative stress-induced embryo toxicity by decreasing intracellular ROS and increasing intracellular GSH that in turn improved developmental potential of oocytes and embryos and alters transcript level of antioxidant enzymes.

  11. Arginine metabolism: nitric oxide and beyond.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, G; Morris, S M

    1998-01-01

    Arginine is one of the most versatile amino acids in animal cells, serving as a precursor for the synthesis not only of proteins but also of nitric oxide, urea, polyamines, proline, glutamate, creatine and agmatine. Of the enzymes that catalyse rate-controlling steps in arginine synthesis and catabolism, argininosuccinate synthase, the two arginase isoenzymes, the three nitric oxide synthase isoenzymes and arginine decarboxylase have been recognized in recent years as key factors in regulating newly identified aspects of arginine metabolism. In particular, changes in the activities of argininosuccinate synthase, the arginases, the inducible isoenzyme of nitric oxide synthase and also cationic amino acid transporters play major roles in determining the metabolic fates of arginine in health and disease, and recent studies have identified complex patterns of interaction among these enzymes. There is growing interest in the potential roles of the arginase isoenzymes as regulators of the synthesis of nitric oxide, polyamines, proline and glutamate. Physiological roles and relationships between the pathways of arginine synthesis and catabolism in vivo are complex and difficult to analyse, owing to compartmentalized expression of various enzymes at both organ (e.g. liver, small intestine and kidney) and subcellular (cytosol and mitochondria) levels, as well as to changes in expression during development and in response to diet, hormones and cytokines. The ongoing development of new cell lines and animal models using cDNA clones and genes for key arginine metabolic enzymes will provide new approaches more clearly elucidating the physiological roles of these enzymes. PMID:9806879

  12. The enzymes associated with denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the reduction of nitrogenous oxides are thought to be intermediates in denitrification processes. This review examines the roles of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductases, nitric oxide reductase, mechanisms of N-N bond formation, and nitrous oxide reductases.

  13. Characterization of non-oxidative transaldolase and transketolase enzymes in the pentose phosphate pathway with regard to xylose utilization by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Goshima, Tetsuya; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Sawayama, Shigeki; Yano, Shinichi

    2012-06-10

    The activity of transaldolase and transketolase, key enzymes in the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, is rate-limiting for xylose utilization in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Overexpression of TAL1 and TKL1, the major transaldolase and transketolase genes, increases the flux from the pentose phosphate pathway into the glycolytic pathway. However, the functional roles of NQM1 and TKL2, the secondary transaldolase and transketolase genes, especially in xylose utilization, remain unclear. This study focused on characterization of NQM1 and TKL2, together with TAL1 and TKL1, regarding their roles in xylose utilization and fermentation. Knockout or overexpression of these four genes on the phenotype of xylose-utilizing S. cerevisiae strains was also examined. Transcriptional analysis indicated that the expression of TAL1, NQM1, and TKL1 was up-regulated in the presence of xylose. A significant decrease in both growth on xylose and xylose-fermenting ability in tal1Δ and tkl1Δ mutants confirmed that TAL1 and TKL1 are essential for xylose assimilation and fermentation. Gene disruption analysis using a tkl1Δ mutant revealed that TKL1 is also required for utilization of glucose. Growth on xylose and xylose-fermenting ability were slightly influenced by deletion of NQM1 or TKL2 when xylose was used as the sole carbon source. Moreover, the rate of xylose consumption and ethanol production was slightly impaired in TKL1- and TKL2-overexpressing strains. NQM1 and TKL2 may thus play a physiological role via an effect on the non-oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in the xylose metabolic pathway, although their roles in xylose utilization and fermentation are less important than those of TAL1 and TKL1.

  14. Enzyme-catalyzed degradation of carbon nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.

    Carbon nanotubes and graphene, the nanoscale sp 2 allotropes of carbon, have garnered widespread attention as a result of their remarkable electrical, mechanical, and optical properties and the promise of new technologies that harness these properties. Consequently, these carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) have been employed for diverse applications such as electronics, sensors, composite materials, energy conversion devices, and nanomedicine. The manufacture and eventual disposal of these products may result in the release of CNMs into the environment and subsequent exposure to humans, animals, and vegetation. Given the possible pro-inflammatory and toxic effects of CNMs, much attention has been focused on the distribution, toxicity, and persistence of CNMs both in living systems and the environment. This dissertation will guide the reader though recent studies aimed at elucidating fundamental insight into the persistence of CNMs such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene derivatives (i.e., graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide). In particular, in-testtube oxidation/degradation of CNMs catalyzed by peroxidase enzymes will be examined, and the current understanding of the mechanisms underlying these processes will be discussed. Finally, an outlook of the current field including in vitro and in vivo biodegradation experiments, which have benefits in terms of human health and environmental safety, and future directions that could have implications for nanomedical applications such as imaging and drug delivery will be presented. Armed with an understanding of how and why CNMs undergo enzyme-catalyzed oxidation/biodegradation, researchers can tailor the structure of CNMs to either promote or inhibit these processes. For example, in nanomedical applications such as drug delivery, the incorporation of carboxylate functional groups could facilitate biodegradation of the nanomaterial after delivery of the cargo. Also, the incorporation of CNMs with defect sites in consumer

  15. Sulfhydryl angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor promotes endothelial cell survival through nitric-oxide synthase, fibroblast growth factor-2, and telomerase cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Donnini, Sandra; Terzuoli, Erika; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2010-03-01

    The protective effect exerted by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) in cardiovascular diseases caused by endothelial injury and aging has been attributed to the restoration of endothelial cell functions. Recently, we demonstrated a central role of the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)/FGF receptor-1 system in mediating the acquisition of an angiogenic phenotype in coronary microvascular endothelium exposed to ACEI. Here, we report on the rescuing effect of ACEI on impaired endothelium and the intracellular signaling mechanisms that lead endothelial cells to enter apoptosis and to senesce. Conditions mimicking pathological cell damage (serum deprivation) lead to endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by increased caspase-3 activity. ACEI enhanced cell survival through activation of prosurvival and antiaging signals involving Akt phosphorylation, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activation, FGF-2 and telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT) up-regulation, and delayed senescence. In microvascular endothelial cells exposed to ACEI, Akt/eNOS pathway-dependent FGF-2 was necessary for gene transcription of TERT. These protective effects were particularly evident for sulfhydryl-containing ACEI (zofenoprilat), which were reported to exhibit potent antioxidant effects. In conclusion, ACEI with antioxidant properties up-regulate eNOS, FGF-2, and TERT mRNA, which favor endothelial cell survival and prolong their lifespan, thus restoring endothelial cell functions after vascular damage. These effects could explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in various cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial injury and aging.

  16. Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.

    PubMed

    Persson, Ingrid A L; Persson, Karin; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson, Rolf G G

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on ZnO nanorods modified reduced graphene oxide-paper electrode and silver deposition-induced signal amplification strategy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lina; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Hongmei; Ma, Chao; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2015-09-15

    Herein, an origami multiplexed enzyme-free electrochemical (EC) immunodevice is developed for the first time. Typically, ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) modified reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-paper electrode is used as a sensor platform, in which rGO improves the electronic transmission rate and ZNRs provide abundant sites for capture probes binding. Furthermore, by combining the large surface area of rGO and high catalytic activity of bovine serum protein (BSA)-stabilized silver nanoparticles (Ag@BSA) toward H2O2 reduction, rGO/Ag@BSA composites can be used as an excellent signal labels. The current signal is generated from the reduction of H2O2 and further amplified by a subsequent signal labels-promoted deposition of silver. Under optimal conditions, the proposed immunoassays exhibit excellent precision, high sensitivity and a wide linear range of 0.002-120 mIU mL(-1) for human chorionic gonadotropin, 0.001-110 ng mL(-1) for prostate-specific antigen, and 0.001-100 ng mL(-1) for carcinoembryonic antigen. The results for real sample analysis demonstrate that the newly constructed immunosensor arrays provide a simple and cost-effective method for clinical applications.

  18. Detection of microRNA in clinical tumor samples by isothermal enzyme-free amplification and label-free graphene oxide-based SYBR Green I fluorescence platform.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Debin; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Wenge; Lu, Suqin; Xing, Xiaobo

    2015-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a kind of small molecules that involve in many important life activities. They have higher expression levels in many kinds of cancers. In this study, we developed an isothermal enzyme-free amplification (EFA) and label-free graphene oxide (GO)-based SYBR Green I fluorescence platform for detection of miRNA. MiRNA-21 was used as an example to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. Results show that the sensitivity of miRNA-21 is 1pM, and the linearity range is from 1pM to 1nM. The method can specifically discriminate miRNA-21 from miRNA-210 and miRNA-214. Three tumor cell lines of A549, HepG2 and MCF7 were detected by the method. The sensitivities of them were 10(2) cells, 10(3) cells and 10(3) cells respectively. Clinical tumor samples were also tested by this method, and 29 of 40 samples gave out positive signals. The method holds great promise in miRNA detection due to its convenience, rapidness, inexpensive and specificity.

  19. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  20. Assessment of the roles of antioxidant enzymes and glutathione in 3,3′,4,4′,5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)-induced oxidative stress in the brain tissues of rats after subchronic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hassoun, Ezdihar A.; Periandri-Steinberg, SeAnna

    2010-01-01

    The abilities of various doses of 3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB126) to induce changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione levels in the brain tissues of rats were examined in rats after subchronic exposure. Groups of rats were administered 10,30, 100, 300, 550 or 1000 ng PCB 126/kg/day, p.o., for 13 weeks and the activities of supeoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), as well as (GSH) levels were determined in the brain tissue homogenates. Treatment resulted in significant and dose-dependent increases in the activities of the three tested enzymes. While maximal increase GSH-Px activity was achieved with a dose of 100-175 mg/kg/day, CAT and SOD activities continued to increase in response to maximal dose used for this study. GSH levels on the other hand, were suppressed significantly in a dose-dependent fashion. Data suggest that previously observed increase in oxidative stress production by PCB-126 in the brain tissues of rats is associated with dose-dependent rise in antioxidant enzyme activities and GSH depletion. However, the increases in the antioxidant enzyme activities can not provide full protection against oxidative damage induced by the same doses. In addition, GSH depletion plays a critical role in the previously observed oxidative stress in response to this compound. PMID:20161674

  1. JWH-018 ω-OH, a shared hydroxy metabolite of the two synthetic cannabinoids JWH-018 and AM-2201, undergoes oxidation by alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in vitro forming the carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Holm, Niels Bjerre; Noble, Carolina; Linnet, Kristian

    2016-09-30

    Synthetic cannabinoids are new psychoactive substances (NPS) acting as agonists at the cannabinoid receptors. The aminoalkylindole-type synthetic cannabinoid naphthalen-1-yl-(1-pentylindol-3-yl)methanone (JWH-018) was among the first to appear on the illicit drug market and its metabolism has been extensively investigated. The N-pentyl side chain is a major site of human cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated oxidative metabolism, and the ω-carboxylic acid metabolite appears to be a major in vivo human urinary metabolite. This metabolite is, however, not formed to any significant extent in human liver microsomal (HLM) incubations raising the possibility that the discrepancy is due to involvement of cytosolic enzymes. Here we demonstrate in incubations with human liver cytosol (HLC), that JWH-018 ω-OH, but not the JWH-018 parent compound, is a substrate for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzymes. The sole end-product identified in HLC was the JWH-018 ω-COOH metabolite, while trapping tests with methoxyamine proved the presence of the aldehyde intermediate. ADH/ALDH and UDP-glucuronosyl-transferases (UGT) enzymes may therefore both act on the JWH-018 ω-OH substrate. Finally, we note that for [1-(5-fluoropentyl)indol-3-yl]-naphthalen-1-yl-methanone (AM-2201), the ω-fluorinated analog of JWH-018, a high amount of JWH-018 ω-OH was formed in HLM incubated without NADPH, suggesting that the oxidative defluorination is efficiently catalyzed by non-CYP enzyme(s). The pathway presented here may therefore be especially important for N-(5-fluoropentyl) substituted synthetic cannabinoids, because the oxidative defluorination can occur even if the CYP-mediated metabolism preferentially takes place on other parts of the molecule than the N-alkyl side chain. Controlled clinical studies in humans are ultimately required to demonstrate the in vivo importance of the oxidation pathway presented here.

  2. Ethanol-induced attenuation of oxidative stress is unable to alter mRNA expression pattern of catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase (GST1A), and superoxide dismutase (SOD3) enzymes in Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Minghui; Shariat-Madar, Bahbak; Haron, Mona H; Wu, Mengmeng; Khan, Ikhlas A; Dasmahapatra, Asok K

    2011-01-01

    Although the mechanism of ethanol toxicity during embryogenesis is unknown, our earlier studies on Japanese rice fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos indicated that the effects might be mediated through oxidative stress. In this study we have determined the oxidative stress and the mRNA content of four antioxidant enzymes (catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and superoxide dismutase) during Japanese rice fish embryogenesis (from 0 day post-fertilization to hatching) and after exposing the embryos to ethanol (100 and 300 mM) for 48 h at three stages (0-2, 1-3 and 4-6 days post-fertilization, dpf) of organogenesis. We observed that oxidative stress was minimal in blastula, gastrula or neurula stages, increased gradually with the advancement of morphogenesis and reached its maximum level in hatchlings. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs were constitutively expressed throughout development; however, the expression pattern was not identical among the enzymes. Catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) mRNAs were minimal in the fertilized eggs, but increased significantly in 1 dpf and then either sharply dropped (SOD) or maintained a steady-state (catalase). Glutathione-S-transferase (GST) was very high in fertilized eggs and sharply dropped 1 dpf and then gradually increased thereafter. Glutathione reductase (GR) maintained a steady-state throughout the development. Ethanol was able to attenuate oxidative stress in embryos exposed only to 300 mM 1-3 dpf; no significant difference with controls was observed in other ethanol-treated groups. The antioxidant enzyme mRNAs also remained unaltered after ethanol treatment. From these data we conclude that the attenuation of oxidative stress by ethanol is probably due to the inhibition of normal growth of the embryos rather than by inhibiting catalase, GST, GR or SOD-dependent activities.

  3. Postnatal exposure to chromium through mother's milk accelerates follicular atresia in F1 offspring through increased oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Jone A; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K; Nithy, Thamizh K; Arosh, Joe A; Hoyer, Patricia B; Burghardt, Robert C; Banu, Sakhila K

    2013-08-01

    Hexavalent chromium, CrVI, is a heavy metal endocrine disruptor, known as a mutagen, teratogen, and a group A carcinogen. Environmental contamination with CrVI, including drinking water, has been increasing in more than 30 cities in the United States. CrVI is rapidly converted to CrIII intracellularly, and CrIII can cause DNA strand breaks and cancer or apoptosis through different mechanisms. Our previous study demonstrated that lactational exposure to chromium results in a delay or arrest in follicle development and a decrease in steroid hormone levels in F1 female rats, both of which are mitigated (partial inhibition) by vitamin C. The current study tested the hypothesis that lactational exposure to CrIII accelerates follicle atresia in F1 offspring by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing cellular antioxidants. Results showed that lactational exposure to CrIII dose-dependently increased follicular atresia and decreased steroidogenesis in postnatal day 25, 45, and 65 rats. Vitamin C mitigated or inhibited the effects of CrIII at all doses. CrIII increased hydrogen peroxide and lipid hydroperoxide in plasma and ovary; decreased the antioxidant enzymes (AOXs) GPx1, GR, SOD, and catalase; and increased glutathione S-transferase in plasma and ovary. To understand the effects of CrVI on ROS and AOXs in granulosa (GC) and theca (TC) cell compartments in the ovary, ROS levels and mRNA expression of cytosolic and mitochondrial AOXs, such as SOD1, SOD2, catalase, GLRX1, GSTM1, GSTM2, GSTA4, GR, TXN1, TXN2, TXNRD2, and PRDX3, were studied in GCs and TCs and in a spontaneously immortalized granulosa cell line (SIGC). Overall, CrVI downregulated each of the AOXs; and vitamin C mitigated the effects of CrVI on these enzymes in GCs and SIGCs, but failed to mitigate CrVI effects on GSTM1, GSTM2, TXN1, and TXN2 in TCs. Thus, these data for the first time reveal that lactational exposure to CrIII accelerated follicular atresia and decreased steroidogenesis in F1

  4. Postnatal exposure to chromium through mother’s milk accelerates follicular atresia in F1 offspring through increased oxidative stress and depletion of antioxidant enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jone A.; Sivakumar, Kirthiram K.; Nithy, Thamizh K.; Arosh, Joe A.; Hoyer, Patricia B.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2013-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium, CrVI, is a heavy metal endocrine disruptor, known as a mutagen, teratogen, and a group A carcinogen. Environmental contamination with CrVI, including drinking water, has been increasing in more than 30 cities in the United States. CrVI is rapidly converted to CrIII intracellularly, and CrIII can cause DNA strand breaks and cancer or apoptosis through different mechanisms. Our previous study demonstrated that lactational exposure to chromium results in a delay or arrest in follicle development and a decrease in steroid hormone levels in F1 female rats, both of which are mitigated (partial inhibition) by vitamin C. The current study tested the hypothesis that lactational exposure to CrIII accelerates follicle atresia in F1 offspring by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing cellular antioxidants. Results showed that lactational exposure to CrIII dose-dependently increased follicular atresia and decreased steroidogenesis in postnatal day 25, 45, and 65 rats. Vitamin C mitigated or inhibited the effects of CrIII at all doses. CrIII increased hydrogen peroxide and lipid hydroperoxide in plasma and ovary; decreased the antioxidant enzymes (AOXs) GPx1, GR, SOD, and catalase; and increased glutathione S-transferase in plasma and ovary. To understand the effects of CrVI on ROS and AOXs in granulosa (GC) and theca (TC) cell compartments in the ovary, ROS levels and mRNA expression of cytosolic and mitochondrial AOXs, such as SOD1, SOD2, catalase, GLRX1, GSTM1, GSTM2, GSTA4, GR, TXN1, TXN2, TXNRD2, and PRDX3, were studied in GCs and TCs and in a spontaneously immortalized granulosa cell line (SIGC). Overall, CrVI downregulated each of the AOXs; and vitamin C mitigated the effects of CrVI on these enzymes in GCs and SIGCs, but failed to mitigate CrVI effects on GSTM1, GSTM2, TXN1, and TXN2 in TCs. Thus, these data for the first time reveal that lactational exposure to CrIII accelerated follicular atresia and decreased steroidogenesis in F1

  5. In-silico analysis and mRNA modulation of detoxification enzymes GST delta and kappa against various biotic and abiotic oxidative stressors.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Mukesh Kumar; Ravichandran, Gayathri; Nizam, Faizal; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arshad, Aziz; Harikrishnan, Ramasamy; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the comprehensive comparative information of two different detoxification enzymes such as glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) delta and kappa from freshwater giant prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (designated as MrGSTD and MrGSTK) by investigating their in-silico characters and mRNA modulation against various biotic and abiotic oxidative stressors. The physico-chemical properties of these cDNA and their polypeptide structure were analyzed using various bioinformatics program. The analysis indicated the variation in size of the polypeptides, presence or absence of domains and motifs and structure. Homology and phylogenetic analysis revealed that MrGSTD shared maximum identity (83%) with crustaceans GST delta, whereas MrGSTK fell in arthropods GST kappa. It is interesting to note that MrGSTD and MrGSTK shared only 21% identity; it indicated their structural difference. Structural analysis indicated that MrGSTD to be canonical dimer like shape and MrGSTK appeared to be butterfly dimer like shape, in spite of four β-sheets being conserved in both GSTs. Tissue specific gene expression analysis showed that both MrGSTD and MrGSTK are highly expressed in immune organs such as haemocyte and hepatopancreas, respectively. To understand the role of mRNA modulation of MrGSTD and MrGSTK, the prawns were inducted with oxidative stressors such as bacteria (Vibrio harveyi), virus [white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)] and heavy metal, cadmium (Cd). The analysis revealed an interesting fact that both MrGSTD and MrGSTK showed higher (P < 0.05) up-regulation at 48 h post-challenge, except MrGSTD stressed with bacteria, where it showed up-regulation at 24 h post-challenge. Overall, the results suggested that GSTs are diverse in their structure and possibly conferring their potential involvement in immune protection in crustaceans. However, further study is necessary to focus their functional differences at proteomic level.

  6. Bacteriolytic Enzymes from Streptomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Welsch, Maurice

    1962-01-01

    A study of the bacteriolytic properties of streptomycetes has progressively uncovered the production by these microorganisms of a large number of different enzymes acting upon various bacterial constituents, especially on some of them located in the cell wall. Although the mechanism of the bacteriolysis is far from being completely elucidated at present, it can, however, be stated that, in two instances at least, it can be regarded as an osmotic explosion following upon the destruction of the structure responsible for the rigidity of the cell wall. PMID:14006056

  7. CorA affects tolerance of Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium to the lactoperoxidase enzyme system but not to other forms of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sermon, Jan; Wevers, Eva M-R P; Jansen, Leentje; De Spiegeleer, Philipp; Vanoirbeek, Kristof; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2005-11-01

    The enzyme lactoperoxidase is part of the innate immune system in vertebrates and owes its antimicrobial activity to the formation of oxidative reaction products from various substrates. In a previous study, we have reported that, with thiocyanate as a substrate, the lactoperoxidase system elicits a distinct stress response in Escherichia coli MG1655. This response is different from but partly overlapping with the stress responses to hydrogen peroxide and to superoxide. In the current work, we constructed knockouts in 10 lactoperoxidase system-inducible genes to investigate their role in the tolerance of E. coli MG1655 to this antimicrobial system. Five mutations resulted in a slightly increased sensitivity, but one mutation (corA) caused hypersensitivity to the lactoperoxidase system. This hypersensitive phenotype was specific to the lactoperoxidase system, since neither the sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide nor to the superoxide generator plumbagin was affected in the corA mutant. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium corA had a similar phenotype. Although corA encodes an Mg2+ transporter and at least three other inducible open reading frames belonged to the Mg2+ regulon, repression of the Mg stimulon by Mg2+ did not change the lactoperoxidase sensitivity of either the wild-type or corA mutant. Prior exposure to 0.3 mM Ni2+, which is also transported by CorA, strongly sensitized MG1655 but not the corA mutant to the lactoperoxidase system. Furthermore, this Ni2+-dependent sensitization was suppressed by the CorA-specific inhibitor Co(III) hexaammine. These results indicate that CorA affects the lactoperoxidase sensitivity of E. coli by modulating the cytoplasmic concentrations of transition metals that enhance the toxicity of the lactoperoxidase system.

  8. Highly scalable, uniform, and sensitive biosensors based on top-down indium oxide nanoribbons and electronic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Aroonyadet, Noppadol; Wang, Xiaoli; Song, Yan; Chen, Haitian; Cote, Richard J; Thompson, Mark E; Datar, Ram H; Zhou, Chongwu

    2015-03-11

    Nanostructure field-effect transistor (FET) biosensors have shown great promise for ultra sensitive biomolecular detection. Top-down assembly of these sensors increases scalability and device uniformity but faces fabrication challenges in achieving the small dimensions needed for sensitivity. We report top-down fabricated indium oxide (In2O3) nanoribbon FET biosensors using highly scalable radio frequency (RF) sputtering to create uniform channel thicknesses ranging from 50 to 10 nm. We combine this scalable sensing platform with amplification from electronic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to achieve high sensitivity to target analytes such as streptavidin and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 proteins. Our approach circumvents Debye screening in ionic solutions and detects p24 protein at 20 fg/mL (about 250 viruses/mL or about 3 orders of magnitude lower than commercial ELISA) with a 35% conduction change in human serum. The In2O3 nanoribbon biosensors have 100% device yield and use a simple 2 mask photolithography process. The electrical properties of 50 In2O3 nanoribbon FETs showed good uniformity in on-state current, on/off current ratio, mobility, and threshold voltage. In addition, the sensors show excellent pH sensitivity over a broad range (pH 4 to 9) as well as over the physiological-related pH range (pH 6.8 to 8.2). With the demonstrated sensitivity, scalability, and uniformity, the In2O3 nanoribbon sensor platform makes great progress toward clinical testing, such as for early diagnosis of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

  9. Label-free and enzyme-free detection of transcription factors with graphene oxide fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Desong; Wang, Lei; Xu, Xiaowen; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-15

    Transcription factors (TFs) play pivotal roles in the regulation of a variety of essential cellular processes and some of them have been recognized as potential diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets of some diseases. Sensitive and accurate detection of TFs is of great importance to better understanding their roles in gene regulation and evaluation of disease state. Here, we developed a simple, label-free and enzyme-free new fluorescent strategy for the detection of TFs by graphene oxide (GO) fluorescence switch-based multifunctional G-quadruplex-hairpin probe (MGHP). The MGHP possessed of three functions simultaneously, adsorbing onto GO with the loop part, binding to target with the stem part and serving as signal carrier with the terminal G-quadruplex. First, the MGHP was adsorbed quickly to GO. Next, the TF bound to the stem part of MGHP to form a huge target-MGHP complex, which led to desorption of the complex from GO. Finally, NMM was inserted into G-quadruplex in the complex to yield an enhanced fluorescence response. The GO used here, as a fluorescence switch, could quickly and efficiently quench the fluorescence of NMM inserted into the MGHP absorbed on the GO, guaranteeing a high signal-to-noise ratio. Sensitive detection of purified NF-κB p50 and HeLa cell nuclear extracts were achieved with detection limits of 0.2nM and 7.8ng/µL, respectively. Moreover, this proposed strategy could be used to screen inhibitors of NF-κB p50 activity. The strategy proposed here might offer a new potential approach for reliable quantification of TFs in clinical diagnostics and treatment research of some diseases.

  10. Nitrite Reductase and Nitric-oxide Synthase Activity of the Mitochondrial Molybdopterin Enzymes mARC1 and mARC2*

    PubMed Central

    Sparacino-Watkins, Courtney E.; Tejero, Jesús; Sun, Bin; Gauthier, Marc C.; Thomas, John; Ragireddy, Venkata; Merchant, Bonnie A.; Wang, Jun; Azarov, Ivan; Basu, Partha; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial amidoxime reducing component (mARC) proteins are molybdopterin-containing enzymes of unclear physiological function. Both human isoforms mARC-1 and mARC-2 are able to catalyze the reduction of nitrite when they are in the reduced form. Moreover, our results indicate that mARC can generate nitric oxide (NO) from nitrite when forming an electron transfer chain with NADH, cytochrome b5, and NADH-dependent cytochrome b5 reductase. The rate of NO formation increases almost 3-fold when pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.5. To determine if nitrite reduction is catalyzed by molybdenum in the active site of mARC-1, we mutated the putative active site cysteine residue (Cys-273), known to coordinate molybdenum binding. NO formation was abolished by the C273A mutation in mARC-1. Supplementation of transformed Escherichia coli with tungsten facilitated the replacement of molybdenum in recombinant mARC-1 and abolished NO formation. Therefore, we conclude that human mARC-1 and mARC-2 are capable of catalyzing reduction of nitrite to NO through reaction with its molybdenum cofactor. Finally, expression of mARC-1 in HEK cells using a lentivirus vector was used to confirm cellular nitrite reduction to NO. A comparison of NO formation profiles between mARC and xanthine oxidase reveals similar Kcat and Vmax values but more sustained NO formation from mARC, possibly because it is not vulnerable to autoinhibition via molybdenum desulfuration. The reduction of nitrite by mARC in the mitochondria may represent a new signaling pathway for NADH-dependent hypoxic NO production. PMID:24500710

  11. Ultrasensitive electrochemical sensing platform for microRNA based on tungsten oxide-graphene composites coupling with catalyzed hairpin assembly target recycling and enzyme signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Hong-Lei; Huang, Ke-Jing; Xing, Ling-Li; Chen, Ying-Xu

    2016-12-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for microRNA (miRNA) is developed based on tungsten oxide-graphene composites coupling with catalyzed hairpin assembly target recycling and enzyme signal amplification. WO3-Gr is prepared by a simple hydrothermal method and then coupled with gold nanoparticles to act as a sensing platform. The thiol-terminated capture probe H1 is immobilized on electrode through Au-S interaction. In the presence of target miRNA, H1 opens its hairpin structure by hybridization with target miRNA. This hybridization can be displaced from the structure by another stable biotinylated hairpin DNA (H2), and target miRNA is released back to the sample solution for next cycle. Thus, a large amount of H1-H2 duplex is produced after the cyclic process. At this point, a lot of signal indicators streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP) are immobilized on the electrode by the specific binding of avidin-biotin. Then, thousands of ascorbic acid, which is the enzymatic product of ALP, induces the electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling to produce a strongly electrochemical response in the presence of ferrocene methanol and tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the established biosensor can detect target miRNA down to 0.05fM (S/N=3) with a linear range from 0.1fM to 100pM, and discriminate target miRNA from mismatched miRNA with a high selectivity.

  12. Complex of vitamins and antioxidants protects low-density lipoproteins in blood plasma from free radical oxidation and activates antioxidants enzymes in erythrocytes from patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Konovalova, G G; Lankin, V Z; Tikhaze, A K; Nezhdanova, I B; Lisina, M O; Kukharchuk, V V

    2003-08-01

    We studied the effect of a complex containing antioxidant vitamins C and E, provitamin A, and antioxidant element selenium on the contents of primary (lipid peroxides) and secondary products (malonic dialdehyde) of free radical lipid oxidation in low-density lipoproteins isolated from the plasma of patients with coronary heart disease and hypercholesterolemia by means of preparative ultracentrifugation. Activity of key antioxidant enzymes in the blood was measured during treatment with the antioxidant preparation. Combination treatment with antioxidant vitamins and antioxidant element selenium sharply decreased the contents of primary and secondary free radical oxidation products in circulating low-density lipoproteins and increased activity of antioxidant enzymes in erythrocytes. Activities of superoxide dismutase and selenium-containing glutathione peroxidase increased 1 and 2 months after the start of therapy, respectively.

  13. Marine enzymes.

    PubMed

    Debashish, Ghosh; Malay, Saha; Barindra, Sana; Joydeep, Mukherjee

    2005-01-01

    Marine enzyme biotechnology can offer novel biocatalysts with properties like high salt tolerance, hyperthermostability, barophilicity, cold adaptivity, and ease in large-scale cultivation. This review deals with the research and development work done on the occurrence, molecular biology, and bioprocessing of marine enzymes during the last decade. Exotic locations have been accessed for the search of novel enzymes. Scientists have isolated proteases and carbohydrases from deep sea hydrothermal vents. Cold active metabolic enzymes from psychrophilic marine microorganisms have received considerable research attention. Marine symbiont microorganisms growing in association with animals and plants were shown to produce enzymes of commercial interest. Microorganisms isolated from sediment and seawater have been the most widely studied, proteases, carbohydrases, and peroxidases being noteworthy. Enzymes from marine animals and plants were primarily studied for their metabolic roles, though proteases and peroxidases have found industrial applications. Novel techniques in molecular biology applied to assess the diversity of chitinases, nitrate, nitrite, ammonia-metabolizing, and pollutant-degrading enzymes are discussed. Genes encoding chitinases, proteases, and carbohydrases from microbial and animal sources have been cloned and characterized. Research on the bioprocessing of marine-derived enzymes, however, has been scanty, focusing mainly on the application of solid-state fermentation to the production of enzymes from microbial sources.

  14. Gene expression of heat shock protein 70 and antioxidant enzymes, oxidative status, and meat oxidative stability of cyclically heat-challenged finishing broilers fed Origanum compactum and Curcuma xanthorrhiza essential oils.

    PubMed

    Akbarian, A; Michiels, J; Golian, A; Buyse, J; Wang, Y; De Smet, S

    2014-08-01

    Heat stress in poultry is a serious problem in many countries and has been associated with oxidative stress. Hence, nutritional interventions with antioxidants might be beneficial. Therefore, the effects of dietary Curcuma xanthorrhiza (CX) and Origanum compactum (OC) essential oils on mRNA levels of heat shock protein 70 and antioxidant enzymes, oxidative status, and meat oxidative stability of heat-challenged broilers were studied. Starting on d 25 of age, a control diet and 4 diets containing 200 or 400 mg/kg feed of CX or OC (CX200, CX400, OC200, OC400 diets) were fed to 3 pen replicates of 20 Ross 308 chickens each. From d 28 of age on, the temperature was increased from 22 to 34°C with 50% RH for 5 h daily during 2 wk. Dietary CX or OC did not affect zootechnical performance. Feeding CX400 and both levels of OC increased the a* value in stored breast meat (P < 0.05), and OC diets tended to decrease the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances values in fresh breast meat (P = 0.061). Compared with control, at d 31, feeding CX400 and OC400 reduced mRNA levels of heat shock protein 70 and increased mRNA levels of catalase in kidney and liver (P < 0.05). The mRNA levels of superoxide dismutase were increased at d 31 on the OC400 diet in kidney and on the CX400 diet in heart (P < 0.05). In heart, at d 31, both dietary levels of CX and OC200 resulted in higher glutathione peroxidase activity (P < 0.05). Feeding CX400 increased superoxide dismutase activity in liver, kidney, and heart at d 31 (P < 0.05). Catalase activity was increased in the CX200 and OC400 groups at d 42 (P < 0.05). Feeding CX at both levels and OC200 decreased plasma malondialdehyde concentrations at d 42 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, dietary essential oils rich in simple phenolic compounds offer potential for improving the antioxidant defense against heat stress-induced changes.

  15. Influence of SkQ1 on Expression of Nrf2 Gene, ARE-Controlled Genes of Antioxidant Enzymes and Their Activity in Rat Blood Leukocytes under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Vnukov, V V; Gutsenko, O I; Milutina, N P; Kornienko, I V; Ananyan, A A; Danilenko, A O; Panina, S B; Plotnikov, A A; Makarenko, M S

    2015-12-01

    The study demonstrated that oxidative stress induced by hyperoxia (0.5 MPa for 90 min) resulted in reduction of mRNA levels of transcription factor Nrf2 and Nrf2-induced genes encoding antioxidant enzymes (SOD1, CAT, GPx4) in peripheral blood leukocytes of rats. The changes in gene expression profiles under hyperoxia were accompanied by disbalance of activity of antioxidant enzymes in the leukocytes, namely activation of superoxide dismutase and inhibition of catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione-S-transferase. Pretreatment of rats with SkQ1 (50 nmol/kg for five days) significantly increased mRNA levels of transcription factor Nrf2 and Nrf2-induced genes encoding antioxidant enzymes SOD2 and GPx4 and normalized the transcriptional activity of the SOD1 and CAT genes in the leukocytes in hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress. At the same time, the activity of catalase and glutathione peroxidase was increased, and the activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione-S-transferase returned to the control level. It is hypothesized that protective effect of SkQ1 in hyperoxia-induced oxidative stress can be realized via a direct antioxidant property and the stimulation of the Keap1/Nrf2 redox-sensitive signaling system.

  16. Elucidation of wear mechanisms by ferrographic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The use of ferrographic analysis in conjunction with light and scanning electron microscopy is described for the elucidation of wear mechanisms taking place in operating equipment. Example of adhesive wear, abrasive wear, corrosive wear, rolling element fatigue, lubricant breakdown, and other wear modes are illustrated. In addition, the use of magnetic solutions to precipitate nonmagnetic debris from aqueous and nonaqueous fluids is described.

  17. Does Pictorial Elucidation Foster Recollection of Idioms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boers, Frank; Piquer Piriz, Ana Maria; Stengers, Helene; Eyckmans, June

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that pictorial elucidation helps learners comprehend and remember the meaning of second language (L2) idioms. In this article we address the question whether it also helps retention of the form of idioms, i.e. their precise lexical composition. In a small-scale experiment, the meaning of English idioms was clarified…

  18. Structure Elucidation of a Natural Product.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, Roy M.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment simulating a real-life structure elucidation problem through isolation, characterization, and chemical transformation of an "unknown," naturally occurring monoterpene, with extensive use being made of spectroscopy and aided by biogenetic considerations. Information given to students, procedures, results, and discussion of…

  19. Enzymes, Industrial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enzymes serve key roles in numerous biotechnology processes and products that are commonly encountered in the forms of food and beverages, cleaning supplies, clothing, paper products, transportation fuels, pharmaceuticals, and monitoring devices. Enzymes can display regio-