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Sample records for oxygen loss gas

  1. Inhaled hydrogen gas therapy for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through reducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that form in the inner ear play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Recent studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has great potential for reducing ROS. In this study, we examined the potential of hydrogen gas to protect against NIHL. We tested this hypothesis in guinea pigs with 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% H2 inhalation in air for 5h a day after noise exposure, for five consecutive days. All animals underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response after the noise exposure; the results revealed that there was a better improvement in the threshold shift for the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated groups than the non-treated group. Furthermore, outer hair cell (OHC) loss was examined 7 days after noise exposure. A significantly higher survival rate of OHCs was observed in the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated group as compared to that of the non-treated group in the basal turn. Immunohistochemical analyses for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were performed to examine the amount of oxidative DNA damage. While strong immunoreactivities against 8-OHdG were observed of the non-treated group, the H2-treated group showed decreased immunoreactivity for 8-OHdG. These findings strongly suggest that inhaled hydrogen gas protects against NIHL.

  2. Oxygenates vs. synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Alessandra Beretta; Maria A. Burcham; Qun Sun; Yeping Cai; Biswanath Roy

    1999-04-01

    Methanol synthesis from H{sub 2}/CO has been carried out at 7.6 MPa over zirconia-supported copper catalysts. Catalysts with nominal compositions of 10/90 mol% and 30/70 mol% Cu/ZrO{sub 2} were used in this study. Additionally, a 3 mol% cesium-doped 10/90 catalyst was prepared to study the effect of doping with heavy alkali, and this promoter greatly increased the methanol productivity. The effects of CO{sub 2} addition, water injection, reaction temperature, and H{sub 2}/C0 ratio have been investigated. Both CO{sub 2} addition to the synthesis gas and cesium doping of the catalyst promoted methanol synthesis, while inhibiting the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Injection of water, however, was found to slightly suppress methanol and dimethyl ether formation while being converted to CO{sub 2} via the water gas shift reaction over these catalysts. There was no clear correlation between copper surface area and catalyst activity. Surface analysis of the tested samples revealed that copper tended to migrate and enrich the catalyst surface. The concept of employing a double-bed reactor with a pronounced temperature gradient to enhance higher alcohol synthesis was explored, and it was found that utilization of a Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a first lower temperature bed and a Cs-promoted ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a second high-temperature bed significantly promoted the productivity of 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas mixtures. While the conversion of CO to C{sub 2+} oxygenates over the double-bed configuration was comparable to that observed over the single Cu-based catalyst, major changes in the product distribution occurred by the coupling to the zinc chromite catalyst; that is, the productivity of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols decreased dramatically, and 2-methyl branched alcohols were selectively formed. The desirable methanol/2-methyl oxygenate molar ratios close to 1 were obtained in the present double

  3. Soil gas oxygen tension and pentachlorophenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, C.J.; Sims, R.C.; Sims, J.L.; Sorensen, D.L.; McLean, J.E.; Huling, S.

    1997-04-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion International Superfund Site in Libby, Mont. This soil was contaminated with wood preserving wastes including creosote and PCP. Degradation rates of {sup 14}C-PCP and nonlabeled PCP were found to be enhanced under soil gas oxygen concentrations between 2 and 21% in the contaminated soil. Between 48 and 64% of {sup 14}C-PCP spiked onto the soil was mineralized after 70 days at soil gas oxygen levels between 2 and 21%. No statistically significant mineralization of PCP was found to occur at 0% oxygen concentrations. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-PCP in contaminated soil poisoned with mercuric chloride was determined to be less than 0.2%. Degradation of indigenous nonradiolabeled PCP in the nonpoisoned soil was statistically significantly greater than in poisoned soil. These results indicated that degradation of PCP was biological and would occur under low oxygen concentrations. Soil gas oxygen concentrations necessary for PCP biodegradation (2--5%) could be maintained, for example, using bioventing technology in order to achieve continued treatment of buried lifts of soil while new lifts are added, thus decreasing the total time for soil remediation of the prepared bed.

  4. SOIL GAS OXYGEN TENSION AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion Inte...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  6. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  7. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  8. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  9. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  10. Oxygen gas generator and method of manufacturing the gas generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, F.A.

    1981-12-01

    A gas generator is capable of being stored in a stable form for long periods of time without deteriorating in quality. The gas generator provides a substantial amount of gases, and particularly oxygen, carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide without producing any harmful or hazardous chemicals. The gas generator includes in some embodiments a minimum of fuel so that a maximum amount of oxygen in the generator is capable of being liberated. The oxygen is liberated by the combustion of a fuel at localized positions in a refractory binder, which has the property of preventing the salt residue from becoming molten and the oxidizer from flowing and thereby preventing the combustion from becoming extinguished. The gas generator includes a suitable refractory material (such as clay) as a binder, a suitable oxidizer such as chlorate and a fuel having properties of combusting with oxygen liberated by the oxidizer and having a granular construction and having relatively poor thermal conductivity through the granules to provide the combustion at localized positions in the refractory material. The fuel may constitute a plant by-product having a cellular structure and a high compression strength. The fuel may specifically constitute dried plant life such as corn cobs. The gas generator is formed by mixing the refractory material, the fuel and the oxidizer without the addition of any water and then compressing the mixture into a suitable form such as briquettes.

  11. Oxygen liquefaction and zero-loss storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Bollo, T. R.; Peterson, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative concept that employs existing technologies and off-the-shelf components to liquefy gaseous oxygen from an in-situ propellant production (ISPP) unit and to store the liquid oxygen without boil-off loss. A primary goal is to minimize active components with a secondary goal of designing the active component in a protected or failure-free environment. The resulting design requires only one active component, a compressor operating in a closed and consequently more protected system. The design avoids pumps as active components by employing cryopumping for gaseous oxygen (GOX) and gravity transfer for liquid oxygen (LOX).

  12. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Liu, Yixin; Gao, Haiyong; Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO NPs film was characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500, 600, and 800°C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF) output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors. PMID:25191652

  13. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  14. Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas cleaning plants in foreground on the left and the right side of the furnace building. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  15. Resistive Oxygen Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf; Izu, Noriya; Rettig, Frank; Reiß, Sebastian; Shin, Woosuck; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Resistive oxygen sensors are an inexpensive alternative to the classical potentiometric zirconia oxygen sensor, especially for use in harsh environments and at temperatures of several hundred °C or even higher. This device-oriented paper gives a historical overview on the development of these sensor materials. It focuses especially on approaches to obtain a temperature independent behavior. It is shown that although in the past 40 years there have always been several research groups working concurrently with resistive oxygen sensors, novel ideas continue to emerge today with respect to improvements of the sensor response time, the temperature dependence, the long-term stability or the manufacture of the devices themselves using novel techniques for the sensitive films. Materials that are the focus of this review are metal oxides; especially titania, titanates, and ceria-based formulations. PMID:22163805

  16. Oxygen rich gas generator design and performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloyer, P. W.; Knuth, W. H.; Crawford, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The present oxygen-rich combustion research investigates oxygen gas generator concepts. The theoretical and modeling aspects of a selected concept are presented, together with a refined concept resulting from the findings of the study. This investigation examined a counter-flow gas generator design for O2/H2 mass ratios of 100-200, featuring a near-stoichiometric combustion zone followed by downstream mixing. The critical technologies required to develop a performance model are analyzed and include the following: (1) oxygen flow boiling; (2) two-phase oxygen flow heat transfer; (3) film-cooling in the combustion zone; (4) oxygen-rich combustion with hydrogen; and (5) mixing and dilution.

  17. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  18. BIOVENTING - Groundwater Aeration by Discontinuous Oxygen Gas Pulse Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater aeration by discontinuous oxygen gas pulse injections appears to be a promising concept for enhanced natural attenuation of dissolved contaminants that are susceptible for oxygenase enzyme attacks. Oxygen amendments facilitate indigenous microbiota to catabolize groundwater pollutants, such as aromatics, that are considered to be recalcitrant in absence of dissolved oxygen. As a rule, natural attenuation of many pollutants under aerobic conditions is considerably faster than under anaerobic conditions. Thus, enhancing the dissolved oxygen level appears to be worthwhile. In situ aeration of groundwater has been accomplished by air sparging, H2O2-supply, or by utilization of oxygen release compounds. However, continuous aeration of previously anaerobic groundwater is not desirable for several reasons: (a) economic efforts too high, (b) pollutant dislocation towards surface (desired only in air sparging), (c) risk of aquifer clogging (gas clogging, oxidation of ferrous iron, formation of bioslimes). In contrast, discontinuous oxygen gas sparging provides only for periodical groundwater aeration which is followed by microaerobic and suboxic conditions. Microaerobic conditions can prevail spatially (e.g., at plume fringes or within biofilms) or temporarily (e.g., at discontinuous bioventing). They still allow adapted bacteria to transform environmental pollutants to less toxic compounds, e.g., aromatic ring cleavage after dioxygenasis attack. Ring cleavage products, on the other hand, may be degraded more easily by anaerobic consortia than the initial aromatic compounds, making oxygen depletion periods highly intriguing in regard to an initiation of natural attenuation processes at plume fringes. In our work we outline the effect of oxygen depletion conditions on biodegradation of monchlorobenzene (MCB) as they occur subsequently to temporary aeration periods. For microaerobic conditions, relative to the oxygen supply, a stoichiometric transformation of MCB

  19. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  20. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  1. The study of excited oxygen molecule gas species production and quenching on thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Fujimoto, Gordon T.; Greene, Frank T.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of excited oxygen and ozone molecules formed by surface catalyzed oxygen atom recombination and reaction was investigated by laser induced fluorescence (LIF), molecular beam mass spectrometric (MBMS), and field ionization (FI) techniques. The experiment used partially dissociated oxygen flows from a microwave discharge at pressures in the range from 60 to 400 Pa or from an inductively coupled RF discharge at atmospheric pressure. The catalyst materials investigated were nickel and the reaction cured glass coating used for Space Shuttle reusable surface insulation tiles. Nonradiative loss processes for the laser excited states makes LIF detection of O2 difficult such that formation of excited oxygen molecules could not be detected in the flow from the microwave discharge or in the gaseous products of atom loss on nickel. MBMS experiments showed that ozone was a product of heterogeneous O atom loss on nickel and tile surfaces at low temperatures and that ozone is lost on these materials at elevated temperatures. FI was separately investigated as a method by which excited oxygen molecules may be conveniently detected. Partial O2 dissociation decreases the current produced by FI of the gas.

  2. Diffusive Gas Loss from Silica Glass Ampoules at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the pressure of hydrogen, helium and neon due to diffusion through the wall of silica crystal growth ampoules at elevated temperatures were determined experimentally. We show that, while both He- and Ne-losses closely follow conventional model of diffusive gas permeation through the wall, hydrogen losses, in particular at low fill pressures, can be much larger. This is interpreted in terms of the high solubility of hydrogen in silica glasses.

  3. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.

    1993-07-20

    A no loss liquid natural gas (LNG) delivery system is described comprising: (a) means for storing LNG and natural gas at low pressure; (b) means for delivering LNG from the means for storing to a use device including means for sub-cooling the LNG; (c) means for pre-cooling the means for sub-cooling before the LNG is delivered to the use device to substantially reduce vaporization of the initial LNG delivered to the use device; and (d) means for delivering a selectable quantity of the natural gas in said storing means to said use device with the LNG.

  4. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  5. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  6. Electron-beam sustained discharge in oxygen gas mixtures: singlet delta oxygen production for oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Hager, Gordon D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Klimachev, Yurii M.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; McIver, John K.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmar'kov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    Electric properties and spectroscopy of an e-beam sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen gas mixtures at gas pressure up to 100 Torr were experimentally studied. The pulsed discharge in pure oxygen and its mixtures with noble gases was shown to be very unstable and characterized by low input energy. When adding small amount of carbon monoxide or hydrogen, the electric stability of the discharge increases, specific input energy (SIE) per molecular component being more than order of magnitude higher and coming up to 6.5 kJ/(l atm) for gas mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1. The results of experiments on spectroscopy of the singlet delta oxygen O2(a1Δg)(SDO) and O2(b1Σg+) states in the EBSD are presented. The calibration of the optical scheme for measuring the SDO absolute concentration and yield using the detection of luminescence of the SDO going from a chemical SDO generator was done. The preliminary measurement of the SDO yield demonstrated that it was ~3% for the SIE of ~1 kJ/(l atm), which is close to the results of theoretical calculations for such a SIE. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that for the SIE of 6.5 kJ/(l atm) the SDO yield may reach ~20% exceeding its threshold value needed for oxygen-iodine laser operation at room temperature, although a part of the energy loaded into the EBSD goes into the vibrational energy of the molecular admixture, (which was experimentally demonstrated by launching a CO laser operating on an oxygen-rich mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1 and measuring its small-signal gain).

  7. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  8. Modeling signal loss in surficial marine sediments containing occluded gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Trevor

    2003-03-01

    The presence of occluded gas in inland lakes, harbor muds, and surficial marine sediments is well documented. Surficial gassy sediments cause underlying beds to be acoustically impenetrable to seismic surveys; therefore, the modeling of signal loss arising from mudline reflection and transmission absorption is of particular interest. The Anderson and Hampton [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 1890-1903 (1980)] model for attenuation in gassy sediments was evaluated against the physical and acoustical properties of eight laboratory silty clay soils containing different amounts of occluded gas in bubbles of 0.2- to 1.8-mm diameter. The model was shown to give good agreement with measured data over the lower frequencies of bubble resonance and above resonance. It did not agree with measured data at frequencies below resonance, for which the model did not simulate the bulk properties of the gassy soils. The Mackenzie [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 32, 221-231 (1960)] model for reflection loss was also examined for the gassy soils. The maximum reflection losses of 6 dB, at a grazing angle of 40°, does not wholly support speculation by Levin [Geophysics 27, 35-47 (1962)] of highly reflective pressure-release boundaries arising from substantial reflection and absorption losses in gassy sediments. It was found that mudlines formed from sediments with significant occluded gas may be successfully penetrated, although the substantial absorption loss arising from signal transmission through the sediment prevents penetration of the surficial layers to much beyond a meter in depth.

  9. Oxygenation and ventilation characteristics in obese sedated dogs before and after weight loss: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mosing, M; German, A J; Holden, S L; MacFarlane, P; Biourge, V; Morris, P J; Iff, I

    2013-11-01

    This prospective clinical study examined the effect of obesity and subsequent weight loss on oxygenation and ventilation during deep sedation in pet dogs. Data from nine dogs completing a formalised weight loss programme were evaluated. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to quantify body fat mass prior to and after weight loss. Dogs were deeply sedated and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Sedation was scored using a semi-objective scheme. As part of the monitoring of sedation, arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) were measured after 10 min in dorsal recumbency. Oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (SpO2) was monitored continuously using pulse oximetry, starting oxygen supplementation where indicated (SpO2<90%) via a face mask. Morphometric measurements were taken from DEXA images and compared before and after weight loss. Several oxygen indices were calculated and correlated with body fat variables evaluated by DEXA. All body fat variables improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2 increased from 27.9±19.2 kPa to 34.8±24.4 kPa, while FiO2 decreased from 0.74±0.31 to 0.66±0.35. Morphometric measurements improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2/FiO2 (inspired oxygen fraction) and Pa/AO2 (ratio of PaO2 to alveolar PO2) also improved significantly, but there was no change in f-shunt and PaCO2 after weight loss. On multiple linear regression analysis, all oxygen indices were negatively associated with thoracic fat percentage. In conclusion, obesity decreases oxygenation in dogs during deep sedation. Oxygenation status improves with successful weight loss, but ventilation is not influenced by obesity.

  10. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert B.; Hegarty, William P.; Studer, David W.; Tirados, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  11. Respiratory Heat Loss Limits in Helium-Oxygen Saturation Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    STATEMENT (of te obstrol eaterdin Bleek #iferen f mim fier ee) WS SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Contm nu F ewfer aie It nl*OOWY Mel D*UtltY or...THIS PASS 3Be a 3M 20. (CONTINUED) neutral skin temperature in a hot water suit. This level of respiratory heat loss is predicted to allow an average...respiratory heat loss from the ventilatory response to the exercise, will be dissipated through the diver’s skin as he adjusts his hot water flow and

  12. Properties of turbulence in natural gas-oxygen diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sautet, J.C.; Ditaranto, M. ); Samaniego, J.M.; Charon, O. )

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of turbulent flow field velocities, including first and second order velocity moments and the shear stress are carried out by laser Doppler velocimetry in five different, 25 kW, turbulent natural gas-oxygen diffusion flames. The mean flow behavior is described including the velocity half value radius as well as centerline velocity. Mean radial velocity profiles are fitted by a Gaussian function. According to the initial momentum ratio, different jet dynamic behaviors are pointed out by the description of the fluctuating velocity field.

  13. Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Methods for Analysis of Gasoline/Oxygenate Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    determination of various oxygenated compounds in gasoline by gas chromotography have been developed.(3-6) These include gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the...ID-Ai33 0i6 EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS i/t OF GASOLINE/OXYGEN.. (U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX ARMY FUELS...0 EVALUATION OF GAS -CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE/OXYGENATE BLENDS INTERIM REPORT

  14. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology

  15. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia: case reports.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sandra N; Guerreiro, Ditza V; Cunha, Anita M; Camacho, Óscar F; Aguiar, Isabel C

    2016-01-01

    The management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia is currently an open problem. Several strategies have been used with variable results and, to the best of our knowledge, there are no prior accounts in the literature on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of this complication. We report two cases of acute onset of unilateral hearing loss after spinal anesthesia, with significantly improved results after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A hypothesis on the possible mechanism behind this complication is discussed. A relation is established between hyperbaric oxygen therapy and this hypothetical mechanism, in order to explain successful results in the reported cases.

  16. Breathing 100% oxygen compared with 50% oxygen: 50% nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. T.; Pilmanis, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    The risk of venous gas emboli (VGE) and decompression sickness (DCS) must be determined before selection of the lowest pressure for an extravehicular activity (EVA) pressure suit which eliminates the requirement for prebreathing. In earlier studies, use of a 50% oxygen:50% nitrogen breathing mixture (50:50 mix) during 139 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-7.8 psia resulted in 51 instances of severe VGE and one case of DCS. Our current study investigated effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while breathing 100% oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No DCS symptoms were observed. Severe VGE were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10%, 20%, and 40% of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100% oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. Our results show that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100% oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  17. Anomalous Oxygen and Krypton Abundances in Interstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar H2 absorption toward a sample of stars observed with the HST STIS spectrograph as part of the ISM SNAP Survey. This Survey was designed to produce a database of high quality, high resolution W spectra from which interstellar gas-phase elemental abundances could be derived for large portions of the Galaxy. In particular, oxygen and krypton were chosen as excellent tracers for measuring the homogeneity of the interstellar gas due to their weak depletion into dust grains. The gas-phase 0 and Kr abundances relative to total hydrogen column density had previously been shown with HST GHRS measurements to be essentially constant in the local Milky Way. One of the main motivations of the ISM SNAP Survey was to determine if this constancy held at greater distances and in denser sightlines (where depletion into dust could be a possibility). The initial ISM SNAP STIS observations indicated a number of sightlines with unusual 0 and Kr abundances relative to the measured H I column densities. Since the appropriate benchmark for accurate abundance comparisons is the total hydrogen column density (H I plus H2), FUSE observations of interstellar H2 were carried out in these sightlines in order to determine if they represent cases of true abundance anomalies.

  18. Effect of oxygen on the internal corrosion of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, C.L.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-08-01

    Internal corrosion is a problem in wet natural gas gathering lines. Literature on the subject suggests that dissolved oxygen (O{sub 2}) is one of the more corrosive contaminants in natural gas. Immersion tests, funded by a major gas transmission company, were performed on C1018 (UNS G10180) specimens to assess the influence of O{sub 2} concentration on the internal corrosion of the wet gathering system in their storage field. Twenty-eight day tests were performed in a flow-through (gas phase only) autoclave at 70 F (21 C) and 1,200 psi (8,274 kPa) with simulated natural gas mixtures containing 10, 100, 500 and 1,000 ppm (by volume) O{sub 2}. Specimens were exposed to the vapor, vapor/liquid (V/L) interface, and liquid phases of pure water and saltwater in these tests. The highest corrosion rate, based on groove depth, was measured for the V/L specimens in pure water with 1,000 ppm O{sub 2}. Corrosion rates, based on weight loss, generally maximized at an O{sub 2} concentration of 100 ppm.

  19. Energy Balance Around Gas Injection into Oxygen Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabah, Shabnam; Brooks, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, a simplified approach of energy balance around gas injection into oxygen steelmaking has been carried out in a cold model. The aim is to provide an estimation of the amount of energy consumed by the different parts of the injection process such as dissipation, stirring of the bath, cavity formation, and splashing. Calculation of jet power used by different processes has been carried for various operating conditions and cavity modes ( i.e., splashing and penetrating). Calculations showed that dissipation and splashing are the dominant processes where most of the power of the jet is used, whereas cavity formation consumes the least amount. In the splashing mode, the percentage of total input power going into dissipation was about 59 to 63 pct, whereas it was found to be 2.6 to 50 pct in the penetrating mode. In splashing mode, about 30 pct power from the nozzle was used to create splash which is proved to be an efficient mode for droplet generation as less power is required to create droplets. At a certain lance height, the percentages of total input power used for splashing and dissipation were found equal. Below this lance height, all the cavities were found to be in penetrating mode. This simplified approach provides an improved understanding of the gas injection process and may be used for developing models of the injection process of steelmaking.

  20. Prognostic effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time for sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Erol; Murat Özcan, K; Palalı, Mehmet; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Ensari, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is one of the otological emergencies whose pathogenesis is uncertain and associated with total or partial loss of hearing function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time affects the management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Fifty-nine patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss admitted to our clinic between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In addition, each patient received intravenous piracetam and 37 patients received steroid therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was initiated between 1 and 7 days with 20 patients determined as Group A, between 8 and 14 days with 25 patients determined as Group B and between 15 and 28 days with 14 patients determined as Group C. Hearing gains of these three groups were statistically evaluated. Each of them showed statistically significant improvement. Lowest hearing gain was observed in Group C and the gain of this group was statistically less than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the hearing gains of the Group A and Group B. Starting hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss within the first 14 days has positive effect on the prognosis of the disease.

  1. Interplay between oxygen demand reactions and kinetic gas-water transfer in porous media.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Sascha E; Griepentrog, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Balcke, Gerd U

    2008-08-01

    Gas-water phase transfer associated with the dissolution of trapped gas in porous media is a key process that occurs during pulsed gas sparging operations in contaminated aquifers. Recently, we applied a numerical model that was experimentally validated for abiotic situations, where multi-species kinetic inter-phase mass transfer and dissolved gas transport occurred during pulsed gas penetration-dissolution events [Balcke, G.U., Meenken, S., Hoefer, C. and Oswald, S.E., 2007. Kinetic gas-water transfer and gas accumulation in porous media during pulsed oxygen sparging. Environmental Science & Technology 41(12), 4428-4434]. Here we extend the model by using a reactive term to describe dissolved oxygen demand reactions via the formation of a reaction product, and to study the effects of such an aerobic degradation process on gas-water mass transfer and dissolution of trapped gas in porous media. As a surrogate for microbial oxygen reduction, first-order oxygen demand reactions were based on the measured oxidation of alkaline pyrogallol in column experiments. This reaction allows for adjusting the rate to values close to expected biodegradation rates and detection of the reaction product. The experiments and model consistently demonstrated accelerated oxygen gas-water mass transfer with increasing oxygen demand rates associated with an influence on the partitioning of other gases. Thus, as the oxygen demand accelerates, less gas phase residues, consisting mainly of nitrogen, are observed, which is in general beneficial to the performance of field biosparging operations. Model results additionally predict how oxygen demand influences oxygen mass transfer for a range of biodegradation rates. A typical field case scenario was simulated to illustrate the observed coupling of oxygen consumption and gas bubble dissolution. The model provides a tool to improve understanding of trapped gas behavior in porous media and contributes to a model-assisted biosparging.

  2. Loss of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium from the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Hurd, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The processes of formation and maturation of lunar soils lead to enrichments in the heavy stable isotopes of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The isotopic enrichment implies substantial losses of these elements from the moon. Vaporization by micrometeorite impact and by ion sputtering have removed at least 1% of the mass of the regolith. The losses of sulfur and potassium amount to at least 20-30% of their original abundance in the regolith.

  3. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  4. Rhizome phyllosphere oxygenation in Phragmites and other species in relation to redox potential, convective gas flow, submergence and aeration pathways.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Jones, R E; Armstrong, W

    2006-01-01

    Underground rhizomes of emergent aquatic macrophytes are important for perennation, vegetative spread, competition and anchorage. In four species we examined the potential for the development of oxidized phyllospheres around rhizome apical buds, similar to the protective oxygenated rhizospheres around roots. Redox potentials and polarographic measurements of radial oxygen loss were recorded using platinum cathodes around the apical buds. The aeration pathway from atmosphere to phyllosphere was investigated anatomically and by applied pressurized gas flow. Redox potentials increased by +400, +45, +200 and +340 mV around rhizome apices of Phragmites australis, Oryza rhizomatis, Carex rostrata and Glyceria maxima, respectively. Radial oxygen loss from rhizome apices of Phragmites was increased by convective gas flow through the rhizome and by shoot de-submergence, and decreased by resistances applied within the aeration pathway and by shoot submergence. We conclude that oxygen passes via internal gas-space connections between aerial shoot, rhizome and underground buds and into the phyllosphere regions via scale-leaf stomata and surfaces on the buds. We suggest that oxidized phyllospheres may protect rhizome apices against phytotoxins in waterlogged soils, just as oxidized rhizospheres protect roots.

  5. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting. 1910.253 Section 1910..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.253 Oxygen... and air or oxygen may be explosive and shall be guarded against. No device or attachment...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting. 1910.253 Section 1910..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.253 Oxygen... and air or oxygen may be explosive and shall be guarded against. No device or attachment...

  7. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting. 1910.253 Section 1910..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Welding, Cutting and Brazing § 1910.253 Oxygen... and air or oxygen may be explosive and shall be guarded against. No device or attachment...

  8. Oxygen gas optrode based on microstructured polymer optical fiber segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinghua; Peng, Lirong; Yuan, Libo; Teng, Pingping; Tian, Fengjun; Li, Le; Luo, Shenzi

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we first propose a novel type of oxygen gas optrode by forming fluorophore doped sensing film in the array microholes with the characteristics of microstructured optical fiber (MOF) segment. Comparing with the conventional O 2 detecting method, this slender shaped optrode shows potential in trace amount of O 2 sensing and online O 2 monitoring. Organical silicate gel or plastified cellulose acetate are chosen as sensing films and tris (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenathroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride ([Ru(dpp) 3]Cl 2) or meso-tetraphenylporphyin (TPP) as quenching fluorophores. From the experimental results, we find [Ru(dpp) 3] 2+-Gel-MOF optrode has favorable sensing characteristics, and the Stern-Volmer plots are linear in the full concentration range of O 2 (0-100% v/v). The ratio of I 0/I 100, where I 0 and I 100 respectively represents the fluorescence intensities of the optrode exposed to 100% N 2 and 100% O 2, as a sensitivity of the optrode is 10.8. Simultaneously, the optrode can make a quick response within 50 ms.

  9. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in Allende and solar nebula gas.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, H; Ito, M; Nagasawa, H

    1998-12-04

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope composition (approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  10. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in allende and solar nebula Gas

    PubMed

    Yurimoto; Ito; Nagasawa

    1998-12-04

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope compositions ( approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  11. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  12. Laboratory Measurements of Oxygen Gas Release from Basaltic Minerals Exposed to UV- Radiation: Implications for the Viking Gas Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    The biology experiments onboard the Viking Landers determined that the Martian soils at Chryse and Utopia Planitia contain an unknown chemical compound of a highly oxidizing nature. The Gas Exchange Experiments (GEx) demonstrated that the humidification of a 1-cc Martian soil sample resulted in the production of as much as 790 nanomoles of oxygen gas. Yen et al. (2000) have provided experimental evidence that superoxide radicals can be generated on plagioclase feldspar (labradorite) grain surfaces by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light in the presence of oxygen gas. Adsorbed superoxide radicals are thought to react readily with water vapor, and produce oxygen gas in quantities sufficient to explain the Viking GEx results. Direct evidence for the formation of oxygen gas, however, was not provided in the experiments of Yen et al (2000). Accordingly, the motivation of this study is to determine whether superoxide radicals adsorbed on labradorite surfaces are capable of producing oxygen gas upon exposure to water vapor. We have constructed an experimental apparatus that is capable of monitoring oxygen gas release from basaltic mineral powders that have been exposed to UV-radiation under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus consists of a stainless-steel vacuum chamber with a UV- transparent window where sample radiation exposures are performed. The vacuum chamber has multiple valved ports for injection of gases and water vapor. The vacuum chamber is connected via a precision leak valve to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, which measures changes in the composition of the headspace gases over our mineral samples. We will report on the results of our experiments, which are aimed at detecting and quantifying oxygen gas release from UV-exposed basaltic mineral samples using this new experimental facility. These results will further constrain whether superoxide ions adsorbed on mineral surfaces provide a viable explanation for the Viking GEx results, which have

  13. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  14. Placental Gas Exchange and the Oxygen Supply to the Fetus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony M

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen supply of the fetus depends on the blood oxygen content and flow rate in the uterine and umbilical arteries and the diffusing capacity of the placenta. Oxygen consumption by the placenta is a significant factor and a potential limitation on availability to the fetus. The relevance of these several factors as well as responses to acute or sustained hypoxia has been explored in the sheep model. In addition, much has been learned in the context of hypobaric hypoxia by studying human populations that have resided at high altitude for varying periods of time. Embryonic development occurs under anaerobic conditions and even the fetus is adapted to a low oxygen environment. Nevertheless, there is a reserve capacity, and during acute hypoxia the fetus can counter a 50% reduction in oxygen delivery by increasing fractional extraction. During sustained hypoxia, on the other hand, fetal growth is slowed, although oxygen consumption is unaltered when corrected for fetal mass. Similarly, birth weight is reduced in humans living at high altitude even if the effect is tempered in those with a long highland ancestry. Placental mass changes little during sustained hypoxia in sheep or humans at high altitude. This conceals the fact that there are structural changes and that placental oxygen consumption is reduced. The underlying mechanisms are a current focus of research. One intriguing possibility is that increased anaerobic metabolism of glucose in the placenta spares oxygen for the fetus but reduces its supply of substrate and thereby limits fetal growth.

  15. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  16. Numerical Study of Transmission Loss Through a Slow Gas Layer Adjacent to a Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Beck, Benjamin S.; Slagle, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic numerical investigation of the sound transmission loss through a multilayer system consisting of a bagged gas and lightweight panel. The goal of the study is to better understand the effect of the gas on transmission loss and determine whether a gas with a slow speed of sound is beneficial for noise control applications. As part of the study, the density and speed of sound of the gas are varied independently to assess the impact of each on transmission loss. Results show that near grazing incidence the plane wave transmission loss through the multilayer system is more sensitive to the speed of sound than the density of the gas. In addition, it was found that a slow wave speed in the bagged gas provides more low-frequency transmission loss benefit than a fast wave speed. At low angles of incidence, close to the plate normal, the benefit is due to the reduction of the characteristic impedance of the gas. At high angles of incidence, the benefit is attributed to the fact that the incident waves at the air/gas interface are bent towards the surface normal. Since transmission loss is angle dependent, refraction in the slow gas layer results in a significant improvement in the transmission loss at high angles of incidence.

  17. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junchao; Yu, Qiuhong; Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Ruiyun; Xue, Lianbi

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA) is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2) can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy. PMID:28362819

  18. Chemical-looping combustion of simulated synthesis gas using nickel oxide oxygen carrier supported on bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Poston, J.A.; Zinn, A.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, C.

    2007-05-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology for clean and efficient utilization of fossil fuels for energy production. This process which produces sequestration ready CO2 systems is a promising technology to be utilized with coal gasification systems. In the present work, chemical-looping combustion has been studied with an oxygen carrier, NiO/bentonite (60 wt % NiO) for the gasification systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data on multicycle tests conducted with NiO/bentonite at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. The rate of reduction increased slightly with an increase in temperature, while the rate of oxidation decreased at 900 °C. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the particle size between 20 and 200 mesh. The rates of reactions depended on the particle size of the oxygen carrier. The smaller the particle size, the higher the reaction rates. The multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for the production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. The data from a one cycle test on the effect of the pressure on the performance with NiO/bentonite utilizing the tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) showed a positive effect of the pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of the NiO phase in NiO/bentonite with the oxidized sample in the highpressure reactor and Ni phase with the reduced sample. The presence of a small amount of NiO in the reduced sample detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) may be due to its exposure to air during sample transfer from the reactor to XPS. Scanning electron

  19. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip. PMID:24843167

  20. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters.

    PubMed

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A

    2014-06-03

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip.

  1. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  2. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    DOEpatents

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  3. Real gas CFD simulations of hydrogen/oxygen supercritical combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, S.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Rogg, B.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive numerical framework has been established to simulate reacting flows under conditions typically encountered in rocket combustion chambers. The model implemented into the commercial CFD Code ANSYS CFX includes appropriate real gas relations based on the volume-corrected Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) for the flow field and a real gas extension of the laminar flamelet combustion model. The results indicate that the real gas relations have a considerably larger impact on the flow field than on the detailed flame structure. Generally, a realistic flame shape could be achieved for the real gas approach compared to experimental data from the Mascotte test rig V03 operated at ONERA when the differential diffusion processes were only considered within the flame zone.

  4. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  5. Efficacy comparison of oral steroid, intratympanic steroid, hyperbaric oxygen and oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen treatments in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss cases.

    PubMed

    Alimoglu, Yalcin; Inci, Ender; Edizer, Deniz Tuna; Ozdilek, Alper; Aslan, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a rare disorder of unknown pathogenesis in which hearing is lost partially or totally. About 60 treatment modalities have been described. We aimed to compare the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen, oral steroid, intratympanic steroid therapy and their combinations in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Files of patients who were followed up between 2004 and 2010 in our clinic were examined retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups according to the therapy received: Oral steroid, oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen, intratympanic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen. Treatment success was assessed by Siegel criteria and mean gains using pre-treatment and post-treatment audiograms. 217 patients and 219 ears were examined. The proportion of patients responding to therapy was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 86.88% (53/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 63.79% (37/58), the intratympanic steroid group with 46,51% (20/43) and the hyperbaric oxygen group with 43.85% (25/57). The proportion of patients who had complete recovery was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 42.6% (26/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 19.0% (11/58), the hyperbaric oxygen group with 17.5% (10/57) and the intratympanic steroid group with 11.6% (5/43). The oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group has the highest mean hearing gain among all groups (p < 0.05). Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients receiving oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen combination therapy have a higher likelihood of recovery than patients receiving oral steroids, hyperbaric oxygen or intratympanic steroids alone.

  6. Singlet oxygen generation on porous superhydrophobic surfaces: effect of gas flow and sensitizer wetting on trapping efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yang; Xu, Qianfeng; Barahman, Mark; Bartusik, Dorota; Greer, Alexander; Lyons, Alan M

    2014-11-13

    We describe physical-organic studies of singlet oxygen generation and transport into an aqueous solution supported on superhydrophobic surfaces on which silicon-phthalocyanine (Pc) particles are immobilized. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was trapped by a water-soluble anthracene compound and monitored in situ using a UV-vis spectrometer. When oxygen flows through the porous superhydrophobic surface, singlet oxygen generated in the plastron (i.e., the gas layer beneath the liquid) is transported into the solution within gas bubbles, thereby increasing the liquid-gas surface area over which singlet oxygen can be trapped. Higher photooxidation rates were achieved in flowing oxygen, as compared to when the gas in the plastron was static. Superhydrophobic surfaces were also synthesized so that the Pc particles were located in contact with, or isolated from, the aqueous solution to evaluate the relative effectiveness of singlet oxygen generated in solution and the gas phase, respectively; singlet oxygen generated on particles wetted by the solution was trapped more efficiently than singlet oxygen generated in the plastron, even in the presence of flowing oxygen gas. A mechanism is proposed that explains how Pc particle wetting, plastron gas composition and flow rate as well as gas saturation of the aqueous solution affect singlet oxygen trapping efficiency. These stable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can physically isolate the photosensitizer particles from the solution may be of practical importance for delivering singlet oxygen for water purification and medical devices.

  7. Singlet Oxygen Generation on Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Effect of Gas Flow and Sensitizer Wetting on Trapping Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe physical-organic studies of singlet oxygen generation and transport into an aqueous solution supported on superhydrophobic surfaces on which silicon–phthalocyanine (Pc) particles are immobilized. Singlet oxygen (1O2) was trapped by a water-soluble anthracene compound and monitored in situ using a UV–vis spectrometer. When oxygen flows through the porous superhydrophobic surface, singlet oxygen generated in the plastron (i.e., the gas layer beneath the liquid) is transported into the solution within gas bubbles, thereby increasing the liquid–gas surface area over which singlet oxygen can be trapped. Higher photooxidation rates were achieved in flowing oxygen, as compared to when the gas in the plastron was static. Superhydrophobic surfaces were also synthesized so that the Pc particles were located in contact with, or isolated from, the aqueous solution to evaluate the relative effectiveness of singlet oxygen generated in solution and the gas phase, respectively; singlet oxygen generated on particles wetted by the solution was trapped more efficiently than singlet oxygen generated in the plastron, even in the presence of flowing oxygen gas. A mechanism is proposed that explains how Pc particle wetting, plastron gas composition and flow rate as well as gas saturation of the aqueous solution affect singlet oxygen trapping efficiency. These stable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can physically isolate the photosensitizer particles from the solution may be of practical importance for delivering singlet oxygen for water purification and medical devices. PMID:24885074

  8. Pathways of sulfide oxidation by haloalkaliphilic bacteria in limited-oxygen gas lift bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Johannes B M; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Buisman, Cees J N; Stams, Alfons J M; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-07-17

    Physicochemical processes, such as the Lo-cat and Amine-Claus process, are commonly used to remove hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gas streams such as landfill gas, natural gas, and synthesis gas. Biodesulfurization offers environmental advantages, but still requires optimization and more insight in the reaction pathways and kinetics. We carried out experiments with gas lift bioreactors inoculated with haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. At oxygen-limiting levels, that is, below an O(2)/H(2)S mole ratio of 1, sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur and sulfate. We propose that the bacteria reduce NAD(+) without direct transfer of electrons to oxygen and that this is most likely the main route for oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur which is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in oxygen-limited bioreactors. We call this pathway the limited oxygen route (LOR). Biomass growth under these conditions is significantly lower than at higher oxygen levels. These findings emphasize the importance of accurate process control. This work also identifies a need for studies exploring similar pathways in other sulfide oxidizers such as Thiobacillus bacteria.

  9. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  10. Abiotic gas formation drives nitrogen loss from a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Sparks, Jed P

    2009-11-06

    In arid environments such as deserts, nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient for biological activity. The majority of the ecosystem nitrogen flux is typically thought to be driven by production and loss of reactive nitrogen species by microorganisms in the soil. We found that high soil-surface temperatures (greater than 50 degrees C), driven by solar radiation, are the primary cause of nitrogen loss in Mojave Desert soils. This abiotic pathway not only enables the balancing of arid ecosystem nitrogen budgets, but also changes our view of global nitrogen cycling and the predicted impact of climate change and increased temperatures on nitrogen bioavailability.

  11. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2016-12-14

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  12. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  13. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  14. Determination of oxygen content in magnesium and its alloys by inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Akira; Achiwa, Hatsumi; Morikawa, Hisashi; Uemoto, Michihisa; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    A method for the determination of the oxygen content in magnesium and magnesium alloys has been developed. Inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry was modified by introducing a multistep heating process; a sample containing oxygen is fused with tin to form an eutectic mixture at 900°C in a graphite crucible, followed by a subsequent gradual temperature increase of up to 2000°C, which enables the evaporation of magnesium from the mixture, and subsequent solidification at the rim of the crucible. Residual tin including magnesium oxide remained at the bottom of the crucible. The oxygen in the tin is measured by a conventional inert gas fusion (IGF) method. From a comparison with the results of charged particle activation analysis, the IGF method is considered to be an attractive candidate for measuring the oxygen content in Mg and its alloys.

  15. Effects of Headspace and Oxygen Level on Off-gas Emissions from Wood Pellets in Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, T.S.; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, X.T.; Melin, Staffan

    2009-10-01

    Few papers have been published in the open literature on the emissions from biomass fuels, including wood pellets, during the storage and transportation and their potential health impacts. The purpose of this study is to provide data on the concentrations, emission factors, and emission rate factors of CO2, CO, and CH4 from wood pellets stored with different headspace to container volume ratios with different initial oxygen levels, in order to develop methods to reduce the toxic off-gas emissions and accumulation in storage spaces. Metal containers (45 l, 305 mm diameter by 610 mm long) were used to study the effect of headspace and oxygen levels on the off-gas emissions from wood pellets. Concentrations of CO2, CO, and CH4 in the headspace were measured using a gas chromatograph as a function of storage time. The results showed that the ratio of the headspace ratios and initial oxygen levels in the storage space significantly affected the off-gas emissions from wood pellets stored in a sealed container. Higher peak emission factors and higher emission rates are associated with higher headspace ratios. Lower emissions of CO2 and CO were generated at room temperature under lower oxygen levels, whereas CH4 emission is insensitive to the oxygen level. Replacing oxygen with inert gases in the storage space is thus a potentially effective method to reduce the biomass degradation and toxic off-gas emissions. The proper ventilation of the storage space can also be used to maintain a high oxygen level and low concentrations of toxic off-gassing compounds in the storage space, which is especially useful during the loading and unloading operations to control the hazards associated with the storage and transportation of wood pellets.

  16. Effects of headspace and oxygen level on off-gas emissions from wood pellets in storage.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, Tumuluru Jaya; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Lim, C Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T; Melin, Staffan

    2009-11-01

    Few papers have been published in the open literature on the emissions from biomass fuels, including wood pellets, during the storage and transportation and their potential health impacts. The purpose of this study is to provide data on the concentrations, emission factors, and emission rate factors of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) from wood pellets stored with different headspace to container volume ratios with different initial oxygen levels, in order to develop methods to reduce the toxic off-gas emissions and accumulation in storage spaces. Metal containers (45 l, 305 mm diameter by 610 mm long) were used to study the effect of headspace and oxygen levels on the off-gas emissions from wood pellets. Concentrations of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) in the headspace were measured using a gas chromatograph as a function of storage time. The results showed that the ratio of the headspace ratios and initial oxygen levels in the storage space significantly affected the off-gas emissions from wood pellets stored in a sealed container. Higher peak emission factors and higher emission rates are associated with higher headspace ratios. Lower emissions of CO(2) and CO were generated at room temperature under lower oxygen levels, whereas CH(4) emission is insensitive to the oxygen level. Replacing oxygen with inert gases in the storage space is thus a potentially effective method to reduce the biomass degradation and toxic off-gas emissions. The proper ventilation of the storage space can also be used to maintain a high oxygen level and low concentrations of toxic off-gassing compounds in the storage space, which is especially useful during the loading and unloading operations to control the hazards associated with the storage and transportation of wood pellets.

  17. Fate of oxygen losses from Typha domingensis (Typhaceae) and Cladium jamaicense (Cyperaceae) and consequences for root metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chabbi, A.; McKee, K.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine whether radial oxygen loss (ROL) from roots of Typha domingensis and Cladium jamaicense creates an internal oxygen deficiency or, conversely, indicates adequate internal aeration and leakage of excess oxygen to the rhizosphere. Methylene blue in agar was used to quantify oxygen leakage. Typha's roots had a higher porosity than Cladium's and responded to flooding treatment by increasing cortical air space, particularly near the root tips. A greater oxygen release, which occurred along the subapical root axis, and an increase in rhizosphere redox potential (Eh) over time were associated with the well-developed aerenchyma system in Typha. Typha roots, regardless of oxygen release pattern, showed low or undetectable alcohol dehydrogenage (ADH) activity or ethanol concentrations, indicating that ROL did not cause internal deficiencies. Cladium roots also releases oxygen, but this loss primarily occurred at the root tips and was accompanied by increased root ADH activity and ethanol concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that oxygen release by Cladium is accompanied by internal deficiencies of oxygen sufficient to stimulate alcoholic fermentation and helps explain Cladium's lesser flood tolerance in comparison with Typha.

  18. Sterilization of Bacillus subtilis Spores Using an Atmospheric Plasma Jet with Argon and Oxygen Mixture Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Fang, Shidong; Xie, Hongbing; Lan, Yan; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Luo, Jiarong; Wang, Xiangke

    2012-03-01

    To determine an efficient sterilization mechanism, Bacillus subtilis spore samples were exposed to an atmospheric plasma jet. By using argon/oxygen mixture gas, the decimal reduction value was reduced from 60 s (using argon gas) to 10 s. More dramatically, after 5 min treatment, the colony-forming unit (CFU) was reduced by six orders. To understand the underlying mechanism of the efficient sterilization by plasma, the contributions from heat, UV radiation, charged particles, ozone, and reactive oxygen radicals were distinguished in this work, showing that charged particles and ozone were the main killing factors. The shape changes of the spores were also discussed.

  19. Effect of weight loss on operational lung volumes and oxygen cost of breathing in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Bhammar, Dharini M.; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of moderate weight loss on operational lung volumes during exercise and the oxygen (O2) cost of breathing are unknown in obese women but could have important implications regarding exercise endurance. Methods In twenty-nine obese women (33 ± 8yr, 97 ± 14kg, BMI: 36 ± 4, body fat: 45.6 ± 4.5%; means ± SD), body composition, fat distribution (by MRI), pulmonary function, operational lung volumes during exercise, and the O2 cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea ( V˙O2 vs. V˙E slope) were studied before and after a 12-week diet and resistance exercise weight loss program. Results Participants lost 7.5 ± 3.1kg or ≈8% of body weight (p < 0.001), but fat distribution remained unchanged. After weight loss, lung volume subdivisions at rest were increased (p < 0.05) and were moderately associated (p < 0.05) with changes in weight. End-expiratory lung volume (%Total Lung Capacity) increased at rest and during constant load exercise (p < 0.05). O2 cost of breathing was reduced by 16% (2.52 ± 1.02 to 2.11 ± 0.72ml/L; P=0.003). As a result, O2 uptake of the respiratory muscles (V˙O2Resp), estimated as the product of O2 cost of breathing and exercise V˙E during cycling at 60W, was significantly reduced by 27 ± 31ml (P<0.001), accounting for 46% of the reduction in total body V˙O2 during cycling at 60W. Conclusions Moderate weight loss yields important improvements in respiratory function at rest and during submaximal exercise in otherwise healthy obese women. These changes in breathing load could have positive effects on the exercise endurance and adherence to physical activity. PMID:26869243

  20. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  1. In situ oxygen transmissibility of rigid gas-permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Weissman, B A; Fatt, I

    1988-05-01

    On the eye a contact lens is bathed in tear fluid, which increases its resistance to oxygen flux. For rigid gas-permeable lenses, this effect should be small during open-eye wear because a large amount of oxygen is provided by air-saturated tears that are pumped under the lens. However, under closed-eye conditions this study suggests substantial decrease in overall lens system oxygen transmissibility when lens transmissibility itself is greater than 20 x 10(-9) cm ml O2/s ml mm Hg and when the average thickness of the tear layer is greater than about 20 micron.

  2. Mixed heavy metals tolerance and radial oxygen loss in mangrove seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Tam, N F Y; Yang, J X; Pi, N; Wong, M H; Ye, Z H

    2009-12-01

    The effects of a mixture of heavy metals (Pb, Zn and Cu) on growth, radial oxygen loss (ROL) and the spatial pattern of ROL were investigated in mangrove seedlings of three species: Aegiceras corniculatum, Avicennia marina and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Heavy metals inhibited the growth of seedlings and led to decreased ROL and changes in the "tight" barrier spatial pattern of ROL. There was a significant positive correlation between the amount of ROL from the roots of seedlings and metal tolerance. The species with the highest ROL amount, B. gymnorrhiza, were also the most tolerant to heavy metals. The "tight" barrier spatial ROL pattern was also related to metal tolerance in the seedlings. Therefore, we conclude that both ROL amount and "tight" barrier spatial ROL pattern in the roots of the mangrove seedlings play an important role in resistance to heavy metal toxicity.

  3. Stable Isotope Composition of Molecular Oxygen in Soil Gas and Groundwater: A Potentially Robust Tracer for Diffusion and Oxygen Consumption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Dillon, M. A.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the concentration and isotopic composition of molecular oxygen in soil gas and groundwater. At a site near Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, soil gas oxygen concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 17.6% at depths of 3-4 m and the δ 18O values ranged mostly from 24.0 to 27.2‰ (SMOW). The concentration of dissolved oxygen in a perched aquifer in the Texas Panhandle (depth to water ˜76 m) was about 5 mg/L and the δ 18O values were 21.2-22.9‰. The δ 18O of soil gas oxygen in our study are higher and those of dissolved oxygen are lower than the δ 18O of atmospheric oxygen (23.5‰). A model for the oxygen concentration and isotopic composition in soil gas was developed using the molecular diffusion theory. The higher δ 18O values in soil gas at the Nebraska site can be explained by the effects of diffusion and soil respiration (plant root and bacterial) on the isotopic composition of molecular oxygen. The lower δ 18O of dissolved oxygen at the Texas site indicates that oxygen consumption below the root zone in the relatively thick unsaturated zone here may have occurred with a different fractionation factor (either due to inorganic consumption or due to low respiration rates) than that observed for the dominant pathways of plant root and bacterial respiration. It is concluded that the use of the concentration and isotopic composition of soil gas and dissolved oxygen should provide a robust tool for studying the subsurface gaseous diffusion and oxygen consumption processes.

  4. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2015-07-01

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness.

  5. Application of the gas tracer method for measuring oxygen transfer rates in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tyroller, Lina; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Santa, Santa; García, Joan

    2010-07-01

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) has a significant impact on the design, optimal operation and modelling of constructed wetlands treating wastewater. Oxygen consumption is very fast in wetlands and the OTR cannot be determined using an oxygen mass balance. This problem is circumvented in this study by applying the gas tracer method. Experiments were conducted in an unplanted gravel bed (dimensions L x W x d 125 x 50 x 35 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 10-11-mm gravel) and a planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) (L x W x d 110 x 70 x 38 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 3.5-mm gravel with Phragmites australis). Tap water saturated with propane as gas tracer (pure or commercial cooking gas, depending on the test) was used. The mass transfer ratio between oxygen and commercial propane gas was quite constant and averaged R = 1.03, which is slightly lower than the value of R = 1.39 that is usually reported for pure propane. The OTR ranged from 0.31 to 5.04 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted gravel bed and from 0.3 to 3.2 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the HSSFCW, depending on the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results of this study suggest that the OTR in HSSFCW is very low for the oxygen demand of standard wastewater and the OTR calculations based on mass balances and theoretical stoichiometric considerations overestimate OTR values by a factor that ranges from 10 to 100. The gas tracer method is a promising tool for determining OTR in constructed wetlands, with commercial gas proving to be a viable low-cost alternative for determining OTR.

  6. Effect of temperature on reduction of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in chemical-looping combustion of simulated coal gas in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Q.L.; Xiao, R.; Deng, Z.Y.; Shen, L.H.; Xiao, J.; Zhang, M.Y.

    2008-12-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a promising combustion technology for gaseous and solid fuel with efficient use of energy and inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. The concept of a coal-fueled CLC system using, calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) as oxygen carrier is proposed in this study. Reduction tests of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier with simulated coal gas were performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor in the temperature range of 890-950{degree}C. A high concentration of CO{sub 2} was obtained at the initial reduction period. CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier exhibited high reactivity initially and decreased gradually at the late period of reduction. The sulfur release during the reduction of CaSO{sub 4} as oxygen carrier was also observed and analyzed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} conversions were greatly influenced by reduction temperature. The oxygen carrier conversion and mass-based reaction rates during the reduction at typical temperatures were compared. Higher temperatures would enhance reaction rates and result in high conversion of oxygen carrier. An XRD patterns study indicated that CaS was the dominant product of reduction and the variation of relative intensity with temperature is in agreement with the solid conversion. ESEM analysis indicated that the surface structure of oxygen carrier particles changed significantly from impervious to porous after reduction. EDS analysis also demonstrated the transfer of oxygen from the oxygen carrier to the fuel gas and a certain amount of sulfur loss and CaO formation on the surface at higher temperatures. The reduction kinetics of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier was explored with the shrinking unreacted-core model. The apparent kinetic parameters were obtained, and the kinetic equation well predicted the experimental data. Finally, some basic considerations on the use of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in a CLC system for solid fuels were discussed.

  7. Synthesis gas production through biomass direct chemical looping conversion with natural hematite as an oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; He, Fang; Feng, Yipeng; Zhao, Kun; Zheng, Anqing; Chang, Sheng; Li, Haibin

    2013-07-01

    Biomass direct chemical looping (BDCL) conversion with natural hematite as an oxygen carrier was conducted in a fluidized bed reactor under argon atmosphere focusing on investigation the cyclic performance of oxygen carrier. The presence of oxygen carrier can evidently promote the biomass conversion. The gas yield and carbon conversion increased from 0.75 Nm(3)/kg and 62.23% of biomass pyrolysis to 1.06 Nm(3)/kg and 87.63% of BDCL, respectively. The components of the gas product in BDCL were close to those in biomass pyrolysis as the cyclic number increased. The gas yield and carbon conversion decreased from 1.06 Nm(3)/kg and 87.63% at 1st cycle to 0.93 Nm(3)/kg and 77.18% at 20th cycle, respectively, due to the attrition and structural changes of oxygen carrier. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the reduction extent of oxygen carrier increased with the cycles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and pore structural analysis displayed that agglomeration was observed with the cycles.

  8. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  9. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO₂ nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO₂ nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450-500 nm in length and 60-80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m²/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO₂. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO₂ nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm.

  10. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... before being left in charge. Rules and instructions covering the operation and maintenance of oxygen or... for free, unobstructed operation and maintenance and shall permit ready adjustment and charging. (4... compressor or booster pump or cooling of the gas, a compressor or booster cutoff shall be provided at a...

  11. Centrifugal spray singlet oxygen generator for a COIL with nitrogen as a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å palek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít.; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    A scalable high pressure centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was developed. This generator uses nitrogen as chlorine diluting gas. Different spray nozzles were tested which could be assembled together and so enable a high chlorine flow rates for a high-power COIL. The designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with reasonable chlorine utilization and O2(1Δg) yield even at very high generator pressures, which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation is beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another advantage of this generator is a very high BHP utilization. The problem of heating of exit gas was solved by introducing additional nitrogen between the separator rotor and stator.

  12. Effect of three-body loss on itinerant ferromagnetism in an atomic Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2011-04-15

    A recent experiment has provided tentative evidence for itinerant ferromagnetism in an ultracold atomic gas. However, the interpretation of the results is complicated by significant atom losses. We argue that during the loss process the system gradually heats up but remains in local equilibrium.To quantify the consequences of atom loss on the putative ferromagnetic transition we adopt an extended Hertz-Millis theory. The losses damp quantum fluctuations, thus increasing the critical interaction strength needed to induce ferromagnetism and revert the transition from being first order to second order. This effect may resolve a discrepancy between the experiment and previous theoretical predictions. We further illuminate the impact of loss by studying the collective spin excitations in the ferromagnet. Even in the fully polarized state, where loss is completely suppressed, spin waves acquire a decay rate proportional to the three-body loss coefficient.

  13. Determination of micro amounts of oxygen in silicon by inert-gas fusion.

    PubMed

    Huannan, H; Yuezhen, L; Guandi, Z; Ronghua, Y; Qingren, L; Mingwei, Q

    1983-10-01

    A chromatographic inert-gas fusion method using an Ni-Sn fusion bath and helium as carrier gas has been developed for determining micro amounts of oxygen in silicon. With the Ni-Sn bath, the oxygen determination can be done at lower temperatures (1650-1700 degrees ) in a heated graphite crucible than in an empty crucible (with no molten metal bath) in which the sample is directly in contact with the carbon. Four samples can be analysed in succession in a single crucible with a relatively short time for oxygen extraction (5 min). Careful control of experimental conditions, and the use of a water-cooled quartz tube and a small unshielded graphite crucible have resulted in a lower blank (0.1 mug of oxygen), and better reproducibility, enabling oxygen in silicon to be determined down to 1 ppm. A calibration curve for determining oxygen in single crystals of silicon by measuring the infrared absorption at 9 mum has been constructed and gives results agreeing with those obtained by alpha-particle activation analysis.

  14. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  15. Online derivatization for hourly measurements of gas- and particle-phase semi-volatile oxygenated organic compounds by thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (SV-TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L. D.; Worton, D. R.; Chan, A. W. H.; Moss, J. A.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies have identified a large number of oxygenated organic compounds that can be used as tracers to understand sources and oxidation chemistry of atmospheric particulate matter. Quantification of these compounds in ambient environments has traditionally relied on low-time-resolution collection of filter samples followed by offline sample treatment with a derivatizing agent to allow analysis by gas chromatography of otherwise non-elutable organic chemicals with hydroxyl groups. We present here an automated in situ instrument for the measurement of highly polar organic semi-volatile and low-volatility compounds in both the gas- and particle-phase with hourly quantification of mass concentrations and gas-particle partitioning. The dual-cell semi-volatile thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) with derivatization collects particle-only and combined particle-plus-vapor samples on two parallel sampling cells that are analyzed in series by thermal desorption into helium saturated with derivatizing agent. Introduction of MSTFA (N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide), a silylating agent, yields complete derivatization of all tested compounds, including alkanoic acids, polyols, diacids, sugars, and multifunctional compounds. In laboratory tests, derivatization is found to be highly reproducible (< 3% variability). During field deployment, a regularly injected internal standard is used to correct for variability in detector response, consumption of the derivatization agent, desorption efficiency, and transfer losses. Error in quantification from instrument fluctuations is found to be less than 10% for hydrocarbons and less than 15% for all oxygenates for which a functionally similar internal standard is available, with an uncertainty of 20-25% in measurements of particle fraction. After internal standard corrections, calibration curves are found to be linear for all compounds over the span of 1 month, with comparable response on

  16. Gas phase production and loss of isoprene epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kelvin H; Crounse, John D; St Clair, Jason M; Bennett, Nathan B; Nguyen, Tran B; Seinfeld, John H; Stoltz, Brian M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2014-02-20

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) form in high yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions. These compounds contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Their gas-phase chemistry has, however, remained largely unexplored. In this study, we characterize the formation of IEPOX isomers from the oxidation of isoprene by OH. We find that cis-β- and trans-β-IEPOX are the dominant isomers produced, and that they are created in an approximate ratio of 1:2 from the low-NO oxidation of isoprene. Three isomers of IEPOX, including cis-β- and trans-β, were synthesized and oxidized by OH in environmental chambers under high- and low-NO conditions. We find that IEPOX reacts with OH at 299 K with rate coefficients of (0.84 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), (1.52 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), and (0.98 ± 0.05) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the δ1, cis-β, and trans-β isomers. Finally, yields of the first-generation products of IEPOX + OH oxidation were measured, and a new mechanism of IEPOX oxidation is proposed here to account for the observed products. The substantial yield of glyoxal and methylglyoxal from IEPOX oxidation may help explain elevated levels of those compounds observed in low-NO environments with high isoprene emissions.

  17. Nonlinear effects in the energy loss of a slow dipole in a free-electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze beyond linear-response theory the energy loss of a slow dipole moving inside a free-electron gas. The energy loss is obtained from a nonlinear treatment of the scattering of electrons at the dipole-induced potential. This potential and the total electronic density are calculated with density-functional theory. We focus on the interference effects, i.e., the difference between the energy loss of a dipole and that of the isolated charges forming it. Comparison of our results to those obtained in linear-response theory shows that a nonlinear treatment of the screening is required to accurately describe the energy loss of slow dipoles.

  18. Loss of gas from echogenic liposomes exposed to pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-12-01

    The destruction of echogenic liposomes (ELIP) in response to pulsed ultrasound excitations has been studied acoustically previously. However, the mechanism underlying the loss of echogenicity due to cavitation nucleated by ELIP has not been fully clarified. In this study, an ultra-high speed imaging approach was employed to observe the destruction phenomena of single ELIP exposed to ultrasound bursts at a center frequency of 6 MHz. We observed a rapid size reduction during the ultrasound excitation in 139 out of 397 (35%) ultra- high-speed recordings. The shell dilation rate, which is defined as the microbubble wall velocity divided by the instantaneous radius, \\dot{{R}}  /R, was extracted from the radius versus time response of each ELIP, and was found to be correlated with the deflation. Fragmentation and surface mode vibrations were also observed and are shown to depend on the applied acoustic pressure and initial radius. Results from this study can be utilized to optimize the theranostic application of ELIP, e.g. by tuning the size distribution or the excitation frequency.

  19. Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

    2012-08-19

    The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

  20. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  1. Discontinuous gas exchange and the significance of respiratory water loss in Scarabaeine beetles.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Davis, Adrian L V

    2003-10-01

    Respiratory water loss in insects is a controversial topic. Whilst earlier studies considered respiratory transpiration a significant component of overall water loss, to the extent that it was thought to be responsible not only for the evolution of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) but also for variation in DGC patterns, later work repeatedly questioned its importance. In particular, investigations of the proportional contribution of respiratory transpiration to total water loss in species showing DGCs suggested that respiratory transpiration was unlikely to be important in these species. In turn, these studies have been criticized on analytical grounds. In this study we investigated variation in cuticular and respiratory water loss rates in five Scarabaeus dung beetle species, all of which show discontinuous gas exchange cycles, to ascertain the significance of respiratory water loss using modern analytical techniques. In particular, we determined whether there is variation in water loss rates amongst these beetles, whether both respiratory and cuticular water loss rates contribute significantly to variation in the former, and whether metabolic rate variation and variation in the duration of the DGC periods contribute significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. Total water loss rate varied such that species from arid areas had the lowest rates of water loss, and both cuticular and spiracular transpiration contributed significantly to variation in overall water loss rate. Moreover, variation in metabolic rate and in the duration of the DGC periods contributed significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. By contrast, examination of proportional water loss revealed little other than that it varies between 6.5% and 21%, depending on the species and the temperature at which it was examined. Cuticular water loss scaled as mass(0.721), but did not differ from that expected from geometric considerations alone. By contrast, respiratory

  2. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

    2003-05-15

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department

  3. Comparison of two different steroid treatments with hyperbaric oxygen for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sevil, Ergun; Bercin, Sami; Muderris, Togay; Gul, Fatih; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of the association of intratympanic (IT) steroid and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients presenting with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), and to compare this protocol with another consisting of intravenous (IV) steroid administration and HBO therapy. A total of 80 patients diagnosed with ISSNHL were included in this prospective trial. Patients were divided into three categories: a mild-to-moderate ISSNHL group with a pure-tone average (PTA) ≤60 decibels (dB), a severe ISSNHL group with a PTA of 60-80 dB, and a profound ISSNHL group with a PTA ≥81 dB. The first protocol consisted of 20 sessions of HBO therapy together with IV methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg body weight and a 10 mg taper every 3 days for 10 days. The second protocol consisted of HBO therapy for 20 sessions, together with an IT injection of dexamethasone at a dose of 4 mg/mL, 0.5-0.7 mL once a day for 7 consecutive days, performed 3 h before the HBO therapy. In the mild-to-moderate ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 19 (0-27) dB and 78.9 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group, and 18 (3-44) dB and 70.5 % in the IV + HBO therapy group. In the severe ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 33 (1-54) dB and 81.8 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group and 33.5 (7-57) dB and 58.2 % in the IV + HBO group. In the profound ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 36 (4-69) dB and 40 %, respectively in the IT + HBO therapy group, and 39.5 (0-92) dB and 72.7 % in the IV + HBO treatment group. The results demonstrated that patients with severe hearing loss success rate was superior in the group submitted to IT + HBO treatment, conversely IV + HBO therapy may be benefit for patients with profound hearing loss. Nevertheless, these clinical results were not statistically significant.

  4. The effect of weight loss on sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation in morbidly obese men.

    PubMed

    Harman, E M; Wynne, J W; Block, A J

    1982-09-01

    Four morbidly obese men who had been found to have significant sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation were restudied after an average weight loss of 108 kg (range 53-155 kg). In all subjects, weight loss was accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of episodes per hour of sleep-disordered breathing events. In three of the four subjects, there was improvment in the severity of desaturation accompanying abnormal breathing. The two subjects with daytime somnolence and hypercapnia prior to weight loss showed the most dramatic improvement in desaturation. This suggests that obesity is a cause, rather than an effect, of the sleep apnea syndrome.

  5. Habitat Loss and Modification Due to Gas Development in the Fayetteville Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Matthew D.; Cox, A. Brandon; Wells, Rachel L.; Benichou, Chloe C.; McClung, Maureen R.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have become major methods to extract new oil and gas deposits, many of which exist in shale formations in the temperate deciduous biome of the eastern United States. While these technologies have increased natural gas production to new highs, they can have substantial environmental effects. We measured the changes in land use within the maturing Fayetteville Shale gas development region in Arkansas between 2001/2002 and 2012. Our goal was to estimate the land use impact of these new technologies in natural gas drilling and predict future consequences for habitat loss and fragmentation. Loss of natural forest in the gas field was significantly higher compared to areas outside the gas field. The creation of edge habitat, roads, and developed areas was also greater in the gas field. The Fayetteville Shale gas field fully developed about 2 % of the natural habitat within the region and increased edge habitat by 1,067 linear km. Our data indicate that without shale gas activities, forest cover would have increased slightly and edge habitat would have decreased slightly, similar to patterns seen recently in many areas of the southern U.S. On average, individual gas wells fully developed about 2.5 ha of land and modified an additional 0.5 ha of natural forest. Considering the large number of wells drilled in other parts of the eastern U.S. and projections for new wells in the future, shale gas development will likely have substantial negative effects on forested habitats and the organisms that depend upon them.

  6. Habitat loss and modification due to gas development in the Fayetteville shale.

    PubMed

    Moran, Matthew D; Cox, A Brandon; Wells, Rachel L; Benichou, Chloe C; McClung, Maureen R

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have become major methods to extract new oil and gas deposits, many of which exist in shale formations in the temperate deciduous biome of the eastern United States. While these technologies have increased natural gas production to new highs, they can have substantial environmental effects. We measured the changes in land use within the maturing Fayetteville Shale gas development region in Arkansas between 2001/2002 and 2012. Our goal was to estimate the land use impact of these new technologies in natural gas drilling and predict future consequences for habitat loss and fragmentation. Loss of natural forest in the gas field was significantly higher compared to areas outside the gas field. The creation of edge habitat, roads, and developed areas was also greater in the gas field. The Fayetteville Shale gas field fully developed about 2% of the natural habitat within the region and increased edge habitat by 1,067 linear km. Our data indicate that without shale gas activities, forest cover would have increased slightly and edge habitat would have decreased slightly, similar to patterns seen recently in many areas of the southern U.S. On average, individual gas wells fully developed about 2.5 ha of land and modified an additional 0.5 ha of natural forest. Considering the large number of wells drilled in other parts of the eastern U.S. and projections for new wells in the future, shale gas development will likely have substantial negative effects on forested habitats and the organisms that depend upon them.

  7. Fast vacancy-mediated oxygen ion incorporation across the ceria-gas electrochemical interface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhuoluo A; El Gabaly, Farid; Ye, Xiaofei; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Chueh, William C

    2014-07-09

    Electrochemical incorporation reactions are ubiquitous in energy storage and conversion devices based on mixed ionic and electronic conductors, such as lithium-ion batteries, solid-oxide fuel cells and water-splitting membranes. The two-way traffic of ions and electrons across the electrochemical interface, coupled with the bulk transport of mass and charge, has been challenging to understand. Here we report an investigation of the oxygen-ion incorporation pathway in CeO2-δ (ceria), one of the most recognized oxygen-deficient compounds, during hydrogen oxidation and water splitting. We probe the response of surface oxygen vacancies, electrons and adsorbates to the electrochemical polarization at the ceria-gas interface. We show that surface oxygen-ion transfer, mediated by oxygen vacancies, is fast. Furthermore, we infer that the electron transfer between cerium cations and hydroxyl ions is the rate-determining step. Our in operando observations reveal the precise roles of surface oxygen vacancy and electron defects in determining the rate of surface incorporation reactions.

  8. Electron attachment to oxygen, water, and methanol, in various drift chamber gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huk, M.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Wagner, A.

    1988-04-01

    Attachment of electrons to oxygen, water, and methanol molecules has been studied in various gas mixtures based on argon, methane and isobutane, a class of gases often used to operate large drift chambers. The measurements were performed using a drift chamber in which the conditions prevailing in large experiments could be closely reproduced. Attachment coefficients were extracted as a function of the gas composition and pressure, the drift field, and the concentration of the molecules under investigation. The observed effects are compared to other measurements, and are discussed within the frame of physical models.

  9. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  10. Oxygen carrier development for chemical looping combustion of coal derived synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Zinn, A.N.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, Clark; Poston, J.A.

    2006-09-01

    In the present work, NETL researchers have studied chemical looping combustion (CLC) with an oxygen carrier NiO/bentonite (60 wt.% NiO) for the IGCC systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Multi cycle CLC was conducted with NiO/Bentonite in TGA at atmospheric pressure and in a high pressure reactor in a temperature range between 700-900°C. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for all oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the TGA data. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the size between 20-200 mesh. The multi cycle CLC tests conducted in a high pressure packed bed flow reactor indicated constant total production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800°C and 900°C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction.

  11. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 2: Effects of the Design and Operating Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Gas distribution plays a significant role in an oxygen blast furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas from the shaft tuyere has been shown to affect the heat distribution and energy utilization in an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the optimal design and operating parameters beneficial to the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace should be determined. In total, three parameters and 22 different conditions in an oxygen blast furnace multifluid model were considered. The gas and heat distributions in an oxygen blast furnace under different conditions were simulated and compared. The study revealed that when the height of shaft tuyere decreased from 7.8 m to 3.8 m, the difference in top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 11.6%. When the recycling gas temperature increased from 1123 K to 1473 K, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.9%. As the allocation ratio increased from 0.90 to 1.94, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.0%. Considering both gas and heat distributions, a shaft tuyere height of 3.8 m to 4.8 m, a recycling gas temperature of 1473 K and an allocation ratio of 1.94 are recommended in practice under the conditions of this study.

  12. An effective device for gas-liquid oxygen removal in enclosed microalgae culture.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenfeng; Kang, Ruijuan; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cong, Wei; Cai, Zhaoling

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance gas-liquid transmission device (HPTD) was described in this paper. To investigate the HPTD mass transfer characteristics, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficients, K(A)(La,CO(2)) for the absorption of gaseous CO(2) and K(A)(La,O(2)) for the desorption of dissolved O(2) were determined, respectively, by titration and dissolved oxygen electrode. The mass transfer capability of carbon dioxide was compared with that of dissolved oxygen in the device, and the operating conditions were optimized to suit for the large-scale enclosed micro-algae cultivation. Based on the effectiveness evaluation of the HPTD applied in one enclosed flat plate Spirulina culture system, it was confirmed that the HPTD can satisfy the demand of the enclosed system for carbon supplement and excessive oxygen removal.

  13. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  14. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration.

  15. Direct Method Gas-phase Oxygen Abundances of Four Lyman Break Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan S.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2014-09-01

    We measure the gas-phase oxygen abundances in four Lyman break analogs using auroral emission lines to derive direct abundances. The direct method oxygen abundances of these objects are generally consistent with the empirically derived strong-line method values, confirming that these objects are low oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation defined by star forming Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find slightly anomalous excitation conditions (Wolf-Rayet features) that could potentially bias the empirical estimates toward high values if caution is not exercised in the selection of the strong-line calibration. The high rate of star formation and low oxygen abundance of these objects is consistent with the predictions of the fundamental metallicity relation, in which the infall of relatively unenriched gas simultaneously triggers an episode of star formation and dilutes the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; the Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  16. Quantitative analysis of trace bulk oxygen in silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion method.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masahiko; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a method for removing oxide film from the surface of silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion impulse furnace and precise determination of bulk oxygen within the wafer. A silicon wafer was cut to about 0.35 g (6 x 13 x 2 mm) and dropped into a graphite crucible. The sample was then heated for 40 s at 1300 degrees C. The wafer's oxide film was reduced by carbon and removed as carbon monoxide. The treated silicon sample was taken out of the graphite crucible and maintained again with the holder of the oxygen analyzer. The graphite crucible was then heated to 2100 degrees C. The treated silicon sample was dropped into the heated graphite crucible and the trace bulk oxygen in the wafer was measured using the inert gas fusion infrared absorption method. The relative standard deviations of the oxygen in silicon wafer samples with the removed surface oxide film were determined to be 0.8% for 9.8 x 10(17) atoms/cm3, and 2.7% for 13.0 x 10(17) atoms/cm3.

  17. Discontinuous gas exchange, water loss, and metabolism in Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    Insects are at high risk of desiccation because of their small size, high surface-area-to-volume ratio, and air-filled tracheal system that ramifies throughout their bodies to transport O(2) and CO(2) to and from respiring cells. Although the tracheal system offers a high-conductance pathway for the movement of respiratory gases, it has the unintended consequence of allowing respiratory transpiration to the atmosphere. When resting, many species exchange respiratory gases discontinuously, and an early hypothesis for the origin of these discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) is that they serve to reduce respiratory water loss. In this study, we test this "hygric" hypothesis by comparing rates of CO(2) exchange and water loss among flower beetles Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae) breathing either continuously or discontinuously. We show that, consistent with the expectations of the hygric hypothesis, rates of total water loss are higher during continuous gas exchange than during discontinuous gas exchange and that the ratio of respiratory water loss to CO(2) exchange is lower during discontinuous gas exchange. This conclusion is in agreement with other studies of beetles and cockroaches that also support the hygric hypothesis. However, this result does not exclude other adaptive hypotheses supported by work on ants and moth pupae. This ambiguity may arise because there are multiple independent evolutionary origins of DGCs and no single adaptive function underlying their genesis. Alternatively, the observed reduction in water loss during DGCs may be a side effect of a nonadaptive gas exchange pattern that is elicited during periods of inactivity.

  18. Greenhouse gas mitigation can reduce sea-ice loss and increase polar bear persistence.

    PubMed

    Amstrup, Steven C; Deweaver, Eric T; Douglas, David C; Marcot, Bruce G; Durner, George M; Bitz, Cecilia M; Bailey, David A

    2010-12-16

    On the basis of projected losses of their essential sea-ice habitats, a United States Geological Survey research team concluded in 2007 that two-thirds of the world's polar bears (Ursus maritimus) could disappear by mid-century if business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions continue. That projection, however, did not consider the possible benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation. A key question is whether temperature increases lead to proportional losses of sea-ice habitat, or whether sea-ice cover crosses a tipping point and irreversibly collapses when temperature reaches a critical threshold. Such a tipping point would mean future greenhouse gas mitigation would confer no conservation benefits to polar bears. Here we show, using a general circulation model, that substantially more sea-ice habitat would be retained if greenhouse gas rise is mitigated. We also show, with Bayesian network model outcomes, that increased habitat retention under greenhouse gas mitigation means that polar bears could persist throughout the century in greater numbers and more areas than in the business-as-usual case. Our general circulation model outcomes did not reveal thresholds leading to irreversible loss of ice; instead, a linear relationship between global mean surface air temperature and sea-ice habitat substantiated the hypothesis that sea-ice thermodynamics can overcome albedo feedbacks proposed to cause sea-ice tipping points. Our outcomes indicate that rapid summer ice losses in models and observations represent increased volatility of a thinning sea-ice cover, rather than tipping-point behaviour. Mitigation-driven Bayesian network outcomes show that previously predicted declines in polar bear distribution and numbers are not unavoidable. Because polar bears are sentinels of the Arctic marine ecosystem and trends in their sea-ice habitats foreshadow future global changes, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions to improve polar bear status would have conservation benefits throughout

  19. Greenhouse gas mitigation can reduce sea-ice loss and increase polar bear persistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Deweaver, E.T.; Douglas, D.C.; Marcot, B.G.; Durner, G.M.; Bitz, C.M.; Bailey, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of projected losses of their essential sea-ice habitats, a United States Geological Survey research team concluded in 2007 that two-thirds of the worlds polar bears (Ursus maritimus) could disappear by mid-century if business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions continue. That projection, however, did not consider the possible benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation. A key question is whether temperature increases lead to proportional losses of sea-ice habitat, or whether sea-ice cover crosses a tipping point and irreversibly collapses when temperature reaches a critical threshold. Such a tipping point would mean future greenhouse gas mitigation would confer no conservation benefits to polar bears. Here we show, using a general circulation model, that substantially more sea-ice habitat would be retained if greenhouse gas rise is mitigated. We also show, with Bayesian network model outcomes, that increased habitat retention under greenhouse gas mitigation means that polar bears could persist throughout the century in greater numbers and more areas than in the business-as-usual case. Our general circulation model outcomes did not reveal thresholds leading to irreversible loss of ice; instead, a linear relationship between global mean surface air temperature and sea-ice habitat substantiated the hypothesis that sea-ice thermodynamics can overcome albedo feedbacks proposed to cause sea-ice tipping points. Our outcomes indicate that rapid summer ice losses in models and observations represent increased volatility of a thinning sea-ice cover, rather than tipping-point behaviour. Mitigation-driven Bayesian network outcomes show that previously predicted declines in polar bear distribution and numbers are not unavoidable. Because polar bears are sentinels of the Arctic marine ecosystem and trends in their sea-ice habitats foreshadow future global changes, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions to improve polar bear status would have conservation benefits throughout

  20. Singlet-oxygen generation at gas-liquid interfaces: A significant artifact in the measurement of singlet-oxygen yields from ozone-biomolecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanofsky, J.R.; Sima, P.D. )

    1993-09-01

    Several ozone-biomolecule reactions have previously been shown to generate singlet oxygen in high yields. For some of these ozone-biomolecule reactions, we now show that the apparent singlet-oxygen yields determined from measurements of 1270 nm chemiluminescence were artifactually elevated by production of gas-phase singlet oxygen. The gas-phase singlet oxygen results from the reaction of gas-phase ozone with biomolecules near the surface of the solution. Through the use of a flow system that excludes air from the reaction chamber, accurate singlet-oxygen yields can be obtained. The revised singlet-oxygen yields (mol 1O2 per mol O3) for the reactions of ozone with cysteine, reduced glutathione, NADH, NADPH, human albumin, methionine, uric acid and oxidized glutathione are 0.23 +/- 0.02, 0.26 +/- 0.2, 0.48 +/- 0.04, 0.41 +/- 0.01, 0.53 +/- 0.06, 1.11 +/- 0.04, 0.73 +/- 0.05 and 0.75 +/- 0.01, respectively. These revised singlet-oxygen yields are still substantial.

  1. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the... Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of this part to determine oxygen concentration at the location of...

  2. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the... Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of this part to determine oxygen concentration at the location of...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the... Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of this part to determine oxygen concentration at the location of...

  4. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the... Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of this part to determine oxygen concentration at the location of...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the... Method 3A or 3B in appendix A of this part to determine oxygen concentration at the location of...

  6. Oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldemo, Markus; Lundgren, Edvin; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    The initial oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C beyond initial adsorbate structures has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Formation of several ordered phases of surface oxides is observed at oxygen coverages between approximately 2.3 and 3.5 oxygen atoms/Fe(110) surface atom. Initially, a FeO(111)-like film is formed with a parallelogram-shaped moiré pattern. It has two mirror domains that are formed symmetrically around the growth direction of a zigzag-shaped adsorbate structure. With increased local oxygen coverage, the moiré structure transforms into a ball-shaped form. Both these moiré structures have equal atomic stacking at the surface and equal apparent height in STM, suggesting oxygen ions diffusing into the film upon oxidation and that the oxide growth takes place at the iron-iron oxide interface. The FeO(111)-like film turns into a Fe3O4(111)-like film with a triangular bistable surface termination as the oxidation proceeds further. The FeO(111)-like film growth proceeds according to the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism while the Fe3O4(111)-like film grows according to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism.

  7. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  8. Gas bubble disease: mortalities of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in water with constant total gas pressure and different oxygen-nitrogen ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding gas-bubble disease can be found in a recent publication by Rucker (1972); one by the National Academy of Science (Anonymous in press); and an unpublished report by Weitkamp and Katz (1973)." Most discussions on gas-bubble disease have dealt with the inert gas, nitrogen-oxygen was given a secondary role. It is important to know the relationship of nitrogen and oxygen when we are concerned with the total gas pressure in water. Where water becomes aerated at dams or falls, oxygen and nitrogen are usually about equally saturated, however, many of the samples analyzed from the Columbia River indicate that nitrogen is often about 7% higher than oxygen when expressed as a percentage. When oxygen is removed from water by metabolic and chemical action, or when oxygen is added to the water by photosynthesis, there is a definite change in the ratio of oxygen and the inert gases (mainly nitrogen with some argon, etc.). This present study shows the effect of varying the oxygen and nitrogen ratio in water on fingerling coho salmon, Oncorh.llnchllS kislltch, while maintaining a constant total gas pressure. The primary purpose of these experiments was to determine differences in lethality of various gas ratios of oxygen and nitrogen at a constant total gas pressure of 119%. I also wished to determine whether there was a difference in susceptibility between sizes and stocks of juvenile coho. Also to be examined was the effect of reducing the oJl:ygen while holding the nitrogen constant.

  9. Respiratory and cuticular water loss in insects with continuous gas exchange: comparison across five ant species.

    PubMed

    Schilman, Pablo E; Lighton, John R B; Holway, David A

    2005-12-01

    Respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects showing continuous emission of CO(2) is poorly studied because few methodologies can measure it. Comparisons of RWL between insects showing continuous and discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGC) are therefore difficult. We used two recently developed methodologies (the hyperoxic switch and correlation between water-loss and CO(2) emission rates) to compare cuticular permeabilities and rates of RWL in five species of ants, the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) and four common native ant competitors. Our results showed that RWL in groups of ants with moderate levels of activity and continuous gas exchange were similar across the two measurement methods, and were similar to published values on insects showing the DGC. Furthermore, ants exposed to anoxia increased their total water loss rates by 50-150%. These results suggest that spiracular control under continuous gas exchange can be as effective as the DGC in reducing RWL. Finally, the mesic-adapted Argentine ant showed significantly higher rates of water loss and cuticular permeability compared to four ant species native to dry environments. Physiological limitations may therefore be responsible for restricting the distribution of this invasive species in seasonally dry environments.

  10. Measuring gas exchange with step changes in inspired oxygen: an analysis of the assumption of oxygen steady state in patients suffering from COPD.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lars P; Weinreich, Ulla M; Karbing, Dan S; Wagner, Peter D; Rees, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Bedside estimation of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be possible from step changes in FIO2 and subsequent measurement of arterial oxygenation at steady state conditions. However, a steady state may not be achieved quickly after a change in FIO2, especially in patients with lung disease such as COPD, rendering this approach cumbersome. This paper investigates whether breath by breath measurement of respiratory gas and arterial oxygen levels as FIO2 is changed can be used as a much more rapid alternative to collecting data from steady state conditions for measuring pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Fourteen patients with COPD were studied using 4-5 step changes in FIO2 in the range of 0.15-0.35. Values of expired respiratory gas and arterial oxygenation were used to calculate and compare the parameters of a mathematical model of pulmonary gas exchange in two cases: from data at steady state; and from breath by breath data prior to achievement of a steady state. For each patient, the breath by breath data were corrected for the delay in arterial oxygen saturation changes following each change in FIO2. Calculated model parameters were shown to be similar for the two data sets, with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of -0.4 and -3.0 to 2.2 % for calculation of pulmonary shunt and 0.17 and -0.47 to 0.81 kPa for alveolar to end-capillary PO2, a measure of oxygen abnormality due to shunting plus regions of low [Formula: see text] A/[Formula: see text] ratio. This study shows that steady state oxygen levels may not be necessary when estimating pulmonary gas exchange using changes in FIO2. As such this technique may be applicable in patients with lung disease such as COPD.

  11. Investigation of Copper Losses to Synthetic Slag at Different Oxygen Partial Pressures in the Presence of Colemanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, Aydın; Derin, Bora; Geveci, Ahmet; Topkaya, Yavuz Ali

    2016-09-01

    Copper losses to slag are crucial for copper matte smelting and converting stages. One factor affecting the copper losses to slag during these processes is partial pressure of oxygen. In this study, theoretical and experimental investigations of oxygen partial pressure effect on copper losses to fayalite type slag in the presence of colemanite were investigated. Theoretical considerations include liquidus temperatures and phase diagrams of the fayalite type slag calculated by the FactSage software program. In the experiments, a synthetic matte-slag (SM-SS) was produced by melting certain amounts of reagent grade Fe2O3-SiO2 and metallic Fe as starting materials. Experiments were carried out with SM-SS pair by the addition of calcined colemanite (from 0% to 6%) under various partial pressures of oxygen (10-7, 10-9, 10-11 atm) at 1250°C for 2 h. From the experimental results, it was found that the amount of copper in slag decreased slowly when colemanite was increased under all oxidizing atmospheres. The lowest copper content in synthetic slag was obtained as 0.38% after 6% colemanite addition.

  12. Oxygen speciation in upgraded fast pyrolysis bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Omais, Badaoui; Crepier, Julien; Charon, Nadège; Courtiade, Marion; Quignard, Alain; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-04-21

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is considered as a promising route to produce liquid for the transportation field from a renewable resource. However, the derived bio-oils are mainly oxygenated (45-50%w/w O on a wet basis) and contain almost no hydrocarbons. Therefore, upgrading is necessary to obtain a liquid with lower oxygen content and characterization of oxygenated compounds in these products is essential to assist conversion reactions. For this purpose, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) can be investigated. Oxygen speciation in such matrices is hampered by the large diversity of oxygenated families and the complexity of the hydrocarbon matrix. Moreover, response factors must be taken into account for oxygenate quantification as the Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) response varies when a molecule contains heteroatoms. To conclude, no distillation cuts were accessible and the analysis had to cover a large range of boiling points (30-630 °C). To take up this analytical challenge, a thorough optimization approach was developed. In fact, four GC × GC column sets were investigated to separate oxygenated compounds from the hydrocarbon matrix. Both model mixtures and the upgraded biomass flash pyrolysis oil were injected using GC × GC-FID to reach a suitable chromatographic separation. The advantages and drawbacks of each column combination for oxygen speciation in upgraded bio-oils are highlighted in this study. Among the four sets, an original polar × semi-polar column combination was selected and enabled the identification by GC × GC-ToF/MS of more than 40 compounds belonging to eight chemical families: ketones, furans, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, guaiacols, anisols, and esters. For quantification purpose, the GC × GC-FID chromatogram was divided into more than 60 blobs corresponding to the previously identified analyte and hydrocarbon zones. A database associating each blob to a molecule and its specific response factor (determined

  13. Nitric oxide added to the sweep gas infusion reduces local clotting formation in adult blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Tevaearai, H T; Mueller, X M; Tepic, S; Cotting, J; Boone, Y; Montavon, P M; von Segesser, L K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. We analyzed the effect of direct infusion of NO into adult blood oxygenators on local clot formation. Nonheparinized calves in a control group (n = 3) and NO group (n = 4) were connected to a jugulocarotid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; centrifugal pump) for 6 hours. The venous line and pumphead were heparin coated, whereas the oxygenator, the heat exchanger, and the arterial line were not. A total of 80 ppm of NO was mixed with the sweep gas infusion in the NO group. The pressure gradient through the oxygenator (deltaP.Ox.) was monitored, and its evolution was compared between groups. Oxygenators membranes were analyzed and photographed, allowing for calculation of the percentage of surface area covered with clots by using a computer image analysis program. The deltaP.Ox. reached a plateau of 193 +/- 26% of the basal value in the NO group after 120 minutes, whereas a similar plateau of 202 +/- 22% was reached after only 20 minutes in the control group (p < 0.05). The surface area of the oxygenator covered with clots was significantly reduced in the NO group (0.54 +/- 0.41%) compared with the control group (5.78 +/- 3.80%, p < 0.05). However, general coagulation parameters were not modified by local NO administration. The activated coagulation time remained stable between 110 and 150 seconds in both groups (p = not significant [ns]), and there were no differences in hematocrit, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen between groups during the 6 hours of CPB. Thus, the mixed infusion of a continuous low dose of NO into adult oxygenators during prolonged CPB prevented local clot formation, whereas the general coagulation pattern remained unchanged.

  14. Wind-driven surficial oxygen transfer and dinitrogen gas emission from treatment lagoons.

    PubMed

    Ro, K S; Hunt, P G; Poach, M E

    2006-01-01

    Surficial oxygen transfer plays an important role, when analyzing the complex biochemical and physical processes responsible for ammonia and dinitrogen gas emission in animal waste treatment lagoons. This paper analyzes if currently known nitrogen biochemical pathways can explain the enigmatic dinitrogen gas emissions recently observed from the treatment lagoons, based on the amount of wind-driven oxygen that can be transferred through the air-water interface. The stoichiometric amounts of the maximum dinitrogen gas production potential per unit mass of O(2) transferred were calculated according to three most likely biochemical pathways for ammonia removal in the treatment lagoons-classical nitrification-denitrification, partial nitrification-denitrification, and partial nitrification-Anammox. Partial nitrification-Anammox pathway would produce the largest N(2) emission, followed by partial nitrification-denitrification pathway, then by classical nitrification-denitrification pathway. In order to estimate stoichiometric amount (i.e., maximum) of N(2) emission from these pathways, we assumed that heterotrophic respiration was substantially inhibited due to high levels of free ammonia prevalent in treatment lagoons. Most observed N(2) emission data were below the maximum N(2) emission potentials by the classical nitrification-denitrification pathway. However, one value of observed N(2) emission was much higher than that could be produced by even the partial nitrification-Anammox pathway. This finding suggests yet unknown biological processes and/or non-biological nitrogen processes such as chemodenitrification may also be important in these treatment lagoons.

  15. Evaluation of oxygen transfer efficiency under process conditions using the dynamic off-gas method.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, A; Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2007-05-01

    The off-gas method can be used to investigate standard oxygen transfer efficiencies under process conditions (alphaSOTE) over the operating life of an aeration system. A method to evaluate alphaSOTE is described in detail by US and German standards. The standards, however, do not describe how to evaluate dynamic changes in aSOTE over a day, which can be useful to uncover problems and unfavourable process conditions. Based on over three years experience gained in off-gas testing in Berlin wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) under operating conditions, a method to evaluate and interpret the dynamic changes in oxygen transfer is presented. The application of the dynamic off-gas method brings important additional information, which can be used to increase operational efficiency of the aeration basin and to increase process reliability, with a relatively small increase in effort. This paper shows how to perform dynamic measurements under process conditions. Some results of such measurements under dynamic process conditions, performed in a Berlin WWTP, are discussed.

  16. Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

    2004-04-01

    Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

  17. EDTA-Decorated Nanostructured ZnO/CdS Thin Films for Oxygen Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunraja, L.; Thirumoorthy, P.; Karthik, A.; Rajendran, V.; Edwinpaul, L.

    2016-08-01

    ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using spin-coating and used for oxygen gas sensor applications. The structural properties of both ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured composites were comparatively characterized. The nanostructure thin film was found in a hexagonal structure with an average crystallite size reduced from 77 nm to 29 nm due to the influence of the EDTA. The optical absorption, photo luminescence, functional groups and surface morphology of the nanostructured thin films were comprehensively investigated. Oxygen was suitably tailored to verify the sensor response over a concentration range of 10-50 ppm at room temperature. Thus, the sensor studies reveal that the performance, response, and recovery time were enhanced in ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin film compared with ZnO/CdS.

  18. Numerical investigation of oxygen impurity distribution during multicrystalline silicon crystal growth using a gas flow guidance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Ying-Yang; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yung

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important types of impurities that can cause thermal donor or light-induced degradation in mc-Si solar cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect that installing a gas flow guidance device in a mc-Si crystal-growth furnace would have on the oxygen impurity distribution in the melt during the growth process. The installation of such a gas flow guidance device can enhance the gas flow near the free surface, which would allow the argon to carry a greater amount of evaporated SiO gas outside the furnace. Furthermore, the enhanced motion of the gas flow also improves heat transfer near the free surface, which would make the melt vortex separate more easily. The separated melt vortex, which is located near the central region of the melt-crystal interface, directs any oxygen impurity towards the central region of the melt-crystal interface. This is why the oxygen concentration can be reduced by installing the gas flow guidance device. The effectiveness of the gas flow guidance device depends on the vertical distance between it and the free surface (h) as well as the gap between the crucible sidewall and the tip of the device (d). The effect on the oxygen concentration in the melt is significant when smaller values for h and d are adopted.

  19. Transmucosal gas-loss rates in middle ears initially filled with O2 or CO2.

    PubMed

    Kania, Romain E; Vérillaud, Benjamin; Ars, Bernard; Tran Ba Huy, Patrice; Herman, Philippe; Ar, Amos

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the role of different gases in clearance of gas in the middle ear cavity (ME) by its mucosal blood flow. A rat model was used to measure gas volume changes in the ME cavity at constant pressure without ventilation. We disturbed the normal gas composition of the ME by filling it with O2 or CO2, measured the consequent changes in gas volume over time and compared these results with previously obtained ones for air and N2. The first 5 min of the primary transient phase (phase I) for O2 or CO2 was characterized by a volume loss decrease of -0.49 ± 0.34 μL and -46.28 ± 8.49 μL, respectively, with volume loss increase for air and N2 differing greatly, at +0.17 ± 0.17 and +2.31 ± 0.81, respectively. The CO2 value of -46.28 μL showed that a volume of gas equivalent to that of the ME cleft volume was eliminated within the first 5 min. In the second phase (phase II), all gases showed a linear decrease in volume, which presumably represents a steady-state gas loss rate. However, the gas loss rate of -0.307 ± 0.170 μL min(-1) for O2-filled MEs was significantly higher than the mean of -0.124 μL min(-1) for all other gases. We used a previously established mathematical model to calculate the effective ME mucosal blood flow rate under steady-state (phase II) conditions. The blood flow results for O2-filled MEs differed greatly from those of the other gases (89.0 ± 49.28 vs. 26.5 μL min(-1), on average), which suggest that the model used to calculate blood flow should be modified if used with O2-filled MEs. Further work should involve a comparison of our method with different methods to verify ME blood flow rate.

  20. Edge Charge Neutralization of Clay for Improved Oxygen Gas Barrier in Multilayer Nanobrick Wall Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Hagen, David A; Qin, Shuang; Holder, Kevin M; Falke, Kyle; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-12-21

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polymer-clay multilayer thin films are known to provide transparent and flexible gas barrier. In an effort to further lower the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of these nanobrick wall thin films, sodium chloride was introduced into montmorillonite (MMT) suspension as an "indifferent electrolyte". At pH 6.5 the amphoteric edge sites of MMT have a neutral net charge, and a moderate concentration of NaCl effectively shields the charge from neighboring platelets, allowing van der Waals forces to attract the edges to one another. This edge-to-edge bonding creates a much more tortuous path for diffusing oxygen molecules. An eight-bilayer (BL) polyethylenimine (PEI)/MMT multilayer coating (∼50 nm thick), assembled with 5 mM NaCl in the aqueous clay suspension, exhibited an order of magnitude reduction in oxygen permeability (∼4 × 10(-20) cm(3)·cm/(cm(2)·Pa·s)) relative to its salt-free counterpart. This result represents the best barrier among polymer-clay bilayer systems, which is also lower than SiOx or AlxOy thin films. At higher NaCl concentration, the strong charge screening causes edge-to-face bonding among MMT nanoplatelets, which leads to misalignment in assembled films and increased OTR. This "salty-clay" strategy provides an efficient way to produce better multilayer oxygen barrier thin films by altering ionic strength of the MMT suspension. This simple modification reduces the number of layers necessary for high gas barrier, potentially making these multilayer films interesting for commercial packaging applications.

  1. Oxygen-induced plasticity in tracheal morphology and discontinuous gas exchange cycles in cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Bartrim, Hamish; Matthews, Philip G D; Lemon, Sussan; White, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    The function and mechanism underlying discontinuous gas exchange in terrestrial arthropods continues to be debated. Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolutionary origin or maintenance of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs), which may have evolved to reduce respiratory water loss, facilitate gas exchange in high CO2 and low O2 micro-environments, or to ameliorate potential damage as a result of oversupply of O2. None of these hypotheses have unequivocal support, and several non-adaptive hypotheses have also been proposed. In the present study, we reared cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea in selected levels of O2 throughout development, and examined how this affected growth rate, tracheal morphology and patterns of gas exchange. O2 level in the rearing environment caused significant changes in tracheal morphology and the exhibition of DGCs, but the direction of these effects was inconsistent with all three adaptive hypotheses: water loss was not associated with DGC length, cockroaches grew fastest in hyperoxia, and DGCs exhibited by cockroaches reared in normoxia were shorter than those exhibited by cockroaches reared in hypoxia or hyperoxia.

  2. NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, N.N.; Belnap, J.; Ojima, D.S.; Mosier, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examined N gas loss as nitric oxide (NO) from N-fixing biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. We hypothesized that NO gas loss would increase with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soil. NO fluxes were measured from biologically crusted soils with three levels of N fixation potential (Scytonema-Nostoc-Collema spp. (dark)>Scytonema-Nostoc-Microcoleus spp. (medium)>Microcoleus spp. (light)) from soil cores and field chambers. In both cores and field chambers there was a significant effect of crust type on NO fluxes, but this was highly dependent on season. NO fluxes from field chambers increased with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soils (dark>medium>light) in the summer months, with no differences in the spring and autumn. Soil chlorophyllasis Type a content (an index of N fixation potential), percent N, and temperature explained 40% of the variability in NO fluxes from our field sites. Estimates of annual NO loss from dark and light crusts was 0.04-0.16 and 0.02-0.11-N/ha/year. Overall, NO gas loss accounts for approximately 3-7% of the N inputs via N fixation in dark and light biologically crusted soils. Land use practices have drastically altered biological soil crusts communities over the past century. Livestock grazing and intensive recreational use of public lands has resulted in a large scale conversion of dark cyanolichen crusts to light cyanobacterial crusts. As a result, changes in biologically crusted soils in arid and semi-arid regions of the western US may subsequently impact regional NO loss. ?? Springer 2005.

  3. No loss single line fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1993-08-03

    A no loss fueling station is described for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a fuel tank of a use device such as a motor vehicle, comprising: (a) a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and a natural gas head; (b) first means for selectively building the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (c) second means for selectively reducing the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (d) means for controlling the first and second means to maintain a desired pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and (e) means for delivering LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  4. Increased polar stratospheric ozone losses and delayed eventual recovery owing to increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Rind, David; Lonergan, Patrick

    1998-04-01

    The chemical reactions responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion are extremely sensitive to temperature. Greenhouse gases warm the Earth's surface but cool the stratosphere radiatively and therefore affect ozone depletion. Here we investigate the interplay between projected future emissions of greenhouse gases and levels of ozone-depleting halogen species using a global climate model that incorporates simplified ozone-depletion chemistry. Temperature and wind changes induced by the increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations alter planetary-wave propagation in our model, reducing the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere. This results in a more stable Arctic polar vortex, with significantly colder temperatures in the lower stratosphere and concomitantly increased ozone depletion. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases might therefore be at least partly responsible for the very large Arctic ozone losses observed in recent winters. Arctic losses reach a maximum in the decade 2010 to 2019 in our model, roughly a decade after the maximum in stratospheric chlorine abundance. The mean losses are about the same as those over the Antarctic during the early 1990s, with geographically localized losses of up to two-thirds of the Arctic ozone column in the worst years. The severity and the duration of the Antarctic ozone hole are also predicted to increase because of greenhouse-gas-induced stratospheric cooling over the coming decades.

  5. Angular momentum loss of primordial gas in Lyα radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2014-06-01

    We present results on the radiation drag exerted by an isotropic and homogeneous background of Lyα photons on neutral gas clouds orbiting within H II regions around Population III stars of different masses. The Doppler shift causes a frequency difference between photons moving in the direction of the cloud and opposite to it resulting in a net momentum loss of the cloud in the direction of motion. We find that half of the angular momentum of gas with vθ ≲ 20 km s-1 near (r ≲ 3 kpc) a Population III star of 120 M⊙ at z = 20 is lost within ˜106 yr. The radiation drag is a strong function of cloud velocity that peaks at v ˜ 20 km s-1 reflecting the frequency dependence of the photon cross-section. Clouds moving with velocities larger than ˜100 km s-1 lose their angular momentum on time-scales of ˜108 yr. At lower redshifts radiation drag becomes inefficient as the Lyα photon density in H II regions decreases by a factor (1 + z)3 and angular momentum is lost on time-scales ≳ 108 yr even for low-velocity clouds. Our results suggest that a sweet spot exists for the loss of angular momentum by radiation drag for gas clouds at z > 10 and with v ˜ 20 km s-1. Comparison to dynamical friction forces acting on typical gas clouds suggest that radiation drag is the dominant effect impacting the orbit. We propose that this effect can suppress the formation of extended gas discs in the first galaxies and help gas accretion near galactic centres and central black holes.

  6. Physical properties and surface/interface analysis of nanocrystalline WO3 films grown under variable oxygen gas flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, R. S.; Carbjal-Franco, G.; Ferrer, D. A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

    2012-10-15

    Nanocrystalline WO3 films were grown by reactive magnetron sputter-deposition in a wide range of oxygen gas flow rates while keeping the deposition temperature fixed at 400 oC. The physical characteristics of WO3 films were evaluated using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Physical characterization indicates that the thickness, grain size, and density of WO3 films are sensitive to the oxygen gas flow rate during deposition. XRD data indicates the formation of tetragonal WO3 films. The grain size increases from 21 to 25 nm with increasing oxygen gas flow rate to 65%, at which point the grain size exhibits a decreasing trend to attain the lowest value of 15 nm at 100% oxygen. TEM analysis provides a model consisting of isotropic WO3 film (nanocrystalline)-SiO2 interface (amorphous)-Si(100) substrate. XRR simulations, which are based on this model, provide excellent agreement to the experimental data indicating that the normalized thickness of WO3 films decreases with the increasing oxygen gas flow rate. The density of WO3 films increases with increasing oxygen gas flow rate.

  7. Effect of oxygen concentration in gas phase on sporulation and individual ganoderic acids accumulation in liquid static culture of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xian; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Effects of oxygen concentration within 21-100% in gaseous phase on the morphology and ganoderic acids (GAs) production by Ganoderma lucidum in liquid static culture were studied. A higher oxygen concentration increased individual GAs production, and more spores and higher total GA content were obtained at an oxygen level of 80%.

  8. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  9. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  10. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  11. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission...

  14. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  15. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  16. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  17. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your...

  18. Gas diffusion-type oxygen electrode using perovskite-type oxides for metal-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Takeo; Miura, Norio; Yamazoe, Noboru

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop an air cathode of metal-air batteries, oxygen reduction behavior of gas diffusion-type carbon electrodes loaded with perovskite-type oxides, La{sub 1{minus}x}A{prime}{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (A{prime} = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0 {le} x {le} 1.0), was examined in 8 M KOH at 60 C. Among the oxide catalysts tested, La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} (specific surface area: 21.5 m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}) gave the highest electrode performance. On the basis of electrode reaction kinetics, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition rates, and temperature programmed desorption of oxygen, it was concluded that such a performance was attributable to the active sites of the oxide for the direct 4-electron reduction of oxygen. Moreover, the electrode using La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} was found to be rather stable in a short-term operation for 90 h at 300 mA{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  19. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  20. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  1. Generating Singlet Oxygen Bubbles: A New Mechanism for Gas-Liquid Oxidations in Water

    PubMed Central

    Bartusik, Dorota; Aebisher, David; Ghafari, BiBi

    2012-01-01

    Laser-coupled microphotoreactors were developed to bubble singlet oxygen [1O2 (1Δg)] into an aqueous solution containing an oxidizable compound. The reactors consisted of custom-modified SMA fiber-optic receptacles loaded with 150-μm silicon phthalocyanine glass sensitizer particles, where the particles were isolated from direct contact with water by a membrane adhesively bonded to the bottom of each device. A tube fed O2 gas to the reactor chambers. In the presence of O2, singlet oxygen was generated by illuminating the sensitizer particles with 669-nm light from an optical fiber coupled to the top of the reactor. The generated 1O2 was transported through the membrane by the O2 stream and formed bubbles in solution. In solution, singlet oxygen reacted with probe compounds (either 9,10-anthracene dipropionate dianion, trans-2-methyl-2-pentanoate anion, N-benzoyl-D,L-methionine, and N-acetyl-D,L-methionine) to give oxidized products in two stages. The early stage was rapid and showed that 1O2 transfer occurred via bubbles mainly in the bulk water solution. The later stage was slow, it arose only from 1O2-probe molecule contact at the gas/liquid interface. A mechanism is proposed that involves 1O2 mass transfer and solvation, where smaller bubbles provide better penetration of 1O2 into the flowing stream due to higher surface-to-volume contact between the probe molecules and 1O2. PMID:22260325

  2. The influence of oxygen supply on metabolism of neural cells cultured on a gas-permeable PTFE foil.

    PubMed

    Mauth, Corinna; Pavlica, Sanja; Deiwick, Andrea; Steffen, Anja; Bader, Augustinus

    2010-01-01

    The influence of oxygen on neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis is of great interest for regenerative therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. These oxygen depending mechanisms have to been considered for the optimization of neural cell culture conditions. In this study, we used a cell culture system with an oxygen-permeable polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) foil to investigate the effect of oxygen on metabolism and survival of neural cell lines in vitro. Human glial astrocytoma-derived cells (GOS-3) and rat pheochromacytoma cells (PC12) were cultured on the gas-permeable PTFE foil as well as a conventional non oxygen-permeable cell culture substrate at various oxygen concentrations. Analyses of metabolic activity, gene expression of apoptotic grade, and dopamine synthesis were performed. Under low oxygen partial pressure (2%, 5%) the anaerobic metabolism and apoptotic rate of cultured cells is diminished on PTFE foil when compared with the conventional culture dishes. In contrast, under higher oxygen atmosphere (21%) the number of apoptotic cells on the PTFE foil was enhanced. This culture model demonstrates a suitable model for the improvement of oxygen dependent metabolism under low oxygen conditions as well as for induction of oxidative stress by high oxygen atmosphere without supplementation of neurotoxins.

  3. Oxygen-induced changes in electron-energy-loss spectra for Al, Be and Ni. [Al; Be; Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. , 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil); Zehner, D.M. )

    1999-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) data are presented to illustrate line shape changes that occur as a result of oxygen interaction with metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum, beryllium and nickel. Core-level EELS data were taken for excitations from Al(2p), Be(1s), Ni(3p/3s) and O(1s) levels to the conduction band (CB) density of states (DOS) of the materials. The primary beam energies for the spectra were 300, 450, 300, and 1135 eV, respectively. The data are presented in both the (as measured) first-derivative and the integral forms. The integral spectra were corrected for coherent background losses and analyzed for CB DOS information. These spectra were found to be in qualitative agreement with published experimental and theoretical studies of these materials. One peak in the spectra for Al oxide is analyzed for its correlation with excitonic screening of the Al(2p) core hole. Similar evidence for exciton formation is found in the Ni(3p) spectra for Ni oxide. Data are also presented showing oxygen-induced changes in the lower-loss-energy EELS curves that, in the pure metal, are dominated by plasmon-loss and interband-transition signals. Single-scattering loss profiles in the integral form of the data were calculated using a procedure of Tougaard and Chorkendorff [S. Tougaard and I. Chorkendorff, Phys. Rev. B. [bold 35], 6570 (1987)]. For all three oxides these profiles are dominated by a feature with a loss energy of around 20[endash]25 eV. Although this feature has been ascribed by other researchers as due to bulk plasmon losses in the oxide, an alternative explanation is that the feature is simply due to O(2s)-to-CB-level excitations. An even stronger feature is found at 7 eV loss energy for Ni oxide. Speculation is given as to its source. The line shapes in both the core-level and noncore-level spectra can also be used simply as [open quotes]fingerprints[close quotes] of the surface chemistry of the materials. Our data were taken using commercially

  4. Dry Matter Losses and Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Outside Storage of Short Rotation Coppice Willow Chip.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Carly; Yates, Nicola E; Powers, Stephen J; Misselbrook, Tom; Shield, Ian

    This study examined the dry matter losses and the greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations within two short rotation coppice (SRC) willow wood chip storage heaps. One heap was built on a grassland area (East Midlands) and the other (Rothamsted) on a concrete hard standing. A series of 1- and 3-m probes were embedded in the heaps in order to retrieve gas samples for analysis, and pre-weighed net bags were positioned in the core of the heap to detect dry matter losses. The bagged samples showed dry matter losses of 18 and 19 % in the East Midlands and Rothamsted heaps after 210 and 97 days storage, respectively. The Rothamsted heap showed a whole-heap dry matter loss of 21 %. During this time, the wood chips dried from 54 to 39 % moisture content in the East Midlands heap and 50 to 43 % at Rothamsted. The results from analysing the whole Rothamsted heap indicated an overall loss of 1.5 GJ per tonne stored, although measurements from bagged samples in the core suggested that the chips dried sufficiently to have a minimal energy loss from storage. The process of mixing the heap, however, led to incorporation of wet outer layers and hence the average moisture content was higher in an average sample of chip. After establishment of the heaps, the temperature rose rapidly and this correlated with a peak in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration within the heap. A peak in methane (CH4) concentration was also detected in both heaps, though more noticeably in the East Midlands heap after around 55 days. In both instances, the peak CH4 concentration occurred as CO2 concentrations dropped, suggesting that after an active period of aerobic decomposition in the first 2 months of storage, the conditions in the heap became anaerobic. The results from this study suggest that outside wood chip storage is not an efficient method of storing biomass, though this may be location-specific as there are some studies showing lower dry matter losses. It is necessary to explore other methods of

  5. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone.

    PubMed

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Bristow, Laura A

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean's largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss.

  6. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    PubMed Central

    Callbeck, Cameron M.; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Bristow, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean’s largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss. PMID:28122044

  7. Complete recovery following hyperbaric oxygen therapy in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss--a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Swati; Sharma, Nishi

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSHL), a common otologic emergency, presents mostly as an abrupt onset unilateral hearing loss, aural fullness, often with vertigo and tinnitus, usually upon awakening in the morning. Its etiopathogenesis is multifactorial, so a number of different therapeutic regimens are in practice, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy being an effective yet underutilized one. Not all cases recover completely even after treatment. Here we describe two cases of ISSHL, diagnosed on the basis of clinical examination and pure-tone audiometry, who had a complete recovery following administration of HBO2 therapy in addition to medical treatment. These cases are reported to highlight the effectiveness of this modality in a physician's armamentarium.

  8. Interaction of iron-copper mixed metal oxide oxygen carriers with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Ksepko, Ewelina; Tian, Hanging

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare supported bimetallic Fe–Cu oxygen carriers and to evaluate their performance for the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal/air. Ten-cycle CLC tests were conducted with Fe–Cu oxygen carriers in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer utilizing simulated synthesis gas derived from the steam gasification of Polish Janina coal and Illinois #6 coal as fuel. The effect of temperature on reaction rates, chemical stability, and oxygen transport capacity were determined. Fractional reduction, fractional oxidation, and global rates of reactions were calculated from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. The supports greatly affected reaction performance. Data showed that reaction rates and oxygen capacities were stable during the 10-cycle TGA tests for most Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers. Bimetallic Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers showed higher reduction rates than Fe-support oxygen carriers. The carriers containing higher Cu content showed better stabilities and better reduction rates. An increase in temperature from 800 °C to 900 °C did not have a significant effect on either the oxygen capacity or the reduction rates with synthesis gas derived from Janina coal. Oxidation reaction was significantly faster than reduction reaction for all supported Fe–Cu oxygen carriers. Carriers with higher Cu content had lower oxidation rates. Ten-cycle TGA data indicated that these oxygen carriers had stable performances at 800–900 °C and might be successfully used up to 900 °C for coal CLC reaction in the presence of steam.

  9. An improved computer model for prediction of axial gas turbine performance losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation model performs a rapid preliminary pitchline optimization of axial gas turbine annular flowpath geometry, as well as an initial estimate of blade profile shapes, given only a minimum of thermodynamic cycle requirements. No geometric parameters need be specified. The following preliminary design data are determined: (1) the optimum flowpath geometry, within mechanical stress limits; (2) initial estimates of cascade blade shapes; and (3) predictions of expected turbine performance. The model uses an inverse calculation technique whereby blade profiles are generated by designing channels to yield a specified velocity distribution on the two walls. Velocity distributions are then used to calculate the cascade loss parameters. Calculated blade shapes are used primarily to determine whether the assumed velocity loadings are physically realistic. Model verification is accomplished by comparison of predicted turbine geometry and performance with an array of seven NASA single-stage axial gas turbine configurations.

  10. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis, volume 1. Task 1: Survey and perspective. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, V. C.; Gaffney, E. F.; Bach, L. J.; Stallone, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to predict the behavior of a rotor system subjected to sudden unbalance. The technique is implemented in the Turbine Engine Transient Rotor Analysis (TETRA) computer program using the component element method. The analysis was particularly aimed toward blade-loss phenomena in gas turbine engines. A dual-rotor, casing, and pylon structure can be modeled by the computer program. Blade tip rubs, Coriolis forces, and mechanical clearances are included. The analytical system was verified by modeling and simulating actual test conditions for a rig test as well as a full-engine, blade-release demonstration.

  11. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  12. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  13. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  14. Gas exchange in frogs and turtles: how ectothermic vertebrates contributed to solving the controversy of pulmonary oxygen secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, T

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms governing pulmonary gas exchange were heavily debated at the start of the 20th century when Christian Bohr provided measurements of lung and blood gases as well as rational arguments in favour of oxygen being secreted actively from the lung gas to the blood within vertebrate lungs. The concept of active transport was studied by August Krogh in his doctoral dissertation on the partitioning of gas exchange in frogs. In later studies, where Marie and August Krogh provided conclusive evidence that pulmonary gas exchange occurs by diffusion and diffusion alone, the turtle lungs provided an important tool to investigate the role of perfusion in pulmonary gas exchange. Here, I review the early Bohr and Krogh studies on pulmonary and cutaneous gas exchange in frogs as well as the experimental studies on gas exchange and its possible autonomic regulation in turtles. The results are discussed within the context of recent studies on the cardiorespiratory physiology of frogs and turtles.

  15. Composition surveys of test gas produced by a hydrogen-oxygen-air burner. [for supersonic ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of the need for a uniform hot gas test stream for fuel injector development for hydrogen fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engines, an experimental study of injector configuration effect on exit flow uniformity of a hydrogen fueled oxygen replenished, combustion burner was made. Measurements used to investigate the burner nozzle exit profiles were pitot and gas sample measurements. Gas composition and associated temperature profiles were reduced to an acceptable level by burner injector modifications. The effect of the injector modifications was to redistribute the hydrogen fuel, increase the air pressure drop, promote premixing of the oxygen and air, and establish a uniform flow pattern where the oxygen-air mixture comes into contact with the hydrogen fuel. The most sensitive phenomenon which affected the composition profiles was the uniformity of the air distribution supplied to the combustion chamber.

  16. Effect of blinking on the level of oxygen beneath hard and soft gas-permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Efron, N; Carney, L G

    1983-03-01

    The oxygen tension, which can also be stated as the equivalent oxygen percentage (EOP), was measured beneath a variety of hard and soft gas-permeable contact lenses following static and dynamic wearing conditions. The significant increases in EOP beneath rigid lenses upon blinking were to be expected in view of the tear pumping mechanisms known to exist with such lenses. However, blinking was found to have a minimal effect on the EOP beneath hydrogen lenses, confirming earlier predictions.

  17. Loss of OxyR reduces efficacy of oxygen respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2017-01-01

    In many bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling cellular response to H2O2. A common phenotype resulting from OxyR loss is reduced growth rate, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We demonstrated in Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, that the defect is primarily due to an electron shortage to major terminal oxidase cytochrome cbb3. The loss of OxyR leads to enhanced production of electron carriers that compete for electrons against cytochrome cbb3, cytochrome bd in particular. We further showed that the oxyR mutation also results in increased production of menaquinone, an additional means to lessen electrons to cytochrome cbb3. Although regulation of OxyR on these biological processes appears to be indirect, these data indicate that the regulator plays a previously underappreciated role in mediating respiration. PMID:28195212

  18. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  19. Methane Emissions from Leak and Loss Audits of Natural Gas Compressor Stations and Storage Facilities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2015-07-07

    As part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign, researchers completed leak and loss audits for methane emissions at three natural gas compressor stations and two natural gas storage facilities. Researchers employed microdilution high-volume sampling systems in conjunction with in situ methane analyzers, bag samples, and Fourier transform infrared analyzers for emissions rate quantification. All sites had a combined total methane emissions rate of 94.2 kg/h, yet only 12% of the emissions total resulted from leaks. Methane slip from exhausts represented 44% of the total emissions. Remaining methane emissions were attributed to losses from pneumatic actuators and controls, engine crankcases, compressor packing vents, wet seal vents, and slop tanks. Measured values were compared with those reported in literature. Exhaust methane emissions were lower than emissions factor estimates for engine exhausts, but when combined with crankcase emissions, measured values were 11.4% lower than predicted by AP-42 as applicable to emissions factors for four-stroke, lean-burn engines. Average measured wet seal emissions were 3.5 times higher than GRI values but 14 times lower than those reported by Allen et al. Reciprocating compressor packing vent emissions were 39 times higher than values reported by GRI, but about half of values reported by Allen et al. Though the data set was small, researchers have suggested a method to estimate site-wide emissions factors for those powered by four-stroke, lean-burn engines based on fuel consumption and site throughput.

  20. Evaluation of a portable oxygen concentrator to provide fresh gas flow to dogs undergoing anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burn, Jessica; Caulkett, Nigel A; Gunn, Marta; Cooney, Claire; Kutz, Susan J; Boysen, Søren R

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) to provide fresh gas to an anesthetic machine via an Ayre's T-piece or a Bain circuit. Fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was compared at flows of 0.5 to 3.0 L/min. Measured FiO2 was 96% at flow rates ≥ 1 L/min. Mean battery life at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 L/min was 4.21 ± 0.45, 2.62 ± 0.37 and 1.5 ± 0.07 hours, respectively. The POC proved to be useful and effective during 2 power outages. The POC was sufficient to prevent rebreathing in 70% of dogs using a T-piece circuit and 20% of dogs with a Bain circuit. A significant negative correlation between inspired CO2 and O2 flow rates was noted. A significant positive correlation between inspired CO2 and ETCO2 was documented. The occurrence of hypercarbia was associated with low O2 flow. Battery back-up was essential during power outages. The POC can be effectively used for delivery of anesthesia.

  1. Evaluation of a portable oxygen concentrator to provide fresh gas flow to dogs undergoing anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Burn, Jessica; Caulkett, Nigel A.; Gunn, Marta; Cooney, Claire; Kutz, Susan J.; Boysen, Søren R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) to provide fresh gas to an anesthetic machine via an Ayre’s T-piece or a Bain circuit. Fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was compared at flows of 0.5 to 3.0 L/min. Measured FiO2 was 96% at flow rates ≥ 1 L/min. Mean battery life at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 L/min was 4.21 ± 0.45, 2.62 ± 0.37 and 1.5 ± 0.07 hours, respectively. The POC proved to be useful and effective during 2 power outages. The POC was sufficient to prevent rebreathing in 70% of dogs using a T-piece circuit and 20% of dogs with a Bain circuit. A significant negative correlation between inspired CO2 and O2 flow rates was noted. A significant positive correlation between inspired CO2 and ETCO2 was documented. The occurrence of hypercarbia was associated with low O2 flow. Battery back-up was essential during power outages. The POC can be effectively used for delivery of anesthesia. PMID:27247461

  2. Performance of a Line Loss Correction Method for Gas Turbine Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Whitefield, P. D.; Lobo, P.

    2015-12-01

    International concern for the environmental impact of jet engine exhaust emissions in the atmosphere has led to increased attention on gas turbine engine emission testing. The Society of Automotive Engineers Aircraft Exhaust Emissions Measurement Committee (E-31) has published an Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 6241 detailing the sampling system for the measurement of non-volatile particulate matter from aircraft engines, and is developing an Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for methodology and system specification. The Missouri University of Science and Technology (MST) Center for Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research has led numerous jet engine exhaust sampling campaigns to characterize emissions at different locations in the expanding exhaust plume. Particle loss, due to various mechanisms, occurs in the sampling train that transports the exhaust sample from the engine exit plane to the measurement instruments. To account for the losses, both the size dependent penetration functions and the size distribution of the emitted particles need to be known. However in the proposed ARP, particle number and mass are measured, but size is not. Here we present a methodology to generate number and mass correction factors for line loss, without using direct size measurement. A lognormal size distribution is used to represent the exhaust aerosol at the engine exit plane and is defined by the measured number and mass at the downstream end of the sample train. The performance of this line loss correction is compared to corrections based on direct size measurements using data taken by MST during numerous engine test campaigns. The experimental uncertainty in these correction factors is estimated. Average differences between the line loss correction method and size based corrections are found to be on the order of 10% for number and 2.5% for mass.

  3. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  4. Influence of oxygen addition to the carrier gas on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements on aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, N.; Migliorini, F.; Dondè, R.; Maffi, S.; De Iuliis, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectrosopy is implemented on aerosol particles for absolute concentration analysis. The aim of this work is the investigation of the effect of the bath gas used for nebulizing the aerosol. Nitrogen, air, and 50% O2 in N2 mixture have been chosen as carrier gasses in order to analyze the effect of oxygen addition to the gas. LIBS measurements have been carried out on aerosol particles produced from CuCl2 2H2O solutions, and the 324.7 nm Cu line is considered. As a first analysis, plasma parameters, such as temperature and electron density, have been evaluated changing the carrier gas. Measurements to derive the LIBS calibration curve of the 324.7 nm Cu line are carried out in air and in N2. The significant difference in the slope of the resulting calibration curves has to be attributed to the oxygen addition to the bath gas. To explore such behavior, time-resolved measurements of the Cu line and peak/base ratio have been performed. The presence of two competitive effects have been observed that becomes significant increasing the amount of oxygen in the carrier gas. One is the oxygen-quenching effect, already observed in the literature, and the other one is the enhancement of the Cu LIBS signal, expecially at short delay times. These effects have been observed also at other Cu lines and changing the analyte source. The results are presented and widely discussed.

  5. Electrochemical Stripping of Atomic Oxygen on Single-Crystalline Platinum: Bridging Gas-Phase and Electrochemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    To understand the interaction between Pt and surface oxygenated species in electrocatalysis, this paper correlates the electrochemistry of atomic oxygen on Pt formed in the gas phase with electrochemically generated oxygen species on a variety of single-crystal platinum surfaces. The atomic oxygen adsorbed on single-crystalline Pt electrodes, made by thermal dissociation of molecular oxygen, is used for voltammetry measurements in acidic electrolytes (HClO4 and H2SO4). The essential knowledge of coverage, binding energy, and surface construction of atomic oxygen is correlated with the charge, potential, and shape of voltammograms, respectively. The differences of the voltammograms between the oxide made by thermal dissociation of molecular oxygen and electrochemical oxidation imply that atomic oxygen is not an intermediate of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111). The reconstruction of (100) terrace and step and the low-potential stripping of atomic oxygen on (111) step site provide insight into the first stages of degradation of Pt-based electrocatalysts. PMID:28225278

  6. Noble gas loss may indicate groundwater flow across flow barriers in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; Bryant, Hudson G.; Stute, M.; Clark, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Average calculated noble gas temperatures increase from 10 to 22oC in groundwater from recharge to discharge areas in carbonate-rock aquifers of southern Nevada. Loss of noble gases from groundwater in these regional flow systems at flow barriers is the likely process that produces an increase in recharge noble gas temperatures. Emplacement of low permeability rock into high permeability aquifer rock and the presence of low permeability shear zones reduce aquifer thickness from thousands to tens of meters. At these flow barriers, which are more than 1,000 m lower than the average recharge altitude, noble gases exsolve from the groundwater by inclusion in gas bubbles formed near the barriers because of greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure. However, re-equilibration of noble gases in the groundwater with atmospheric air at the low altitude spring discharge area, at the terminus of the regional flow system, cannot be ruled out. Molecular diffusion is not an important process for removing noble gases from groundwater in the carbonate-rock aquifers because concentration gradients are small.

  7. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  8. Improvement of oxygen diffusion characteristic in gas diffusion layer with planar-distributed wettability for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koresawa, Ryo; Utaka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Mass transfer characteristics of gas diffusion layer (GDL) are closely related to performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of water distribution relating to the microscopic conformation and oxygen diffusivity of GDL. A hybrid type carbon paper GDL with planar-distributed wettability is investigated for control of liquid water movement and distribution due to hydrophobic to hydrophilic areas that provide wettability differences in GDL and to achieve enhancement of both oxygen diffusion and moisture retention. Hybrid GDLs with different PTFE content were fabricated in an attempt to improve the oxygen diffusion characteristics. The effects of different PTFE contents on the oxygen diffusivity and water distribution were simultaneously measured and observed using galvanic cell oxygen absorber and X-ray radiography. The PTFE distribution was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The formation of oxygen diffusion paths was confirmed by X-ray radiography, where voids in the hybrid GDL were first formed in the hydrophobic regions and then spread to the untreated wetting region. Thus, the formation of oxygen diffusion paths enhanced the oxygen diffusion. In addition, the effects of local PTFE content in the hydrophobic region and the optimal amount of PTFE for hybrid GDL were elucidated.

  9. Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C.

    2009-03-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

  10. Elimination of Flammable Gas Effects in Cerium Oxide Semiconductor-Type Resistive Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck; Miki, Yusuke; Hirose, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the catalytic layer in zirconium-doped cerium oxide, Ce0.9Zr0.1O2 (CeZr10) resistive oxygen sensors for reducing the effects of flammable gases, namely hydrogen and carbon monoxide. When the concentration of flammable gases is comparable to that of oxygen, the resistance of CeZr10 is affected by the presence of these gases. We have developed layered thick films, which consist of an oxygen sensor layer (CeZr10), an insulation layer (Al2O3), and a catalytic layer consisting of CeZr10 with 3 wt% added platinum, which was prepared via the screen printing method. The Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer was found to prevent the detrimental effects of the flammable gases on the resistance of the sensor layer. This effect is due to the catalytic layer promoting the oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the consumption of ambient O2 and/or the lattice oxygen atoms of the Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer. PMID:25905705

  11. Photon Doppler Velocimeter to Measure Entrained Additive Manufactured Bulk Metal Powders in Hot Subsonic and Supersonic Oxygen Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Parts produced by additive manufacturing, particularly selective laser melting (SLM), have been shown to silt metal particulate even after undergoing stringent precision aerospace cleaning processes (Lowrey 2016). As printed parts are used in oxygen systems with increased pressures, temperatures, and gas velocity, the risk of ignition by particle impact, the most common direct ignition source of metals in oxygen, substantially increases. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), desires to test the ignitability of SLM metals by particle impact in heated oxygen. The existing test systems rely on gas velocity calculations to infer particle velocity in both subsonic and supersonic particle impact systems. Until now, it was not possible to directly measure particle velocity. To increase the fidelity of planned SLM ignition studies, it is necessary to validate that the Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) test system can accurately measure particle velocity.

  12. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R.

  13. Ozone production in parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge from oxygen and air: the influence of gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dingkun; Wang, Zhihua; Ding, Can; He, Yong; Whiddon, Ronald; Cen, Kefa

    2016-11-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of gas pressure (0.1 Mpa-0.2 Mpa) on ozone generation in a parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with a narrow gap (0.2 mm). In addition to determining ozone concentration and ozone yield characteristics with gas pressure variation, this paper examines the possible reasons leading to the inconsistency with previous reported results. All the experimental results are plotted on the basis of specific input energy (SIE) in order to conduct the comparison within identical power density. By reviewing the experimental results, the possible cause leading to the inconsistency concerning gas pressure dependences of ozone generation was found using different comparison bases. Results show that ozone generation is slightly suppressed with an increase of gas pressure with an initial increase in SIE. The results of the ozone yield show that an increase of gas pressure would have a favorable effect on ozone production efficiency with an SIE larger than 400 J l-1 in oxygen while ozone yield reaches the maximum at 0.14 Mpa with an SIE larger than 150 J l-1 in air. Increasing gas pressure would lead to a higher critical SIE value at which ozone yield firstly decreases with an increase of SIE both in oxygen and air. The results of nitrogen oxide byproducts show that both NO x byproducts emission and the discharge poisoning effect are suppressed by increasing gas pressure in air plasmas.

  14. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Koponen, Anne S; Aho, Jyrki M; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O(2) carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O(2)Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O(2) carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O(2) delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O(2) carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at

  15. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E.; Tikkanen, Heikki O.; Koponen, Anne S.; Aho, Jyrki M.; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak exercise

  16. Dynamic Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Respirations Caused by Changing Oxygen Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, D.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    The necessity for constant monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is clearly evident now more than ever. Moreover, interpreting and understanding the processes that dictate the production and consumption of these gases will allow for proper management of GHGs in order to mitigate its detrimental climate effects. Presence of oxygen, or lack of it, is the driving force for determining pathways within biochemical redox reactions. Experiments to find correlations between oxygen and greenhouse gases have helped us understand photosynthesis, denitrification and beyond. Within the past few years measurements of O2 and nitrous oxide have been used over a wide ranging array of disciplines; from studying avenues for redox chemistry to characterizing gas profiles in sputum of cystic fibrosis patients. We present a full analysis solution, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, for simultaneous measurements of N2O, CO2, CH4, H2O, NH3, and O2 concentrations in soil flux, in order to better understand dynamics of ecological and biogeochemical processes. The stability and high temporal resolution of the five-species CRDS analyzer, coupled with a continuous high-precision O2 measurement (1-σ <200ppm) produces a complete picture of biogeochemical processes, for which a multitude of additional research experiments can be conceived. Adding another dimension to explore to help determine the rate at which these greenhouse gases are produced or consumed, allows scientists to further address fundamental scientific questions. Data is presented showing precision, drift and limitations of the O2 sensor measurement as well as the validity of spectroscopic corrections with the CRDS analyzer caused by changing O2. Experimental data is also presented to explore correlations of soil respiration rates of N2O, CO2 and CH4 due to differing soil O2 contents at varying timescales from minutes to days.

  17. Detonation mode and frequency analysis under high loss conditions for stoichiometric propane-oxygen

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Scott I.; Lee, Bok Jik; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2016-03-24

    In this paper, the propagation characteristics of galloping detonations were quantified with a high-time-resolution velocity diagnostic. Combustion waves were initiated in 30-m lengths of 4.1-mm inner diameter transparent tubing filled with stoichiometric propane–oxygen mixtures. Chemiluminescence from the resulting waves was imaged to determine the luminous wave front position and velocity every 83.3 μ. As the mixture initial pressure was decreased from 20 to 7 kPa, the wave was observed to become increasingly unsteady and transition from steady detonation to a galloping detonation. While wave velocities averaged over the full tube length smoothly decreased with initial pressure down to half ofmore » the Chapman–Jouguet detonation velocity (DCJ) at the quenching limit, the actual propagation mechanism was seen to be a galloping wave with a cycle period of approximately 1.0 ms, corresponding to a cycle length of 1.3–2.0 m or 317–488 tube diameters depending on the average wave speed. The long test section length of 7300 tube diameters allowed observation of up to 20 galloping cycles, allowing for statistical analysis of the wave dynamics. In the galloping regime, a bimodal velocity distribution was observed with peaks centered near 0.4 DCJ and 0.95 DCJ. Decreasing initial pressure increasingly favored the low velocity mode. Galloping frequencies ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 kHz and were insensitive to initial mixture pressure. Wave deflagration-to-detonation transition and detonation failure trajectories were found to be repeatable in a given test and also across different initial mixture pressures. The temporal duration of wave dwell at the low and high velocity modes during galloping was also quantified. It was found that the mean wave dwell duration in the low velocity mode was a weak function of initial mixture pressure, while the mean dwell time in the high velocity mode depended exponentially on initial mixture pressure. Analysis of the velocity

  18. Detonation mode and frequency analysis under high loss conditions for stoichiometric propane-oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I.; Lee, Bok Jik; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2016-03-24

    In this paper, the propagation characteristics of galloping detonations were quantified with a high-time-resolution velocity diagnostic. Combustion waves were initiated in 30-m lengths of 4.1-mm inner diameter transparent tubing filled with stoichiometric propane–oxygen mixtures. Chemiluminescence from the resulting waves was imaged to determine the luminous wave front position and velocity every 83.3 μ. As the mixture initial pressure was decreased from 20 to 7 kPa, the wave was observed to become increasingly unsteady and transition from steady detonation to a galloping detonation. While wave velocities averaged over the full tube length smoothly decreased with initial pressure down to half of the Chapman–Jouguet detonation velocity (DCJ) at the quenching limit, the actual propagation mechanism was seen to be a galloping wave with a cycle period of approximately 1.0 ms, corresponding to a cycle length of 1.3–2.0 m or 317–488 tube diameters depending on the average wave speed. The long test section length of 7300 tube diameters allowed observation of up to 20 galloping cycles, allowing for statistical analysis of the wave dynamics. In the galloping regime, a bimodal velocity distribution was observed with peaks centered near 0.4 DCJ and 0.95 DCJ. Decreasing initial pressure increasingly favored the low velocity mode. Galloping frequencies ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 kHz and were insensitive to initial mixture pressure. Wave deflagration-to-detonation transition and detonation failure trajectories were found to be repeatable in a given test and also across different initial mixture pressures. The temporal duration of wave dwell at the low and high velocity modes during galloping was also quantified. It was found that the mean wave dwell duration in the low velocity mode was a weak function of initial mixture pressure, while the mean dwell time in the high velocity mode depended exponentially on initial mixture pressure. Analysis

  19. Development of an automated sampling-analysis system for simultaneous measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gas and particle phases: GAC-ROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Limin; Dong, Huabin; Huo, Peng; Fang, Dongqing; Schauer, James J.

    2016-06-01

    A novel online system, GAC-ROS, for simultaneous measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both gas and particle phases was developed based on 2‧,7‧-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) assay to provide fast sampling and analysis of atmospheric ROS. The GAC-ROS, composed of a Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC), a series of reaction and transportation systems, and a fluorescence detector, was tested for instrumental performance in laboratory. Results showed good performance with a favorable R2 value for the calibration curve (above 0.998), high penetration efficiencies of ROS (above 99.5%), and low detection limits (gas-phase ROS: 0.16 nmol H2O2 m-3; particle-phase ROS: 0.12 nmol H2O2 m-3). Laboratorial comparison between online and offline methods for particle-bound ROS showed significant loss of ROS due to the relatively long time off-line treatment. Field observations in Beijing found that concentrations of ROS in winter time were significantly higher than those observed in spring. Only a few weak positive correlations were found between ROS and some air pollutants, which reflects the complexities of ROS generation and transformation in atmosphere. This study was the first to simultaneously obtain concentrations of gas and particle-phase ROS using an online method. Consequently, it provides a powerful tool to characterize the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and the sources of the oxidizing capacity.

  20. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Speck, A. K.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Hony, S.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-06-10

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK{sub s} and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with {gamma} of -3.5, a {sub min} of 0.01 {mu}m, and a {sub 0} of 0.1 {mu}m to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be {approx}5100 L {sub sun} and {approx}36,000 L {sub sun}, respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of {approx}3 M {sub sun} and {approx}7 M {sub sun}. This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius {approx}17 and

  1. Numerical and experimental study on shear coaxial injectors with hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas and GH2/GO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ping; Li, Mao; Cai, Guo-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The influences of the shear coaxial injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of a combustor are studied numerically and experimentally. The injector parameters, including the ratio of the oxidizer pressure drop to the combustor pressure (DP), the velocity ratio of fuel to oxidizer (RV), the thickness (WO), and the recess (HO) of the oxidizer injector post tip, the temperature of the hydrogen-rich gas (TH) and the oxygen-rich gas (TO), are integrated by the orthogonal experimental design method to investigate the performance of the shear coaxial injector. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen at ambient temperature (GH2/GO2), and the hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas are used here. The length of the combustion (LC), the average temperatures of the combustor wall (TW), and the faceplate (TF) are selected as the indicators. The tendencies of the influences of injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of the combustor for the GH2/GO2 case are similar to those in the hot propellants case. However, the combustion performance in the hot propellant case is better than that in the GH2/GO2 case, and the heat load of the combustor is also larger than that in the latter case.

  2. Decorative black TiCxOy film fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering without importing oxygen reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Katsushi; Wakabayashi, Masao; Tsukakoshi, Yukio; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Decorative black TiCxOy films were fabricated by dc (direct current) magnetron sputtering without importing the oxygen reactive gas into the sputtering chamber. Using a ceramic target of titanium oxycarbide (TiC1.59O0.31), the oxygen content in the films could be easily controlled by adjustment of total sputtering gas pressure without remarkable change of the carbon content. The films deposited at 2.0 and 4.0 Pa, those are higher pressure when compared with that in conventional magnetron sputtering, showed an attractive black color. In particular, the film at 4.0 Pa had the composition of TiC1.03O1.10, exhibited the L* of 41.5, a* of 0.2 and b* of 0.6 in CIELAB color space. These values were smaller than those in the TiC0.29O1.38 films (L* of 45.8, a* of 1.2 and b* of 1.2) fabricated by conventional reactive sputtering method from the same target under the conditions of gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and optimized oxygen reactive gas concentration of 2.5 vol.% in sputtering gas. Analysis of XRD and XPS revealed that the black film deposited at 4.0 Pa was the amorphous film composed of TiC, TiO and C. The adhesion property and the heat resisting property were enough for decorative uses. This sputtering process has an industrial advantage that the decorative black coating with color uniformity in large area can be easily obtained by plain operation because of unnecessary of the oxygen reactive gas importing which is difficult to be controlled uniformly in the sputtering chamber.

  3. Experimental investigation of engine emissions with marine gas oil-oxygenate blends.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2010-07-15

    This paper investigates the diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions with marine gas oil-alternative fuel additive. Marine gas oil (MGO) was selected as base fuel for the engine experiments. An oxygenate, diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (DGM), and a biodiesel (BD) jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) with a volume of 10% were blended with the MGO fuel. JOME was derived from inedible jatropha oil. Lower emissions with diesel-BD blends (soybean methyl ester, rapeseed methyl ester etc.) have been established so far, but the effect of MGO-BD (JOME) blends on engine performance and emissions has been a growing interest as JOME (BD) is derived from inedible oil and MGO is frequently used in maritime transports. No phase separation between MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends was found. The neat MGO, MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends are termed as MGO, Ox10 and B10 respectively. The experiments were conducted with a six-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged, direct-injection Scania DC 1102 (DI) diesel engine. The experimental results showed significant reductions in fine particle number and mass emissions, PM and smoke emissions with Ox10 and B10 fuels compared to the MGO fuel. Other emissions including total unburned hydrocarbon (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and engine noise were also reduced with the Ox10 and B10 fuels, while maintaining similar brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and thermal efficiency with MGO fuel. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions, on the other hand, were slightly higher with the Ox10 and B10 fuels at high engine load conditions.

  4. Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Chaudhari, K.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Liu, T.; Sanders, T.; Veser, G.; Siriwardane, R.

    2008-01-01

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

  5. Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanjing Tian; Karuna Chaudhari; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston; Tengfei Liu; Tom Sanders; Goetz Veser; Ranjani Siriwardane

    2008-11-15

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900{degree}C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO{sub 2} from fuel gas at 800 and 900{degree}C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700{degree}C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900{degree}C. 48 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Chemical-looping Combustion of Coal-derived Synthesis Gas Over Copper Oxide Oxygen Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanjing; Chaudhari, K P; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, J A; Liu, Tengfei; Sanders, Tom; Veser, Goetz; Siriwardane, R V

    2008-11-01

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

  7. The Mass Loss Return from Evolved Stars to the Large Magellanic Cloud: Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Meixner, M.; Kemper, F.; Tielens, X.; Speck, A.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.; Hony, S.; Gordon, K.; Indebetouw, R.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G.; Woods, P.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE; PI: M. Meixner) has observed over 6 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud with both the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) instruments to explore the life-cycle of matter in a galaxy. Over 17000 of these stars were found to be candidate Oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (O-rich AGB) stars. We combine photometry from Spitzer and elsewhere in constructing Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) for the SAGE candidate O-rich AGB stars. These SEDs are then modeled using the radiative transfer program 2Dust, with the goal of determining the O-rich AGB star candidates' mass-loss rates. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra are available as part of the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) for a number of SAGE O-rich AGB star candidates; for two of these, IRS spectra in addition to the photometry are modeled with 2Dust to determine reasonable dust grain parameters to use for the candidate O-rich AGB stars in the rest of the SAGE sample. Using these dust grain properties, a grid of radiative transfer models was computed using 2Dust, varying stellar effective temperature and luminosity, dust shell inner radius, and dust shell optical depth at 10 microns wavelength. Synthetic photometry from models and observed photometry are plotted on color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, and model SEDs are directly compared to observed SEDs. The mass-loss rates from all O-rich AGB stars, especially those with the highest mass-loss rates, in the LMC are estimated and compared to its mass budget. Dust composition is also discussed in light of the results of the model grids.

  8. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  9. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored as a gas or liquid in special tanks. These tanks can be delivered to your home and contain ... they won’t run out of oxygen. Portable tanks and oxygen concentrators may make it easier for ...

  10. Effect of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaniego, J. -M.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural turbulent diffusion flames gas flames have been investigated. The chemistry of nitric oxides has been studied numerically in the counterflow configuration. Systematic calculations with the GRI 2.11 mechanism for combustion of methane and NO chemistry were conducted to provide a base case. It was shown that the 'simple' Zeldovich mechanism accounts for more than 75% of N2 consumption in the flame in a range of strain-rates varying between 10 and 1000 s-l. The main shortcomings of this mechanism are: 1) overestimation (15%) of the NO production rate at low strain-rates because it does not capture the reburn due to the hydrocarbon chemistry, and 2) underestimation (25%) of the NO production rate at high strainrates because it ignores NO production through the prompt mechanism. Reburn through the Zeldovich mechanism alone proves to be significant at low strain-rates. A one-step model based on the Zeldovich mechanism and including reburn has been developed. It shows good agreement with the GRI mechanism at low strain-rates but underestimates significantly N2 consumption (about 50%) at high strain-rates. The role of turbulence has been assessed by using an existing 3-D DNS data base of a diffusion flame in decaying turbulence. Two PDF closure models used in practical industrial codes for turbulent NO formation have been tested. A simpler version of the global one-step chemical scheme for NO compared to that developed in this study was used to test the closure assumptions of the PDF models, because the data base could not provide all the necessary ingredients. Despite this simplification, it was possible to demonstrate that the current PDF models for NO overestimate significantly the NO production rate due to the fact that they neglect the correlations between the fluctuations in oxygen concentration and temperature. A single scalar PDF model for temperature that accounts for such correlations based

  11. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  12. Using the local gas-phase oxygen abundances to explore a metallicity dependence in SNe Ia luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Raya, M. E.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mollá, M.; Galbany, L.; Vílchez, J. M.; Carnero, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an analysis of the gas-phase oxygen abundances of a sample of 28 galaxies in the local Universe (z < 0.02) hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The data were obtained with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. We derive local oxygen abundances for the regions where the SNe Ia exploded by calculating oxygen gradients through each galaxy (when possible) or assuming the oxygen abundance of the closest H II region. The sample selection only considered galaxies for which distances not based on the SN Ia method are available. Then, we use a principal component analysis to study the dependence of the absolute magnitudes on the colour of the SN Ia, the oxygen abundances of the region where they exploded and the stretch of the SN light curve. We demonstrate that our previous result suggesting a metallicity dependence on the SN Ia luminosity for non-reddened SNe Ia can be extended to our whole sample. These results reinforce the need of including a metallicity proxy, such as the oxygen abundance of the host galaxy, to minimize the systematic effect induced by the metallicity dependence of the SN Ia luminosity in future studies of SNe Ia at cosmological distances.

  13. Using soil oxygen sensors to inform understanding of soil greenhouse gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarecke, K. M.; Loecke, T.; Burgin, A. J.; Franz, T. E.; Rubol, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hot spots and hot moments of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes can contribute significantly to overall GHG budgets. Hot spots and hot moments occur when dynamic soil hydrology triggers important shifts in soil biogeochemical and physical processes that control GHG emissions. Soil oxygen (O2), a direct control on biogenic GHG production (i.e., nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and methane-CH4), may serve as both an important proxy for determining sudden shifts in subsurface biogenic GHG production, as well as the physical transport of soil GHG to the atmosphere. Recent technological advancements offer opportunities to link in-situ, near-continuous measurements of soil O2 concentration to soil biogeochemical processes and soil gas transport. Using high frequency data, this study asked: Do soil O2 dynamics correspond to changes in soil GHG concentrations and GHG surface fluxes? We addressed this question using precipitation event-based and weekly sampling (19 months in duration) data sets from a restored riparian wetland in Ohio, USA. During and after precipitation events, changes in subsurface (10 and 20 cm) CO2 and N2O concentrations were inversely related to short-term (< 48 h) changes in soil O2 concentrations. Subsurface CH4 concentrations changes during precipitation events, however, did not change in response to soil O2 dynamics. Changing subsurface GHG concentrations did not necessarily translate into altered surface (soil to atmosphere) GHG fluxes; soil O2 dynamics at 10 cm did not correspond with changes in surface N2O and CH4 fluxes. However, changes in soil O2 concentration at 10 cm had a significant positive linear relationship with change in surface CO2­ flux. We used a random forest approach to identify the soil sensor data (O2, temperature, moisture) which contribute the most to predicting weekly GHG fluxes. Our study suggests that monitoring near-continuous soil O2 concentration under dynamic soil hydrology may lead to greater understanding of GHG

  14. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation.

  15. Investigation of Pinus mugo essential oil oxygenated fraction by combined use of gas chromatography and dry column chromatography.

    PubMed

    A, M B; Coran, S A; Giannellini, V; Vincieri, F F; Moneti, G

    1981-09-01

    The oxygenated compounds of Pinus mugo Turra essential oil were investigated by a combination of GC and dry column chromatography (DCC) coordinated by GC data processing. The collected data resulted in a bar graph ("normalized" gas chromatogram) giving the RRT's and relative amounts of 68 components; 38 of them were identified by MS and IR. The described procedure may be used for essential oil analysis in general.

  16. Do radial oxygen loss and external aeration affect iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuan; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Wu, Shengchun; Deng, Dan; Zhu, Yongguan; Wong, Minghung

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of radial oxygen loss (ROL) and external aeration on iron (Fe) plaque formation, and arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The data showed that there were significant correlations between ROL and Fe concentrations in Fe plaque produced on different genotypes of rice. There were also significant differences in the amounts of Fe plaque formed between different genotypes in different positions of roots and under different aeration conditions (aerated, normal, and stagnant treatments). In aerated treatments, rice tended to have a higher Fe plaque formation than in a stagnant solution, with the greatest formation at the root tip decreasing with increasing distances away, in accordance with a trend of spatial ROL. Genotypes with higher rates of ROL induced higher degrees of Fe plaque formation. Plaques sequestered As on rice roots, with arsenate almost double that with arsenite, leading to decreased As accumulation in both roots and shoots. The major As species detected in roots and shoots was arsenite, ranging from 34 to 78% of the total As in the different treatments and genotypes. These results contribute to our understanding of genotypic differences in As uptake by rice and the mechanisms causing rice genotypes with higher ROL to show lower overall As accumulation. PMID:22345639

  17. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  18. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  19. a Comparative Study of Oxygen Loss on in Situ Heating in PrMnO3 and BaMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, K. B.; Heinonen, M.; Nordblad, P.; Dalela, S. D.; Panwar, N.; Sen, V.; Agarwal, S. K.; Sharma, Neha

    We have thoroughly investigated the oxygen loss in PrMnO3 and BaMnO3, the end members of the AMnO3 system, on in situ heating in a reducing atmosphere. This was done to drive some oxygen out from them and thus possibly alter the valence of the Mn cation. Sample characterization was done through X-ray diffraction and SEM measurements. The core-level photoemission point to oxygen loss from only BaMnO3 changing some of Mn4+ to Mn3+ in it, transfer of some spectral weight to the highly localized Fehrenbacher-Rice states and an increased Mn 3d-O 2p hybridization. Magnetization measurements show that at low temperatures, the samples depict a canted antiferromagnetic ordering.

  20. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha/Sima.

    PubMed

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-11-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-alpha polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-alpha/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima.

  1. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-α/Sima

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-α polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-α/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima. PMID:16179946

  2. Oxygen partial pressures on gas-diffusion layer surface and gas-flow channel wall in polymer electrolyte fuel cell during power generation studied by visualization technique combined with numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigami, Yuta; Waskitoaji, Wihatmoko; Yoneda, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Hyakutake, Tsuyoshi; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Visualization of the oxygen partial pressures was carried out at the surface of a gas diffusion layer (GDL) for the first time together with the upper part of the gas-flow channel of the cathode of a running polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) using two different oxygen-sensitive luminescent dye films. The visualized distributions of the oxygen partial pressures at the GDL and the upper gas-flow channel during the PEFC operation were very different in a conventional test cell. The change in the distribution of the oxygen partial pressures was observed by changing the oxygen utilization, which should be connected with the reactive locations in the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA). A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of water and current density inside the MEA. The water distribution inside the MEA was confirmed to strongly affect the distributions of the current density and the oxygen /partial pressure.

  3. Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

    1995-04-01

    To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

  4. Measurement of fuel oxygenates in tap water using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Frederick L; Blount, Benjamin C; Schmidt, Rachael; Morrow, John

    2008-01-01

    The presence of alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in drinking water supplies has raised public health concerns because of possible adverse health effects from chronic exposure to these compounds. To enable large exposure studies exploring possible relationships between chronic exposure to alkyl ether fuel oxygenates and health effects, we developed an improved analytical method, using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. This method quantifies trace levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether, ethyl tertiary-butyl ether, di-isopropyl ether, and tertiary-amyl methyl ether in tap water. The method achieves detection limits of less than 0.025 microg/L for all analytes and linear ranges of three orders of magnitude in the measurement of the alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in 5-mL tap water samples. The relative percentage of recoveries of the alkyl ether fuel oxygenates ranged from 97% to 105%. The relative standard deviation ranged from 2% to 6%. Methyl tertiary-butyl ether was detected in samples of tap water taken from geographically diverse regions of the United States. The improved throughput and sensitivity of this method will enable large epidemiologic field studies of the prevalence and magnitude of exposure to alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in the general population.

  5. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; ...

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high asmore » 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.« less

  6. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley; Hy, Sunny

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.

  7. Thermofluid analysis of the SSME preburner using a gas-gas diffusion model for oxygen and hydrogen combustion at supercritical pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, C.; Singhal, A. K.; Shafer, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the thermofluid analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuelside preburner. The governing equations have been solved numerically to predict flow, heat transfer, mixing, and combustion. A two-fluid approach is adopted in which oxygen is regarded as one fluid and hydrogen is regarded as the other fluid. The chemical kinetics is assumed to be very fast so that combustion is primarily controlled by the rate of mixing between oxygen and hydrogen. The preburner pressure is much greater than the critical pressures of oxygen and hydrogen; hence, a gas-gas diffusion model (rather than an evaporation model) has been developed to compute the rate of interphase mixing. Empirical correlations have been incorporated to account for the effect of slip on the interphase exchange. A sensitivity study has been performed with various model parameters. It is observed that the model can predict possibility of incomplete combustion and local regions of high temperatures under steady operating conditions. Some of these anomalies have been observed in actual tests, and the numerical model is useful for understanding possible causes and remedies. At least some measurements are needed for quantitative verification of the model.

  8. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Gerardo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2012-01-01

    The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  9. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  10. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  11. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  12. Oxygen-limited thermal tolerance is seen in a plastron-breathing insect and can be induced in a bimodal gas exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bilton, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermal tolerance has been hypothesized to result from a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. However, the generality of this hypothesis has been challenged by studies on various animal groups, including air-breathing adult insects. Recently, comparisons across taxa have suggested that differences in gas exchange mechanisms could reconcile the discrepancies found in previous studies. Here, we test this suggestion by comparing the behaviour of related insect taxa with different gas exchange mechanisms, with and without access to air. We demonstrate oxygen-limited thermal tolerance in air-breathing adults of the plastron-exchanging water bug Aphelocheirus aestivalis. Ilyocoris cimicoides, a related, bimodal gas exchanger, did not exhibit such oxygen-limited thermal tolerance and relied increasingly on aerial gas exchange with warming. Intriguingly, however, when denied access to air, oxygen-limited thermal tolerance could also be induced in this species. Patterns in oxygen-limited thermal tolerance were found to be consistent across life-history stages in these insects, with nymphs employing the same gas exchange mechanisms as adults. These results advance our understanding of oxygen limitation at high temperatures; differences in the degree of respiratory control appear to modulate the importance of oxygen in setting tolerance limits. PMID:25964420

  13. Oxygen-limited thermal tolerance is seen in a plastron-breathing insect and can be induced in a bimodal gas exchanger.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Bilton, David T

    2015-07-01

    Thermal tolerance has been hypothesized to result from a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. However, the generality of this hypothesis has been challenged by studies on various animal groups, including air-breathing adult insects. Recently, comparisons across taxa have suggested that differences in gas exchange mechanisms could reconcile the discrepancies found in previous studies. Here, we test this suggestion by comparing the behaviour of related insect taxa with different gas exchange mechanisms, with and without access to air. We demonstrate oxygen-limited thermal tolerance in air-breathing adults of the plastron-exchanging water bug Aphelocheirus aestivalis. Ilyocoris cimicoides, a related, bimodal gas exchanger, did not exhibit such oxygen-limited thermal tolerance and relied increasingly on aerial gas exchange with warming. Intriguingly, however, when denied access to air, oxygen-limited thermal tolerance could also be induced in this species. Patterns in oxygen-limited thermal tolerance were found to be consistent across life-history stages in these insects, with nymphs employing the same gas exchange mechanisms as adults. These results advance our understanding of oxygen limitation at high temperatures; differences in the degree of respiratory control appear to modulate the importance of oxygen in setting tolerance limits.

  14. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  15. Reliability of the Gas Supply in the Air Force Emergency Passenger Oxygen System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    to be intact. A hypodermic needle was attached to the sampling line of a mass spectrometer (Perkin-El- mer, Model MGA-1100). The needle was inserted...Emergency Passenger Oxygen System (EPOS; Fig. 1) was alleged to have significant numbers of inadequate oxygen cylinders. In theory , this could prevent the...hypothetical analysis demonstrates the disparity between a manufacturing specifi cation of a component and the overall performance of a device. This

  16. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature or in iced water and blood gas analysis was performed at baseline and after 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. RESULTS--In the first 10 minutes measured PaO2 in plastic syringes at room temperature fell by an average of 1.21 kPa/min; placing the sample on ice reduced the rate of PaO2 decline to 0.19 kPa/min. The rate of fall of PaO2 in glass at room temperature was 0.49 kPa/min. The changes in PaCO2 were less dramatic and at room temperature averaged increases of 0.47 kPa for plastic syringes and 0.71 kPa for glass syringes over the entire two hour period. These changes in gas tension for plastic syringes would lead to an overestimation of pulmonary shunt measured by the 100% oxygen technique of 0.6% for each minute left at room temperature before analysis. CONCLUSIONS--Glass syringes are superior to plastic syringes in preserving samples with a high PaO2, and prompt and adequate cooling of such samples is essential for accurate blood gas analysis. PMID:8016801

  17. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  18. Gas hold-up and oxygen mass transfer in three pneumatic bioreactors operating with sugarcane bagasse suspensions.

    PubMed

    Esperança, M N; Cunha, F M; Cerri, M O; Zangirolami, T C; Farinas, C S; Badino, A C

    2014-05-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a low-cost and abundant by-product generated by the bioethanol industry, and is a potential substrate for cellulolytic enzyme production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of air flow rate (QAIR), solids loading (%S), sugarcane bagasse type, and particle size on the gas hold-up (εG) and volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) in three different pneumatic bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Concentric tube airlift (CTA), split-cylinder airlift (SCA), and bubble column (BC) bioreactor types were tested. QAIR and %S affected oxygen mass transfer positively and negatively, respectively, while sugarcane bagasse type and particle size (within the range studied) did not influence kLa. Using large particles of untreated sugarcane bagasse, the loop-type bioreactors (CTA and SCA) exhibited higher mass transfer, compared to the BC reactor. At higher %S, SCA presented a higher kLa value (0.0448 s−1) than CTA, and the best operational conditions in terms of oxygen mass transfer were achieved for %S < 10.0 g L−1 and QAIR > 27.0 L min−1. These results demonstrated that pneumatic bioreactors can provide elevated oxygen transfer in the presence of vegetal biomass, making them an excellent option for use in three-phase systems for cellulolytic enzyme production by filamentous fungi.

  19. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  20. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  1. Oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture. A critical evaluation of the various methods clarifies positive and negative aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Besides oxygen, several other gases such as NO, CO, H2, H2S, Xe and O3 have come to age over the past few years. With regards to O3, its mechanisms of action in medicine have been clarified during the last two decades so that now a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending ozone therapy in various pathologies is available. O3 used within the determined therapeutic window is absolutely safe and more effective than golden standard medications in numerous pathologies, like vascular diseases. However, ozone therapy is mostly in practitioners' hands and some recent developments for increasing cost effectiveness and speed of treatment are neither standardized, nor evaluated toxicologically. Hence, the aim of this article is to emphasize the need to objectively assess the pros and cons of oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture in the hope that ozone therapy will be accepted by orthodox medicine in the near future. PMID:22146387

  2. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. (82) Kr (~11.58%), (83) Kr (~11.49%), (84) Kr (~57%) and (86) Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. (82) Kr, (86) Kr and (83) Kr, (86) Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of (86) Kr to (84) Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Estimation of economic losses caused by disruption of lifeline service: An analysis of the Memphis Light, Gas and Water system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.E.; Seligson, H.A.; Eguchi, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    The assessment of economic impact remains an important missing link in earthquake loss estimation procedures. This paper presents a general methodology for evaluating the economic losses caused by seismically-induced disruption of lifeline service in an urban area. The methodology consists of three steps: (1) development of a lifeline usage model on an industry basis; (2) estimation of the spatial distribution of economic activity throughout the urban area; and (3) assessment of direct losses through evaluation of the spatial coincidence of economic activity with lifeline service disruption. To demonstrate this methodology, a pilot analysis was conducted on the Memphis Light, Gas and Water electric power system for a Magnitude 7.5 earthquake in New Madrid seismic Zone. Using newly-available empirical data, business interruption in Shelby County, Tennessee, was estimated for major industries in the local economy. Extensions of the methodology are also discussed.

  4. On-line derivatization for hourly measurements of gas- and particle-phase Semi-Volatile oxygenated organic compounds by Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatography (SV-TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L. D.; Worton, D. R.; Chan, A. W. H.; Moss, J. A.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies have identified a large number of oxygenated organic compounds that can be used as tracers to understand sources and oxidation chemistry of atmospheric particulate matter. Quantification of these compounds in ambient environments has traditionally relied on low time-resolution collection of filter samples followed by offline sample treatment with a derivatizing agent to allow analysis by gas chromatography of otherwise non-elutable organic chemicals with hydroxyl groups. We present here an automated in situ instrument for the measurement of highly polar organic semi-volatile and low-volatility compounds in both the gas- and particle-phase with hourly time-resolution. The dual-cell Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) with derivatization collects particle-only and combined particle-plus-vapor samples on two parallel sampling cells that are analyzed in series by thermal desorption into helium saturated with derivatizing agent. Introduction of MSTFA, a silylating agent, yields complete derivatization of all tested compounds, including alkanoic acids, polyols, diacids, sugars, and multifunctional compounds. In laboratory tests, derivatization is found to be highly reproducible (< 3% variability). During field deployment, a regularly injected internal standard is used to correct for variability in detector response, derivatization efficiency, desorption efficiency, and transfer efficiency. Error in quantification from instrument fluctuations is found to be less than 10% for hydrocarbons and less than 15% for all oxygenates for which a functionally similar internal standard is available. After internal standard corrections, calibration curves are found to be linear for all compounds over the span of one month with comparable response on both of the parallel sampling cells.

  5. Study of oxygen gas production phenomenon during stand and discharge in silver-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Standard production procedures for manufacturing silver zinc batteries are evaluated and modified to reduce oxygen generation during open circuit stand and discharge. Production predictions of several variable combinations using analysis models are listed for minimum gassing, with emphasis on the concentration of potassium hydroxide in plate formation. A recommendation for work optimizing the variables involved in plate processing is included.

  6. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator.

  7. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  8. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... before being left in charge. Rules and instructions covering the operation and maintenance of oxygen or...—1965, which is incorporated by reference as specified in § 1910.6. (iv) All cylinders with a water... warm (not boiling) water is recommended. Valve-protection caps are designed to protect cylinder...

  9. The effects of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture on maximal pulmonary ventilation and maximal oxygen consumption during exercise in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Calbet, Jose A L; Honda, Yasushi; Fujii, Naoto; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that maximal exercise pulmonary ventilation (VE max) is a limiting factor affecting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) in moderate hypobaric hypoxia (H), we examined the effect of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture (He-O(2); 20.9% O(2)), which would reduce air density and would be expected to increase VE max. Fourteen healthy young male subjects performed incremental treadmill running tests to exhaustion in normobaric normoxia (N; sea level) and in H (atmospheric pressure equivalent to 2,500 m above sea level). These exercise tests were carried out under three conditions [H with He-O(2), H with normal air and N] in random order. VO2 max and arterial oxy-hemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)) were, respectively, 15.2, 7.5 and 4.0% higher (all p < 0.05) with He-O(2) than with normal air (VE max, 171.9 ± 16.1 vs. 150.1 ± 16.9 L/min; VO2 max, 52.50 ± 9.13 vs. 48.72 ± 5.35 mL/kg/min; arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)), 79 ± 3 vs. 76 ± 3%). There was a linear relationship between the increment in VE max and the increment in VO2 max in H (r = 0.77; p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into two groups based on their VO2 max, both groups showed increased VE max and SaO(2) in H with He-O(2), but VO2 max was increased only in the high VO2 max group. These findings suggest that in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia, air-flow resistance can be a limiting factor affecting VE max; consequently, VO2 max is limited in part by VE max especially in subjects with high VO2 max.

  10. Thermodynamic approach to oxygen delivery in vivo by natural and artificial oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Enrico

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen is a toxic gas, still indispensable to aerobic life. This paper explores how normal physiology uses the physico-chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of oxygen for transforming a toxic gas into a non toxic indispensable metabolite. Plasma oxygen concentration is in the range of 10(-5) M, insufficient to sustain metabolism. Oxygen carriers, present in blood, release oxygen into plasma, thereby replacing consumed oxygen and buffering PO(2) near their P(50). They are the natural cell-bound carriers, like hemoglobin inside red cells, myoglobin inside myocytes, and artificial cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) dissolved in plasma. Metabolic oxygen replacement can be defined as cell-bound and cell-free delivery. Cell-bound delivery is retarded by the slow diffusion of oxygen in plasma and interstitial fluids. The 40% hematocrit of normal blood compensates for the delay, coping with the fast oxygen consumption by mitochondria. Facilitated oxygen diffusion by HBOCs corrects for the slow diffusion, making cell-free delivery relatively independent from P(50). At all oxygen affinities, HBOCs produce hyperoxygenations that are compensated by vasoconstrictions. There is a strict direct correlation between the rate of oxygen replacement and hemoglobin content of blood. The free energy loss of the gradient adds a relevant regulation of tissues oxygenation. Oxygen is retained intravascularly by the limited permeability to gases of vessel walls.

  11. Surface Casing Pressure As an Indicator of Well Integrity Loss and Stray Gas Migration in the Wattenberg Field, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Greg; Rajaram, Harihar; Sherwood, Owen A; Burke, Troy L; Ryan, Joseph N

    2017-03-21

    The risk of environmental contamination by oil and gas wells depends strongly on the frequency with which they lose integrity. Wells with compromised integrity typically exhibit pressure in their outermost annulus (surface casing pressure, SfCP) due to gas accumulation. SfCP is an easily measured but poorly documented gauge of well integrity. Here, we analyze SfCP data from the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission database to evaluate the frequency of well integrity loss in the Wattenberg Test Zone (WTZ), within the Wattenberg Field, Colorado. Deviated and horizontal wells were found to exhibit SfCP more frequently than vertical wells. We propose a physically meaningful well-specific critical SfCP criterion, which indicates the potential for a well to induce stray gas migration. We show that 270 of 3923 wells tested for SfCP in the WTZ exceeded critical SfCP. Critical SfCP is strongly controlled by the depth of the surface casing. Newer horizontal wells, drilled during the unconventional drilling boom, exhibited critical SfCP less frequently than other wells because they were predominantly constructed with deeper surface casings. Thus, they pose a lower risk for inducing stray gas migration than legacy vertical or deviated wells with surface casings shorter than modern standards.

  12. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  13. Probing ‘Spin-Forbidden’ Oxygen Atom Transfer: Gas-Phase Reactions of Chromium-Porphyrin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fornarini, Simonetta; Lanucara, Francesco; Warren, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen-atom transfer reactions of metalloporphyrin species play an important role in biochemical and synthetic oxidation reactions. An emerging theme in this chemistry is that spin-state changes can play important roles, and a ‘two-state’ reactivity model has been extensively applied especially in iron-porphyrin systems. Herein we explore the gas phase oxygen-atom transfer chemistry of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (TPFPP) chromium complexes, as well as some other tetradentate macrocyclic ligands. Electrospray ionization in concert with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometry has been used to characterize and observe reactivity of the ionic species [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ (1) and [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ (2). These are an attractive system to examine the effects of spin state change on oxygen atom transfer because the d1 CrV species are doublets while the CrIII complexes have quartet ground states with high-lying doublet excited states. In the gas phase, [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ forms adducts with a variety of neutral donors but O-atom transfer is only observed for NO2. Pyridine N-oxide adducts of 1 do yield 2 upon collision induced dissociation (CID), but the ethylene oxide, DMSO, and TEMPO analogs do not. [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ is shown by its reactivity and by CID experiments to be a terminal metal-oxo with a single vacant coordination site. It also displays limited reaction chemistry, being deoxygenated only by the very potent reductant P(OMe)3. In general, [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ species are much less reactive than the Fe and Mn analogs. Thermochemical analysis of the reactions points towards the involvement of spin issues in the lower observed reactivity of the chromium complexes. PMID:20218631

  14. Gas-phase Oxygen Abundances and Radial Metallicity Gradients in the Two nearby Spiral Galaxies NGC 7793 and NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia; Magrini, Laura; Casasola, Viviana

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase abundances in H ii regions of two spiral galaxies, NGC 7793 and NGC 4945, have been studied to determine their radial metallicity gradients. We used the strong-line method to derive oxygen abundances from spectra acquired with GMOS-S, the multi-object spectrograph on the 8 m Gemini South telescope. We found that NGC 7793 has a well-defined gas-phase radial oxygen gradient of -0.321 ± 0.112 dex {R}25-1 (or -0.054 ± 0.019 dex kpc-1) in the galactocentric range 0.17 < RG/R25 < 0.82, not dissimilar from gradients calculated with direct abundance methods in galaxies of similar mass and morphology. We also determined a shallow radial oxygen gradient in NGC 4945, -0.253 ± 0.149 dex {R}25-1 (or -0.019 ± 0.011 dex kpc-1) for 0.04 < RG/R25 < 0.51, where the larger relative uncertainty derives mostly from the larger inclination of this galaxy. NGC 7793 and NGC 4945 have been selected for this study because they are similar, in mass and morphology, to M33 and the Milky Way, respectively. Since at zeroth order we expect the radial metallicity gradients to depend on mass and galaxy type, we compared our galaxies in the framework of radial metallicity models best suited for M33 and the Galaxy. We found a good agreement between M33 and NGC 7793, pointing toward similar evolution for the two galaxies. We notice instead differences between NGC 4945 and the radial metallicity gradient model that best fits the Milky Way. We found that these differences are likely related to the presence of an active galactic nucleus combined with a bar in the central regions of NGC 4945, and to its interacting environment.

  15. Production of singlet oxygen by the reaction of non-basic hydrogen peroxide with chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenming; Shi, Wenbo; Yang, Heping; Cui, Rongrong; Deng, Liezheng

    2012-10-14

    Non-basic hydrogen peroxide was found to be very easy to react with Cl(2) to produce singlet oxygen O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) (i.e. the molecular oxygen in its first electronic excited state) when an H(+) absorbent such as C(5)H(5)N, CH(3)COONH(4), HCOONH(4) or NH(4)F was added into H(2)O(2) aqueous solution, and the long concealed fact that molecular H(2)O(2) can react with Cl(2) to produce O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) was then uncovered. It is only when an H(+) absorbent has provided a stronger base than H(2)O to absorb the H(+) produced during the reaction that O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) can be produced.

  16. Study of oxygen gas production phenomenon during stand and discharge in silver-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The effects of a number of cell process and performance variables upon the oxygen evolution rate of silver/silver oxide cathodes are studied to predict and measure the conditions which would result in the production of a minimum of oxygen. The following five tasks comprise the study: the design and fabrication of two pilot test cells to be used for electrode testing; the determination of the sensitivity and accuracy of the test cell; the determination of total volumes and rates of generation by cathodes of standard production procedures; the construction of a sequential test plan; and the construction of a series of positive formation cells in which formation process factors can be controlled.

  17. A pared-down gas-phase kinetics for the chemical oxygen-iodine laser medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichugin, S. Yu.; Heaven, M. C.

    2013-11-01

    Kinetic data obtained in the last decade has resulted in revisions of some mechanisms of excitation and deactivation of excited states in the chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) medium. This review considers new kinetic data and presents analyses of the mechanisms of pumping and quenching of electronically and vibrationally excited states in the oxygen-iodine laser media. An effective three-level model of I2 molecule excitation and relaxation has been developed. The calculated effective rate constants for deactivation of I2(X,11 ⩽ υ ⩽ 24) by O2, N2, He and CO2 are presented. A simplified kinetic package for the COIL active medium is recommended. This model consists of a 30-reaction set with 14 species. The results of calculations utilizing simplified model are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  18. West Siberian gas accumulations - the origin of methane and losses to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, B.; Littke, R.; Braun, A. )

    1996-01-01

    West Siberia is the most prolific gas producing sedimentary basin of the world. Nevertheless the problem of the origin of these large gas accumulations has not yet been solved. Late thermogenic gas generation from Jurassic strata (usually 3500 m and deeper) and early thermogenic or bacterial gas generation from Cenomanian to Aptian strata (usually at 600 to 2500 m depth) are the processes currently in discussion. Organic-geochemical analyses of 150 core samples as well as compositional and isotopic data of about 120 gases provided the database of this study. The Cenomanian reservoirs contain almost pure methane (average 98.6% CH[sub 4]) with [delta][sup 13]C of methane as light as -55[per thousand], while the gases from Neocomian and Jurassic reservoirs show more positive values, which are typical for high maturity source rocks. A model of linear mixing between Cenomanian and Jurassic gases fits fairly well with the observed compositional trends. This model indicates that up to 90% of the Cenomanian methane was probably generated in the Cenomanian-Aptian sequence. The question of bacterial versus early thermogenic generation will be discussed. Wireline log interpretation allowed the detection of up to three layers of permafrost in this region, which might be effective seals to prevent upward gas migration. Surface geochemical measurements show no detectable amounts of methane diffusing from the reservoirs into the atmosphere.

  19. West Siberian gas accumulations - the origin of methane and losses to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, B.; Littke, R.; Braun, A.

    1996-12-31

    West Siberia is the most prolific gas producing sedimentary basin of the world. Nevertheless the problem of the origin of these large gas accumulations has not yet been solved. Late thermogenic gas generation from Jurassic strata (usually 3500 m and deeper) and early thermogenic or bacterial gas generation from Cenomanian to Aptian strata (usually at 600 to 2500 m depth) are the processes currently in discussion. Organic-geochemical analyses of 150 core samples as well as compositional and isotopic data of about 120 gases provided the database of this study. The Cenomanian reservoirs contain almost pure methane (average 98.6% CH{sub 4}) with {delta}{sup 13}C of methane as light as -55{per_thousand}, while the gases from Neocomian and Jurassic reservoirs show more positive values, which are typical for high maturity source rocks. A model of linear mixing between Cenomanian and Jurassic gases fits fairly well with the observed compositional trends. This model indicates that up to 90% of the Cenomanian methane was probably generated in the Cenomanian-Aptian sequence. The question of bacterial versus early thermogenic generation will be discussed. Wireline log interpretation allowed the detection of up to three layers of permafrost in this region, which might be effective seals to prevent upward gas migration. Surface geochemical measurements show no detectable amounts of methane diffusing from the reservoirs into the atmosphere.

  20. Investigation of biphasic tumor oxygen dynamics induced by hyperoxic gas intervention: the dynamic phantom approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Liu, Hanli

    2008-01-01

    We have developed dynamic tumor vascular phantoms and utilized them to investigate the biphasic behavior of increases in light absorption, which is directly associated with oxygenated hemoglobin concentration that was observed in vivo from rat breast tumor experiments during carbogen/oxygen inhalation. The experimental setup for the phantom study included a continuous-wave, multichannel, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system and syringe pumps to drive the simulated blood through the dynamic vascular phantoms. The results from such phantom experiments clearly show that the two time constants observed in tumor oxygenation dynamics in vivo can result from two different perfusion rates or two different blood flow velocities. We provide experimental support for our previous hypothesis: the biphasic tumor hemodynamic feature stems from a well-perfused and poorly perfused region that could be detected with the two time constants of the NIRS signals. With a multichannel approach, noninvasive NIRS measurements may have useful and prognostic values to quantify the therapeutic effects of cancer treatments.

  1. Nanocomposite oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion of sulfur-contaminated synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rahul D. Solunke; Goetz Veser

    2009-09-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC, which combine the high reactivity of metals with the high-temperature stability of ceramics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of H{sub 2}S in a typical coal-derived syngas on the stability and redox kinetics of Ni- and Cu-based nanostructured oxygen carriers. Both carriers show excellent structural stability and only mildly changed redox kinetics upon exposure to H{sub 2}S, despite a significant degree of sulfide formation. Surprisingly, partial sulfidation of the support results in a strong increase in oxygen carrier capacity in both cases because of the addition of a sulfide-sulfate cycle. Overall, the carriers show great potential for use in CLC of high-sulfur fuels. 21 refs., 13 figs. 1 tab.

  2. Gas-liquid slug-flow oxygen transport and non-invasive biomass estimation in hollow-fiber reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Maintenance of non-limiting concentrations of dissolved gases at the surface of a particulate biocatalyst is a formidable barrier to the development of ultra-compact bioreactors. The method proposed here for supplying dissolved gases resembles the microcirculation of vertebrates. In the microcirculation, two phases, oxygen-rich hemoglobin-packed erythrocytes and nutrient-rich plasma, pass alternately through the capillaries. In slug-flow membrane bioreactors, two phases, oxygen-rich gas bubbles and slugs of aqueous nutrient medium, flow alternately on one side of a semipermeable membrane while cells grow on the opposite side. Protein synthesis rates were measured for Bacillus licheniformis 749C cultures immobilized in slug-flow hollow-fiber membrane reactors. The cultures required oxygen for growth and protein synthesis. A mathematical model of slug-flow identified the operating conditions corresponding to either continuous or periodic oxygen supply within the reactors. Synthesis rates within the slug-flow reactors were higher than those predicted by the model; the model apparently underestimated concentrations of soluble nutrients in the biomass. Non-invasive estimates of the total immobilized biomass are needed to monitor and control the biomass density, and hence the transport properties of the biomass phase. Investigators have used two non-invasive methods: in situ monitoring of an aggregate property, such as electrical conductivity; and inferential estimates based on substrate consumption and metabolic models. Techniques were developed to estimate immobilized biomass concentrations and growth rates from sulfur mass balances. Additionally, global mass balances showed that time-averaged biomass specific growth rates can be estimated from effluent concentrations of any substrate with a finite yield coefficient.

  3. Influence of Oxygen Gas Ratio on the Properties of Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Films Prepared by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minha; Jang, Yong-Jun; Jung, Ho-Sung; Song, Woochang; Kang, Hyunil; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Donguk; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited on glass and polyimide substrates using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. We investigated the effects of the oxygen gas ratio on the properties of the AZO films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell applications. The structural and optical properties of the AZO thin films were measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and UV-Visible-NIR spectrophotometry. The oxygen gas ratio played a crucial role in controlling the optical as well as electrical properties of the films. When oxygen gas was added into the film, the surface AZO thin films became smoother and the grains were enlarged while the preferred orientation changed from (0 0 2) to (1 0 0) plane direction of the hexagonal phase. An improvement in the transmittance of the AZO thin films was achieved with the addition of 2.5-% oxygen gas. The electrical resistivity was highly increased even for a small amount of the oxygen gas addition.

  4. Nitrogen gas propagation in a liquid helium cooled vacuum tube following a sudden vacuum loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    We present experimental measurements and analysis of propagation of the nitrogen gas that was vented to a high vacuum tube immersed in liquid helium (LHe). The scenario resembles accidental venting of atmospheric air to a SRF beam-line and was investigated to understand how the in-flowing air would propagate in such geometry. The gas front propagation speed in the tube was measured using pressure probes and thermometers installed at regular intervals over the tube length. The experimental data show the front speed to decrease along the vacuum tube. The empirical and analytical models developed to characterize the front deceleration are summarized.

  5. Decreasing phosphorus loss in tile-drained landscapes using flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural non-point source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P...

  6. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and

  7. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  8. Combined Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen and Antimicrobials in a Model of Gas Gangrene.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    effect on growth or survival of the bacteria (16). However, alpha toxin production was inhibited by the same dose of HBO (16). The purpose of the...this model. 14L S•euc’T Time IS. NiR OF PAG1s Hyperbaric Oxygen, Clostridial nVonecr1-osis, aluha toxin , antinicrobials I, LmOO COW "II. SI•CT Q.AMSSO...temperature. Organisms were recultured every two weeks. Prior to each experiment, bacteria were cultured in aerobic and anaerobic conditions on

  9. Home Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... oxygen is rarely delivered in the older large, steel gas cylinders any longer since frequent and costly ... just like the compressed oxygen in the older steel cylinders. An important advantage of liquid oxygen is ...

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric study of 19-oxygenation of the aromatase inhibitor 19-methylandrostenedione with human placental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamada, Akane

    2006-06-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied 19-oxygenation of 19-methyl-substituted derivative of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), compound 1, with human placental aromatase by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Incubation of the 19-methyl derivative 1 with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under an aerobic condition did not yield a detectable amount of [19S]19-hydroxy product 2 or its [19R]-isomer 3 when the product was analyzed as the bis-methoxime-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative by GC-MS; moreover, the production of estrogen was not detected as the bis-TMS derivative of estradiol (detection limit: about 3 ng and 10 pg per injection for the 19-ol and estradiol, respectively). The results reveal that the 19-methyl steroid 1 does not serve as a substrate of aromatase, although it does serve as a powerful inhibitor of the enzyme.

  12. Using photo-ionisation models to derive carbon and oxygen gas-phase abundances in the rest UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Amorín, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method to derive oxygen and carbon abundances using the ultraviolet (UV) lines emitted by the gas-phase ionised by massive stars. The method is based on the comparison of the nebular emission-line ratios with those predicted by a large grid of photo-ionisation models. Given the large dispersion in the O/H - C/O plane, our method firstly fixes C/O using ratios of appropriate emission lines and, in a second step, calculates O/H and the ionisation parameter from carbon lines in the UV. We find abundances totally consistent with those provided by the direct method when we apply this method to a sample of objects with an empirical determination of the electron temperature using optical emission lines. The proposed methodology appears as a powerful tool for systematic studies of nebular abundances in star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

  13. Computation of decompression schedules for single inert gas-oxygen dives using a hand-held programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ranade, A; Peterson, R E

    1980-08-01

    An algorithm for on-site computation with a hand-held programmable calculator (TI-59, Texas Instruments) of single inert-gas decompression schedules is described. This program is based on Workman's 'M-value' method. It can compute decompression schedules with changes in the oxygen content of the breathing mixture and extension of stay at any decompression stop. The features of the program that enable calculation of atypical dive profiles, along with the portability of small calculators, would make such an algorithm suitable for on-site applications. However, since dive profiles generated by the program have not yet been tested, divers are warned not to generate schedules until their safety has been established by field tests.

  14. Use of transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions for assessing indices of gas exchange during exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Banham, S W

    2000-04-01

    The slow response characteristics of the combined transcutaneous electrode have been viewed as a major disadvantage when compared with other types of non-invasive assessment of gas exchange during exercise testing. We have previously shown that by using the highest recommended temperature of 45 degrees C to reduce response times, and combining this with an exercise protocol of gradual work load increments, that this allows changes in arterial blood gases to be closely followed by transcutaneous values. In the present study we have validated the use of a transcutaneous electrode for estimation of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaO2) and dead space to tidal volume ratio (V(D)/V(T)) during exercise, against values calculated from direct arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred measurements were made in 20 patients with various cardiopulmonary disorders who underwent exercise testing. Exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometry with a specific protocol involving gradual work load increments at 2 min intervals. Transcutaneous gas tensions were measured by a heated combined O2 and CO2 electrode. Arterial blood was sampled at the midpoint of each stage of exercise and transcutaneous tensions noted at the end of each stage. The mean difference of the AaO2 gradient calculated from blood gas tensions obtained by the two methods was 0.14 kPa. The limits of agreement were -0.26 and 0.63 kPa. The same values for V(D)/V(T) calculated from gas tensions measured by the two methods were: mean difference 0001; limits of agreement -0.0242 and 0.0252. For both these parameters there was an even scatter around the mean value on Bland and Altman analysis. The findings of this study suggest that estimation of parameters of gas exchange using transcutaneous values during exercise testing is reliable, provided the electrode is heated to a slightly higher temperature than usual and the work load increments are gradual, allowing for the latency in the response time of the system

  15. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  16. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P; Aramendi, José F; Gorostiaga, Esteban M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  17. Gas/particle partitioning of n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs in urban Denver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P.; Barsanti, Kelley C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a medium volume sampler equipped with quartz fiber filters (QFFs) and a polyurethane foam (PUF)/XAD-4/PUF sandwich (PXP) was used to collect semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in both gaseous and particle (PM2.5) phases. A backup QFF (bQFF) was used to evaluate possible sampling artifact of particulate organics due to vapor-phase adsorption. A series of n-alkanes (molecular weight: 170-562) and PAHs (128-300), and two oxy-PAHs (acenaphthenone, 168; fluorenone, 180) were measured. Breakthrough experiments demonstrated that the PXP could collect all gas-phase target compounds with high efficiency, even the low molecular weight (MW) species (e.g., naphthalene). Comparing species concentrations across different sampling matrices encountered at the Denver, Colorado field site, the light n-alkanes (MW < 282) and PAHs (MW < 192) were mostly distributed into the gas phase; while those heavy n-alkanes (MW > 324) and PAHs (MW > 202) were primarily in the particle phase (Average temperature, 12.5 ± 10.1 °C). Log values of measured gas/particle (G/P) partitioning coefficients (Kmp,OM) of selected SVOCs (docosane, tricosane, fluoranthene, pyrene, acenaphthenone and fluorenone) were linearly regressed to those of theoretically-based partitioning coefficients (Ktp,OM) for comparison. Prior to Kmp,OM calculation, the gas- and particle-phase concentrations of SVOCs were corrected following two different approaches based on bQFF measurements. The first approach assumed that the bQFF associated SVOCs were from the adsorption of gaseous SVOCs (positive artifact); the second approach assumed equal contributions from positive and negative (organics evaporated from top QFF and adsorbed by bQFF) artifacts. Under both corrections, significant correlations (p < 0.05) were observed between log Kmp,OM and log Ktp,OM for the six selected SVOCs, suggesting that the predicted G/P partitioning can reasonably capture the measured G/P partitioning behavior. The large

  18. On the oxygen abundance of neutral gas in I ZW 18.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, M.; Lipman, K.

    1995-05-01

    Whether the H II regions of dwarf emission line galaxies are self-polluted by the nucleosynthetic products of massive stars remains an open question, despite recent claims to the contrary. We show that the finding by Kunth and collaborators that the neutral interstellar medium of I Zw 18 has a metallicity one order of magnitude lower than that of the ionized gas is highly uncertain. The range of possible values of (O/H) admitted by the saturated O I absorption line used in their analysis is very large, spanning a factor of ~1000. We suggest that future observations of the intrinsically weaker S II λ1256 multiplet offer the best prospects for measuring the true degree of metal enrichment of this dwarf galaxy.

  19. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  20. Thermal analysis of magnesium reactions with nitrogen/oxygen gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Lifu, Yu; Chang, Li; Gang, Li; Shengjun, Zhong

    2013-09-15

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of magnesium powder subjected to a nitrogen-rich atmosphere was investigated in thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures heated at rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. At higher temperature increase rates, the observed oxidation or nitridation steps shifted toward higher temperatures. The comparison of mass gain and heat of reaction in different nitrogen concentrations is helpful in interpreting the inerting effect of nitrogen on magnesium powder explosion in closed vessels. Activation energies for oxidation in air calculated by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method are generally consistent with previously published reports, but the method was not successful for the entire nitridation process. The change of activation energy with temperature was related to protective properties of the corresponding coating layer at particle surfaces. Two main coating layer growth processes were found in magnesium oxidation and nitridation using a modified Dreizin method which was also employed to determine activation energy for both magnesium oxidation and nitridation. For magnesium powder oxidation, activation energy calculated by the Dreizin method was close to that by KAS. Variation in activation energies was a function of different mechanisms inherent in the two methods.

  1. Tuning graphene for energy and environmental applications: Oxygen reduction reaction and greenhouse gas mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul; Sarkar, Shuranjan; Hassan, Mahbub; Hossain, Md. Shahriar; Minett, Andrew I.; Dou, Shi Xue; Gomes, Vincent G.

    2016-10-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped graphene samples were synthesized and tuned via pyrolysis of solid nitrogen precursor dimethyl-aminoterephthalate with graphene oxide as template. Our investigations show that the extent of thermal treatment, total concentration of nitrogen and the nature of nitrogen moieties play important roles in enhancing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and CO2 uptake. N-doped graphene synthesized at 650 °C (NG-650) with specific BET surface area of 278 m2/g, exhibits enhanced CO2 sorption capacity of 4.43 mmol/g (at 298 K, 1 bar) with exceptional selectivity (CO2:N2 = 42) and cyclic regeneration stability. In contrast, nitrogen-doped graphene synthesized at 750 °C (NG-750) demonstrated excellent catalytic activity for ORR via favourable 4e- transfer, performance stability with tests conducted up to 5000 cycles, and is unaffected by methanol cross-over effect. Thus, NG-750 shows potential to replace metal-based electrodes for fuel cell application. The comparative results for ORR with non-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene electrodes showed that graphitic nitrogen sites play vital role in enhancing catalytic activity.

  2. Effects of silicon (Si) on arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan; Zou, Qi; Xue, Shengguo; Mo, Jingyu; Pan, Weisong; Lou, Laiqing; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils has adversely affected the health of millions of people those consuming rice for staple food. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of silicon (Si) fertilization on As uptake, speciation in rice plants with different radial oxygen loss (ROL). Six genotypes were planted in pot soils under greenhouse conditions until late tillering state. The results showed that the rates of ROL were higher in hybrid rice genotypes varying from 19.76 to 27 μmol O2 g(-1) root dry weight h(-1) than that in conventional indica rice genotypes varying from 9.55 to 15.41 μmol O2 g(-1) root dry weight h(-1). Si addition significantly increased straw biomass (p<0.005), but with no significant effects on root biomass. Si fertilization significantly reduced shoot and root total As concentrations (p<0.001) in six genotypes grown in 40 mg As/kg soil. Si addition decreased the inorganic As in shoots of 'Xiangfengyou-9' with lower ROL and 'Xiangwanxian-12' with higher ROL by 31% and 25% respectively and had the tendency to increase DMA concentrations. It is potential to reduce As contamination of rice efficiently by combining Si fertilization and selecting genotypes with high radial oxygen loss.

  3. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  4. On-line gas analysis in animal cell cultivation: II. Methods for oxygen uptake rate estimation and its application to controlled feeding of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Eyer, K; Oeggerli, A; Heinzle, E

    1995-01-05

    Different methods for oxygen uptake rate (OUR) determinations in animal cell cultivation were investigated using a high quality mass spectrometer. Dynamic measurements have considerable disadvantages because of disturbances of the growing cells by the necessary variations of dissolved oxygen concentration. Only infrequent discrete measurements are possible using this method. Stationary liquid phase balance yielded better results with much higher frequency. Gas phase balancing has the advantage of not requiring dissolved oxygen measurement and knowledge of K(L)a, both of them are easily biased. It was found that simple gas phase balancing is either very inaccurate (error larger than expected signal) or very slow, with gas phase residence times of several hours. Therefore, a new method of aeration was designed. Oxygen and CO(2) transfer are mainly achieved via sparging. The gas released to the headspace is diluted with a roughly 100-fold stream of an inert gas (helium). Through this dilution, gas ratios are not changed for O(2), CO(2), Ar, and N(2). The measurement of lower concentrations (parts per million and below) is easy using mass spectrometry with a secondary electron multiplier. With this new method an excellent accuracy and sufficient speed of analysis were obtained. All these on-line methods for OUR measurement were tested during the cultivation of animal cells. The new method allowed better study of the kinetics of animal cell cultures as was shown with a hybridoma cell line (HFN 7.1, ATCC CRL 1606) producing monoclonal antibodies against human fibronectin. With the aid of these methods it was possible to find a correlation between a rapid decrease in oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and glutamine concentration. The sudden decrease in OUR can be attributed to glutamine depletion. This provided a basis for the controlled addition of glutamine to reduce the formation of ammonia produced by hydrolysis. This control method based on OUR measurement resulted in

  5. Loss of Homeostatic Gas Exchange in Eastern Hemlock in Response to Pollution and Rising CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayback, S. A.; Gagen, M. H.; Lini, A.; Cogbill, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    In eastern North American, multiple environmental effects, natural and anthropogenic, may impinge upon tree-ring based stable carbon isotope ratios when examined over long time periods. Investigation of relationships between a Vermont (USA) eastern hemlock δ¹³C (1849-2010) chronology and local and regional climate variables, as well as a regional sulfur dioxide time series revealed the decoupling of δ¹³C from significant climate drivers such as May-August maximum temperature (r=0.50, p<0.01) and, raise the possibility that this decoupling can be attributed to foliar and soil leaching of calcium due to acidic deposition since the 1960s. Further, investigation of derived photosynthetic isotope discrimination (Δ¹³C) time series showed an overall decreasing trend in Δ¹³C in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (ca), but with a slight rise in Δ¹³C in the last decade. Comparison of time series of leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (ci), ci/ca, and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) showed homeostatic maintenance of ci levels against ca until 1965 and rising iWUE. Then, ci increased proportional (1965-2000) and later at the same rate as ca (2001-2010) and iWUE leveled off indicating a potential loss of sensitivity to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. This more recent passive response may be an indication of a loss of homeostatic maintenance of stomatal control and/or may be linked to changing climate in the region (e.g., wetter conditions).

  6. Degradation mechanisms of 4-chlorophenol in a novel gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor by pulsed high voltage system with oxygen or nitrogen bubbling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Minghua; Hao, Xiaolong; Lei, Lecheng

    2007-03-01

    The effect of gas bubbling on the removal efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in aqueous solution has been investigated using a novel pulsed high voltage gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor, which generates gas-phase discharge above the water surface simultaneously with the spark discharge directly in the liquid. The time for 100% of 4-CP degradation in the case of oxygen bubbling (7 min) was much shorter than that in the case of nitrogen bubbling (25 min) as plenty of hydrogen peroxide and ozone formed in oxygen atmosphere enhanced the removal efficiency of 4-CP. Except for the main similar intermediates (4-chlorocatechol, hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone) produced in the both cases of oxygen and nitrogen bubbling, special intermediates (5-chloro-3-nitropyrocatechol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol, nitrate and nitrite ions) were produced in nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction pathway of 4-CP in the case of oxygen bubbling was oxygen/ozone attack on the radical hydroxylated derivatives of 4-CP. However, in the case of nitrogen bubbling, hydroxylation was the main reaction pathway with effect of N atom on degradation of 4-CP.

  7. High-resolution TALIF measurements of atomic oxygen: determination of gas temperature and collisional broadening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Drag, Cyril; Engeln, Richard; Golda, Judith; Schultz-von der Gathern, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is a well-established technique to measure relative (and with appropriate calibration techniques, absolute) densities of atoms in plasmas and flames. The excitation line profiles can provide additional information, but this is usually overlooked due to the mediocre spectral resolution of commercial pulsed dye laser systems. We have investigated O-atom TALIF excitation line profiles using a house-built narrow line-width pulsed UV laser system, based on pulsed Ti:Sa ring laser seeded by a cw infrared diode laser. The observed Doppler profiles allow unambiguous measurement of gas temperature with high precision in O2 and CO2 DC glow discharges. Sub-Doppler measurements, performed by reflecting the laser beam back through excitation zone, allow the pressure-broadened line shapes to be observed, both in a pure O2 DC discharge (up to 10 Torr pressure) and in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet in He/O2. Pressure broadening coefficients of the 3p3PJ state of O were determined for O2 and He bath gases, and were found to be an order of magnitude bigger than that predicted from the measured quenching rate. Work performed in the LABEX Plas@par project, with financial state aid (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02 and ANR-13-BS09-0019).

  8. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  9. Chemical bonding, interface strength, and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structure of the Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Sasaki, Takeo; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2006-12-15

    Chemical bondings and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) of oxygen terminated Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerfaces with hollow and on-top configurations were theoretically investigated by using a first principles orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals method. From the chemical bonding analysis, it was found that the hollow configuration has stronger ionic and covalent bondings as compared with the on-top configuration, and the weakness of the on-top configuration originates from the strong antibonding interactions between an interfacial oxygen and the second near neighbor Cu. Detailed analysis using overlap population diagrams revealed the formation mechanism of the strong antibonding interactions in the on-top configuration. In the oxygen K ELNES calculation, a prepeak feature appears in both configurations and it was predicted that the prepeak for the on-top configuration is larger than that for the hollow configuration. The overlap population diagrams elucidated that the prepeak is mainly composed of the O-Cu antibonding interactions, and the larger prepeak of the on-top configuration originates from the larger O-Cu interactions. The dependence of O-K ELNES on the direction of the momentum transfer vector was also discussed. Knowledge of the responsible direction of the momentum transfer vector in relation to the interface orientation was concluded to be indispensable in order to discuss detailed profiles of the ELNES from metal/ceramic heterointerfaces. This study reveals the effect of the atomic configuration of the interface to the chemical bondings, interface strength, and ELNES.

  10. Auger electron spectroscopy, electron loss spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction of oxygen and carbon monoxide adsorption of Pd films

    SciTech Connect

    Vook, R.W.; De Cooman, B.C.; Vankar, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and carbon monoxide at room temperature on polycrystalline and (111) monocrystalline thin films of Pd vapor deposited on mice was investigated by AES, ELS, and LEED. The results show that adsorbate coverage depends strongly on surface microstructure, composition, and topography. Polycrystalline or Cl contaminated surfaces adsorb large amounts of the gases, while flat, monocrystalline surfaces will adsorb almost none. These results are quite different from those observed earlier using sputter etched and annealed bulk single cyrstals where adsorbate superlattices formed after rather low gaseous exposures. In the present work no superlattices were observed after exposures ranging up to several thousand langmuirs. The contradictory results obtained in the two cases are attributed to probable differences in surface microtopography and microstructure.

  11. Using stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen for the determination of gas exchange in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Terra S; Schiff, Sherry L; Taylor, William D

    2013-02-01

    Gas exchange can be a key component of the dissolved oxygen (DO) mass balance in aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of gas transfer rates is essential for the estimation of DO production and consumption rates, and determination of assimilation capacities of systems receiving organic inputs. Currently, the accurate determination of gas transfer rate is a topic of debate in DO modeling, and there are a wide variety of approaches that have been proposed in the literature. The current study investigates the use of repeated measures of stable isotopes of O₂ and DO and a dynamic dual mass-balance model to quantify gas transfer coefficients (k) in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada. Measurements were conducted over a longitudinal gradient that reflected watershed changes from agricultural to urban. Values of k in the Grand River ranged from 3.6 to 8.6 day⁻¹, over discharges ranging from 5.6 to 22.4 m³ s⁻¹, with one high-flow event of 73.1 m³ s⁻¹. The k values were relatively constant over the range of discharge conditions studied. The range in discharge observed in this study is generally representative of non-storm and summer low-flow events; a greater range in k might be observed under a wider range of hydrologic conditions. Overall, k values obtained with the dual model for the Grand River were found to be lower than predicted by the traditional approaches evaluated, highlighting the importance of determining site-specific values of k. The dual mass balance approach provides a more constrained estimate of k than using DO only, and is applicable to large rivers where other approaches would be difficult to use. The addition of an isotopic mass balance provides for a corroboration of the input parameter estimates between the two balances. Constraining the range of potential input values allows for a direct estimate of k in large, productive systems where other k-estimation approaches may be uncertain or logistically infeasible.

  12. Loss-of-Function GAS8 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Disrupt the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Heike; Cremers, Carolin; Loges, Niki T.; Werner, Claudius; Nielsen, Kim G.; Marthin, June K.; Philipsen, Maria; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Edelbusch, Christine; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Schwartz, Oliver; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Rommelmann, Frank; Omran, Heymut

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated epithelial cells protect the upper and lower airways from chronic bacterial infections by moving mucus and debris outward. Congenital disorders of ciliary beating, referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), are characterized by deficient mucociliary clearance and severe, recurrent respiratory infections. Numerous genetic defects, most of which can be detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are so far known to cause different abnormalities of the ciliary axoneme. However, some defects are not regularly discernable by TEM because the ciliary architecture of the axoneme remains preserved. This applies in particular to isolated defects of the nexin links, also known as the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), connecting the peripheral outer microtubular doublets. Immunofluorescence analyses of respiratory cells from PCD-affected individuals detected a N-DRC defect. Genome-wide exome sequence analyses identified recessive loss-of-function mutations in GAS8 encoding DRC4 in three independent PCD-affected families. PMID:26387594

  13. Multiscale Computational Analysis of Nitrogen and Oxygen Gas-Phase Thermochemistry in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason D.

    Understanding hypersonic aerodynamics is important for the design of next-generation aerospace vehicles for space exploration, national security, and other applications. Ground-level experimental studies of hypersonic flows are difficult and expensive; thus, computational science plays a crucial role in this field. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of extremely high-speed flows require models of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium processes, such as dissociation of diatomic molecules and vibrational energy relaxation. Current models are outdated and inadequate for advanced applications. We describe a multiscale computational study of gas-phase thermochemical processes in hypersonic flows, starting at the atomic scale and building systematically up to the continuum scale. The project was part of a larger effort centered on collaborations between aerospace scientists and computational chemists. We discuss the construction of potential energy surfaces for the N4, N2O2, and O4 systems, focusing especially on the multi-dimensional fitting problem. A new local fitting method named L-IMLS-G2 is presented and compared with a global fitting method. Then, we describe the theory of the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) approach for modeling molecular collisions. We explain how we implemented the approach in a new parallel code for high-performance computing platforms. Results from billions of QCT simulations of high-energy N2 + N2, N2 + N, and N2 + O2 collisions are reported and analyzed. Reaction rate constants are calculated and sets of reactive trajectories are characterized at both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The data shed light on fundamental mechanisms of dissociation and exchange reactions -- and their coupling to internal energy transfer processes -- in thermal environments typical of hypersonic flows. We discuss how the outcomes of this investigation and other related studies lay a rigorous foundation for new macroscopic models for

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O2 content and had emitted significantly more CO2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  15. Role of biochar amendment in mitigation of nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas emission during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Wang, Quan; Ren, Xiuna; Zhao, Junchao; Huang, Hui; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Li, Ronghua; Zhou, Lina; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to mitigate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during composting of dewatered fresh sewage sludge (DFSS) employing biochar combined with zeolite (B+Z) and low dosage of lime (B+L). The 12% biochar was mixed at a 10%, 15% and 30% of zeolite and 1% lime, while without any additives was used as control. The results indicated that the combine use of B+Z was significantly increased the enzymatic activities and reduced the ammonia loss 58.03-65.17% as compare to B+L amended treatment, while CH4 92.85-95.34% and N2O 95.14-97.28% decreased than control. The B+L1% amendment significantly increased the organic matter degradation but the reduction was lower than B+Z and that could reduce the CH4 and N2O emission by 55.17-63.08% and 62.24-65.53% as compare to control, respectively. Overall our results demonstrated that 12%B+Z10% addition into DFSS can be potentially used to improve the DFSS composting by mitigation of GHG emission and nitrogen loss.

  16. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine: Parasitic Loss Control through Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Farshid Sadeghi; Chin-Pei Wang

    2008-12-31

    This report presents results of our investigation on parasitic loss control through surface modification in reciprocating engine. In order to achieve the objectives several experimental and corresponding analytical models were designed and developed to corroborate our results. Four different test rigs were designed and developed to simulate the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL) contact. The Reciprocating Piston Test Rig (RPTR) is a novel suspended liner test apparatus which can be used to accurately measure the friction force and side load at the piston-cylinder interface. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with the experimental measurements. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results showed good agreement. The results revealed that in the reciprocating engines higher friction occur near TDC and BDC of the stroke due to the extremely low piston speed resulting in boundary lubrication. A Small Engine Dynamometer Test Rig was also designed and developed to enable testing of cylinder liner under motored and fired conditions. Results of this study provide a baseline from which to measure the effect of surface modifications. The Pin on Disk Test Rig (POD) was used in a flat-on-flat configuration to study the friction effect of CNC machining circular pockets and laser micro-dimples. The results show that large and shallow circular pockets resulted in significant friction reduction. Deep circular pockets did not provide much load support. The Reciprocating Liner Test Rig (RLTR) was designed to simplifying the contact at the PRCL interface. Accurate measurement of friction was obtained using 3-axis piezoelectric force transducer. Two fiber optic sensors were used to measure the film thickness precisely. The results show that the friction force is reduced through the use of modified surfaces. The Shear Driven Test Rig (SDTR) was designed to simulate the mechanism of the

  17. Study of an Ozone Composing Mechanism derived from the Third Element on Surface of Electrode using Oxygen Gas: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Akira; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi

    In our third experiment, we changed the density of nitrogen through the addition of heat energy to the anode. A computer simulation confirmed the same phenomenon. Then the copper anode was replaced with an antimony anode. We found that antimony worked better than nitrogen as a third element. Finally, in the fourth experiment, we used an industrial ozone generator including ceramic dielectrics and a titanium expanded metal electrode. A decrease in the temperature of the cooling water led to a proportional increase in ozone. It follows the formula of van't Hoff. After spattering the surface of the electrodes with argon gas and supplying the ozone generator with 99% oxygen, we were able to produce ozone which was more than 20% higher in concentration than primary state ozone under the same conditions. The ozone generator produced ozone in high yield efficiency due to the optimum density of a third element like nitrogen on the surface of the electrodes. Antimony works better than nitrogen does as a third element.

  18. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  19. Gas turbine engine adapted for use in combination with an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from compressed air

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J [Oviedo, FL; Horazak, Dennis A [Orlando, FL

    2012-03-06

    A gas turbine engine is provided comprising an outer shell, a compressor assembly, at least one combustor assembly, a turbine assembly and duct structure. The outer shell includes a compressor section, a combustor section, an intermediate section and a turbine section. The intermediate section includes at least one first opening and at least one second opening. The compressor assembly is located in the compressor section to define with the compressor section a compressor apparatus to compress air. The at least one combustor assembly is coupled to the combustor section to define with the combustor section a combustor apparatus. The turbine assembly is located in the turbine section to define with the turbine section a turbine apparatus. The duct structure is coupled to the intermediate section to receive at least a portion of the compressed air from the compressor apparatus through the at least one first opening in the intermediate section, pass the compressed air to an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from the compressed air to produced vitiated compressed air and return the vitiated compressed air to the intermediate section via the at least one second opening in the intermediate section.

  20. Reliability of the determination of whole-blood oxygen affinity by means of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters.

    PubMed

    Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijistra, W G

    1989-05-01

    Determination of the oxygen affinity of human whole blood with the help of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters is compared with an accurate method for recording hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curves (Clin Chem 1982;28:1287-92). P50 (oxygen tension at half saturation; So2 = 50%) and Hill's n (delta log [So2/(1-So2)]/delta log Po2) were determined in blood of 24 healthy donors. Three slightly different procedures were used for determination of P50 on the basis of Po2, pH, Pco2, and So2 measured with each of four different blood-gas analyzer/oximeter combinations. These methods were not able to discriminate between high and low values for P50 within the normal reference interval, but never failed to detect the high oxygen affinity of blood stored for 12 days, reflected in low values of P50. The methods thus proved suitable for detecting clinically significant deviations in oxygen affinity such as occur in patients with, e.g., abnormal hemoglobins, anemias, or carbon monoxide poisoning. Determination of Hill's n by these methods did not produce useful results.

  1. Comparative investigation on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas containing H2S over supported NiO oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ksepko, E.; Siriwardane, R.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Sciazko, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of simulated coal-derived synthesis gas was conducted with NiO oxygen carriers supported on SiO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and sepiolite. The effect of H2S on the performance of these samples for the CLC process was also evaluated. Five-cycle thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests at 800 C indicated that all oxygen carriers had a stable performance at 800 C, except NiO/SiO2. Full reduction/oxidation reactions of the oxygen carrier were obtained during the five-cycle test. It was found that support had a significant effect on reaction performance of NiO both in reduction and oxidation rates. The reduction reaction was significantly faster than the oxidation reaction for all oxygen carriers, while the oxidation reaction is fairly slow due to oxygen diffusion on NiO layers. The reaction profile was greatly affected by the presence of H2S, but there was no effect on the capacity due to the presence of H2S in synthesis gas. The presence of H2S decreased reduction reaction rates significantly, but oxidation rates of reduced samples increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the oxidized samples after a five-cycle test showed stable crystalline phases without any formation of sulfides or sulfites/sulfates. Increase in reaction temperature to 900 C had a positive effect on the performance.

  2. Geo-Effective Solar Flare Events In December 2006: Space Weather Effect on Mars and Venus Oxygen Loss to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    2007-12-01

    In Dec. 2006, single sunspot region produced a series of proton solar flares, up to X9.0 level on 5 Dec 2006 10:35 UT. One unique feature of this X9.0 flare is that MeV particles originated from this proton flare were observed at Venus and Mars by Venus Express (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX), which are respectively located away from Earth by nearly +160° and -160° as viewed from the Sun. On 5 Dec 2006, the plasma instruments ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 on board MEX and VEX have detected a large enhancement in their respective background count level, which is a typical signature of intensive MeV particle flux. The timing of these enhancements were consistent with the estimated field-aligned travel time along the Parker spiral from the site of X9.0 flare to Venus and Mars. The Mars Express data indicate a one-order enhancement in the heavy ion outflow from the Martian atmosphere during the SEP period. This is the first observation of the increase of escaping flux at Mars during a violent solar activity. This suggests that the solar EUV flux levels also significantly affect the atmospheric loss from unmagnetized planets.

  3. Effect of oxygen atoms dissociated by non-equilibrium plasma on flame of methane oxygen and argon pre-mixture gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    For more efficient way of combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has been investigated by many researchers. But it is very difficult to clarify the effect of plasma even on the flame of methane. Because there are many complex chemical reactions in combustion system. Sasaki et al. has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power. They also measured emission from Second Positive Band System of nitrogen during the irradiation. The emission indicates existence of high energy electrons which are accelerated by the microwave. The high energy electrons also dissociate oxygen molecules easily and oxygen atom would have some effects on the flame. But the dissociation ratio of oxygen molecules by the non-equilibrium plasma is significantly low, compared to that in the combustion reaction. To clarify the effect of dissociated oxygen atoms on the flame, dependence of dissociation ratio of oxygen on the flame has been examined using CHEMKIN. It is found that in the case of low dissociation ratio of 10-6, the ignition of the flame becomes slightly earlier. It is also found that in the case of high dissociation ratio of 10-3, the ignition time becomes significantly earlier by almost half. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  4. Rhenium/Oxygen Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Myers, Dwight; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Humphrey, Donald

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of pure rhenium is examined from 600-1400 C in oxygen/argon mixtures. Linear weight loss kinetics are observed. Gas pressures, flow rates, and temperatures are methodically varied to determine the rate controlling steps. The reaction at 600 and 800 C appears to be controlled by a chemical reaction step at the surface; whereas the higher temperature reactions appear to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of oxygen to the rhenium surface. Attack of the rhenium appears to be along grain boundaries and crystallographic planes.

  5. 20th century human pressures drive reductions in deepwater oxygen leading to losses of benthic methane-based food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Simon; Millet, Laurent; Verneaux, Valérie; Lami, Andrea; David, Etienne; Murgia, Laurie; Parent, Claire; Musazzi, Simona; Gauthier, Emilie; Bichet, Vincent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater lakes play a key role in the global carbon cycle as sinks (organic carbon sequestration) and sources (greenhouse gas emissions). Understanding the carbon cycle response to environmental changes is becoming a crucial challenge in the context of global warming and the preponderance of human pressures. We reconstructed the long-term (1500 years) evolution of trophic functioning of the benthic food web, based on methanotrophic ancient DNA and chironomid isotope analyses). In addition, human land use is also reconstructed in three different lakes (eastern France, Jura Mountains). Our findings confirm that the benthic food web can be highly dependent on methane-derived carbon (up to 50% of the chironomid biomass) and reveal that the activation of this process can correspond to a natural functioning or be a consequence of anthropic perturbation. The studied lakes also showed a similar temporal evolution over the last century with the disappearance of the profundal aquatic insects (Chironomidae, Diptera), considered as keystone for the whole lake food web (e.g., coupling benthic-pelagic), inducing a potential collapse in the transfer of methane to top consumers. This functional state, also called the dead zone expansion, was caused by the change in human land-use occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. The strong modification of agro-pastoral practices (e.g., fertilization practices, intensive grazing, and sewage effluent) modified the influx of nutrients (by diffuse and/or point-source inputs) and induced a significant increase in the trophic status and organic matter sedimentation to reach unprecedented values. Further studies should be planned to assess dead zone expansion and, according to the regime shift theory, to provide environmental tipping points for sustainable resource management.

  6. [Reduction of radiation-induced vitamin E- and B1- losses by irradiation of foodstuffs at low temperature and by exclusion of atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Diehl, J F

    1979-10-01

    The protective effect of low temperatures during irradiation on vitamin B1 and E levels in foods is not abolished by subsequent storage or heating. Egg powder irradiated at 1 Mrad in the presence of air and stored for 4 months at ambient temperature lost 68% of its thiamin content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 33% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Sunflower oil irradiated at 3 Mrad in the presence of air and subsequently heated for 1 hour at 180 degrees C lost 98% of its alpha-tocopherol content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 65% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Exclusion of atmospheric oxygen by packaging under nitrogen reduced the loss of alpha-tocopherol in irradiated (0.1 Mrad) rolled oats after 8 months of storage from 56 to 5% and the loss of thiamin from 86 to 26%. Vacuum packaging was equally effective during the first 3 months and somewhat less effective during the following 5 months. Packaging under carbon dioxide showed no advantage over packaging in air. Sensory evaluation of rolled oats, raw or cooked, 1 and 3 months after irradiation with 0.1 Mrad indicated no significant quality difference between unirradiated and irradiated samples packaged under nitrogen.

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss among liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinder infusion workers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the exposure levels of noise, estimated prevalence, and identify risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among male workers with a cross-sectional study in a liquefied petroleum gas cylinder infusion factory in Taipei City. Male in-field workers exposed to noise and administrative controls were enrolled in 2006 and 2007. Face-to-face interviews were applied for demographics, employment history, and drinking/smoking habit. We then performed the measurements on noise levels in field and administration area, and hearing thresholds on study subjects with standard apparatus and protocols. Existence of hearing loss > 25 dBHL for the average of 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz was accordingly determined for NIHL. The effects from noise exposure, predisposing characteristics, employment-related factors, and personal habits to NIHL were estimated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. A total of 75 subjects were involved in research and 56.8% of in-field workers had NIHL. Between the in-field and administration groups, hearing thresholds on the worse ear showed significant differences at frequencies of 4 k, 6 k, and 8 kHz with aging considered. Adjusted odds ratio for field noise exposure (OR=99.57, 95% CI: 3.53, 2,808.74) and frequent tea or coffee consumption (OR=0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.51) were found significant. Current study addressed NIHL in a specific industry in Taiwan. Further efforts in minimizing its impact are still in need.

  8. Fine temporal control of the medium gas content and acidity and on-chip generation of series of oxygen concentrations for cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Polinkovsky, Mark; Gutierrez, Edgar; Levchenko, Andre; Groisman, Alex

    2009-04-21

    We describe the design, operation, and applications of two microfluidic devices that generate series of concentrations of oxygen, [O(2)], by on-chip gas mixing. Both devices are made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and have two layers of channels, the flow layer and the gas layer. By using in-situ measurements of [O(2)] with an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent dye, we show that gas diffusion through PDMS leads to equilibration of [O(2)] in an aqueous solution in the flow layer with [O(2)] in a gas injected into the gas layer on a time scale of approximately 1 sec. Injection of carbon dioxide into the gas layer causes the pH in the flow layer to drop within approximately 0.5 sec. Gas-mixing channel networks of both devices generate series of 9 gas mixtures with different [O(2)] from two gases fed to the inlets, thus creating regions with 9 different [O(2)] in the flow layer. The first device generates nitrogen-oxygen mixtures with [O(2)] varying linearly between 0 and 100%. The second device generates nitrogen-air mixtures with [O(2)] varying exponentially between 0 and 20.9%. The flow layers of the devices are designed for culturing bacteria in semi-permeable microchambers, and the second device is used to measure growth curves of E. coli colonies at 9 different [O(2)] in a single experiment. The cell division rates at [O(2)] of 0, 0.2, and 0.5% are found to be significantly different, further validating the capacity of the device to set [O(2)] in the flow layer with high precision and resolution. The degree of control of [O(2)] achieved in the devices and the robustness with respect to oxygen consumption due to respiration would be difficult to match in a traditional large-scale culture. The proposed devices and technology can be used in research on bacteria and yeast under microaerobic conditions and on mammalian cells under hypoxia.

  9. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  10. The effect of discontinuous gas exchange on respiratory water loss in grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) varies across an aridity gradient.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Talal, Stav; Ayali, Amir; Gefen, Eran

    2015-08-01

    The significance of discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC) in reducing respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects is contentious. Results from single-species studies are equivocal in their support of the classic 'hygric hypothesis' for the evolution of DGC, whereas comparative analyses generally support a link between DGC and water balance. In this study, we investigated DGC prevalence and characteristics and RWL in three grasshopper species (Acrididae, subfamily Pamphaginae) across an aridity gradient in Israel. In order to determine whether DGC contributes to a reduction in RWL, we compared the DGC characteristics and RWL associated with CO2 release (transpiration ratio, i.e. the molar ratio of RWL to CO2 emission rates) among these species. Transpiration ratios of DGC and continuous breathers were also compared intraspecifically. Our data show that DGC characteristics, DGC prevalence and the transpiration ratios correlate well with habitat aridity. The xeric-adapted Tmethis pulchripennis exhibited a significantly shorter burst period and lower transpiration ratio compared with the other two mesic species, Ocneropsis bethlemita and Ocneropsis lividipes. However, DGC resulted in significant water savings compared with continuous exchange in T. pulchripennis only. These unique DGC characteristics for T. pulchripennis were correlated with its significantly higher mass-specific tracheal volume. Our data suggest that the origin of DGC may not be adaptive, but rather that evolved modulation of cycle characteristics confers a fitness advantage under stressful conditions. This modulation may result from morphological and/or physiological modifications.

  11. Reversible Formation of 2D Electron Gas at the LaFeO3 /SrTiO3 Interface via Control of Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfa; Han, Wei; Rice, Philip M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Mohseni, Katayoon; Meyerheim, Holger L; Ostanin, Sergey; Maznichenko, Igor V; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K U; Ernst, Arthur; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2017-03-01

    A conducting 2D electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the interface between epitaxial LaFeO3 layers >3 unit cells thick and the surface of SrTiO3 single crystals. The 2DEG is exquisitely sensitive to cation intermixing and oxygen nonstoichiometry. It is shown that the latter thus allows the controllable formation of the 2DEG via ionic liquid gating, thereby forming a nonvolatile switch.

  12. Gas Hydrate and Acoustically Laminated Sediments: Potential Environmental Cause of Anomalously Low Acoustic Bottom Loss in Deep-Ocean Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-02-09

    saturation. One volume of water commonly binds from 70 to 220 volumes of gas. Voids in the atomic lattice of hydrate become increasingly occupied at lnwer...gas hydrates are expected in nature. Structure I hydrates, which are less densely packed structures that accommodate varying gas molecule atomic radii...paraffin series natural gas and other gases in relation to atomic size of molecules. The largest allowable size of gas molecules that can be incorporated

  13. Control of the Position of Oxygen Delivery in Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 by Amino Acid Side Chains within a Gas Migration Channel.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Lara; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-04-22

    Understanding gas migration pathways is critical to unraveling structure-function relationships in enzymes that process gaseous substrates such as O2, H2, and N2 This work investigates the role of a defined pathway for O2 in regulating the peroxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase 1. Computational and mutagenesis studies provide strong support for a dominant delivery channel that shuttles molecular oxygen to a specific region of the active site, thereby ensuring the regio- and stereospecificity of product. Analysis of reaction kinetics and product distribution in channel mutants also reveals a plasticity to the gas migration pathway. The findings show that a single site mutation (I553W) limits oxygen accessibility to the active site, greatly increasing the fraction of substrate that reacts with oxygen free in solution. They also show how a neighboring site mutation (L496W) can result in a redirection of oxygen toward an alternate position of the substrate, changing the regio- and stereospecificity of peroxidation. The present data indicate that modest changes in a protein scaffold may modulate the access of small gaseous molecules to enzyme-bound substrates.

  14. Characterization of novel single-variety oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions via headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Van Opstaele, Filip; Praet, Tatiana; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2013-11-06

    The volatile composition of novel varietal oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions ("spicy essences") was characterized by headspace solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Oxygenated sesquiterpenes represent the major chemical compound class, accounting for at least 65% of the total volatile fraction. In addition to oxygenated sesquiterpenes, spicy hop essences consist of several ketones, sesquiterpene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, and a relatively high number of unidentified compounds. On the basis of their relative composition, spicy hop essences can be fully differentiated according to their varietal origin. Multidimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry on spicy hop essence cv. Spalter Select further demonstrated the enormous complexity of this particular hop oil fraction. The aromagram obtained via gas chromatography-olfactometry comprised nine odor-active regions described in terms of "citrus", "green", "haylike", "earthy", "woody", and "spicy". 2-Undecanone, 2-tridecanone, γ-cadinene, α-calacorene, calarene, humuladienone, caryolan-1-ol, caryophyllene oxide enantiomers, and humulene epoxide II are tentatively identified in the odor-active zones.

  15. Kinetics of oxygen-enhanced water gas shift on bimetallic catalysts and the roles of metals and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugai, Junichiro

    The post-processing of reformate is an important step in producing hydrogen (H2) with low carbon monoxide (CO) for low temperature fuel cells from syn-gas. However, the conventional process consists of three steps, i.e. two steps of water gas shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PROX) of CO, and it is not suitable for mobile applications due to the large volume of water gas shift (WGS) catalysts and conditioning and/or regeneration necessary for these catalysts. Aiming at replacing those three steps by a simple one-step process, small amount of oxygen was added to WGS (the reaction called oxygen-enhanced water gas shift or OWGS) to promote the reaction kinetics and low pyrophoric ceria-supported bimetallic catalysts were employed for stable performance in this reaction. Not only CO conversion, but also H2 yield was found to increase by the O2 addition on CeO2-supported catalysts. The characteristics of OWGS, high H2 production rate at 200 to 300°C at short contact time where unreacted O2 exists, evidenced the impact of O2 addition on surface species on the catalyst. Around 1.5 of reaction order in CO for various CeO2-supported metal catalysts for OWGS compared to reaction orders in CO ranging from -0.1 to 0.6 depending on metal species for WGS shows O2 addition decreases CO coverage to free up the active sites for co-reactant (H2O) adsorption and activation. Among the monometallic and bimetallic catalysts, Pt-Cu and Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts were superior to monometallic catalysts in OWGS. These bimetallic components were found to form alloys where noble metal is surrounded mainly by Cu to have strong interaction between noble metal and copper resulting in high OWGS activity and low pyrophoric property. The metal loadings were optimized for CeO2-supported Pd-Cu bimetallic system and 2 wt% Pd with 5 -- 10 wt% Cu were found to be the optimum for the present OWGS condition. In the kinetic study, Pd in Pd-Cu was shown to increase the active sites for H2O

  16. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  17. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  18. A regional assessment of the cost and effectiveness of mitigation measures for reducing nutrient losses to water and greenhouse gas emissions to air from pastoral farms.

    PubMed

    Vibart, Ronaldo; Vogeler, Iris; Dennis, Samuel; Kaye-Blake, William; Monaghan, Ross; Burggraaf, Vicki; Beautrais, Josef; Mackay, Alec

    2015-06-01

    Using a novel approach that links geospatial land resource information with individual farm-scale simulation, we conducted a regional assessment of nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) losses to water and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to air from the predominant mix of pastoral industries in Southland, New Zealand. An evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of several nutrient loss mitigation strategies applied at the farm-scale, set primarily for reducing N and P losses and grouped by capital cost and potential ease of adoption, followed an initial baseline assessment. Grouped nutrient loss mitigation strategies were applied on an additive basis on the assumption of full adoption, and were broadly identified as 'improved nutrient management' (M1), 'improved animal productivity' (M2), and 'restricted grazing' (M3). Estimated annual nitrate-N leaching losses occurring under representative baseline sheep and beef (cattle) farms, and representative baseline dairy farms for the region were 10 ± 2 and 32 ± 6 kg N/ha (mean ± standard deviation), respectively. Both sheep and beef and dairy farms were responsive to N leaching loss mitigation strategies in M1, at a low cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Only dairy farms were responsive to N leaching loss abatement from adopting M2, at no additional cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Dairy farms were also responsive to N leaching loss abatement from adopting M3, but this reduction came at a greater cost per kg N-loss mitigated. Only dairy farms were responsive to P-loss mitigation strategies, in particular by adopting M1. Only dairy farms were responsive to GHG abatement; greater abatement was achieved by the most intensified dairy farm system simulated. Overall, M1 provided for high levels of regional scale N- and P-loss abatement at a low cost per farm without affecting overall farm production, M2 provided additional N-loss abatement but only marginal P-loss abatement, whereas M3 provided the greatest N-loss abatement, but

  19. Gas exchange

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... during exhalation. Gas exchange is the delivery of oxygen from the lungs to the bloodstream, and the ... share a membrane with the capillaries in which oxygen and carbon dioxide move freely between the respiratory ...

  20. Oxygen Sensing and Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Semenza, Gregg L.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of carotid bodies as sensory receptors for detecting arterial blood oxygen levels, and the identification and elucidation of the roles of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) in oxygen homeostasis have propelled the field of oxygen biology. This review highlights the gas-messenger signaling mechanisms associated with oxygen sensing, as well as transcriptional and non-transcriptional mechanisms underlying the maintenance of oxygen homeostasis by HIFs and their relevance to physiology and pathology. PMID:26328879

  1. Quantifying the loss of methane through secondary gas mass transport (or 'slip') from a micro-porous membrane contactor applied to biogas upgrading.

    PubMed

    McLeod, Andrew; Jefferson, Bruce; McAdam, Ewan J

    2013-07-01

    Secondary gas transport during the separation of a binary gas with a micro-porous hollow fibre membrane contactor (HMFC) has been studied for biogas upgrading. In this application, the loss or 'slip' of the secondary gas (methane) during separation is a known concern, specifically since methane possesses the intrinsic calorific value. Deionised (DI) water was initially used as the physical solvent. Under these conditions, carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) absorption were dependent upon liquid velocity (V(L)). Whilst the highest CO2 flux was recorded at high V(L), selectivity towards CO2 declined due to low residence times and a diminished gas-side partial pressure, and resulted in slip of approximately 5.2% of the inlet methane. Sodium hydroxide was subsequently used as a comparative chemical absorption solvent. Under these conditions, CO2 mass transfer increased by increasing gas velocity (VG) which is attributed to the excess of reactive hydroxide ions present in the solvent, and the fast conversion of dissolved CO2 to carbonate species reinitiating the concentration gradient at the gas-liquid interface. At high gas velocities, CH4 slip was reduced to 0.1% under chemical conditions. Methane slip is therefore dependent upon whether the process is gas phase or liquid phase controlled, since methane mass transport can be adequately described by Henry's law within both physical and chemical solvents. The addition of an electrolyte was found to further retard CH4 absorption via the salting out effect. However, their applicability to physical solvents is limited since electrolytic concentration similarly impinges upon the solvents' capacity for CO2. This study illustrates the significance of secondary gas mass transport, and furthermore demonstrates that gas-phase controlled systems are recommended where greater selectivity is required.

  2. A Comparison of the Nitrogen Gas Excess Versus the Fixed Nitrogen Deficit in Two Major Oxygen Deficient Zones of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devol, A. H.; Chang, B. X.

    2006-12-01

    This study compares the nitrogen gas excesses in the oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea. These are two of the three largest ODZs in the world. In the near absence of oxygen, heterotrophic denitrification is the dominant form of respiration in these regions which, coupled to the sheer vastness of the ODZs, makes them a globally significant sink of marine fixed nitrogen. Thus, understanding how nitrogen is cycled in the ODZs is important to understanding the global nitrogen cycle. We measured profiles of nitrogen gas and argon concentrations through the ODZs of the ETSP and the Arabian Sea in the fall of 2005 and 2004, respectively. Nitrogen gas concentrations were normalized to argon concentrations to eliminate variations due to physical changes in the water mass. Any nitrogen gas in excess of the background nitrogen gas concentration was interpreted to be from denitrification. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, we found the nitrogen gas excess up to 18 uM N. Using stoichiometric relationships of nitrate and phosphate specific to the Arabian Sea, previous workers have estimated the nitrate deficit in the Arabian Sea ODZ to be no more than 12 uM N, which is only two-thirds of the nitrogen gas excess. In the ODZ of the ETSP, we found the nitrogen gas excess to be 15 uM N and the estimated nitrate deficit to be comparable, which suggests that in the ETSP, the nitrogen gas excess may be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, however, there is 50% more nitrogen in the excess than can be accounted for by the nitrate deficit. Several explanations are possible for this discrepancy, but probably the most significant is the likely greater contribution of nitrogen fixation to the overall productivity of the Arabian Sea compared to the ETSP. Nitrogen fixing bacteria are known to have an elevated N:P relative to the assumed near-Redfieldian organic matter falling into the ODZ. Nitrogen fixation has been

  3. Multicycle study on chemical-looping combustion of simulated coal gas with a CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Qilei Song; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Wenguang Zheng; Laihong Shen; Jun Xiao

    2008-11-15

    The cyclic test of a CaSO{sub 4}-based oxygen carrier (natural anhydrite) in alternating reducing simulated coal gas and oxidizing conditions was performed at 950{degree}C in a fluidized bed reactor at atmospheric pressure. A high concentration of CO{sub 2} was obtained in the reduction. The H{sub 2} and CO conversions and CO{sub 2} yield increased initially and final decreased significantly. The release of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S during the cyclic test was found to be responsible for the decrease of reactivity of a CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier. The oxygen carrier conversion after the reduction reaction decreased gradually in the cyclic test. Through the comparison of mass-based reaction rates as a function of mass conversion at typical cycles, it was also evident that the reactivity of a CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier increased for the initial cycles but finally decreased after around 15 cycles. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the presence and intensity of the reduction sulfur species was in accordance with the results of gas conversion. The content of CaO was higher than expected, suggesting the formation of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S during the cycles. Surface morphology analysis demonstrates that the natural anhydrite particle surface varied from impervious to porous after the cyclic test. It was also observed that the small grains on the surface of the oxygen carrier sintered in the cyclic tests. Energy-dispersive spectrum analysis also demonstrated the decrease of oxygen intensity after reduction, and CaO became the main component after the 20th oxidation. Pore structure analysis suggested that the particles agglomerated or sintered in the cyclic tests. The possible method for sulfur mitigation is proposed. Finally, some basic consideration on the design criteria of a CLC system for solid fuels using a CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier is discussed by the references and provides direction for future work. 49 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Group additive values for the gas-phase standard enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity of oxygenates.

    PubMed

    Paraskevas, Paschalis D; Sabbe, Maarten K; Reyniers, Marie-Françoise; Papayannakos, Nikos; Marin, Guy B

    2013-11-25

    A complete and consistent set of 60 Benson group additive values (GAVs) for oxygenate molecules and 97 GAVs for oxygenate radicals is provided, which allow to describe their standard enthalpies of formation, entropies and heat capacities. Approximately half of the GAVs for oxygenate molecules and the majority of the GAVs for oxygenate radicals have not been reported before. The values are derived from an extensive and accurate database of thermochemical data obtained by ab initio calculations at the CBS-QB3 level of theory for 202 molecules and 248 radicals. These compounds include saturated and unsaturated, α- and β-branched, mono- and bifunctional oxygenates. Internal rotations were accounted for by using one-dimensional hindered rotor corrections. The accuracy of the database was further improved by adding bond additive corrections to the CBS-QB3 standard enthalpies of formation. Furthermore, 14 corrections for non-nearest-neighbor interactions (NNI) were introduced for molecules and 12 for radicals. The validity of the constructed group additive model was established by comparing the predicted values with both ab initio calculated values and experimental data for oxygenates and oxygenate radicals. The group additive method predicts standard enthalpies of formation, entropies, and heat capacities with chemical accuracy, respectively, within 4 kJ mol(-1) and 4 J mol(-1) K(-1) for both ab initio calculated and experimental values. As an alternative, the hydrogen bond increment (HBI) method developed by Lay et al. (T. H. Lay, J. W. Bozzelli, A. M. Dean, E. R. Ritter, J. Phys. Chem.- 1995, 99, 14514) was used to introduce 77 new HBI structures and to calculate their thermodynamic parameters (Δ(f)H°, S°, C(p)°). The GAVs reported in this work can be reliably used for the prediction of thermochemical data for large oxygenate compounds, combining rapid prediction with wide-ranging application.

  5. Special features of oxygen distribution in the surface region of steel IOKhN2 under the effect of gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V. Yu.; Pivovarov, A. L.; Chenakin, S. P.; Cherepin, V. T.

    1996-04-01

    In recent years technological processes and methods of treatment that include the use of low-temperature gas-discharge plasma have become very popular. Ion-plasma technologies are used successfully for cleaning the surface of materials or creating thin-film structures and coatings and for chemicothermal treatment (nitriding, siliconizing, boronizing, carburizing, etc.) of various metals and alloys. The effect of the plasma of a gas glow discharge on a solid body can be manifested in a change in the chemical composition of its surface region. This is caused by the introduction of elements from the gas atmosphere into the specimen and by the redistribution of the matrix components in this region. The nature of such a redistribution of the components under the action of a gas-discharge plasma is not completely clear, which, among other reasons, is associated with the insufficiency of experimental and theoretical data on the problem. The present work concerns the causes and possible mechanism of the appearance of an oxygen-rich layer in the near-surface region of steel 10KhN2 after the action of a glow-discharge plasma in He, N2 + 25% H2, and Ar atmospheres. A correct explanation of this phenomenon can have a decisive role in understanding the special features of the diffusion processes occurring in a solid body under the effect of a gas-discharge plasma.

  6. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)

    SciTech Connect

    John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

    2003-11-09

    The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

  7. Characteristics of Coaxial Dielectric Barrier Discharge at an Atmospheric Pressure with a Swirling Gas Argon/Oxygen Mixture for the Surface Modification of Polyester Fiber Cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jinzhou; Zhong, Ping; Li, Jialing; Lin, Jie; Diao, Ying; Zhang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    A newly developed coaxial dielectric barrier discharge reactor with a length of 1000 mm at an atmospheric pressure was used for plasma treatment of polyester fiber cord in a roll-to-roll manner. In this reactor, swirling mixture gases of oxygen of about 1% and argon with a flow rate of 1.5 L/min to 2.7 L/min ensured the gas usage sparing, discharge uniformity and efficient fiber surface modification. The water contact angle and surface morphology of the treated fiber were measured. The results show that the surface oxygenation is mainly responsible for the wettability improvement of the fiber cord when passing through the plasma zone at a linear speed of 3 m/min to 8 m/min. The specimens of modified-polyester fiber reinforced rubber composite were also prepared for the interfacial shear strength tests. Furthermore, the effect of adding oxygen into argon discharge on the fiber surface oxidation was correlated with optical emission spectroscopy. Finally, the effect of adding oxygen into argon discharge on the kinetic processes of the active species generation were also analyzed.

  8. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks - Part I: Stationary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes numerical simulations, using thermal networks, of shield temperatures and radiative and conductive heat losses of a super-insulated cryogenic storage tank operating at 77 K. Interactions between radiation and conductive heat transfer modes in the shields are investigated, by calculation of local shield temperatures. As a new method, fluid networks are introduced for calculation of stationary residual gas pressure distribution in the evacuated multilayer super-insulation. Output from the fluid network is coupled to the iterative thermal network calculations. Parameter tests concern thickness and emissivity of shields, degree of perforation, residual gas sources like desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls, and permeation from the inner container to the evacuated insulation space. Variations of either a conductive (thickness of Al-film on Mylar) or a radiative parameter (thermal emissivity) exert crosswise influences on the radiative or conductive heat losses of the tank, respectively.

  9. Combustion Dynamics and Stability Modeling of a Liquid Oxygen/RP-2 Oxygen-Rich Staged Combustion Preburner and Thrust Chamber Assembly with Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injector Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casiano, M. J.; Kenny, R. J.; Protz, C. S.; Garcia, C. P.; Simpson, S. P.; Elmore, J. L.; Fischbach, S. R.; Giacomoni, C. B.; Hulka, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Combustion Stability Tool Development (CSTD) project, funded by the Air Force Space and Missile Systems Center, began in March 2015 supporting a renewed interest in the development of a liquid oxygen/hydrocarbon, oxygen-rich combustion engine. The project encompasses the design, assembly, and hot-fire testing of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center 40-klbf Integrated Test Rig (MITR). The test rig models a staged-combustion configuration by combining an oxygen-rich preburner (ORPB), to generate hot gas, with a thrust chamber assembly (TCA) using gas-centered swirl coaxial injector elements. There are five separately designed interchangeable injectors in the TCA that each contain 19- or 27- injector elements. A companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes the design characteristics, rationale, and fabrication issues for all the injectors. The data acquired from a heavily instrumented rig encompasses several injectors, several operating points, and stability bomb tests. Another companion paper in this JANNAF conference describes this test program in detail. In this paper, dynamic data from the hot-fire testing is characterized and used to identify the responses in the ORPB and TCA. A brief review of damping metrics are discussed and applied as a measure of stability margin for damped acoustic modes. Chug and longitudinal combustion stability models and predictions are described which includes new dynamic models for compressible flow through an orifice and a modification to incorporate a third feed line for inclusion of the fuel-film coolant. Flow-acoustics finite element modeling is used to investigate the anticipated TCA acoustics, the effects of injector element length on stability margin, and the potential use of an ORPB orifice trip ring for improving longitudinal stability margin.

  10. Pre-dive Whole-Body Vibration Better Reduces Decompression-Induced Vascular Gas Emboli than Oxygenation or a Combination of Both

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Costantino; Theunissen, Sigrid; Papadopoulou, Virginie; Le Mener, Cedric; Germonpré, Peter; Guerrero, François; Lafère, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Since non-provocative dive profiles are no guarantor of protection against decompression sickness, novel means including pre-dive “preconditioning” interventions, are proposed for its prevention. This study investigated and compared the effect of pre-dive oxygenation, pre-dive whole body vibration or a combination of both on post-dive bubble formation. Methods: Six healthy volunteers performed 6 no-decompression dives each, to a depth of 33 mfw for 20 min (3 control dives without preconditioning and 1 of each preconditioning protocol) with a minimum interval of 1 week between each dive. Post-dive bubbles were counted in the precordium by two-dimensional echocardiography, 30 and 90 min after the dive, with and without knee flexing. Each diver served as his own control. Results: Vascular gas emboli (VGE) were systematically observed before and after knee flexing at each post-dive measurement. Compared to the control dives, we observed a decrease in VGE count of 23.8 ± 7.4% after oxygen breathing (p < 0.05), 84.1 ± 5.6% after vibration (p < 0.001), and 55.1 ± 9.6% after vibration combined with oxygen (p < 0.001). The difference between all preconditioning methods was statistically significant. Conclusions: The precise mechanism that induces the decrease in post-dive VGE and thus makes the diver more resistant to decompression stress is still not known. However, it seems that a pre-dive mechanical reduction of existing gas nuclei might best explain the beneficial effects of this strategy. The apparent non-synergic effect of oxygen and vibration has probably to be understood because of different mechanisms involved. PMID:27965591

  11. Breathe softly, beetle: continuous gas exchange, water loss and the role of the subelytral space in the tenebrionid beetle, Eleodes obscura.

    PubMed

    Schilman, Pablo E; Kaiser, Alexander; Lighton, John R B

    2008-01-01

    Flightless, diurnal tenebrionid beetles are commonly found in deserts. They possess a curious morphological adaptation, the subelytral cavity (an air space beneath the fused elytra) the function of which is not completely understood. In the tenebrionid beetle Eleodes obscura, we measured abdominal movements within the subelytral cavity, and the activity of the pygidial cleft (which seals or unseals the subelytral cavity), simultaneously with total CO2 release rate and water loss rate. First, we found that E. obscura has the lowest cuticular permeability measured in flow-through respirometry in an insect (0.90 microg H2O cm(-2) Torr(-1) h(-1)). Second, it does not exhibit a discontinuous gas exchange cycle. Third, we describe the temporal coupling between gas exchange, water loss, subelytral space volume, and the capacity of the subelytral space to exchange gases with its surroundings as indicated by pygidial cleft state. Fourth, we suggest possible mechanisms that may reduce respiratory water loss rates in E. obscura. Finally, we suggest that E. obscura cannot exchange respiratory gases discontinuously because of a morphological constraint (small tracheal or spiracular conductance). This "conductance constraint hypothesis" may help to explain the otherwise puzzling phylogenetic patterns of continuous vs. discontinuous gas exchange observed in tracheate arthropods.

  12. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  13. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    PubMed

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  14. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 1: Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is the Final Report for Task 1, Cost Estimates of Small Modular Systems, as part of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 1.1 looked into processes and technologies that have been commercially built at both large and small scales, with three technologies, Fluidized Catalytic Cracking (FCC) of refinery gas oil, Steam Methane Reforming (SMR) of Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids (NGL) Expanders, chosen for further investigation. These technologies were chosen due to their applicability relative to other technologies being considered by NREL for future commercial applications, such as indirect gasification and fluidized bed tar cracking. Research in this subject is driven by an interest in the impact that scaling has on the cost and major process unit designs for commercial technologies. Conclusions from the evaluations performed could be applied to other technologies being considered for modular or skid-mounted applications.

  15. Analysis and modeling of PEM fuel cell stack performance: Effect of in situ reverse water gas shift reaction and oxygen bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, G.; Li, Xianguo

    In this study the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack is analyzed with a mathematical model when the stack operates on hydrocarbon reformate gas as the anode feed stream. It is shown that the effect of carbon dioxide dilution of the hydrogen dominated reformate gas has a minimal impact on the stack performance. However, the CO-poisoning effect due to the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction in the anode feed stream could have a very serious adverse impact on the stack performance, especially at high current densities. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the equilibrium concentrations of CO could be as high as 100 ppm, generated by the in situ reverse water gas shift reaction, under the typical conditions of PEM fuel cell operation; and are influenced by the stack operating temperature and water content of the reformate anode feed. This CO-poisoning of the stack performance is shown mitigated effectively by introducing about 0.5-1% oxygen to the anode feed.

  16. Adsorption of SF6 decomposed gas on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces with oxygen defect: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Chen, Qinchuan; Tang, Ju; Hu, Weihua; Zhang, Jinbin

    2014-04-23

    The detection of partial discharge by analyzing the components of SF6 gas in gas-insulated switchgears is important to the diagnosis and assessment of the operational state of power equipment. A gas sensor based on anatase TiO2 is used to detect decomposed gases in SF6. In this paper, first-principle density functional theory calculations are adopted to analyze the adsorption of SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2, the primary decomposition by-products of SF6 under partial discharge, on anatase (101) and (001) surfaces. Simulation results show that the perfect anatase (001) surface has a stronger interaction with the three gases than that of anatase (101), and both surfaces are more sensitive and selective to SO2 than to SOF2 and SO2F2. The selection of a defect surface to SO2, SOF2, and SO2F2 differs from that of a perfect surface. This theoretical result is corroborated by the sensing experiment using a TiO2 nanotube array (TNTA) gas sensor. The calculated values are analyzed to explain the results of the Pt-doped TNTA gas sensor sensing experiment. The results imply that the deposited Pt nanoparticles on the surface increase the active sites of the surface and the gas molecules may decompose upon adsorption on the active sites.

  17. Windage Power Loss in Gas Foil Bearings and the Rotor-Stator Clearance of High Speed Generators Operating in High Pressure Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruckner, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) and Closed Supercritical Cycle (CSC) engines are prime candidates to convert heat from a reactor into electric power for robotic space exploration and habitation. These engine concepts incorporate a permanent magnet starter/generator mounted on the engine shaft along with the requisite turbomachinery. Successful completion of the long-duration missions currently anticipated for these engines will require designs that adequately address all losses within the machine. The preliminary thermal management concept for these engine types is to use the cycle working fluid to provide the required cooling. In addition to providing cooling, the working fluid will also serve as the bearing lubricant. Additional requirements, due to the unique application of these microturbines, are zero contamination of the working fluid and entirely maintenance-free operation for many years. Losses in the gas foil bearings and within the rotor-stator gap of the generator become increasingly important as both rotational speed and mean operating pressure are increased. This paper presents the results of an experimental study, which obtained direct torque measurements on gas foil bearings and generator rotor-stator gaps. Test conditions for these measurements included rotational speeds up to 42,000 revolutions per minute, pressures up to 45 atmospheres, and test gases of nitrogen, helium, and carbon dioxide. These conditions provided a maximum test Taylor number of nearly one million. The results show an exponential rise in power loss as mean operating density is increased for both the gas foil bearing and generator windage. These typical "secondary" losses can become larger than the total system output power if conventional design paradigms are followed. A nondimensional analysis is presented to extend the experimental results into the CSC range for the generator windage.

  18. Study of a blast-furnace smelting technology which involves the injection of pulverized-coal fuel, natural gas, and an oxygen-enriched blast into the hearth

    SciTech Connect

    Ryzhenkov, A.N.; Yaroshevskii, S.L.; Zamuruev, V.P.; Popov, V.E.; Afanas'eva, Z.K.

    2006-05-15

    Studies were made of features of a blast-furnace smelting technology that involves the injection of natural gas (NG), oxygen (O{sub 2}) and pulverized-coal fuel (PCF) into the hearth. The technology has been implemented in the compensation and overcompensation regimes, which has made it possible to maintain or improve the gas dynamics of the furnace, the conditions for the reduction of iron oxides, the heating of the charge, and PCF combustion in the tuyere zone as PCF consumption is increased and coke use is decreased. Under the given conditions, with the blast having an oxygen content of 25.64-25.7%, the hearth injection of 131-138 kg PCF and 65-69 m{sup 3} NG for each ton of pig iron has made it possible to reduce coke consumption by 171-185 kg/ton pig (30.2-32.7%), reduce the consumption of comparison fuel by 36-37 kg/ton (5.2-5.3%), and lower the production cost of the pig iron by 43-49 hryvnas/ton (3.7-6.4%). Here, furnace productivity has increased 3.8-6.5%, while the quality of the conversion pig iron remains the same as before. Measures are being implemented to further increase the level and efficiency of PCF use.

  19. Gas transfer velocities for quantifying methane, oxygen and other gas fluxes through the air-water interface of wetlands with emergent vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Empirical models for the gas transfer velocity, k, in the ocean, lakes and rivers are fairly well established, but there are few data to predict k for wetlands. We have conducted experiments in a simulated emergent marsh in the laboratory to explore the relationship between k, wind shear and thermal convection. Now we identify the implications of these results for gas transfer in actual wetlands by (1) quantifying the range of wind conditions in emergent vegetation canopies and the range of thermal convection intensities in wetland water columns, and (2) describing the non-linear interaction of these two stirring forces over their relevant ranges in wetlands. We measured mean wind speeds and wind speed variance within the shearless region of a Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh canopy in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Northern California, USA). The mean wind speed within this region, , is significantly smaller than wind above the canopy. Based on our laboratory experiments, for calm or even average wind conditions in this emergent marsh k600 is only on the order 0.1 cm hr-1 (for neutrally or stably stratified water columns). We parameterize unstable thermal stratification and the resulting thermal convection using the heat flux through the air-water interface, q. We analyzed a water temperature record for the Schoenoplectus-Typha marsh to obtain a long-term heat flux record. We used these heat flux data along with short-term heat flux data from other wetlands in the literature to identify the range of the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection in wetlands. The typical range of heat fluxes through water columns shaded by closed emergent canopies (-200 W m-2 to +200 W m-2) yields k600 values of 0.5 - 2.5 cm hr-1 according to the model we developed in the laboratory. Thus for calm or average wind conditions, the gas transfer velocity associated with thermal convection is significantly larger than the gas transfer velocity associated with wind

  20. Quantifying the loss of processed natural gas within California's South Coast Air Basin using long-term measurements of ethane and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Hedelius, Jacob K.; Vizenor, Nicholas; Roehl, Coleen M.; Saad, Katherine M.; Blavier, Jean-François L.; Blake, Donald R.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2016-11-01

    Methane emissions inventories for Southern California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) have underestimated emissions from atmospheric measurements. To provide insight into the sources of the discrepancy, we analyze records of atmospheric trace gas total column abundances in the SoCAB starting in the late 1980s to produce annual estimates of the ethane emissions from 1989 to 2015 and methane emissions from 2007 to 2015. The first decade of measurements shows a rapid decline in ethane emissions coincident with decreasing natural gas and crude oil production in the basin. Between 2010 and 2015, however, ethane emissions have grown gradually from about 13 ± 5 to about 23 ± 3 Gg yr-1, despite the steady production of natural gas and oil over that time period. The methane emissions record begins with 1 year of measurements in 2007 and continuous measurements from 2011 to 2016 and shows little trend over time, with an average emission rate of 413 ± 86 Gg yr-1. Since 2012, ethane to methane ratios in the natural gas withdrawn from a storage facility within the SoCAB have been increasing by 0.62 ± 0.05 % yr-1, consistent with the ratios measured in the delivered gas. Our atmospheric measurements also show an increase in these ratios but with a slope of 0.36 ± 0.08 % yr-1, or 58 ± 13 % of the slope calculated from the withdrawn gas. From this, we infer that more than half of the excess methane in the SoCAB between 2012 and 2015 is attributable to losses from the natural gas infrastructure.

  1. Hydrogen production with CO 2 capture by coupling steam reforming of methane and chemical-looping combustion: Use of an iron-based waste product as oxygen carrier burning a PSA tail gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, María; Gayán, Pilar; de Diego, Luis F.; García-Labiano, Francisco; Abad, Alberto; Pans, Miguel A.; Adánez, Juan

    In this work it is analyzed the performance of an iron waste material as oxygen carrier for a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) system. CLC is a novel combustion technology with the benefit of inherent CO 2 separation that can be used as a source of energy for the methane steam reforming process (SR). The tail gas from the PSA unit is used as fuel in the CLC system. The oxygen carrier behaviour with respect to gas combustion was evaluated in a continuous 500 W th CLC prototype using a simulated PSA off-gas stream as fuel. Methane or syngas as fuel were also studied for comparison purposes. The oxygen carrier showed enough high oxygen transport capacity and reactivity to fully convert syngas at 880 °C. However, lower conversion of the fuel was observed with methane containing fuels. An estimated solids inventory of 1600 kg MW th -1 would be necessary to fully convert the PSA off-gas to CO 2 and H 2O. An important positive effect of the oxygen carrier-to-fuel ratio up to 1.5 and the reactor temperature on the combustion efficiency was found. A characterization of the calcined and after-used particles was carried out showing that this iron-based material can be used as oxygen carrier in a CLC plant since particles maintain their properties (reactivity, no agglomeration, high durability, etc.) after more than 111 h of continuous operation.

  2. [The gas chromatographic determination of sulfur- and oxygen-containing organic compounds released into the air of cellulose sulfate works].

    PubMed

    Taranenko, N A; Dorogova, V B

    1992-01-01

    The article presents data on the design of sensitive, selective, useful in group analysis method to detect dimethylsulphide, dimethyldisulphide, acetic, propionic, butyric and valeric acids, methyl alcohol and phenol by means of gas chromatography in the air of cellulose sulphate production working zone. The methods were tested in examining the work conditions in Bratsk found-lavage shops.

  3. Synthesis of a further improved porous polymer for the separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide by gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.

    1986-01-01

    A further improvement has been made in the synthesis of an N-type porous polymer for the separation of permanent gases. Changing the ratios of reactants and diluting the Hi-DVB with styrene led to a porous polymer gas chromatographic packing which is superior to commercial products and to the author's own previously reported custom-made polymer.

  4. Sudden Deaths Among Oil and Gas Extraction Workers Resulting from Oxygen Deficiency and Inhalation of Hydrocarbon Gases and Vapors - United States, January 2010-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Robert J; Retzer, Kyla; Kosnett, Michael J; Hodgson, Michael; Jordan, Todd; Ridl, Sophia; Kiefer, Max

    2016-01-15

    In 2013, an occupational medicine physician from the University of California, San Francisco, contacted CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) about two oil and gas extraction worker deaths in the western United States. The suspected cause of these deaths was exposure to hydrocarbon gases and vapors (HGVs) and oxygen (O2)-deficient atmospheres after opening the hatches of hydrocarbon storage tanks. The physician and experts from NIOSH and OSHA reviewed available fatality reports from January 2010 to March 2015, and identified seven additional deaths with similar characteristics (nine total deaths). Recommendations were made to industry and regulators regarding the hazards associated with opening hatches of tanks, and controls to reduce or eliminate the potential for HGV exposure were proposed. Health care professionals who treat or evaluate oil and gas workers need to be aware that workers might report symptoms of exposure to high concentrations of HGVs and possible O2 deficiency; employers and workers need to be aware of this hazard and know how to limit exposure. Medical examiners investigating the death of oil and gas workers who open tank hatches should consider the contribution of O2 deficiency and HGV exposure.

  5. Three annual flue gas desulfurization gypsum applications on macronutrient and micronutrient losses in runoff from bermudagrass fertilized with poultry litter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Considerable amounts of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum are being produced as a by-product of generating electricity. As a result, beneficial reuse of this by-product is being sought to reduce landfilling and its associated cost. The use of this byproduct as a low-cost soil amendment for suppl...

  6. The use of high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy for refining the infrared optical constants of GaS, GaSe, and InSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li-Ming; Thiry, P. A.; Degiovanni, A.; Conard, Th.; Leclerc, G.; Caudano, R.; Lambin, Ph.; Debever, J.-M.

    1994-06-01

    Cleaved surfaces of III-VI lamellar semiconducting compounds GaS, GaSe, and InSe have been studied by high resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The infrared optical constants of the materials were retrieved by using the dielectric theory taking account of the resonance frequencies published from infrared reflectivity (IRS) data. The limitations of the HREELS and IRS measurements in the case of these materials are discussed in detail. However, it is shown that, by combining the informations from both spectroscopies, it is possible to refine some of the oscillator strengths of these materials.

  7. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Wood Feedstock

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for treatment of wood-derived syngas for use in the synthesis of liquid fuels. Two different 2,000 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, a low-pressure, indirect system using the gasifier, and a high-pressure, direct system using gasification technology were evaluated. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  8. Regulation of acid-base status in ectothermic vertebrates: the consequences for oxygen pressures in lung gas and arterial blood.

    PubMed

    Glass, M L; Soncini, R

    1995-01-01

    Extensive literature reports a negative delta pHa/delta t in ectothermic vertebrates, but data are scarce as to its consequences for O2 transport. In reptiles, the negative delta pHa/delta t results from an elevated lung gas PCO2 (PACO2) at higher temperatures, implying a corresponding fall of PAO2. In parallel, arterial PO2 rises with temperature, due to a combination of central vascular shunt and decreasing Hb.O2 affinity. As a result, the PO2 gradient between lung gas and blood (PA-aO2) becomes reduced at higher temperatures. In amphibians, the negative delta pHa/delta t results from combined cutaneous and pulmonary CO2 elimination. We propose that this leads to a rather temperature-independent lung gas PO2. Moreover, our calculations suggest that resting reptiles and amphibians maintain a relatively large PA-aO2 also at high temperatures. The negative delta pHa/delta t in teleost fish is generally considered to be a result of modulated plasma [HCO3-]. Recent data from our laboratory suggest that acute pH adjustments at high temperatures may involve alterations of PaCO2 through gill ventilation, leading to a decrease of PaO2 with rising temperature.

  9. Energy loss in gas-surface dynamics: Electron-hole pair and phonon excitation upon adsorbate relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novko, D.; Blanco-Rey, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Alducin, M.

    2016-09-01

    We study the effect of electron and phonon degrees of freedom on the relaxation dynamics of adsorption processes in gas-surface systems by using ab initio molecular dynamics that incorporates an electronic friction force (AIMDEF). As representative cases we have chosen three systems with different adsorption energies and adsorbate-to-surface atom mass ratios: H on Pd(1 0 0), N on Ag(1 1 1), and N2 on Fe(1 1 0). We show, through inspection of the total energies and trajectories of the hot adsorbates on the surface, that electron-hole (e-h) pair excitations dominate relaxation of the light gas species, while the phonon channel is dominant for the heavy species. In the latter case e-h pairs become more important at the final thermalization stages.

  10. Production of reactive oxygen species by withaferin A causes loss of type collagen expression and COX-2 expression through the PI3K/Akt, p38, and JNK pathways in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song-Ja

    2013-11-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is a major chemical constituent of Withania somnifera, also known as Indian ginseng. Many recent reports have provided evidence of its anti-tumor, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant, and immune modulatory activities. Although the compound appears to have a large number of effects, its defined mechanisms of action have not yet been determined. We investigated the effects of WFA on loss of type collagen expression and inflammation in rabbit articular chondrocytes. WFA increased the production of reactive oxygen species, suggesting the induction of oxidative stress, in a dose-dependent manner. Also, we confirmed that WFA causes loss of type collagen expression and inflammation as determined by a decrease of type II collagen expression and an increase of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression via western blot analysis in a dose- and time- dependent manner. WFA also reduced the synthesis of sulfated proteoglycan via Alcian blue staining and caused the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) via assay kit in dose- and time-dependent manners. Treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, inhibited WFA-induced loss of type II collagen expression and increase in COX-2 expression, accompanied by inhibition of reactive oxygen species production. WFA increased phosphorylation of both Akt and p38. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt, p38, and JNK with LY294002 (LY), SB203580 (SB), or SP600125 (SP) in WFA-treated cells rescued the expression of type II collagen and suppressed the expression of COX-2. These results demonstrate that WFA induces loss of type collagen expression and inflammation via PI3K/Akt, p38, and JNK by generating reactive oxygen species in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

  11. GAS EXCHANGE WITH MASS CULTURES OF ALGAE. I. EFFECTS OF LIGHT INTENSITY AND RATE OF CARBON DIOXIDE INPUT ON OXYGEN PRODUCTION.

    PubMed

    HANNAN, P J; PATOUILLET, C

    1963-09-01

    The performance of a small photosynthetic gas exchanger is described in which simultaneous measurements of suspension density, O(2) production, and CO(2) absorption are readily accomplished. The volume of suspension was 6200 ml. With the Sorokin strain of Chlorella pyrenoidosa 7-11-05, this unit produced 4500 cc of O(2) per hr at a light intensity of 34,000 ft-c from each of six Quartzline lamps. At any given light intensity, the O(2) production was proportional to the rate of CO(2) input up to a maximum. The impetus for this study was the consideration of the algal system as a means of oxygen generation in a submarine. Based on the performance of this unit, the power requirement per man for a system having the geometry described would be 52 kw, but reasons are given for the hope that this may be reduced to less than 5 kw.

  12. Determination of local concentration of H2O molecules and gas temperature in the process of hydrogen - oxygen gas mixture heating by means of linear and nonlinear laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, D. N.; Kobtsev, V. D.; Stel'makh, O. M.; Smirnov, Valery V.; Stepanov, E. V.

    2013-01-01

    Employing the methods of linear absorption spectroscopy and nonlinear four-wave mixing spectroscopy using laserinduced gratings we have simultaneously measured the local concentrations of H2O molecules and the gas temperature in the process of the H2 - O2 mixture heating. During the measurements of the deactivation rates of pulsed-laser excited singlet oxygen O2 (b 1Σ+g) in collisions with H2 in the range 294 - 850 K, the joint use of the two methods made it possible to determine the degree of hydrogen oxidation at a given temperature. As the mixture is heated, H2O molecules are formed by 'dark' reactions of H2 with O2 in the ground state. The experiments have shown that the measurements of tunable diode laser radiation absorption along an optical path through the inhomogeneously heated gas mixture in a cell allows high-accuracy determination of the local H2O concentration in the O2 laser excitation volume, if the gas temperature in this volume is known. When studying the collisional deactivation of O2 (b 1Σ+g) molecules, the necessary measurements of the local temperature can be implemented using laser-induced gratings, arising due to spatially periodic excitation of O2 (X3Σ-g) molecules to the b 1Σ+g state by radiation of the pump laser of the four-wave mixing spectrometer.

  13. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2: Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates -- Black Liquor Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    As part of Task 2, Gas Cleanup and Cost Estimates, Nexant investigated the appropriate process scheme for removal of acid gases from black liquor-derived syngas for use in both power and liquid fuels synthesis. Two 3,200 metric tonne per day gasification schemes, both low-temperature/low-pressure (1100 deg F, 40 psi) and high-temperature/high-pressure (1800 deg F, 500 psi) were used for syngas production. Initial syngas conditions from each of the gasifiers was provided to the team by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Princeton University. Nexant was the prime contractor and principal investigator during this task; technical assistance was provided by both GTI and Emery Energy.

  14. Optoacoustic measurements of human placenta and umbilical blood oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanovskaya, T. N.; Petrov, I. Y.; Petrov, Y.; Patrikeeva, S. L.; Ahmed, M. S.; Hankins, G. D. V.; Prough, D. S.; Esenaliev, R. O.

    2016-03-01

    Adequate oxygenation is essential for normal embryogenesis and fetal growth. Perturbations in the intrauterine oxidative environment during pregnancy are associated with several pathophysiological disorders such as pregnancy loss, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. We proposed to use optoacoustic technology for monitoring placental and fetal umbilical blood oxygenation. In this work, we studied optoacoustic monitoring of oxygenation in placenta and umbilical cord blood ex vivo using technique of placenta perfusion. We used a medical grade, nearinfrared, tunable, optoacoustic system developed and built for oxygenation monitoring in blood vessels and in tissues. First, we calibrated the system for cord blood oxygenation measurements by using a CO-Oximeter (gold standard). Then we performed validation in cord blood circulating through the catheters localized on the fetal side of an isolated placental lobule. Finally, the oxygenation measurements were performed in the perfused placental tissue. To increase or decrease blood oxygenation, we used infusion of a gas mixture of 95% O2 + 5% CO2 and 95% N2 + 5% CO2, respectively. In placental tissue, up to four cycles of changes in oxygenation were performed. The optoacoustically measured oxygenation in circulating cord blood and in placental lobule closely correlated with the actual oxygenation data measured by CO-Oximeter. We plan to further test the placental and cord blood oxygenation monitoring with optoacoustics in animal and clinical studies.

  15. Use of gas-phase photoadsorption generator of singlet oxygen for the liquid-phase oxidation of organic substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Tolstikov, G.A.; Dzhemilev, U.M.; Kazakov, V.P.; Ostakhov, S.S.; Sharipov, G.L.; Voloshin, A.I.

    1986-04-01

    This paper shows that it is possible and preferable to use the heterogeneous photogeneration of /sup 1/O/sub 2/ in the preparation of unstable 1,2-dioxetanes. The /sup 1/O/sub 2/ generator employed took the form of a Pyrex tube packed with Raschig rings which were coated with a sensitizer - methylene blue. The use of a singlet oxygen generator makes it possible to avoid contamination of the product by the sensitizer and thereby eliminates the isolation stage, which is laborious and in the case of unstable products not always possible. In spite of the lower efficiency of the method, the use of a photoadsorption /sup 1/O/sub 2/ generator is to be preferred for the preparation of unstable products.

  16. Inhibiting effect of sulfur and oxygen compounds on carbazole hydrogenitrogenation on NiMo/Al sub 2 O sub 3 catalysts and relation to gas-phase acidity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, M.; Ogino, T. )

    1987-04-01

    The inhibiting effect of various sulfur and oxygen compounds on carbazole hydrodenitrogenation on NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts has been studied. The reactions were carried out with a flow microreactor at 260-360{degree}C and 10.1 MPa total pressure. A major denitrogenated product was bicyclohexyl, and a hydrogenated compound was tetrahydrocarbazole, accompanied by small amounts of perhydrocarbazole and hexahydrocarbazole. Sulfidation of the reduced catalyst increased the activity of the catalyst at all temperatures. At 360{degree}C, the presence of the sulfur and oxygen compounds depressed the denitrogenation of perhydrocarbazole to bicyclohexyl on the reduced and sulfided catalyst which was a rate-determining step. At lower temperatures, all the additives affected the hydrogenation of carbazole to tetrahydrocarbazole which was not in equilibrium and resulted in a decrease of denitrogenation. The denitrogenation of perhydrocarbazole was assumed to follow the Langmuir-type equation, allowing for competitive adsorption of perhydrocarbazole and additives on the denitrogenated sites. The relationship between the inhibiting effect of the additives and their gas-phase acidity was also discussed.

  17. Oxygen transport from the atmosphere to soil gas beneath a slab-on-grade foundation overlying petroleum-impacted soil.

    PubMed

    Lundegard, Paul D; Johnson, Paul C; Dahlen, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Modeling and field study results suggest that, in the case of a building overlying an aerobically biodegradable vapor source (i.e., petroleum-impacted soil), the significance of vapor intrusion into the building depends on the source vapor concentration, the relative position of the vapor source and building, and the rate of O2 transport from the atmosphere to the soil gas beneath the building. This work quantified the latter at a house having about a 250 m2 slab-on-grade foundation footprint. It was constructed on 1.5 m of clean fill overlying a petroleum hydrocarbon-impacted soil layer undergoing methanogenesis. Soil gas O2 and CH4 profiles adjacent to and beneath the foundation were measured and then the soil gas beneath the slab was rapidly displaced with N2. The natural replenishment of O2 was monitored for 90 days using in situ O2 sensors, and the responses with time were similar, independent of location. The O2 replenishment rate was about 2500 g-O2/d immediately after the N2 flood and then it declined to 200-500 g-O2/d over 30 days. Weather events affected the O2 replenishment rate; an increase occurred during a strong wind period (> 3 m/s), and a decrease occurred during a heavy rainfall event. The spatial and temporal patterns in the O2 sensor responses and quantified O2 replenishment rates could not be accounted for by simple mechanistic hypotheses involving lateral diffusion or advection through the bulk soil, and instead the data suggest rapid replenishment immediately below the foundation followed by downward diffusion.

  18. Effect of the hemoglobin-based oxygen carrier HBOC-201 on laboratory instrumentation: cobas integra, chiron blood gas analyzer 840, Sysmex SE-9000 and BCT.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Peek, D; Scholten, R; Moreira, P; Gawryl, M; Clark, T; Westerhuis, L

    1999-01-01

    As part of a clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of the hemoglobin-based oxygen-carrier (HBOC) HBOC-201 (an ultrapurified, stroma-free bovine hemoglobin product, Biopure, Cambridge, MA, USA) on our routine clinical chemistry analyzer (Cobas Integra, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland ), blood gas analyzer (Chiron 840, Chiron Diagnostics Corporation, East Walpole, MA, USA), routine hemocytometry analyzer (Sysmex SE-9000, TOA Medical Electronics Co Ltd., Kobe, Japan), hemostasis analyzer (BCT, Dade-Behring, Marburg, Germany) and bloodbanking system (Dia-Med-ID Micro Typing System, DiaMed AG, Cressier, Switzerland). The maximum tested concentration of HBOC-201 was 65 g/l. Of the 27 routine clinical chemistry tests challenged with HBOC-201, bilirubin-direct, creatine kinase MB-fraction (CK-MB), creatine kinase (CK), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), magnesium and uric acid were influenced by even low concentrations of HBOC-201. These tests were excluded from use on the plasma of patients treated with HBOC-201. Since the non-availability of the cardiac marker CK-MB may lead to problems in acute situations, we introduced the qualitative Trop T-test (Boehringer Mannheim), which was not influenced. The applicability of another nine tests was limited by the concentration of the HBOC-201 in the patients' plasma. No interference of HBOC-201 in routine hemocytometry, hemostasis-analysis and red-blood cell agglutination detection (blood-bank tests) was observed. Although immediate patient-care was not compromised, routine use of hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers will have a strong impact on logistical management. The development of robust laboratory tests free from the interference of the pigmented oxygen carriers should therefore precede its introduction into routine transfusion medicine.

  19. High-temperature pyrolysis/gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry: simultaneous measurement of the stable isotopes of oxygen and carbon in cellulose.

    PubMed

    Woodley, Ewan J; Loader, Neil J; McCarroll, Danny; Young, Giles H F; Robertson, Iain; Heaton, Timothy H E; Gagen, Mary H; Warham, Joseph O

    2012-01-30

    Stable isotope analysis of cellulose is an increasingly important aspect of ecological and palaeoenvironmental research. Since these techniques are very costly, any methodological development which can provide simultaneous measurement of stable carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in cellulose deserves further exploration. A large number (3074) of tree-ring α-cellulose samples are used to compare the stable carbon isotope ratios (δ(13)C) produced by high-temperature (1400°C) pyrolysis/gas chromatography (GC)/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) with those produced by combustion GC/IRMS. Although the two data sets are very strongly correlated, the pyrolysis results display reduced variance and are strongly biased towards the mean. The low carbon isotope ratios of tree-ring cellulose during the last century, reflecting anthropogenic disturbance of atmospheric carbon dioxide, are thus overestimated. The likely explanation is that a proportion of the oxygen atoms are bonding with residual carbon in the reaction chamber to form carbon monoxide. The 'pyrolysis adjustment', proposed here, is based on combusting a stratified sub-sample of the pyrolysis results, across the full range of carbon isotope ratios, and using the paired results to define a regression equation that can be used to adjust all the pyrolysis measurements. In this study, subsamples of 30 combustion measurements produced adjusted chronologies statistically indistinguishable from those produced by combusting every sample. This methodology allows simultaneous measurement of the stable isotopes of carbon and oxygen using high-temperature pyrolysis, reducing the amount of sample required and the analytical costs of measuring them separately.

  20. Studies on the room temperature growth of nanoanatase phase TiO2 thin films by pulsed dc magnetron with oxygen as sputter gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karuppasamy, A.; Subrahmanyam, A.

    2007-03-01

    The anatase phase titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin films were deposited at room temperature by pulsed dc magnetron sputtering using pure oxygen as sputter gas. The structural, optical, electrical, and electrochromic properties of the films have been studied as a function of oxygen pressure in the chamber. The x-ray diffraction results indicate that the films grown above 4.5×10-2mbar are nanocrystalline (grain size of 28-43nm) with anatase phase. The films deposited at the chamber pressure of 7.2×10-2mbar are found to be highly crystalline with a direct optical band gap of 3.40eV, refractive index of 2.54 (at λ =400nm), and work function of 4.77eV (determined by the Kelvin probe measurements). From the optical emission spectra of the plasma and transport of ions in matter calculations, we find that the crystallization of TiO2 at room temperature is due to the impingement of electrons and ions on the growing films. Particularly, the negative oxygen ions reflected from the target by "negative ion effects" and the enhanced density of TiO, TiO +, TiO2+, and O2+ particles in the plasma are found to improve the crystallization even at a relatively low temperature. From an application point of view, the film grown at 7.2×10-2mbar was studied for its electrochromic properties by protonic intercalation. It showed good electrochromic behavior with an optical modulation of ˜45%, coloration efficiency of 14.7 cm2C-1, and switching time (tc) of 50s for a 2×2 cm2 device at λ =633nm.

  1. Effect of phytoremediation on concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site, Charleston, South Carolina, USA, 1998–2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landmeyer, James E.; Effinger, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of benzene, toluene, naphthalene, and dissolved oxygen in groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site near Charleston, South Carolina, USA, have been monitored since the installation of a phytoremediation system of hybrid poplar trees in 1998. Between 2000 and 2014, the concentrations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene (BT&N) in groundwater in the planted area have decreased. For example, in the monitoring well containing the highest concentrations of BT&N, benzene concentrations decreased from 10,200 µg/L to less than 4000 µg/L, toluene concentrations decreased from 2420 µg/L to less than 20 µg/L, and naphthalene concentrations decreased from 6840 µg/L to less than 3000 µg/L. Concentrations of BT&N in groundwater in all wells were observed to be lower during the summer months relative to the winter months of a particular year during the first few years after installing the phytoremediation system, most likely due to increased transpiration and contaminant uptake by the hybrid poplar trees during the warm summer months; this pathway of uptake by trees was confirmed by the detection of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene in trees during sampling events in 2002, and later in the study in 2012. These data suggest that the phytoremediation system affects the groundwater contaminants on a seasonal basis and, over multiple years, has resulted in a cumulative decrease in dissolved-phase contaminant concentrations in groundwater. The removal of dissolved organic contaminants from the aquifer has resulted in a lower demand on dissolved oxygen supplied by recharge and, as a result, the redox status of the groundwater has changed from anoxic to oxic conditions. This study provides much needed information for water managers and other scientists on the viability of the long-term effectiveness of phytoremediation in decreasing groundwater contaminants and increasing dissolved oxygen at sites contaminated by benzene, toluene, and naphthalene.

  2. Hot precursor reactions during the collisions of gas-phase oxygen atoms with deuterium chemisorbed on Pt(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Heywood H.; Shumbera, R. Bradley; Weaver, Jason F.

    2007-04-01

    We utilized direct rate measurements and temperature programmed desorption to investigate reactions that occur during the collisions of gaseous oxygen atoms with deuterium-covered Pt(100). We find that both D2O and D2 desorb promptly when an oxygen atom beam impinges upon D-covered Pt(100) held at surface temperatures ranging from 90to150K, and estimate effective cross sections of 12 and 1.8Å2, respectively, for the production of gaseous D2O and D2 at 90K. The yields of D2O and D2 that desorb at 90K are about 13% and 2%, respectively, of the initial D atom coverage, though most of the D2O product molecules (˜80%) thermalize to the surface rather than desorb at the surface temperatures studied. Increasing the surface temperature from 90to150K causes the D2O desorption rate to decay more quickly during O atom exposures to the surface and results in lower yields of gaseous D2O. We attribute the production of D2O and D2 in these experiments to reactions involving intermediates that are not thermally accommodated to the surface, so-called hot precursors. The results are consistent with the production of hot D2O involving first the generation of hot OD groups from the reaction O*+D(a)→OD*, where the asterisk denotes a hot precursor, followed by the parallel pathways OD *+D(a)→D2O* and OD *+OD(a)→D2O*+O(a). The final reaction contributes significantly to hot D2O production only later in the reaction period when thermalized OD groups have accumulated on the surface, and it becomes less important at higher temperature due to depletion of the OD(a) concentration by thermally activated D2O production.

  3. Hot precursor reactions during the collisions of gas-phase oxygen atoms with deuterium chemisorbed on Pt(100).

    PubMed

    Kan, Heywood H; Shumbera, R Bradley; Weaver, Jason F

    2007-04-07

    We utilized direct rate measurements and temperature programmed desorption to investigate reactions that occur during the collisions of gaseous oxygen atoms with deuterium-covered Pt(100). We find that both D2O and D2 desorb promptly when an oxygen atom beam impinges upon D-covered Pt(100) held at surface temperatures ranging from 90 to 150 K, and estimate effective cross sections of 12 and 1.8 A2, respectively, for the production of gaseous D2O and D2 at 90 K. The yields of D2O and D2 that desorb at 90 K are about 13% and 2%, respectively, of the initial D atom coverage, though most of the D2O product molecules (approximately 80%) thermalize to the surface rather than desorb at the surface temperatures studied. Increasing the surface temperature from 90 to 150 K causes the D2O desorption rate to decay more quickly during O atom exposures to the surface and results in lower yields of gaseous D2O. We attribute the production of D2O and D2 in these experiments to reactions involving intermediates that are not thermally accommodated to the surface, so-called hot precursors. The results are consistent with the production of hot D2O involving first the generation of hot OD groups from the reaction O*+D(a)-->OD*, where the asterisk denotes a hot precursor, followed by the parallel pathways OD*+D(a)-->D2O* and OD*+OD(a)-->D2O*+O(a). The final reaction contributes significantly to hot D2O production only later in the reaction period when thermalized OD groups have accumulated on the surface, and it becomes less important at higher temperature due to depletion of the OD(a) concentration by thermally activated D2O production.

  4. Gas chromatographic separation of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and carbon monoxide using custom-made porous polymers from high purity divinylbenzene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollock, G. E.; Ohara, D.; Hollis, O. L.

    1984-01-01

    Existing porous polymers were surveyed for their ability to separate the subject gases. Certain products that showed more promise than others were synthesized and the existing synthetic procedures studied and modified to produce new polymers with enhanced ability to separate the subject gases. Evaluation of the porous polymers was carried out practically by gas chromatography at ambient temperature. The modified synthetic procedures were somewhat simpler than the originals. The new porous polymers made with high purity divinylbenzene enabled use of shorter columns to obtain the separations desired.

  5. Versatile radar measurement of the electron loss rate in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogariu, Arthur; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2013-11-01

    We present an experimental method that makes possible in-situ measurements of the electron loss rate in arbitrary gas mixtures. A weakly ionized plasma is induced via resonant multiphoton ionization of trace amounts of nitric oxide seeded into the gas, and homodyne microwave scattering detection is used to study the dynamics of the electron loss mechanisms. Using this approach, the attachment rate for electrons to molecular oxygen in room temperature, atmospheric pressure air is determined. The measured 0.76 × 108 s-1 attachment rate is in very good agreement with predictions based on literature data.

  6. Versatile radar measurement of the electron loss rate in air

    SciTech Connect

    Dogariu, Arthur; Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2013-11-25

    We present an experimental method that makes possible in-situ measurements of the electron loss rate in arbitrary gas mixtures. A weakly ionized plasma is induced via resonant multiphoton ionization of trace amounts of nitric oxide seeded into the gas, and homodyne microwave scattering detection is used to study the dynamics of the electron loss mechanisms. Using this approach, the attachment rate for electrons to molecular oxygen in room temperature, atmospheric pressure air is determined. The measured 0.76 × 10{sup 8} s{sup −1} attachment rate is in very good agreement with predictions based on literature data.

  7. Determination of Oxygen by Means of a Biogas and Gas - Interference Study Using an Optical Tris (4,7-Diphenyl-1,10-Phenanthroline) Ruthenium(II) Dichloride Complex Sensor.

    PubMed

    Brglez, Polonca; Holobar, Andrej; Pivec, Aleksandra; Nataša, Belšak; Kolar, Mitja

    2012-03-01

    Biogas is a mixture of gases produced by anaerobic fermentation where biomass or animal waste is decomposed and methane and carbon dioxide are mainly released. Biogas also has a very high moisture content (up to 80%), temperatures of around 60 °C, high pressure, and can contain other gases (N2, H2S, NH3 and H2). We searched for an appropriate measuring system for the determining of oxygen in biogas, since the production process of biogas must be run under anaerobic conditions; as the presence of oxygen decreases the quality of the biogas. Ruthenium (II) complexes are by far the most widely-used oxygen dyes within optical oxygen sensors. In general, they have efficient luminescences, relatively long-life metal-ligand charge-transfer excited states, fast response times, strong visible absorptions, large Stokes shifts, and high-photochemical stability. The purpose of this work was to characterise and optimize an optical oxygen sensor using tris (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride complex for measuring oxygen. Different sensor properties were additionally studied, focusing on the interference of external light, temperature, and various gases. A special gas-mixing chamber was developed for gas interference study, and on-line experiments are presented for oxygen determination within the pilot biogas reactor.

  8. Delayed addition of nitrogen-rich substrates during composting of municipal waste: Effects on nitrogen loss, greenhouse gas emissions and compost stability.

    PubMed

    Nigussie, Abebe; Bruun, Sander; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Neergaard, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Municipal waste is usually composted with an N-rich substrate, such as manure, to increase the N content of the product. This means that a significant amount of nitrogen can be lost during composting. The objectives of this study were (i) to investigate the effect of split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate (poultry manure) on nitrogen losses and greenhouse gas emissions during composting and to link this effect to different bulking agents (coffee husks and sawdust), and (ii) to assess the effect of split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate on compost stability and sanitisation. The results showed that split addition of the nitrogen-rich substrate reduced nitrogen losses by 9% when sawdust was used and 20% when coffee husks were used as the bulking agent. Depending on the bulking agent used, split addition increased cumulative N2O emissions by 400-600% compared to single addition. In contrast, single addition increased methane emissions by up to 50% compared to split addition of the substrate. Hence, the timing of the addition of the N-rich substrate had only a marginal effect on total non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions. Split addition of the N-rich substrate resulted in compost that was just as stable and effective at completely eradicating weed seeds as single addition. These findings therefore show that split addition of a nitrogen-rich substrate could be an option for increasing the fertilising value of municipal waste compost without having a significant effect on total greenhouse gas emissions or compost stability.

  9. Enhanced formation of aerenchyma and induction of a barrier to radial oxygen loss in adventitious roots of Zea nicaraguensis contribute to its waterlogging tolerance as compared with maize (Zea mays ssp. mays).

    PubMed

    Abiko, Tomomi; Kotula, Lukasz; Shiono, Katsuhiro; Malik, Al Imran; Colmer, Timothy David; Nakazono, Mikio

    2012-09-01

    Enhancement of oxygen transport from shoot to root tip by the formation of aerenchyma and also a barrier to radial oxygen loss (ROL) in roots is common in waterlogging-tolerant plants. Zea nicaraguensis (teosinte), a wild relative of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays), grows in waterlogged soils. We investigated the formation of aerenchyma and ROL barrier induction in roots of Z. nicaraguensis, in comparison with roots of maize (inbred line Mi29), in a pot soil system and in hydroponics. Furthermore, depositions of suberin in the exodermis/hypodermis and lignin in the epidermis of adventitious roots of Z. nicaraguensis and maize grown in aerated or stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution were studied. Growth of maize was more adversely affected by low oxygen in the root zone (waterlogged soil or stagnant deoxygenated nutrient solution) compared with Z. nicaraguensis. In stagnant deoxygenated solution, Z. nicaraguensis was superior to maize in transporting oxygen from shoot base to root tip due to formation of larger aerenchyma and a stronger barrier to ROL in adventitious roots. The relationships between the ROL barrier formation and suberin and lignin depositions in roots are discussed. The ROL barrier, in addition to aerenchyma, would contribute to the waterlogging tolerance of Z. nicaraguensis.

  10. Singlet delta oxygen production in a 2D micro-discharge array in air: effect of gas residence time and discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gaurav; Santos Sousa, João; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    The production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) is of growing interest for many applications. We report on the measurement of O2(a 1Δg) and ozone (O3) in a room temperature atmospheric pressure discharge in dry air. The plasma source is a 2D array of micro-discharges generated by an alternating current voltage at 20 kHz. The study focuses on the effect of gas flow through the discharge. The maximum investigated flow rate allows reducing the gas residence time in the discharge zone to half the discharge period. Results indicate that the residence time and discharge power have a major effect on the O2(a 1Δg) production. Different O2(a 1Δg) density dependencies on power are observed for different flow rates. Effects of collisional quenching on the as-produced and measured O2(a 1Δg) densities are discussed. The flow rate also allows for control of the O2(a 1Δg) to O3 density ratio in the effluent from 0.7 to conditions of pure O3.

  11. The Effect of Pericellular Oxygen Levels on Proteomic Profile and Lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Differentiated Preadipocytes Cultured on Gas-Permeable Cultureware.

    PubMed

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Pavlikova, Nela; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Halada, Petr; Seda, Ondrej; Trnka, Jan; Kovar, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pericellular oxygen concentration represents an important factor in the regulation of cell functions, including cell differentiation, growth and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Hypoxia in adipose tissue has been associated with altered adipokine secretion profile and suggested as a possible factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments provide an indispensable tool in metabolic research, however, physical laws of gas diffusion make prolonged exposure of adherent cells to desired pericellular O2 concentrations questionable. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of various O2 levels (1%, 4% and 20% O2) on the proteomic profile and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 differentiated preadipocytes using gas-permeable cultureware. Following differentiation of cells under desired pericellular O2 concentrations, cell lysates were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein visualization using Coomassie blue staining. Spots showing differential expression under hypoxia were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. All identified proteins were subjected to pathway analysis. We observed that protein expression of 26 spots was reproducibly affected by 4% and 1% O2 (17 upregulated and 9 downregulated). Pathway analysis showed that mitochondrial energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis were significantly upregulated by hypoxia. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the direct effects of pericellular O2 levels on adipocyte energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis, probably mediated through the reversed tricarboxylic acid cycle flux.

  12. The Effect of Pericellular Oxygen Levels on Proteomic Profile and Lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 Differentiated Preadipocytes Cultured on Gas-Permeable Cultureware

    PubMed Central

    Weiszenstein, Martin; Pavlikova, Nela; Elkalaf, Moustafa; Halada, Petr; Seda, Ondrej; Trnka, Jan; Kovar, Jan; Polak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Pericellular oxygen concentration represents an important factor in the regulation of cell functions, including cell differentiation, growth and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Hypoxia in adipose tissue has been associated with altered adipokine secretion profile and suggested as a possible factor in the development of type 2 diabetes. In vitro experiments provide an indispensable tool in metabolic research, however, physical laws of gas diffusion make prolonged exposure of adherent cells to desired pericellular O2 concentrations questionable. The aim of this study was to investigate the direct effect of various O2 levels (1%, 4% and 20% O2) on the proteomic profile and triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 differentiated preadipocytes using gas-permeable cultureware. Following differentiation of cells under desired pericellular O2 concentrations, cell lysates were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein visualization using Coomassie blue staining. Spots showing differential expression under hypoxia were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. All identified proteins were subjected to pathway analysis. We observed that protein expression of 26 spots was reproducibly affected by 4% and 1% O2 (17 upregulated and 9 downregulated). Pathway analysis showed that mitochondrial energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis were significantly upregulated by hypoxia. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the direct effects of pericellular O2 levels on adipocyte energy metabolism and triglyceride synthesis, probably mediated through the reversed tricarboxylic acid cycle flux. PMID:27023342

  13. Corrosion of 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures: Studies at constant temperature and fixed oxygen potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. B.; Jacob, K. T.; Nelson, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Corrosion of SAE 310 stainless steel in H2-H2O-H2S gas mixtures was studied at a constant temperature of 1150 K. Reactive gas mixtures were chosen to yield a constant oxygen potential of approximately 6 x 10 to the minus 13th power/cu Nm and sulfur potentials ranging from 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm to 33 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm. The kinetics of corrosion were determined using a thermobalance, and the scales were analyzed using metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Two corrosion regimes, which were dependent on sulfur potential, were identified. At high sulfur potentials (p sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 2.7 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were high, the kinetics obeyed a linear rate equation, and the scales consisted mainly of sulfide phases similar to those observed from pure sulfication. At low sulfur potentials (P sub S sub 2 less than or equal to 0.19 x 10 to the minus 2nd power/cu Nm) the corrosion rates were low, the kinetics obeyed a parabolic rate equation, and scales consisted mainly of oxide phases.

  14. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal-oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.J.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-09-15

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxides - such as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxide - was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H{sub 2}S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H{sub 2}S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H{sub 2}S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H{sub 2}S for all four metal oxides.

  15. Effect of hydrogen sulfide on chemical looping of coal-derived synthesis gas over bentonite-supported metal---oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Siriwardane, R.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on the chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas with bentonite-supported metal oxidesssuch as iron oxide, nickel oxide, manganese oxide, and copper oxideswas investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). During the reaction with synthesis gas containing H2S, metal-oxide oxygen carriers were first reduced by carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and then interacted with H2S to form metal sulfide, which resulted in a weight gain during the reduction/sulfidation step. The reduced/sulfurized compounds could be regenerated to form sulfur dioxide and oxides during the oxidation reaction with air. The reduction/oxidation capacities of iron oxide and nickel oxide were not affected by the presence of H2S, but both manganese oxide and copper oxide showed decreased reduction/oxidation capacities. However, the rates of reduction and oxidation decreased in the presence of H2S for all four metal oxides.

  16. Mass-independent fractionation of oxygen isotopes during H2O2 formation by gas-phase discharge from water vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Ignatiev, Alexander V.; Budnitskiy, Sergey Y.; Yakovenko, Victoria V.; Vysotskiy, Sergey V.

    2016-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important atmospheric component involved in various gas-phase and aqueous-phase transformation processes in the Earth's atmosphere. A study of mass-independent 17O anomalies in H2O2 can provide additional insights into the chemistry of the modern atmosphere and, possibly, of the ancient atmosphere. Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments to study the fractionation of three oxygen isotopes (16O, 17O, and 18O) during H2O2 formation from products of water vapour dissociation. The experiments were carried out by passing an electrical discharge through a gaseous mixture of helium and water at atmospheric pressure. The effect of the presence of O2 in the gas mixture on the isotopic composition of H2O2 was also investigated. All of the experiments showed that H2O2 produced under two different conditions (with or without O2 added in the gas mixtures) was mass-independently fractionated (MIF). We found a positive MIF signal (∼1.4‰) in the no-O2 added experiments, and this signal increased to ∼2.5‰ once O2 was added (1.6% mixing ratio). We suggest that if O2 concentrations are very low, the hydroxyl radical recombination reaction is the dominant pathway for H2O2 formation and is the source of MIF in H2O2. Although H2O2 formation via a hydroxyl radical recombination process is limited in the modern atmosphere, it would be possible in the Archean atmosphere when O2 was a trace constituent, and H2O2 would be mass-independently fractionated. The anomalous 17O excess, which was observed in H2O2 produced by spark discharge experiments, may provide useful information about the radical chemistry of the ancient atmosphere and the role of H2O2 in maintaining and controlling the atmospheric composition.

  17. Repeatability of Blood Gas Parameters, Pco2 Gap, and Pco2 Gap to Arterial-to-Venous Oxygen Content Difference in Critically Ill Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Jihad; Lazkani, Ali; Lemyze, Malcolm; Pepy, Florent; Meddour, Mehdi; Gasan, Gaëlle; Temime, Johanna; Vangrunderbeeck, Nicolas; Tronchon, Laurent; Thevenin, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the repeatability of blood gas (BG) parameters and their derived variables such as the central venous-to-arterial carbon dioxide tension difference (▵Pco2) and the ratio of ▵Pco2 over the central arteriovenous oxygen content difference (▵Pco2/C(a-cv)O2) and to determine the smallest detectable changes in individual patients. A total of 192 patients with arterial and central venous catheters were included prospectively. Two subsequent arterial and central venous blood samples were collected immediately one after the other and analyzed using the same point-of-care BG analyzer. The samples were analyzed for arterial and venous BG parameters, ▵Pco2, and ▵Pco2/C(a-cv)O2 ratio. Repeatability was expressed as the smallest detectable difference (SDD) and the least significant change (LSC). A change in value of these parameters exceeding the SDD or the LSC should be regarded as real. The SDDs for arterial carbon dioxide tension, arterial oxygen saturation, central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2), and ▵Pco2 were small: ±2.06 mm Hg, ±1.23%, 2.92%, and ±1.98 mm Hg, respectively, whereas the SDDs for arterial oxygen tension (Pao2) and ▵Pco2/C(a-cv)O2 were high: ±9.09 mm Hg and ±0.57 mm Hg/mL, respectively. The LSCs (%) for these variables were 5.06, 1.27, 4.44, 32.4, 9.51, and 38.5, respectively. The repeatability of all these variables was good except for Pao2 and ▵Pco2/C(a-cv)O2 ratio for which we observed an important inherent variability. Expressed as SDD, a ScvO2 change value of at least ±3% should be considered as true. The clinician must be aware that an apparent change in these variables in an individual patient might represent only an inherent variation. PMID:25621691

  18. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  19. Dynamics of oxygen in the YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x basal planes by elastic-energy-loss measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Cannelli, G. ); Cantelli, R. ); Cordero, F. ); Ferretti, M. ); Verdini, L. )

    1990-11-01

    We report elastic-energy-dissipation measurements in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{ital x}} from 50 to 300 K at frequencies between 0.48 and 6.3 kHz. It is shown unambiguously that the two peaks around {Tc} are thermally activated with activation energies of 0.16 and 0.19 eV. When oxygen is reduced to about 6.5 atoms per formula unit, the higher-temperature process nearly disappears, while the other one increases. The peaks are interpreted in terms of jumps of the O atoms in the Cu-O basal planes, and two mechanisms are proposed and discussed: short jumps between the off-center positions in the chains and jumps between O(4) and O(5) positions of isolated atoms in hypothetical oxygen-depleted islands of the orthorhombic basal planes.

  20. Reactivity of oxygen radical anions bound to scandia nanoparticles in the gas phase: C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Li-Hua; Meng, Jing-Heng; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Ding, Xun-Lei; He, Sheng-Gui; Ma, Tong-Mei

    2014-01-20

    The activation of C-H bonds in alkanes is currently a hot research topic in chemistry. The atomic oxygen radical anion (O(-·)) is an important species in C-H activation. The mechanistic details of C-H activation by O(-·) radicals can be well understood by studying the reactions between O(-·) containing transition metal oxide clusters and alkanes. Here the reactivity of scandium oxide cluster anions toward n-butane was studied by using a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled with a fast flow reactor. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) from n-butane by (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters was observed. The reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-18) clusters is significantly sizedependent and the highest reactivity was observed for N=4 (Sc8O13(-)) and 12 (Sc24O37(-)). Larger (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) clusters generally have higher reactivity than the smaller ones. Density functional theory calculations were performed to interpret the reactivity of (Sc2O3)(N)O(-) (N=1-5) clusters, which were found to contain the O(-·) radicals as the active sites. The local charge environment around the O(-·) radicals was demonstrated to control the experimentally observed size-dependent reactivity. This work is among the first to report HAA reactivity of cluster anions with dimensions up to nanosize toward alkane molecules. The anionic O(-·) containing scandium oxide clusters are found to be more reactive than the corresponding cationic ones in the C-H bond activation.

  1. Quantifying denitrification losses from a sub-tropical pasture in Queensland/Australia - use of the 15N gas flux method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, Johannes; Scheer, Clemens; Warner, Daniel; Grace, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The microbial mediated production of nitrous oxide (N2O) and its reduction to dinitrogen (N2) via denitrification represents a loss of nitrogen (N) from fertilised agro ecosystems to the atmosphere. Although denitrification remains a major uncertainty in estimating N losses from soils, the magnitude of N2 losses and related N2:N2O ratios from soils are largely unknown due to difficulties measuring N2 against a high atmospheric background. In order to address this lack of data, this study investigated the influence of different soil moisture contents on N2 and N2O emissions from a sub-tropical pasture in Queensland/Australia using the 15N gas flux method. Intact soil cores were incubated over 14 days at 80% and 100% water filled pore space (WFPS). Gas samples were taken up to six times per day after application of 15N labelled nitrate, equivalent to 50 kg N ha-1 and analysed for N2 and N2O by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Fluxes were calculated assuming non-random 15N distribution in the headspace according to Mulvaney and Kurtz (1984) using the labelled pool of nitrate estimated from N2O measurements (Stevens and Laughlin 2001). The main product of denitrification in both treatments was N2. N2 emissions exceeded N2O emissions by a factor of 1.3 ± 0.3 at 80% WFPS and a factor of 3 ± 0.8 at 100% WFPS. The total amount of N-N2 lost over the incubation period was 13.5±1.0 kg N ha-1 at 80% WFPS and 21.8±1.8 kg ha-1 at 100% WFPS respectively. Over the entire incubation period, N2 emissions remained elevated at 100% WFPS, showing high variation between soil cores, while related N2O emissions decreased. At 80% WFPS, N2 emissions increased constantly over time showing significantly higher values after day five. At the same time, N2O fluxes declined. Consequently, N2:N2O ratios rose over the incubation period in both treatments. Overall denitrification rates and related N2:N2O ratios were higher at 100% WFPS compared to 80% WFPS, confirming WFPS as a major driver of

  2. Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss?

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_162793.html Could Anemia Cause Hearing Loss? Iron deficiency might keep ear cells from getting oxygen ... HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss may be linked to iron deficiency anemia -- a combination of low levels of ...

  3. Tests to produce and recover carbon dioxide by burning coal in oxygen and recycled flue gas: Black Hills Power and Light Company Customer Service Center Boiler No. 2, Rapid City, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Fuller, T.; Kocourek, R.; Teats, G.; Young, J.; Myles, K.; Wolsky, A.

    1987-12-01

    Experiments were conducted using a modified stoker-fired boiler (2.2 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h) instrumented to examine the feasibility of producing and recovering carbon dioxide by burning coal in oxygen and recycled flue gas in a utility environment. The tests demonstrated that the boiler can be operated in the oxygen-blown/flue-gas-recirculation mode without any noticeable effects on coal combustion, heat delivery to the water, or the coal-feed or ash-handling systems. Pretest calculations showed that a feasible set of operating parameters for a carbon-dioxide-producing combustor system tightly sealed against air infiltration and containing no more than about 5% O/sub 2/ (dry basis) at the furnace exit would be a flue-gas recycling ratio between 0.6 and 0.7 and an oxygen feed rate of 1.17 g-moles per g-atom of carbon, yielding an exhaust gas composition (wet basis) of approximately 46.9% CO/sub 2/, 50.6% H/sub 2/O, and 2.5% O/sub 2/. This composition corresponds to a product gas containing 95% CO/sub 2/ and 5% O/sub 2/ (dry basis). However, because air leaked into the test combustor and the flue-gas handling system, the highest carbon dioxide concentration achieved in the exhaust gas was 48.5% (dry basis). Major sources of inleakage were the furnace brickwork, the gas-handling system, and the coal-feed and ash-extraction systems. 40 figs.

  4. Predictive Evaluations of Oxygen-Rich Hydrocarbon Combustion Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injectors using a Flamelet-Based 3-D CFD Simulation Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Brian R.; Braman, Kalem; West, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has embarked upon a joint project with the Air Force to improve the state-of-the-art of space application combustion device design and operational understanding. One goal of the project is to design, build and hot-fire test a 40,000 pound-thrust Oxygen/Rocket Propellant-2 (RP-2) Oxygen-Rich staged engine at MSFC. The overall project goals afford the opportunity to test multiple different injector designs and experimentally evaluate the any effect on the engine performance and combustion dynamics. To maximize the available test resources and benefits, pre-test, combusting flow, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed on the individual injectors to guide the design. The results of the CFD analysis were used to design the injectors for specific, targeted fluid dynamic features and the analysis results also provided some predictive input for acoustic and thermal analysis of the main Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA). MSFC has developed and demonstrated the ability to utilize a computationally efficient, flamelet-based combustion model to guide the pre-test design of single-element Gas Centered Swirl Coaxial (GCSC) injectors. Previous, Oxygen/RP-2 simulation models utilizing the Loci-STREAM flow solver, were validated using single injector test data from the EC-1 Air Force test facility. The simulation effort herein is an extension of the validated, CFD driven, single-injector design approach applied to single injectors which will be part of a larger engine array. Time-accurate, Three-Dimensional, CFD simulations were performed for five different classes of injector geometries. Simulations were performed to guide the design of the injector to achieve a variety of intended performance goals. For example, two GCSC injectors were designed to achieve stable hydrodynamic behavior of the propellant circuits while providing the largest thermal margin possible within the design envelope. While another injector was designed

  5. Compaction and gas loss in welded pyroclastic deposits as revealed by porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity measurements of the Shevlin Park Tuff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wright, Heather M.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2014-01-01

    Pyroclastic flows produced by large volcanic eruptions commonly densify after emplacement. Processes of gas escape, compaction, and welding in pyroclastic-flow deposits are controlled by the physical and thermal properties of constituent material. Through measurements of matrix porosity, permeability, and electrical conductivity, we provide a framework for understanding the evolution of pore structure during these processes. Using data from the Shevlin Park Tuff in central Oregon, United States, and from the literature, we find that over a porosity range of 0%–70%, matrix permeability varies by almost 10 orders of magnitude (from 10–20 to 10–11 m2), with over three orders of magnitude variation at any given porosity. Part of the variation at a given porosity is due to permeability anisotropy, where oriented core samples indicate higher permeabilities parallel to foliation (horizontally) than perpendicular to foliation (vertically). This suggests that pore space is flattened during compaction, creating anisotropic crack-like networks, a geometry that is supported by electrical conductivity measurements. We find that the power law equation: k1 = 1.3 × 10–21 × ϕ5.2 provides the best approximation of dominant horizontal gas loss, where k1 = permeability, and ϕ = porosity. Application of Kozeny-Carman fluid-flow approximations suggests that permeability in the Shevlin Park Tuff is controlled by crack- or disk-like pore apertures with minimum widths of 0.3 and 7.5 μm. We find that matrix permeability limits compaction over short times, but deformation is then controlled by competition among cooling, compaction, water resorption, and permeable gas escape. These competing processes control the potential for development of overpressure (and secondary explosions) and the degree of welding in the deposit, processes that are applicable to viscous densification of volcanic deposits in general. Further, the general relationships among porosity, permeability, and

  6. Upper ocean bubble measurements from the NE Pacific and estimates of their role in air-sea gas transfer of the weakly soluble gases nitrogen and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagle, Svein; McNeil, Craig; Steiner, Nadja

    2010-12-01

    Simultaneous observations of upper-ocean bubble clouds, and dissolved gaseous nitrogen (N2) and oxygen (O2) from three winter storms are presented and analyzed. The data were collected on the Canadian Surface Ocean Lower Atmosphere Study (C-SOLAS) mooring located near Ocean Station Papa (OSP) at 50°N, 145°W in the NE Pacific during winter of 2003/2004. The bubble field was measured using an upward looking 200 kHz echosounder. Direct estimates of bubble mediated gas fluxes were made using assumed bubble size spectra and the upward looking echosounder data. A one-dimensional biogeochemical model was used to help compare data and various existing models of bubble mediated air-sea gas exchange. The direct bubble flux calculations show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. After scaling from N2/O2 to carbon dioxide, near surface, nonsupersaturating, air-sea transfer rates, KT, for U10 > 12 m s-1 fall between quadratic and cubic relationships. Estimates of the subsurface bubble induced air injection flux, VT, show an approximate quadratic/cubic dependence on mean bubble penetration depth. Both KT and VT are much higher than those measured during Hurricane Frances over the wind speed range 12 < U10 < 23 m s-1. This result implies that over the open ocean and this wind speed range, older and more developed seas which occur during winter storms are more effective in exchanging gases between the atmosphere and ocean than younger less developed seas which occur during the rapid passage of a hurricane.

  7. Gas hydrates (clathrates) causing pore-water freshening and oxygen isotope fractionation in deep-water sedimentary sections of terrigenous continental margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hesse, R.; Harrison, W.E.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of gas hydrates in deep-water sections of the continental margins predicted from anomalous acoustic reflectors on seismic profiles has been confirmed by recent deep-sea drilling results. On the Pacific continental slope off Guatemala gas hydrates were brought up for the first time from two holes (497, 498A) drilled during Leg 67 of the DSDP in water depths of 2360 and 5500 m, respectively. The hydrates occur in organic matter-rich Pleistocene to Miocene terrigenous sediments. In the hydrate-bearing zone a marked decrease in interstitial water chlorinities was observed starting at about 10-20 m subbottom depth. Pore waters at the bottom of the holes (near 400 m subbottom) have as little as half the chlorinity of seawater (i.e. 9???). Similar, but less pronounced, trends were observed during previous legs of the DSDP in other hydrate-prone segments of the continental margins where recharge of fresh water from the continent can be excluded (e.g. Leg 11). The crystallization of hydrates, like ice, excludes salt ions from the crystal structure. During burial the dissolved salts are separated from the solids. Subsidence results in a downward motion of the solids (including hydrates) relative to the pore fluids. Thawing of hydrates during recovery releases fresh water which is remixed with the pore fluid not involved in hydrate formation. The volume of the latter decreases downhole thus causing downward decreasing salinity (chlorinity). Hydrate formation is responsible for oxygen isotope fractionation with 18O-enrichment in the hydrate explaining increasingly more positive ??18O values in the pore fluids recovered (after hydrate dissociation) with depth. ?? 1981.

  8. A Simplified Formula Using Early Blood Gas Analysis Can Predict Survival Outcomes and the Requirements for Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Won; Lee, Byong Sop; Lim, Gina; Choi, Yong-Sung; Kim, Ellen Ai-Rhan

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether early arterial blood gas analysis (ABGA) could define the severity of disease in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We conducted a retrospective study over a 21-yr period of infants diagnosed with CDH. Outcomes were defined as death before discharge, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation requirements (ECMO) or death. A total 114 infants were included in this study. We investigated whether simplified prediction formula [PO2-PCO2] values at 0, 4, 8, and 12 hr after birth were associated with mortality, and ECMO or death. The area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic curve was used to determine the optimum ABGA values for predicting outcomes. The value of [PO2-PCO2] at birth was the best predictor of mortality (AUC 0.803, P < 0.001) and at 4 hr after birth was the most reliable predictor of ECMO or death (AUC 0.777, P < 0.001). The value of [PO2-PCO2] from ABGA early period after birth can reliably predict outcomes in infants with CDH. PMID:23772159

  9. Oxygen loss, semiconductivity, and positive temperature coefficient of resistance behavior in undoped cation-stoichiometric BaTiO3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán, H.; Cordoncillo, E.; Escribano, P.; Sinclair, D. C.; West, A. R.

    2005-11-01

    Stoichiometric BaTiO3 ceramics fabricated from sol-gel-derived powders and sintered at temperatures <=1100 °C are highly insulating and electrically homogeneous. At higher sintering temperatures, samples gradually lose oxygen and the conductivity increases as a consequence. The latter phenomena are very sensitive to the furnace atmosphere and are partially reversible during cooling when partial reoxidation can occur. This results in ceramics that are often electrically heterogeneous with insulating surfaces or grain boundaries but semiconducting grain cores. In samples that were heated at 1450 °C in N2 and quenched, a positive temperature coefficient of resistance (PTCR) effect was observed, associated with an additional impedance arising from space-charge effects. These results demonstrate that, depending on sample processing, insulating cation-stoichiometric BaTiO3 can instead be semiconducting and under certain circumstances, exhibit a PTCR effect, without the need for donor dopant additives.

  10. Oxygen control with microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Martin D; Rexius-Hall, Megan L; Elgass, Laura Jane; Eddington, David T

    2014-11-21

    Cellular function and behavior are affected by the partial pressure of O2, or oxygen tension, in the microenvironment. The level of oxygenation is important, as it is a balance of oxygen availability and oxygen consumption that is necessary to maintain normoxia. Changes in oxygen tension, from above physiological oxygen tension (hyperoxia) to below physiological levels (hypoxia) or even complete absence of oxygen (anoxia), trigger potent biological responses. For instance, hypoxia has been shown to support the maintenance and promote proliferation of regenerative stem and progenitor cells. Paradoxically, hypoxia also contributes to the development of pathological conditions including systemic inflammatory response, tumorigenesis, and cardiovascular disease, such as ischemic heart disease and pulmonary hypertension. Current methods to study cellular behavior in low levels of oxygen tension include hypoxia workstations and hypoxia chambers. These culture systems do not provide oxygen gradients that are found in vivo or precise control at the microscale. Microfluidic platforms have been developed to overcome the inherent limits of these current methods, including lack of spatial control, slow equilibration, and unachievable or difficult coupling to live-cell microscopy. The various applications made possible by microfluidic systems are the topic of this review. In order to understand how the microscale can be leveraged for oxygen control of cells and tissues within microfluidic systems, some background understanding of diffusion, solubility, and transport at the microscale will be presented in addition to a discussion on the methods for measuring the oxygen tension in microfluidic channels. Finally the various methods for oxygen control within microfluidic platforms will be discussed including devices that rely on diffusion from liquid or gas, utilizing on-or-off-chip mixers, leveraging cellular oxygen uptake to deplete the oxygen, relying on chemical reactions in

  11. Hydrogen-induced atomic structure evolution of the oxygen-chemisorbed Cu(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Weitao; Liu, Qianqian; Li, Jonathan; Cai, Na; Saidi, Wissam A.; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-12-01

    Using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) modeling, we determine the mechanism of the atomic structural evolution of the oxygenated Cu(110) surface induced by the reaction of adsorbed hydrogen with chemisorbed oxygen in the Cu(110)-c(6 × 2)-O structure. Our STM observations show that the reconstructed Cu(110)-c(6 × 2)-O surface undergoes a phase transition to the (2 × 1)-O reconstruction in the course of oxygen loss induced by the reaction with H2 gas. Using DFT modeling, we find that the surface phase transition is initiated via the adsorption of molecular hydrogen on the chemisorbed oxygen, which results in the formation of H2O molecules that desorb spontaneously from the surface. The loss of chemisorbed oxygen induces the c(6 × 2) → (2 × 1) transition that involves the diffusion of Cu―O―Cu chains along the ⟨1 ¯ 10 ⟩ direction.

  12. N2 Gas Flushing Alleviates the Loss of Bacterial Diversity and Inhibits Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas during the Cold Storage of Bovine Raw Milk.

    PubMed

    Gschwendtner, Silvia; Alatossava, Tapani; Kublik, Susanne; Fuka, Mirna Mrkonjić; Schloter, Michael; Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The quality and safety of raw milk still remains a worldwide challenge. Culture-dependent methods indicated that the continuous N2 gas-flushing of raw milk reduced the bacterial growth during cold storage by up to four orders of magnitude, compared to cold storage alone. This study investigated the influence of N2 gas-flushing on bacterial diversity in bovine raw-milk samples, that were either cold stored at 6°C or additionally flushed with pure N2 for up to one week. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the V1-V2 hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA genes, derived from amplified cDNA, which was obtained from RNA directly isolated from raw-milk samples, was performed. The reads, which were clustered into 2448 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), were phylogenetically classified. Our data revealed a drastic reduction in the diversity of OTUs in raw milk during cold storage at 6°C at 97% similarity level; but, the N2-flushing treatment alleviated this reduction and substantially limited the loss of bacterial diversity during the same cold-storage period. Compared to cold-stored milk, the initial raw-milk samples contained less Proteobacteria (mainly Pseudomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae) but more Firmicutes (mainly Ruminococcaceaea, Lachnospiraceae and Oscillospiraceaea) and Bacteroidetes (mainly Bacteroidales). Significant differences between cold-stored and additionally N2-flushed milk were mainly related to higher levels of Pseudomononadaceae (including the genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter) in cold-stored milk samples; furthermore, rare taxa were better preserved by the N2 gas flushing compared to the cold storage alone. No major changes in bacterial composition with time were found regarding the distribution of the major 9 OTUs, that dominated the Pseudomonas genus in N2-flushed or non-flushed milk samples, other than an intriguing predominance of bacteria related to P. veronii. Overall, this study established that neither bacteria causing milk

  13. N2 Gas Flushing Alleviates the Loss of Bacterial Diversity and Inhibits Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas during the Cold Storage of Bovine Raw Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kublik, Susanne; Fuka, Mirna Mrkonjić; Schloter, Michael; Munsch-Alatossava, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The quality and safety of raw milk still remains a worldwide challenge. Culture-dependent methods indicated that the continuous N2 gas-flushing of raw milk reduced the bacterial growth during cold storage by up to four orders of magnitude, compared to cold storage alone. This study investigated the influence of N2 gas-flushing on bacterial diversity in bovine raw-milk samples, that were either cold stored at 6°C or additionally flushed with pure N2 for up to one week. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the V1-V2 hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA genes, derived from amplified cDNA, which was obtained from RNA directly isolated from raw-milk samples, was performed. The reads, which were clustered into 2448 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), were phylogenetically classified. Our data revealed a drastic reduction in the diversity of OTUs in raw milk during cold storage at 6°C at 97% similarity level; but, the N2-flushing treatment alleviated this reduction and substantially limited the loss of bacterial diversity during the same cold-storage period. Compared to cold-stored milk, the initial raw-milk samples contained less Proteobacteria (mainly Pseudomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae) but more Firmicutes (mainly Ruminococcaceaea, Lachnospiraceae and Oscillospiraceaea) and Bacteroidetes (mainly Bacteroidales). Significant differences between cold-stored and additionally N2-flushed milk were mainly related to higher levels of Pseudomononadaceae (including the genera Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter) in cold-stored milk samples; furthermore, rare taxa were better preserved by the N2 gas flushing compared to the cold storage alone. No major changes in bacterial composition with time were found regarding the distribution of the major 9 OTUs, that dominated the Pseudomonas genus in N2-flushed or non-flushed milk samples, other than an intriguing predominance of bacteria related to P. veronii. Overall, this study established that neither bacteria causing milk

  14. Electron Transfer Reduction of the Diazirine Ring in Gas-Phase Peptide Ions. On the Peculiar Loss of [NH4O] from Photoleucine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marek, Aleš; Shaffer, Christopher J.; Pepin, Robert; Slováková, Kristina; Laszlo, Kenneth J.; Bush, Matthew F.; Tureček, František

    2015-03-01

    Electron transfer to gas-phase peptide ions with diazirine-containing amino acid residue photoleucine (L*) triggers diazirine ring reduction followed by cascades of residue-specific radical reactions. Upon electron transfer, substantial fractions of (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals undergo elimination of [NH4O] radicals and N2H2 molecules from the side chain. The side-chain dissociations are particularly prominent on collisional activation of long-lived (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals formed by electron transfer dissociation of noncovalent peptide-18-crown-6-ether ion complexes. The ion dissociation products were characterized by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MSn) and ion mobility measurements. The elimination of [NH4O] was elucidated with the help of 2H, 15 N, and 18O-labeled peptide ions and found to specifically involve the amide oxygen of the N-terminal residue. The structures, energies, and electronic states of the peptide radical species were elucidated by a combination of near-UV photodissociation experiments and electron structure calculations combining ab initio and density functional theory methods. Electron transfer reaching the ground electronic states of charge reduced (GL*GGR +2H)+● cation-radicals was found to reduce the diazirine ring. In contrast, backbone N - Cα bond dissociations that represent a 60%-75% majority of all dissociations because of electron transfer are predicted to occur from excited electronic states.

  15. Monitor hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation in living mouse tail using photoacoustic CT scanner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Kruger, Robert; Reinecke, Daniel; Stantz, Keith M.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to use PCT spectroscopy scanner to monitor the hemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation change of living mouse by imaging the artery and veins in a mouse tail. Materials and Methods: One mouse tail was scanned using the PCT small animal scanner at the isosbestic wavelength (796nm) to obtain its hemoglobin concentration. Immediately after the scan, the mouse was euthanized and its blood was extracted from the heart. The true hemoglobin concentration was measured using a co-oximeter. Reconstruction correction algorithm to compensate the acoustic signal loss due to the existence of bone structure in the mouse tail was developed. After the correction, the hemoglobin concentration was calculated from the PCT images and compared with co-oximeter result. Next, one mouse were immobilized in the PCT scanner. Gas with different concentrations of oxygen was given to mouse to change the oxygen saturation. PCT tail vessel spectroscopy scans were performed 15 minutes after the introduction of gas. The oxygen saturation values were then calculated to monitor the oxygen saturation change of mouse. Results: The systematic error for hemoglobin concentration measurement was less than 5% based on preliminary analysis. Same correction technique was used for oxygen saturation calculation. After correction, the oxygen saturation level change matches the oxygen volume ratio change of the introduced gas. Conclusion: This living mouse tail experiment has shown that NIR PCT-spectroscopy can be used to monitor the oxygen saturation status in living small animals.

  16. Gas treating process

    SciTech Connect

    Hass, R.H.

    1990-01-09

    This patent describes a process for preventing oxygen from deactivating a catalyst susceptible to deactivation by oxygen. It comprises: scavenging oxygen contained in a feed gas stream comprising carbon monoxide and water vapor as reactant gases in the presence of an oxidation catalyst under conditions which remove essentially all of the oxygen by reaction with hydrogen sulfide and contacting the resultant gas stream, containing the reactants but essentially free of oxygen, with a catalyst susceptible to deactivation by oxygen but active for the water gas shift reaction. The contacting being under conditions resulting in the conversion of at least some of the carbon monoxide and water vapor to hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

  17. Environmental & Water Quality Operational Studies: Improvement of Hydropower Release Dissolved Oxygen with Turbine Venting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    provides air to 13 the turbine is long, with bends, elbows, and valves which cause a significant loss of energy as air flows through the venting...large air flow rate (Figures B28-B29). The turbine efficiency losses and gas transfer were generally greater with deflectors than without. 74. Based on...provide a data base to develop predictive and design capabilities for turbine venting systems.’ tesultsoft these tests>indicated that, at most, the oxygen

  18. Feasibility and Reproducibility of BOLD and TOLD Measurements in the Liver With Oxygen and Carbogen Gas Challenge in Healthy Volunteers and Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bane, Octavia; Besa, Cecilia; Wagner, Mathilde; Oesingmann, Niels; Zhu, Hongfa; Fiel, Maria Isabel; Taouli, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify baseline relaxation rates R2∗ and R1 in the abdomen, their changes after respiratory challenges, and their reproducibility in healthy volunteers and patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at 1.5T and 3.0T. Materials and Methods R2∗ measurements were acquired in the liver in 8 volunteers and 27 patients with 34 HCCs using multiecho T2∗ at baseline and after respiratory challenges with 100% oxygen (O2) and carbogen (CB=95%O2/5%CO2). R1 was measured at 1.5T in one volunteer and 21 patients with 23 HCCs. Test retest coefficient of variation (CV) was assessed in 10 subjects. Intra and interobserver variability of R2∗ and R1 measurements was assessed in 12 and 10 patients, respec tively. Parameters for HCC, liver, and muscle were compared between baseline and after gas challenges. Results We observed that R2∗ and R1 imaging of HCCs with O2 and CB is feasible and reproducible (test retest CV R2∗<15%/R1<5%; intra- and interobserver intraclass correlation coefficient R2∗>0.88/R1>0.7 and CV R2∗<7%/R1<3% at 1.5T). R2∗ measurements were observed to be less reproducible at 3.0T (CV<35%). There was a statistically significant decrease in R2∗ values in HCC before and after O2 (P=0.02) and increase in R1 after O2 (P=0.004). CB had no significant effct (P R2∗=0.47/R1=0.278). Conclusion R2∗ measurements in HCC and liver parenchyma are more reproducible at 1.5T than at 3.0T, and with O2 than with CB challenge. We observed a decrease in R2∗ and an increase in R1 of HCCs from baseline in response to O2 challenge, as expected with increased tissue and blood oxygenation. PMID:26417669

  19. A half-century of production-phase greenhouse gas emissions from food loss & waste in the global food supply chain.

    PubMed

    Porter, Stephen D; Reay, David S; Higgins, Peter; Bomberg, Elizabeth

    2016-11-15

    Research on loss & waste of food meant for human consumption (FLW) and its environmental impact typically focuses on a single or small number of commodities in a specific location and point in time. However, it is unclear how trends in global FLW and potential for climate impact have evolved. Here, by utilising the Food and Agriculture Organization's food balance sheet data, we expand upon existing literature. Firstly, we provide a differentiated (by commodity, country and supply chain stage) bottom-up approach; secondly, we conduct a 50-year longitudinal analysis of global FLW and its production-phase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; and thirdly, we trace food wastage and its associated emissions through the entire food supply chain. Between 1961 and 2011 the annual amount of FLW by mass grew a factor of three - from 540Mt to 1.6Gt; associated production-phase (GHG) emissions more than tripled (from 680Mt to 2.2Gt CO2e). A 44% increase in global average per capita FLW emissions was also identified - from 225kg CO2e in 1961 to 323kg CO2e in 2011. The regional weighting within this global average changing markedly over time; in 1961 developed countries accounted for 48% of FLW and less than a quarter (24%) in 2011. The largest increases in FLW-associated GHG emissions were from developing economies, specifically China and Latin America - primarily from increasing losses in fruit and vegetables. Over the period examined, cumulatively such emissions added almost 68Gt CO2e to the atmospheric GHG stock; an amount the rough equivalent of two years of emissions from all anthropogenic sources at present rates. Building up from the most granular data available, this study highlights the growth in the climate burden of FLW emissions, and thus the need to improve efficiency in food supply chains to mitigate future emissions.

  20. Monolithic solid electrolyte oxygen pump

    DOEpatents

    Fee, Darrell C.; Poeppel, Roger B.; Easler, Timothy E.; Dees, Dennis W.

    1989-01-01

    A multi-layer oxygen pump having a one-piece, monolithic ceramic structure affords high oxygen production per unit weight and volume and is thus particularly adapted for use as a portable oxygen supply. The oxygen pump is comprised of a large number of small cells on the order of 1-2 millimeters in diameter which form the walls of the pump and which are comprised of thin, i.e., 25-50 micrometers, ceramic layers of cell components. The cell components include an air electrode, an oxygen electrode, an electrolyte and interconnection materials. The cell walls form the passages for input air and for exhausting the oxygen which is transferred from a relatively dilute gaseous mixture to a higher concentration by applying a DC voltage across the electrodes so as to ionize the oxygen at the air electrode, whereupon the ionized oxygen travels through the electrolyte and is converted to oxygen gas at the oxygen electrode.

  1. Lunar oxygen - The reduction of glass by hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton C.; Mckay, David S.; Morris, Richard V.

    1992-01-01

    The direct reduction of volcanic glass by hydrogen has been proposed as a method of extracting oxygen from the lunar soil. Experiments using lunar simulant glasses reacted with flowing hydrogen gas have demonstrated reduction at temperatures from 1000 to 1200 C. For melted samples ferrous iron was reduced to the metal, which formed large crystals at the expense of the glass. Samples held below the melting point rapidly devitrified, and iron was formed from submicrometer crystals of ilmenite and pyroxene. Weight losses of 3.6 - 4.5 percent, depending on glass composition, were achieved in 3 hours at 1100 C. A lunar oxygen plant operating at this efficiency and utilizing Apollo 17 orange glass as a feedstock could produce 50 kg of oxygen per ton of soil. The processes of reduction and sintering of lunar soil are synergistic, and could be combined to produce both oxygen and construction material at a moon base.

  2. GDNF pre-treatment aggravates neuronal cell loss in oxygen-glucose deprived hippocampal slice cultures: a possible effect of glutamate transporter up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Bonde, C; Sarup, A; Schousboe, A; Gegelashvili, G; Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    2003-01-01

    Besides its neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on dopaminergic neurons and spinal motoneurons, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has potent neuroprotective effects in cerebral ischemia. The protective effect has so far been related to reduced activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAr). This study tested the effects of GDNF on glutamate transporter expression, with the hypothesis that modulation of glutamate transporter activity would affect the outcome of cerebral ischemia. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures, derived from 1-week-old rats, were treated with 100 ng/ml GDNF for either 2 or 5 days, followed by Western blot analysis of NMDAr subunit 1 (NR1) and two glutamate transporter subtypes, GLAST and GLT-1. After 5-day exposure to GDNF, expression of GLAST and GLT-1 was up-regulated to 169 and 181% of control values, respectively, whereas NR1 was down-regulated to 64% of control. However, despite these changes that potentially would support neuronal resistance to excitotoxicity, the long-term treatment with GDNF was found to aggravate the neuronal damage induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). The increased cell death, assessed by propidium iodide (PI) uptake, occurred not only among the most susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells, but also in CA3 and fascia dentata. Given that glutamate transporters are able to release glutamate by reversed action during energy failure, it is suggested that the observed increase in OGD-induced cell death in the GDNF-pretreated cultures was caused by the build-up of excitotoxic concentrations of extracellular glutamate released through the glutamate transporters, which were up-regulated by GDNF. Although the extent and consequences of glutamate release via reversal of GLAST and GLT-1 transporters seem to vary in different energy failure models, the present findings should be taken into account in clinical trials of GDNF.

  3. Blockade of Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate channels decreases oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced Zn2+ accumulation and neuronal loss in hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hong Z; Sensi, Stefano L; Ogoshi, Fumio; Weiss, John H

    2002-02-15

    Synaptic release of Zn2+ and its translocation into postsynaptic neurons probably contribute to neuronal injury after ischemia or epilepsy. Studies in cultured neurons have revealed that of the three major routes of divalent cation entry, NMDA channels, voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs), and Ca2+-permeable AMPA/kainate (Ca-A/K) channels, Ca-A/K channels exhibit the highest permeability to exogenously applied Zn2+. However, routes through which synaptically released Zn2+ gains entry to postsynaptic neurons have not been characterized in vivo. To model ischemia-induced Zn2+ movement in a system approximating the in vivo situation, we subjected mouse hippocampal slice preparations to controlled periods of oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD). Timm's staining revealed little reactive Zn2+ in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons of slices exposed in the presence of O2 and glucose. However, 15 min of OGD resulted in marked labeling in both regions. Whereas strong Zn2+ labeling persisted if both the NMDA antagonist MK-801 and the VSCC blocker Gd3+ were present during OGD, the presence of either the Ca-A/K channel blocker 1-naphthyl acetyl spermine (NAS) or the extracellular Zn2+ chelator Ca2+ EDTA substantially decreased Zn2+ accumulation in pyramidal neurons of both subregions. In parallel experiments, slices were subjected to 5 min OGD exposures as described above, followed 4 hr later by staining with the cell-death marker propidium iodide. As in the Timm's staining experiments, substantial CA1 or CA3 pyramidal neuronal damage occurred despite the presence of MK-801 and Gd3+, whereas injury was decreased by NAS or by Ca2+ EDTA (in CA1).

  4. Gas-phase reactions of molecular oxygen with uranyl(V) anionic complexes-synthesis and characterization of new superoxides of uranyl(VI).

    PubMed

    Lucena, Ana F; Carretas, José M; Marçalo, Joaquim; Michelini, Maria C; Gong, Yu; Gibson, John K

    2015-04-16

    Gas-phase complexes of uranyl(V) ligated to anions X(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, OH, NO3, ClO4, HCO2, CH3CO2, CF3CO2, CH3COS, NCS, N3), [UO2X2](-), were produced by electrospray ionization and reacted with O2 in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to form uranyl(VI) anionic complexes, [UO2X2(O2)](-), comprising a superoxo ligand. The comparative rates for the oxidation reactions were measured, ranging from relatively fast [UO2(OH)2](-) to slow [UO2I2](-). The reaction rates of [UO2X2](-) ions containing polyatomic ligands were significantly faster than those containing the monatomic halogens, which can be attributed to the greater number of vibrational degrees of freedom in the polyatomic ligands to dissipate the energy of the initial O2-association complexes. The effect of the basicity of the X(-) ligands was also apparent in the relative rates for O2 addition, with a general correlation between increasing ligand basicity and O2-addition efficiency for polyatomic ligands. Collision-induced dissociation of the superoxo complexes showed in all cases loss of O2 to form the [UO2X2](-) anions, indicating weaker binding of the O2(-) ligand compared to the X(-) ligands. Density functional theory computations of the structures and energetics of selected species are in accord with the experimental observations.

  5. Phenotypic plasticity of gas exchange pattern and water loss in Scarabaeus spretus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae): deconstructing the basis for metabolic rate variation.

    PubMed

    Terblanche, John S; Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2010-09-01

    Investigation of gas exchange patterns and modulation of metabolism provide insight into metabolic control systems and evolution in diverse terrestrial environments. Variation in metabolic rate in response to environmental conditions has been explained largely in the context of two contrasting hypotheses, namely metabolic depression in response to stressful or resource-(e.g. water) limited conditions, or elevation of metabolism at low temperatures to sustain life in extreme conditions. To deconstruct the basis for metabolic rate changes in response to temperature variation, here we undertake a full factorial study investigating the longer- and short-term effects of temperature exposure on gas exchange patterns. We examined responses of traits of gas exchange [standard metabolic rate (SMR); discontinuous gas exchange (DGE) cycle frequency; cuticular, respiratory and total water loss rate (WLR)] to elucidate the magnitude and form of plastic responses in the dung beetle, Scarabaeus spretus. Results showed that short- and longer-term temperature variation generally have significant effects on SMR and WLR. Overall, acclimation to increased temperature led to a decline in SMR (from 0.071+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.039+/-0.004 ml CO(2) h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) modulated by reduced DGE frequency (15 degrees C acclimation: 0.554+/-0.027 mHz, 20 degrees C acclimation: 0.257+/-0.030 mHz, 25 degrees C acclimation: 0.208+/-0.027 mHz recorded at 20 degrees C), reduced cuticular WLRs (from 1.058+/-0.537 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 0.900+/-0.400 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 20 degrees C) and reduced total WLR (from 4.2+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 3.1+/-0.5 mg h(-1) in 25 degrees C-acclimated beetles measured at 25 degrees C). Respiratory WLR was reduced from 2.25+/-0.40 mg h(-1) in 15 degrees C-acclimated beetles to 1.60+/-0.40 mg h

  6. Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE): Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) Capillary Fluid Dynamic Restriction Effects on Gas Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Marianne; Quinn, Jacqueline; Captain, Janine; Santiago-Bond, Josephine; Starr, Stanley

    2015-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) mission with the Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload aims to show the presence of water in lunar regolith, and establish a proving ground for NASAs mission to Mars. One of the analysis is performed by the Lunar Advanced Volatiles Analysis (LAVA) subsystem, which consists of a fluid network that facilitates the transport of volatile samples to a gas chromatograph and mass spectrometer (GC-MS) instrument. The understanding of fluid dynamics directed from the GC to the MS is important due to the influence of flow rates and pressures that affect the accuracy of and prevent the damage to the overall GC-MS instrument. The micro-scale capillary fluid network within the GC alone has various lengths and inner-diameters; therefore, determination of pressure differentials and flow rates are difficult to model computationally, with additional complexity from the vacuum conditions in space and lack of a lunar atmosphere. A series of tests were performed on an experimental set-up of the system where the inner diameters of the GC transfer line connecting to the MS were varied. The effect on chromatography readings were also studied by applying these lines onto a GC instrument. It was found that a smaller inner diameter transfer line resulted in a lower flow rate, as well as a lower pressure differential across the thermal conductivity detector (TCD) unit of the GC and a negligible pressure drop across the mock-up capillary column. The chromatography was affected with longer retention times and broader peak integrations. It was concluded that a 0.050 mm inner diameter line still proved most suitable for the systems flow rate preferences. In addition, it was evident that this small transfer line portrayed some expense to GC signal characteristics and the wait time for steady-state operation.

  7. A major locus involved in the formation of the radial oxygen loss barrier in adventitious roots of teosinte Zea nicaraguensis is located on the short-arm of chromosome 3.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohtaro; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Sato, Saori; Nishiuchi, Shunsaku; Omori, Fumie; Malik, Al Imran; Colmer, Timothy David; Mano, Yoshiro; Nakazono, Mikio

    2017-02-01

    A radial oxygen loss (ROL) barrier in roots of waterlogging-tolerant plants promotes oxygen movement via aerenchyma to the root tip, and impedes soil phytotoxin entry. The molecular mechanism and genetic regulation of ROL barrier formation are largely unknown. Zea nicaraguensis, a waterlogging-tolerant wild relative of maize (Zea mays ssp. mays), forms a tight ROL barrier in its roots when waterlogged. We used Z. nicaraguensis chromosome segment introgression lines (ILs) in maize (inbred line Mi29) to elucidate the chromosomal region involved in regulating root ROL barrier formation. A segment of the short-arm of chromosome 3 of Z. nicaraguensis conferred ROL barrier formation in the genetic background of maize. This chromosome segment also decreased apoplastic solute permeability across the hypodermis/exodermis. However, the IL and maize were similar for suberin staining in the hypodermis/exodermis at 40 mm and further behind the root tip. Z. nicaraguensis contained suberin in the hypodermis/exodermis at 20 mm and lignin at the epidermis. The IL with ROL barrier, however, did not contain lignin in the epidermis. Discovery of the Z. nicaraguensis chromosomal region responsible for root ROL barrier formation has improved knowledge of this trait and is an important step towards improvement of waterlogging tolerance in maize.

  8. Comparison of three lines of broilers differing in ascites susceptibility or growth rate. 2. Egg weight loss, gas pressures, embryonic heat production, and physiological hormone levels.

    PubMed

    De Smit, L; Tona, K; Bruggeman, V; Onagbesan, O; Hassanzadeh, M; Arckens, L; Decuypere, E

    2005-09-01

    Ascites is a metabolic disorder that accounts for over 25% of overall mortality in the broiler industry. This disorder is manifested between wk 5 and 6 posthatch, but there are previous indications that predisposition may be identified during embryonic development. In this current study, we determined embryonic physiological and metabolic parameters that may be associated with ascites predisposition. For this purpose, we used broiler eggs from 3 lines that differed in ascites sensitivity. These included an ascites-sensitive dam line (DAS), an ascites-resistant dam line (DAR), and an ascites-sensitive sire line (SASL). Eggs were incubated for 21 d under standard conditions. The following parameters were measured during incubation: egg weights at setting, egg weight losses at 18 d, embryo body weights and embryo heart weights throughout development, air cell partial gas pressures (pCO2 and pO2) levels at d 18 and at internal pipping (IP); plasma triiodothyronine, thyroxine, and corticosterone levels at d 18, IP, and hatch; heat production from d 17 until hatch, hematocrit values at hatch, and posthatch growth rate to 7 d along with hematocrit values. The data obtained revealed that selection for ascites sensitivity or rapid growth rate had no consistent influence on some of these parameters such that they could be wholly associated with ascites sensitivity for predictive purposes. Whereas differences in embryonic developmental patterns were apparent throughout embryonic development, these differences in physiological and metabolic parameters may be due partly to genetic differences unrelated to ascites sensitivity.

  9. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-02-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was carried out on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} to investigate oxygen deficiency ({delta}) of the sample. The TGA was performed in a controlled atmosphere using oxygen, argon, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with adjustable gas flow rates. In this experiment, the weight loss and gain of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} was directly measured by TGA. The weight change of the sample was evaluated at between 600 and 1250 C in air or 1000 C as a function of oxygen partial pressure. The oxygen deficiencies calculated from TGA data as a function of oxygen activity and temperature will be estimated and compared with that from neutron diffraction measurement in air. The LSFT and LSFT/CGO membranes were fabricated from the powder obtained from Praxair Specialty Ceramics. The sintered membranes were subjected to microstructure analysis and hardness analysis. The LSFT membrane is composed of fine grains with two kinds of grain morphology. The grain size distribution was characterized using image analysis. In LSFT/CGO membrane a lot of grain pullout was observed from the less dense, porous phase. The hardness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes were studied at various loads. The hardness values obtained from the cross section of the membranes were also compared to that of the values obtained from the surface. An electrochemical cell has been designed and built for measurements of the Seebeck coefficient as a function of temperature and pressure. Measurements on La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.55}Ti{sub 0.45}O{sub 3-{delta}} as a function of temperature an oxygen partial pressure are reported. Further analysis of the dilatometry data obtained previously is presented. A series of isotope transients

  10. 41 CFR 50-204.67 - Oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Oxygen. 50-204.67 Section..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.67 Oxygen. The in-plant transfer, handling, storage, and utilization of oxygen as a liquid or a compressed gas shall be in accordance with Compressed Gas...

  11. 41 CFR 50-204.67 - Oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Oxygen. 50-204.67..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.67 Oxygen. The in-plant transfer, handling, storage, and utilization of oxygen as a liquid or a compressed gas shall be in accordance with Compressed Gas...

  12. 41 CFR 50-204.67 - Oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Oxygen. 50-204.67..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.67 Oxygen. The in-plant transfer, handling, storage, and utilization of oxygen as a liquid or a compressed gas shall be in accordance with Compressed Gas...

  13. 41 CFR 50-204.67 - Oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Oxygen. 50-204.67 Section..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.67 Oxygen. The in-plant transfer, handling, storage, and utilization of oxygen as a liquid or a compressed gas shall be in accordance with Compressed Gas...

  14. 41 CFR 50-204.67 - Oxygen.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Oxygen. 50-204.67 Section..., Vapors, Fumes, Dusts, and Mists § 50-204.67 Oxygen. The in-plant transfer, handling, storage, and utilization of oxygen as a liquid or a compressed gas shall be in accordance with Compressed Gas...

  15. The effects of the pressure and the oxygen content of the sputtering gas on the structure and the properties of zinc oxy-nitride thin films deposited by reactive sputtering of zinc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nanke; Georgiev, Daniel G.; Jayatissa, Ahalapitiya H.

    2013-02-01

    Zinc nitride and oxy-nitride thin films were prepared by reactive magnetron rf sputtering of zinc in either nitrogen-argon or nitrogen-argon-oxygen ambient. The effects of varying the total sputtering pressure and the oxygen fraction in the total sputtering gas mixture on the microstructure, electrical and optical properties were investigated. With increasing the sputtering pressure, the dominant phase comprising the film material changes from the crystalline zinc nitride phase to crystalline zinc oxide. The characteristic pressure, at which this change in the dominant phase is observed, decreases with the increase of the oxygen fraction in the total sputtering gas mixture. The increase of the oxygen content in the films (from 5 at.% to a maximum of 40 at.%) and the downward shift in the optical absorption edge (from 920 to 400 nm), combined with the x-ray diffraction data, support these observations, indicating the controllable fabrication of an oxy-nitride film material. Correlations between the films’ fabrication conditions, including post-deposition annealing, their structure and composition, and their electrical properties are examined as well.

  16. Rapid loss of structural motifs in the manganese complex of oxygenic photosynthesis by X-ray irradiation at 10-300 K.

    PubMed

    Grabolle, Markus; Haumann, Michael; Müller, Claudia; Liebisch, Peter; Dau, Holger

    2006-02-24

    Structural changes upon photoreduction caused by x-ray irradiation of the water-oxidizing tetramanganese complex of photosystem II were investigated by x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the manganese K-edge. Photoreduction was directly proportional to the x-ray dose. It was faster in the higher oxidized S2 state than in S1; seemingly the oxidizing potential of the metal site governs the rate. X-ray irradiation of the S1 state at 15 K initially caused single-electron reduction to S0* accompanied by the conversion of one di-mu-oxo bridge between manganese atoms, previously separated by approximately 2.7 A, to a mono-mu-oxo motif. Thereafter, manganese photoreduction was 100 times slower, and the biphasic increase in its rate between 10 and 300 K with a breakpoint at approximately 200 K suggests that protein dynamics is rate-limiting the radical chemistry. For photoreduction at similar x-ray doses as applied in protein crystallography, halfway to the final Mn(II)4 state the complete loss of inter-manganese distances <3 A was observed, even at 10 K, because of the destruction of mu-oxo bridges between manganese ions. These results put into question some structural attributions from recent protein crystallography data on photosystem II. It is proposed to employ controlled x-ray photoreduction in metalloprotein research for: (i) population of distinct reduced states, (ii) estimating the redox potential of buried metal centers, and (iii) research on protein dynamics.

  17. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 2: Nitrogen and ambient oxygen testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brannam, R. J.; Buckmann, P. S.; Chen, B. H.; Church, S. J.; Sabiers, R. L.

    1990-01-01

    The testing of a rocket engine oxygen turbopump using high pressure ambient temperature nitrogen and oxygen as the turbine drive gas in separate test series is discussed. The pumped fluid was liquid nitrogen or liquid oxygen. The turbopump (TPA) is designed to operate with 400 F oxygen turbine drive gas which will be demonstrated in a subsequent test series. Following bearing tests, the TPA was finish machined (impeller blading and inlet/outlet ports). Testing started on 15 February 1989 and was successfully concluded on 21 March 1989. Testing started using nitrogen to reduce the ignition hazard during initial TPA checkout. The Hydrostatic Bearing System requires a Bearing Pressurization System. Initial testing used a separate bearing supply to prevent a rubbing start. Two test series were successfully completed with the bearing assist supplied only by the pump second stage output which entailed a rubbing start until pump pressure builds up. The final test series used ambient oxygen drive and no external bearing assist. Total operating time was 2268 seconds. There were 14 starts without bearing assist and operating speeds up to 80,000 rpm were logged. Teardown examination showed some smearing of silverplated bearing surfaces but no exposure of the underlying monel material. There was no evidence of melting or oxidation due to the oxygen exposure. The articulating, self-centering hydrostatic bearing exhibited no bearing load or stability problems. The only anomaly was higher than predicted flow losses which were attributed to a faulty ring seal. The TPA will be refurbished prior to the 400 F oxygen test series but its condition is acceptable, as is, for continued operating. This was a highly successful test program.

  18. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Air or Gas Embolism; Carbon Monoxide Poisoning; Clostridial Myositis and Myonecrosis (Gas Gangrene); Crush Injury, Compartment Syndrome & Other Acute Traumatic Ischemias; Decompression Sickness; Peripheral Arterial Insufficiency and Central Retinal Artery Occlusion; Severe Anemia; Intracranial Abscess; Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infections; Osteomyelitis (Refractory); Delayed Radiation Injury (Soft Tissue and Bony Necrosis); Compromised Grafts and Flaps; Acute Thermal Burn Injury; Idiopathic Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss

  19. Dissolved oxygen: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senn, David; Downing-Kunz, Maureen; Novick, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration serves as an important indicator of estuarine habitat condition, because all aquatic macro-organisms require some minimum DO level to survive and prosper. The instantaneous DO concentration, measured at a specific location in the water column, results from a balance between multiple processes that add or remove oxygen (Figure 6.1): primary production produces O2; aerobic respiration in the water column and sediments consumes O2; abiotic or microbially-mediated biogeochemical reactions utilize O2 as an oxidant (e.g., oxidation of ammonium, sulfide, and ferrous iron); O2 exchange occurs across the air:water interface in response to under- or oversaturated DO concentrations in the water column; and water currents and turbulent mixing transport DO into and out of zones in the water column. If the oxygen loss rate exceeds the oxygen production or input rate, DO concentration decreases. When DO losses exceed production or input over a prolonged enough period of time, hypoxia ((<2-3 mg/L) or anoxia can develop. Persistent hypoxia or anoxia causes stress or death in aquatic organism populations, or for organisms that can escape a hypoxic or anoxic area, the loss of habitat. In addition, sulfide, which is toxic to aquatic organisms and causes odor problems, escapes from sediments under low oxygen conditions. Low dissolved oxygen is a common aquatic ecosystem response to elevated organic

  20. Make Liquid Oxygen in Your Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, M. M. J.; Hibbert, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the component gases of air at room temperature, making up around 20% of the atmosphere. But can oxygen be liquified? This article details a method for making small amounts of liquid oxygen in the classroom if there is no access to a cylinder of compressed oxygen gas, and two methods for identifying the fact that it is liquid…

  1. Monitoring Oxygen Status.

    PubMed

    Toffaletti, J G; Rackley, C R

    Although part of a common "blood gas" test panel with pH and pCO2, the pO2, %O2Hb, and related parameters are independently used to detect and monitor oxygen deficits from a variety of causes. Measurement of blood gases and cooximetry may be done by laboratory analyzers, point of care testing, noninvasive pulse oximetry, and transcutaneous blood gases. The specimen type and mode of monitoring oxygenation that are chosen may be based on a combination of urgency, practicality, clinical need, and therapeutic objectives. Because oxygen concentrations in blood are extremely labile, there are several highly important preanalytical practices necessary to prevent errors in oxygen and cooximetry results. Effective utilization of oxygen requires binding by hemoglobin in the lungs, transport in the blood, and release to tissues, where cellular respiration occurs. Hydrogen ion (pH), CO2, temperature, and 2,3-DPG all play important roles in these processes. Additional measurements and calculations are often used to interpret and locate the cause and source of an oxygen deficit. These include the Hb concentration, Alveolar-arterial pO2 gradient, pO2:FIO2 ratio, oxygenation index, O2 content and O2 delivery, and pulmonary dead space and intrapulmonary shunting. The causes of hypoxemia will be covered and, to illustrate how the oxygen parameters are used clinically in the diagnosis and management of patients with abnormal oxygenation, two clinical cases will be presented and described.

  2. Relationship of Exercise, Age, and Gender on Decompression Sickness and Venous Gas Emboli During 2-Hour Oxygen Prebreathe Prior to Hypobaric Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Foster, P. P.; Pilmanis, A. A.; Butler, B. D.; Beltran, E.; Fife, C. E.; Vann, R. D.; Gerth, W. A.; Loftin, K. C.; Paloski, William H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated four 2-hour oxygen prebreathe protocols combining adynamia (non-walking) and 4 different amounts of exercise for potential use with extravehicular activity (EVA) on the International Space Station. Phase I: upper and lower body exercises using dual-cycle ergometry (75% VO2 max for 10 min). Phase 11: same ergometry plus 24 min of light exercise that simulated space suit preparations. Phase III: same 24 min of light exercise but no ergometry, and Phase IV: 56 min of light exercise without ergometry. After 80 min on 100% O2, the subjects breathed 26.5% O2 - 73.5% N2 for 30 min at 10.2 psi. All subjects performed a series of upper body exercises from a recumbent position for 4 hrs at 4.3 psi to simulate EVA work. Venous gas emboli (VGE) were monitored every 12 min using precordial Doppler ultrasound. The 39 female and 126 male exposures were analyzed for correlations between decompression sickness (DCS) or VGE, and risk variables. The duration and quantity of exercise during prebreathe inversely relates to DCS and VGE incidence. The type and distribution of the 19 cases of DCS were similar to historical cases. There was no correlation of age, gender, body mass index, or fitness level with greater incidence of DCS or all VGE. However there were more Grade IV VGE in males > 40 years (10 of 19) than in those =< 40 years (3 of 107), with p<0.01 from Fisher's Exact Chi square The latency time for VGE was longer (103 min +/- 56 SD, n = 15 versus 53 min +/- 31, n =13) when the ergometry occurred about 15 min into the prebreathe than when performed at the start of the prebreathe, but the order of the ergometry did not influence the overall DCS and VGE incidence. An increasing amount of exercise during prebreathes reduced the risk of DCS during subsequent exposures to 4.3 psi. Age, gender, or fitness level did not correlate with the incidence of DCS or VGE (combination of Grades I-IV). However males greater than 40 years had a higher incidence of Grade IV VGE.

  3. The Anaesthesia Gas Supply System

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sabyasachi; Chattopadhyay, Subhrajyoti; Bose, Payel

    2013-01-01

    The anaesthesia gas supply system is designed to provide a safe, cost-effective and convenient system for the delivery of medical gases at the point of-use. The doctrine of the anaesthesia gas supply system is based on four essential principles: Identity, continuity, adequacy and quality. Knowledge about gas supply system is an integral component of safe anaesthetic practice. Mishaps involving the malfunction or misuse of medical gas supply to operating theatres have cost many lives. The medical gases used in anaesthesia and intensive care are oxygen, nitrous oxide, medical air, entonox, carbon dioxide and heliox. Oxygen is one of the most widely used gases for life-support and respiratory therapy besides anaesthetic procedures. In this article, an effort is made to describe the production, storage and delivery of anaesthetic gases. The design of anaesthesia equipment must take into account the local conditions such as climate, demand and power supply. The operational policy of the gas supply system should have a backup plan to cater to the emergency need of the hospital, in the event of the loss of the primary source of supply. PMID:24249882

  4. Ceramic oxygen transport membrane array reactor and reforming method

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Sean M.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Rosen, Lee J.; Robinson, Charles; Wilson, Jamie R.; Gonzalez, Javier E.; Doraswami, Uttam R.

    2016-09-27

    A commercially viable modular ceramic oxygen transport membrane reforming reactor for producing a synthesis gas that improves the thermal coupling of reactively-driven oxygen transport membrane tubes and catalyst reforming tubes required to efficiently and effectively produce synthesis gas.

  5. Oxygen Transport Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay

    2008-08-30

    The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the

  6. Using oxygen at home

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen - home use; COPD - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive airways disease - home oxygen; Chronic obstructive lung disease - home oxygen; Chronic bronchitis - home oxygen; Emphysema - home oxygen; Chronic respiratory ...

  7. Application of dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in effluents from the production of petroleum bitumen.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Makoś, Patrycja; Przyjazny, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    We present a new procedure for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of postoxidative effluents from the production of petroleum bitumens using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry. The eight extraction parameters were optimized for 43 oxygenated volatile organic compounds. The detection limits obtained ranged from 0.07 to 0.82 μg/mL for most of the analytes, the precision was good (relative standard deviation below 2.91% at the 5 μg/mL level and 4.75% at the limit of quantification), the recoveries for the majority of compounds varied from 70.6 to 118.9%, and the linear range was wide, which demonstrates the usefulness of the procedure. The developed procedure was used for the determination of oxygenated volatile organic compounds in samples of raw postoxidative effluents and in effluents after chemical treatment. In total, 23 compounds at concentration levels from 0.37 to 32.95 μg/mL were identified in real samples. The same samples were also analyzed in the SCAN mode, which resulted in four more phenol derivatives being identified and tentatively determined. The studies demonstrated the need for monitoring volatile organic compounds content in effluents following various treatments due to the formation of secondary oxygenated volatile organic compounds.

  8. Oxygen supplies in disaster management.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Thomas C; Branson, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    Mass casualty events and disasters, both natural and human-generated, occur frequently around the world and can generate scores of injured or ill victims in need of resources. Of the available medical supplies, oxygen remains the critical consumable resource in disaster management. Strategic management of oxygen supplies in disaster scenarios remains a priority. Hospitals have large supplies of liquid oxygen and a supply of compressed gas oxygen cylinders that allow several days of reserve, but a large influx of patients from a disaster can strain these resources. Most backup liquid oxygen supplies are attached to the main liquid system and supply line. In the event of damage to the main system, the reserve supply is rendered useless. The Strategic National Stockpile supplies medications, medical supplies, and equipment to disaster areas, but it does not supply oxygen. Contracted vendors can deliver oxygen to alternate care facilities in disaster areas, in the form of concentrators, compressed gas cylinders, and liquid oxygen. Planning for oxygen needs following a disaster still presents a substantial challenge, but alternate care facilities have proven to be valuable in relieving pressure from the mass influx of patients into hospitals, especially for those on home oxygen who require only an electrical source to power their oxygen concentrator.

  9. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    DOEpatents

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  10. Short period of oxygenation releases latch on peat decomposition.

    PubMed

    Brouns, Karlijn; Verhoeven, Jos T A; Hefting, Mariet M

    2014-05-15

    Extreme summer droughts are expected to occur more often in the future in NW Europe due to climate change. These droughts might accelerate the rate of peat oxidation in drained peat areas, with impacts on soil subsidence, GHG emission and water quality. This study aimed at providing more insight in the oxidation of deep peat layers that had not previously been exposed to air, the so-called secondary decomposition. We incubated two types of peat (eutrophic and oligotrophic), sampled from permanently anoxic peat layers from nature reserves and agricultural peat meadows. Peat samples were incubated for thirteen weeks under anoxic conditions, but were exposed to air for one to eight weeks. The production of CO2 and CH4 was quantified as a proxy for decomposition; concentrations of soluble nutrients and phenolic compounds were also measured. The results showed that oxygenation led to a steep increase in the rate of decomposition, indicated by higher carbon loss rates during and after oxygenation compared to non-oxygenated samples. Carbon loss rates increased more for eutrophic peat (agricultural area: 352%, nature reserve: 182%) than for oligotrophic peat (83% and 159% respectively). Most peat samples investigated showed higher post-oxygenation CO2 and/or CH4 production compared to the anoxic pre-oxygenation period. This indicates that oxygenation stimulates decomposition, even after anoxic conditions have returned. Contrary to the enzymic latch theory, no effects of oxygenation on the concentrations of soluble or condensed phenolic compounds were detected. Soluble nutrient concentrations did not change due to oxygenation either. Noteworthy is the occurrence of pyrite mineralization and associated acidification in eutrophic peat. Thus, low summer water levels, for example due to climate change, should be avoided in order to limit exceptionally high decomposition rates and associated problems such as increasing subsidence rates, greenhouse gas emission, sulfate release

  11. Single Step Bi-reforming and Oxidative Bi-reforming of Methane (Natural Gas) with Steam and Carbon Dioxide to Metgas (CO-2H2) for Methanol Synthesis: Self-Sufficient Effective and Exclusive Oxygenation of Methane to Methanol with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Goeppert, Alain; Czaun, Miklos; Mathew, Thomas; May, Robert B; Prakash, G K Surya

    2015-07-15

    Catalysts based on suitable metal oxide supports, such as NiO/MgO and CoO/MgO, were shown to be active for single step bi-reforming, the combined steam and dry reforming of methane or natural gas with H2O and CO2 exclusively to metgas (CO-2H2) for efficient methanol synthesis. Reactions were carried out in a tubular flow reactor under pressures up to 42 bar at 830-910 °C. Using a CH4 to steam to CO2 ratio of ∼3:2:1 in the gas feed, the H2/CO ratio of 2:1 was achieved, which is desired for subsequent methanol synthesis. The needed 2/1 steam/CO2 feed ratio together with the reaction heat for the endothermic bi-reforming can be conveniently obtained by the complete combustion of a quarter part of the overall used methane (natural gas) with oxygen of the air (oxidative bi-reforming). Complete combustion of a part of methane followed by bi-reforming leads to the production of metgas (H2/CO in 2:1 mol ratio) for self-sufficient exclusive methanol synthesis. The long sought after but elusive efficient and selective oxygenation of methane to methanol is thus achieved in an effective and economic way without any oxidation byproduct formation according to CH4 + 1/2O2 → CH3OH.

  12. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    PubMed

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (P<0.05) in TVC and sensory parameters were observed for poultry samples stored under a high-oxygen atmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets.

  13. Environmental science: Oceans lose oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Denis

    2017-02-01

    Oxygen is essential to most life in the ocean. An analysis shows that oxygen levels have declined by 2% in the global ocean over the past five decades, probably causing habitat loss for many fish and invertebrate species. See Letter p.335

  14. [Apneic oxygenation].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, A V; Vyzhigina, M A; Parshin, V D; Fedorov, D S

    2013-01-01

    Recent technological advances in thoracic and tracheal surgery make the anaesthesiologist use different respiratory techniques during the operation. Apneic oxygenation is a one of alternative techniques. This method is relatively easy in use, does not require special expensive equipment and is the only possible technique in several clinical situations when other respiratory methods are undesirable or cannot be used. However there is no enough information about apneic oxygenation in Russian. This article reviews publications about apneic oxygenation. The review deals with experiments on diffusion respiration in animals, physiological changes during apneic oxygenation in man and defines clinical cases when apneic oxygenation can be used.

  15. Origin of the Two-Dimensional Electron Gas at LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interfaces: The Role of Oxygen Vacancies and Electronic Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Li, C. J.; Lü, W. M.; Huang, X. H.; Huang, Z.; Zeng, S. W.; Qiu, X. P.; Huang, L. S.; Annadi, A.; Chen, J. S.; Coey, J. M. D.; Venkatesan, T.; Ariando

    2013-04-01

    The relative importance of atomic defects and electron transfer in explaining conductivity at the crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface has been a topic of debate. Metallic interfaces with similar electronic properties produced by amorphous oxide overlayers on SrTiO3 [Y. Chen , Nano Lett. 11, 3774 (2011)NALEFD1530-698410.1021/nl201821j; S. W. Lee , Nano Lett. 12, 4775 (2012)NALEFD1530-698410.1021/nl302214x] have called in question the original polarization catastrophe model [N. Nakagawa , Nature Mater. 5, 204 (2006)NMAACR1476-112210.1038/nmat1569]. We resolve the issue by a comprehensive comparison of (100)-oriented SrTiO3 substrates with crystalline and amorphous overlayers of LaAlO3 of different thicknesses prepared under different oxygen pressures. For both types of overlayers, there is a critical thickness for the appearance of conductivity, but its value is always 4 unit cells (around 1.6 nm) for the oxygen-annealed crystalline case, whereas in the amorphous case, the critical thickness could be varied in the range 0.5 to 6 nm according to the deposition conditions. Subsequent ion milling of the overlayer restores the insulating state for the oxygen-annealed crystalline heterostructures but not for the amorphous ones. Oxygen post-annealing removes the oxygen vacancies, and the interfaces become insulating in the amorphous case. However, the interfaces with a crystalline overlayer remain conducting with reduced carrier density. These results demonstrate that oxygen vacancies are the dominant source of mobile carriers when the LaAlO3 overlayer is amorphous, while both oxygen vacancies and polarization catastrophe contribute to the interface conductivity in unannealed crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures, and the polarization catastrophe alone accounts for the conductivity in oxygen-annealed crystalline LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures. Furthermore, we find that the crystallinity of the LaAlO3 layer is crucial for the polarization catastrophe mechanism in the

  16. Effect of oxygen concentration on the spike formation during reactive ion etching of SiC using the mixed gas plasma of NF{sub 3} and O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tasaka, A.; Watanabe, E.; Kai, T.; Shimizu, W.; Kanatani, T.; Inaba, M.; Tojo, T.; Tanaka, M.; Abe, T.; Ogumi, Z.

    2007-03-15

    Reactive ion etching (RIE) of poly-{beta}-SiC was investigated in the NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} mixture gas plasma. The addition of 10% oxygen concentration to the NF{sub 3} plasma increased the etching rate to {approx}80 nm/min at a total pressure of 10 Pa and 997 nm/min at a total pressure of 20 Pa. The ratio of increase in etching rate against that in the pure NF{sub 3} plasma was {approx}43%. RIE for longer than 30 min in the 90% NF{sub 3} and 10% O{sub 2} mixture gas plasma gave a much smoother surface than that etched in the pure NF{sub 3} plasma. However, the further addition of O{sub 2} decreased the etching rate. Optical-emission spectra indicated the presence of an oxygen radical, in addition to fluorine radical and molecular nitrogen cations, in the NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} mixture gas plasma. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy analysis of the etched samples revealed that the SiO{sub 2} layer was formed on the surface at the higher O{sub 2} concentration. The role of oxygen in the NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} mixture gas plasma was elucidated. Scanning electron microscopy observation revealed that many thornlike substances, i.e., spikes, were formed on the SiC surface during RIE at the total pressure of 10 Pa. Images of the cross section of spike formed during RIE at the total pressure of 2 Pa also indicated that the sputtered aluminum particle from a mask may be preferentially deposited on the top of carbon-rich island formed on the SiC surface and act as a micromask together with carbon on the carbon-rich island to form a thornlike spike. An etching model of the SiC surface and the mechanism on formation and growth of the spike on the SiC surface in the NF{sub 3}/O{sub 2} mixture gas plasma are proposed.

  17. Synthetic carriers of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Dellacherie, E; Labrude, P; Vigneron, C; Riess, J G

    1987-01-01

    During the last decade, construction of artificial carriers of oxygen for transfusion purposes has evolved in three main directions, which can be reviewed as follows. The first approach consists of modifying hemoglobin (Hb), the natural oxygen carrier, in order to lower its oxygen affinity and increase its intravascular persistence. To achieve this aim, two basic procedures have been used: molecular and environmental modification. In the first case, Hb is modified with chemical reagents; the second requires encapsulation of Hb to obtain artificial erythrocytes. The second approach is based on the use of synthetic oxygen-carrying chelates that mimic the oxygenation function of Hb. The main products in this class are metalloporphyrins, whose chemical environment is designed to render them efficient as reversible carriers of oxygen in vivo. Finally, the third approach deals with the perfluorochemicals used in emulsified form. Perfluorochemical liquids are excellent gas solvents, but some problems remain unsolved with regard to their development as oxygen carriers in vivo: low O2 dissolving capacity, toxicity, and excretion.

  18. Simultaneous analysis of oxygenated and nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on standard reference material 1649a (urban dust) and on natural ambient air samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation.

    PubMed

    Albinet, A; Leoz-Garziandia, E; Budzinski, H; Viilenave, E

    2006-07-14

    This study deals with the development of a routine analytical method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with negative ion chemical ionisation (GC/NICI-MS) for the determination of 17 nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) and 9 oxygenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OPAHs) present at low concentrations in the atmosphere. This method includes a liquid chromatography purification procedure on solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge. Application of this analytical procedure has been performed on standard reference material (SRM 1649a: urban dust), giving results in good agreement with the few data available in the literature. The analytical method was also applied on ambient air samples (on both gas and particulate phases) from the French POVA program (POllution des Vallées Alpines). NPAHs concentrations observed for a rural site during the Winter period are about 0.2-100.0pgm(-3) in the particulate phase and about 0.0-20.0pgm(-3) in the gas phase. OPAHs present concentrations 10-100 times higher (0.1-2.0ngm(-3) and 0.0-1.4ngm(-3) for the particulate and the gas phases, respectively). These preliminary results show a good correlation between the characteristics of the sampling site and the compound origins (primary or secondary).

  19. Fabrication and operation of an oxygen insert for adherent cellular cultures.

    PubMed

    Oppegard, Shawn; Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David

    2010-01-06

    Oxygen is a key modulator of many cellular pathways, but current devices permitting in vitro oxygen modulation fail to meet the needs of biomedical research. The hypoxic chamber offers a simple system to control oxygenation in standard culture vessels, but lacks precise temporal and spatial control over the oxygen concentration at the cell surface, preventing its application in studying a variety of physiological phenomena. Other systems have improved upon the hypoxic chamber, but require specialized knowledge and equipment for their operation, making them intimidating for the average researcher. A microfabricated insert for multiwell plates has been developed to more effectively control the temporal and spatial oxygen concentration to better model physiological phenomena found in vivo. The platform consists of a polydimethylsiloxane insert that nests into a standard multiwell plate and serves as a passive microfluidic gas network with a gas-permeable membrane aimed to modulate oxygen delivery to adherent cells. The device is simple to use and is connected to gas cylinders that provide the pressure to introduce the desired oxygen concentration into the platform. Fabrication involves a combination of standard SU-8 photolithography, replica molding, and defined PDMS spinning on a silicon wafer. The components of the device are bonded after surface treatment using a hand-held plasma system. Validation is accomplished with a planar fluorescent oxygen sensor. Equilibration time is on the order of minutes and a wide variety of oxygen profiles can be attained based on the device design, such as the cyclic profile achieved in this study, and even oxygen gradients to mimic those found in vivo. The device can be sterilized for cell culture using common methods without loss of function. The device's applicability to studying the in vitro wound healing response will be demonstrated.

  20. Effect of annealing in a various oxygen atmosphere on structural, optical, electrical and gas sensing properties of MoxOy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfaoui, A.; Ouni, B.; Touihri, S.; Mhamdi, A.; Labidi, A.; Manoubi, T.

    2015-07-01

    Molybdenum oxide thin films were thermally evaporated on a glass substrate and monitored by an annealing process in a variable oxygen atmosphere. The effects of post annealing condition on the microstructural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscope, spectroscopic ellipsometry and impedance spectroscopy. As-deposited amorphous films crystallized into tetragonal metastable phase of Mo5O14 on annealing at 500 °C in vacuum and air. This structure transformed to stable orthorhombic of MoO3 with annealing in oxygen environment. The optical parameters such as the refractive index, extinction coefficient, optical band gap energy and the Urbach energy were calculated from Cauchy formalism. Ellipsometric measurements reveal that the samples present optical gap located between 3.24 and 3.90 eV when the atmosphere becomes rich on oxygen. The variation of the conductivity in terms of the temperature shows an electrical behavior with oxygen environment. Finally, it has been found that MoO3 thin films had high sensitivity to ethanol, which made them as a good candidate for the ethanol sensor.

  1. Ultraviolet assisted processing: A unique approach to mitigate oxygen vacancies and attain low loss highly tunable Ba0.60Sr0.40TiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. W.; Toonen, R. C.; Ivill, M.; Hirsch, S. G.; Ngo, E.; Hubbard, C.

    2011-12-01

    Isothermal (700 °C) ultraviolet annealing (UVA) processing of crystallized Ba0.60Sr0.40TiO3 (BST) thin films for exposure times up to 225 min films has been studied. The BST films, grown on PtSi wafers via the metalorganic solution deposition (MOSD) technique, were crystallized via conventional furnace annealing (CFA) prior to UVA treatment, and the effects of UV annealing time on the structural, dielectric, and insulation properties were evaluated. The experimental results demonstrated significantly improved structural, dielectric, and insulation properties for the UVA films. Specifically, lattice parameter contraction (toward that of bulk BST60/40) and a 20% reduction in loss were observed for the UVA treated films with respect to the CFA/control film. Leakage current characteristics were found to be the most sensitive characterization technique to access material property modification as a result of UVA exposure time. Specifically, the 225 min UVA exposure time resulted in a three-order of magnitude reduction in leakage current density compared to the CFA film, and the lowest value observed was 1.06 × 10-7 A/cm2 at E = 300 kV/cm. The useable tunability (tunability value at the maximum acceptable leakage current, 500 pA) was found to be elevated by a factor of two with respect to that of the CFA/control BST film (52.31%/UVA film vs. 18.5%/control film). It is suggested that the improved material properties are due to the mitigation of unwanted oxygen vacancies within the film after UV-annealing. A mechanistic model is presented and discussed.

  2. Kinetics of the gas-phase reaction between ozone and three unsaturated oxygenated compounds: Ethyl 3,3-dimethyl acrylate, 2-methyl-2-pentenal and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona Colmán, Elizabeth; Blanco, María B.; Barnes, Ian; Teruel, Mariano A.

    2015-05-01

    Rate coefficients for the gas-phase reactions of O3 molecules with three unsaturated oxygenated compounds have been determined using the relative kinetic technique in an environmental chamber with FTIR detection of the reactants at (298 ± 2) K in 760 Torr total pressure of synthetic air. The following rate coefficients (in units of 10-17 cm3 molecule-1 s-1) were determined: ethyl 3,3-dimethyl acrylate (0.82 ± 0.19), 2-methyl-2-pentenal (0.71 ± 0.16) and 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one (26 ± 7). The different reactivity of the unsaturated oxygenated compounds toward O3 is discussed in terms of their chemical structure. In addition, a correlation between the reactivity of structurally different unsaturated compounds (alkenes and unsaturated oxygenated VOCs, such as ethers, esters, aldehydes, ketones and alcohols) toward O3 molecules and the HOMO (Highest Occupied Molecular Orbital) of the compounds is presented. Using the kinetic parameters determined in this work, residence times of these unsaturated compounds in the atmosphere with respect to reaction with O3 have been calculated. In urban and rural areas the main sink of 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one is reaction with O3 molecules with a residence time in the order of few minutes.

  3. Enhancement of oxygen mass transfer and gas holdup using palm oil in stirred tank bioreactors with xanthan solutions as simulated viscous fermentation broths.

    PubMed

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Krishnan, Jagannathan; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V P S

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44 h(-1). It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients.

  4. Enhancement of Oxygen Mass Transfer and Gas Holdup Using Palm Oil in Stirred Tank Bioreactors with Xanthan Solutions as Simulated Viscous Fermentation Broths

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Sauid, Suhaila; Huey Ling, Tan; Veluri, Murthy V. P. S.

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric mass transfer coefficient (kLa) is an important parameter in bioreactors handling viscous fermentations such as xanthan gum production, as it affects the reactor performance and productivity. Published literatures showed that adding an organic phase such as hydrocarbons or vegetable oil could increase the kLa. The present study opted for palm oil as the organic phase as it is plentiful in Malaysia. Experiments were carried out to study the effect of viscosity, gas holdup, and kLa on the xanthan solution with different palm oil fractions by varying the agitation rate and aeration rate in a 5 L bench-top bioreactor fitted with twin Rushton turbines. Results showed that 10% (v/v) of palm oil raised the kLa of xanthan solution by 1.5 to 3 folds with the highest kLa value of 84.44 h−1. It was also found that palm oil increased the gas holdup and viscosity of the xanthan solution. The kLa values obtained as a function of power input, superficial gas velocity, and palm oil fraction were validated by two different empirical equations. Similarly, the gas holdup obtained as a function of power input and superficial gas velocity was validated by another empirical equation. All correlations were found to fit well with higher determination coefficients. PMID:24350269

  5. High Temperature Langasite SAW Oxygen Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Chin, Tao-Lun; Greve, David; Oppenheim, Irving; Malone, Vanessa; Cao, Limin

    2011-08-01

    High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensors using sputtered ZnO as a resistive gas-sensing layer were fabricated and tested. Sensitivity to oxygen gas was observed between 500°C to 700°C, with a sensitivity peak at about 625°C, consistent with the theoretical predictions of the acoustoelectric effect.

  6. Hot oxygen corona of Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Ip, W.H.

    1988-10-01

    Electron dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions in the Venus ionosphere, which may be an important source of suprathermal atomic oxygen, is presently considered as a factor in the Mars exosphere; due to the weaker surface gravitational attraction of Mars, a hot oxygen corona thus formed would be denser than that of Venus at altitudes greater than 2000 km despite Mars' lower ionospheric content. If such an extended oxygen corona does exist on Mars, its collisional interaction with Phobos would lead to the formation of an oxygen gas torus whose average number density is of the order of only 1-2/cu cm along the Phobos orbit. 51 references.

  7. Pressure Physiology: Studies of Acute and Chronic Exposures to Increased Pressures of Oxygen and Inert Gases in Diving, Decompression and Therapy of Decompression and Isobaric Gas Lesion Diseases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-31

    Jr. and E.D. Thalmann. CNS oxygen toxicity in closed - circuit scuba divers. In: Underwater Physiology VIII, ed. by Bachrach, A.J. and Matzen, M.M...residual capacity, total lung capacity), closing volumes, carbon monoxide diffusing capacity, alveolar-arterial P02 and PCO2 values, static and dynamic...inspiratory and expiratory reserve volume, residual volume, functional residual capacity, total lung capacity), closing volumes, carbon monoxide

  8. Atomic oxygen reactor having at least one sidearm conduit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for treating a microporous structure with atomic oxygen is presented. The apparatus includes a main gas chamber for flowing gas in an axial direction and a source of gas, containing atomic oxygen, connected for introducing the gas into the main gas chamber. The apparatus employs at least one side arm extending from the main atomic oxygen-containing chamber. The side arm has characteristic relaxation times such that a uniform atomic oxygen dose rate is delivered to a specimen positioned transversely in the side arm spaced from the main gas chamber.

  9. Theoretical studies of the infrared emission from circumstellar dust shells: the infrared characteristics of circumstellar silicates and the mass-loss rate of oxygen-rich late-type giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, W. A.; Tielens, A. G.; Allamandola, L. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1989-01-01

    We have modeled the infrared emission of spherically symmetric, circumstellar dust shells with the aim of deriving the infrared absorption properties of circumstellar silicate grains and the mass-loss rates of the central stars. As a basis for our numerical studies, a simple semianalytical formula has been derived that illustrates the essential characteristics of the infrared emission of such dust shells. A numerical radiative transfer program has been developed and applied to dust shells around oxygen-rich late-type giants. Free parameters in such models include the absorption properties and density distribution of the dust. An approximate, analytical expression is derived for the density distribution of circumstellar dust driven outward by radiation pressure from a central source. A large grid of models has been calculated to study the influence of the free parameters on the emergent spectrum. These results form the basis for a comparison with near-infrared observations. Observational studies have revealed a correlation between the near-infrared color temperature, Tc, and the strength of the 10 micrometers emission or absorption feature, A10. This relationship, which essentially measures the near-infrared optical depth in terms of the 10 micrometers optical depth, is discussed. Theoretical A10-Tc relations have been calculated and compared to the observations. The results show that this relation is a sensitive way to determine the ratio of the near-infrared to 10 micrometers absorption efficiency of circumstellar silicates. These results as well as previous studies show that the near-infrared absorption efficiency of circumstellar silicate grains is much higher than expected from terrestrial minerals. We suggest that this enhanced absorption is due to the presence of ferrous iron (Fe2+) color centers dissolved in the circumstellar silicates. By using the derived value for the ratio of the near-infrared to 10 micrometers absorption efficiency, the observed A10-Tc

  10. [Oxygen Leukocyte Larceny].

    PubMed

    Pinto da Costa, Miguel; Pimenta Coelho, Henrique

    2016-05-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old male patient, previously diagnosed with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, who was admitted to the Emergency Room with dyspnea. The initial evaluation revealed severe anemia (Hgb = 5.0 g/dL) with hyperleukocytosis (800.000/µL), nearly all of the cells being mature lymphocytes, a normal chest X-ray and a low arterial oxygen saturation (89%; pulse oximetry). After red blood cell transfusion, Hgb values rose (9.0 g/dL) and there was a complete reversion of the dyspnea. Yet, subsequent arterial blood gas analysis, without the administration of supplemental oxygen, systematically revealed very low oxygen saturation values (~ 46%), which was inconsistent with the patientâs clinical state and his pulse oximetry values (~ 87%), and these values were not corrected by the administration of oxygen via non-rebreather mask. The investigation performed allowed to establish the diagnosis of oxygen leukocyte larceny, a phenomenon which conceals the true oxygen saturation due to peripheral consumption by leukocytes.

  11. Tuning the Activity of Oxygen in LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 Battery Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Karki, Khim; Huang, Yiqing; Hwang, Sooyeon; Gamalski, Andrew D; Whittingham, M Stanley; Zhou, Guangwen; Stach, Eric A

    2016-10-06

    Layered transition metal oxides such as LiNi0.8Co 0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) are highly desirable battery electrodes. However, these materials suffer from thermal runaway caused by deleterious oxygen loss and surface phase transitions when in highly overcharged and overheated conditions, prompting serious safety concerns. Using in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy techniques, we demonstrate that surface oxygen loss and structural changes in the highly overcharged NCA particles are suppressed by exposing them to an oxygen-rich environment. The onset temperature for the loss of oxygen from the electrode particle is delayed to 350 °C at oxygen gas overpressure of 400 mTorr. Similar heating of the particles in a reducing hydrogen gas demonstrated a quick onset of oxygen loss at 150 °C and rapid surface degradation of the particles. The results reported here illustrate the fundamental mechanism governing the failure processes of electrode particles and highlight possible strategies to circumvent such issues.

  12. Pulsed Source Of Energetic Oxygen Atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, George; Krech, Robert; Green, David; Pirri, Anthony

    1988-01-01

    Apparatus developed that generates high-flux pulses of oxygen atoms to bombard specimens in experiments on aging and degradation of materials in low Earth-orbit environment. Preliminary studies of specimens irradiated with atomic oxygen provided spectral evidence of erosion, in addition to measurable mass loss. Intense atomic oxygen pulses also useful in studies of microfabrication techniques.

  13. Insects breathe discontinuously to avoid oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hetz, Stefan K; Bradley, Timothy J

    2005-02-03

    The respiratory organs of terrestrial insects consist of tracheal tubes with external spiracular valves that control gas exchange. Despite their relatively high metabolic rate, many insects have highly discontinuous patterns of gas exchange, including long periods when the spiracles are fully closed. Two explanations have previously been put forward to explain this behaviour: first, that this pattern serves to reduce respiratory water loss, and second, that the pattern may have initially evolved in underground insects as a way of dealing with hypoxic or hypercapnic conditions. Here we propose a third possible explanation based on the idea that oxygen is necessary for oxidative metabolism but also acts as a toxic chemical that can cause oxidative damage of tissues even at relatively low concentrations. At physiologically normal partial pressures of CO2, the rate of CO2 diffusion out of the insect respiratory system is slower than the rate of O2 entry; this leads to a build-up of intratracheal CO2. The spiracles must therefore be opened at intervals to rid the insect of accumulated CO2, a process that exposes the tissues to dangerously high levels of O2. We suggest that the cyclical pattern of open and closed spiracles observed in resting insects is a necessary consequence of the need to rid the respiratory system of accumulated CO2, followed by the need to reduce oxygen toxicity.

  14. Appreciating Oxygen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Hilton M.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic flora and microfauna utilize light from the sun to convert carbon dioxide and water into carbohydrates and oxygen. While these carbohydrates and their derivative hydrocarbons are generally considered to be fuels, it is the thermodynamically energetic oxygen molecule that traps, stores, and provides almost all of the energy that…

  15. Mass loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Leo

    1987-01-01

    Observational evidence for mass loss from cool stars is reviewed. Spectra line profiles are used for the derivation of mass-loss rates with the aid of the equation of continuity. This equation implies steady mass loss with spherical symmetry. Data from binary stars, Mira variables, and red giants in globular clusters are examined. Silicate emission is discussed as a useful indicator of mass loss in the middle infrared spectra. The use of thermal millimeter-wave radiation, Very Large Array (VLA) measurement of radio emission, and OH/IR masers are discussed as a tool for mass loss measurement. Evidence for nonsteady mass loss is also reviewed.

  16. A coupled numerical analysis of shield temperatures, heat losses and residual gas pressures in an evacuated super-insulation using thermal and fluid networks. Part III: Unsteady-state conditions (evacuation period)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, H.

    2006-12-01

    This paper analyses the evacuation period of a 300 L super-insulated cryogenic storage tank for liquid nitrogen. Storage tank and radiation shields are the same as in part I of this paper. The present analysis extends application of stationary fluid networks to unsteady-states to determine local, residual gas pressures between shields and the evacuation time of a multilayer super-insulation. Parameter tests comprise magnitude of desorption from radiation shields, spacers and container walls and their influence on length of the evacuation period. Calculation of the integrals over time-dependent desorption rates roughly confirms weight losses of radiation shields obtained after heating and out-gassing the materials, as reported in the literature. After flooding the insulation space with dry N 2-gas, the evacuation time can enormously be reduced, from 72 to 4 h, to obtain a residual gas pressure of 0.01 Pa in-between shields of this storage tank. Permeation of nitrogen through container walls is of no importance for residual gas pressures. The simulations finally compare freezing H 2O-layers adsorbed on shields, spacers and container walls with flooding of the materials.

  17. Wide-area remote-sensing system of pollution and gas dispersal by near-infrared absorption based on low-loss optical fiber network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inaba, H.

    1986-01-01

    An all optical remote sensing system utilizing long distance, ultralow loss optical fiber networks is studied and discussed for near infrared absorption measurements of combustible and/or explosive gases such as CH4 and C3H8 in our environment, including experimental results achieved in a diameter more than 20 km. The use of a near infrared wavelength range is emphasized.

  18. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid disease , can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause hair loss in teen girls as well as ...

  19. Miniature radio-frequency mobility analyzer as a gas chromatographic detector for oxygen-containing volatile organic compounds, pheromones and other insect attractants.

    PubMed

    Eiceman, G A; Tadjikov, B; Krylov, E; Nazarov, E G; Miller, R A; Westbrook, J; Funk, P

    2001-05-11

    A high electric field, radio-frequency ion mobility spectrometry (RF-IMS) analyzer was used as a small detector in gas chromatographic separations of mixtures of volatile organic compounds including alcohols, aldehydes, esters, ethers, pheromones, and other chemical attractants for insects. The detector was equipped with a 2 mCi 63Ni ion source and the drift region for ion characterization was 5 mm wide, 15 mm long and 0.5 mm high. The rate of scanning for the compensation voltages was 60 V s(-1) and permitted four to six scans to be obtained across a capillary chromatographic elution profile for each component. The RF-IMS scans were characteristic of a compound and provided a second dimension of chemical identity to chromatographic retention adding specificity in instances of co-elution. Limits of detection were 1.6-55 x 10(-11) g with an average detection limit for all chemicals of 9.4 x 10(-11) g. Response to mass was linear from 2-50 x 10(-10) g with an average sensitivity of 4 pA ng(-1). Separations of pheromones and chemical attractants for insects illustrated the distinct patterns obtained from gas chromatography with RF-IMS scans in real time and suggest an analytical utility of the RF-IMS as a small, advanced detector for on-site gas chromatographs.

  20. 35. VIEW OF DUAL VENTURI GAS WASHER IN THE GAS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VIEW OF DUAL VENTURI GAS WASHER IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING NORTHEAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  1. Rhenium-Oxygen Interactions at High Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan S.; Myers, Dwight L.; Zhu, Dongming; Humphrey, Donald

    2000-01-01

    The reaction of pure rhenium metal with dilute oxygen/argon mixtures was studied from 600 to 1400 C. Temperature, oxygen pressure, and flow rates were systematically varied to determine the rate-controlling steps. At lower temperatures the oxygen/rhenium chemical reaction is rate limiting; at higher temperatures gas-phase diffusion of oxygen through the static boundary layer is rate limiting. At all temperatures post-reaction microstructures indicate preferential attack along certain crystallographic planes and defects.

  2. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  3. Numerical modeling of anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Bhavsar, Sonya S; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-11-01

    Prediction of flow patterns through oxygenator fiber bundles can allow shape optimization so that efficient gas exchange occurs with minimal thrombus formation and hemolysis. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations can be used to predict three-dimensional flow velocities and flow distribution from spatially dependent variables and they allow estimations of erythrocyte residence time within the fiber bundle. This study builds upon previous work to develop an accurate numerical model for oxygenators, which would allow for accelerated iterations in oxygenator shape and diffuser plate design optimization. Hollow fiber flow channels were developed to permit experimental calculation of fluid permeability in two directions: main flow along the hollow fiber and perpendicular to the hollow fibers. Commercial software was used to develop three-dimensional CFD models of the experimental flow channels and an anisotropic porous media model for oxygenators from these experimental results. The oxygenator model was used to predict pressure loss throughout the device, visualize blood distribution within the fiber bundle, and estimate erythrocyte residence time within the bundle. Experimental flow channels measurements produced a streamwise permeability of 1.143e(-8) m(2) and transverse permeability of 2.385e(-9) m(2) . These permeabilities, coupled with previous work with volume porosity, were used to develop the numerical model of anisotropic behavior through porous fiber bundles, which indicated a more uniform flow field throughout the oxygenator. Incorporation of known anisotropic fiber bundle behavior in previous numerical models more accurately represents fluid behavior through an oxygenator fiber bundle. CFD coupled with experimental validation can produce a powerful tool for oxygenator design and development.

  4. Improvements in modelling (by ESCADRE mod1.0) radiative heat losses through gas and aerosols generated by molten corium-concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Passalacqua, R.; Zabiego, M.; Cognet, G.; Pascale, C. De; Commande, A.; Renault, C.

    1996-07-01

    Aerosols generated during the molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) influence the reactor cavity thermal hydraulics: the cloud of aerosols, located inside the reactor cavity, restrains the upward-directed heat exchange consequently the cool-down of the high-temperature molten corium for a considerable period of time. IPSN is developing a computer code system for source predictions in severe accident scenarios. This code system is named ESCADRE. WECHSL/CALTHER is internal module dealing with MCCI (it is also a stand-alone code): it models the heat transfers involving the superior volume of the cavity. When modelling the upward-directed power distribution by WECHSL/CALTHER, a faster concrete basemat penetration takes place due to the low heat losses of the closed MCCI cavity enclosure. The model, here presented, is going to be validated with data from the AEROSTAT experiment. This experiment, planned at CEA Cadarache, will evaluate the influence of aerosols on the global power distribution in the reactor cavity. Radiative heat losses are important especially for cavity configurations such as those of new plant designs (equipped with a core-catcher) where the upward power losses are promoted by the corium spreading in a flat cavity.

  5. Dynamics of Gas Exchange through the Fractal Architecture of the Human Lung, Modeled as an Exactly Solvable Hierarchical Tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Michael; Pfeifer, Peter; Gheorghiu, Stefan

    2008-03-01

    The acinar airways lie at the periphery of the human lung and are responsible for the transfer of oxygen from air to the blood during respiration. This transfer occurs by the diffusion-reaction of oxygen over the irregular surface of the alveolar membranes lining the acinar airways. We present an exactly solvable diffusion-reaction model on a hierarchically branched tree, allowing a quantitative prediction of the oxygen current over the entire system of acinar airways responsible for the gas exchange. We discuss the effect of diffusional screening, which is strongly coupled to oxygen transport in the human lung. We show that the oxygen current is insensitive to a loss of permeability of the alveolar membranes over a wide range of permeabilities, similar to a ``constant-current source'' in an electric network. Such fault tolerance has been observed in other treatments of the gas exchange in the lung and is obtained here as a fully analytical result.

  6. Oxygen safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... with electric motors Electric baseboard or space heaters Wood stoves, fireplaces, candles Electric blankets Hairdryers, electric razors, ... Therapy.aspx . Accessed February 9, 2016. National Fire Protection Association. Medical oxygen. Updated July 2013. www.nfpa. ...

  7. Oxygen electrode reaction in molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Appleby, A.J.; White, R.E.

    1992-07-07

    Molten carbonate fuel cell system is a leading candidate for the utility power generation because of its high efficiency for fuel to AC power conversion, capability for an internal reforming, and a very low environmental impact. However, the performance of the molten carbonate fuel cell is limited by the oxygen reduction reaction and the cell life time is limited by the stability of the cathode material. An elucidation of oxygen reduction reaction in molten alkali carbonate is essential because overpotential losses in the molten carbonate fuel cell are considerably greater at the oxygen cathode than at the fuel anode. Oxygen reduction on a fully-immersed gold electrode in a lithium carbonate melt was investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry to determine electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters. The dependences of electrode kinetic and mass transfer parameters on gas composition and temperature were examined to determine the reaction orders and the activation energies. The results showed that oxygen reduction in a pure lithium carbonate melt occurs via the peroxide mechanism. A mass transfer parameter, D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O}, estimated by the cyclic voltammetry concurred with that calculated by the EIS technique. The temperature dependence of the exchange current density and the product D{sub O}{sup 1/2}C{sub O} were examined and the apparent activation energies were determined to be about 122 and 175 kJ/ mol, respectively.

  8. The importance of perivitelline fluid convection to oxygen uptake of Pseudophryne bibronii eggs.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Casey A; Seymour, Roger S

    2011-01-01

    The ciliated epithelium of amphibian embryos produces a current within the perivitelline fluid of the egg that is important in the convective transfer of oxygen to the embryo's surface. The effects of convection on oxygen uptake and the immediate oxygen environment of the embryo were investigated in Pseudophryne bibronii. Gelatin was injected into the eggs, setting the perivitelline fluid and preventing convective flow. Oxygen consumption rate (M(.)o₂) and the oxygen partial pressure (Po₂) of the perivitelline fluid were measured in eggs with and without this treatment. M(.)o₂ decreased in eggs without convection at Gosner stages 17-19 under normoxia. The lack of convection also shifted embryos from regulators to conformers as environmental Po₂ decreased. A strong Po₂ gradient formed within the eggs when convection was absent, demonstrating that the loss of convection is equivalent to decreasing the inner radius of the capsule, an important factor in gas exchange, by 25%. M(.)o₂ also declined in stage 26-27 embryos without cilia-driven convection, although not to the extent of younger stages, because of muscular movements and a greater skin surface area in direct contact with the inner capsule wall. This study demonstrates the importance of convective flow within the perivitelline fluid to gas exchange. Convection is especially important in the middle of embryonic development, when the perivitelline space has formed, creating a barrier to gas exchange, but the embryos have yet to develop muscular movements or have a large surface area exposed directly to the jelly capsule.

  9. Preparation of a heteroepitaxial La{sub x}Sr{sub y}Mn{sub z}O{sub 3}/BiFeO{sub 3} bilayer by r.f. magnetron sputtering with various oxygen gas flow ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Naganuma, H. Ichinose, T.; Begum, H. A.; Sato, S.; Oogane, M.; Ando, Y.; Han, X. F.; Miyazaki, T.; Bae, In-T.

    2014-08-15

    BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) and La{sub x}Sr{sub y}Mn{sub z}O{sub 3} (LSMO) films were epitaxially grown on SrTiO{sub 3} (100) substrates by r.f. magnetron sputtering with various oxygen gas flow ratios (F{sub O2}). Compositional ratios of each atom in both of BFO and LSMO could be controlled kept to around 10 at.% by changing F{sub O2}. Adjusting the compositional ratio to La{sub 0.35}Sr{sub 0.15}Mn{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} not only increase T{sub c} of LSMO but also produces sufficient oxygen to form a perovskite lattice. For an LSMO/BFO heterostructure, detailed observation by cross sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the lattice of rhombohedral (SG: R-3c) LSMO was shrank by a clamping effect from the SrTiO{sub 3} substrates, and then the BFO was grown in two layers: (i) an interfacial BFO layer (7 nm thick) with evenly shrunk a-axis and c-axis, and (ii) an upper BFO layer (25 nm thick) expanded along the c-axis. Neither misfit strain nor dislocations appeared at the interface between the shrunken BFO and LSMO layers, and these heterostructures did not show exchange bias. These results suggest that BFO is suitable for a tunneling barrier combine with LSMO electrode.

  10. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied

  11. Volatile organic compounds in a residential and commercial urban area with a diesel, compressed natural gas and oxygenated gasoline vehicular fleet.

    PubMed

    Martins, Eduardo Monteiro; Arbilla, Graciela; Gatti, Luciana Vanni

    2010-02-01

    Air samples were collected in a typical residential and commercial area in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where buses and trucks use diesel and light duty vehicles use compressed natural gas, ethanol, and gasohol (gasoline blended with ethanol) as fuel. A total of 66 C3-C12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified. The most abundant compounds, on a mass concentration basis, included propane, isobutane, i-pentane, m,p-xylene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, toluene, styrene, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, o-xylene and 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene. Two VOCs photochemical reactivity rankings are presented: one involves reaction with OH and the other involves production of ozone.

  12. SAR11 bacteria linked to ocean anoxia and nitrogen loss

    PubMed Central

    Tsementzi, Despina; Wu, Jieying; Deutsch, Samuel; Nath, Sangeeta; Rodriguez-R, Luis M; Burns, Andrew S.; Ranjan, Piyush; Sarode, Neha; Malmstrom, Rex R.; Padilla, Cory C.; Stone, Benjamin K.; Bristow, Laura A.; Larsen, Morten; Glass, Jennifer B.; Thamdrup, Bo; Woyke, Tanja; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria of the SAR11 clade constitute up to one half of all microbial cells in the oxygen-rich surface ocean. DNA sequences from SAR11 are also abundant in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) where oxygen falls below detection and anaerobic microbes play important roles in converting bioavailable nitrogen to N2 gas. Evidence for anaerobic metabolism in SAR11 has not yet been observed, and the question of how these bacteria contribute to OMZ biogeochemical cycling is unanswered. Here, we identify the metabolic basis for SAR11 activity in anoxic ocean waters. Genomic analysis of single cells from the world’s largest OMZ revealed diverse and previously uncharacterized SAR11 lineages that peak in abundance at anoxic depths, but are largely undetectable in oxygen-rich ocean regions. OMZ SAR11 contain adaptations to low oxygen, including genes for respiratory nitrate reductases (Nar). SAR11 nar genes were experimentally verified to encode proteins catalyzing the nitrite-producing first step of denitrification and constituted ~40% of all OMZ nar transcripts, with transcription peaking in the zone of maximum nitrate reduction rates. These results redefine the ecological niche of Earth’s most abundant organismal group and suggest an important contribution of SAR11 to nitrite production in OMZs, and thus to pathways of ocean nitrogen loss. PMID:27487207

  13. Device and method for separating oxygen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Rockwood, Stephen D.; Sander, Robert K.

    1984-01-01

    A device and method for separating oxygen isotopes with an ArF laser which produces coherent radiation at approximately 193 nm. The output of the ArF laser is filtered in natural air and applied to an irradiation cell where it preferentially photodissociates molecules of oxygen gas containing .sup.17 O or .sup.18 O oxygen nuclides. A scavenger such as O.sub.2, CO or ethylene is used to collect the preferentially dissociated oxygen atoms and recycled to produce isotopically enriched molecular oxygen gas. Other embodiments utilize an ArF laser which is narrowly tuned with a prism or diffraction grating to preferentially photodissociate desired isotopes. Similarly, desired mixtures of isotopic gas can be used as a filter to photodissociate enriched preselected isotopes of oxygen.

  14. Using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography for the analysis of oxygenates in middle distillates I. Determination of the nature of biodiesels blend in diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Adam, Frédérick; Bertoncini, Fabrice; Coupard, Vincent; Charon, Nadège; Thiébaut, Didier; Espinat, Didier; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2008-04-04

    In the current energetic context (increasing consumption of vehicle fuels, greenhouse gas emission etc.) government policies lead to mandatory introduction in fossil fuels of fuels resulting from renewable sources of energy such as biomass. Blending of fatty acid alkyl esters from vegetable oils (also known as biodiesel) with conventional diesel fuel is one of the solutions technologically available; B5 blends (up to 5%w/w esters in fossil fuel) are marketed over Europe. Therefore, for quality control as well as for forensic reasons, it is of major importance to monitor the biodiesel origin (i.e. the fatty acid ester distribution) and its content when it is blend with petroleum diesel. This paper reports a comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) method that was developed for the individual quantitation of fatty acid esters in middle distillates matrices. Several first and the second dimension columns have been investigated and their performances to achieve (i) a group type separation of hydrocarbons and (ii) individual identification and quantitation of fatty acid ester blend with diesel are reported and discussed. Finally, comparison of quantitative GC x GC results with reference methods demonstrates the benefits of GC x GC approach which enables fast and reliable individual quantitation of fatty acid esters in one single run. Results show that under developed chromatographic conditions, quantitative group type analysis of hydrocarbons is also possible, meaning that simultaneous quantification of hydrocarbons and fatty acid esters can be achieved in one single run.

  15. The use of a housecleaning product in an indoor environment leading to oxygenated polar compounds and SOA formation: Gas and particulate phase chemical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossignol, S.; Rio, C.; Ustache, A.; Fable, S.; Nicolle, J.; Même, A.; D'Anna, B.; Nicolas, M.; Leoz, E.; Chiappini, L.

    2013-08-01

    This work investigates Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) formed by limonene ozonolysis using a housecleaning product in indoor environment. This study combines simulation chamber ozonolysis experiments and field studies in an experimental house allowing different scenarios of housecleaning product use in real conditions. Chemical speciation has been performed using a new method based on simultaneous sampling of both gas and particulate phases on sorbent tubes and filters. This method allowed the identification and quantification of about 35 products in the gas and particulate phases. Among them, products known to be specific from limonene ozonolysis such as limononaldehyde, ketolimonene and ketolimonic acid have been detected. Some other compounds such as 2-methylbutanoic acid had never been detected in previous limonene ozonolysis studies. Some compounds like levulinic acid had already been detected but their formation remained unexplained. Potential reaction pathways are proposed in this study for these compounds. For each experiment, chemical data are coupled together with physical characterization of formed particles: mass and size and number distribution evolution which allowed the observation of new particles formation (about 87,000 particle cm-3). The chemical speciation associated to aerosol size distribution results confirmed that limonene emitted by the housecleaning product was responsible for SOA formation. To our knowledge, this work provides the most comprehensive analytical study of detected compounds in a single experiment for limonene ozonolysis in both gaseous and particulate phases in real indoor environment.

  16. Morphology and gas sensing characteristics of density-controlled CuO nanostructures obtained by varying the oxygen partial pressure during growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dongjin; Jin, Changhyun; Noh, Youngwook; Park, Seokhyun; Choi, Sun-Woo

    2016-07-01

    By exerting different O2 partial pressures (0, 20, 40, and 60 sccm) onto copper substrates, we discovered that the growth parameter, namely, the O2 flow rate, affects the degree of nucleation, diameter, length, and crystalline quality of CuO nanowires (NWs). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to analyze the evolution of the morphological and the microstructural changes in the CuO nanostructures. The formation of a Cu2O interlayer between the Cu and the CuO layers could be adjusted by controlling more precisely the O2 flow rate. In addition, the reducing (H2S) and the oxidizing (O2, NO2, and SO2) gas sensing performances of these O2-assisted CuO NWs were compared with those of CuO NWs grown in static air. The response to the reducing H2S of the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using O2 at 40 sccm showed a higher electrical change and faster response and recovery times than the sensors based on CuO NWs grown using lower O2 flow rates, including the ones grown in static air and/or used for sensing oxidizing gases (O2, NO2, and SO2) did. On the basis of their growth and their gas-sensing applications, the possible mechanisms characteristic of the density-controlled CuO NWs grown using various O2 partial pressures are discussed.

  17. Report on ISS O2 Production, Gas Supply and Partial Pressure Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaezler, Ryan N.; Cook, Anthony J.

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen is used on International Space Station (ISS) for metabolic support and denitrogenation procedures prior to Extra-Vehicular Activities. Nitrogen is used to maintain total pressure and account for losses associated with leakage and operational losses. Oxygen and nitrogen have been supplied by various visiting vehicles such as the Progress and Shuttle in addition to the on-orbit oxygen production capability. Starting in 2014, new high pressure oxygen/nitrogen tanks are available to launch on commercial cargo vehicles and will replace the high pressure gas source that Shuttle used to provide. To maintain a habitable atmosphere the oxygen and nitrogen partial pressures are controlled between upper and lower bounds. The full range of the allowable partial pressures along with the increased ISS cabin volume are utilized as a buffer allowing days to pass between oxygen production or direct addition of oxygen and nitrogen to the atmosphere from reserves. This paper summarizes the amount of gas supplied and produced from all of the sources and describes past experience of managing partial pressures along with the range of management options available to the ISS.

  18. [Use of hyperbaric oxygenation for wound management].

    PubMed

    Berner, Juan Enrique; Vidal, Pedro; Will, Patrick; Castillo, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation consists in exposing patients to increased gas pressures while inhaling pure oxygen. It involves the use of hyperbaric chambers that can double or triple gas pressure inside them. Hyperbaric oxygenation may be useful in different clinical situations, but mostly for the treatment of decompression syndrome. In the last decades, it has been used for the management of different kinds of wounds. Hyperbaric oxygenation not only increases the delivery of oxygen to damaged tissues, but also stimulates angiogenesis, collagen synthesis, stem cell migration and local immune response. Clinical trials that have addressed the use of hyperbaric oxygenation are difficult to compare due to their heterogeneity in terms of experimental design, kind of injuries involved and assessment of outcome. Even though, most studies support the concept that hyperbaric oxygenation accelerates the healing process.

  19. Fluid phase thermodynamics : I) nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically enhanced gravity and II) superconducting cavity resonators for high-stability frequency references and precision density measurements of helium-4 gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corcovilos, Theodore Allen

    Although fluids are typically the first systems studied in undergraduate thermodynamics classes, we still have only a rudimentary phenomenological understanding of these systems outside of the classical and equilibrium regimes. Two experiments will be presented. First, we present progress on precise measurements of helium-4 gas at low temperatures (1 K-5 K). We study helium because at low densities it is an approximately ideal gas but at high densities the thermodynamic properties can be predicted by numerical solutions of Schroedinger's equation. By utilizing the high resolution and stability in frequency of a superconducting microwave cavity resonator we can measure the dielectric constant of helium-4 to parts in 109, corresponding to an equivalent resolution in density. These data will be used to calculate the virial coefficients of the helium gas so that we may compare with numerical predictions from the literature. Additionally, our data may allow us to measure Boltzmann's constant to parts in 108, a factor of 100 improvement over previous measurements. This work contains a description of the nearly-completed apparatus and the methods of operation and data analysis for this experiment. Data will be taken by future researchers.The second experiment discussed is a study of nucleate pool boiling. To date, no adequate quantitative model exists of this everyday phenomenon. In our experiment, we vary one parameter inaccessible to most researchers, gravity, by applying a magnetic force to our test fluid, oxygen. Using this technique, we may apply effective gravities of 0-80 times Earth's gravitational acceleration (g). In this work we present heat transfer data for the boiling of oxygen at one atmosphere ambient pressure for effective gravity values between 1g and 16g . Our data describe two relationships between applied heat flux and temperature differential: at low heat flux the system obeys a power law and at high heat flux the behavior is linear. We find that the

  20. Oxygen Gas Barrier Properties of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Thin Films Deposited with a Pulse-Biased Inductively Coupled Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Sang-min; Shirafuji, Tatsuru; Cho, Sung-pyo; Saito, Nagahiro; Takai, Osamu

    2010-08-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films have been deposited on poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films with an pulse-biased inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition method using CH4 and C2H2 gases. We have investigated the effects of the pulse-bias frequency on the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of the a-C:H-coated PET sample, and discussed relationship between the OTR characteristics and the structure of the films based on the results of Raman and infrared absorption spectroscopy. In case of CH4 plasmas, the OTR of the sample has been reduced down to 1.12 cm3/(m2·day·atm) by increasing the bias-frequency to 2 kHz, and the structure of the a-C:H films has been modified from polymer-like to tetrahedral one. In case of C2H2 plasmas, the OTR of the samples has been 1.18 cm3/(m2·day·atm) with the lower bias frequency of 0.5 kHz, and has not shown strong dependence on the pulse-bias frequency. This has been explained by the fact that the films prepared with C2H2 plasma can be modified to tetrahedral structures by applying the bias with the lower frequency.

  1. Inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation and downstream activation of the ERK/STAT3/RANKL signaling cascade in osteoblasts accounts for the protective effects of estradiol on ethanol-induced bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone loss occurs with chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption in males and cycling females as a result of increased bone resorption. We have demonstrated that in vivo estradiol treatment can reverse this effect. However, the molecular mechanisms of EtOH-induced bone loss and of estrogen protection are la...

  2. A CENSUS OF OXYGEN IN STAR-FORMING GALAXIES: AN EMPIRICAL MODEL LINKING METALLICITIES, STAR FORMATION RATES, AND OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Dima, G. I.; Kewley, L. J.; Erb, D. K.; Dave, R.

    2012-09-20

    In this contribution, we present the first census of oxygen in star-forming galaxies in the local universe. We examine three samples of galaxies with metallicities and star formation rates (SFRs) at z = 0.07, 0.8, and 2.26, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and DEEP2 survey. We infer the total mass of oxygen produced and mass of oxygen found in the gas-phase from our local SDSS sample. The star formation history is determined by requiring that galaxies evolve along the relation between stellar mass and SFR observed in our three samples. We show that the observed relation between stellar mass and SFR for our three samples is consistent with other samples in the literature. The mass-metallicity relation is well established for our three samples, and from this we empirically determine the chemical evolution of star-forming galaxies. Thus, we are able to simultaneously constrain the SFRs and metallicities of galaxies over cosmic time, allowing us to estimate the mass of oxygen locked up in stars. Combining this work with independent measurements reported in the literature, we conclude that the loss of oxygen from the interstellar medium of local star-forming galaxies is likely to be a ubiquitous process with the oxygen mass loss scaling (almost) linearly with stellar mass. We estimate the total baryonic mass loss and argue that only a small fraction of the baryons inferred from cosmological observations accrete onto galaxies.

  3. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss in teens: Illnesses or medical conditions. Endocrine (hormonal) conditions, such as uncontrolled diabetes or thyroid disease , can interfere with hair production and cause hair loss. People with lupus can also lose hair. The hormone imbalance that happens in polycystic ovary syndrome can cause ...

  4. Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... and painful this loss can be. You might wonder if you'll ever have a baby to hold and call your own. But surviving the emotional impact of pregnancy loss is possible. And many women go on to have successful pregnancies. Expand all | ...

  5. 38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF COOLING WATER BOOSTER PUMP FOR OXYGEN FURNACES, LANCES, AND FUME HOODS IN THE GAS WASHER PUMP HOUSE LOOKING EAST. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  6. The Role of Plasmas on Enhanced O2+ Loss at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, Robert; Andersson, Laila; Woodson, Adam; Fowler, Chris; Weber, Tristan; Delory, Greg; Andrews, David; Eriksson, Anders; Mooroka, Mitchico; Stweart, Ian; Mahaffy, Paul; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures in Mars' day side ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher electron temperature (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher electron temperature may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars.

  7. Enhanced O2+ loss at Mars due to an ambipolar electric field from electron heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ergun, R. E.; Andersson, L. A.; Fowler, C. M.; Woodson, A. K.; Weber, T. D.; Delory, G. T.; Andrews, D. J.; Eriksson, A. I.; McEnulty, T.; Morooka, M. W.; Stewart, A. I. F.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Jakosky, B. M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results from the MAVEN Langmuir Probe and Waves instrument suggest higher than predicted electron temperatures (Te) in Mars' dayside ionosphere above ~180 km in altitude. Correspondingly, measurements from Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer indicate significant abundances of O2+ up to ~500 km in altitude, suggesting that O2+ may be a principal ion loss mechanism of oxygen. In this article, we investigate the effects of the higher Te (which results from electron heating) and ion heating on ion outflow and loss. Numerical solutions show that plasma processes including ion heating and higher Te may greatly increase O2+ loss at Mars. In particular, enhanced Te in Mars' ionosphere just above the exobase creates a substantial ambipolar electric field with a potential (eΦ) of several kBTe, which draws ions out of the region allowing for enhanced escape. With active solar wind, electron, and ion heating, direct O2+ loss could match or exceed loss via dissociative recombination of O2+. These results suggest that direct loss of O2+ may have played a significant role in the loss of oxygen at Mars over time.

  8. Simultaneous determination of gasoline oxygenates and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene in water samples using headspace-programmed temperature vaporization-fast gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pérez Pavón, José Luis; del Nogal Sánchez, Miguel; Fernández Laespada, María Esther; Moreno Cordero, Bernardo

    2007-12-14

    A sensitive method is presented for the fast analysis of seven fuel oxygenates (methanol, ethanol, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) and diisopropyl ether (DIPE)) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-xylene (BTEX) in water samples. The applicability of a headspace (HS) autosampler in combination with a GC device equipped with a programmable temperature vaporizer (PTV) and a MS detector is explored. The proposed method achieves a clear improvement in sensitivity with respect to conventional headspace methods due to the use of the PTV. Two different packed liners with materials of different trapping strengths (glass wool and Tenax-TA) were compared. The benefits of using Tenax-TA instead of glass wool as packed material for the measurement of the 11 compounds emerged as better signal-to-noise ratios and hence better detection limits. The proposed method is extremely sensitive. The limits of detection are of the order of ng/L for six of the compounds studied and of the order of microg/L for the rest, with the exception of the most polar and volatile compound: methanol. Precision (measured as the relative standard deviation for a level with an S/N ratio close to 3) was equal to or lower than 15% in all cases. The method was applied to the determination of the analytes in natural matrixes (tap, river and sea water) and the results obtained can be considered highly satisfactory. The methodology has much lower detection limits than the concentration limits proposed in drinking water by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union for compounds under regulation.

  9. Effects of oxygen content and oxide layer thickness on interface state densities for metal-oxynitride-oxide-silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dan; Kapoor, Vik J.

    1991-08-01

    The interface state density of metal-oxynitride-oxide-silicon (MNOS) devices was investigated as a function of the tunnel oxide thickness and the amount of oxygen in the oxynitride films. Nitrous oxide gas was used to introduce oxygen into the oxynitride film during the deposition process. As 17 at. % oxygen was introduced into the oxynitride film, the lowest oxide-silicon interface state density increased from 3.0 to 3.5×1011 cm-2 eV-1 for 90-Å oxide MNOS devices, and decreased from 5.1 to 3.65×1011 cm-2 eV-1 for 20 Å oxide devices. The increase in interface state density with increasing oxygen for 90-Å oxide devices may be due to an increase in the loss of hydrogen passivation at the interfacial regions as more oxygen is introduced into the film. The higher interface state density for the 20 vs 90 Å oxide samples, for a given oxygen content of the oxynitride films, may be due to additional contributions from the trapping states near or at the oxide-oxynitride interface. However, the decrease in the interface state density for increasing oxygen concentration for 20-Å oxide MNOS devices may be due to passivation of trapping states at the oxide-oxynitride interface by oxygen. The silicon dangling bonds responsible for these trapping states may be compensated by oxygen introduced during the deposition process.

  10. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  11. Respiratory weight losses during exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporative water loss from the respiratory tract was determined over a wide range of exercise. The absolute humidity of the expired air was the same at all levels of exercise and equal to that measured at rest. The rate of respiratory water loss during exercise was found to be 0.019 of the oxygen uptake times (44 minus water vapor pressure). The rate of weight loss during exercise due to CO2-O2 exchange was calculated. For exercise at oxygen consumption rates exceeding 1.5 L/min in a dry environment with a water vapor pressure of 10 mm Hg, the total rate of weight loss via the respiratory tract is on the order of 2-5 g/min.

  12. Controlled temperature expansion in oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1985-06-04

    A continuous process is set forth for the production of oxygen from an oxygen containing gas stream, such as air, by contacting a feed gas stream with a molten solution of an oxygen acceptor to oxidize the acceptor and cyclically regenerating the oxidized acceptor by releasing oxygen from the acceptor wherein the oxygen-depleted gas stream from the contact zone is treated sequentially to temperature reduction by heat exchange against the feed stream so as to condense out entrained oxygen acceptor for recycle to the process, combustion of the gas stream with fuel to elevate its temperature and expansion of the combusted high temperature gas stream in a turbine to recover power.

  13. Herschel Oxygen Project Observations of Molecular Oxygen in Orion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.; Liseau, R.; Bell, T. A.; Lis, D. C.; Chen, J. H.; Snell, R.; Li, D.; Kaufman, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Melnick, G.; HOP Team

    2011-05-01

    Oxygen is the third most abundant element in the cosmos. In the gas phase, oxygen can be ionized, atomic, or in molecular, and it is also incorporated into interstellar grains. Models of the gas-phase chemistry in dense clouds predict molecular oxygen (O2) to be almost as abundant as carbon monoxide (CO). A number of searches for molecular oxygen have been carried out, including ground-based searches for the isotopologue 16O18O and searches for O2 in redshifted galaxies. Searches for Galactic O2 carried out with the SWAS and Odin spacecraft have yielded upper limits on the abundance of molecular oxygen typically 1 to 2 orders of magnitude below those predicted by gas-phase models. There has been a detection of a single transition of O2 in one source, again indicating a low abundance. A variety of explanations have been proposed to explain this low abundance. Some of these are based on depletion of atomic oxygen onto dust grains, resulting in incorporation of this species into water that remains on the grain surface. Available gas-phase oxygen is largely incorporated into CO, leaving little for gas-phase O2. Other models involve circulation of material between UV-irradiated and well-shielded regions, and highly clumpy cloud structure. The Herschel Open Time Key Project HOP (Herschel Oxygen Project) addresses this important problem in astrochemistry, exploiting the high angular resolution and sensitivity of the Herschel HIFI instrument to observe 3 rotational transitions of O2 in a broad sample of molecular clouds. The sensitivity and angular resolution of HIFI are dramatically better than what has previously been available at these frequencies. We will discuss the HOP observations to date, focusing on the detection of O2 towards the H2 Peak 1 position near KL in Orion. This region is heavily impacted by the molecular outflow and resulting shocks which are manifest in the highly-structured emission from pure rotational and rotation-vibration transitions of molecular

  14. 3-D CFD Simulation and Validation of Oxygen-Rich Hydrocarbon Combustion in a Gas-Centered Swirl Coaxial Injector using a Flamelet-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Brian; Kenny, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Injector design is a critical part of the development of a rocket Thrust Chamber Assembly (TCA). Proper detailed injector design can maximize propulsion efficiency while minimizing the potential for failures in the combustion chamber. Traditional design and analysis methods for hydrocarbon-fuel injector elements are based heavily on empirical data and models developed from heritage hardware tests. Using this limited set of data produces challenges when trying to design a new propulsion system where the operating conditions may greatly differ from heritage applications. Time-accurate, Three-Dimensional (3-D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of combusting flows inside of injectors has long been a goal of the fluid analysis group at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the larger CFD modeling community. CFD simulation can provide insight into the design and function of an injector that cannot be obtained easily through testing or empirical comparisons to existing hardware. However, the traditional finite-rate chemistry modeling approach utilized to simulate combusting flows for complex fuels, such as Rocket Propellant-2 (RP-2), is prohibitively expensive and time consuming even with a large amount of computational resources. MSFC has been working, in partnership with Streamline Numerics, Inc., to develop a computationally efficient, flamelet-based approach for modeling complex combusting flow applications. In this work, a flamelet modeling approach is used to simulate time-accurate, 3-D, combusting flow inside a single Gas Centered Swirl Coaxial (GCSC) injector using the flow solver, Loci-STREAM. CFD simulations were performed for several different injector geometries. Results of the CFD analysis helped guide the design of the injector from an initial concept to a tested prototype. The results of the CFD analysis are compared to data gathered from several hot-fire, single element injector tests performed in the Air Force Research Lab EC-1 test facility

  15. Memory loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003257.htm Memory loss To use the sharing features on this ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  16. Hearing Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... topic was provided by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Topic last reviewed: December ... a total loss of hearing. It can be hereditary or it can result from disease, trauma, certain ...

  17. Hair Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans Nutrients and Nutritional Info Sugar and Sugar Substitutes Exercise and Fitness Exercise Basics Sports Safety Injury Rehabilitation Emotional Well- ...

  18. Quantum dots as a possible oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółczyk, Paulina; Kur-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Przybyt, Małgorzata; Miller, Ewa

    Results of studies on optical properties of low toxicity quantum dots (QDs) obtained from copper doped zinc sulfate are discussed in the paper. The effect of copper admixture concentration and solution pH on the fluorescence emission intensity of QDs was investigated. Quenching of QDs fluorescence by oxygen was reported and removal of the oxygen from the environment by two methods was described. In the chemical method oxygen was eliminated by adding sodium sulfite, in the other method oxygen was removed from the solution using nitrogen gas. For elimination of oxygen by purging the solution with nitrogen the increase of fluorescence intensity with decreasing oxygen concentration obeyed Stern-Volmer equation indicating quenching. For the chemical method Stern-Volmer equation was not fulfilled. The fluorescence decays lifetimes were determined and the increase of mean lifetimes at the absence of oxygen support hypothesis that QDs fluorescence is quenched by oxygen.

  19. Singlet Oxygen at the Laundromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeports, David

    1995-09-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen is an interesting molecule both visually and theoretically, since its red chemiluminescence can be analyzed by the application of simple molecular orbital theory. It can be produced from the reaction of hydrogen peroxide from either chlorine gas or hypochlorite ion from household bleach. Here we demostrate how to produce it using simple laundry cleansers.

  20. Orbital transfer vehicle oxygen turbopump technology. Volume 3: Hot oxygen testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urke, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    This report covers the work done in preparation for a liquid oxygen rocket engine turbopump test utilizing high pressure hot oxygen gas for the turbine drive. The turbopump (TPA) is designed to operate with 400 F oxygen turbine drive gas. The goal of this test program was to demonstrate the successful operation of the TPA under simulated engine conditions including the hot oxygen turbine drive. This testing follows a highly successful series of tests pumping liquid oxygen with gaseous nitrogen as the turbine drive gas. That testing included starting of the TPA with no assist to the hydrostatic bearing. The bearing start entailed a rubbing start until the pump generated enough pressure to support the bearing. The articulating, self-centering hydrostatic bearing exhibited no bearing load or stability problems. The TPA was refurbished for the hot gas drive tests and facility work was begun, but unfortunately funding cuts prohibited the actual testing.