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Sample records for oxygen loss gas

  1. Effects of oil on internal gas transport, radial oxygen loss, gas films and bud growth in Phragmites australis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jean; Keep, Rory; Armstrong, William

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Oil pollution of wetlands is a world-wide problem but, to date, research has concentrated on its influences on salt marsh rather than freshwater plant communities. The effects of water-borne light oils (liquid paraffin and diesel) were investigated on the fresh/brackish wetland species Phragmites australis in terms of routes of oil infiltration, internal gas transport, radial O2 loss (ROL), underwater gas films and bud growth. Methods Pressure flow resistances of pith cavities of nodes and aerenchyma of leaf sheaths, with or without previous exposure to oil, were recorded from flow rates under applied pressure. Convective flows were measured from living excised culms with oiled and non-oiled nodes and leaf sheaths. The effect of oil around culm basal nodes on ROL from rhizome and root apices was measured polarographically. Surface gas films on submerged shoots with and without oil treatment were recorded photographically. Growth and emergence of buds through water with and without an oil film were measured. Key Results Internodes are virtually impermeable, but nodes of senesced and living culms are permeable to oils which can block pith cavity diaphragms, preventing flows at applied pressures of 1 kPa, natural convective transport to the rhizome, and greatly decreasing ROL to phyllospheres and rhizospheres. Oil infiltrating or covering living leaf sheaths prevents humidity-induced convection. Oil displaces surface gas films from laminae and leaf sheaths. Buds emerge only a few centimetres through oil and die. Conclusions Oil infiltrates the gas space system via nodal and leaf sheath stomata, reducing O2 diffusion and convective flows into the rhizome system and decreasing oxygenation of phyllospheres and rhizospheres; underwater gas exchange via gas films will be impeded. Plants can be weakened by oil-induced failure of emerging buds. Plants will be most at risk during the growing season. PMID:18996951

  2. Inhaled hydrogen gas therapy for prevention of noise-induced hearing loss through reducing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kurioka, Takaomi; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Satoh, Yasushi; Niwa, Katsuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that form in the inner ear play an important role in noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Recent studies have revealed that molecular hydrogen (H2) has great potential for reducing ROS. In this study, we examined the potential of hydrogen gas to protect against NIHL. We tested this hypothesis in guinea pigs with 0.5%, 1.0% and 1.5% H2 inhalation in air for 5h a day after noise exposure, for five consecutive days. All animals underwent measurements for auditory brainstem response after the noise exposure; the results revealed that there was a better improvement in the threshold shift for the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated groups than the non-treated group. Furthermore, outer hair cell (OHC) loss was examined 7 days after noise exposure. A significantly higher survival rate of OHCs was observed in the 1.0% and 1.5% H2-treated group as compared to that of the non-treated group in the basal turn. Immunohistochemical analyses for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were performed to examine the amount of oxidative DNA damage. While strong immunoreactivities against 8-OHdG were observed of the non-treated group, the H2-treated group showed decreased immunoreactivity for 8-OHdG. These findings strongly suggest that inhaled hydrogen gas protects against NIHL.

  3. Oxygenates vs. synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Alessandra Beretta; Maria A. Burcham; Qun Sun; Yeping Cai; Biswanath Roy

    1999-04-01

    Methanol synthesis from H{sub 2}/CO has been carried out at 7.6 MPa over zirconia-supported copper catalysts. Catalysts with nominal compositions of 10/90 mol% and 30/70 mol% Cu/ZrO{sub 2} were used in this study. Additionally, a 3 mol% cesium-doped 10/90 catalyst was prepared to study the effect of doping with heavy alkali, and this promoter greatly increased the methanol productivity. The effects of CO{sub 2} addition, water injection, reaction temperature, and H{sub 2}/C0 ratio have been investigated. Both CO{sub 2} addition to the synthesis gas and cesium doping of the catalyst promoted methanol synthesis, while inhibiting the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Injection of water, however, was found to slightly suppress methanol and dimethyl ether formation while being converted to CO{sub 2} via the water gas shift reaction over these catalysts. There was no clear correlation between copper surface area and catalyst activity. Surface analysis of the tested samples revealed that copper tended to migrate and enrich the catalyst surface. The concept of employing a double-bed reactor with a pronounced temperature gradient to enhance higher alcohol synthesis was explored, and it was found that utilization of a Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a first lower temperature bed and a Cs-promoted ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a second high-temperature bed significantly promoted the productivity of 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas mixtures. While the conversion of CO to C{sub 2+} oxygenates over the double-bed configuration was comparable to that observed over the single Cu-based catalyst, major changes in the product distribution occurred by the coupling to the zinc chromite catalyst; that is, the productivity of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols decreased dramatically, and 2-methyl branched alcohols were selectively formed. The desirable methanol/2-methyl oxygenate molar ratios close to 1 were obtained in the present double

  4. Hair loss after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Pettignano, Robert; Heard, Micheal L; Labuz, Michele D; Wagoner, Scott F; Fortenberry, James

    2003-07-01

    To discuss the factors associated with hair loss reported after the completion of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Prospective survey and retrospective chart review. Tertiary care pediatric and adult extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program in a children's hospital. All patients aged > or =60 months who underwent extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory or cardiac failure. Telephone survey of all patients or patient families who met study entry criteria. Twelve extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients met entry criteria. Nine were contacted and surveyed. Seven children and one adult reported hair loss. One child had no reported hair loss. One patient had a reported hair loss of <10%, three had 25% hair loss, two had 50% hair loss, and two had >50% hair loss. Initial hair loss occurred between 2 wks and 3 months after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and lasted from 1 to 6 months. No patient sought medical treatment and all reported regrowth of their hair by 6 months after identifying the initial hair loss. Hair loss after critical illness is a well-documented phenomenon. Hair loss after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation has not been previously reported. The etiology of the hair loss is probably multifactorial and resolves spontaneously. Patients and families should be educated about hair loss as a potential side effect of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation during their post-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and discharge teaching.

  5. Loss of atomic oxygen in mass spectrometer ion sources.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, L. R.; Nier, A. O.

    1973-01-01

    A gas beam consisting of a mixture of atomic and molecular oxygen has been directed at the ion source of a mass spectrometer like those used in sounding rockets for determining the neutral composition of the lower thermosphere. The loss of atomic oxygen on mass spectrometer surfaces was evaluated by flagging the beam in several ways and comparing the experimental results with predicted values. The results obtained suggest that in rocket flights using similar instruments the atomic oxygen densities computed assuming no-loss conditions may be low by a factor of 2.5. Studies made using a beam containing tracer O-18 indicate that carbon dioxide observed when atomic oxygen enters the source is formed in a reaction involving atomic oxygen from the beam and carbon monoxide from the surfaces bombarded.

  6. Reversible Oxygen Gas Sensor Based On Electrochemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Tsow, Francis

    2013-01-01

    A novel and robust oxygen gas sensor based on electrochemiluminescence of Ru(bpy)33+/+ ion annihilation in an ionic liquid is presented. Real-time detection of environmental oxygen concentration together with selective, sensitive and reversible performance is demonstrated. PMID:20386795

  7. Soil gas oxygen tension and pentachlorophenol biodegradation

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, C.J.; Sims, R.C.; Sims, J.L.; Sorensen, D.L.; McLean, J.E.; Huling, S.

    1997-04-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion International Superfund Site in Libby, Mont. This soil was contaminated with wood preserving wastes including creosote and PCP. Degradation rates of {sup 14}C-PCP and nonlabeled PCP were found to be enhanced under soil gas oxygen concentrations between 2 and 21% in the contaminated soil. Between 48 and 64% of {sup 14}C-PCP spiked onto the soil was mineralized after 70 days at soil gas oxygen levels between 2 and 21%. No statistically significant mineralization of PCP was found to occur at 0% oxygen concentrations. Mineralization of {sup 14}C-PCP in contaminated soil poisoned with mercuric chloride was determined to be less than 0.2%. Degradation of indigenous nonradiolabeled PCP in the nonpoisoned soil was statistically significantly greater than in poisoned soil. These results indicated that degradation of PCP was biological and would occur under low oxygen concentrations. Soil gas oxygen concentrations necessary for PCP biodegradation (2--5%) could be maintained, for example, using bioventing technology in order to achieve continued treatment of buried lifts of soil while new lifts are added, thus decreasing the total time for soil remediation of the prepared bed.

  8. SOIL GAS OXYGEN TENSION AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion Inte...

  9. SOIL GAS OXYGEN TENSION AND PENTACHLOROPHENOL BIODEGRADATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Laboratory tests were conducted to determine the effect of soil gas oxygen concentration on the degradation and mineralization of spiked 14C-pentachlorophenol and nonlabeled pentachlorophenol (PCP) present in soil taken from a prepared-bed land treatment unit at the Champion Inte...

  10. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  11. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  12. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  13. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  14. 21 CFR 868.1720 - Oxygen gas analyzer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Oxygen gas analyzer. 868.1720 Section 868.1720...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1720 Oxygen gas analyzer. (a) Identification. An oxygen gas analyzer is a device intended to measure the concentration of oxygen in...

  15. Oxygen-rich Mass Loss with a Pinch of Salt: NaCl in the Circumstellar Gas of IK Tauri and VY Canis Majoris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milam, S. N.; Apponi, A. J.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2007-10-01

    The NaCl molecule has been observed in the circumstellar envelopes of VY Canis Majoris (VY CMa) and IK Tauri (IK Tau)-the first identifications of a metal refractory in oxygen-rich shells of evolved stars. Five rotational transitions of NaCl at 1 and 2 mm were detected toward VY CMa and three 1 mm lines were observed toward IK Tau, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory. In both objects, the line widths of the NaCl profiles were extremely narrow relative to those of other molecules, indicating that sodium chloride has not reached the terminal outflow velocity in either star, likely a result of early condensation onto grains. Modeling the observed spectra suggests abundances, relative to H2, of f~5×10-9 in VY CMa and f~4×10-9 in IK Tau, with source sizes of 0.5" and 0.3", respectively. The extent of these sources is consistent with the size of the dust acceleration zones in both stars. NaCl therefore appears to be at least as abundant in O-rich shells as compared to C-rich envelopes, where f~(0.2-2)×10-9, although it appears to condense out earlier in the O-rich case. Chemical equilibrium calculations indicate that NaCl is the major carrier of sodium at T~1100 K for oxygen-rich stars, with predicted fractional abundances in good agreement with the observations. These measurements suggest that crystalline salt may be an important condensate for sodium in both C- and O-rich circumstellar shells.

  16. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers.

    PubMed

    Van Der Wal, A W; Van Ooij, P J A M; De Ru, J A

    2016-11-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers may be caused by either inner-ear barotrauma or inner-ear decompression sickness. There is no consensus on the best treatment option. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers. A literature review and three cases of divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy are presented. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in hearing improvement in 80 per cent of patients: 39 per cent had hearing improvement and 41 per cent had full recovery. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy improved hearing in divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

  17. Oxygen gas generator and method of manufacturing the gas generator

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, F.A.

    1981-12-01

    A gas generator is capable of being stored in a stable form for long periods of time without deteriorating in quality. The gas generator provides a substantial amount of gases, and particularly oxygen, carbon monoxide or carbon dioxide without producing any harmful or hazardous chemicals. The gas generator includes in some embodiments a minimum of fuel so that a maximum amount of oxygen in the generator is capable of being liberated. The oxygen is liberated by the combustion of a fuel at localized positions in a refractory binder, which has the property of preventing the salt residue from becoming molten and the oxidizer from flowing and thereby preventing the combustion from becoming extinguished. The gas generator includes a suitable refractory material (such as clay) as a binder, a suitable oxidizer such as chlorate and a fuel having properties of combusting with oxygen liberated by the oxidizer and having a granular construction and having relatively poor thermal conductivity through the granules to provide the combustion at localized positions in the refractory material. The fuel may constitute a plant by-product having a cellular structure and a high compression strength. The fuel may specifically constitute dried plant life such as corn cobs. The gas generator is formed by mixing the refractory material, the fuel and the oxidizer without the addition of any water and then compressing the mixture into a suitable form such as briquettes.

  18. Oxygen and helium gas mixtures for dyspnoea.

    PubMed

    Laude, Elizabeth A; Ahmedzai, Sam H

    2007-08-01

    Recent reports of the benefits of helium/oxygen gas mixtures (heliox) use for the relief of dyspnoea and exercise limitation have stimulated interest in the use of heliox in the palliation of dyspnoea especially in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. With better understanding of the mechanistic causes of dyspnoea in these patients theoretical benefits of heliox have been suggested. This report considers the evidence to support this role and reviews the current position on heliox administration and use as a carrier gas for nebulization therapies. Heliox can effectively improve exercise limitations, decrease the work of breathing and reduce dyspnoea in lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients; in the latter it works by reducing dynamic hyperinflation. The evidence comes from short-term assessments of single exercise tests and additional benefits are seen when used in conjunction with other current therapies such as supplemental oxygen and nebulization. Dedicated devices with better comprehensive guidelines for administration have been developed to alleviate some of the reluctance of use. Heliox use could prove beneficial either administered alone or as an addition to current therapies for the palliation of dyspnoea and give significant improvement in outcomes of rehabilitation programmes. There is still an urgent need to identify which patients are the best candidates for heliox use and translate the significant short-term benefits into long-term improvements in functioning and quality of life.

  19. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Liu, Yixin; Gao, Haiyong; Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO NPs film was characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500, 600, and 800°C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF) output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors. PMID:25191652

  20. Oxygen liquefaction and zero-loss storage system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, F. N.; Bollo, T. R.; Peterson, D. M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative concept that employs existing technologies and off-the-shelf components to liquefy gaseous oxygen from an in-situ propellant production (ISPP) unit and to store the liquid oxygen without boil-off loss. A primary goal is to minimize active components with a secondary goal of designing the active component in a protected or failure-free environment. The resulting design requires only one active component, a compressor operating in a closed and consequently more protected system. The design avoids pumps as active components by employing cryopumping for gaseous oxygen (GOX) and gravity transfer for liquid oxygen (LOX).

  1. Minimizing EVA Airlock Time and Depress Gas Losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Lafuse, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the need and solution for minimizing EVA airlock time and depress gas losses using a new method that minimizes EVA out-the-door time for a suited astronaut and reclaims most of the airlock depress gas. This method consists of one or more related concepts that use an evacuated reservoir tank to store and reclaim the airlock depress gas. The evacuated tank can be an inflatable tank, a spent fuel tank from a lunar lander descent stage, or a backup airlock. During EVA airlock operations, the airlock and reservoir would be equalized at some low pressure, and through proper selection of reservoir size, most of the depress gas would be stored in the reservoir for later reclamation. The benefit of this method is directly applicable to long duration lunar and Mars missions that require multiple EVA missions (up to 100, two-person lunar EVAs) and conservation of consumables, including depress pump power and depress gas. The current ISS airlock gas reclamation method requires approximately 45 minutes of the astronaut s time in the airlock and 1 KW in electrical power. The proposed method would decrease the astronaut s time in the airlock because the depress gas is being temporarily stored in a reservoir tank for later recovery. Once the EVA crew is conducting the EVA, the volume in the reservoir would be pumped back to the cabin at a slow rate. Various trades were conducted to optimize this method, which include time to equalize the airlock with the evacuated reservoir versus reservoir size, pump power to reclaim depress gas versus time allotted, inflatable reservoir pros and cons (weight, volume, complexity), and feasibility of spent lunar nitrogen and oxygen tanks as reservoirs.

  2. Gas phase antimony/magnesium/oxygen clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, H.T.; Okada, Y.; Foltin, M.; Castleman, A.W. Jr. )

    1994-09-15

    Antimony/magnesium/oxygen clusters are produced by a gas aggregation source, in which a mixture of antimony and magnesium is vaporized and reacted with N[sub 2]O introduced in helium carrier gas. The resulting product distribution is detected by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer following ionization with a KrF excimer laser. Four types of cluster products are observed: Sb[sub x][sup +], Sb[sub x]Mg[sub y]O[sub z][sup +], Sb[sub x]Mg[sub y][sup +], and Mg[sub y]O[sub z][sup +]. The mass spectral intensity distributions display enhanced abundances for Mg[sub 2]O[sup +], Sb[sub 2[minus]4]Mg[sub 3]O[sup +], Sb[sub 1[minus]4]Mg[sub 2]O[sup +], Sb[sub 4]Mg[sup +], Sb[sub 5]Mg[sub 2][sup +], and Sb[sub 6]Mg[sub 2][sup +]. The experimental observation of Mg[sub 2]O[sup +] and Mg[sub 3]O[sup +] shows that the suboxides of group 2 are stable species, consistent with theoretical predictions. The binding abilities of antimony clusters to magnesium and magnesium oxides are found to be dependent on cluster size. When the number of antimony atoms in the clusters is smaller than 6, Sb[sub x]Mg[sub y]O[sub z][sup +] are the main products dominating the mass distribution the mass distribution. On the other hand, when the cluster size of Sb[sub x] is larger than 6, only Sb/Mg alloy clusters are observed. 52 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Shielding gas oxygen equivalent in weld metal microstructure optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Onsoeien, M.I.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1996-07-01

    One of the compositional variables that strongly influence low-carbon structural steel weld metal microstructure and mechanical properties is the weld metal oxygen content. As the weld metal oxygen content varies, a change in microstructure occurs. At low concentrations of oxygen, ferrite with aligned or nonaligned second phases may become predominant, slightly higher oxygen levels may result in the formation of the desired acicular ferrite, and further increases in the oxygen content to promote the formation of grain boundary ferrite. The start of austenite decomposition and ferrite nucleation are very sensitive to variations in the amount of oxygen present in the weld metal. Thus, in gas metal arc welding, adjusting the shielding gas oxygen potential provides a means of controlling the weld metal oxygen content. Bead-in-groove gas metal arc welding experiments were performed on HSLA steel coupons using three different welding wires and two heat inputs. A total of 17 different argon-based oxygen and carbon dioxide shielding gas mixtures was used. Complete metallographic and chemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the weld specimens. Sub-size Charpy V-notch toughness testing was performed on selected welds.

  4. Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking east at the basic oxygen furnace building with gas cleaning plants in foreground on the left and the right side of the furnace building. - U.S. Steel Edgar Thomson Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Braddock, Allegheny County, PA

  5. Resistive Oxygen Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf; Izu, Noriya; Rettig, Frank; Reiß, Sebastian; Shin, Woosuck; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Resistive oxygen sensors are an inexpensive alternative to the classical potentiometric zirconia oxygen sensor, especially for use in harsh environments and at temperatures of several hundred °C or even higher. This device-oriented paper gives a historical overview on the development of these sensor materials. It focuses especially on approaches to obtain a temperature independent behavior. It is shown that although in the past 40 years there have always been several research groups working concurrently with resistive oxygen sensors, novel ideas continue to emerge today with respect to improvements of the sensor response time, the temperature dependence, the long-term stability or the manufacture of the devices themselves using novel techniques for the sensitive films. Materials that are the focus of this review are metal oxides; especially titania, titanates, and ceria-based formulations. PMID:22163805

  6. Oxygen rich gas generator design and performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloyer, P. W.; Knuth, W. H.; Crawford, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The present oxygen-rich combustion research investigates oxygen gas generator concepts. The theoretical and modeling aspects of a selected concept are presented, together with a refined concept resulting from the findings of the study. This investigation examined a counter-flow gas generator design for O2/H2 mass ratios of 100-200, featuring a near-stoichiometric combustion zone followed by downstream mixing. The critical technologies required to develop a performance model are analyzed and include the following: (1) oxygen flow boiling; (2) two-phase oxygen flow heat transfer; (3) film-cooling in the combustion zone; (4) oxygen-rich combustion with hydrogen; and (5) mixing and dilution.

  7. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 2; Gas Separation Technology--State of the Art

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Eklund, Thor I.; Haack, Gregory A.

    2001-01-01

    This purpose of this contract study task was to investigate the State of the Art in Gas Separation Technologies utilized for separating air into both nitrogen and oxygen gases for potential applications on commercial aircraft. The intended applications included: nitrogen gas for fuel tank inerting, cargo compartment fire protection, and emergency oxygen for passenger and crew use in the event of loss of cabin pressure. The approach was to investigate three principle methods of gas separation: Hollow Fiber Membrane (HFM), Ceramic Membrane (CM), and liquefaction: Total Atmospheric Liquefaction of Oxygen and Nitrogen (TALON). Additional data on the performance of molecular sieve pressure swing adsorption (PSA) systems was also collected and discussed. Performance comparisons of these technologies are contained in the body of the report.

  8. Modeling Corneal Oxygen with Scleral Gas Permeable Lens Wear.

    PubMed

    Compañ, Vicente; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Edrington, Timothy B; Weissman, Barry A

    2016-11-01

    The main goal of this current work is to use an updated calculation paradigm, and updated boundary conditions, to provide theoretical guidelines to assist the clinician whose goal is to improve his or her scleral gas permeable (GP) contact lens wearing patients' anterior corneal oxygen supply. Our model uses a variable value of corneal oxygen consumption developed through Monod equations that disallows negative oxygen tensions within the stroma to predict oxygen tension at the anterior corneal surface of scleral GP contact lens wearing eyes, and to describe oxygen tension and flux profiles, for various boundary conditions, through the lens, tears, and cornea. We use several updated tissue and boundary parameters in our model. Tear exchange with GP scleral lenses is considered nonexistent in this model. The majority of current scleral GP contact lenses should produce some levels of corneal hypoxia under open eye conditions. Only lenses producing the thinnest of tear vaults should result in anterior corneal surface oxygen tensions greater than a presumed critical oxygen tension of 100 mmHg. We also find that corneal oxygen tension and flux are each more sensitive to modification in tear vault than to changes in lens oxygen permeability, within the ranges of current clinical manipulation. Our study suggests that clinicians would be prudent to prescribe scleral GP lenses manufactured from higher oxygen permeability materials and especially to fit without excessive corneal clearance.

  9. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaopeng; Xiao, Huajun; Shi, Weiru; Wen, Dongqing; Yu, Lihua; Chen, Jianzhang

    2015-01-01

    Positive pressure breathing (PPB) can cause circulatory dysfunction due to peripheral pooling of blood. This study explored a better way at ground level to simulate pure oxygen PPB at 59,055 ft (18,000 m) by comparing the physiological changes during PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen at ground level. Six subjects were exposed to 3 min of 69-mmHg PPB and 3 min of 59-mmHg PPB with pure oxygen and low oxygen while wearing the thoracic counterpressure jerkin inflated to 1× breathing pressure and G-suit inflated to 3 and 4× breathing pressure. Stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), and peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo2) were measured. Subjects completed a simulating flying task (SFT) during 3-min PPB and scores were recorded. HR and SV responses differed significantly between breathing pure oxygen and low oxygen. CO response was not significantly different for pure oxygen and low oxygen, the two levels of PPB, and the two levels of G-suit pressure. Spo2 declined as a linear function of time during low-oxygen PPB and there was a significant difference in Spo2 response for the two levels of PPB. The average score of SFT during pure oxygen PPB was 3970.5 ± 1050.4, which was significantly higher than 2708.0 ± 702.7 with low oxygen PPB. Hypoxia and PPB have a synergistic negative effect on both the cardiovascular system and SFT performance. PPB with low oxygen was more appropriate at ground level to investigate physiological responses during PPB and evaluate the protective performance of garments. Liu X, Xiao H, Shi W, Wen D, Yu L, Chen J. Physiological effects of positive pressure breathing with pure oxygen and a low oxygen gas mixture.

  10. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  11. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  12. BIOVENTING - Groundwater Aeration by Discontinuous Oxygen Gas Pulse Injections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schirmer, M.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater aeration by discontinuous oxygen gas pulse injections appears to be a promising concept for enhanced natural attenuation of dissolved contaminants that are susceptible for oxygenase enzyme attacks. Oxygen amendments facilitate indigenous microbiota to catabolize groundwater pollutants, such as aromatics, that are considered to be recalcitrant in absence of dissolved oxygen. As a rule, natural attenuation of many pollutants under aerobic conditions is considerably faster than under anaerobic conditions. Thus, enhancing the dissolved oxygen level appears to be worthwhile. In situ aeration of groundwater has been accomplished by air sparging, H2O2-supply, or by utilization of oxygen release compounds. However, continuous aeration of previously anaerobic groundwater is not desirable for several reasons: (a) economic efforts too high, (b) pollutant dislocation towards surface (desired only in air sparging), (c) risk of aquifer clogging (gas clogging, oxidation of ferrous iron, formation of bioslimes). In contrast, discontinuous oxygen gas sparging provides only for periodical groundwater aeration which is followed by microaerobic and suboxic conditions. Microaerobic conditions can prevail spatially (e.g., at plume fringes or within biofilms) or temporarily (e.g., at discontinuous bioventing). They still allow adapted bacteria to transform environmental pollutants to less toxic compounds, e.g., aromatic ring cleavage after dioxygenasis attack. Ring cleavage products, on the other hand, may be degraded more easily by anaerobic consortia than the initial aromatic compounds, making oxygen depletion periods highly intriguing in regard to an initiation of natural attenuation processes at plume fringes. In our work we outline the effect of oxygen depletion conditions on biodegradation of monchlorobenzene (MCB) as they occur subsequently to temporary aeration periods. For microaerobic conditions, relative to the oxygen supply, a stoichiometric transformation of MCB

  13. Oxygen fugacity of basaltic magmas and the role of gas-forming elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.

    1978-01-01

    It is suggested that major variations in the relative oxygen fugacity of a basaltic magma are caused primarily by gas-forming elements, especially carbon and hydrogen. According to this theory, carbon, present in the source region of a basaltic magma, reduces the host magma during ascent, as isothermally carbon becomes more reducing with decreasing pressure. For an anhydrous magma such as lunar basalts, this reduction continues through the extrusive phase and the relative oxygen fugacity decreases rapidly until buffered by the precipitation of a metallic phase. For hydrous magmas such as terrestrial basalts, reduction by carbon is eventually superceded by oxidation due to loss of H2 generated by the reaction of C with H2O and by thermal dissociation of H2O. The relative oxygen fugacity of a hydrous magma initially decreases as a magma ascends from the source region and then increases until magnetite crystallization curbs the rising trend of the relative oxygen fugacity.

  14. The study of excited oxygen molecule gas species production and quenching on thermal protection system materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordine, Paul C.; Fujimoto, Gordon T.; Greene, Frank T.

    1987-01-01

    The detection of excited oxygen and ozone molecules formed by surface catalyzed oxygen atom recombination and reaction was investigated by laser induced fluorescence (LIF), molecular beam mass spectrometric (MBMS), and field ionization (FI) techniques. The experiment used partially dissociated oxygen flows from a microwave discharge at pressures in the range from 60 to 400 Pa or from an inductively coupled RF discharge at atmospheric pressure. The catalyst materials investigated were nickel and the reaction cured glass coating used for Space Shuttle reusable surface insulation tiles. Nonradiative loss processes for the laser excited states makes LIF detection of O2 difficult such that formation of excited oxygen molecules could not be detected in the flow from the microwave discharge or in the gaseous products of atom loss on nickel. MBMS experiments showed that ozone was a product of heterogeneous O atom loss on nickel and tile surfaces at low temperatures and that ozone is lost on these materials at elevated temperatures. FI was separately investigated as a method by which excited oxygen molecules may be conveniently detected. Partial O2 dissociation decreases the current produced by FI of the gas.

  15. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width. PMID:28796167

  16. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  17. Hydrogen and Oxygen Gas Monitoring System Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee C. Cadwallader; Kevin G. DeWall; J. Stephen Herring

    2007-06-01

    This paper describes pertinent design practices of selecting types of monitors, monitor unit placement, setpoint selection, and maintenance considerations for gas monitors. While hydrogen gas monitors and enriched oxygen atmosphere monitors as they would be needed for hydrogen production experiments are the primary focus of this paper, monitors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide are also discussed. The experiences of designing, installing, and calibrating gas monitors for a laboratory where experiments in support of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) are described along with codes, standards, and regulations for these monitors. Information from the literature about best operating practices is also presented. The NHI program has two types of activities. The first, near-term activity is laboratory and pilot-plant experimentation with different processes in the kilogram per day scale to select the most promising types of processes for future applications of hydrogen production. Prudent design calls for indoor gas monitors to sense any hydrogen leaks within these laboratory rooms. The second, longer-term activity is the prototype, or large-scale plants to produce tons of hydrogen per day. These large, outdoor production plants will require area (or “fencepost”) monitoring of hydrogen gas leaks. Some processes will have oxygen production with hydrogen production, and any oxygen releases are also safety concerns since oxygen gas is the strongest oxidizer. Monitoring of these gases is important for personnel safety of both indoor and outdoor experiments. There is some guidance available about proper placement of monitors. The fixed point, stationary monitor can only function if the intruding gas contacts the monitor. Therefore, monitor placement is vital to proper monitoring of the room or area. Factors in sensor location selection include: indoor or outdoor site, the location and nature of potential vapor/gas sources, chemical and physical data of the

  18. Electron-beam sustained discharge in oxygen gas mixtures: singlet delta oxygen production for oxygen-iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Hager, Gordon D.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Klimachev, Yurii M.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; McIver, John K.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmar'kov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    Electric properties and spectroscopy of an e-beam sustained discharge (EBSD) in oxygen and oxygen gas mixtures at gas pressure up to 100 Torr were experimentally studied. The pulsed discharge in pure oxygen and its mixtures with noble gases was shown to be very unstable and characterized by low input energy. When adding small amount of carbon monoxide or hydrogen, the electric stability of the discharge increases, specific input energy (SIE) per molecular component being more than order of magnitude higher and coming up to 6.5 kJ/(l atm) for gas mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1. The results of experiments on spectroscopy of the singlet delta oxygen O2(a1Δg)(SDO) and O2(b1Σg+) states in the EBSD are presented. The calibration of the optical scheme for measuring the SDO absolute concentration and yield using the detection of luminescence of the SDO going from a chemical SDO generator was done. The preliminary measurement of the SDO yield demonstrated that it was ~3% for the SIE of ~1 kJ/(l atm), which is close to the results of theoretical calculations for such a SIE. Theoretical calculations demonstrated that for the SIE of 6.5 kJ/(l atm) the SDO yield may reach ~20% exceeding its threshold value needed for oxygen-iodine laser operation at room temperature, although a part of the energy loaded into the EBSD goes into the vibrational energy of the molecular admixture, (which was experimentally demonstrated by launching a CO laser operating on an oxygen-rich mixture O2:Ar:CO = 1:1:0.1 and measuring its small-signal gain).

  19. Diffusive Gas Loss from Silica Glass Ampoules at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in the pressure of hydrogen, helium and neon due to diffusion through the wall of silica crystal growth ampoules at elevated temperatures were determined experimentally. We show that, while both He- and Ne-losses closely follow conventional model of diffusive gas permeation through the wall, hydrogen losses, in particular at low fill pressures, can be much larger. This is interpreted in terms of the high solubility of hydrogen in silica glasses.

  20. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, K.

    1993-07-20

    A no loss liquid natural gas (LNG) delivery system is described comprising: (a) means for storing LNG and natural gas at low pressure; (b) means for delivering LNG from the means for storing to a use device including means for sub-cooling the LNG; (c) means for pre-cooling the means for sub-cooling before the LNG is delivered to the use device to substantially reduce vaporization of the initial LNG delivered to the use device; and (d) means for delivering a selectable quantity of the natural gas in said storing means to said use device with the LNG.

  1. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  2. Gas and aerosol wall losses in Teflon film smog chambers

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, P.H.; Grosjean, D.

    1985-12-01

    Large smog chambers (approx.60 m/sup 3/) constructed of FEP Teflon film are frequently used to study photochemistry and aerosol formation in model chemical systems. In a previous paper a theory for aerosol wall loss rates in Teflon film smog chambers was developed; predicted particle loss rates were in good agreement with measured rates. In the present paper, measurements of wall deposition rates and the effects of wall losses on measurements of gas-to-particle conversion in smog chambers are discussed. Calculations indicate that a large fraction of the aerosol formed in several smog chamber experiments was on the chamber walls at the end of the experiment. Estimated values for particulate organic carbon yield for several precursor hydrocarbons increased by factors of 1.3-6.0 when wall deposition was taken into account. The theory is also extended to loss rates of gaseous species. Such loss rates are either limited by diffusion through a concentration boundary layer near the surface or by uptake at the surface. It is shown that for a typical 60-m/sup 3/ Teflon film smog chamber, gas loss rates are limited by surface reaction rates if mass accommodation coefficients are less than 6 x 10/sup -6/. It follows that previously reported loss rates of several gases in a chamber of this type were limited by surface reactions.

  3. Integrated production of fuel gas and oxygenated organic compounds from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert B.; Hegarty, William P.; Studer, David W.; Tirados, Edward J.

    1995-01-01

    An oxygenated organic liquid product and a fuel gas are produced from a portion of synthesis gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and sulfur-containing compounds in a integrated feed treatment and catalytic reaction system. To prevent catalyst poisoning, the sulfur-containing compounds in the reactor feed are absorbed in a liquid comprising the reactor product, and the resulting sulfur-containing liquid is regenerated by stripping with untreated synthesis gas from the reactor. Stripping offgas is combined with the remaining synthesis gas to provide a fuel gas product. A portion of the regenerated liquid is used as makeup to the absorber and the remainder is withdrawn as a liquid product. The method is particularly useful for integration with a combined cycle coal gasification system utilizing a gas turbine for electric power generation.

  4. Modeling signal loss in surficial marine sediments containing occluded gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Trevor

    2003-03-01

    The presence of occluded gas in inland lakes, harbor muds, and surficial marine sediments is well documented. Surficial gassy sediments cause underlying beds to be acoustically impenetrable to seismic surveys; therefore, the modeling of signal loss arising from mudline reflection and transmission absorption is of particular interest. The Anderson and Hampton [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 67, 1890-1903 (1980)] model for attenuation in gassy sediments was evaluated against the physical and acoustical properties of eight laboratory silty clay soils containing different amounts of occluded gas in bubbles of 0.2- to 1.8-mm diameter. The model was shown to give good agreement with measured data over the lower frequencies of bubble resonance and above resonance. It did not agree with measured data at frequencies below resonance, for which the model did not simulate the bulk properties of the gassy soils. The Mackenzie [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 32, 221-231 (1960)] model for reflection loss was also examined for the gassy soils. The maximum reflection losses of 6 dB, at a grazing angle of 40°, does not wholly support speculation by Levin [Geophysics 27, 35-47 (1962)] of highly reflective pressure-release boundaries arising from substantial reflection and absorption losses in gassy sediments. It was found that mudlines formed from sediments with significant occluded gas may be successfully penetrated, although the substantial absorption loss arising from signal transmission through the sediment prevents penetration of the surficial layers to much beyond a meter in depth.

  5. Thermal losses in the process of gas-assisted laser cutting of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazyleva, I. O.; Galushkin, Michail G.; Golubev, Vladimir S.; Dubrovina, E. A.; Karasev, Vladimir A.

    2002-04-01

    Gas assisted laser cutting (GALC) is accompanied by formation of heat affected zone (HAZ). A part of laser beam power is spent on this. Thermal losses cannot only decrease GALC efficiency, but cause thermal deformations of the treated material. The temperature measurement of samples heating under GALC were performed. The dependence of the samples temperature on cutting velocity was obtained under blowing by nitrogen and oxygen. In the first case dross was formed, the contribution of its crystallization enthalpy into plate heating was taken into account in estimations of GALC energy balance. As a result, the limiting physical value of heat losses was obtained, and its dependence on velocity was plotted. It has been revealed that a portion of thermal losses at low cutting velocities was essential. A qualitative physical model was suggested which gave a satisfactory description of the obtained experimental results. The GALC conditions for minimum thermal losses were defined.

  6. Pulmonary gas exchange in anaesthetised horses mechanically ventilated with oxygen or a helium/oxygen mixture.

    PubMed

    Staffieri, F; Bauquier, S H; Moate, P J; Driessen, B

    2009-11-01

    It is unknown whether administration of gas-mixtures high in inspired fraction of oxygen (FiO2) under general anaesthesia may increase formation of pulmonary atelectasis and impair gas exchange. To evaluate the effects of different FiO2 on pulmonary gas exchange in isoflurane-anaesthetised horses breathing a helium/oxygen (He/O2) mixture. Thirty healthy mature horses were sedated with i.v. acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg bwt), detomidine (0.002 mg/kg bwt) and xylazine (02-0.4 mg/kg bwt). General anaesthesia was induced with i.v. 5% guaifenesin to effect, diazepam (0.1 mg/kg bwt) and ketamine (2 mg/kg bwt), and maintained with isoflurane. Fifteen horses (Group HX) were ventilated mechanically with gas mixtures of successively increasing FiO2 (0.25-030, 0.50-0.55, > 0.90), obtained by blending 02 with Heliox (70% He/30% O2). The other 15 horses (Group O) were ventilated immediately with 100% O2 (FiO2 > 0.90). After 20 min of ventilation at the different FiO2 levels in Group HX and after 60 min in Group O, PaO2 and PaCO2 were measured and the alveolar to arterial PO2 gradient (P(A-a)O2) was calculated. Data analysis included robust categorical regression with clustering on horse (P < 0.05). Inhalation of a He/O2 mixture with FiO2 as low as 0.25-030 ensured adequate arterial oxygenation and was associated with a smaller P(A-a)O2 gradient than inhalation of pure O2 (P < 0.05). In Group HX, PaO2 increased with each rise in FiO2 and so did P(A-a)O2 (P < 0.05). The PaO2 was significantly lower and the P(A-a)O2 higher in Group O compared to Group HX at a FiOz >0.90 (P < 0.05). Administration of a He/O2 gas mixture low in FiO2 can better preserve lung function than ventilation with pure oxygen. A step-wise increase of FiO2 using a He/O2 gas mixture might offer advantages with respect to pulmonary gas exchange over an immediate exposure to 100% 2O2.

  7. Properties of turbulence in natural gas-oxygen diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect

    Sautet, J.C.; Ditaranto, M. ); Samaniego, J.M.; Charon, O. )

    1999-07-01

    Measurements of turbulent flow field velocities, including first and second order velocity moments and the shear stress are carried out by laser Doppler velocimetry in five different, 25 kW, turbulent natural gas-oxygen diffusion flames. The mean flow behavior is described including the velocity half value radius as well as centerline velocity. Mean radial velocity profiles are fitted by a Gaussian function. According to the initial momentum ratio, different jet dynamic behaviors are pointed out by the description of the fluctuating velocity field.

  8. Evaluation of Gas Chromatographic Methods for Analysis of Gasoline/Oxygenate Blends.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    determination of various oxygenated compounds in gasoline by gas chromotography have been developed.(3-6) These include gas chromatographic (GC) analysis of the...ID-Ai33 0i6 EVALUATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS i/t OF GASOLINE/OXYGEN.. (U) SOUTHWEST RESEARCH INST SAN ANTONIO TX ARMY FUELS...0 EVALUATION OF GAS -CHROMATOGRAPHIC METHODS FOR ANALYSIS OF GASOLINE/OXYGENATE BLENDS INTERIM REPORT

  9. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology

  10. Breathing 100% oxygen compared with 50% oxygen: 50% nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. T.; Pilmanis, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    The risk of venous gas emboli (VGE) and decompression sickness (DCS) must be determined before selection of the lowest pressure for an extravehicular activity (EVA) pressure suit which eliminates the requirement for prebreathing. In earlier studies, use of a 50% oxygen:50% nitrogen breathing mixture (50:50 mix) during 139 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-7.8 psia resulted in 51 instances of severe VGE and one case of DCS. Our current study investigated effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while breathing 100% oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No DCS symptoms were observed. Severe VGE were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10%, 20%, and 40% of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100% oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. Our results show that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100% oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  11. Breathing 100% oxygen compared with 50% oxygen: 50% nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, J. T.; Pilmanis, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    The risk of venous gas emboli (VGE) and decompression sickness (DCS) must be determined before selection of the lowest pressure for an extravehicular activity (EVA) pressure suit which eliminates the requirement for prebreathing. In earlier studies, use of a 50% oxygen:50% nitrogen breathing mixture (50:50 mix) during 139 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-7.8 psia resulted in 51 instances of severe VGE and one case of DCS. Our current study investigated effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while breathing 100% oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No DCS symptoms were observed. Severe VGE were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10%, 20%, and 40% of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100% oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. Our results show that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100% oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  12. Oxygenation and ventilation characteristics in obese sedated dogs before and after weight loss: a clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mosing, M; German, A J; Holden, S L; MacFarlane, P; Biourge, V; Morris, P J; Iff, I

    2013-11-01

    This prospective clinical study examined the effect of obesity and subsequent weight loss on oxygenation and ventilation during deep sedation in pet dogs. Data from nine dogs completing a formalised weight loss programme were evaluated. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) was used to quantify body fat mass prior to and after weight loss. Dogs were deeply sedated and positioned in dorsal recumbency. Sedation was scored using a semi-objective scheme. As part of the monitoring of sedation, arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) and arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) were measured after 10 min in dorsal recumbency. Oxygen saturation of haemoglobin (SpO2) was monitored continuously using pulse oximetry, starting oxygen supplementation where indicated (SpO2<90%) via a face mask. Morphometric measurements were taken from DEXA images and compared before and after weight loss. Several oxygen indices were calculated and correlated with body fat variables evaluated by DEXA. All body fat variables improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2 increased from 27.9±19.2 kPa to 34.8±24.4 kPa, while FiO2 decreased from 0.74±0.31 to 0.66±0.35. Morphometric measurements improved significantly after weight loss. PaO2/FiO2 (inspired oxygen fraction) and Pa/AO2 (ratio of PaO2 to alveolar PO2) also improved significantly, but there was no change in f-shunt and PaCO2 after weight loss. On multiple linear regression analysis, all oxygen indices were negatively associated with thoracic fat percentage. In conclusion, obesity decreases oxygenation in dogs during deep sedation. Oxygenation status improves with successful weight loss, but ventilation is not influenced by obesity.

  13. Anomalous Oxygen and Krypton Abundances in Interstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar H2 absorption toward a sample of stars observed with the HST STIS spectrograph as part of the ISM SNAP Survey. This Survey was designed to produce a database of high quality, high resolution W spectra from which interstellar gas-phase elemental abundances could be derived for large portions of the Galaxy. In particular, oxygen and krypton were chosen as excellent tracers for measuring the homogeneity of the interstellar gas due to their weak depletion into dust grains. The gas-phase 0 and Kr abundances relative to total hydrogen column density had previously been shown with HST GHRS measurements to be essentially constant in the local Milky Way. One of the main motivations of the ISM SNAP Survey was to determine if this constancy held at greater distances and in denser sightlines (where depletion into dust could be a possibility). The initial ISM SNAP STIS observations indicated a number of sightlines with unusual 0 and Kr abundances relative to the measured H I column densities. Since the appropriate benchmark for accurate abundance comparisons is the total hydrogen column density (H I plus H2), FUSE observations of interstellar H2 were carried out in these sightlines in order to determine if they represent cases of true abundance anomalies.

  14. Anomalous Oxygen and Krypton Abundances in Interstellar Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar H2 absorption toward a sample of stars observed with the HST STIS spectrograph as part of the ISM SNAP Survey. This Survey was designed to produce a database of high quality, high resolution W spectra from which interstellar gas-phase elemental abundances could be derived for large portions of the Galaxy. In particular, oxygen and krypton were chosen as excellent tracers for measuring the homogeneity of the interstellar gas due to their weak depletion into dust grains. The gas-phase 0 and Kr abundances relative to total hydrogen column density had previously been shown with HST GHRS measurements to be essentially constant in the local Milky Way. One of the main motivations of the ISM SNAP Survey was to determine if this constancy held at greater distances and in denser sightlines (where depletion into dust could be a possibility). The initial ISM SNAP STIS observations indicated a number of sightlines with unusual 0 and Kr abundances relative to the measured H I column densities. Since the appropriate benchmark for accurate abundance comparisons is the total hydrogen column density (H I plus H2), FUSE observations of interstellar H2 were carried out in these sightlines in order to determine if they represent cases of true abundance anomalies.

  15. Respiratory Heat Loss Limits in Helium-Oxygen Saturation Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    STATEMENT (of te obstrol eaterdin Bleek #iferen f mim fier ee) WS SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES It. KEY WORDS (Contm nu F ewfer aie It nl*OOWY Mel D*UtltY or...THIS PASS 3Be a 3M 20. (CONTINUED) neutral skin temperature in a hot water suit. This level of respiratory heat loss is predicted to allow an average...respiratory heat loss from the ventilatory response to the exercise, will be dissipated through the diver’s skin as he adjusts his hot water flow and

  16. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  17. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia: case reports.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Sandra N; Guerreiro, Ditza V; Cunha, Anita M; Camacho, Óscar F; Aguiar, Isabel C

    2016-01-01

    The management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss following spinal anesthesia is currently an open problem. Several strategies have been used with variable results and, to the best of our knowledge, there are no prior accounts in the literature on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy in the treatment of this complication. We report two cases of acute onset of unilateral hearing loss after spinal anesthesia, with significantly improved results after hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A hypothesis on the possible mechanism behind this complication is discussed. A relation is established between hyperbaric oxygen therapy and this hypothetical mechanism, in order to explain successful results in the reported cases.

  18. Effect of oxygen on the internal corrosion of natural gas pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Durr, C.L.; Beavers, J.A.

    1996-08-01

    Internal corrosion is a problem in wet natural gas gathering lines. Literature on the subject suggests that dissolved oxygen (O{sub 2}) is one of the more corrosive contaminants in natural gas. Immersion tests, funded by a major gas transmission company, were performed on C1018 (UNS G10180) specimens to assess the influence of O{sub 2} concentration on the internal corrosion of the wet gathering system in their storage field. Twenty-eight day tests were performed in a flow-through (gas phase only) autoclave at 70 F (21 C) and 1,200 psi (8,274 kPa) with simulated natural gas mixtures containing 10, 100, 500 and 1,000 ppm (by volume) O{sub 2}. Specimens were exposed to the vapor, vapor/liquid (V/L) interface, and liquid phases of pure water and saltwater in these tests. The highest corrosion rate, based on groove depth, was measured for the V/L specimens in pure water with 1,000 ppm O{sub 2}. Corrosion rates, based on weight loss, generally maximized at an O{sub 2} concentration of 100 ppm.

  19. Energy Balance Around Gas Injection into Oxygen Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabah, Shabnam; Brooks, Geoffrey

    2016-02-01

    In the present work, a simplified approach of energy balance around gas injection into oxygen steelmaking has been carried out in a cold model. The aim is to provide an estimation of the amount of energy consumed by the different parts of the injection process such as dissipation, stirring of the bath, cavity formation, and splashing. Calculation of jet power used by different processes has been carried for various operating conditions and cavity modes ( i.e., splashing and penetrating). Calculations showed that dissipation and splashing are the dominant processes where most of the power of the jet is used, whereas cavity formation consumes the least amount. In the splashing mode, the percentage of total input power going into dissipation was about 59 to 63 pct, whereas it was found to be 2.6 to 50 pct in the penetrating mode. In splashing mode, about 30 pct power from the nozzle was used to create splash which is proved to be an efficient mode for droplet generation as less power is required to create droplets. At a certain lance height, the percentages of total input power used for splashing and dissipation were found equal. Below this lance height, all the cavities were found to be in penetrating mode. This simplified approach provides an improved understanding of the gas injection process and may be used for developing models of the injection process of steelmaking.

  20. Prognostic factors for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intravenous steroids.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, S; Sugiyama, K; Takahashi, G; Takebayashi, S; Mineta, H

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the prognosis of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss when treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intravenous steroids. The clinical data for 334 patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated by hyperbaric oxygen therapy and intravenous steroids at our hospital were retrospectively reviewed. These data included the initial averaged five-frequency hearing level, patient age, interval between onset of symptoms and treatment, vertigo as a complication, and co-existence of diabetes mellitus. The overall improvement rate was 69.2 per cent, including better improvement (25.5 per cent), good improvement (21.0 per cent) and fair improvement (22.7 per cent). Hyperbaric oxygen therapy appears to confer a significant additional therapeutic benefit when used in combination with steroid therapy for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. If performed early, hyperbaric oxygen therapy may bring about hearing improvement in many patients who are unresponsive to initial therapy.

  1. Interplay between oxygen demand reactions and kinetic gas-water transfer in porous media.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Sascha E; Griepentrog, Marco; Schirmer, Mario; Balcke, Gerd U

    2008-08-01

    Gas-water phase transfer associated with the dissolution of trapped gas in porous media is a key process that occurs during pulsed gas sparging operations in contaminated aquifers. Recently, we applied a numerical model that was experimentally validated for abiotic situations, where multi-species kinetic inter-phase mass transfer and dissolved gas transport occurred during pulsed gas penetration-dissolution events [Balcke, G.U., Meenken, S., Hoefer, C. and Oswald, S.E., 2007. Kinetic gas-water transfer and gas accumulation in porous media during pulsed oxygen sparging. Environmental Science & Technology 41(12), 4428-4434]. Here we extend the model by using a reactive term to describe dissolved oxygen demand reactions via the formation of a reaction product, and to study the effects of such an aerobic degradation process on gas-water mass transfer and dissolution of trapped gas in porous media. As a surrogate for microbial oxygen reduction, first-order oxygen demand reactions were based on the measured oxidation of alkaline pyrogallol in column experiments. This reaction allows for adjusting the rate to values close to expected biodegradation rates and detection of the reaction product. The experiments and model consistently demonstrated accelerated oxygen gas-water mass transfer with increasing oxygen demand rates associated with an influence on the partitioning of other gases. Thus, as the oxygen demand accelerates, less gas phase residues, consisting mainly of nitrogen, are observed, which is in general beneficial to the performance of field biosparging operations. Model results additionally predict how oxygen demand influences oxygen mass transfer for a range of biodegradation rates. A typical field case scenario was simulated to illustrate the observed coupling of oxygen consumption and gas bubble dissolution. The model provides a tool to improve understanding of trapped gas behavior in porous media and contributes to a model-assisted biosparging.

  2. Steady state cooling flow models with gas loss for normal elliptical galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarazin, Craig L.; Ashe, Gregory A.

    1989-01-01

    A grid of cooling flow models for the hot gas in normal elliptical galaxies is calculated, including the loss of gas due to inhomogeneous cooling. The loss process is modeled as a distributed sink for the gas with the rate of loss being proportional to the local cooling rate. The cooling flow models with gas loss have smaller sonic radii, smaller inflow rates in their central regions, lower densities, and higher temperatures than homogeneous models. The reduction in the amount of hot gas flowing into the center of the models brings the models into much better agreement with the observed X-ray surface brightness profiles of elliptical galaxies. However, there is a large dispersion in the observed X-ray luminosities of ellipticals, and this cannot be explained by variations in the efficiency of gas loss. The gas-loss models have X-ray surface brightness profiles which are much less centrally peaked than the no-gas-loss models.

  3. Impact of Incremental Perfusion Loss on Oxygen Transport in a Capillary Network Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graham M; Sharpe, Michael D; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    To quantify how incremental capillary PL, such as that seen in experimental models of sepsis, affects tissue oxygenation using a computation model of oxygen transport. A computational model was applied to capillary networks with dimensions 84 × 168 × 342 (NI) and 70 × 157 × 268 (NII) μm, reconstructed in vivo from rat skeletal muscle. FCD loss was applied incrementally up to ~40% and combined with high tissue oxygen consumption to simulate severe sepsis. A loss of ~40% FCD loss decreased median tissue PO2 to 22.9 and 20.1 mmHg in NI and NII compared to 28.1 and 27.5 mmHg under resting conditions. Increasing RBC SR to baseline levels returned tissue PO2 to within 5% of baseline. HC combined with a 40% FCD loss, resulted in tissue anoxia in both network volumes and median tissue PO2 of 11.5 and 8.9 mmHg in NI and NII respectively; median tissue PO2 was recovered to baseline levels by increasing total SR 3-4 fold. These results suggest a substantial increase in total SR is required in order to compensate for impaired oxygen delivery as a result of loss of capillary perfusion and increased oxygen consumption during sepsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Rhizome phyllosphere oxygenation in Phragmites and other species in relation to redox potential, convective gas flow, submergence and aeration pathways.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Jones, R E; Armstrong, W

    2006-01-01

    Underground rhizomes of emergent aquatic macrophytes are important for perennation, vegetative spread, competition and anchorage. In four species we examined the potential for the development of oxidized phyllospheres around rhizome apical buds, similar to the protective oxygenated rhizospheres around roots. Redox potentials and polarographic measurements of radial oxygen loss were recorded using platinum cathodes around the apical buds. The aeration pathway from atmosphere to phyllosphere was investigated anatomically and by applied pressurized gas flow. Redox potentials increased by +400, +45, +200 and +340 mV around rhizome apices of Phragmites australis, Oryza rhizomatis, Carex rostrata and Glyceria maxima, respectively. Radial oxygen loss from rhizome apices of Phragmites was increased by convective gas flow through the rhizome and by shoot de-submergence, and decreased by resistances applied within the aeration pathway and by shoot submergence. We conclude that oxygen passes via internal gas-space connections between aerial shoot, rhizome and underground buds and into the phyllosphere regions via scale-leaf stomata and surfaces on the buds. We suggest that oxidized phyllospheres may protect rhizome apices against phytotoxins in waterlogged soils, just as oxidized rhizospheres protect roots.

  5. Oxygen gas optrode based on microstructured polymer optical fiber segment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xinghua; Peng, Lirong; Yuan, Libo; Teng, Pingping; Tian, Fengjun; Li, Le; Luo, Shenzi

    2011-06-01

    In this article, we first propose a novel type of oxygen gas optrode by forming fluorophore doped sensing film in the array microholes with the characteristics of microstructured optical fiber (MOF) segment. Comparing with the conventional O 2 detecting method, this slender shaped optrode shows potential in trace amount of O 2 sensing and online O 2 monitoring. Organical silicate gel or plastified cellulose acetate are chosen as sensing films and tris (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenathroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride ([Ru(dpp) 3]Cl 2) or meso-tetraphenylporphyin (TPP) as quenching fluorophores. From the experimental results, we find [Ru(dpp) 3] 2+-Gel-MOF optrode has favorable sensing characteristics, and the Stern-Volmer plots are linear in the full concentration range of O 2 (0-100% v/v). The ratio of I 0/I 100, where I 0 and I 100 respectively represents the fluorescence intensities of the optrode exposed to 100% N 2 and 100% O 2, as a sensitivity of the optrode is 10.8. Simultaneously, the optrode can make a quick response within 50 ms.

  6. Woody encroachment impacts on ecosystem nitrogen cycling: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2016-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs have the potential to alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates vary seasonally, inter-annually and as a function of plant age and abiotic conditions. Applying a small-scale mass balance model to soil N accrual around individual trees (accounting for atmospheric inputs, and gas and hydrologic losses) generated current fixation estimates of 11 kg N ha-1 yr-1, making symbiotic fixation the largest input of N to the ecosystem. However, soil N accrual and increased cycling rates did not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Lab incubations suggested that N2 losses are likely to be low, with field oxygen conditions not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of significant net N accrual, driven by fixation under ongoing encroachment. Given the large scale of woody legume encroachment in the USA, this process is likely to contribute

  7. The influence of woody encroachment on the nitrogen cycle: fixation, storage and gas loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soper, F.; Sparks, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Woody encroachment is a pervasive land cover change throughout the tropics and subtropics. Encroachment is frequently catalyzed by nitrogen (N)-fixing trees and the resulting N inputs potentially alter whole-ecosystem N cycling, accumulation and loss. In the southern US, widespread encroachment by legume Prosopis glandulosa is associated with increased soil total N storage, inorganic N concentrations, and net mineralization and nitrification rates. To better understand the effects of this process on ecosystem N cycling, we investigated patterns of symbiotic N fixation, N accrual and soil N trace gas and N2 emissions during Prosopis encroachment into the southern Rio Grande Plains. Analyses of d15N in foliage, xylem sap and plant-available soil N suggested that N fixation rates increase with tree age and are influenced by abiotic conditions. A model of soil N accrual around individual trees, accounting for atmospheric inputs and gas losses, generates lifetimes N fixation estimates of up to 9 kg for a 100-year-old tree and current rates of 7 kg N ha-1 yr-1. However, these N inputs and increased soil cycling rates do not translate into increased N gas losses. Two years of field measurements of a complete suite of N trace gases (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitric oxide and other oxidized N compounds) found no difference in flux between upland Prosopis groves and adjacent unencroached grasslands. Total emissions for both land cover types average 0.56-0.65 kg N ha-1 yr-1, comparable to other southern US grasslands. Additional lab experiments suggested that N2 losses are low and that field oxygen conditions are not usually conducive to denitrification. Taken together, results suggest that this ecosystem is currently experiencing a period of net N accrual under ongoing encroachment.

  8. Weight loss and exercise training effect on oxygen uptake and heart rate response to locomotion.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Gary R; Fisher, Gordon; Bryan, David R; Zuckerman, Paul A

    2012-05-01

    Effects of resistance and aerobic training on the ease of physical activity during and after weight loss are unknown. The purpose of the study was to determine what effect weight loss combined with either aerobic or resistance training has on the ease of locomotion (net V[Combining Dot Above]O2 and heart rate). It is hypothesized that exercise training will result in an increased ease, lowers heart rate during locomotion. Seventy-three overweight premenopausal women were assigned to diet and aerobic training, diet and resistance training, or diet only. Subjects were evaluated while overweight, after diet-induced weight loss (average, 12.5 kg loss), and 1 year after weight loss (5.5 kg regain). Submaximal walking, grade walking, stair climbing, and bike oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured at all time points. Weight loss diet was 800 kcal per day. Exercisers trained 3 times per week during weight loss and 2 times per week during 1-year follow-up. Resistance training increased strength, and aerobic training increased maximum oxygen uptake. Net submaximal oxygen uptake was not affected by weight loss or exercise training. However, heart rate during walking, stair climbing, and bicycling was reduced after weight loss. No significant differences in reduction in heart rate were observed among the 3 treatment groups for locomotion after weight loss. However, during 1-year follow-up, exercise training resulted in maintenance of lower submaximal heart rate, whereas nonexercisers increased heart rate during locomotion. Results suggest that moderately intense exercise is helpful in improving the ease of movement after weight loss. Exercise training may be helpful in increasing the participation in free-living physical activity.

  9. Weight loss and exercise training effect on oxygen uptake and heart rate response to locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Gary R.; Fisher, Gordon; Bryan, David R.; Zuckerman, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of resistance and aerobic training on ease of physical activity during and following weight loss are unknown. Purpose of study is to determine what affect weight loss combined with either aerobic or resistance training has on ease of locomotion (netVO2 and heart rate). It is hypothesized that exercise training will result in increased ease, lower heart rate during locomotion. Seventy three overweight, premenopausal women were assigned to diet and aerobic training, diet and resistance training, or diet only. Subjects were evaluated while overweight, after diet induced weight loss (average 12.5 kg loss), and one year following weight loss (5.5 kg regain). Submaximal walking, grade walking, stair climbing, and bike oxygen uptake and heart rate were measured at all time points. Weight loss diet was 800 kcal/day. Exercisers trained 3 times/wk during weight loss and 2 times/wk during one year follow-up. Resistance training increased strength and aerobic training increased maximum oxygen uptake. Net submaximal oxygen uptake was not affected by weight loss or exercise training. However, heart rate during walking, stair climbing, and bicycling was reduced following weight loss. No significant differences in reduction in heart rate were observed between the 3 treatment groups for locomotion following weight loss. However, during one-year follow-up, exercise training resulted in maintenance of lower submaximal heart rate, while non exercisers increased heart rate during locomotion. Results, suggest that moderately intense exercise is helpful in improving ease of movement following weight loss. Exercise training may be helpful in increasing participation in free living physical activity. PMID:22344063

  10. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in allende and solar nebula Gas

    PubMed

    Yurimoto; Ito; Nagasawa

    1998-12-04

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope compositions ( approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  11. Oxygen isotope exchange between refractory inclusion in Allende and solar nebula gas.

    PubMed

    Yurimoto, H; Ito, M; Nagasawa, H

    1998-12-04

    A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) from the Allende meteorite was analyzed and found to contain melilite crystals with extreme oxygen-isotope composition (approximately 5 percent oxygen-16 enrichment relative to terrestrial oxygen-16). Some of the melilite is also anomalously enriched in oxygen-16 compared with oxygen isotopes measured in other CAIs. The oxygen isotopic variation measured among the minerals (melilite, spinel, and fassaite) indicates that crystallization of the CAI started from oxygen-16-rich materials that were probably liquid droplets in the solar nebula, and oxygen isotope exchange with the surrounding oxygen-16-poor nebular gas progressed through the crystallization of the CAI. Additional oxygen isotope exchange also occurred during subsequent reheating events in the solar nebula.

  12. Prognostic effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time for sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Erol; Murat Özcan, K; Palalı, Mehmet; Cetin, Mehmet Ali; Ensari, Serdar; Dere, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss is one of the otological emergencies whose pathogenesis is uncertain and associated with total or partial loss of hearing function. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the hyperbaric oxygen therapy starting time affects the management of sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Fifty-nine patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss admitted to our clinic between 2008 and 2012 were retrospectively included in this study. All patients received hyperbaric oxygen therapy. In addition, each patient received intravenous piracetam and 37 patients received steroid therapy. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy was initiated between 1 and 7 days with 20 patients determined as Group A, between 8 and 14 days with 25 patients determined as Group B and between 15 and 28 days with 14 patients determined as Group C. Hearing gains of these three groups were statistically evaluated. Each of them showed statistically significant improvement. Lowest hearing gain was observed in Group C and the gain of this group was statistically less than the other two groups. There was no significant difference between the hearing gains of the Group A and Group B. Starting hyperbaric oxygen therapy in patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss within the first 14 days has positive effect on the prognosis of the disease.

  13. Loss of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium from the lunar regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Hurd, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The processes of formation and maturation of lunar soils lead to enrichments in the heavy stable isotopes of oxygen, silicon, sulfur, and potassium. The isotopic enrichment implies substantial losses of these elements from the moon. Vaporization by micrometeorite impact and by ion sputtering have removed at least 1% of the mass of the regolith. The losses of sulfur and potassium amount to at least 20-30% of their original abundance in the regolith.

  14. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss after Failure from Oral and Intratympanic Corticosteroid

    PubMed Central

    Poonsap, Pipat; Snidvongs, Kornkiat

    2012-01-01

    Systemic and intratympanic steroids are most widely used for treating idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Other treatments include vasodilator, immunosuppressant and antiviral medication. However, only 61% of patients achieve full recovery, and controversies about the standard treatment still exist. In this case report, we present a patient with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss who failed to respond to systemic and intratympanic steroid treatments but subsequently recovered after undergoing hyperbaric oxygen therapy. PMID:22701158

  15. JSC systems using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacites in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1981-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 KN/sq meter (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change of temperature. A thermogravimetric analysis system employing these techniques of redox control and measurement is also described. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  16. A system using solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cells to measure oxygen fugacities in gas-mixing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. J.; Mullins, O.

    1976-01-01

    Details are given for the construction and operation of a 101.3 kN/sq m (1 atmosphere) redox control system. A solid ceramic oxygen electrolyte cell is used to monitor the oxygen fugacity in the furnace. The system consists of a vertical quench, gas mixing furnace with heads designed for mounting the electrolyte cell and with facilities for inserting and removing the samples. The system also contains the high input impedance electronics necessary for measurements, a simplified version of a gas mixing apparatus, and devices for experiments under controlled rates of change relative to temperature and redox state. The calibration and maintenance of the system are discussed.

  17. Usefulness of high doses of glucocorticoids and hyperbaric oxygen therapy in sudden sensorineural hearing loss treatment.

    PubMed

    Narozny, Waldemar; Sicko, Zdzislaw; Przewozny, Tomasz; Stankiewicz, Czeslaw; Kot, Jacek; Kuczkowski, Jerzy

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the effect of pharmacologic (steroids, vasodilators, vitamins, and Betaserc) and hyperbaric oxygen therapy on patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss. The pharmacologic arm of the study consisted of 52 patients with defined sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated simultaneously in the ENT Department and National Center for Hyperbaric Medicine of the Medical University of Gdansk, Poland, from 1997 to 2000 (Group A). The hyperbaric oxygen therapy consisted of exposure to 100% oxygen at a pressure of 250 kPa for a total of 60 minutes in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber. The control group included 81 patients with defined sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated in the ENT Department, Medical University of Gdansk, from 1980 to 1996 (Group B). Both groups were comparable regarding the age of the patients, season of hearing loss occurrence, tinnitus and vestibular symptom frequency, delay before therapy, and average threshold loss before the start of treatment. The treatment results (hearing gain) were estimated using pure-tone audiometry. We retrospectively analyzed the audiograms of all patients. Patients from Group A (blood flow-promoting drugs, glucocorticoids in high doses, betahistine, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy) showed significantly better recovery of hearing levels compared with those from Group B (blood flow-promoting drugs and glucocorticoids in low doses) at seven frequencies (500, 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, 4,000, 6,000, and 8,000 Hz) (p < 0.05) and four groups of frequencies (pure-tone average, high-tone average, pure middle-tone average, and overall average) (p < 0.05). Percentage hearing gain in all investigated frequencies was also better in Group A versus Group B, and the differences were statistically significant (p < 0.05). We conclude that hyperbaric oxygen therapy with high doses of glucocorticoids improves the results of conventional sudden sensorineural hearing loss treatment and should be recommended. In addition, the best

  18. Laboratory Measurements of Oxygen Gas Release from Basaltic Minerals Exposed to UV- Radiation: Implications for the Viking Gas Exchange Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; Yen, A. S.

    2007-12-01

    The biology experiments onboard the Viking Landers determined that the Martian soils at Chryse and Utopia Planitia contain an unknown chemical compound of a highly oxidizing nature. The Gas Exchange Experiments (GEx) demonstrated that the humidification of a 1-cc Martian soil sample resulted in the production of as much as 790 nanomoles of oxygen gas. Yen et al. (2000) have provided experimental evidence that superoxide radicals can be generated on plagioclase feldspar (labradorite) grain surfaces by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light in the presence of oxygen gas. Adsorbed superoxide radicals are thought to react readily with water vapor, and produce oxygen gas in quantities sufficient to explain the Viking GEx results. Direct evidence for the formation of oxygen gas, however, was not provided in the experiments of Yen et al (2000). Accordingly, the motivation of this study is to determine whether superoxide radicals adsorbed on labradorite surfaces are capable of producing oxygen gas upon exposure to water vapor. We have constructed an experimental apparatus that is capable of monitoring oxygen gas release from basaltic mineral powders that have been exposed to UV-radiation under Martian atmospheric pressure conditions. The apparatus consists of a stainless-steel vacuum chamber with a UV- transparent window where sample radiation exposures are performed. The vacuum chamber has multiple valved ports for injection of gases and water vapor. The vacuum chamber is connected via a precision leak valve to a quadrupole mass spectrometer, which measures changes in the composition of the headspace gases over our mineral samples. We will report on the results of our experiments, which are aimed at detecting and quantifying oxygen gas release from UV-exposed basaltic mineral samples using this new experimental facility. These results will further constrain whether superoxide ions adsorbed on mineral surfaces provide a viable explanation for the Viking GEx results, which have

  19. Oxygen-sulfur exchange and the gas-phase reactivity of cobalt sulfide cluster anions with molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Jia, Mei-Ye; Luo, Zhixun; He, Sheng-Gui; Ge, Mao-Fa

    2014-09-18

    We present here a study of gas-phase reactivity of cobalt sulfide cluster anions Co(m)S(n)(-) with molecular oxygen. Nascent Co(m)S(n)(-) clusters were prepared via a laser ablation source and reacted with oxygen in a fast flow reactor under thermal collision conditions. We chose (18)O2 in place of (16)O2 to avoid mass degeneration with sulfur, and a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer was used to detect the cluster distributions in the absence and presence of the reactant. It was found that oxygen-sulfur exchange occurs in the reactions for those with specific compositions (CoS)(n)(-) and (CoS)(n)S(-) (n = 2-5) according to a consistent pathway, "Co(m)S(n)(-) + (18)O2 → Co(m)S(n-1)(18)O(-) + S(18)O". Typically, for "Co2S2(-) + (18)O2" we have calculated the reaction coordinates by employing the density functional theory (DFT), where both the oxygen-sulfur exchange and SO molecule release are thermodynamically and kinetically favorable. It is noteworthy that the reaction with molecular oxygen (triplet ground state) needs to overcome a spin excitation as well as a large O-O activation energy. This study sheds light on the activation of molecular oxygen by cobalt sulfides on one hand and also provides insight into the regeneration mechanism of cobalt oxides from the counterpart sulfides in the presence of oxygen gas on the other hand.

  20. The place of hyperbaric oxygen therapy and ozone therapy in sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Ergun Taşdöven, Gülin; Derin, Alper Tunga; Yaprak, Neslihan; Özçağlar, Hasan Ümit

    It is difficult to evaluate the effect of drugs clinically used for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, mainly because its underlying mechanism remains unknown. This study assessed the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy or ozone therapy in the treatment of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss, when either therapy was included with steroid treatment. A retrospective analysis examined 106 patients with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss seen between January 2010 and June 2012. Those with an identified etiology were excluded. The patients were divided into three treatment groups: oral steroid only (n=65), oral steroid+hyperbaric oxygen (n=26), and oral steroid+ozone (n=17). Treatment success was assessed using Siegel criteria and mean gains using pre- and post-treatment audiograms. The highest response rate to treatment was observed in the oral steroid+ozone therapy group (82.4%), followed by the oral steroid+hyperbaric oxygen (61.5%), and oral steroid groups (50.8%). There were no significant differences in the response to treatment between the oral steroid and oral steroid+hyperbaric oxygen groups (p<0.355). The oral steroid+ozone group showed a significantly higher response rate to treatment than the oral steroid group (p=0.019). There were no significant differences between the oral steroid+hyperbaric oxygen and oral steroid+ozone groups (p=0.146). The efficiency of steroid treatment in patients with severe hearing loss was low. It was statistically ascertained that adding hyperbaric oxygen or ozone therapy to the treatment contributed significantly to treatment success. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Transmission of low-energy oxygen ions through ultrathin rare-gas films: Molecular-dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Peter; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Vicanek, Martin

    1995-02-01

    By use of molecular dynamics we simulate a recent experiment by Sack et al. in which oxygen ions are desorbed by electron impact from a WOx surface, and their transmission through rare-gas films of a few monolayer thickness has been measured. When using only elastic scattering cross sections between O+ and rare-gas atoms in the simulation, we find fair quantitative agreement with the measured transmission yield, and energy, and angular distributions, for Xe and Kr films. The large number of transmitted oxygen ions can be traced back to the small O+ radius. The discrepancy between measured and simulated transmission behavior through Ar films is attributed to either electronically inelastic losses or structural effects in these films. The im pact of this work on the depth of origin of sputtered particles is discussed.

  2. Placental Gas Exchange and the Oxygen Supply to the Fetus.

    PubMed

    Carter, Anthony M

    2015-07-01

    The oxygen supply of the fetus depends on the blood oxygen content and flow rate in the uterine and umbilical arteries and the diffusing capacity of the placenta. Oxygen consumption by the placenta is a significant factor and a potential limitation on availability to the fetus. The relevance of these several factors as well as responses to acute or sustained hypoxia has been explored in the sheep model. In addition, much has been learned in the context of hypobaric hypoxia by studying human populations that have resided at high altitude for varying periods of time. Embryonic development occurs under anaerobic conditions and even the fetus is adapted to a low oxygen environment. Nevertheless, there is a reserve capacity, and during acute hypoxia the fetus can counter a 50% reduction in oxygen delivery by increasing fractional extraction. During sustained hypoxia, on the other hand, fetal growth is slowed, although oxygen consumption is unaltered when corrected for fetal mass. Similarly, birth weight is reduced in humans living at high altitude even if the effect is tempered in those with a long highland ancestry. Placental mass changes little during sustained hypoxia in sheep or humans at high altitude. This conceals the fact that there are structural changes and that placental oxygen consumption is reduced. The underlying mechanisms are a current focus of research. One intriguing possibility is that increased anaerobic metabolism of glucose in the placenta spares oxygen for the fetus but reduces its supply of substrate and thereby limits fetal growth.

  3. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  4. CNS oxygen toxicity in closed-circuit diving: signs and symptoms before loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Arieli, R; Arieli, Y; Daskalovic, Y; Eynan, M; Abramovich, A

    2006-11-01

    There is a dearth of information regarding CNS oxygen toxicity accidents in closed-circuit oxygen diving. The aims of the present study were to report the sensations and symptoms that accompany CNS oxygen toxicity accidents, and to evaluate whether loss of consciousness can occur without any warning signs. We documented 36 CNS oxygen toxicity accidents in closed-circuit oxygen diving. The full accident inquiry included the first report from the diving unit, an interview of the victim and his buddy by the researchers, and an examination of the diving equipment. The symptoms that appeared before termination of a dive, as reported by the victim or his buddy, were as follows (in descending order of frequency): limb convulsions; hyperventilation; difficulty maintaining a steady depth; headache; and visual disturbances. The symptoms that appeared after detachment from the mouthpiece were, in descending order of frequency: headache; loss of consciousness; confusion; weakness; dizziness; and facial muscle twitching and limb convulsions. A high inspired CO2 [mean 4.2 kPa (29.9 mmHg)] was connected with loss of consciousness. No dive was terminated before at least two symptoms (mean 3.4) had been noted a minimum of 5 min before termination. Symptoms that are accepted as being related to CNS oxygen toxicity, as well as others such as headache, difficulty maintaining a steady depth, hyperventilation, weakness, and a choking sensation, were more frequent among the O2 accident victims compared with divers who did not interrupt their dives. Awareness of any unusual sensation can prevent a potentially dangerous situation from arising.

  5. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Junchao; Yu, Qiuhong; Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Ruiyun; Xue, Lianbi

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA) is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2) can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy. PMID:28362819

  6. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junchao; Yu, Qiuhong; Liu, Yaling; Zhang, Ruiyun; Xue, Lianbi

    2017-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA) is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2) can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  7. Oxygen measurement by multimode diode lasers employing gas correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xiutao; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2009-02-10

    Multimode diode laser (MDL)-based correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was used to measure oxygen in ambient air, thereby employing a diode laser (DL) having an emission spectrum that overlaps the oxygen absorption lines of the A band. A sensitivity of 700 ppm m was achieved with good accuracy (2%) and linearity (R(2)=0.999). For comparison, measurements of ambient oxygen were also performed by tunable DL absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technique employing a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. We demonstrate that, despite slightly degraded sensitivity, the MDL-based COSPEC-based oxygen sensor has the advantages of high stability, low cost, ease-of-use, and relaxed requirements in component selection and instrument buildup compared with the TDLAS-based instrument.

  8. Chemical-looping combustion of simulated synthesis gas using nickel oxide oxygen carrier supported on bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Poston, J.A.; Zinn, A.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, C.

    2007-05-01

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technology for clean and efficient utilization of fossil fuels for energy production. This process which produces sequestration ready CO2 systems is a promising technology to be utilized with coal gasification systems. In the present work, chemical-looping combustion has been studied with an oxygen carrier, NiO/bentonite (60 wt % NiO) for the gasification systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data on multicycle tests conducted with NiO/bentonite at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. The rate of reduction increased slightly with an increase in temperature, while the rate of oxidation decreased at 900 °C. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the particle size between 20 and 200 mesh. The rates of reactions depended on the particle size of the oxygen carrier. The smaller the particle size, the higher the reaction rates. The multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for the production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. The data from a one cycle test on the effect of the pressure on the performance with NiO/bentonite utilizing the tapered element oscillating microbalance (TEOM) showed a positive effect of the pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the presence of the NiO phase in NiO/bentonite with the oxidized sample in the highpressure reactor and Ni phase with the reduced sample. The presence of a small amount of NiO in the reduced sample detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) may be due to its exposure to air during sample transfer from the reactor to XPS. Scanning electron

  9. On the silicate crystallinities of oxygen-rich evolved stars and their mass-loss rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiaming; Jiang, B. W.; Li, Aigen; Gao, Jian

    2017-04-01

    For decades ever since the early detection in the 1990s of the emission spectral features of crystalline silicates in oxygen-rich evolved stars, there is a long-standing debate on whether the crystallinity of the silicate dust correlates with the stellar mass-loss rate. To investigate the relation between the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of evolved stars, we carry out a detailed analysis of 28 nearby oxygen-rich stars. We derive the mass-loss rates of these sources by modelling their spectral energy distributions from the optical to the far-infrared. Unlike previous studies in which the silicate crystallinity was often measured in terms of the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio, we characterize the silicate crystallinities of these sources with the flux ratios of the emission features of crystalline silicates to that of amorphous silicates. This does not require the knowledge of the silicate dust temperatures, which are the major source of uncertainties in estimating the crystalline-to-amorphous silicate mass ratio. With a Pearson correlation coefficient of ∼-0.24, we find that the silicate crystallinities and the mass-loss rates of these sources are not correlated. This supports the earlier findings that the dust shells of low mass-loss rate stars can contain a significant fraction of crystalline silicates without showing the characteristic features in their emission spectra.

  10. Numerical Study of Transmission Loss Through a Slow Gas Layer Adjacent to a Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Beck, Benjamin S.; Slagle, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic numerical investigation of the sound transmission loss through a multilayer system consisting of a bagged gas and lightweight panel. The goal of the study is to better understand the effect of the gas on transmission loss and determine whether a gas with a slow speed of sound is beneficial for noise control applications. As part of the study, the density and speed of sound of the gas are varied independently to assess the impact of each on transmission loss. Results show that near grazing incidence the plane wave transmission loss through the multilayer system is more sensitive to the speed of sound than the density of the gas. In addition, it was found that a slow wave speed in the bagged gas provides more low-frequency transmission loss benefit than a fast wave speed. At low angles of incidence, close to the plate normal, the benefit is due to the reduction of the characteristic impedance of the gas. At high angles of incidence, the benefit is attributed to the fact that the incident waves at the air/gas interface are bent towards the surface normal. Since transmission loss is angle dependent, refraction in the slow gas layer results in a significant improvement in the transmission loss at high angles of incidence.

  11. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  12. GAS PHASE SELECTIVE PHOTOXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS USING LIGHT-ACTIVATED TITANIUM DIOXIDE AND MOLECULAR OXYGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas Phase Selective Oxidation of Alcohols Using Light-Activated Titanium Dioxide and Molecular Oxygen

    Gas phase selective oxidations of various primary and secondary alcohols are studied in an indigenously built stainless steel up-flow photochemical reactor using ultravi...

  13. Water loss and gas exchange by eggs of Manduca sexta: trading off costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    Woods, H Arthur

    2010-05-01

    Like all terrestrial organisms, insect eggs face a tradeoff between exchanging metabolic gases (O(2) and CO(2)) and conserving water. Here I summarize the physiology underlying this tradeoff and the ecological contexts in which it may be important. The ideas are illustrated primarily by work from my laboratory on eggs of the sphingid moth Manduca sexta. In particular, I discuss: (1) dynamic changes in metabolic demand and water loss during development; and (2) how the eggshell layers and embryonic tracheal system control the traffic of gases between the embryo and its environment. Subsequently, I identify three areas with interesting but unresolved issues: (1) what eggs actually experience in their microclimates, focusing particularly on the leaf microclimates relevant to eggs of M. sexta; (2) how egg experience influences whether or not hatchling larvae succeed in establishing feeding sites on host plants; and (3) whether Hetz and Bradley's [Hetz, S.K., Bradley, T.J., 2005. Insects breathe discontinuously to avoid oxygen toxicity. Nature 433, 516-519] oxygen toxicity hypothesis for discontinuous gas-exchange cycles applies to insect eggs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    DOEpatents

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  15. Real gas CFD simulations of hydrogen/oxygen supercritical combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohl, S.; Jarczyk, M.; Pfitzner, M.; Rogg, B.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive numerical framework has been established to simulate reacting flows under conditions typically encountered in rocket combustion chambers. The model implemented into the commercial CFD Code ANSYS CFX includes appropriate real gas relations based on the volume-corrected Peng-Robinson (PR) equation of state (EOS) for the flow field and a real gas extension of the laminar flamelet combustion model. The results indicate that the real gas relations have a considerably larger impact on the flow field than on the detailed flame structure. Generally, a realistic flame shape could be achieved for the real gas approach compared to experimental data from the Mascotte test rig V03 operated at ONERA when the differential diffusion processes were only considered within the flame zone.

  16. Myocardial oxygen consumption change predicts left ventricular relaxation improvement in obese humans after weight loss.

    PubMed

    Lin, C Huie; Kurup, Suraj; Herrero, Pilar; Schechtman, Kenneth B; Eagon, J Christopher; Klein, Samuel; Dávila-Román, Víctor G; Stein, Richard I; Dorn, Gerald W; Gropler, Robert J; Waggoner, Alan D; Peterson, Linda R

    2011-09-01

    Obesity adversely affects myocardial metabolism, efficiency, and diastolic function. Our objective was to determine whether weight loss can ameliorate obesity-related myocardial metabolism and efficiency derangements and that these improvements directly relate to improved diastolic function in humans. We studied 30 obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) subjects with positron emission tomography (PET) (myocardial metabolism, blood flow) and echocardiography (structure, function) before and after marked weight loss from gastric bypass surgery (N = 10) or moderate weight loss from diet (N = 20). Baseline BMI, insulin resistance, hemodynamics, left ventricular (LV) mass, systolic function, myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2), and fatty acid (FA) metabolism were similar between the groups. MVO2/g decreased after diet-induced weight loss (P = 0.009). Total MVO2 decreased after dietary (P = 0.02) and surgical weight loss (P = 0.0006) and was related to decreased BMI (P = 0.006). Total myocardial FA utilization decreased (P = 0.03), and FA oxidation trended lower (P = 0.06) only after surgery. FA esterification and LV efficiency were unchanged. After surgical weight loss, LV mass decreased by 23% (Doppler-derived) E/E' by 33%, and relaxation increased (improved) by 28%. Improved LV relaxation related significantly to decreased BMI, insulin resistance, total MVO2, and LV mass but not FA utilization. Decreased total MVO(2) predicted LV relaxation improvement independent of BMI change (P = 0.02). Weight loss can ameliorate the obesity-related derangements in myocardial metabolism and LV structure and diastolic function. Decreased total MVO2 independently predicted improved LV relaxation, suggesting that myocardial oxygen metabolism may be mechanistically important in determining cardiac relaxation.

  17. Singlet oxygen generation on porous superhydrophobic surfaces: effect of gas flow and sensitizer wetting on trapping efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanyuan; Liu, Yang; Xu, Qianfeng; Barahman, Mark; Bartusik, Dorota; Greer, Alexander; Lyons, Alan M

    2014-11-13

    We describe physical-organic studies of singlet oxygen generation and transport into an aqueous solution supported on superhydrophobic surfaces on which silicon-phthalocyanine (Pc) particles are immobilized. Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was trapped by a water-soluble anthracene compound and monitored in situ using a UV-vis spectrometer. When oxygen flows through the porous superhydrophobic surface, singlet oxygen generated in the plastron (i.e., the gas layer beneath the liquid) is transported into the solution within gas bubbles, thereby increasing the liquid-gas surface area over which singlet oxygen can be trapped. Higher photooxidation rates were achieved in flowing oxygen, as compared to when the gas in the plastron was static. Superhydrophobic surfaces were also synthesized so that the Pc particles were located in contact with, or isolated from, the aqueous solution to evaluate the relative effectiveness of singlet oxygen generated in solution and the gas phase, respectively; singlet oxygen generated on particles wetted by the solution was trapped more efficiently than singlet oxygen generated in the plastron, even in the presence of flowing oxygen gas. A mechanism is proposed that explains how Pc particle wetting, plastron gas composition and flow rate as well as gas saturation of the aqueous solution affect singlet oxygen trapping efficiency. These stable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can physically isolate the photosensitizer particles from the solution may be of practical importance for delivering singlet oxygen for water purification and medical devices.

  18. Singlet Oxygen Generation on Porous Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Effect of Gas Flow and Sensitizer Wetting on Trapping Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe physical-organic studies of singlet oxygen generation and transport into an aqueous solution supported on superhydrophobic surfaces on which silicon–phthalocyanine (Pc) particles are immobilized. Singlet oxygen (1O2) was trapped by a water-soluble anthracene compound and monitored in situ using a UV–vis spectrometer. When oxygen flows through the porous superhydrophobic surface, singlet oxygen generated in the plastron (i.e., the gas layer beneath the liquid) is transported into the solution within gas bubbles, thereby increasing the liquid–gas surface area over which singlet oxygen can be trapped. Higher photooxidation rates were achieved in flowing oxygen, as compared to when the gas in the plastron was static. Superhydrophobic surfaces were also synthesized so that the Pc particles were located in contact with, or isolated from, the aqueous solution to evaluate the relative effectiveness of singlet oxygen generated in solution and the gas phase, respectively; singlet oxygen generated on particles wetted by the solution was trapped more efficiently than singlet oxygen generated in the plastron, even in the presence of flowing oxygen gas. A mechanism is proposed that explains how Pc particle wetting, plastron gas composition and flow rate as well as gas saturation of the aqueous solution affect singlet oxygen trapping efficiency. These stable superhydrophobic surfaces, which can physically isolate the photosensitizer particles from the solution may be of practical importance for delivering singlet oxygen for water purification and medical devices. PMID:24885074

  19. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  20. Breathing 100 percent oxygen compared with 50 percent oxygen:50 percent nitrogen reduces altitude-induced venous gas emboli

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, James T.; Pilmanis, Andrew A.

    1993-01-01

    The study investigates effects of 40 zero-prebreathe decompressions of male subjects to 8.3-6.8 psia for 6 h while they were breathing 100 percent oxygen and performing moderate exercise. No decompression sickness (DCS) symptoms were observed. Severe venous gas emboli (VGE) were not detected at 8.3 psia, but were present during 10, 20, and 40 percent of the exposures at 7.8, 7.3, and 6.8 psia, respectively. Zero-prebreathe decompression while breathing 100 percent oxygen results in significantly lower VGE and DCS risk levels than while breathing a 50:50 mix. It is shown that 7.3 psia EVA pressure suits with 100 percent oxygen should be safer than 8.3 psia suits with a 50:50 mix.

  1. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A.

    2014-01-01

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip. PMID:24843167

  2. Gas loss in simulated galaxies as they fall into clusters.

    PubMed

    Cen, Renyue; Pop, Ana Roxana; Bahcall, Neta A

    2014-06-03

    We use high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamic galaxy formation simulations to gain insights into how galaxies lose their cold gas at low redshift as they migrate from the field to the high-density regions of clusters of galaxies. We find that beyond three cluster virial radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies is constant, representing the field. Within three cluster-centric radii, the fraction of gas-rich galaxies declines steadily with decreasing radius, reaching <10% near the cluster center. Our results suggest galaxies start to feel the effect of the cluster environment on their gas content well beyond the cluster virial radius. We show that almost all gas-rich galaxies at the cluster virial radius are falling in for the first time at nearly radial orbits. Furthermore, we find that almost no galaxy moving outward at the cluster virial radius is gas-rich (with a gas-to-baryon ratio greater than 1%). These results suggest that galaxies that fall into clusters lose their cold gas within a single radial round-trip.

  3. Pathways of sulfide oxidation by haloalkaliphilic bacteria in limited-oxygen gas lift bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Klok, Johannes B M; van den Bosch, Pim L F; Buisman, Cees J N; Stams, Alfons J M; Keesman, Karel J; Janssen, Albert J H

    2012-07-17

    Physicochemical processes, such as the Lo-cat and Amine-Claus process, are commonly used to remove hydrogen sulfide from hydrocarbon gas streams such as landfill gas, natural gas, and synthesis gas. Biodesulfurization offers environmental advantages, but still requires optimization and more insight in the reaction pathways and kinetics. We carried out experiments with gas lift bioreactors inoculated with haloalkaliphilic sulfide-oxidizing bacteria. At oxygen-limiting levels, that is, below an O(2)/H(2)S mole ratio of 1, sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur and sulfate. We propose that the bacteria reduce NAD(+) without direct transfer of electrons to oxygen and that this is most likely the main route for oxidizing sulfide to elemental sulfur which is subsequently oxidized to sulfate in oxygen-limited bioreactors. We call this pathway the limited oxygen route (LOR). Biomass growth under these conditions is significantly lower than at higher oxygen levels. These findings emphasize the importance of accurate process control. This work also identifies a need for studies exploring similar pathways in other sulfide oxidizers such as Thiobacillus bacteria.

  4. Automatable Measurement of Gas Exchange Rate in Streams: Oxygen-Carbon Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, R.; Haggerty, R.; Argerich, A.; Wondzell, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Gas exchange rates between streams and the atmosphere are critically important to measurement of in-stream ecologic processes, as well as fate and transport of hazardous pollutants such as mercury and PCBs. Methods to estimate gas exchange rates include empirical relations to hydraulics, and direct injection of a tracer gas such as propane or SF6. Empirical relations are inconsistent and inaccurate, particularly for lower order, high-roughness streams. Gas injections are labor-intensive, and measured gas exchange rates are difficult to extrapolate in time since they change with discharge and stream geometry. We propose a novel method for calculation of gas exchange rates utilizing O2, pCO2, pH, and temperature data. Measurements, which can be automated using data loggers and probes, are made on the upstream and downstream end of the study reach. Gas exchange rates are then calculated from a solution to the transport equations for oxygen and dissolved inorganic carbon. Field tests in steep, low order, high roughness streams of the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest indicate the method to be viable along stream reaches with high downstream gas concentration gradients and high rates of gas transfer velocity. Automated and continuous collection of oxygen and carbonate chemistry data is increasingly common, thus the method may be used to estimate gas exchange rates through time, and is well suited for interactivity with databases.

  5. Gas exchange efficiency of an oxygenator with integrated pulsatile displacement blood pump for neonatal patients.

    PubMed

    Schlanstein, Peter C; Borchardt, Ralf; Mager, Ilona; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Arens, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Oxygenators have been used in neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) since the 1970s. The need to develop a more effective oxygenator for this patient cohort exists due to their size and blood volume limitations. This study sought to validate the next design iteration of a novel oxygenator for neonatal ECMO with an integrated pulsatile displacement pump, thereby superseding an additional blood pump. Pulsating blood flow within the oxygenator is generated by synchronized active air flow expansion and contraction of integrated silicone pump tubes and hose pinching valves located at the oxygenator inlet and outlet. The current redesign improved upon previous prototypes by optimizing silicone pump tube distribution within the oxygenator fiber bundle; introduction of an oval shaped inner fiber bundle core, and housing; and a higher fiber packing density, all of which in combination reduced the priming volume by about 50% (50 to 27 mL and 41 to 20 mL, respectively). Gas exchange efficiency was tested for two new oxygenators manufactured with different fiber materials: one with coating and one with smaller pore size, both capable of long-term use (OXYPLUS® and CELGARD®). Results demonstrated that the oxygen transfer for both oxygenators was 5.3-24.7 mlO2/min for blood flow ranges of 100-500 mlblood/min. Carbon dioxide transfer for both oxygenators was 3.7-26.3 mlCO2/min for the same blood flow range. These preliminary results validated the oxygenator redesign by demonstrating an increase in packing density and thus in gas transfer, an increase in pumping capacity and a reduction in priming volume.

  6. Effect of oxygen desaturation threshold on determination of OSA severity during weight loss.

    PubMed

    Myllymaa, Katja; Myllymaa, Sami; Leppänen, Timo; Kulkas, Antti; Kupari, Salla; Tiihonen, Pekka; Mervaala, Esa; Seppä, Juha; Tuomilehto, Henri; Töyräs, Juha

    2016-03-01

    Weight loss leads to improvement of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), based on frequency of respiratory events (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI). However, AHI does not incorporate the severity of individual obstruction events. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine suggests two alternative oxygen desaturation thresholds (ODT) for scoring of hypopneas. We hypothesize that lowering the ODT level increases the determined impact of weight loss on OSA severity. We investigate this during weight change with AHI and adjusted AHI. Adjusted AHI is a novel parameter incorporating both severity and number of the events. Ambulatory polygraphic data of 54 OSA patients (F 15/M 39, 51.7 ± 8.4 years), divided into weight loss (>5 %, n = 20), control (weight change 0-5 %, n = 26), and weight gain (>5 %, n = 8) groups, were evaluated at baseline and after 5-year follow-up. Effect of ODT (ODT2%-ODT6%) on AHI and adjusted AHI was investigated. The greatest changes in AHI (decrease in weight loss group and increase in weight gain group) were observed with ODT2%. Changes in AHI diminished with increasing ODT. In weight loss group, adjusted AHI showed a similar but non-significant trend. In contrast, the higher ODT was used in weight gain group, the greater increase in adjusted AHI resulted. Using adjusted AHI instead of AHI, led to a smaller number of patients (20 vs. 55 %, ODT3%) whose OSA severity category improved along weight loss. Weight loss significantly reduced AHI. This reduction was highly dependent on selected ODT. The change in adjusted AHI did not occur in the same extent. This was expected as the more severe events which tend to remain during the weight loss have greater importance in adjusted AHI, while the event severity is neglected in AHI.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2016-12-14

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  8. Helium-oxygen mixture does not improve gas exchange in mechanically ventilated children with bronchiolitis

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Matthew F; Spear, Robert M; Peterson, Bradley M

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Heliox has been found to reduce both the arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) and work of breathing in children and adults with status asthmaticus. We hypothesized that, in mechanically ventilated children with bronchiolitis, increasing the ratio of helium:oxygen concentrations would improve both ventilation and oxygenation. Objective: To examine the effect of varying concentrations of heliox mixtures on ventilation and oxygenation in mechanically ventilated children with bronchiolitis. Patients and methods: This was a case series, with a nonrandomized, unblinded, repeated-measures design, which was conducted in a pediatric intensive care unit in a children's hospital. Ten patients, aged 1-9 months, were mechanically ventilated in SIMV mode with the following gas mixtures delivered at 15-min intervals: 50%/50% nitrogen/oxygen, 50%/50% heliox, 60%/40% heliox, 70%/30% heliox, and return to 50%/50% nitrogen/oxygen. Two-factor, repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to determine whether the different gas mixtures affected the mean PaCO2, the ratio of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) to fractional inspired oxygen (FiO2), or the ratio of PaO2 to alveolar oxygen tension (PAO2). Results: No statistical or noticeable difference was found between the mean PaCO2, PaO2/FiO2, or PaO2/PAO2 values while the patients were receiving the four different gas mixtures (P = 0.93, 0.98, and 0.96, respectively). Conclusion: The use of different heliox mixtures compared with 50%/50% nitrogen/oxygen in mechanically ventilated children with bronchiolitis did not result in a significant or noticeable decrease in ventilation or oxygenation. PMID:11056751

  9. Rice and Phragmites: effects of organic acids on growth, root permeability, and radial oxygen loss to the rhizosphere.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, J; Armstrong, W

    2001-08-01

    Young Phragmites plants were grown in two cocktails of monocarboxylic acids (C(1)-C(5)) at pH 6, where the concentration of each acid was innocuous and the total undissociated (potentially toxic) concentrations were 0.35 mmol/L and 0.42 mmol/L. Rice plants were subjected to 1.5 mmol/L acetic acid at pH 4.5 (undissociated concentration = 1.05 mmol/L). In Phragmites, each cocktail curtailed root growth especially and induced premature shoot senescence. In both species, after 3-5 d of treatment, radial oxygen loss (ROL) from apical regions of adventitious roots, and from Phragmites laterals, was reduced to very low values and associated with cell wall lignification and suberization in the surface cell layers. At later stages of treatment, rice responded to acetic acid in similar ways to Phragmites, with the development of intercellular and callus type occlusions in the gas space system, vascular blockages, and the failure of laterals to emerge. The results are relevant to the supply of oxygen from Phragmites roots to sediments for the phytopurification of waste waters, to the efflux of methane and carbon dioxide from wetlands, and to rice cultivation.

  10. Microbial competition for N intermediates drives oscillating N loss from marine oxygen deficient zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penn, J. L.; Weber, T. S.; Deutsch, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    Small oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) below the ocean surface play a major role in regulating marine biological productivity, through the removal of bioavailable nitrogen (N). Recent observations have shown diverse microbial communities affecting N metabolic pathways, but the large-scale consequences of this complexity are unknown. Here we investigate the key microbial interactions and their importance for N loss in a circulation and ecosystem model of the largest ODZ, in the North Pacific. The microbial model replicates observed chemical distributions, but exhibits fundamentally distinct behavior from traditional models based on chemistry alone. The ecosystem undergoes local oscillations that create large variability in the regional rate of N loss, even in a steady circulation. These N loss fluctuations occur at the boundary between oxic and anoxic waters, where miniscule fluctuations in scarce resources are driven by competitive dynamics and dramatically shift the balance between aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The coexistence of these populations and their competing geochemical effects reduces overall rates of N loss while expanding the scale of anoxic waters. Intrinsic ecosystem oscillations also cause dramatic swings in the ratio of heterotrophic to autotrophic N loss pathways, possibly underlying the wide variations observed in nature.

  11. Regulation of cellular gas exchange, oxygen sensing, and metabolic control.

    PubMed

    Clanton, T L; Hogan, M C; Gladden, L B

    2013-07-01

    Cells must continuously monitor and couple their metabolic requirements for ATP utilization with their ability to take up O2 for mitochondrial respiration. When O2 uptake and delivery move out of homeostasis, cells have elaborate and diverse sensing and response systems to compensate. In this review, we explore the biophysics of O2 and gas diffusion in the cell, how intracellular O2 is regulated, how intracellular O2 levels are sensed and how sensing systems impact mitochondrial respiration and shifts in metabolic pathways. Particular attention is paid to how O2 affects the redox state of the cell, as well as the NO, H2S, and CO concentrations. We also explore how these agents can affect various aspects of gas exchange and activate acute signaling pathways that promote survival. Two kinds of challenges to gas exchange are also discussed in detail: when insufficient O2 is available for respiration (hypoxia) and when metabolic requirements test the limits of gas exchange (exercising skeletal muscle). This review also focuses on responses to acute hypoxia in the context of the original "unifying theory of hypoxia tolerance" as expressed by Hochachka and colleagues. It includes discourse on the regulation of mitochondrial electron transport, metabolic suppression, shifts in metabolic pathways, and recruitment of cell survival pathways preventing collapse of membrane potential and nuclear apoptosis. Regarding exercise, the issues discussed relate to the O2 sensitivity of metabolic rate, O2 kinetics in exercise, and influences of available O2 on glycolysis and lactate production. © 2013 American Physiological Society.

  12. Determination of oxygen content in magnesium and its alloys by inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Akira; Achiwa, Hatsumi; Morikawa, Hisashi; Uemoto, Michihisa; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-01-01

    A method for the determination of the oxygen content in magnesium and magnesium alloys has been developed. Inert gas fusion-infrared absorptiometry was modified by introducing a multistep heating process; a sample containing oxygen is fused with tin to form an eutectic mixture at 900°C in a graphite crucible, followed by a subsequent gradual temperature increase of up to 2000°C, which enables the evaporation of magnesium from the mixture, and subsequent solidification at the rim of the crucible. Residual tin including magnesium oxide remained at the bottom of the crucible. The oxygen in the tin is measured by a conventional inert gas fusion (IGF) method. From a comparison with the results of charged particle activation analysis, the IGF method is considered to be an attractive candidate for measuring the oxygen content in Mg and its alloys.

  13. Direct method gas-phase oxygen abundances of four Lyman break analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Jonathan S.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2014-09-10

    We measure the gas-phase oxygen abundances in four Lyman break analogs using auroral emission lines to derive direct abundances. The direct method oxygen abundances of these objects are generally consistent with the empirically derived strong-line method values, confirming that these objects are low oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation defined by star forming Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find slightly anomalous excitation conditions (Wolf-Rayet features) that could potentially bias the empirical estimates toward high values if caution is not exercised in the selection of the strong-line calibration. The high rate of star formation and low oxygen abundance of these objects is consistent with the predictions of the fundamental metallicity relation, in which the infall of relatively unenriched gas simultaneously triggers an episode of star formation and dilutes the interstellar medium of the host galaxy.

  14. Effects of headspace and oxygen level on off-gas emissions from wood pellets in storage.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, Tumuluru Jaya; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Lim, C Jim; Bi, Xiaotao T; Melin, Staffan

    2009-11-01

    Few papers have been published in the open literature on the emissions from biomass fuels, including wood pellets, during the storage and transportation and their potential health impacts. The purpose of this study is to provide data on the concentrations, emission factors, and emission rate factors of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) from wood pellets stored with different headspace to container volume ratios with different initial oxygen levels, in order to develop methods to reduce the toxic off-gas emissions and accumulation in storage spaces. Metal containers (45 l, 305 mm diameter by 610 mm long) were used to study the effect of headspace and oxygen levels on the off-gas emissions from wood pellets. Concentrations of CO(2), CO, and CH(4) in the headspace were measured using a gas chromatograph as a function of storage time. The results showed that the ratio of the headspace ratios and initial oxygen levels in the storage space significantly affected the off-gas emissions from wood pellets stored in a sealed container. Higher peak emission factors and higher emission rates are associated with higher headspace ratios. Lower emissions of CO(2) and CO were generated at room temperature under lower oxygen levels, whereas CH(4) emission is insensitive to the oxygen level. Replacing oxygen with inert gases in the storage space is thus a potentially effective method to reduce the biomass degradation and toxic off-gas emissions. The proper ventilation of the storage space can also be used to maintain a high oxygen level and low concentrations of toxic off-gassing compounds in the storage space, which is especially useful during the loading and unloading operations to control the hazards associated with the storage and transportation of wood pellets.

  15. Effects of Headspace and Oxygen Level on Off-gas Emissions from Wood Pellets in Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine; Kuang, Xingya; Shankar, T.S.; Lim, C. Jim; Bi, X.T.; Melin, Staffan

    2009-10-01

    Few papers have been published in the open literature on the emissions from biomass fuels, including wood pellets, during the storage and transportation and their potential health impacts. The purpose of this study is to provide data on the concentrations, emission factors, and emission rate factors of CO2, CO, and CH4 from wood pellets stored with different headspace to container volume ratios with different initial oxygen levels, in order to develop methods to reduce the toxic off-gas emissions and accumulation in storage spaces. Metal containers (45 l, 305 mm diameter by 610 mm long) were used to study the effect of headspace and oxygen levels on the off-gas emissions from wood pellets. Concentrations of CO2, CO, and CH4 in the headspace were measured using a gas chromatograph as a function of storage time. The results showed that the ratio of the headspace ratios and initial oxygen levels in the storage space significantly affected the off-gas emissions from wood pellets stored in a sealed container. Higher peak emission factors and higher emission rates are associated with higher headspace ratios. Lower emissions of CO2 and CO were generated at room temperature under lower oxygen levels, whereas CH4 emission is insensitive to the oxygen level. Replacing oxygen with inert gases in the storage space is thus a potentially effective method to reduce the biomass degradation and toxic off-gas emissions. The proper ventilation of the storage space can also be used to maintain a high oxygen level and low concentrations of toxic off-gassing compounds in the storage space, which is especially useful during the loading and unloading operations to control the hazards associated with the storage and transportation of wood pellets.

  16. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Sarah; Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung.

  17. Towards a Biohybrid Lung: Endothelial Cells Promote Oxygen Transfer through Gas Permeable Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Finocchiaro, Nicole; Donay, Christine; Thiebes, Anja Lena; Hesselmann, Felix; Arens, Jutta; Djeljadini, Suzana; Wessling, Matthias; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Cornelissen, Christian Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    In patients with respiratory failure, extracorporeal lung support can ensure the vital gas exchange via gas permeable membranes but its application is restricted by limited long-term stability and hemocompatibility of the gas permeable membranes, which are in contact with the blood. Endothelial cells lining these membranes promise physiological hemocompatibility and should enable prolonged application. However, the endothelial cells increase the diffusion barrier of the blood-gas interface and thus affect gas transfer. In this study, we evaluated how the endothelial cells affect the gas exchange to optimize performance while maintaining an integral cell layer. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were seeded on gas permeable cell culture membranes and cultivated in a custom-made bioreactor. Oxygen transfer rates of blank and endothelialized membranes in endothelial culture medium were determined. Cell morphology was assessed by microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Both setups provided oxygenation of the test fluid featuring small standard deviations of the measurements. Throughout the measuring range, the endothelial cells seem to promote gas transfer to a certain extent exceeding the blank membranes gas transfer performance by up to 120%. Although the underlying principles hereof still need to be clarified, the results represent a significant step towards the development of a biohybrid lung. PMID:28913354

  18. Sterilization of Bacillus subtilis Spores Using an Atmospheric Plasma Jet with Argon and Oxygen Mixture Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jie; Cheng, Cheng; Fang, Shidong; Xie, Hongbing; Lan, Yan; Ni, Guohua; Meng, Yuedong; Luo, Jiarong; Wang, Xiangke

    2012-03-01

    To determine an efficient sterilization mechanism, Bacillus subtilis spore samples were exposed to an atmospheric plasma jet. By using argon/oxygen mixture gas, the decimal reduction value was reduced from 60 s (using argon gas) to 10 s. More dramatically, after 5 min treatment, the colony-forming unit (CFU) was reduced by six orders. To understand the underlying mechanism of the efficient sterilization by plasma, the contributions from heat, UV radiation, charged particles, ozone, and reactive oxygen radicals were distinguished in this work, showing that charged particles and ozone were the main killing factors. The shape changes of the spores were also discussed.

  19. Polymer Growth Rate in a Wire Chamber with Oxygen,Water, or Alcohol Gas Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarski, Adam; /SLAC

    2008-07-02

    The rate of polymer growth on wires was measured in a wire chamber while the chamber was aged initially with helium-isobutane (80:20) gas, and then with either oxygen, water, or alcohol added to the gas. At the completion of the aging process for each gas mixture, the carbon content on the wires was measured in a SEM/EDX instrument. The same physical wires were used in all the gas mixtures, allowing measurement of polymer build up or polymer depletion by each gas additive. It is found that the rate of polymer growth is not changed by the presence of oxygen, water or alcohol. Conjecture that oxygen reduces breakdown by removing polymer deposits on field wires is negated by these measurements. Instead, it appears that the reduced breakdown is due to lower resistance in the polymer from oxygen ions being transported into the polymer. It is also observed that field wires bombarded by the electrons in the SEM and then placed back into the chamber show an abundance of single electrons being emitted, indicating that electron charge is stored in the polymer layer and that a high electric field is necessary to remove the charge.

  20. Efficacy comparison of oral steroid, intratympanic steroid, hyperbaric oxygen and oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen treatments in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss cases.

    PubMed

    Alimoglu, Yalcin; Inci, Ender; Edizer, Deniz Tuna; Ozdilek, Alper; Aslan, Mehmet

    2011-12-01

    Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss is a rare disorder of unknown pathogenesis in which hearing is lost partially or totally. About 60 treatment modalities have been described. We aimed to compare the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen, oral steroid, intratympanic steroid therapy and their combinations in idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients. Files of patients who were followed up between 2004 and 2010 in our clinic were examined retrospectively. Patients were divided into four groups according to the therapy received: Oral steroid, oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen, intratympanic steroid and hyperbaric oxygen. Treatment success was assessed by Siegel criteria and mean gains using pre-treatment and post-treatment audiograms. 217 patients and 219 ears were examined. The proportion of patients responding to therapy was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 86.88% (53/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 63.79% (37/58), the intratympanic steroid group with 46,51% (20/43) and the hyperbaric oxygen group with 43.85% (25/57). The proportion of patients who had complete recovery was the highest in the oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group with 42.6% (26/61) followed by the oral steroid group with 19.0% (11/58), the hyperbaric oxygen group with 17.5% (10/57) and the intratympanic steroid group with 11.6% (5/43). The oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen group has the highest mean hearing gain among all groups (p < 0.05). Idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss patients receiving oral steroid + hyperbaric oxygen combination therapy have a higher likelihood of recovery than patients receiving oral steroids, hyperbaric oxygen or intratympanic steroids alone.

  1. In situ oxygen transmissibility of rigid gas-permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Weissman, B A; Fatt, I

    1988-05-01

    On the eye a contact lens is bathed in tear fluid, which increases its resistance to oxygen flux. For rigid gas-permeable lenses, this effect should be small during open-eye wear because a large amount of oxygen is provided by air-saturated tears that are pumped under the lens. However, under closed-eye conditions this study suggests substantial decrease in overall lens system oxygen transmissibility when lens transmissibility itself is greater than 20 x 10(-9) cm ml O2/s ml mm Hg and when the average thickness of the tear layer is greater than about 20 micron.

  2. Coal Combustion Behavior in New Ironmaking Process of Top Gas Recycling Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenfeng; Xue, Qingguo; Tang, Huiqing; Wang, Guang; Wang, Jingsong

    2017-10-01

    The top gas recycling oxygen blast furnace (TGR-OBF) is a new ironmaking process which can significantly reduce the coke ratio and emissions of carbon dioxide. To better understand the coal combustion characteristics in the TGR-OBF, a three dimensional model was developed to simulate the lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway of a TGR-OBF. The combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in TGR-OBF were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of oxygen concentration and temperature were also analyzed. The simulation results show that the coal burnout increased by 16.23% compared to that of the TBF. The oxygen content has an obvious effect on the burnout. At 70% oxygen content, the coal burnout is only 21.64%, with a decrease of 50.14% compared to that of TBF. Moreover, the effect of oxygen temperature is also very obvious.

  3. Coal Combustion Behavior in New Ironmaking Process of Top Gas Recycling Oxygen Blast Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenfeng; Xue, Qingguo; Tang, Huiqing; Wang, Guang; Wang, Jingsong

    2017-08-01

    The top gas recycling oxygen blast furnace (TGR-OBF) is a new ironmaking process which can significantly reduce the coke ratio and emissions of carbon dioxide. To better understand the coal combustion characteristics in the TGR-OBF, a three dimensional model was developed to simulate the lance-blowpipe-tuyere-raceway of a TGR-OBF. The combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in TGR-OBF were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of oxygen concentration and temperature were also analyzed. The simulation results show that the coal burnout increased by 16.23% compared to that of the TBF. The oxygen content has an obvious effect on the burnout. At 70% oxygen content, the coal burnout is only 21.64%, with a decrease of 50.14% compared to that of TBF. Moreover, the effect of oxygen temperature is also very obvious.

  4. Abiotic gas formation drives nitrogen loss from a desert ecosystem.

    PubMed

    McCalley, Carmody K; Sparks, Jed P

    2009-11-06

    In arid environments such as deserts, nitrogen is often the most limiting nutrient for biological activity. The majority of the ecosystem nitrogen flux is typically thought to be driven by production and loss of reactive nitrogen species by microorganisms in the soil. We found that high soil-surface temperatures (greater than 50 degrees C), driven by solar radiation, are the primary cause of nitrogen loss in Mojave Desert soils. This abiotic pathway not only enables the balancing of arid ecosystem nitrogen budgets, but also changes our view of global nitrogen cycling and the predicted impact of climate change and increased temperatures on nitrogen bioavailability.

  5. Stable Isotope Composition of Molecular Oxygen in Soil Gas and Groundwater: A Potentially Robust Tracer for Diffusion and Oxygen Consumption Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Pradeep K.; Dillon, M. A.

    1998-02-01

    We have measured the concentration and isotopic composition of molecular oxygen in soil gas and groundwater. At a site near Lincoln, Nebraska, USA, soil gas oxygen concentrations ranged from 13.8 to 17.6% at depths of 3-4 m and the δ 18O values ranged mostly from 24.0 to 27.2‰ (SMOW). The concentration of dissolved oxygen in a perched aquifer in the Texas Panhandle (depth to water ˜76 m) was about 5 mg/L and the δ 18O values were 21.2-22.9‰. The δ 18O of soil gas oxygen in our study are higher and those of dissolved oxygen are lower than the δ 18O of atmospheric oxygen (23.5‰). A model for the oxygen concentration and isotopic composition in soil gas was developed using the molecular diffusion theory. The higher δ 18O values in soil gas at the Nebraska site can be explained by the effects of diffusion and soil respiration (plant root and bacterial) on the isotopic composition of molecular oxygen. The lower δ 18O of dissolved oxygen at the Texas site indicates that oxygen consumption below the root zone in the relatively thick unsaturated zone here may have occurred with a different fractionation factor (either due to inorganic consumption or due to low respiration rates) than that observed for the dominant pathways of plant root and bacterial respiration. It is concluded that the use of the concentration and isotopic composition of soil gas and dissolved oxygen should provide a robust tool for studying the subsurface gaseous diffusion and oxygen consumption processes.

  6. Energy losses of positive and negative charged particles in electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diachenko, M. M.; Kholodov, R. I.

    2017-02-01

    A heavy charged particle propagation through electron gas has been studied using combination of non-relativistic quantum mechanics and the Green’s functions method. The energy loss of a charged particle has been found in the case of large transferred momentum taking into account the interference term in the expression for the rate. The dependence of the energy loss of a charged particles in electron gas with nonzero temperature on the sign of the charge has been obtained.

  7. Mass loss of shuttle space suit orthofabric under simulated ionospheric atomic oxygen bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    Many polymeric materials used for thermal protection and insulation on spacecraft degrade significantly under prolonged bombardment by ionospheric atomic oxygen. The covering fabric of the multilayered shuttle space suit is composed of a loose weave of GORE-TEX fibers, Nomex and Kevlar-29, which are all polymeric materials. The complete evaluation of suit fabric degradation from ionospheric atomic oxygen is of importance in reevaluating suit lifetime and inspection procedures. The mass loss and visible physical changes of each test sample was determined. Kapton control samples and data from previous asher and flight tests were used to scale the results to reflect ionospheric conditions at about 220 km altitude. It is predicted that the orthofabric loses mass in the ionosphere at a rate of about 66% of the original orthofabric mass/yr. The outer layer of the two-layer orthofabric test samples shows few easily visible signs of degradation, even when observed at 440X. It is concluded that the orthofabric could suffer significant loss of performance after much less than a year of total exposure time, while the degradation might be undetectable in post flight visual examinations of space suits.

  8. Application of the gas tracer method for measuring oxygen transfer rates in subsurface flow constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Tyroller, Lina; Rousseau, Diederik P L; Santa, Santa; García, Joan

    2010-07-01

    The oxygen transfer rate (OTR) has a significant impact on the design, optimal operation and modelling of constructed wetlands treating wastewater. Oxygen consumption is very fast in wetlands and the OTR cannot be determined using an oxygen mass balance. This problem is circumvented in this study by applying the gas tracer method. Experiments were conducted in an unplanted gravel bed (dimensions L x W x d 125 x 50 x 35 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 10-11-mm gravel) and a planted horizontal subsurface flow constructed wetland (HSSFCW) (L x W x d 110 x 70 x 38 cm filled with a 30-cm layer of 3.5-mm gravel with Phragmites australis). Tap water saturated with propane as gas tracer (pure or commercial cooking gas, depending on the test) was used. The mass transfer ratio between oxygen and commercial propane gas was quite constant and averaged R = 1.03, which is slightly lower than the value of R = 1.39 that is usually reported for pure propane. The OTR ranged from 0.31 to 5.04 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the unplanted gravel bed and from 0.3 to 3.2 g O(2) m(-2) d(-1) in the HSSFCW, depending on the hydraulic retention time (HRT). The results of this study suggest that the OTR in HSSFCW is very low for the oxygen demand of standard wastewater and the OTR calculations based on mass balances and theoretical stoichiometric considerations overestimate OTR values by a factor that ranges from 10 to 100. The gas tracer method is a promising tool for determining OTR in constructed wetlands, with commercial gas proving to be a viable low-cost alternative for determining OTR.

  9. Damage and Loss Estimation for Natural Gas Networks: The Case of Istanbul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çaktı, Eser; Hancılar, Ufuk; Şeşetyan, Karin; Bıyıkoǧlu, Hikmet; Şafak, Erdal

    2017-04-01

    Natural gas networks are one of the major lifeline systems to support human, urban and industrial activities. The continuity of gas supply is critical for almost all functions of modern life. Under natural phenomena such as earthquakes and landslides the damages to the system elements may lead to explosions and fires compromising human life and damaging physical environment. Furthermore, the disruption in the gas supply puts human activities at risk and also results in economical losses. This study is concerned with the performance of one of the largest natural gas distribution systems in the world. Physical damages to Istanbul's natural gas network are estimated under the most recent probabilistic earthquake hazard models available, as well as under simulated ground motions from physics based models. Several vulnerability functions are used in modelling damages to system elements. A first-order assessment of monetary losses to Istanbul's natural gas distribution network is also attempted.

  10. MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology applied in China: combustion temperature, flue gas loss and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhe; Zhang, Shihong; Li, Xiangpeng; Shao, Jingai; Wang, Ke; Chen, Hanping

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the application prospect of MSW oxy-enriched incineration technology in China, the technical and economical analyses of a municipal solid waste (MSW) grate furnace with oxy-fuel incineration technology in comparison to co-incineration with coal are performed. The rated capacity of the grate furnace is 350 tonnes MSW per day. When raw MSW is burned, the amount of pure oxygen injected should be about 14.5 wt.% under 25% O2 oxy-fuel combustion conditions with the mode of oxygen supply determined by the actual situation. According to the isothermal combustion temperature (Ta), the combustion effect of 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is identical with that of MSW co-incineration with 20% mass ratio of coal (α = 1.91). However, the former is better than the latter in terms of plant cost, flue gas loss, and environmental impact. Despite the lower costs of MSW co-incineration with mass ratio of 5% and 10% coal (α = 1.91), 25% O2 oxy-enriched incineration (α = 1.43) is far more advantageous in combustion and pollutant control. Conventional combustion flue gas loss (q2) for co-incineration with 0% coal, 20% coal, 10% coal, 5% coal are around 17%, 13%, 14% and 15%, respectively, while that under the condition of 25% O2 oxy-enriched combustion is approximately 12% (α = 1.43). Clearly, q2 of oxy-enriched incineration is less than other methods under the same combustion conditions. High moisture content presents challenges for MSW incineration, therefore it is necessary to dry MSW prior to incineration, and making oxy-enriched incineration technology achieves higher combustion temperature and lower flue gas loss. In conclusion, based on technical and economical analysis, MSW oxy-enriched incineration retains obvious advantages and demonstrates great future prospects for MSW incineration in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Onboard Inert Gas Generation System/Onboard Oxygen Gas Generation System (OBIGGS/OBOGS) Study. Part 1; Aircraft System Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas L.; Bailey, Delbert B.; Lewinski, Daniel F.; Roseburg, Conrad M.; Palaszewski, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this technology assessment is to define a multiphase research study program investigating Onboard Inert Gas Generation Systems (OBIGGS) and Onboard Oxygen Generation Systems (OBOGS) that would identify current airplane systems design and certification requirements (Subtask 1); explore state-of-the-art technology (Subtask 2); develop systems specifications (Subtask 3); and develop an initial system design (Subtask 4). If feasible, consideration may be given to the development of a prototype laboratory test system that could potentially be used in commercial transport aircraft (Subtask 5). These systems should be capable of providing inert nitrogen gas for improved fire cargo compartment fire suppression and fuel tank inerting and emergency oxygen for crew and passenger use. Subtask I of this research study, presented herein, defines current production aircraft certification requirements and design objectives necessary to meet mandatory FAA certification requirements and Boeing design and performance specifications. These requirements will be utilized for baseline comparisons for subsequent OBIGGS/OBOGS application evaluations and assessments.

  12. Method to prevent recession loss of silica and silicon-containing materials in combustion gas environments

    DOEpatents

    Brun, Milivoj Konstantin; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    2003-01-01

    While silicon-containing ceramics or ceramic composites are prone to material loss in combustion gas environments, this invention introduces a method to prevent or greatly reduce the thickness loss by injecting directly an effective amount, generally in the part per million level, of silicon or silicon-containing compounds into the combustion gases.

  13. Synthesis gas production through biomass direct chemical looping conversion with natural hematite as an oxygen carrier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; He, Fang; Feng, Yipeng; Zhao, Kun; Zheng, Anqing; Chang, Sheng; Li, Haibin

    2013-07-01

    Biomass direct chemical looping (BDCL) conversion with natural hematite as an oxygen carrier was conducted in a fluidized bed reactor under argon atmosphere focusing on investigation the cyclic performance of oxygen carrier. The presence of oxygen carrier can evidently promote the biomass conversion. The gas yield and carbon conversion increased from 0.75 Nm(3)/kg and 62.23% of biomass pyrolysis to 1.06 Nm(3)/kg and 87.63% of BDCL, respectively. The components of the gas product in BDCL were close to those in biomass pyrolysis as the cyclic number increased. The gas yield and carbon conversion decreased from 1.06 Nm(3)/kg and 87.63% at 1st cycle to 0.93 Nm(3)/kg and 77.18% at 20th cycle, respectively, due to the attrition and structural changes of oxygen carrier. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the reduction extent of oxygen carrier increased with the cycles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and pore structural analysis displayed that agglomeration was observed with the cycles.

  14. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO₂ nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO₂ nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450-500 nm in length and 60-80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m²/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO₂. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO₂ nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO₂ nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm.

  15. Effect of temperature on reduction of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in chemical-looping combustion of simulated coal gas in a fluidized bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Q.L.; Xiao, R.; Deng, Z.Y.; Shen, L.H.; Xiao, J.; Zhang, M.Y.

    2008-12-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a promising combustion technology for gaseous and solid fuel with efficient use of energy and inherent separation of CO{sub 2}. The concept of a coal-fueled CLC system using, calcium sulfate (CaSO{sub 4}) as oxygen carrier is proposed in this study. Reduction tests of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier with simulated coal gas were performed in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed reactor in the temperature range of 890-950{degree}C. A high concentration of CO{sub 2} was obtained at the initial reduction period. CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier exhibited high reactivity initially and decreased gradually at the late period of reduction. The sulfur release during the reduction of CaSO{sub 4} as oxygen carrier was also observed and analyzed. H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} conversions were greatly influenced by reduction temperature. The oxygen carrier conversion and mass-based reaction rates during the reduction at typical temperatures were compared. Higher temperatures would enhance reaction rates and result in high conversion of oxygen carrier. An XRD patterns study indicated that CaS was the dominant product of reduction and the variation of relative intensity with temperature is in agreement with the solid conversion. ESEM analysis indicated that the surface structure of oxygen carrier particles changed significantly from impervious to porous after reduction. EDS analysis also demonstrated the transfer of oxygen from the oxygen carrier to the fuel gas and a certain amount of sulfur loss and CaO formation on the surface at higher temperatures. The reduction kinetics of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier was explored with the shrinking unreacted-core model. The apparent kinetic parameters were obtained, and the kinetic equation well predicted the experimental data. Finally, some basic considerations on the use of CaSO{sub 4} oxygen carrier in a CLC system for solid fuels were discussed.

  16. Gas sensing in microplates with optodes: influence of oxygen exchange between sample, air, and plate material.

    PubMed

    Arain, Sarina; Weiss, Svenja; Heinzle, Elmar; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Klimant, Ingo

    2005-05-05

    Microplates with integrated optical oxygen sensors are a new tool to study metabolic rates and enzyme activities. Precise measurements are possible only if oxygen exchange between the sample and the environment is known. In this study we quantify gas exchange in plastic microplates. Dissolved oxygen was detected using either an oxygen-sensitive film fixed at the bottom of each well or a needle-type sensor. The diffusion of oxygen into wells sealed with different foils, paraffin oil, and paraffin wax, respectively, was quantified. Although foil covers showed the lowest oxygen permeability, they include an inevitable gas phase between sample and sealing and are difficult to manage. The use of oil was found to be critical due to the extensive shaking caused by movement of the plates during measurements in microplate readers. Thus, paraffin wax was the choice material because it avoids convection of the sample and is easy to handle. Furthermore, without shaking, significant gradients in pO2 levels within a single well of a polystyrene microplate covered with paraffin oil were detected with the needle-type sensor. Higher pO2 levels were obtained near the surface of the sample as well as near the wall of the well. A significant diffusion of oxygen through the plastic plate material was found using plates based on polystyrene. Thus, the location of a sensor element within the well has an effect on the measured pO2 level. Using a sensor film fixed on the bottom of a well or using a dissolved pO2-sensitive indicator results in pO2 offset and in apparently lower respiration rates or enzyme activities. Oxygen diffusion through a polystyrene microplate was simulated for measurements without convection--that is, for samples without oxygen diffusion through the cover and for unshaken measurements using permeable sealings. This mathematical model allows for calculation of the correct kinetic parameters. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Centrifugal spray singlet oxygen generator for a COIL with nitrogen as a buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Å palek, Otomar; Jirásek, Vít.; Čenský, Miroslav; Kodymová, Jarmila

    2012-01-01

    A scalable high pressure centrifugal spray generator of singlet oxygen for chemical oxygen-iodine laser (COIL) was developed. This generator uses nitrogen as chlorine diluting gas. Different spray nozzles were tested which could be assembled together and so enable a high chlorine flow rates for a high-power COIL. The designed generator can produce singlet oxygen, O2(1Δg), with reasonable chlorine utilization and O2(1Δg) yield even at very high generator pressures, which cannot be attained by other O2(1Δg) generators. This high-pressure operation is beneficial for a pressure recovery system of the laser. Another advantage of this generator is a very high BHP utilization. The problem of heating of exit gas was solved by introducing additional nitrogen between the separator rotor and stator.

  18. Determination of micro amounts of oxygen in silicon by inert-gas fusion.

    PubMed

    Huannan, H; Yuezhen, L; Guandi, Z; Ronghua, Y; Qingren, L; Mingwei, Q

    1983-10-01

    A chromatographic inert-gas fusion method using an Ni-Sn fusion bath and helium as carrier gas has been developed for determining micro amounts of oxygen in silicon. With the Ni-Sn bath, the oxygen determination can be done at lower temperatures (1650-1700 degrees ) in a heated graphite crucible than in an empty crucible (with no molten metal bath) in which the sample is directly in contact with the carbon. Four samples can be analysed in succession in a single crucible with a relatively short time for oxygen extraction (5 min). Careful control of experimental conditions, and the use of a water-cooled quartz tube and a small unshielded graphite crucible have resulted in a lower blank (0.1 mug of oxygen), and better reproducibility, enabling oxygen in silicon to be determined down to 1 ppm. A calibration curve for determining oxygen in single crystals of silicon by measuring the infrared absorption at 9 mum has been constructed and gives results agreeing with those obtained by alpha-particle activation analysis.

  19. Online derivatization for hourly measurements of gas- and particle-phase semi-volatile oxygenated organic compounds by thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatography (SV-TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L. D.; Worton, D. R.; Chan, A. W. H.; Moss, J. A.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies have identified a large number of oxygenated organic compounds that can be used as tracers to understand sources and oxidation chemistry of atmospheric particulate matter. Quantification of these compounds in ambient environments has traditionally relied on low-time-resolution collection of filter samples followed by offline sample treatment with a derivatizing agent to allow analysis by gas chromatography of otherwise non-elutable organic chemicals with hydroxyl groups. We present here an automated in situ instrument for the measurement of highly polar organic semi-volatile and low-volatility compounds in both the gas- and particle-phase with hourly quantification of mass concentrations and gas-particle partitioning. The dual-cell semi-volatile thermal desorption aerosol gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) with derivatization collects particle-only and combined particle-plus-vapor samples on two parallel sampling cells that are analyzed in series by thermal desorption into helium saturated with derivatizing agent. Introduction of MSTFA (N-methyl-N-(trimethylsilyl)trifluoroacetamide), a silylating agent, yields complete derivatization of all tested compounds, including alkanoic acids, polyols, diacids, sugars, and multifunctional compounds. In laboratory tests, derivatization is found to be highly reproducible (< 3% variability). During field deployment, a regularly injected internal standard is used to correct for variability in detector response, consumption of the derivatization agent, desorption efficiency, and transfer losses. Error in quantification from instrument fluctuations is found to be less than 10% for hydrocarbons and less than 15% for all oxygenates for which a functionally similar internal standard is available, with an uncertainty of 20-25% in measurements of particle fraction. After internal standard corrections, calibration curves are found to be linear for all compounds over the span of 1 month, with comparable response on

  20. Optical methods and systems for detecting a constituent in a gas containing oxygen in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, Michael A.; Sirinakis, George

    2011-01-04

    A method for detecting a gas phase constituent such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, hydrogen, or hydrocarbons in a gas comprising oxygen such as air, includes providing a sensing material or film having a metal embedded in a catalytically active matrix such as gold embedded in a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) matrix. The method may include annealing the sensing material at about 900.degree. C., exposing the sensing material and gas to a temperature above 400.degree. C., projecting light onto the sensing material, and detecting a change in the absorption spectrum of the sensing material due to the exposure of the sensing material to the gas in air at the temperature which causes a chemical reaction in the sensing material compared to the absorption spectrum of the sensing material in the absence of the gas. Systems employing such a method are also disclosed.

  1. Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

    2012-08-19

    The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

  2. Extremely low flow tracheal gas insufflation of helium-oxygen mixture improves gas exchange in a rabbit model of piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Baba, Atsushi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Aikawa, Tetsuya; Koike, Kenichi

    2013-04-08

    The purpose of this study was to show the effects of the tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) technique on gas exchange using helium-oxygen mixtures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique (0.3 L/min) would enhance gas exchange during HFOV. Three rabbits were prepared and ventilated by HFOV with carrier 70% helium/oxygen or 70% nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture with TGI in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen70% to helium70% and back was performed three times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Compared with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture, the helium-oxygen mixture of TGI reduced PaCO2 by 7.6 mmHg (p < 0.01) and improved PaO2 by 14 mmHg (p < 0.01). Amplitude during TGI was significantly lower with the helium-oxygen mixture than with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture (p < 0.01) and did not significantly affect mean airway pressure. This study demonstrated that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique would enhance CO2 elimination and improve oxygenation during HFOV.

  3. Extremely low flow tracheal gas insufflation of helium-oxygen mixture improves gas exchange in a rabbit model of piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to show the effects of the tracheal gas insufflation (TGI) technique on gas exchange using helium-oxygen mixtures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique (0.3 L/min) would enhance gas exchange during HFOV. Methods Three rabbits were prepared and ventilated by HFOV with carrier 70% helium/oxygen or 70% nitrogen/oxygen gas mixture with TGI in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen70% to helium70% and back was performed three times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Results Compared with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture, the helium-oxygen mixture of TGI reduced PaCO2 by 7.6 mmHg (p < 0.01) and improved PaO2 by 14 mmHg (p < 0.01). Amplitude during TGI was significantly lower with the helium-oxygen mixture than with the nitrogen-oxygen mixture (p < 0.01) and did not significantly affect mean airway pressure. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a helium-oxygen mixture delivered into the trachea using the TGI technique would enhance CO2 elimination and improve oxygenation during HFOV. PMID:23566050

  4. Fate of oxygen losses from Typha domingensis (Typhaceae) and Cladium jamaicense (Cyperaceae) and consequences for root metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chabbi, A.; McKee, K.L.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine whether radial oxygen loss (ROL) from roots of Typha domingensis and Cladium jamaicense creates an internal oxygen deficiency or, conversely, indicates adequate internal aeration and leakage of excess oxygen to the rhizosphere. Methylene blue in agar was used to quantify oxygen leakage. Typha's roots had a higher porosity than Cladium's and responded to flooding treatment by increasing cortical air space, particularly near the root tips. A greater oxygen release, which occurred along the subapical root axis, and an increase in rhizosphere redox potential (Eh) over time were associated with the well-developed aerenchyma system in Typha. Typha roots, regardless of oxygen release pattern, showed low or undetectable alcohol dehydrogenage (ADH) activity or ethanol concentrations, indicating that ROL did not cause internal deficiencies. Cladium roots also releases oxygen, but this loss primarily occurred at the root tips and was accompanied by increased root ADH activity and ethanol concentrations. These results support the hypothesis that oxygen release by Cladium is accompanied by internal deficiencies of oxygen sufficient to stimulate alcoholic fermentation and helps explain Cladium's lesser flood tolerance in comparison with Typha.

  5. Relation between Pulmonary Gas Exchange and Closing Volume before and after Substantial Weight Loss in Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Farebrother, M. J. B.; McHardy, G. J. R.; Munro, J. F.

    1974-01-01

    Relations between expiratory reserve volume (ERV), closing volume (CV) as a percentage of vital capacity (CV/VC%), and pulmonary gas exchange have been investigated in the sitting and supine postures in eight severely obese subjects before and after substantial weight loss. CV/VC% exceeded predicted values but did not change with posture or weight loss; the increase could have been owing to the smoking habits of the subjects. Arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2) was significantly less in the supine than in the sitting posture and improved after weight loss in six subjects. The reduction in PaO2 was correlated with the extent to which dependent airways were closed within the range of tidal breathing, shown by increasing negativity of ERV-CV as a percentage of VC. A good correlation was also found between PaO2 and ERV, an easier measurement for routine use. Improvement of pulmonary gas exchange occurred only in those patients who lost weight to within 30% in excess of ideal. PMID:4854081

  6. Effect of weight loss on operational lung volumes and oxygen cost of breathing in obese women

    PubMed Central

    Bhammar, Dharini M.; Stickford, Jonathon L.; Bernhardt, Vipa; Babb, Tony G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of moderate weight loss on operational lung volumes during exercise and the oxygen (O2) cost of breathing are unknown in obese women but could have important implications regarding exercise endurance. Methods In twenty-nine obese women (33 ± 8yr, 97 ± 14kg, BMI: 36 ± 4, body fat: 45.6 ± 4.5%; means ± SD), body composition, fat distribution (by MRI), pulmonary function, operational lung volumes during exercise, and the O2 cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea ( V˙O2 vs. V˙E slope) were studied before and after a 12-week diet and resistance exercise weight loss program. Results Participants lost 7.5 ± 3.1kg or ≈8% of body weight (p < 0.001), but fat distribution remained unchanged. After weight loss, lung volume subdivisions at rest were increased (p < 0.05) and were moderately associated (p < 0.05) with changes in weight. End-expiratory lung volume (%Total Lung Capacity) increased at rest and during constant load exercise (p < 0.05). O2 cost of breathing was reduced by 16% (2.52 ± 1.02 to 2.11 ± 0.72ml/L; P=0.003). As a result, O2 uptake of the respiratory muscles (V˙O2Resp), estimated as the product of O2 cost of breathing and exercise V˙E during cycling at 60W, was significantly reduced by 27 ± 31ml (P<0.001), accounting for 46% of the reduction in total body V˙O2 during cycling at 60W. Conclusions Moderate weight loss yields important improvements in respiratory function at rest and during submaximal exercise in otherwise healthy obese women. These changes in breathing load could have positive effects on the exercise endurance and adherence to physical activity. PMID:26869243

  7. Effect of weight loss on operational lung volumes and oxygen cost of breathing in obese women.

    PubMed

    Bhammar, D M; Stickford, J L; Bernhardt, V; Babb, T G

    2016-06-01

    The effects of moderate weight loss on operational lung volumes during exercise and the oxygen (O2) cost of breathing are unknown in obese women but could have important implications regarding exercise endurance. In 29 obese women (33±8 years, 97±14 kg, body mass index: 36±4 kg m(-2), body fat: 45.6±4.5%; means±s.d.), body composition, fat distribution (by magnetic resonance imaging), pulmonary function, operational lung volumes during exercise and the O2 cost of breathing during eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (([Vdot ]O2) vs ([Vdot ]E) slope) were studied before and after a 12-week diet and resistance exercise weight loss program. Participants lost 7.5±3.1 kg or ≈8% of body weight (P<0.001), but fat distribution remained unchanged. After weight loss, lung volume subdivisions at rest were increased (P<0.05) and were moderately associated (P<0.05) with changes in weight. End-expiratory lung volume (percentage of total lung capacity) increased at rest and during constant load exercise (P<0.05). O2 cost of breathing was reduced by 16% (2.52±1.02-2.11±0.72 ml l(-1); P=0.003). As a result, O2 uptake of the respiratory muscles ([Vdot ]O2Resp), estimated as the product of O2 cost of breathing and exercise ([Vdot ]E) during cycling at 60 W, was significantly reduced by 27±31 ml (P<0.001), accounting for 46% of the reduction in total body ([Vdot ]O2) during cycling at 60 W. Moderate weight loss yields important improvements in respiratory function at rest and during submaximal exercise in otherwise healthy obese women. These changes in breathing load could have positive effects on the exercise endurance and adherence to physical activity.

  8. Mixed heavy metals tolerance and radial oxygen loss in mangrove seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Tam, N F Y; Yang, J X; Pi, N; Wong, M H; Ye, Z H

    2009-12-01

    The effects of a mixture of heavy metals (Pb, Zn and Cu) on growth, radial oxygen loss (ROL) and the spatial pattern of ROL were investigated in mangrove seedlings of three species: Aegiceras corniculatum, Avicennia marina and Bruguiera gymnorrhiza. Heavy metals inhibited the growth of seedlings and led to decreased ROL and changes in the "tight" barrier spatial pattern of ROL. There was a significant positive correlation between the amount of ROL from the roots of seedlings and metal tolerance. The species with the highest ROL amount, B. gymnorrhiza, were also the most tolerant to heavy metals. The "tight" barrier spatial ROL pattern was also related to metal tolerance in the seedlings. Therefore, we conclude that both ROL amount and "tight" barrier spatial ROL pattern in the roots of the mangrove seedlings play an important role in resistance to heavy metal toxicity.

  9. Intratympanic steroid injection and hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the treatment of refractory sudden hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Gülüstan, Filiz; Yazıcı, Zahide Mine; Alakhras, Wesam M E; Erdur, Omer; Acipayam, Harun; Kufeciler, Levent; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin

    2016-11-22

    Controversy surrounds the use of salvage therapies to treat sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL), with no consensus on recommendations. While several studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of intratympanic administration of steroids (ITS) and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment, few have compared the efficacy of ITS and HBO therapy in patients with refractory SSNHL. We evaluated the efficiency of ITS and HBO therapy in patients with refractory SSNHL. Patients who did not adequately benefit from systemic treatment were evaluated retrospectively. Refractory patients were defined as those who gained less than 20dB in hearing after initial treatment. All refractory patients were informed about salvage therapy options: ITS or HBO therapy, the advantages and disadvantages of which were explained briefly. ITS involved 4mg/mL dexamethasone administered through a 25 gauge needle. Patients underwent HBO therapy in a hyperbaric chamber where they breathed 100% oxygen for 120min at 2.5 atmospheric pressure. The hearing levels of both groups were evaluated before the salvage therapy and at 3 months after treatment. Improvements in hearing were evaluated according to the Furahashi criteria. We also compared the two therapies in terms of speech discrimination scores (SDSs) and the recovery of all frequencies. The salvage therapies generated similar results. Changes in pure tone averages and SDSs were similar for ITS and HBO therapy (p=0.364 and p=0.113). Comparison of SDSs and hearing thresholds at all frequencies showed similar levels of improvement. ITS and HBO therapy produced similar improvements in SSNHL patients, but the sample size was too small to draw definitive conclusions. Further randomized controlled studies are needed to identify the best therapy for patients with refractory sudden hearing loss. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy as salvage treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Pezzoli, M; Magnano, M; Maffi, L; Pezzoli, L; Marcato, P; Orione, M; Cupi, D; Bongioannini, G

    2015-07-01

    The most commonly used treatment for sensorineural sudden hearing loss (SSHL) in clinical practice is the administration of steroids; however, a favorable result is not always obtained. We studied 58 patients who failed to recover after primary treatment with IV steroids, 44 of these met our inclusion criteria (mean age 50.7, 27 males, range 30-74). We treated 23 patients (mean age 47.3, 16 males, age range 22-74) with hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) (2.5 ATA for 60 min for 15 treatments), while 21 (mean age 54.5, 11 males, age range 22-71) patients refused to be treated and served as a non-randomized control group. Patients treated with HBO had a mean improvement of 15.6 dB (SD ± 15.3), with 1 of them completely healed, 5 with a good recovery, 10 with a fair recovery and 7 unchanged. Patients who were not treated had a spontaneous mean improvement of 5.0 dB (SD ± 11.4) with 3 patients with a good recovery, 1 patient with a fair recovery and 17 patients unchanged. Mean improvement was significantly better in patients treated with HBO compared to controls (p = 0.0133). Patients with worst hearing had the greater degree of improvement whether or not they were treated in the first 10 days after the onset of the hearing loss or between 11 and 30 days. In conclusion, hyperbaric oxygen therapy can lead to significant improvement of pure tone hearing thresholds in patients with SSHL who failed primary corticosteroid treatment and are within 4 weeks of the onset of deafness.

  11. Effect of three-body loss on itinerant ferromagnetism in an atomic Fermi gas

    SciTech Connect

    Conduit, G. J.; Altman, E.

    2011-04-15

    A recent experiment has provided tentative evidence for itinerant ferromagnetism in an ultracold atomic gas. However, the interpretation of the results is complicated by significant atom losses. We argue that during the loss process the system gradually heats up but remains in local equilibrium.To quantify the consequences of atom loss on the putative ferromagnetic transition we adopt an extended Hertz-Millis theory. The losses damp quantum fluctuations, thus increasing the critical interaction strength needed to induce ferromagnetism and revert the transition from being first order to second order. This effect may resolve a discrepancy between the experiment and previous theoretical predictions. We further illuminate the impact of loss by studying the collective spin excitations in the ferromagnet. Even in the fully polarized state, where loss is completely suppressed, spin waves acquire a decay rate proportional to the three-body loss coefficient.

  12. Entropy Generation/Availability Energy Loss Analysis Inside MIT Gas Spring and "Two Space" Test Rigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebiana, Asuquo B.; Savadekar, Rupesh T.; Patel, Kaushal V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the entropy generation and availability energy loss analysis under conditions of oscillating pressure and oscillating helium gas flow in two Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) test rigs piston-cylinder and piston-cylinder-heat exchanger are presented. Two solution domains, the gas spring (single-space) in the piston-cylinder test rig and the gas spring + heat exchanger (two-space) in the piston-cylinder-heat exchanger test rig are of interest. Sage and CFD-ACE+ commercial numerical codes are used to obtain 1-D and 2-D computer models, respectively, of each of the two solution domains and to simulate the oscillating gas flow and heat transfer effects in these domains. Second law analysis is used to characterize the entropy generation and availability energy losses inside the two solution domains. Internal and external entropy generation and availability energy loss results predicted by Sage and CFD-ACE+ are compared. Thermodynamic loss analysis of simple systems such as the MIT test rigs are often useful to understand some important features of complex pattern forming processes in more complex systems like the Stirling engine. This study is aimed at improving numerical codes for the prediction of thermodynamic losses via the development of a loss post-processor. The incorporation of loss post-processors in Stirling engine numerical codes will facilitate Stirling engine performance optimization. Loss analysis using entropy-generation rates due to heat and fluid flow is a relatively new technique for assessing component performance. It offers a deep insight into the flow phenomena, allows a more exact calculation of losses than is possible with traditional means involving the application of loss correlations and provides an effective tool for improving component and overall system performance.

  13. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl

    2003-05-15

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated several coal fired power plant configurations designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for use or sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB units results in significant Boiler Island cost savings. Additionally, ALSTOM has identified several advanced/novel plant configurations, which improve the efficiency and cost of the CO{sub 2} product cleanup and compression process. These advanced/novel concepts require long development efforts. An economic analysis indicates that the proposed oxygen-firing technology in circulating fluidized boilers could be developed and deployed economically in the near future in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) applications or enhanced gas recovery (EGR), such as coal bed methane recovery. ALSTOM received a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department

  14. Gas phase production and loss of isoprene epoxydiols.

    PubMed

    Bates, Kelvin H; Crounse, John D; St Clair, Jason M; Bennett, Nathan B; Nguyen, Tran B; Seinfeld, John H; Stoltz, Brian M; Wennberg, Paul O

    2014-02-20

    Isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX) form in high yields from the OH-initiated oxidation of isoprene under low-NO conditions. These compounds contribute significantly to secondary organic aerosol formation. Their gas-phase chemistry has, however, remained largely unexplored. In this study, we characterize the formation of IEPOX isomers from the oxidation of isoprene by OH. We find that cis-β- and trans-β-IEPOX are the dominant isomers produced, and that they are created in an approximate ratio of 1:2 from the low-NO oxidation of isoprene. Three isomers of IEPOX, including cis-β- and trans-β, were synthesized and oxidized by OH in environmental chambers under high- and low-NO conditions. We find that IEPOX reacts with OH at 299 K with rate coefficients of (0.84 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), (1.52 ± 0.07) × 10(-11), and (0.98 ± 0.05) × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for the δ1, cis-β, and trans-β isomers. Finally, yields of the first-generation products of IEPOX + OH oxidation were measured, and a new mechanism of IEPOX oxidation is proposed here to account for the observed products. The substantial yield of glyoxal and methylglyoxal from IEPOX oxidation may help explain elevated levels of those compounds observed in low-NO environments with high isoprene emissions.

  15. Energy loss in gas lasers operating in hollow-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Ryan A.; Madden, Timothy J.

    2017-03-01

    The output of solid core fiber lasers is constrained in the mid-infrared due to the absorption properties of silica. Optically pumped gas lasers can reach the mid-infrared but require long path lengths for interaction between the pump light and gain medium. Optically pumped gas lasers where the gain medium is contained in a hollow-core optical fiber may provide a robust and compact platform that combines advantages of fiber and optically-pumped gas lasers. Experimental demonstrations of gas-filled-fiber lasers have been reported. The energy output of a molecular gas laser operating in a hollow-core optical fiber is computationally modeled using rate equations. The rate equations include terms for various physical processes including molecular self-collisions, molecular collisions with the fiber walls, and fiber attenuation. The rate equations are solved for a time-dependent, one-dimensional fiber model with an acetylene gain medium that lases along rotation-vibrational transitions. The energy output and losses are computed for multiple configurations. Model correspondence with reported experiments is shown. The computed energy losses due to backwards propagating light, fiber losses, and molecular collisions are applied to pulsed, continuous wave, and synchronously pumped gas lasers operating in hollow-core optical fibers. Energy losses due to molecular collisions are used to estimate heating in the gain medium.

  16. Nonlinear effects in the energy loss of a slow dipole in a free-electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J.I.

    2002-11-01

    We analyze beyond linear-response theory the energy loss of a slow dipole moving inside a free-electron gas. The energy loss is obtained from a nonlinear treatment of the scattering of electrons at the dipole-induced potential. This potential and the total electronic density are calculated with density-functional theory. We focus on the interference effects, i.e., the difference between the energy loss of a dipole and that of the isolated charges forming it. Comparison of our results to those obtained in linear-response theory shows that a nonlinear treatment of the screening is required to accurately describe the energy loss of slow dipoles.

  17. Implementation of empirical total pressure loss data into the DUCTFLO and TOPAZ gas transfer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.; Kanouff, M.P.

    1984-11-01

    Sandia presently has two computer codes capable of modeling local pressure and enthalpy losses in lines connecting gas reservoirs and receivers. Each code conserves flow continuity, momentum, and energy as a function of position along the flow path. The first of these codes, DUCTFLO, models gas flow by solving a set of coupled algebraic equations. The DUCTFLO code has been formulated to make direct use of laboratory total pressure and enthalpy loss data. The second code, TOPAZ, models gas flow by solving a set of coupled ordinary differential equations using a conventional finite difference technique. The TOPAZ finite difference equations must be altered slightly in order to make use of laboratory total pressure and enthalpy loss data. In this report, methods for implementing empirical loss data in the two codes are discussed. In quasi-steady flow situations, it is shown that the two codes predict the same gas transfer for a given set of empirical loss data. This is demonstrated in an example problem consisting of a reservoir and receiver connected by a series of seven flow components each having unique loss characteristics. 11 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Loss of gas from echogenic liposomes exposed to pulsed ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Jason L.; Luan, Ying; Peng, Tao; Huang, Shao-Ling; McPherson, David D.; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, Nico; Holland, Christy K.

    2016-12-01

    The destruction of echogenic liposomes (ELIP) in response to pulsed ultrasound excitations has been studied acoustically previously. However, the mechanism underlying the loss of echogenicity due to cavitation nucleated by ELIP has not been fully clarified. In this study, an ultra-high speed imaging approach was employed to observe the destruction phenomena of single ELIP exposed to ultrasound bursts at a center frequency of 6 MHz. We observed a rapid size reduction during the ultrasound excitation in 139 out of 397 (35%) ultra- high-speed recordings. The shell dilation rate, which is defined as the microbubble wall velocity divided by the instantaneous radius, \\dot{{R}}  /R, was extracted from the radius versus time response of each ELIP, and was found to be correlated with the deflation. Fragmentation and surface mode vibrations were also observed and are shown to depend on the applied acoustic pressure and initial radius. Results from this study can be utilized to optimize the theranostic application of ELIP, e.g. by tuning the size distribution or the excitation frequency.

  19. Does venous blood gas analysis provide accurate estimates of hemoglobin oxygen affinity?

    PubMed

    Huber, Fabienne L; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Goede, Jeroen S; Bloch, Konrad E

    2013-04-01

    Alterations in hemoglobin oxygen affinity can be detected by exposing blood to different PO2 and recording oxygen saturation, a method termed tonometry. It is the gold standard to measure the PO2 associated with 50 % oxygen saturation, the index used to quantify oxygen affinity (P50Tono). P50Tono is used in the evaluation of patients with erythrocytosis suspected to have hemoglobin with abnormal oxygen affinity. Since tonometry is labor intensive and not generally available, we investigated whether accurate estimates of P50 could also be obtained by venous blood gas analysis, co-oximetry, and standard equations (P50Ven). In 50 patients referred for evaluation of erythrocytosis, pH, PO2, and oxygen saturation were measured in venous blood to estimate P50Ven; P50Tono was measured for comparison. Agreement among P50Ven and P50Tono was evaluated (Bland-Altman analysis). Mean P50Tono was 25.8 (range 17.4-34.1) mmHg. The mean difference (bias) of P50Tono-P50Ven was 0.5 mmHg; limits of agreement (95 % confidence limits) were -5.2 to +6.1 mmHg. The sensitivity and specificity of P50Ven to identify the 25 patients with P50Tono outside the normal range of 22.9-26.8 mmHg were 5 and 77 %, respectively. We conclude that estimates of P50 based on venous blood gas analysis and standard equations have a low bias compared to tonometry. However, the precision of P50Ven is not sufficiently high to replace P50Tono in the evaluation of individual patients with suspected disturbances of hemoglobin oxygen affinity.

  20. Severe blood loss anemia in a Jehovah's Witness treated with adjunctive hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Graffeo, Charles; Dishong, William

    2013-04-01

    We describe the case of a 39-year-old African-American woman who developed sudden onset, near-term placental abruption with severe blood loss anemia whose religious beliefs precluded her from receiving any blood products. The patient had lost most of her blood volume, with a reported hemoglobin level of 1.9 g/dL, developed multisystem failure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation with bilateral deep venous thrombosis. Adjunctive hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) therapy was considered, and the patient was referred for treatment. The patient required ventilatory support as well as vasopressors and hemodialysis. HBO therapy occured in a monoplace chamber setting at 2.0 atmospheres absolute for 90 minutes per treatment up to twice daily depending on patients clinical status. The patient underwent a total of 30 HBO treatments and had sustained improvement in all hemodynamic parameters, red blood cell volume, renal and respiratory function. She was discharged to a rehabilitation facility on hospital day 29 and then to home, soon thereafter. The patient had no evidence of sustained physical or cognitive impairment at time of discharge, and there were no reported complications associated with HBO therapy. Adjunctive HBO therapy should be considered in the management of patients with exceptional severe blood loss anemia who refuse the use of blood products.

  1. Oxygen consumption and insensible water loss in premature infants under radiant heaters.

    PubMed

    Marks, K H; Gunther, R C; Rossi, J A; Maisels, M J

    1980-08-01

    Oxygen consumption ((Vo2), carbon dioxide production (Vco2), and insensible water loss (IWL) were measured simultaneously in nine nondistressed, appropriately grown, premature infants less than 2 weeks old, nursed in a conventional, blow-warmed incubator, and were compared with measurements made on the same infants under a radiant heater. The infants had a pronounced increase (148% on average) in IWL when under the radiant heater (P < .001) whereas Vo2 increased by only 4.6% (P = .073). Abdominal skin temperature (servocontrolled to maintain 36.5 C) and esophageal temperature were the same under both conditions, but ambient air temperature was 0.7 C higher in the incubator (P < 05). Although a positive correlation was found between the increase in IWL and the change in Vo2 (r = .75, P < .01), the large increase in IWL (and, therefore, evaporative heat loss) under the radiant heater is out of proportion to, and cannot be accounted for, by the change in metabolic heat production. The heat transfer processes involved in maintaining body temperature constant under these conditions require further study.

  2. Discontinuous gas exchange and the significance of respiratory water loss in Scarabaeine beetles.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Davis, Adrian L V

    2003-10-01

    Respiratory water loss in insects is a controversial topic. Whilst earlier studies considered respiratory transpiration a significant component of overall water loss, to the extent that it was thought to be responsible not only for the evolution of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) but also for variation in DGC patterns, later work repeatedly questioned its importance. In particular, investigations of the proportional contribution of respiratory transpiration to total water loss in species showing DGCs suggested that respiratory transpiration was unlikely to be important in these species. In turn, these studies have been criticized on analytical grounds. In this study we investigated variation in cuticular and respiratory water loss rates in five Scarabaeus dung beetle species, all of which show discontinuous gas exchange cycles, to ascertain the significance of respiratory water loss using modern analytical techniques. In particular, we determined whether there is variation in water loss rates amongst these beetles, whether both respiratory and cuticular water loss rates contribute significantly to variation in the former, and whether metabolic rate variation and variation in the duration of the DGC periods contribute significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. Total water loss rate varied such that species from arid areas had the lowest rates of water loss, and both cuticular and spiracular transpiration contributed significantly to variation in overall water loss rate. Moreover, variation in metabolic rate and in the duration of the DGC periods contributed significantly to variation in respiratory water loss rate. By contrast, examination of proportional water loss revealed little other than that it varies between 6.5% and 21%, depending on the species and the temperature at which it was examined. Cuticular water loss scaled as mass(0.721), but did not differ from that expected from geometric considerations alone. By contrast, respiratory

  3. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  4. Fast vacancy-mediated oxygen ion incorporation across the ceria-gas electrochemical interface.

    PubMed

    Feng, Zhuoluo A; El Gabaly, Farid; Ye, Xiaofei; Shen, Zhi-Xun; Chueh, William C

    2014-07-09

    Electrochemical incorporation reactions are ubiquitous in energy storage and conversion devices based on mixed ionic and electronic conductors, such as lithium-ion batteries, solid-oxide fuel cells and water-splitting membranes. The two-way traffic of ions and electrons across the electrochemical interface, coupled with the bulk transport of mass and charge, has been challenging to understand. Here we report an investigation of the oxygen-ion incorporation pathway in CeO2-δ (ceria), one of the most recognized oxygen-deficient compounds, during hydrogen oxidation and water splitting. We probe the response of surface oxygen vacancies, electrons and adsorbates to the electrochemical polarization at the ceria-gas interface. We show that surface oxygen-ion transfer, mediated by oxygen vacancies, is fast. Furthermore, we infer that the electron transfer between cerium cations and hydroxyl ions is the rate-determining step. Our in operando observations reveal the precise roles of surface oxygen vacancy and electron defects in determining the rate of surface incorporation reactions.

  5. Electron attachment to oxygen, water, and methanol, in various drift chamber gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huk, M.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Wagner, A.

    1988-04-01

    Attachment of electrons to oxygen, water, and methanol molecules has been studied in various gas mixtures based on argon, methane and isobutane, a class of gases often used to operate large drift chambers. The measurements were performed using a drift chamber in which the conditions prevailing in large experiments could be closely reproduced. Attachment coefficients were extracted as a function of the gas composition and pressure, the drift field, and the concentration of the molecules under investigation. The observed effects are compared to other measurements, and are discussed within the frame of physical models.

  6. Numerical Study of the Gas Distribution in an Oxygen Blast Furnace. Part 2: Effects of the Design and Operating Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zongliang; Meng, Jiale; Guo, Lei; Guo, Zhancheng

    2015-09-01

    Gas distribution plays a significant role in an oxygen blast furnace. The uneven distribution of recycling gas from the shaft tuyere has been shown to affect the heat distribution and energy utilization in an oxygen blast furnace. Therefore, the optimal design and operating parameters beneficial to the gas distribution in an oxygen blast furnace should be determined. In total, three parameters and 22 different conditions in an oxygen blast furnace multifluid model were considered. The gas and heat distributions in an oxygen blast furnace under different conditions were simulated and compared. The study revealed that when the height of shaft tuyere decreased from 7.8 m to 3.8 m, the difference in top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 11.6%. When the recycling gas temperature increased from 1123 K to 1473 K, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.9%. As the allocation ratio increased from 0.90 to 1.94, the difference in the top gas CO concentration between the center and edge decreased by 3.0%. Considering both gas and heat distributions, a shaft tuyere height of 3.8 m to 4.8 m, a recycling gas temperature of 1473 K and an allocation ratio of 1.94 are recommended in practice under the conditions of this study.

  7. Oxygen carrier development for chemical looping combustion of coal derived synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, R.V.; Chaudhari, K.; Zinn, A.N.; Simonyi, T.; Robinson, Clark; Poston, J.A.

    2006-09-01

    In the present work, NETL researchers have studied chemical looping combustion (CLC) with an oxygen carrier NiO/bentonite (60 wt.% NiO) for the IGCC systems utilizing simulated synthesis gas. Multi cycle CLC was conducted with NiO/Bentonite in TGA at atmospheric pressure and in a high pressure reactor in a temperature range between 700-900°C. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation as a function of conversion were calculated for all oxidation-reduction cycles utilizing the TGA data. The effect of particle size of the oxygen carrier on CLC was studied for the size between 20-200 mesh. The multi cycle CLC tests conducted in a high pressure packed bed flow reactor indicated constant total production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800°C and 900°C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction.

  8. Reactions of gas-phase H atoms with atomically and molecularly adsorbed oxygen on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biener, Jürgen; Lang, Erwin; Lutterloh, Carsten; Küppers, Jürgen

    2002-02-01

    The interaction of gas-phase H atoms with ordered and disordered adlayers of atomic oxygen, hydroxyl, and molecular oxygen on Pt(111) surfaces was investigated by in situ mass spectrometry and post-reaction TPD (temperature programed desorption). Exposure of oxygen adlayers to gas-phase H atoms at 85 K leads to formation of H2O via two consecutive hydrogenation reactions: H(g)+O(a)→OH(a) followed by H(g)+OH(a)→H2O(g,a). Both reaction steps are highly exothermic, and nascent H2O molecules partially escape into the gas phase before being thermally accommodated on the surface. Empty surface sites and hydrogen bonding promote thermalization of H2O. Separate experiments performed with OH-covered Pt(111) surfaces reveal that the hydrogenation of hydroxyl is a slow reaction compared to the hydrogenation of atomic oxygen; additionally, the abstraction of H from OH by gas-phase D atoms, OH(a)+D(g)→O(a)+HD(g), was detected. Abstraction of H from adsorbed H2O was not observed. Admission of gas-phase H atoms to O2-covered Pt(111) surfaces at 85 K leads to the desorption of O2 and H2O. The thermodynamic stability of the HO2 radical suggests that the reaction is initiated by hydrogenation of molecular oxygen, O2(a)+H(g)→HO2. The intermediate HO2 either decomposes via dissociation of the HO-O bond, HO2→OH(a)+O(a), finally leading to the formation of H2O (˜85%), or via dissociation of the H-O2 bond thus leading to desorption of O2 (˜15%). The whole reaction sequence of formation and decomposition of HO2 is fast compared to the formation of H2O via hydrogenation of atomic oxygen and hydroxyl. The observed coverage dependence of the reaction kinetics indicates the dominance of hot-atom mediated reactions.

  9. The ventilation distribution of helium-oxygen mixtures and the role of inertial losses in the presence of heterogeneous airway obstructions.

    PubMed

    Katz, Ira M; Martin, Andrew R; Muller, Pierre-Antoine; Terzibachi, Karine; Feng, Chia-Hsiang; Caillibotte, Georges; Sandeau, Julien; Texereau, Joëlle

    2011-04-07

    The regional distribution of inhaled gas within the lung is affected in part by normal variations in airway geometry or by obstructions resulting from disease. In the present work, the effects of heterogeneous airway obstructions on the distribution of air and helium-oxygen were examined using an in vitro model, the two compartments of a dual adult test lung. Breathing helium-oxygen resulted in a consistently more uniform distribution, with the gas volume delivered to a severely obstructed compartment increased by almost 80%. An engineering approach to pipe flow was used to analyze the test lung and was extrapolated to a human lung model to show that the in vitro experimental parameters are relevant to the observed in vivo conditions. The engineering analysis also showed that helium-oxygen can decrease the relative weight of the flow resistance due to obstructions if they are inertial in nature (i.e., density dependent) due to either turbulence or laminar convective losses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Gas-phase Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Air Surface Dielectric Barrier Discharges by FTIR and UV spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Sakiyama, Yukinori; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Graves, David B.

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasmas are considered promising for biomedical treatment purpose due to the production of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species during the discharge. In this study, a surface micro-discharge system which operates at 10 kHz, 0.01 -- 1 W/cm^2 in ambient air is used. FTIR and UV-absorbance are used to investigate the time-average gas phase composition and time-resolved ozone concentration, respectively. The results showed that the gas composition is greatly influenced by the power consumption in plasmas. At 0.3 W/cm^2, the gas phase is dominant by NOx species and nearly no ozone is observed while at 0.05 W/cm^2 the amount of NOx is less and the ozone is dominant. Also, time-resolved ozone measurement by means of UV (254 nm) absorbance shows that ozone concentration reaches higher than 1000 ppm in the first tens of seconds and quenched within 1 minutes at high power condition. However, at low power condition no obvious quench of ozone is observed and the ozone concentration attains a steady state in response to the equilibrium of ozone generation and diffusion loss

  11. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration.

  12. The Decompression Sickness and Venous Gas Emboli Consequences of Air Breaks During 100% Oxygen Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, Johnny; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Powell, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    Not enough is known about the increased risk of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) and production of venous (VGE) and arterial (AGE) gas emboli following an air break in an otherwise normal 100% resting oxygen (O2) prebreathe (PB), and certainly a break in PB when exercise is used to accelerate nitrogen (N2) elimination from the tissues. Current Aeromedical Flight Rules at the Johnson Space Center about additional PB payback times are untested, possibly too conservative, and therefore not optimized for operational use.

  13. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  14. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  15. An effective device for gas-liquid oxygen removal in enclosed microalgae culture.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhenfeng; Kang, Ruijuan; Shi, Shaoyuan; Cong, Wei; Cai, Zhaoling

    2010-01-01

    A high-performance gas-liquid transmission device (HPTD) was described in this paper. To investigate the HPTD mass transfer characteristics, the overall volumetric mass transfer coefficients, K(A)(La,CO(2)) for the absorption of gaseous CO(2) and K(A)(La,O(2)) for the desorption of dissolved O(2) were determined, respectively, by titration and dissolved oxygen electrode. The mass transfer capability of carbon dioxide was compared with that of dissolved oxygen in the device, and the operating conditions were optimized to suit for the large-scale enclosed micro-algae cultivation. Based on the effectiveness evaluation of the HPTD applied in one enclosed flat plate Spirulina culture system, it was confirmed that the HPTD can satisfy the demand of the enclosed system for carbon supplement and excessive oxygen removal.

  16. Habitat loss and modification due to gas development in the Fayetteville shale.

    PubMed

    Moran, Matthew D; Cox, A Brandon; Wells, Rachel L; Benichou, Chloe C; McClung, Maureen R

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have become major methods to extract new oil and gas deposits, many of which exist in shale formations in the temperate deciduous biome of the eastern United States. While these technologies have increased natural gas production to new highs, they can have substantial environmental effects. We measured the changes in land use within the maturing Fayetteville Shale gas development region in Arkansas between 2001/2002 and 2012. Our goal was to estimate the land use impact of these new technologies in natural gas drilling and predict future consequences for habitat loss and fragmentation. Loss of natural forest in the gas field was significantly higher compared to areas outside the gas field. The creation of edge habitat, roads, and developed areas was also greater in the gas field. The Fayetteville Shale gas field fully developed about 2% of the natural habitat within the region and increased edge habitat by 1,067 linear km. Our data indicate that without shale gas activities, forest cover would have increased slightly and edge habitat would have decreased slightly, similar to patterns seen recently in many areas of the southern U.S. On average, individual gas wells fully developed about 2.5 ha of land and modified an additional 0.5 ha of natural forest. Considering the large number of wells drilled in other parts of the eastern U.S. and projections for new wells in the future, shale gas development will likely have substantial negative effects on forested habitats and the organisms that depend upon them.

  17. Habitat Loss and Modification Due to Gas Development in the Fayetteville Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, Matthew D.; Cox, A. Brandon; Wells, Rachel L.; Benichou, Chloe C.; McClung, Maureen R.

    2015-06-01

    Hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have become major methods to extract new oil and gas deposits, many of which exist in shale formations in the temperate deciduous biome of the eastern United States. While these technologies have increased natural gas production to new highs, they can have substantial environmental effects. We measured the changes in land use within the maturing Fayetteville Shale gas development region in Arkansas between 2001/2002 and 2012. Our goal was to estimate the land use impact of these new technologies in natural gas drilling and predict future consequences for habitat loss and fragmentation. Loss of natural forest in the gas field was significantly higher compared to areas outside the gas field. The creation of edge habitat, roads, and developed areas was also greater in the gas field. The Fayetteville Shale gas field fully developed about 2 % of the natural habitat within the region and increased edge habitat by 1,067 linear km. Our data indicate that without shale gas activities, forest cover would have increased slightly and edge habitat would have decreased slightly, similar to patterns seen recently in many areas of the southern U.S. On average, individual gas wells fully developed about 2.5 ha of land and modified an additional 0.5 ha of natural forest. Considering the large number of wells drilled in other parts of the eastern U.S. and projections for new wells in the future, shale gas development will likely have substantial negative effects on forested habitats and the organisms that depend upon them.

  18. Quantitative analysis of trace bulk oxygen in silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion method.

    PubMed

    Uchihara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masahiko; Nakahara, Taketoshi

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes a method for removing oxide film from the surface of silicon wafers using an inert gas fusion impulse furnace and precise determination of bulk oxygen within the wafer. A silicon wafer was cut to about 0.35 g (6 x 13 x 2 mm) and dropped into a graphite crucible. The sample was then heated for 40 s at 1300 degrees C. The wafer's oxide film was reduced by carbon and removed as carbon monoxide. The treated silicon sample was taken out of the graphite crucible and maintained again with the holder of the oxygen analyzer. The graphite crucible was then heated to 2100 degrees C. The treated silicon sample was dropped into the heated graphite crucible and the trace bulk oxygen in the wafer was measured using the inert gas fusion infrared absorption method. The relative standard deviations of the oxygen in silicon wafer samples with the removed surface oxide film were determined to be 0.8% for 9.8 x 10(17) atoms/cm3, and 2.7% for 13.0 x 10(17) atoms/cm3.

  19. Direct Method Gas-phase Oxygen Abundances of Four Lyman Break Analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Jonathan S.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.

    2014-09-01

    We measure the gas-phase oxygen abundances in four Lyman break analogs using auroral emission lines to derive direct abundances. The direct method oxygen abundances of these objects are generally consistent with the empirically derived strong-line method values, confirming that these objects are low oxygen abundance outliers from the mass-metallicity (MZ) relation defined by star forming Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. We find slightly anomalous excitation conditions (Wolf-Rayet features) that could potentially bias the empirical estimates toward high values if caution is not exercised in the selection of the strong-line calibration. The high rate of star formation and low oxygen abundance of these objects is consistent with the predictions of the fundamental metallicity relation, in which the infall of relatively unenriched gas simultaneously triggers an episode of star formation and dilutes the interstellar medium of the host galaxy. Based on data acquired using the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT). The LBT is an international collaboration among institutions in the United States, Italy, and Germany. LBT Corporation partners are the University of Arizona on behalf of the Arizona university system; Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Italy; LBT Beteiligungsgesellschaft, Germany, representing the Max-Planck Society, the Astrophysical Institute Potsdam, and Heidelberg University; the Ohio State University, and the Research Corporation, on behalf of the University of Notre Dame, University of Minnesota, and University of Virginia.

  20. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Oxygen therapy is a treatment that provides you with extra oxygen. Oxygen is a gas that your body needs to function. Normally, your lungs absorb oxygen from the air you breathe. But some conditions ...

  1. Gas bubble disease: mortalities of coho salmon, Oncorhynchus kisutch, in water with constant total gas pressure and different oxygen-nitrogen ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    A review of the literature regarding gas-bubble disease can be found in a recent publication by Rucker (1972); one by the National Academy of Science (Anonymous in press); and an unpublished report by Weitkamp and Katz (1973)." Most discussions on gas-bubble disease have dealt with the inert gas, nitrogen-oxygen was given a secondary role. It is important to know the relationship of nitrogen and oxygen when we are concerned with the total gas pressure in water. Where water becomes aerated at dams or falls, oxygen and nitrogen are usually about equally saturated, however, many of the samples analyzed from the Columbia River indicate that nitrogen is often about 7% higher than oxygen when expressed as a percentage. When oxygen is removed from water by metabolic and chemical action, or when oxygen is added to the water by photosynthesis, there is a definite change in the ratio of oxygen and the inert gases (mainly nitrogen with some argon, etc.). This present study shows the effect of varying the oxygen and nitrogen ratio in water on fingerling coho salmon, Oncorh.llnchllS kislltch, while maintaining a constant total gas pressure. The primary purpose of these experiments was to determine differences in lethality of various gas ratios of oxygen and nitrogen at a constant total gas pressure of 119%. I also wished to determine whether there was a difference in susceptibility between sizes and stocks of juvenile coho. Also to be examined was the effect of reducing the oJl:ygen while holding the nitrogen constant.

  2. Singlet-oxygen generation at gas-liquid interfaces: A significant artifact in the measurement of singlet-oxygen yields from ozone-biomolecule reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kanofsky, J.R.; Sima, P.D. )

    1993-09-01

    Several ozone-biomolecule reactions have previously been shown to generate singlet oxygen in high yields. For some of these ozone-biomolecule reactions, we now show that the apparent singlet-oxygen yields determined from measurements of 1270 nm chemiluminescence were artifactually elevated by production of gas-phase singlet oxygen. The gas-phase singlet oxygen results from the reaction of gas-phase ozone with biomolecules near the surface of the solution. Through the use of a flow system that excludes air from the reaction chamber, accurate singlet-oxygen yields can be obtained. The revised singlet-oxygen yields (mol 1O2 per mol O3) for the reactions of ozone with cysteine, reduced glutathione, NADH, NADPH, human albumin, methionine, uric acid and oxidized glutathione are 0.23 +/- 0.02, 0.26 +/- 0.2, 0.48 +/- 0.04, 0.41 +/- 0.01, 0.53 +/- 0.06, 1.11 +/- 0.04, 0.73 +/- 0.05 and 0.75 +/- 0.01, respectively. These revised singlet-oxygen yields are still substantial.

  3. Reactivity and analytical performance of oxygen as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgilio, Alex; Amais, Renata S.; Amaral, Clarice D. B.; Fialho, Lucimar L.; Schiavo, Daniela; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.

    2016-12-01

    The reactivity and analytical performance of O2 as cell gas in inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry was investigated. Selected analytes in a wide mass range were divided in three groups according to their reactivity: G1 represents elements with high oxygen affinity (Ce, La, P, Sc, Ti, and Y), G2 contains elements that may partially react with oxygen (As, Ba, Mo, Si, Sr, and V), and G3 comprises elements expected to be less reactive towards oxygen (Al, Bi, Cu, Mg, Pb, and Pd). On-mass and mass-shift modes were evaluated by monitoring atomic and metal oxide ions, respectively. Analytical signal profiles, oxide percentages, sensitivities and limits of detection for oxygen flow rates varying from 0.1 to 1.0 mL min- 1 were also studied. Group 1 elements plus As and V presented better sensitivities and LODs when measuring oxides, which were the major species for all flow rates evaluated. Molybdenum and Si oxides presented intermediate behavior and MoO fraction was up to 47% and limit of detection was the same as that obtained in on-mass mode. For others G2 and G3 elements, on-mass mode presented higher sensitivity and better LODs, with estimated oxide contents lower than 10%. In most cases, increasing oxygen flow rates led to lower sensitivities and worse LODs.

  4. Cerebral arterial gas embolism following diagnostic bronchoscopy: delayed treatment with hyperbaric oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wherrett, Chris G; Mehran, Reza J; Beaulieu, Marc-Andre

    2002-01-01

    To describe a clinical scenario consistent with the diagnosis of cerebral arterial gas embolism (CAGE) acquired during an outpatient bronchoscopy. Our discussion explores the mechanisms and diagnosis of CAGE and the role of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A diagnostic bronchoscopy was performed on a 70-yr-old man who had had a lobectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma three months earlier. During the direct insufflation of oxygen into the right middle lobe bronchus, the patient became unresponsive and developed subcutaneous emphysema. Immediately, an endotracheal tube and bilateral chest tubes were placed with resultant improvement in his oxygen saturation. However, he remained unresponsive with extensor and flexor responses to pain. Later, in the intensive care unit, he exhibited seizure activity requiring anticonvulsant therapy. Sedation was utilized only briefly to facilitate controlled ventilation. Investigations revealed a negative computerized tomography (CT) scan of the head, a normal cerebral spinal fluid examination, a CT chest that showed evidence of barotrauma, and an abnormal electroencephalogram. Fifty-two hours after the event, he was treated for presumed CAGE with hyperbaric oxygen using a modified United States Navy Table 6. Twelve hours later he had regained consciousness and was extubated. He underwent two more hyperbaric treatments and was discharged from hospital one week after the event, fully recovered. A patient with presumed CAGE made a complete recovery following treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy even though it was initiated after a significant time delay.

  5. Oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldemo, Markus; Lundgren, Edvin; Weissenrieder, Jonas

    2016-02-01

    The initial oxidation of Fe(110) in oxygen gas at 400 °C beyond initial adsorbate structures has been studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Formation of several ordered phases of surface oxides is observed at oxygen coverages between approximately 2.3 and 3.5 oxygen atoms/Fe(110) surface atom. Initially, a FeO(111)-like film is formed with a parallelogram-shaped moiré pattern. It has two mirror domains that are formed symmetrically around the growth direction of a zigzag-shaped adsorbate structure. With increased local oxygen coverage, the moiré structure transforms into a ball-shaped form. Both these moiré structures have equal atomic stacking at the surface and equal apparent height in STM, suggesting oxygen ions diffusing into the film upon oxidation and that the oxide growth takes place at the iron-iron oxide interface. The FeO(111)-like film turns into a Fe3O4(111)-like film with a triangular bistable surface termination as the oxidation proceeds further. The FeO(111)-like film growth proceeds according to the Frank-van der Merwe mechanism while the Fe3O4(111)-like film grows according to the Stranski-Krastanov mechanism.

  6. A Numerical Study on Gas Phase Dynamics of High-Velocity Oxygen Fuel Thermal Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baik, Jae-Sang; Park, Sun-Kyu; Kim, Youn-Jea

    2008-08-01

    The high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) thermal spray is used for a particulate deposition process in which micro-sized particles are propelled and heated in a supersonic combusting gas stream. It is characterized by high gas velocity and high density and is being used in an increasing variety of coating applications, such as ceramic and composite coatings, to improve wear and abrasion resistance. The particle temperature and velocity are two of the most important parameters in HVOF thermal spraying, which affect the quality of the coatings. To understand the particle dynamics, it is necessary to study, first, the thermal flow characteristics in the HVOF system. In this study, a numerical analysis is performed to predict the gas dynamic behaviors, and the effect of the geometrical parameter is studied to optimize the nozzle design.

  7. Polyoxometalate-mediated electron transfer-oxygen transfer oxidation of cellulose and hemicellulose to synthesis gas.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Bidyut Bikash; Neumann, Ronny

    2014-08-01

    Terrestrial plants contain ~70% hemicellulose and cellulose that are a significant renewable bioresource with potential as an alternative to petroleum feedstock for carbon-based fuels. The efficient and selective deconstruction of carbohydrates to their basic components, carbon monoxide and hydrogen, so called synthesis gas, is an important key step towards the realization of this potential, because the formation of liquid hydrocarbon fuels from synthesis gas are known technologies. Here we show that by using a polyoxometalate as an electron transfer-oxygen transfer catalyst, carbon monoxide is formed by cleavage of all the carbon-carbon bonds through dehydration of initially formed formic acid. In this oxidation-reduction reaction, the hydrogen atoms are stored on the polyoxometalate as protons and electrons, and can be electrochemically released from the polyoxometalate as hydrogen. Together, synthesis gas is formed. In a hydrogen economy scenario, this method can also be used to convert carbon monoxide to hydrogen.

  8. Greenhouse gas mitigation can reduce sea-ice loss and increase polar bear persistence

    Treesearch

    Steven C. Amstrup; Eric T. DeWeaver; David C. Douglas; Bruce G. Marcot; George M. Durner; Cecilia M. Bitz; David A. Bailey

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of projected losses of their essential sea-ice habitats, a United States Geological Survey research team concluded in 2007 that two-thirds of the world's polar bears (Ursus maritimus) could disappear by mid-century if business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions continue. That projection, however, did not consider the possible...

  9. Comparison of two different steroid treatments with hyperbaric oxygen for idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Sevil, Ergun; Bercin, Sami; Muderris, Togay; Gul, Fatih; Kiris, Muzaffer

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of the association of intratympanic (IT) steroid and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy in patients presenting with idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL), and to compare this protocol with another consisting of intravenous (IV) steroid administration and HBO therapy. A total of 80 patients diagnosed with ISSNHL were included in this prospective trial. Patients were divided into three categories: a mild-to-moderate ISSNHL group with a pure-tone average (PTA) ≤60 decibels (dB), a severe ISSNHL group with a PTA of 60-80 dB, and a profound ISSNHL group with a PTA ≥81 dB. The first protocol consisted of 20 sessions of HBO therapy together with IV methylprednisolone 1 mg/kg body weight and a 10 mg taper every 3 days for 10 days. The second protocol consisted of HBO therapy for 20 sessions, together with an IT injection of dexamethasone at a dose of 4 mg/mL, 0.5-0.7 mL once a day for 7 consecutive days, performed 3 h before the HBO therapy. In the mild-to-moderate ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 19 (0-27) dB and 78.9 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group, and 18 (3-44) dB and 70.5 % in the IV + HBO therapy group. In the severe ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 33 (1-54) dB and 81.8 %, respectively in the IT + HBO treatment group and 33.5 (7-57) dB and 58.2 % in the IV + HBO group. In the profound ISSNHL patients, the mean hearing gain and successful treatment rate was 36 (4-69) dB and 40 %, respectively in the IT + HBO therapy group, and 39.5 (0-92) dB and 72.7 % in the IV + HBO treatment group. The results demonstrated that patients with severe hearing loss success rate was superior in the group submitted to IT + HBO treatment, conversely IV + HBO therapy may be benefit for patients with profound hearing loss. Nevertheless, these clinical results were not statistically significant.

  10. The effect of weight loss on sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation in morbidly obese men.

    PubMed

    Harman, E M; Wynne, J W; Block, A J

    1982-09-01

    Four morbidly obese men who had been found to have significant sleep-disordered breathing and oxygen desaturation were restudied after an average weight loss of 108 kg (range 53-155 kg). In all subjects, weight loss was accompanied by a significant reduction in the number of episodes per hour of sleep-disordered breathing events. In three of the four subjects, there was improvment in the severity of desaturation accompanying abnormal breathing. The two subjects with daytime somnolence and hypercapnia prior to weight loss showed the most dramatic improvement in desaturation. This suggests that obesity is a cause, rather than an effect, of the sleep apnea syndrome.

  11. Discontinuous gas exchange, water loss, and metabolism in Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae).

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    Insects are at high risk of desiccation because of their small size, high surface-area-to-volume ratio, and air-filled tracheal system that ramifies throughout their bodies to transport O(2) and CO(2) to and from respiring cells. Although the tracheal system offers a high-conductance pathway for the movement of respiratory gases, it has the unintended consequence of allowing respiratory transpiration to the atmosphere. When resting, many species exchange respiratory gases discontinuously, and an early hypothesis for the origin of these discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs) is that they serve to reduce respiratory water loss. In this study, we test this "hygric" hypothesis by comparing rates of CO(2) exchange and water loss among flower beetles Protaetia cretica (Cetoniinae, Scarabaeidae) breathing either continuously or discontinuously. We show that, consistent with the expectations of the hygric hypothesis, rates of total water loss are higher during continuous gas exchange than during discontinuous gas exchange and that the ratio of respiratory water loss to CO(2) exchange is lower during discontinuous gas exchange. This conclusion is in agreement with other studies of beetles and cockroaches that also support the hygric hypothesis. However, this result does not exclude other adaptive hypotheses supported by work on ants and moth pupae. This ambiguity may arise because there are multiple independent evolutionary origins of DGCs and no single adaptive function underlying their genesis. Alternatively, the observed reduction in water loss during DGCs may be a side effect of a nonadaptive gas exchange pattern that is elicited during periods of inactivity.

  12. Greenhouse gas mitigation can reduce sea-ice loss and increase polar bear persistence.

    PubMed

    Amstrup, Steven C; Deweaver, Eric T; Douglas, David C; Marcot, Bruce G; Durner, George M; Bitz, Cecilia M; Bailey, David A

    2010-12-16

    On the basis of projected losses of their essential sea-ice habitats, a United States Geological Survey research team concluded in 2007 that two-thirds of the world's polar bears (Ursus maritimus) could disappear by mid-century if business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions continue. That projection, however, did not consider the possible benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation. A key question is whether temperature increases lead to proportional losses of sea-ice habitat, or whether sea-ice cover crosses a tipping point and irreversibly collapses when temperature reaches a critical threshold. Such a tipping point would mean future greenhouse gas mitigation would confer no conservation benefits to polar bears. Here we show, using a general circulation model, that substantially more sea-ice habitat would be retained if greenhouse gas rise is mitigated. We also show, with Bayesian network model outcomes, that increased habitat retention under greenhouse gas mitigation means that polar bears could persist throughout the century in greater numbers and more areas than in the business-as-usual case. Our general circulation model outcomes did not reveal thresholds leading to irreversible loss of ice; instead, a linear relationship between global mean surface air temperature and sea-ice habitat substantiated the hypothesis that sea-ice thermodynamics can overcome albedo feedbacks proposed to cause sea-ice tipping points. Our outcomes indicate that rapid summer ice losses in models and observations represent increased volatility of a thinning sea-ice cover, rather than tipping-point behaviour. Mitigation-driven Bayesian network outcomes show that previously predicted declines in polar bear distribution and numbers are not unavoidable. Because polar bears are sentinels of the Arctic marine ecosystem and trends in their sea-ice habitats foreshadow future global changes, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions to improve polar bear status would have conservation benefits throughout

  13. Greenhouse gas mitigation can reduce sea-ice loss and increase polar bear persistence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amstrup, Steven C.; Deweaver, E.T.; Douglas, D.C.; Marcot, B.G.; Durner, G.M.; Bitz, C.M.; Bailey, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of projected losses of their essential sea-ice habitats, a United States Geological Survey research team concluded in 2007 that two-thirds of the worlds polar bears (Ursus maritimus) could disappear by mid-century if business-as-usual greenhouse gas emissions continue. That projection, however, did not consider the possible benefits of greenhouse gas mitigation. A key question is whether temperature increases lead to proportional losses of sea-ice habitat, or whether sea-ice cover crosses a tipping point and irreversibly collapses when temperature reaches a critical threshold. Such a tipping point would mean future greenhouse gas mitigation would confer no conservation benefits to polar bears. Here we show, using a general circulation model, that substantially more sea-ice habitat would be retained if greenhouse gas rise is mitigated. We also show, with Bayesian network model outcomes, that increased habitat retention under greenhouse gas mitigation means that polar bears could persist throughout the century in greater numbers and more areas than in the business-as-usual case. Our general circulation model outcomes did not reveal thresholds leading to irreversible loss of ice; instead, a linear relationship between global mean surface air temperature and sea-ice habitat substantiated the hypothesis that sea-ice thermodynamics can overcome albedo feedbacks proposed to cause sea-ice tipping points. Our outcomes indicate that rapid summer ice losses in models and observations represent increased volatility of a thinning sea-ice cover, rather than tipping-point behaviour. Mitigation-driven Bayesian network outcomes show that previously predicted declines in polar bear distribution and numbers are not unavoidable. Because polar bears are sentinels of the Arctic marine ecosystem and trends in their sea-ice habitats foreshadow future global changes, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions to improve polar bear status would have conservation benefits throughout

  14. Measuring gas exchange with step changes in inspired oxygen: an analysis of the assumption of oxygen steady state in patients suffering from COPD.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Lars P; Weinreich, Ulla M; Karbing, Dan S; Wagner, Peter D; Rees, Stephen E

    2014-12-01

    Bedside estimation of pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be possible from step changes in FIO2 and subsequent measurement of arterial oxygenation at steady state conditions. However, a steady state may not be achieved quickly after a change in FIO2, especially in patients with lung disease such as COPD, rendering this approach cumbersome. This paper investigates whether breath by breath measurement of respiratory gas and arterial oxygen levels as FIO2 is changed can be used as a much more rapid alternative to collecting data from steady state conditions for measuring pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Fourteen patients with COPD were studied using 4-5 step changes in FIO2 in the range of 0.15-0.35. Values of expired respiratory gas and arterial oxygenation were used to calculate and compare the parameters of a mathematical model of pulmonary gas exchange in two cases: from data at steady state; and from breath by breath data prior to achievement of a steady state. For each patient, the breath by breath data were corrected for the delay in arterial oxygen saturation changes following each change in FIO2. Calculated model parameters were shown to be similar for the two data sets, with Bland-Altman bias and limits of agreement of -0.4 and -3.0 to 2.2 % for calculation of pulmonary shunt and 0.17 and -0.47 to 0.81 kPa for alveolar to end-capillary PO2, a measure of oxygen abnormality due to shunting plus regions of low [Formula: see text] A/[Formula: see text] ratio. This study shows that steady state oxygen levels may not be necessary when estimating pulmonary gas exchange using changes in FIO2. As such this technique may be applicable in patients with lung disease such as COPD.

  15. Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas by using oxygen-permeable ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Hongwei Cheng; Yuwen Zhang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding; Qian Li

    2009-01-15

    Hydrogen production from simulated hot coke oven gas (HCOG) was investigated in a BaCo{sub 0.7}Fe{sub 0.2}Nb{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BCFNO) membrane reactor combined with a Ni/Mg(Al)O catalyst by the partial oxidation with toluene as a model tar compound under atmospheric pressure. The reaction results indicated that toluene was completely converted to H{sub 2} and CO in the catalytic reforming of the simulated HCOG in the temperature range from 825 to 875{sup o}C. Both thermodynamically predicated values and experimental data showed that the selective oxidation of toluene took precedence over that of CH{sub 4} in the reforming reaction. At optimized reaction conditions, the dense oxygen-permeable membrane has an oxygen permeation flux around 12.3 mL cm{sup -2} min{sup -1}, and a CH{sub 4} conversion of 86%, a CO{sub 2} conversion of 99%, a H{sub 2} yield of 88%, and a CO yield of 87% have been achieved. When the toluene and methane were reformed, the amount of H{sub 2} in the reaction effluent gas was about 2 times more than that of original H{sub 2} in simulated HCOG. The results reveal that it is feasible for hydrogen production from HCOG by reforming hydrocarbon compounds in a ceramic oxygen-permeable membrane reactor. 27 refs., 10 figs., 3 abs.

  16. Oxygen speciation in upgraded fast pyrolysis bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Omais, Badaoui; Crepier, Julien; Charon, Nadège; Courtiade, Marion; Quignard, Alain; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-04-21

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is considered as a promising route to produce liquid for the transportation field from a renewable resource. However, the derived bio-oils are mainly oxygenated (45-50%w/w O on a wet basis) and contain almost no hydrocarbons. Therefore, upgrading is necessary to obtain a liquid with lower oxygen content and characterization of oxygenated compounds in these products is essential to assist conversion reactions. For this purpose, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) can be investigated. Oxygen speciation in such matrices is hampered by the large diversity of oxygenated families and the complexity of the hydrocarbon matrix. Moreover, response factors must be taken into account for oxygenate quantification as the Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) response varies when a molecule contains heteroatoms. To conclude, no distillation cuts were accessible and the analysis had to cover a large range of boiling points (30-630 °C). To take up this analytical challenge, a thorough optimization approach was developed. In fact, four GC × GC column sets were investigated to separate oxygenated compounds from the hydrocarbon matrix. Both model mixtures and the upgraded biomass flash pyrolysis oil were injected using GC × GC-FID to reach a suitable chromatographic separation. The advantages and drawbacks of each column combination for oxygen speciation in upgraded bio-oils are highlighted in this study. Among the four sets, an original polar × semi-polar column combination was selected and enabled the identification by GC × GC-ToF/MS of more than 40 compounds belonging to eight chemical families: ketones, furans, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, guaiacols, anisols, and esters. For quantification purpose, the GC × GC-FID chromatogram was divided into more than 60 blobs corresponding to the previously identified analyte and hydrocarbon zones. A database associating each blob to a molecule and its specific response factor (determined

  17. Nitric oxide added to the sweep gas infusion reduces local clotting formation in adult blood oxygenators.

    PubMed

    Tevaearai, H T; Mueller, X M; Tepic, S; Cotting, J; Boone, Y; Montavon, P M; von Segesser, L K

    2000-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation. We analyzed the effect of direct infusion of NO into adult blood oxygenators on local clot formation. Nonheparinized calves in a control group (n = 3) and NO group (n = 4) were connected to a jugulocarotid cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB; centrifugal pump) for 6 hours. The venous line and pumphead were heparin coated, whereas the oxygenator, the heat exchanger, and the arterial line were not. A total of 80 ppm of NO was mixed with the sweep gas infusion in the NO group. The pressure gradient through the oxygenator (deltaP.Ox.) was monitored, and its evolution was compared between groups. Oxygenators membranes were analyzed and photographed, allowing for calculation of the percentage of surface area covered with clots by using a computer image analysis program. The deltaP.Ox. reached a plateau of 193 +/- 26% of the basal value in the NO group after 120 minutes, whereas a similar plateau of 202 +/- 22% was reached after only 20 minutes in the control group (p < 0.05). The surface area of the oxygenator covered with clots was significantly reduced in the NO group (0.54 +/- 0.41%) compared with the control group (5.78 +/- 3.80%, p < 0.05). However, general coagulation parameters were not modified by local NO administration. The activated coagulation time remained stable between 110 and 150 seconds in both groups (p = not significant [ns]), and there were no differences in hematocrit, thrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, or fibrinogen between groups during the 6 hours of CPB. Thus, the mixed infusion of a continuous low dose of NO into adult oxygenators during prolonged CPB prevented local clot formation, whereas the general coagulation pattern remained unchanged.

  18. Wind-driven surficial oxygen transfer and dinitrogen gas emission from treatment lagoons.

    PubMed

    Ro, K S; Hunt, P G; Poach, M E

    2006-01-01

    Surficial oxygen transfer plays an important role, when analyzing the complex biochemical and physical processes responsible for ammonia and dinitrogen gas emission in animal waste treatment lagoons. This paper analyzes if currently known nitrogen biochemical pathways can explain the enigmatic dinitrogen gas emissions recently observed from the treatment lagoons, based on the amount of wind-driven oxygen that can be transferred through the air-water interface. The stoichiometric amounts of the maximum dinitrogen gas production potential per unit mass of O(2) transferred were calculated according to three most likely biochemical pathways for ammonia removal in the treatment lagoons-classical nitrification-denitrification, partial nitrification-denitrification, and partial nitrification-Anammox. Partial nitrification-Anammox pathway would produce the largest N(2) emission, followed by partial nitrification-denitrification pathway, then by classical nitrification-denitrification pathway. In order to estimate stoichiometric amount (i.e., maximum) of N(2) emission from these pathways, we assumed that heterotrophic respiration was substantially inhibited due to high levels of free ammonia prevalent in treatment lagoons. Most observed N(2) emission data were below the maximum N(2) emission potentials by the classical nitrification-denitrification pathway. However, one value of observed N(2) emission was much higher than that could be produced by even the partial nitrification-Anammox pathway. This finding suggests yet unknown biological processes and/or non-biological nitrogen processes such as chemodenitrification may also be important in these treatment lagoons.

  19. Evaluation of oxygen transfer efficiency under process conditions using the dynamic off-gas method.

    PubMed

    Schuchardt, A; Libra, J A; Sahlmann, C; Wiesmann, U; Gnirss, R

    2007-05-01

    The off-gas method can be used to investigate standard oxygen transfer efficiencies under process conditions (alphaSOTE) over the operating life of an aeration system. A method to evaluate alphaSOTE is described in detail by US and German standards. The standards, however, do not describe how to evaluate dynamic changes in aSOTE over a day, which can be useful to uncover problems and unfavourable process conditions. Based on over three years experience gained in off-gas testing in Berlin wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) under operating conditions, a method to evaluate and interpret the dynamic changes in oxygen transfer is presented. The application of the dynamic off-gas method brings important additional information, which can be used to increase operational efficiency of the aeration basin and to increase process reliability, with a relatively small increase in effort. This paper shows how to perform dynamic measurements under process conditions. Some results of such measurements under dynamic process conditions, performed in a Berlin WWTP, are discussed.

  20. The effects of oxygen induced pulmonary vasoconstriction on bedside measurement of pulmonary gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Ulla M; Thomsen, Lars P; Rees, Stephen E; Rasmussen, Bodil S

    2016-04-01

    In patients with respiratory failure measurements of pulmonary gas exchange are of importance. The bedside automatic lung parameter estimator (ALPE) of pulmonary gas exchange is based on changes in inspired oxygen (FiO2) assuming that these changes do not affect pulmonary circulation. This assumption is investigated in this study. Forty-two out of 65 patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had measurements of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP), cardiac output and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure thus enabling the calculation of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at each FiO2 level. The research version of ALPE was used and FiO2 was step-wise reduced a median of 0.20 and ultimately returned towards baseline values, allowing 6-8 min' steady state period at each of 4-6 levels before recording the oxygen saturation (SpO2). FiO2 reduction led to median decrease in SpO2 from 99 to 92 %, an increase in MPAP of 4 mmHg and an increase in PVR of 36 dyn s cm(-5). Changes were immediately reversed on returning FiO2 towards baseline. In this study changes in MPAP and PVR are small and immediately reversible consistent with small changes in pulmonary gas exchange. This indicates that mild deoxygenation induced pulmonary vasoconstriction does not have significant influences on the ALPE parameters in patients after CABG.

  1. The production of low mass carbon stars - Carbon-rich dredge up or oxygen-rich mass loss?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Pesce, J. E.; Macgregor, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional theory explains the origin of carbon stars as due to dredge up of carbon enriched material from the stellar core during helium flash events late in the life of solar mass AGB stars. This relatively efficient process, however, seems to produce a larger C/O ratio than observed (Lambert et al., 1987). A secondary effect which could contribute to the appearance of carbon stars, is the selective removal of oxygen from the atmosphere by radiative force expulsion of oxygen-rich dust grains. Calculations for this scenario are presented, which evaluate the degree of momentum coupling between the grains and gas under the thermodynamical conditions of AGB star atmospheres.

  2. Oxygen Effects on Thermophilic Microbial Populations in Biofilters Treating Nitric Oxide Containing Off-Gas Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold; Smith, William Aaron

    2004-04-01

    Electricity generation from coal has increased by an average of 51 billion kWh per year over the past 3 years. For this reason cost-effective strategies to control nitrogen oxides (NOx) from coal-fired power plant combustion gases must be developed. Compost biofilters operated at 55°C at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 13 seconds were shown to be feasible for removal of nitric oxide (NO) from synthetic flue gas. Denitrifying microbial populations in these biofilters were shown to reduce influent NO feeds by 90 to 95% at inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Oxygen was shown to have a significant effect on the NO removal efficiency demonstrated by these biofilters. Two biofilters were set up under identical conditions for the purpose of monitoring NO removal as well as changes in the microbial population in the bed medium under anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Changes in the microbial population were monitored to determine the maximum oxygen tolerance of a denitrifying biofilter as well as methods of optimizing microbial populations capable of denitrification in the presence of low oxygen concentrations. Nitric oxide removal dropped to between 10 and 20% when oxygen was present in the influent stream. The inactive compost used to pack the biofilters may have also caused the decreased NO removal efficiency compared to previous biofiltration experiments. Analysis of the bed medium microbial population using environmental scanning electron microscopy indicated significant increases in biomass populating the surface of the compost when compared to unacclimated compost.

  3. Alveolar gas composition during maximal and interrupted apnoeas in ambient air and pure oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fagoni, Nazzareno; Taboni, Anna; Vinetti, Giovanni; Bottarelli, Sara; Moia, Christian; Bringard, Aurélién; Ferretti, Guido

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the alveolar gas composition at the transition between the steady phase II (φ2) and the dynamic phase III (φ3) of the cardiovascular response to apnoea may lay on the physiological breaking point curve (Lin et al., 1974). Twelve elite divers performed maximal and φ2-interrupted apnoeas, in air and pure oxygen. We recorded beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure and heart rate; we measured alveolar oxygen and carbon dioxide pressures (PAO2 and PACO2, respectively) before and after apnoeas; we calculated the PACO2 difference between the end and the beginning of apnoeas (ΔPACO2). Cardiovascular responses to apnoea were similar compared to previous studies. PAO2 and PACO2 at the end of φ2-interrupted apnoeas, corresponded to those reported at the physiological breaking point. For maximal apnoeas, PACO2 was less than reported by Lin et al. (1974). ΔPACO2 was higher in oxygen than in air. The transition between φ2 and φ3 corresponds indeed to the physiological breaking point. We attribute this transition to ΔPACO2, rather than the absolute PACO2 values, both in air and oxygen apnoeas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Numerical investigation of oxygen impurity distribution during multicrystalline silicon crystal growth using a gas flow guidance device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Ying-Yang; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Chen, Chi-Yung

    2012-12-01

    Oxygen is one of the most important types of impurities that can cause thermal donor or light-induced degradation in mc-Si solar cells. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect that installing a gas flow guidance device in a mc-Si crystal-growth furnace would have on the oxygen impurity distribution in the melt during the growth process. The installation of such a gas flow guidance device can enhance the gas flow near the free surface, which would allow the argon to carry a greater amount of evaporated SiO gas outside the furnace. Furthermore, the enhanced motion of the gas flow also improves heat transfer near the free surface, which would make the melt vortex separate more easily. The separated melt vortex, which is located near the central region of the melt-crystal interface, directs any oxygen impurity towards the central region of the melt-crystal interface. This is why the oxygen concentration can be reduced by installing the gas flow guidance device. The effectiveness of the gas flow guidance device depends on the vertical distance between it and the free surface (h) as well as the gap between the crucible sidewall and the tip of the device (d). The effect on the oxygen concentration in the melt is significant when smaller values for h and d are adopted.

  5. Respiratory and cuticular water loss in insects with continuous gas exchange: comparison across five ant species.

    PubMed

    Schilman, Pablo E; Lighton, John R B; Holway, David A

    2005-12-01

    Respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects showing continuous emission of CO(2) is poorly studied because few methodologies can measure it. Comparisons of RWL between insects showing continuous and discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGC) are therefore difficult. We used two recently developed methodologies (the hyperoxic switch and correlation between water-loss and CO(2) emission rates) to compare cuticular permeabilities and rates of RWL in five species of ants, the Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) and four common native ant competitors. Our results showed that RWL in groups of ants with moderate levels of activity and continuous gas exchange were similar across the two measurement methods, and were similar to published values on insects showing the DGC. Furthermore, ants exposed to anoxia increased their total water loss rates by 50-150%. These results suggest that spiracular control under continuous gas exchange can be as effective as the DGC in reducing RWL. Finally, the mesic-adapted Argentine ant showed significantly higher rates of water loss and cuticular permeability compared to four ant species native to dry environments. Physiological limitations may therefore be responsible for restricting the distribution of this invasive species in seasonally dry environments.

  6. EDTA-Decorated Nanostructured ZnO/CdS Thin Films for Oxygen Gas Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunraja, L.; Thirumoorthy, P.; Karthik, A.; Rajendran, V.; Edwinpaul, L.

    2016-08-01

    ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using spin-coating and used for oxygen gas sensor applications. The structural properties of both ZnO/CdS and ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured composites were comparatively characterized. The nanostructure thin film was found in a hexagonal structure with an average crystallite size reduced from 77 nm to 29 nm due to the influence of the EDTA. The optical absorption, photo luminescence, functional groups and surface morphology of the nanostructured thin films were comprehensively investigated. Oxygen was suitably tailored to verify the sensor response over a concentration range of 10-50 ppm at room temperature. Thus, the sensor studies reveal that the performance, response, and recovery time were enhanced in ZnO/CdS-EDTA nanostructured thin film compared with ZnO/CdS.

  7. Role of gas exchange in the inorganic carbon, oxygen, and /sup 222/Rn budgets of the Amazon River

    SciTech Connect

    Devol, A.H.; Quay, P.D.; Richey, J.E.; Martinelli, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    Dissolved oxygen, /sup 222/Rn, pCO/sub 2/, alkalinity, respiration rate, and discharge have been measured at eight mainstem and seven tributary stations during February-March 1984 in a 1700-km stretch of the Amazon River between Vargem Grande and Obidos in Brazil. Air-water gas exchange rates were estimated two ways: measurements of the flux of /sup 222/Rn int floating domes yielded an average boundary layer thickness of 78..mu..m, and oxygen mass balance calculations resulted in an average of 38..mu..m. Given a boundary layer thickness on the order of 50..mu..m, CO/sub 2/ loss to the atmosphere in the entire reach would have been 37.4 kmol s/sup -1/, which is about equal to the total tributary dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) input and is about half of the total fluvial DIC input to the section. Thus, CO/sub 2/ evasion is a major component of Amazon River DIC balance. Because gas exchange within the section was rapid relative to water travel time through the section, a quasi-steady state was maintained between respiratory input and evasion of CO/sub 2/. Dissolved /sup 222/Rn activities in the mainstem varied from 3.5 to 8.3 dpm liter/sup -1/ and were always highly supersaturated with respect to the atmosphere. Dissolved radon was also not supported by decay of /sup 222/Ra in the mainstem. A /sup 222/Rn mass balance indicated that direct groundwater input into this stretch of the Amazon mainstem probably accounted for no more than 1% of water discharge.

  8. Remarkable separability of circulation response to Arctic sea ice loss and greenhouse gas forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, K. E.; Kushner, P. J.; Fyfe, J. C.; Sigmond, M.; Kharin, V. V.; Bitz, C. M.

    2017-08-01

    Arctic sea ice loss may influence midlatitude climate by changing large-scale circulation. The extent to which climate change can be understood as greenhouse gas-induced changes that are modulated by this loss depends on how additive the responses to the separate influences are. A novel sea ice nudging methodology in a fully coupled climate model reveals that the separate effects of doubled atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and associated Arctic sea ice loss are remarkably additive and insensitive to the mean climate state. This separability is evident in several fields throughout most of the year, from hemispheric to synoptic scales. The extent to which the regional response to sea ice loss sometimes agrees with and sometimes cancels the response to CO2 is quantified. The separability of the responses might provide a means to better interpret the diverse array of modeling and observational studies of Arctic change and influence.

  9. Welfare loss to monopoly under public ownership: A study of the municipal natural gas distribution industry

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    Government ownership is one of the policy approaches to the control of monopoly power in the utility industry. Welfare loss estimates will be biased downwards if potential cost increases under monopoly are not taken into consideration. The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the extent of deadweight welfare loss in publicly-owned utilities, using a methodolgy that incorporates failure to minimize costs onto the allocative loss measure. Municipal gas utilities are the subjects of the study which comprises an economic analysis of one of the lesser-examined segments of the utility industry. Three customer classes-residential, commercial, and industrial-are examined. The hypothesis of separability in outputs and inputs could not be rejected. All other restrictions on production were rejected at the .05 level. The hypothesis that municipal gas utilities achieve relative price efficiency in the use of inputs could not be rejected. The separable, minimum cost function was therefore used to obtain estimates of long run marginal cost for the welfare analysis. For the residential class the mean welfare loss equal to 4.4% of utility total residential revenue. Corresponding values for the commercial and industrial classes were 1.8 and 3.3%, respectively. The only statistically significant difference in means occurred between the residential and commercial classes. Analysis of ratios of price to marginal cost indicates that municipal gas utilities engage in third degree price discrimination, with nonresidential customers as the beneficaries. Deadweight welfare loss was found to exist in publicly-owned gas utilities. The adverse effects of monopoly seem to be the most severe for the residential class. However, there was also evidence of scope economies between the residential and nonresidential outputs.

  10. Hyperbaric oxygen does not improve cerebral function when started 2 or 4 hours after cerebral arterial gas embolism in swine.

    PubMed

    Weenink, Robert P; Hollmann, Markus W; Vrijdag, Xavier C E; Van Lienden, Krijn P; De Boo, Diederick W; Stevens, Markus F; Van Gulik, Thomas M; Van Hulst, Robert A

    2013-07-01

    Hyperbaric oxygenation is the accepted treatment for cerebral arterial gas embolism. Although earlier start of hyperbaric oxygenation is associated with better outcome, it is unknown how much delay can be tolerated before start of hyperbaric oxygenation. This study investigates the effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on cerebral function in swine when initiated 2 or 4 hours after cerebral arterial gas embolism. Prospective interventional animal study. Surgical laboratory and hyperbaric chamber. Twenty-two Landrace pigs. Under general anesthesia, probes to measure intracranial pressure, brain oxygen tension (PbtO2), and brain microdialysis, and electrodes for electroencephalography were placed. The electroencephalogram (quantified using temporal brain symmetry index) was suppressed during 1 hour by repeated injection of air boluses through a catheter placed in the right ascending pharyngeal artery. Hyperbaric oxygenation was administered using U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 after 2- or 4-hour delay. Control animals were maintained on an inspiratory oxygen fraction of 0.4. Intracranial pressure increased to a mean maximum of 19 mm Hg (SD, 4.5 mm Hg) due to the embolization procedure. Hyperbaric oxygenation significantly increased PbtO2 in both groups treated with hyperbaric oxygenation (mean maximum PbtO2, 390 torr; SD, 177 torr). There were no significant differences between groups with regard to temporal brain symmetry index (control vs 2-hr delay, p = 0.078; control vs 4-hr delay, p = 0.150), intracranial pressure, and microdialysis values. We did not observe an effect of hyperbaric oxygenation on cerebral function after a delay of 2 or 4 hours. The injury caused in our model could be too severe for a single session of hyperbaric oxygenation to be effective. Our study should not change current hyperbaric oxygenation strategies for cerebral arterial gas embolism, but further research is necessary to elucidate our results. Whether less severe injury benefits from

  11. Oxygen-induced plasticity in tracheal morphology and discontinuous gas exchange cycles in cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Bartrim, Hamish; Matthews, Philip G D; Lemon, Sussan; White, Craig R

    2014-12-01

    The function and mechanism underlying discontinuous gas exchange in terrestrial arthropods continues to be debated. Three adaptive hypotheses have been proposed to explain the evolutionary origin or maintenance of discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs), which may have evolved to reduce respiratory water loss, facilitate gas exchange in high CO2 and low O2 micro-environments, or to ameliorate potential damage as a result of oversupply of O2. None of these hypotheses have unequivocal support, and several non-adaptive hypotheses have also been proposed. In the present study, we reared cockroaches Nauphoeta cinerea in selected levels of O2 throughout development, and examined how this affected growth rate, tracheal morphology and patterns of gas exchange. O2 level in the rearing environment caused significant changes in tracheal morphology and the exhibition of DGCs, but the direction of these effects was inconsistent with all three adaptive hypotheses: water loss was not associated with DGC length, cockroaches grew fastest in hyperoxia, and DGCs exhibited by cockroaches reared in normoxia were shorter than those exhibited by cockroaches reared in hypoxia or hyperoxia.

  12. Edge Charge Neutralization of Clay for Improved Oxygen Gas Barrier in Multilayer Nanobrick Wall Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Song, Yixuan; Hagen, David A; Qin, Shuang; Holder, Kevin M; Falke, Kyle; Grunlan, Jaime C

    2016-12-21

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polymer-clay multilayer thin films are known to provide transparent and flexible gas barrier. In an effort to further lower the oxygen transmission rate (OTR) of these nanobrick wall thin films, sodium chloride was introduced into montmorillonite (MMT) suspension as an "indifferent electrolyte". At pH 6.5 the amphoteric edge sites of MMT have a neutral net charge, and a moderate concentration of NaCl effectively shields the charge from neighboring platelets, allowing van der Waals forces to attract the edges to one another. This edge-to-edge bonding creates a much more tortuous path for diffusing oxygen molecules. An eight-bilayer (BL) polyethylenimine (PEI)/MMT multilayer coating (∼50 nm thick), assembled with 5 mM NaCl in the aqueous clay suspension, exhibited an order of magnitude reduction in oxygen permeability (∼4 × 10(-20) cm(3)·cm/(cm(2)·Pa·s)) relative to its salt-free counterpart. This result represents the best barrier among polymer-clay bilayer systems, which is also lower than SiOx or AlxOy thin films. At higher NaCl concentration, the strong charge screening causes edge-to-face bonding among MMT nanoplatelets, which leads to misalignment in assembled films and increased OTR. This "salty-clay" strategy provides an efficient way to produce better multilayer oxygen barrier thin films by altering ionic strength of the MMT suspension. This simple modification reduces the number of layers necessary for high gas barrier, potentially making these multilayer films interesting for commercial packaging applications.

  13. Structurally integrated organic light emitting device-based sensors for gas phase and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shinar, Ruth; Zhou, Zhaoqun; Choudhury, Bhaskar; Shinar, Joseph

    2006-05-24

    A compact photoluminescence (PL)-based O2 sensor utilizing an organic light emitting device (OLED) as the light source is described. The sensor device is structurally integrated. That is, the sensing element and the light source, both typically thin films that are fabricated on separate glass substrates, are attached back-to-back. The sensing elements are based on the oxygen-sensitive dyes Pt- or Pd-octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP or PdOEP, respectively), which are embedded in a polystyrene (PS) matrix, or dissolved in solution. Their performance is compared to that of a sensing element based on tris(4,7-diphenyl-l,10-phenanthroline) Ru II (Ru(dpp)) embedded in a sol-gel film. A green OLED light source, based on tris(8-hydroxy quinoline Al (Alq3), was used to excite the porphyrin dyes; a blue OLED, based on 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylviny1)-1,1'-biphenyl, was used to excite the Ru(dpp)-based sensing element. The O2 level was monitored in the gas phase and in water, ethanol, and toluene solutions by measuring changes in the PL lifetime tau of the O2-sensitive dyes. The sensor performance was evaluated in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, gas flow rate, and temperature effect, including the temperature dependence of tau in pure Ar and O2 atmospheres. The dependence of the sensitivity on the preparation procedure of the sensing film and on the PS and dye concentrations in the sensing element, whether a solid matrix or solution, were also evaluated. Typical values of the detection sensitivity in the gas phase, S(g) identical with tau(0% O2)/tau(100% O2), at 23 degrees C, were approximately 35 to approximately 50 for the [Alq3 OLED[/[PtOEP dye] pair; S(g) exceeded 200 for the Alq3/PdOEP sensor. For dissolved oxygen (DO) in water and ethanol, S(DO) (defined as the ratio of tau in de-oxygenated and oxygen-saturated solutions) was approximately 9.5 and approximately 11, respectively, using the PtOEP-based film sensor. The oxygen level in toluene was measured with Pt

  14. The ideal oxygen/nitrous oxide fresh gas flow sequence with the Anesthesia Delivery Unit machine.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, Jan F A; Cardinael, Sara; Carette, Rik; Lemmens, Hendrikus J M; De Wolf, Andre M

    2007-06-01

    To determine whether early reduction of oxygen and nitrous oxide fresh gas flow from 6 L/min to 0.7 L/min could be accomplished while maintaining end-expired nitrous oxide concentration > or =50% with an Anesthesia Delivery Unit anesthesia machine. Prospective, randomized clinical study. Large teaching hospital in Belgium. 53 ASA physical status I and II patients requiring general endotracheal anesthesia and controlled mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomly assigned to one of 4 groups depending on the duration of high oxygen/nitrous oxide fresh gas flow (two and 4 L/min, respectively) before lowering total fresh gas flow to 0.7 L/min (0.3 and 0.4 L/min oxygen and nitrous oxide, respectively): one, two, three, or 5 minutes (1-minute group, 2-minute group, 3-minute group, and 5-minute group), with n = 10, 12, 13, and 8, respectively. The course of the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration and bellows volume deficit at end-expiration was compared among the 4 groups during the first 30 minutes. At the end of the high-flow period the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration was 35.6 +/- 6.2%, 48.4 +/- 4.8%, 53.7 +/- 8.7%, and 57.3 +/- 1.6% in the 4 groups, respectively. Thereafter, the end-expired nitrous oxide concentration decreased to a nadir of 36.1 +/- 4.5%, 45.4 +/- 3.8%, 50.9 +/- 6.1%, and 55.4 +/- 2.8% after three, 4, 6, and 8 minutes after flows were lowered in the 1- to 5-minute groups, respectively. A decrease in bellows volume was observed in most patients, but was most pronounced in the 2-minute group. The bellows volume deficit gradually faded within 15 to 20 minutes in all 4 groups. A 3-minute high-flow period (oxygen and nitrous oxide fresh gas flow of 2 and 4 L/min, respectively) suffices to attain and maintain end-expired nitrous oxide concentration > or =50% and ensures an adequate bellows volume during the ensuing low-flow period.

  15. Numerical simulation of operation processes in the combustion chamber and gas generator of oxygen-methane liquid rocket engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, G. P.; Larionov, A. A.; Sidlerov, D. A.; Yanchilin, L. A.

    2009-09-01

    The results of numerical simulations of processes in gas generators and combustion chambers operating on oxygen and methane are presented. Specific features of mixing, evaporation, and combustion of propellants have been investigated. The degree of combustion completeness in chambers with three types of injectors - coaxial-jet gas-liquid, liquid-liquid monopropellant, and bipropellant impinging-jets injectors - has been estimated.

  16. Physical properties and surface/interface analysis of nanocrystalline WO3 films grown under variable oxygen gas flow rates

    SciTech Connect

    Vemuri, R. S.; Carbjal-Franco, G.; Ferrer, D. A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

    2012-10-15

    Nanocrystalline WO3 films were grown by reactive magnetron sputter-deposition in a wide range of oxygen gas flow rates while keeping the deposition temperature fixed at 400 oC. The physical characteristics of WO3 films were evaluated using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. Physical characterization indicates that the thickness, grain size, and density of WO3 films are sensitive to the oxygen gas flow rate during deposition. XRD data indicates the formation of tetragonal WO3 films. The grain size increases from 21 to 25 nm with increasing oxygen gas flow rate to 65%, at which point the grain size exhibits a decreasing trend to attain the lowest value of 15 nm at 100% oxygen. TEM analysis provides a model consisting of isotropic WO3 film (nanocrystalline)-SiO2 interface (amorphous)-Si(100) substrate. XRR simulations, which are based on this model, provide excellent agreement to the experimental data indicating that the normalized thickness of WO3 films decreases with the increasing oxygen gas flow rate. The density of WO3 films increases with increasing oxygen gas flow rate.

  17. Oxygen diffusion and edema with modern scleral rigid gas permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Compañ, Vicente; Oliveira, Cristina; Aguilella-Arzo, Marcel; Mollá, Sergio; Peixoto-de-Matos, Sofia C; González-Méijome, José M

    2014-09-04

    We defined the theoretical oxygen tension behind modern scleral contact lenses (CLs) made of different rigid gas permeable (RGP) materials, assuming different thickness of the tear layer behind the lens. A second goal was to show clinically the effect of the postlens tear film on corneal swelling. We simulated the partial pressure of oxygen across the cornea behind scleral CLs made of different lens materials (oxygen permeability Dk, 75-200 barrer) and different thickness (Tav, 100-300 μm). Postlens tear film thicknesses (Tpost-tear) ranging from 150 to 350 μm were considered. Eight healthy subjects were fitted randomly with a scleral lens with a thin and a thick postlens tear layer in two different sessions for a period of 3 hours under open-eye conditions. The CLs with less than 125 barrer of Dk and a thickness over 200 μm depleted the oxygen availability at the lens-cornea interface below 55 mm Hg for a postlens tear film of 150 μm. For a postlens tear film thickness of 350 μm, no combination of material or lens thickness will meet the criteria of 55 mm Hg. Our clinical measures of corneal edema showed that this was significantly higher (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed ranks test) with the thicker compared to the thinner Tpost-tear (mean ± SD, 1.66 ± 1.12 vs. 4.27 ± 1.19%). Scleral RGP CLs must be comprised of at least 125 barrer of oxygen permeability and up to 200 μm thick to avoid hypoxic effects even under open eye conditions. Postlens tear film layer should be below 150 μm to avoid clinically significant edema. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. Growth and characterization of nanostructured CuO films via CBD approach for oxygen gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurfazliana, M. F.; Sahdan, M. Z.; Saim, H.

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured copper oxide (CuO) films were grown on portable IDE circuit silicon-based by low-cost chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique at three different deposition times (3 h, 5 h and 7 h). The effect of deposition times on the morphological, structural, optical and sensing properties of the nanostructured films were investigated. From the morphological and structural properties, the nanostructured film deposited at 5 h was found to have homogenous surface of CuO nanowhiskers and high crystallinity with tenorite phase compared to 3 h and 7 h films. Besides, there is no heat treatment required in order to produce CuO nanostructures film with tenorite phase. The sensing response (resistance changes) of as-synthesized films to concentration of oxygen (O2) gas also was compared. Film resistance of CuO nanostructures was studied in an environment of dry air loaded (gas sensor chamber) with 30 % of O2 gas. The results revealed that the deposition time causes significant effect on the sensing performance of nanostructured CuO to O2 gas.

  19. Transmucosal gas-loss rates in middle ears initially filled with O2 or CO2.

    PubMed

    Kania, Romain E; Vérillaud, Benjamin; Ars, Bernard; Tran Ba Huy, Patrice; Herman, Philippe; Ar, Amos

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the role of different gases in clearance of gas in the middle ear cavity (ME) by its mucosal blood flow. A rat model was used to measure gas volume changes in the ME cavity at constant pressure without ventilation. We disturbed the normal gas composition of the ME by filling it with O2 or CO2, measured the consequent changes in gas volume over time and compared these results with previously obtained ones for air and N2. The first 5 min of the primary transient phase (phase I) for O2 or CO2 was characterized by a volume loss decrease of -0.49 ± 0.34 μL and -46.28 ± 8.49 μL, respectively, with volume loss increase for air and N2 differing greatly, at +0.17 ± 0.17 and +2.31 ± 0.81, respectively. The CO2 value of -46.28 μL showed that a volume of gas equivalent to that of the ME cleft volume was eliminated within the first 5 min. In the second phase (phase II), all gases showed a linear decrease in volume, which presumably represents a steady-state gas loss rate. However, the gas loss rate of -0.307 ± 0.170 μL min(-1) for O2-filled MEs was significantly higher than the mean of -0.124 μL min(-1) for all other gases. We used a previously established mathematical model to calculate the effective ME mucosal blood flow rate under steady-state (phase II) conditions. The blood flow results for O2-filled MEs differed greatly from those of the other gases (89.0 ± 49.28 vs. 26.5 μL min(-1), on average), which suggest that the model used to calculate blood flow should be modified if used with O2-filled MEs. Further work should involve a comparison of our method with different methods to verify ME blood flow rate.

  20. NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barger, N.N.; Belnap, J.; Ojima, D.S.; Mosier, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we examined N gas loss as nitric oxide (NO) from N-fixing biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah. We hypothesized that NO gas loss would increase with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soil. NO fluxes were measured from biologically crusted soils with three levels of N fixation potential (Scytonema-Nostoc-Collema spp. (dark)>Scytonema-Nostoc-Microcoleus spp. (medium)>Microcoleus spp. (light)) from soil cores and field chambers. In both cores and field chambers there was a significant effect of crust type on NO fluxes, but this was highly dependent on season. NO fluxes from field chambers increased with increasing N fixation potential of the biologically crusted soils (dark>medium>light) in the summer months, with no differences in the spring and autumn. Soil chlorophyllasis Type a content (an index of N fixation potential), percent N, and temperature explained 40% of the variability in NO fluxes from our field sites. Estimates of annual NO loss from dark and light crusts was 0.04-0.16 and 0.02-0.11-N/ha/year. Overall, NO gas loss accounts for approximately 3-7% of the N inputs via N fixation in dark and light biologically crusted soils. Land use practices have drastically altered biological soil crusts communities over the past century. Livestock grazing and intensive recreational use of public lands has resulted in a large scale conversion of dark cyanolichen crusts to light cyanobacterial crusts. As a result, changes in biologically crusted soils in arid and semi-arid regions of the western US may subsequently impact regional NO loss. ?? Springer 2005.

  1. No loss single line fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1993-08-03

    A no loss fueling station is described for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a fuel tank of a use device such as a motor vehicle, comprising: (a) a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and a natural gas head; (b) first means for selectively building the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (c) second means for selectively reducing the pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank; (d) means for controlling the first and second means to maintain a desired pressure and temperature in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and (e) means for delivering LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  2. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring...

  3. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the...

  4. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous...

  5. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the...

  6. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring...

  7. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous...

  8. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring...

  9. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous...

  10. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous...

  11. 40 CFR 62.15200 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 62.15200 Section 62.15200 Protection of Environment... I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous...

  12. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring...

  13. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the...

  14. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the...

  15. 40 CFR 60.1745 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1745 Section 60.1745 Protection of Environment... choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the initial evaluation of your continuous emission monitoring...

  16. 40 CFR 60.1255 - What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? 60.1255 Section 60.1255 Protection of Environment... Continuous Emission Monitoring § 60.1255 What must I do if I choose to monitor carbon dioxide instead of oxygen as a diluent gas? You must establish the relationship between oxygen and carbon dioxide during the...

  17. Effect of oxygen concentration in gas phase on sporulation and individual ganoderic acids accumulation in liquid static culture of Ganoderma lucidum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Xian; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Effects of oxygen concentration within 21-100% in gaseous phase on the morphology and ganoderic acids (GAs) production by Ganoderma lucidum in liquid static culture were studied. A higher oxygen concentration increased individual GAs production, and more spores and higher total GA content were obtained at an oxygen level of 80%.

  18. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  19. BLOOD SUBSTITUTES: EVOLUTION FROM NON-CARRYING TO OXYGEN AND GAS CARRYING FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Cabrales, Pedro; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The development of oxygen (O2) carrying blood substitutes has evolved from the goal of replicating blood O2 transports properties to that of preserving microvascular and organ function, reducing the inherent or potential toxicity of the material used to carry O2, and treating pathologies initiated by anemia and hypoxia. Furthermore, the emphasis has shifted from blood replacement fluid to “O2 therapeutics” that restore tissue oxygenation to specific tissues regions. This review covers the different alternatives, potential and limitations of hemoglobin based O2 carriers (HBOCs) and perfluorocarbon based O2 carriers (PFCOCs), with emphasis on the physiological conditions disturbed in the situation that they will be used. It describes how concepts learned from plasma expanders without O2 carrying capacity can be applied to maintain O2 delivery and summarizes the microvascular responses due to HBOCs and PFCOCs. This review also presents alternative applications of HBOCs and PFCOCs namely: 1) How HBOC O2 affinity can be engineered to target O2 delivery to hypoxic tissues; and 2) How the high gas solubility of PFCOCs provides new opportunities for carrying, dissolving and delivering gases with biological activity. It is concluded that current blood substitutes development has amplified their applications horizon by devising therapeutic functions for oxygen carriers requiring limited O2 delivery capacity restoration. Conversely, full, blood-like O2 carrying capacity re-establishment awaits control of O2 carrier toxicity. PMID:23820271

  20. Gas diffusion-type oxygen electrode using perovskite-type oxides for metal-air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Hyodo, Takeo; Miura, Norio; Yamazoe, Noboru

    1995-12-31

    In order to develop an air cathode of metal-air batteries, oxygen reduction behavior of gas diffusion-type carbon electrodes loaded with perovskite-type oxides, La{sub 1{minus}x}A{prime}{sub x}FeO{sub 3} (A{prime} = Ca, Sr, Ba, 0 {le} x {le} 1.0), was examined in 8 M KOH at 60 C. Among the oxide catalysts tested, La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} (specific surface area: 21.5 m{sup 2}{center_dot}g{sup {minus}1}) gave the highest electrode performance. On the basis of electrode reaction kinetics, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition rates, and temperature programmed desorption of oxygen, it was concluded that such a performance was attributable to the active sites of the oxide for the direct 4-electron reduction of oxygen. Moreover, the electrode using La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3} was found to be rather stable in a short-term operation for 90 h at 300 mA{center_dot}cm{sup {minus}2}.

  1. Tissue gas and blood analyses of human subjects breathing 80% argon and 20% oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horrigan, D. J.; Wells, C. H.; Guest, M. M.; Hart, G. B.; Goodpasture, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Eight human volunteers, individually studied in a hyperbaric chamber, breathed: (1) air at 1 ATA; (2) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min; (3) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (4) 100% O2 at 1 ATA for 30 min; (5) air at 1 ATA for 30 min; (6) 100% O2 at 2 ATA for 60 min; and (7) 80% argon and 20% oxygen at 1 ATA for 30 min. Oxygen, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon tensions were measured in muscle and subcutaneous tissue by mass spectroscopic analyses. Venous blood obtained at regular intervals was analyzed for coagulation and fibrinolytic factors. Inert gas narcosis was not observed. After breathing argon for 30 min, muscle argon tensions were almost three times the subcutaneous tensions. Argon wash-in mirrored nitrogen wash-out. Argon wash-in and wash-out had no effect on tissue PO2 or PCO2. Coagulation and fibrinolytic changes usually associated with vascular bubbles were absent.

  2. Angular momentum loss of primordial gas in Lyα radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Hidenobu; Khochfar, Sadegh

    2014-06-01

    We present results on the radiation drag exerted by an isotropic and homogeneous background of Lyα photons on neutral gas clouds orbiting within H II regions around Population III stars of different masses. The Doppler shift causes a frequency difference between photons moving in the direction of the cloud and opposite to it resulting in a net momentum loss of the cloud in the direction of motion. We find that half of the angular momentum of gas with vθ ≲ 20 km s-1 near (r ≲ 3 kpc) a Population III star of 120 M⊙ at z = 20 is lost within ˜106 yr. The radiation drag is a strong function of cloud velocity that peaks at v ˜ 20 km s-1 reflecting the frequency dependence of the photon cross-section. Clouds moving with velocities larger than ˜100 km s-1 lose their angular momentum on time-scales of ˜108 yr. At lower redshifts radiation drag becomes inefficient as the Lyα photon density in H II regions decreases by a factor (1 + z)3 and angular momentum is lost on time-scales ≳ 108 yr even for low-velocity clouds. Our results suggest that a sweet spot exists for the loss of angular momentum by radiation drag for gas clouds at z > 10 and with v ˜ 20 km s-1. Comparison to dynamical friction forces acting on typical gas clouds suggest that radiation drag is the dominant effect impacting the orbit. We propose that this effect can suppress the formation of extended gas discs in the first galaxies and help gas accretion near galactic centres and central black holes.

  3. Increased polar stratospheric ozone losses and delayed eventual recovery owing to increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shindell, Drew T.; Rind, David; Lonergan, Patrick

    1998-04-01

    The chemical reactions responsible for stratospheric ozone depletion are extremely sensitive to temperature. Greenhouse gases warm the Earth's surface but cool the stratosphere radiatively and therefore affect ozone depletion. Here we investigate the interplay between projected future emissions of greenhouse gases and levels of ozone-depleting halogen species using a global climate model that incorporates simplified ozone-depletion chemistry. Temperature and wind changes induced by the increasing greenhouse-gas concentrations alter planetary-wave propagation in our model, reducing the frequency of sudden stratospheric warmings in the Northern Hemisphere. This results in a more stable Arctic polar vortex, with significantly colder temperatures in the lower stratosphere and concomitantly increased ozone depletion. Increased concentrations of greenhouse gases might therefore be at least partly responsible for the very large Arctic ozone losses observed in recent winters. Arctic losses reach a maximum in the decade 2010 to 2019 in our model, roughly a decade after the maximum in stratospheric chlorine abundance. The mean losses are about the same as those over the Antarctic during the early 1990s, with geographically localized losses of up to two-thirds of the Arctic ozone column in the worst years. The severity and the duration of the Antarctic ozone hole are also predicted to increase because of greenhouse-gas-induced stratospheric cooling over the coming decades.

  4. Investigation of Copper Losses to Synthetic Slag at Different Oxygen Partial Pressures in the Presence of Colemanite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusen, Aydın; Derin, Bora; Geveci, Ahmet; Topkaya, Yavuz Ali

    2016-09-01

    Copper losses to slag are crucial for copper matte smelting and converting stages. One factor affecting the copper losses to slag during these processes is partial pressure of oxygen. In this study, theoretical and experimental investigations of oxygen partial pressure effect on copper losses to fayalite type slag in the presence of colemanite were investigated. Theoretical considerations include liquidus temperatures and phase diagrams of the fayalite type slag calculated by the FactSage software program. In the experiments, a synthetic matte-slag (SM-SS) was produced by melting certain amounts of reagent grade Fe2O3-SiO2 and metallic Fe as starting materials. Experiments were carried out with SM-SS pair by the addition of calcined colemanite (from 0% to 6%) under various partial pressures of oxygen (10-7, 10-9, 10-11 atm) at 1250°C for 2 h. From the experimental results, it was found that the amount of copper in slag decreased slowly when colemanite was increased under all oxidizing atmospheres. The lowest copper content in synthetic slag was obtained as 0.38% after 6% colemanite addition.

  5. Weight loss: indication of brain damage and effect of combined normobaric oxygen and ethanol therapy after stroke.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lipeng; Geng, Xiaokun; Hussain, Mohammed; Liu, Zongjian; Gao, Zhi; Liu, Shimeng; Du, Huishan; Ji, Xunming; Ding, Yuchuan

    2015-05-01

    Weight loss is commonly seen after stroke. However, there is paucity of data that objectively examines the relationship between weight loss and infarction. We have used two unique models of middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in rats to determine if weight loss can be used as indicator for severity of brain damage and for beneficial effects of stroke therapy. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent MCA occlusion using the rat intraluminal filament or auto-thrombus stroke models. Reperfusion was established at different intervals by removing the intraluminal filament or injecting r-tPA, followed by treatment with either ethanol (EtOH), normobaric oxygen (NBO), NBO plus EtOH or no treatment. The extent of brain injury was determined using infarct volume and motor performance. The intraluminal filament ischaemic model demonstrated a significant positive correlation between weight loss and infarct volume size after acute stroke, as well as compared to infarct volumes post-treatment with NBO, EtOH and NBO plus EtOH. There was also a positive significant correlation between weight loss and infarct volume size in the thromboembolism ischaemic model with or without treatment. Furthermore a positive correlation was observed between weight loss and deficit score in both ischaemic models. Degree of weight loss after stroke is largely associated with severity of infarction as well as damage reduction after treatment administration.

  6. The influence of oxygen supply on metabolism of neural cells cultured on a gas-permeable PTFE foil.

    PubMed

    Mauth, Corinna; Pavlica, Sanja; Deiwick, Andrea; Steffen, Anja; Bader, Augustinus

    2010-01-01

    The influence of oxygen on neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis is of great interest for regenerative therapies in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. These oxygen depending mechanisms have to been considered for the optimization of neural cell culture conditions. In this study, we used a cell culture system with an oxygen-permeable polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) foil to investigate the effect of oxygen on metabolism and survival of neural cell lines in vitro. Human glial astrocytoma-derived cells (GOS-3) and rat pheochromacytoma cells (PC12) were cultured on the gas-permeable PTFE foil as well as a conventional non oxygen-permeable cell culture substrate at various oxygen concentrations. Analyses of metabolic activity, gene expression of apoptotic grade, and dopamine synthesis were performed. Under low oxygen partial pressure (2%, 5%) the anaerobic metabolism and apoptotic rate of cultured cells is diminished on PTFE foil when compared with the conventional culture dishes. In contrast, under higher oxygen atmosphere (21%) the number of apoptotic cells on the PTFE foil was enhanced. This culture model demonstrates a suitable model for the improvement of oxygen dependent metabolism under low oxygen conditions as well as for induction of oxidative stress by high oxygen atmosphere without supplementation of neurotoxins.

  7. Investigation on the reaction mechanisms of generation and loss of oxygen-related species in atmospheric-pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in argon/oxygen mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jie; Tan, Zhenyu Pan, Guangsheng; Shan, Chunhong; Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Yadi; Jiang, Jixiang

    2016-07-15

    This work presents a numerical investigation, using a 1-D fluid model, on the generation and loss of oxygen-related species and the spatial-temporal evolutions of the species densities in the atmospheric-pressure pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in the argon/oxygen mixture. The reaction pathways as well as their contributions to the generation and loss of oxygen-related species are given. The considered oxygen-related species include O, O({sup 1}D), O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}), O{sub 3}, O{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup −}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and O{sub 3}{sup −}. The following significant results are obtained. O, O({sup 1}D), O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}), and O{sup −} are produced mainly via the electron impact with O{sub 2}. Ar{sup +} plays an essential role in the generation of O{sup +} and O{sub 2}{sup +}. Almost all of O{sub 3} derives from the reaction O{sub 2} + O{sub 2} + O → O{sub 3} + O{sub 2}. The O{sub 3}-related reactions produce an essential proportion of O{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 3}{sup −}. The substantial loss of O{sup −}, O{sub 2}{sup −}, and O{sub 3}{sup −} is induced by their reactions with O{sub 2}{sup +}. Loss of O{sup +}, O, and O({sup 1}D) is mainly due to their reactions with O{sub 2}, loss of O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}) due to O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}) impacts with O{sub 3} as well as the de-excitation reactions between O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}) and e, O{sub 2}, and O, and loss of O{sub 3} due to the reactions between O{sub 3} and other neutral species. In addition, the densities of O{sup +} and O({sup 1}D) present two obvious peaks at the pulse duration, but the densities of O{sub 2}{sup +}, O, O{sub 2}({sup 1}Δ{sub g}), and O{sub 3} are almost unchanged. The densities of negative oxygen ions increase at the pulse duration and then decline. O{sup −} density is obviously large nearby the dielectric surfaces and the densities of O{sub 2}{sup −} and O{sub 3}{sup −} present generally uniform distributions.

  8. Measurements on the gas desorption yield of the oxygen-free copper irradiated with low-energy Xe10+ and O+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Z. Q.; Li, P.; Yang, J. C.; Yuan, Y. J.; Xie, W. J.; Zheng, W. H.; Liu, X. J.; Chang, J. J.; Luo, C.; Meng, J.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, Y. M.; Yin, Y.; Chai, Z.

    2017-10-01

    Heavy ion beam lost on the accelerator vacuum wall will release quantity of gas molecules and make the vacuum system deteriorate seriously. This phenomenon is called dynamic vacuum effect, observed at CERN, GSI and BNL, leading to the decrease of beam lifetime when increasing beam intensity. Heavy ion-induced gas desorption, which results in dynamic vacuum effect, becomes one of the most important problems for future accelerators proposed to operate with intermediate charge state beams. In order to investigate the mechanism of this effect and find the solution method for the IMP future project High Intensity heavy-ion Accelerator Facility (HIAF), which is designed to extract 1 × 1011 uranium particles with intermediate charge state per cycle, two dedicated experiment setups have been installed at the beam line of the CSR and the 320 kV HV platform respectively. Recently, experiment was performed at the 320 kV HV platform to study effective gas desorption with oxygen-free copper target irradiated with continuous Xe10+ beam and O+ beam in low energy regime. Gas desorption yield in this energy regime was calculated and the link between gas desorption and electronic energy loss in Cu target was proved. These results will be used to support simulations about dynamic vacuum effect and optimizations about efficiency of collimators to be installed in the HIAF main synchrotron BRing, and will also provide guidance for future gas desorption measurements in high energy regime.

  9. A gas sensor using a multi-walled carbon nanotube sheet to detect oxygen molecules.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Kyung H; Kim, Donghyun; Overzet, Lawrence J; Lee, Gil S

    2013-12-01

    A gas sensor using a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet, which can detect oxygen (O2) gas, is presented and its output characteristics are evaluated in this study. A simple, cost effective and novel fabrication technique is described compared to dispersing CNTs into a liquid or polymer. The sheets are spun from a MWCNT forest grown on a silicon substrate; its electrical resistance decreases linearly with O2 exposure. The MWCNT sheet has a large surface area and many individual MWCNT contact points; this leads to a linear sensitivity, a fast response time, repeatability, and stability. It is well known that the surface distribution and areal density of MWCNTs have a significantly affect on their sensing characteristics. The sensors fabricated using dispersed CNTs on a substrate, either with separated CNTs of low density or with overlapping CNTs of low resistance, reveal much lower sensitivities. The large surface area and uniform distribution of the gas sensor, however, allow for the higher interaction of the MWCNTs with the O2 molecules, increasing the sensor's characteristics. Moreover, the MWCNT sheet does not need purification or a complex transfer process to be used as a sensor, making it suitable for practical applications.

  10. Stable isotope profiles of nitrogen gas indicate denitrification in oxygen-stratified humic lakes.

    PubMed

    Tiirola, Marja A; Rissanen, Antti J; Sarpakunnas, Miika; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu

    2011-06-15

    Mid-summer N(2) profiles were analyzed from nine oxygen-stratified, humic-acid-rich lakes using a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer and a Gasbench II device. Sample preparation steps were performed under water to avoid air contamination. The instrument precision for the δ(15)N measurement was high (0.03‰), but for the whole sampling and analysis procedure the mean deviation between replicate samples was 0.13‰ for the δ(15)N measurements and 5.5% for the N(2) gas concentration analysis. The results show that the Gasbench peripheral was suitable for measurement of the (15)N natural abundance of dissolved nitrogen gas, with denitrification indicated by the oversaturation and slightly (<1‰) depleted δ(15)N values of the dissolved N(2) gas in the suboxic zones of some of the study lakes. Calculated values for the denitrified (excess) N(2) varied between -5.3 and 0.7‰. The denitrification potential was determined using the (15)N tracer method, with results showing nitrate-inducible denitrification and no signs of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Interaction of iron-copper mixed metal oxide oxygen carriers with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Ksepko, Ewelina; Tian, Hanging

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this work was to prepare supported bimetallic Fe–Cu oxygen carriers and to evaluate their performance for the chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process with simulated synthesis gas derived from steam gasification of coal/air. Ten-cycle CLC tests were conducted with Fe–Cu oxygen carriers in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer utilizing simulated synthesis gas derived from the steam gasification of Polish Janina coal and Illinois #6 coal as fuel. The effect of temperature on reaction rates, chemical stability, and oxygen transport capacity were determined. Fractional reduction, fractional oxidation, and global rates of reactions were calculated from the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) data. The supports greatly affected reaction performance. Data showed that reaction rates and oxygen capacities were stable during the 10-cycle TGA tests for most Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers. Bimetallic Fe–Cu/support oxygen carriers showed higher reduction rates than Fe-support oxygen carriers. The carriers containing higher Cu content showed better stabilities and better reduction rates. An increase in temperature from 800 °C to 900 °C did not have a significant effect on either the oxygen capacity or the reduction rates with synthesis gas derived from Janina coal. Oxidation reaction was significantly faster than reduction reaction for all supported Fe–Cu oxygen carriers. Carriers with higher Cu content had lower oxidation rates. Ten-cycle TGA data indicated that these oxygen carriers had stable performances at 800–900 °C and might be successfully used up to 900 °C for coal CLC reaction in the presence of steam.

  12. Optimal scan time of oxygen-15-labeled gas inhalation autoradiographic method for measurement of cerebral oxygen extraction fraction and cerebral oxygen metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    Shidahara, Miho; Watabe, Hiroshi; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kudomi, Nobuyuki; Ito, Hiroshi; Iida, Hidehiro

    2008-10-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) can be estimated from C15O, H(2)15O, and 15O2 tracers and positron emission tomography (PET) using an autoradiographic (ARG) method. Our objective in this study was to optimize the scan time for 15O2 gas study for accurate estimation of OEF and CMRO2. We evaluated statistical noise in OEF by varying the scan time and error caused by the tissue heterogeneity in estimated OEF and CMRO2 using computer simulations. The characteristics of statistical noise were investigated by signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio from repeated tissue time activity curves with noise, which were generated using measured averaged arterial input function and assuming CBF=20, 50, and 80 (ml/100 g per minute). Error caused by tissue heterogeneity was also investigated by estimated OEF and CMRO2 from tissue time activity curve with mixture of gray and white matter varying fraction of mixture. In the simulations, three conditions were assumed (i) CBF in gray and white matter (CBFg and CBFw) was 80 and 20, OEF in gray and white matter (Eg and Ew) was 0.4 and 0.3, (ii) CBFg and CBFw decreased by 50%, and Eg and Ew increased by 50% when compared with conditions (i) and (iii). CBFg and CBFw decreased by 80%, and Eg and Ew increased by 50% when compared with condition (i). The longer scan time produced the better S/N ratio of estimated OEF value from three CBF values (20, 50, and 80). Errors of estimated OEF for three conditions owing to tissue heterogeneity decreased, as scan time took longer. Meanwhile in the case of CMRO2, 3 min of scan time was desirable. The optimal scan time of 15O2 inhalation study with the ARG method was concluded to be 3 min from taking into account for maintaining the S/N ratio and the quantification of accurate OEF and CMRO2.

  13. Gas exchange in frogs and turtles: how ectothermic vertebrates contributed to solving the controversy of pulmonary oxygen secretion.

    PubMed

    Wang, T

    2011-07-01

    The mechanisms governing pulmonary gas exchange were heavily debated at the start of the 20th century when Christian Bohr provided measurements of lung and blood gases as well as rational arguments in favour of oxygen being secreted actively from the lung gas to the blood within vertebrate lungs. The concept of active transport was studied by August Krogh in his doctoral dissertation on the partitioning of gas exchange in frogs. In later studies, where Marie and August Krogh provided conclusive evidence that pulmonary gas exchange occurs by diffusion and diffusion alone, the turtle lungs provided an important tool to investigate the role of perfusion in pulmonary gas exchange. Here, I review the early Bohr and Krogh studies on pulmonary and cutaneous gas exchange in frogs as well as the experimental studies on gas exchange and its possible autonomic regulation in turtles. The results are discussed within the context of recent studies on the cardiorespiratory physiology of frogs and turtles.

  14. Effect of helium-oxygen (heliox) gas mixtures on the function of four pediatric ventilators.

    PubMed

    Berkenbosch, John W; Grueber, Ryan E; Dabbagh, Osuama; McKibben, Andrew W

    2003-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of helium on the function of four ventilators commonly used in pediatrics: the Bird VIP, Bird VIP Gold, Servo 300, and Servo 900C. Prospective setting. Research laboratory at a university hospital. Helium was administered as an 80:20 mixture of helium-oxygen through the air inlet of the ventilator. Delivered fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio(2)) was compared with the Fio(2) set on the blender dial. Inspiratory displayed tidal volume was recorded as an indicator of what the ventilator "believed" it had delivered and was compared with the V(T) displayed during ventilation with 100% oxygen (control). Actual delivered V(T) was measured by a Neonatal Bicore connected to the side port of a "bag-in-box" spirometer, making measurements independent of inspired gas properties, and was compared with V(T) delivered during ventilation with 100% oxygen. Five gas mixtures were evaluated: Fio(2) = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 (balance helium). Delivered Fio(2) was less than set Fio(2) on the Servo 900C and VIP ventilators. V(T) displayed was minimally altered by helium during volume-controlled ventilation but substantially decreased during pressure-controlled ventilation, particularly with the Bird ventilators. During volume-controlled ventilation, V(T) delivered was substantially increased by helium with the Bird and, to a lesser degree, the Servo 900C ventilators. In contrast, V(T) delivered decreased slightly in helium with the Servo 300. The same pattern, but with a decreased magnitude, was observed for V(T) delivered during pressure-controlled ventilation. The addition of helium has a significant effect on Fio(2) delivery, displayed inspiratory V(T), and actual delivered V(T) during both volume- and pressure-controlled ventilation in four ventilators commonly used in pediatric critical care. These effects are both ventilator specific and ventilation mode specific, mandating vigilance during helium ventilation in clinical practice.

  15. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  16. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  17. Gas Loss by Ram Pressure Stripping and Internal Feedback from Low-mass Milky Way Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emerick, Andrew; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Grcevich, Jana; Gatto, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of dwarf satellites in the Milky Way (MW) is affected by a combination of ram pressure stripping (RPS), tidal stripping, and internal feedback from massive stars. We investigate gas loss processes in the smallest satellites of the MW using three-dimensional, high-resolution, idealized wind tunnel simulations, accounting for gas loss through both ram pressure stripping and expulsion by supernova feedback. Using initial conditions appropriate for a dwarf galaxy like Leo T, we investigate whether or not environmental gas stripping and internal feedback can quench these low-mass galaxies on the expected timescales, shorter than 2 Gyr. We find that supernova feedback contributes negligibly to the stripping rate for these low star formation rate galaxies. However, we also find that RPS is less efficient than expected in the stripping scenarios we consider. Our work suggests that although RPS can eventually completely strip these galaxies, other physics is likely at play to reconcile our computed stripping times with the rapid quenching timescales deduced from observations of low-mass MW dwarf galaxies. We discuss the roles additional physics may play in this scenario, including host-satellite tidal interactions, cored versus cuspy dark matter profiles, reionization, and satellite preprocessing. We conclude that a proper accounting of these physics together is necessary to understand the quenching of low-mass MW satellites.

  18. Composition surveys of test gas produced by a hydrogen-oxygen-air burner. [for supersonic ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of the need for a uniform hot gas test stream for fuel injector development for hydrogen fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engines, an experimental study of injector configuration effect on exit flow uniformity of a hydrogen fueled oxygen replenished, combustion burner was made. Measurements used to investigate the burner nozzle exit profiles were pitot and gas sample measurements. Gas composition and associated temperature profiles were reduced to an acceptable level by burner injector modifications. The effect of the injector modifications was to redistribute the hydrogen fuel, increase the air pressure drop, promote premixing of the oxygen and air, and establish a uniform flow pattern where the oxygen-air mixture comes into contact with the hydrogen fuel. The most sensitive phenomenon which affected the composition profiles was the uniformity of the air distribution supplied to the combustion chamber.

  19. Dry Matter Losses and Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Outside Storage of Short Rotation Coppice Willow Chip.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Carly; Yates, Nicola E; Powers, Stephen J; Misselbrook, Tom; Shield, Ian

    This study examined the dry matter losses and the greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations within two short rotation coppice (SRC) willow wood chip storage heaps. One heap was built on a grassland area (East Midlands) and the other (Rothamsted) on a concrete hard standing. A series of 1- and 3-m probes were embedded in the heaps in order to retrieve gas samples for analysis, and pre-weighed net bags were positioned in the core of the heap to detect dry matter losses. The bagged samples showed dry matter losses of 18 and 19 % in the East Midlands and Rothamsted heaps after 210 and 97 days storage, respectively. The Rothamsted heap showed a whole-heap dry matter loss of 21 %. During this time, the wood chips dried from 54 to 39 % moisture content in the East Midlands heap and 50 to 43 % at Rothamsted. The results from analysing the whole Rothamsted heap indicated an overall loss of 1.5 GJ per tonne stored, although measurements from bagged samples in the core suggested that the chips dried sufficiently to have a minimal energy loss from storage. The process of mixing the heap, however, led to incorporation of wet outer layers and hence the average moisture content was higher in an average sample of chip. After establishment of the heaps, the temperature rose rapidly and this correlated with a peak in carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration within the heap. A peak in methane (CH4) concentration was also detected in both heaps, though more noticeably in the East Midlands heap after around 55 days. In both instances, the peak CH4 concentration occurred as CO2 concentrations dropped, suggesting that after an active period of aerobic decomposition in the first 2 months of storage, the conditions in the heap became anaerobic. The results from this study suggest that outside wood chip storage is not an efficient method of storing biomass, though this may be location-specific as there are some studies showing lower dry matter losses. It is necessary to explore other methods of

  20. The effect of dense gas dynamics on loss in ORC transonic turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durá Galiana, FJ; Wheeler, APS; Ong, J.; Ventura, CA de M.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes a number of recent investigations into the effect of dense gas dynamics on ORC transonic turbine performance. We describe a combination of experimental, analytical and computational studies which are used to determine how, in-particular, trailing-edge loss changes with choice of working fluid. A Ludwieg tube transient wind-tunnel is used to simulate a supersonic base flow which mimics an ORC turbine vane trailing-edge flow. Experimental measurements of wake profiles and trailing-edge base pressure with different working fluids are used to validate high-order CFD simulations. In order to capture the correct mixing in the base region, Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) are performed and verified against the experimental data by comparing the LES with different spatial and temporal resolutions. RANS and Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES) are also compared with experimental data. The effect of different modelling methods and working fluid on mixed-out loss is then determined. Current results point at LES predicting the closest agreement with experimental results, and dense gas effects are consistently predicted to increase loss.

  1. Interpreting the corneal response to oxygen: Is there a basis for re-evaluating data from gas-goggle studies?

    PubMed

    Papas, Eric B; Sweeney, Deborah F

    2016-10-01

    When anoxia (0% oxygen) is created within a gas-tight goggle, ocular physiological responses, including corneal swelling, limbal hyperaemia and pH change, are known to vary, depending on the presence or absence of a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens. A new theory is proposed to account for this discrepancy based on the concept of lid derived oxygen, whereby oxygen originating from the vascular plexus of the palpebral conjunctiva supplements that available to the ocular surface in an open, normally blinking eye, even when the surrounding gaseous atmosphere is anoxic. The effect of a lid derived contribution to corneal oxygenation was assessed by using existing experimental data to model open-eye, corneal swelling behavior as a function of atmospheric oxygen content, both with and without the presence of a contact lens. These models predict that under atmospheric anoxia, contact lens wear results in 13.2% corneal swelling compared with only 5.4% when the lens was absent. Lid derived oxygen acts to provide the ocular surface in the non-contact lens wearing, normally blinking, open-eye with up to 4.7% equivalent oxygen concentration, even within the anoxic environment of a nitrogen filled goggle. Correcting for lid derived oxygen eliminates previously observed discrepancies in corneal swelling behavior and harmonizes the models for the contact lens wearing and gas-goggle cases. On this basis it is proposed that true anoxia at the ocular surface cannot be achieved by atmospheric manipulation (i.e. a gas-goggle) alone but requires an additional presence, e.g. a low, oxygen transmissibility contact lens, to prevent access to oxygen from the eyelids. Data from previously conducted experiments in which the gas-goggle paradigm was used, may have been founded on underestimates of the real oxygen concentration acting on the ocular surface at the time and if so, will require re-interpretation. Future work in this area should consider if a correction for lid derived

  2. Effect of blinking on the level of oxygen beneath hard and soft gas-permeable contact lenses.

    PubMed

    Efron, N; Carney, L G

    1983-03-01

    The oxygen tension, which can also be stated as the equivalent oxygen percentage (EOP), was measured beneath a variety of hard and soft gas-permeable contact lenses following static and dynamic wearing conditions. The significant increases in EOP beneath rigid lenses upon blinking were to be expected in view of the tear pumping mechanisms known to exist with such lenses. However, blinking was found to have a minimal effect on the EOP beneath hydrogen lenses, confirming earlier predictions.

  3. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  4. Gas propagation in a liquid helium cooled vacuum tube following a sudden vacuum loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuley, Ram C.

    This dissertation describes the propagation of near atmospheric nitrogen gas that rushes into a liquid helium cooled vacuum tube after the tube suddenly loses vacuum. The loss-of-vacuum scenario resembles accidental venting of atmospheric air to the beam-line of a superconducting radio frequency particle accelerator and is investigated to understand how in the presence of condensation, the in-flowing air will propagate in such geometry. In a series of controlled experiments, room temperature nitrogen gas (a substitute for air) at a variety of mass flow rates was vented to a high vacuum tube immersed in a bath of liquid helium. Pressure probes and thermometers installed on the tube along its length measured respectively the tube pressure and tube wall temperature rise due to gas flooding and condensation. At high mass in-flow rates a gas front propagated down the vacuum tube but with a continuously decreasing speed. Regression analysis of the measured front arrival times indicates that the speed decreases nearly exponentially with the travel length. At low enough mass in-flow rates, no front propagated in the vacuum tube. Instead, the in-flowing gas steadily condensed over a short section of the tube near its entrance and the front appeared to `freeze-out'. An analytical expression is derived for gas front propagation speed in a vacuum tube in the presence of condensation. The analytical model qualitatively explains the front deceleration and flow freeze-out. The model is then simplified and supplemented with condensation heat/mass transfer data to again find the front to decelerate exponentially while going away from the tube entrance. Within the experimental and procedural uncertainty, the exponential decay length-scales obtained from the front arrival time regression and from the simplified model agree.

  5. A Novel Teflon-membrane Gas Tension Device for Denitrification-studies in Oxygen Minimum Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, A. C.; McNeil, C. L.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Altabet, M. A.; Johnson, B.; Bourbonnais, A.

    2014-12-01

    Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) are global hotspots for the biogeochemical transformation of biologically-available forms of nitrogen to unusable nitrogen-gas. We present a new Teflon-membrane based Gas Tension Device (GTD) for measuring the excess N2 signal generated by denitrification and anammox in OMZs, with a hydrostatic pressure-independent response and a depth range from 0 - 550 m, a significant advancement from previous GTD models. The GTD consists of a 4/1000" thick by 2" diameter Teflon-membrane with a water-side plenum connected to SeaBird 5T pump. Dissolved gases in the water equilibrate across the membrane with a low-dead-volume housing connected to a high-precision quart pressure sensor. Laboratory data characterizing the GTD will be presented. The e-folding (response) time ranges from 14 min at continuous (100%) pumping to 28 min at pulse (10%) pumping. We also demonstrate the pressure dependence of the partial pressures from Henry's Law in the laboratory for pure nitrogen, pure oxygen, and standard atmospheric ratios of gases. GTD's were field tested on two floats deployed in the Eastern Tropical North Pacific (ETNP) OMZ for 15 days that targeted a productive mesoscale surface eddy originating from the Mexican coast. We anticipated that high organic carbon export should stimulate denitrification within the OMZ below. The floats profiled between the surface and 400 m depth and concurrently measured T, S, PAR, O2 (SBE 43 and Optode), and nitrate (SUNA). The N2-profiles from the GTDs are validated against independently measured N2/Ar ratio data collected during the deployment.

  6. An improved computer model for prediction of axial gas turbine performance losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, R. M.

    1984-01-01

    The calculation model performs a rapid preliminary pitchline optimization of axial gas turbine annular flowpath geometry, as well as an initial estimate of blade profile shapes, given only a minimum of thermodynamic cycle requirements. No geometric parameters need be specified. The following preliminary design data are determined: (1) the optimum flowpath geometry, within mechanical stress limits; (2) initial estimates of cascade blade shapes; and (3) predictions of expected turbine performance. The model uses an inverse calculation technique whereby blade profiles are generated by designing channels to yield a specified velocity distribution on the two walls. Velocity distributions are then used to calculate the cascade loss parameters. Calculated blade shapes are used primarily to determine whether the assumed velocity loadings are physically realistic. Model verification is accomplished by comparison of predicted turbine geometry and performance with an array of seven NASA single-stage axial gas turbine configurations.

  7. Evaluation of a portable oxygen concentrator to provide fresh gas flow to dogs undergoing anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Burn, Jessica; Caulkett, Nigel A.; Gunn, Marta; Cooney, Claire; Kutz, Susan J.; Boysen, Søren R.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) to provide fresh gas to an anesthetic machine via an Ayre’s T-piece or a Bain circuit. Fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was compared at flows of 0.5 to 3.0 L/min. Measured FiO2 was 96% at flow rates ≥ 1 L/min. Mean battery life at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 L/min was 4.21 ± 0.45, 2.62 ± 0.37 and 1.5 ± 0.07 hours, respectively. The POC proved to be useful and effective during 2 power outages. The POC was sufficient to prevent rebreathing in 70% of dogs using a T-piece circuit and 20% of dogs with a Bain circuit. A significant negative correlation between inspired CO2 and O2 flow rates was noted. A significant positive correlation between inspired CO2 and ETCO2 was documented. The occurrence of hypercarbia was associated with low O2 flow. Battery back-up was essential during power outages. The POC can be effectively used for delivery of anesthesia. PMID:27247461

  8. Evaluation of a portable oxygen concentrator to provide fresh gas flow to dogs undergoing anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burn, Jessica; Caulkett, Nigel A; Gunn, Marta; Cooney, Claire; Kutz, Susan J; Boysen, Søren R

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the ability of a portable oxygen concentrator (POC) to provide fresh gas to an anesthetic machine via an Ayre's T-piece or a Bain circuit. Fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) was compared at flows of 0.5 to 3.0 L/min. Measured FiO2 was 96% at flow rates ≥ 1 L/min. Mean battery life at 1.0, 2.0, and 3.0 L/min was 4.21 ± 0.45, 2.62 ± 0.37 and 1.5 ± 0.07 hours, respectively. The POC proved to be useful and effective during 2 power outages. The POC was sufficient to prevent rebreathing in 70% of dogs using a T-piece circuit and 20% of dogs with a Bain circuit. A significant negative correlation between inspired CO2 and O2 flow rates was noted. A significant positive correlation between inspired CO2 and ETCO2 was documented. The occurrence of hypercarbia was associated with low O2 flow. Battery back-up was essential during power outages. The POC can be effectively used for delivery of anesthesia.

  9. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  10. Influence of oxygen addition to the carrier gas on laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements on aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazzo, N.; Migliorini, F.; Dondè, R.; Maffi, S.; De Iuliis, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, laser-induced breakdown spectrosopy is implemented on aerosol particles for absolute concentration analysis. The aim of this work is the investigation of the effect of the bath gas used for nebulizing the aerosol. Nitrogen, air, and 50% O2 in N2 mixture have been chosen as carrier gasses in order to analyze the effect of oxygen addition to the gas. LIBS measurements have been carried out on aerosol particles produced from CuCl2 2H2O solutions, and the 324.7 nm Cu line is considered. As a first analysis, plasma parameters, such as temperature and electron density, have been evaluated changing the carrier gas. Measurements to derive the LIBS calibration curve of the 324.7 nm Cu line are carried out in air and in N2. The significant difference in the slope of the resulting calibration curves has to be attributed to the oxygen addition to the bath gas. To explore such behavior, time-resolved measurements of the Cu line and peak/base ratio have been performed. The presence of two competitive effects have been observed that becomes significant increasing the amount of oxygen in the carrier gas. One is the oxygen-quenching effect, already observed in the literature, and the other one is the enhancement of the Cu LIBS signal, expecially at short delay times. These effects have been observed also at other Cu lines and changing the analyte source. The results are presented and widely discussed.

  11. Blade loss transient dynamics analysis, volume 1. Task 1: Survey and perspective. [aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallardo, V. C.; Gaffney, E. F.; Bach, L. J.; Stallone, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    An analytical technique was developed to predict the behavior of a rotor system subjected to sudden unbalance. The technique is implemented in the Turbine Engine Transient Rotor Analysis (TETRA) computer program using the component element method. The analysis was particularly aimed toward blade-loss phenomena in gas turbine engines. A dual-rotor, casing, and pylon structure can be modeled by the computer program. Blade tip rubs, Coriolis forces, and mechanical clearances are included. The analytical system was verified by modeling and simulating actual test conditions for a rig test as well as a full-engine, blade-release demonstration.

  12. Experimentally-determined external heat loss of automotive gas turbine engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, P. R.; Wulf, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    An external heat balance was conducted on a 150 HP two-shaft automotive gas turbine engine. The engine was enclosed in a calorimeter box and the temperature change of cooling air passing through the box was measured. Cooling airflow ranges of 1.6 to 2.1 lb-per-second and 0.8 to 1.1 lb-per-second were used. The engine housing heat loss increased as the cooling airflow through the calorimeter box was increased, as would be the case in a moving automobile. The heat balance between the total energy input and the sum of shaft power output and various losses compared within 30 percent at engine idle speeds and within 7 percent at full power.

  13. Electrochemical Stripping of Atomic Oxygen on Single-Crystalline Platinum: Bridging Gas-Phase and Electrochemical Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    To understand the interaction between Pt and surface oxygenated species in electrocatalysis, this paper correlates the electrochemistry of atomic oxygen on Pt formed in the gas phase with electrochemically generated oxygen species on a variety of single-crystal platinum surfaces. The atomic oxygen adsorbed on single-crystalline Pt electrodes, made by thermal dissociation of molecular oxygen, is used for voltammetry measurements in acidic electrolytes (HClO4 and H2SO4). The essential knowledge of coverage, binding energy, and surface construction of atomic oxygen is correlated with the charge, potential, and shape of voltammograms, respectively. The differences of the voltammograms between the oxide made by thermal dissociation of molecular oxygen and electrochemical oxidation imply that atomic oxygen is not an intermediate of the electrochemical oxidation of Pt(111). The reconstruction of (100) terrace and step and the low-potential stripping of atomic oxygen on (111) step site provide insight into the first stages of degradation of Pt-based electrocatalysts. PMID:28225278

  14. Oxygen-induced changes in electron-energy-loss spectra for Al, Be and Ni. [Al; Be; Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. , 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil); Zehner, D.M. )

    1999-09-01

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) data are presented to illustrate line shape changes that occur as a result of oxygen interaction with metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum, beryllium and nickel. Core-level EELS data were taken for excitations from Al(2p), Be(1s), Ni(3p/3s) and O(1s) levels to the conduction band (CB) density of states (DOS) of the materials. The primary beam energies for the spectra were 300, 450, 300, and 1135 eV, respectively. The data are presented in both the (as measured) first-derivative and the integral forms. The integral spectra were corrected for coherent background losses and analyzed for CB DOS information. These spectra were found to be in qualitative agreement with published experimental and theoretical studies of these materials. One peak in the spectra for Al oxide is analyzed for its correlation with excitonic screening of the Al(2p) core hole. Similar evidence for exciton formation is found in the Ni(3p) spectra for Ni oxide. Data are also presented showing oxygen-induced changes in the lower-loss-energy EELS curves that, in the pure metal, are dominated by plasmon-loss and interband-transition signals. Single-scattering loss profiles in the integral form of the data were calculated using a procedure of Tougaard and Chorkendorff [S. Tougaard and I. Chorkendorff, Phys. Rev. B. [bold 35], 6570 (1987)]. For all three oxides these profiles are dominated by a feature with a loss energy of around 20[endash]25 eV. Although this feature has been ascribed by other researchers as due to bulk plasmon losses in the oxide, an alternative explanation is that the feature is simply due to O(2s)-to-CB-level excitations. An even stronger feature is found at 7 eV loss energy for Ni oxide. Speculation is given as to its source. The line shapes in both the core-level and noncore-level spectra can also be used simply as [open quotes]fingerprints[close quotes] of the surface chemistry of the materials. Our data were taken using commercially

  15. Changes in thoracic gas volume with air-displacement plethysmography after a weight loss program in overweight and obese women.

    PubMed

    Minderico, C S; Silva, A M; Fields, D A; Branco, T L; Martins, S S; Teixeira, P J; Sardinha, L B

    2008-03-01

    This study was designed to compare measured and predicted thoracic gas volume (V (TG)) after weight loss and to analyze the effect of body composition confounders such as waist circumference (WC) on measured V (TG) changes. Prospective intervention study. Outpatient University Laboratory, Lisbon, Portugal. Eighty-five overweight and obese women (body mass index = 30.0+/-3.5 kg/m(2); age = 39.0+/-5.7 years) participating in a 16-month university-based weight control program designed to increase physical activity and improve diet. Body weight (Wb), body volume (Vb), body density (Db), fat mass (FM), percent fat mass (%FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were assessed by air-displacement plethysmography (ADP) at baseline and at post-intervention (16 months). The ADP assessment included a protocol to measure V (TG) and a software-based predicted V (TG). Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) (Hologic QDR 1500) was also used to estimate FM, %FM and FFM. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2) max) was assessed with a modified Balke cardiopulmonary exercise testing protocol with a breath-by-breath gas analysis. Significant differences between the baseline and post-weight loss intervention were observed for body weight and composition (Vb, Db, %FM, FM and FFM), and measures of V (TG) (measured: Delta=0.2 l, P<0.001; predicted: Delta=0.01 l, P<0.010) variables. Measured V (TG) change was negatively associated with the change in the WC (P=0.008), controlling for VO(2) max and age (P=0.007, P=0.511 and P=0.331). Linear regression analysis results indicated that %FM and FM using the measured and predicted V (TG) explained 72 and 76%, and 86 and 90% respectively, of the variance in %FM and FM changes using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. After weight loss, measured V (TG) increased significantly, which was partially attributed to changes is an indicator of body fat distribution such as WC. Consequently, measured and predicted V (TG) should not be used interchangeably when tracking changes in

  16. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone

    PubMed Central

    Callbeck, Cameron M.; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Bristow, Laura A.

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean’s largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss. PMID:28122044

  17. Enhanced Nitrogen Loss by Eddy-Induced Vertical Transport in the Offshore Peruvian Oxygen Minimum Zone.

    PubMed

    Callbeck, Cameron M; Lavik, Gaute; Stramma, Lothar; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Bristow, Laura A

    2017-01-01

    The eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP) upwelling region is one of the ocean's largest sinks of fixed nitrogen, which is lost as N2 via the anaerobic processes of anammox and denitrification. One-third of nitrogen loss occurs in productive shelf waters stimulated by organic matter export as a result of eastern boundary upwelling. Offshore, nitrogen loss rates are lower, but due to its sheer size this area accounts for ~70% of ETSP nitrogen loss. How nitrogen loss and primary production are regulated in the offshore ETSP region where coastal upwelling is less influential remains unclear. Mesoscale eddies, ubiquitous in the ETSP region, have been suggested to enhance vertical nutrient transport and thereby regulate primary productivity and hence organic matter export. Here, we investigated the impact of mesoscale eddies on anammox and denitrification activity using 15N-labelled in situ incubation experiments. Anammox was shown to be the dominant nitrogen loss process, but varied across the eddy, whereas denitrification was below detection at all stations. Anammox rates at the eddy periphery were greater than at the center. Similarly, depth-integrated chlorophyll paralleled anammox activity, increasing at the periphery relative to the eddy center; suggestive of enhanced organic matter export along the periphery supporting nitrogen loss. This can be attributed to enhanced vertical nutrient transport caused by an eddy-driven submesoscale mechanism operating at the eddy periphery. In the ETSP region, the widespread distribution of eddies and the large heterogeneity observed in anammox rates from a compilation of stations suggests that eddy-driven vertical nutrient transport may regulate offshore primary production and thereby nitrogen loss.

  18. Effects of air bubbles and tube transportation on blood oxygen tension in arterial blood gas analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin Ying; Kao, Jau Tsuen; Chien, Tzu I; Lee, Tai Fen; Tsai, Keh Sung

    2003-04-01

    Pneumatic tube transport has been reported to aggravate the error in partial pressure of oxygen (PO(2)) measurements caused by air bubbles. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of manual and pneumatic tube methods of sample transportation and different amounts of air bubbles on arterial blood gas analysis. Blood gas samples from 15 patients and a pooled wasted blood mixture with 3 different levels of PO(2) were analyzed to determine the effects of air bubbles and manual versus pneumatic tube transportation on PO(2) levels. PO(2) increased significantly in samples containing 10% air bubbles and was exaggerated by pneumatic tube transport (from 115.63 +/- 9.31 mm Hg to 180.51 +/- 11.29 mm Hg, p < 0.001). In samples with low PO(2) ( approximately 30 mm Hg), the measurement was not aberrant regardless of the method of transportation or the amount of air bubbles contained in the specimen. However, in samples with medium and high PO(2) (> 70 mm Hg), aberrances in measurements were noted even with only 0.5% air bubbles and regardless of whether the sample was transported by manual methods or pressurized tube. The increments of PO(2) correlated positively with the amount of air introduced into the specimens. Thus, the measured PO(2) increased 8.13 and 31.77 mm Hg when 0.5% and 10% air bubbles were introduced, respectively, to samples with medium PO(2) (p < 0.05). The interaction between the amount of air bubbles and the method of transportation was significant (p < 0.001). Trapped air in the syringe should be expelled as thoroughly as possible, since the presence of only 1% air bubbles can result in aberrance in PO(2) measurement. Samples for blood gas analysis should be carried in ambient pressure to the laboratory because pneumatic tube delivery systems significantly aggravate the air bubble-related aberrance in PO(2) measurement.

  19. Methane Emissions from Leak and Loss Audits of Natural Gas Compressor Stations and Storage Facilities.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Derek R; Covington, April N; Clark, Nigel N

    2015-07-07

    As part of the Environmental Defense Fund's Barnett Coordinated Campaign, researchers completed leak and loss audits for methane emissions at three natural gas compressor stations and two natural gas storage facilities. Researchers employed microdilution high-volume sampling systems in conjunction with in situ methane analyzers, bag samples, and Fourier transform infrared analyzers for emissions rate quantification. All sites had a combined total methane emissions rate of 94.2 kg/h, yet only 12% of the emissions total resulted from leaks. Methane slip from exhausts represented 44% of the total emissions. Remaining methane emissions were attributed to losses from pneumatic actuators and controls, engine crankcases, compressor packing vents, wet seal vents, and slop tanks. Measured values were compared with those reported in literature. Exhaust methane emissions were lower than emissions factor estimates for engine exhausts, but when combined with crankcase emissions, measured values were 11.4% lower than predicted by AP-42 as applicable to emissions factors for four-stroke, lean-burn engines. Average measured wet seal emissions were 3.5 times higher than GRI values but 14 times lower than those reported by Allen et al. Reciprocating compressor packing vent emissions were 39 times higher than values reported by GRI, but about half of values reported by Allen et al. Though the data set was small, researchers have suggested a method to estimate site-wide emissions factors for those powered by four-stroke, lean-burn engines based on fuel consumption and site throughput.

  20. Performance of a Line Loss Correction Method for Gas Turbine Emission Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Whitefield, P. D.; Lobo, P.

    2015-12-01

    International concern for the environmental impact of jet engine exhaust emissions in the atmosphere has led to increased attention on gas turbine engine emission testing. The Society of Automotive Engineers Aircraft Exhaust Emissions Measurement Committee (E-31) has published an Aerospace Information Report (AIR) 6241 detailing the sampling system for the measurement of non-volatile particulate matter from aircraft engines, and is developing an Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) for methodology and system specification. The Missouri University of Science and Technology (MST) Center for Excellence for Aerospace Particulate Emissions Reduction Research has led numerous jet engine exhaust sampling campaigns to characterize emissions at different locations in the expanding exhaust plume. Particle loss, due to various mechanisms, occurs in the sampling train that transports the exhaust sample from the engine exit plane to the measurement instruments. To account for the losses, both the size dependent penetration functions and the size distribution of the emitted particles need to be known. However in the proposed ARP, particle number and mass are measured, but size is not. Here we present a methodology to generate number and mass correction factors for line loss, without using direct size measurement. A lognormal size distribution is used to represent the exhaust aerosol at the engine exit plane and is defined by the measured number and mass at the downstream end of the sample train. The performance of this line loss correction is compared to corrections based on direct size measurements using data taken by MST during numerous engine test campaigns. The experimental uncertainty in these correction factors is estimated. Average differences between the line loss correction method and size based corrections are found to be on the order of 10% for number and 2.5% for mass.

  1. Microwave-assisted synthesis of SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas sensing at room temperature

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Ameer; Habib, Sami S; Salah, Numan A; Ahmed, Faheem

    2013-01-01

    High-quality single-crystalline SnO2 nanorods were synthesized using a microwave-assisted solution method. The nanorods were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), ultraviolet-visible and Raman spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET), and electrical resistance measurements. The XRD pattern indicated the formation of single-phase SnO2 nanorods with rutile structure. FE-SEM and TEM images revealed tetragonal nanorods of about 450–500 nm in length and 60–80 nm in diameter. The nanorods showed a higher BET surface area of 288 m2/g, much higher than that of previously reported work. The Raman scattering spectra indicated a typical rutile phase of the SnO2. The absorption spectrum showed an absorption peak centered at 340 nm, and the band-gap value was found to be 3.64 eV. The gas-sensing properties of the SnO2 nanorods for oxygen gas with different concentrations were measured at room temperature. It was found that the value of resistance increased with the increase in oxygen gas concentration in the test chamber. The SnO2 nanorods exhibited high sensitivity and rapid response-recovery characteristics to oxygen gas, and could detect oxygen concentration as low as 1, 3, 5, and 10 ppm. PMID:24143091

  2. Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C.

    2009-03-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

  3. Improvement of oxygen diffusion characteristic in gas diffusion layer with planar-distributed wettability for polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koresawa, Ryo; Utaka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Mass transfer characteristics of gas diffusion layer (GDL) are closely related to performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the characteristics of water distribution relating to the microscopic conformation and oxygen diffusivity of GDL. A hybrid type carbon paper GDL with planar-distributed wettability is investigated for control of liquid water movement and distribution due to hydrophobic to hydrophilic areas that provide wettability differences in GDL and to achieve enhancement of both oxygen diffusion and moisture retention. Hybrid GDLs with different PTFE content were fabricated in an attempt to improve the oxygen diffusion characteristics. The effects of different PTFE contents on the oxygen diffusivity and water distribution were simultaneously measured and observed using galvanic cell oxygen absorber and X-ray radiography. The PTFE distribution was observed using scanning electron microscopy. The formation of oxygen diffusion paths was confirmed by X-ray radiography, where voids in the hybrid GDL were first formed in the hydrophobic regions and then spread to the untreated wetting region. Thus, the formation of oxygen diffusion paths enhanced the oxygen diffusion. In addition, the effects of local PTFE content in the hydrophobic region and the optimal amount of PTFE for hybrid GDL were elucidated.

  4. Noble gas loss may indicate groundwater flow across flow barriers in southern Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.M.; Bryant, Hudson G.; Stute, M.; Clark, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Average calculated noble gas temperatures increase from 10 to 22oC in groundwater from recharge to discharge areas in carbonate-rock aquifers of southern Nevada. Loss of noble gases from groundwater in these regional flow systems at flow barriers is the likely process that produces an increase in recharge noble gas temperatures. Emplacement of low permeability rock into high permeability aquifer rock and the presence of low permeability shear zones reduce aquifer thickness from thousands to tens of meters. At these flow barriers, which are more than 1,000 m lower than the average recharge altitude, noble gases exsolve from the groundwater by inclusion in gas bubbles formed near the barriers because of greatly reduced hydrostatic pressure. However, re-equilibration of noble gases in the groundwater with atmospheric air at the low altitude spring discharge area, at the terminus of the regional flow system, cannot be ruled out. Molecular diffusion is not an important process for removing noble gases from groundwater in the carbonate-rock aquifers because concentration gradients are small.

  5. Photon Doppler Velocimeter to Measure Entrained Additive Manufactured Bulk Metal Powders in Hot Subsonic and Supersonic Oxygen Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Parts produced by additive manufacturing, particularly selective laser melting (SLM), have been shown to silt metal particulate even after undergoing stringent precision aerospace cleaning processes (Lowrey 2016). As printed parts are used in oxygen systems with increased pressures, temperatures, and gas velocity, the risk of ignition by particle impact, the most common direct ignition source of metals in oxygen, substantially increases. The White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), in collaboration with Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), desires to test the ignitability of SLM metals by particle impact in heated oxygen. The existing test systems rely on gas velocity calculations to infer particle velocity in both subsonic and supersonic particle impact systems. Until now, it was not possible to directly measure particle velocity. To increase the fidelity of planned SLM ignition studies, it is necessary to validate that the Photon Doppler Velocimetry(PDV) test system can accurately measure particle velocity.

  6. Ozone production in parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge from oxygen and air: the influence of gas pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Dingkun; Wang, Zhihua; Ding, Can; He, Yong; Whiddon, Ronald; Cen, Kefa

    2016-11-01

    This research aims to investigate the influence of gas pressure (0.1 Mpa-0.2 Mpa) on ozone generation in a parallel multichannel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with a narrow gap (0.2 mm). In addition to determining ozone concentration and ozone yield characteristics with gas pressure variation, this paper examines the possible reasons leading to the inconsistency with previous reported results. All the experimental results are plotted on the basis of specific input energy (SIE) in order to conduct the comparison within identical power density. By reviewing the experimental results, the possible cause leading to the inconsistency concerning gas pressure dependences of ozone generation was found using different comparison bases. Results show that ozone generation is slightly suppressed with an increase of gas pressure with an initial increase in SIE. The results of the ozone yield show that an increase of gas pressure would have a favorable effect on ozone production efficiency with an SIE larger than 400 J l-1 in oxygen while ozone yield reaches the maximum at 0.14 Mpa with an SIE larger than 150 J l-1 in air. Increasing gas pressure would lead to a higher critical SIE value at which ozone yield firstly decreases with an increase of SIE both in oxygen and air. The results of nitrogen oxide byproducts show that both NO x byproducts emission and the discharge poisoning effect are suppressed by increasing gas pressure in air plasmas.

  7. Elimination of Flammable Gas Effects in Cerium Oxide Semiconductor-Type Resistive Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck; Miki, Yusuke; Hirose, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the catalytic layer in zirconium-doped cerium oxide, Ce0.9Zr0.1O2 (CeZr10) resistive oxygen sensors for reducing the effects of flammable gases, namely hydrogen and carbon monoxide. When the concentration of flammable gases is comparable to that of oxygen, the resistance of CeZr10 is affected by the presence of these gases. We have developed layered thick films, which consist of an oxygen sensor layer (CeZr10), an insulation layer (Al2O3), and a catalytic layer consisting of CeZr10 with 3 wt% added platinum, which was prepared via the screen printing method. The Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer was found to prevent the detrimental effects of the flammable gases on the resistance of the sensor layer. This effect is due to the catalytic layer promoting the oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the consumption of ambient O2 and/or the lattice oxygen atoms of the Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer. PMID:25905705

  8. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    PubMed Central

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E.; Tikkanen, Heikki O.; Koponen, Anne S.; Aho, Jyrki M.; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E.

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak exercise

  9. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Rissanen, Antti-Pekka E; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Koponen, Anne S; Aho, Jyrki M; Hägglund, Harriet; Lindholm, Harri; Peltonen, Juha E

    2012-01-01

    The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O(2) carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex) oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O(2) carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O(2)Hb]), deoxy- (Δ[HHb]) and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb]), and tissue saturation index (TSI). NIRS inflection points (NIP), reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds [anaerobic threshold (AT), respiratory compensation point (RC); V-slope method] was examined. Blood O(2) carrying capacity [total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass)] was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01), but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O(2) delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O(2) carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at

  10. Postmortem computed tomography evaluation of fatal gas embolism due to connection of an intravenous cannula to an oxygen supply.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoichiro; Sano, Rie; Yasuda, Akiyuki; Kuboya, Eri; Takahashi, Keiko; Kubo, Rieko; Kominato, Yoshihiko; Takei, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Susumu; Shimada, Takehiro; Awata, Sachiko; Tokue, Hiroyuki; Hirasawa, Satoshi

    2017-07-01

    An 84-year-old man who had suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease accompanied by moderate pneumonia as well as gastric cancer with liver metastasis was found dead by a nurse, who noticed that the patient's intravenous catheter in the left forearm had been erroneously connected to an oxygen supply in his hospital room, leading to infusion of oxygen into a vein. Postmortem CT scanning demonstrated multiple accumulations of gas in the pulmonary artery, the right atrium and ventricle, as well as the left subclavian and brachiocephalic veins, corresponding to the route that the infused gas would have taken to the heart and pulmonary artery. Conventional autopsy revealed the presence of gas in the right ventricle. These findings suggested that the immediate cause of death was a gas embolus due to oxygen that had entered the cardiopulmonary circulation via the intravenous catheter. This case highlights the usefulness of postmortem imaging as an aid to conventional autopsy for demonstrating gas embolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Respirations Caused by Changing Oxygen Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleck, D.; Saad, N.

    2015-12-01

    The necessity for constant monitoring of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is clearly evident now more than ever. Moreover, interpreting and understanding the processes that dictate the production and consumption of these gases will allow for proper management of GHGs in order to mitigate its detrimental climate effects. Presence of oxygen, or lack of it, is the driving force for determining pathways within biochemical redox reactions. Experiments to find correlations between oxygen and greenhouse gases have helped us understand photosynthesis, denitrification and beyond. Within the past few years measurements of O2 and nitrous oxide have been used over a wide ranging array of disciplines; from studying avenues for redox chemistry to characterizing gas profiles in sputum of cystic fibrosis patients. We present a full analysis solution, based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy, for simultaneous measurements of N2O, CO2, CH4, H2O, NH3, and O2 concentrations in soil flux, in order to better understand dynamics of ecological and biogeochemical processes. The stability and high temporal resolution of the five-species CRDS analyzer, coupled with a continuous high-precision O2 measurement (1-σ <200ppm) produces a complete picture of biogeochemical processes, for which a multitude of additional research experiments can be conceived. Adding another dimension to explore to help determine the rate at which these greenhouse gases are produced or consumed, allows scientists to further address fundamental scientific questions. Data is presented showing precision, drift and limitations of the O2 sensor measurement as well as the validity of spectroscopic corrections with the CRDS analyzer caused by changing O2. Experimental data is also presented to explore correlations of soil respiration rates of N2O, CO2 and CH4 due to differing soil O2 contents at varying timescales from minutes to days.

  12. Numerical and experimental study on shear coaxial injectors with hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas and GH2/GO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ping; Li, Mao; Cai, Guo-Biao

    2013-04-01

    The influences of the shear coaxial injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of a combustor are studied numerically and experimentally. The injector parameters, including the ratio of the oxidizer pressure drop to the combustor pressure (DP), the velocity ratio of fuel to oxidizer (RV), the thickness (WO), and the recess (HO) of the oxidizer injector post tip, the temperature of the hydrogen-rich gas (TH) and the oxygen-rich gas (TO), are integrated by the orthogonal experimental design method to investigate the performance of the shear coaxial injector. The gaseous hydrogen/oxygen at ambient temperature (GH2/GO2), and the hot hydrogen-rich gas/oxygen-rich gas are used here. The length of the combustion (LC), the average temperatures of the combustor wall (TW), and the faceplate (TF) are selected as the indicators. The tendencies of the influences of injector parameters on the combustion performance and the heat load of the combustor for the GH2/GO2 case are similar to those in the hot propellants case. However, the combustion performance in the hot propellant case is better than that in the GH2/GO2 case, and the heat load of the combustor is also larger than that in the latter case.

  13. Development of an automated sampling-analysis system for simultaneous measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gas and particle phases: GAC-ROS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanxun; Zhang, Yang; Zeng, Limin; Dong, Huabin; Huo, Peng; Fang, Dongqing; Schauer, James J.

    2016-06-01

    A novel online system, GAC-ROS, for simultaneous measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both gas and particle phases was developed based on 2‧,7‧-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) assay to provide fast sampling and analysis of atmospheric ROS. The GAC-ROS, composed of a Gas and Aerosol Collector (GAC), a series of reaction and transportation systems, and a fluorescence detector, was tested for instrumental performance in laboratory. Results showed good performance with a favorable R2 value for the calibration curve (above 0.998), high penetration efficiencies of ROS (above 99.5%), and low detection limits (gas-phase ROS: 0.16 nmol H2O2 m-3; particle-phase ROS: 0.12 nmol H2O2 m-3). Laboratorial comparison between online and offline methods for particle-bound ROS showed significant loss of ROS due to the relatively long time off-line treatment. Field observations in Beijing found that concentrations of ROS in winter time were significantly higher than those observed in spring. Only a few weak positive correlations were found between ROS and some air pollutants, which reflects the complexities of ROS generation and transformation in atmosphere. This study was the first to simultaneously obtain concentrations of gas and particle-phase ROS using an online method. Consequently, it provides a powerful tool to characterize the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and the sources of the oxidizing capacity.

  14. Loss of OxyR reduces efficacy of oxygen respiration in Shewanella oneidensis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fen; Shi, Miaomiao; Gao, Haichun

    2017-01-01

    In many bacteria, OxyR is the major regulator controlling cellular response to H2O2. A common phenotype resulting from OxyR loss is reduced growth rate, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We demonstrated in Shewanella oneidensis, an important research model for applied and environmental microbes, that the defect is primarily due to an electron shortage to major terminal oxidase cytochrome cbb3. The loss of OxyR leads to enhanced production of electron carriers that compete for electrons against cytochrome cbb3, cytochrome bd in particular. We further showed that the oxyR mutation also results in increased production of menaquinone, an additional means to lessen electrons to cytochrome cbb3. Although regulation of OxyR on these biological processes appears to be indirect, these data indicate that the regulator plays a previously underappreciated role in mediating respiration. PMID:28195212

  15. Nitrogen loss and oxygen paradox in full-scale biofiltration for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xin; Qi, Zhihua; Zhang, Xiaojian; Yu, Ping; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Limin; Fu, Liang

    2007-04-01

    The nitrogen loss and DO paradox in full-scale biofiltration for drinking water treatment and the possible pathway responsible for them were investigated. A highly contaminated source water was treated at Pinghu Surface Water Plant using four biofilters, which resulted in a steady removal of NH(4)(+)-N (2.67mg/L), a great DO consumption (8.86 mg/L) and an increase in the concentration of NO(3)(-)-N (1.77mg/L). The nitrogen and DO balances indicated that about 13 NH(4)(+)-N was lost and the actual DO consumption was about 30% lower than the theoretical DO demand if nitrification was regarded as the only pathway to remove NH(4)(+)-N. The analysis of correlation coefficients analysis between several factors and the nitrogen loss suggested that "Aerobic deammonification", the coupling of shortcut nitrification and the anaerobic ammonia oxidation (Anammox) in an aerobic environment, might be the most probable pathways to explain the occurrence of these phenomena. According to this mechanism, about 57% NH(4)(+)-N was removed through complete nitrification and about 21.5% NH(4)(+)-N was incompletely nitrified into NO(2)(-)-N. The latter then involved in Anammox as the electron acceptor with the remaining NH(4)(+)-N as the electron donor. Since the Anammox reaction is anaerobic, the nitrogen loss and DO paradox can be justified.

  16. Decorative black TiCxOy film fabricated by DC magnetron sputtering without importing oxygen reactive gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Katsushi; Wakabayashi, Masao; Tsukakoshi, Yukio; Abe, Yoshiyuki

    2016-02-01

    Decorative black TiCxOy films were fabricated by dc (direct current) magnetron sputtering without importing the oxygen reactive gas into the sputtering chamber. Using a ceramic target of titanium oxycarbide (TiC1.59O0.31), the oxygen content in the films could be easily controlled by adjustment of total sputtering gas pressure without remarkable change of the carbon content. The films deposited at 2.0 and 4.0 Pa, those are higher pressure when compared with that in conventional magnetron sputtering, showed an attractive black color. In particular, the film at 4.0 Pa had the composition of TiC1.03O1.10, exhibited the L* of 41.5, a* of 0.2 and b* of 0.6 in CIELAB color space. These values were smaller than those in the TiC0.29O1.38 films (L* of 45.8, a* of 1.2 and b* of 1.2) fabricated by conventional reactive sputtering method from the same target under the conditions of gas pressure of 0.3 Pa and optimized oxygen reactive gas concentration of 2.5 vol.% in sputtering gas. Analysis of XRD and XPS revealed that the black film deposited at 4.0 Pa was the amorphous film composed of TiC, TiO and C. The adhesion property and the heat resisting property were enough for decorative uses. This sputtering process has an industrial advantage that the decorative black coating with color uniformity in large area can be easily obtained by plain operation because of unnecessary of the oxygen reactive gas importing which is difficult to be controlled uniformly in the sputtering chamber.

  17. Experimental investigation of engine emissions with marine gas oil-oxygenate blends.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Md Nurun; Hustad, Johan Einar

    2010-07-15

    This paper investigates the diesel engine performance and exhaust emissions with marine gas oil-alternative fuel additive. Marine gas oil (MGO) was selected as base fuel for the engine experiments. An oxygenate, diethylene glycol dimethyl ether (DGM), and a biodiesel (BD) jatropha oil methyl ester (JOME) with a volume of 10% were blended with the MGO fuel. JOME was derived from inedible jatropha oil. Lower emissions with diesel-BD blends (soybean methyl ester, rapeseed methyl ester etc.) have been established so far, but the effect of MGO-BD (JOME) blends on engine performance and emissions has been a growing interest as JOME (BD) is derived from inedible oil and MGO is frequently used in maritime transports. No phase separation between MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends was found. The neat MGO, MGO-DGM and MGO-JOME blends are termed as MGO, Ox10 and B10 respectively. The experiments were conducted with a six-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged, direct-injection Scania DC 1102 (DI) diesel engine. The experimental results showed significant reductions in fine particle number and mass emissions, PM and smoke emissions with Ox10 and B10 fuels compared to the MGO fuel. Other emissions including total unburned hydrocarbon (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and engine noise were also reduced with the Ox10 and B10 fuels, while maintaining similar brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and thermal efficiency with MGO fuel. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions, on the other hand, were slightly higher with the Ox10 and B10 fuels at high engine load conditions.

  18. Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, H.; Chaudhari, K.; Simonyi, T.; Poston, J.; Liu, T.; Sanders, T.; Veser, G.; Siriwardane, R.

    2008-01-01

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

  19. Chemical-looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas over copper oxide oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Hanjing Tian; Karuna Chaudhari; Thomas Simonyi; James Poston; Tengfei Liu; Tom Sanders; Goetz Veser; Ranjani Siriwardane

    2008-11-15

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900{degree}C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO{sub 2} from fuel gas at 800 and 900{degree}C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700{degree}C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900{degree}C. 48 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Chemical-looping Combustion of Coal-derived Synthesis Gas Over Copper Oxide Oxygen Carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Hanjing; Chaudhari, K P; Simonyi, Thomas; Poston, J A; Liu, Tengfei; Sanders, Tom; Veser, Goetz; Siriwardane, R V

    2008-11-01

    CuO/bentonite and CuO-BHA nanocomposites were studied as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) of simulated synthesis gas. Global reaction rates of reduction and oxidation, as the function of reaction conversion, were calculated from 10-cycle oxidation/reduction tests utilizing thermogravimetric analysis at atmospheric pressure between 700 and 900 °C. It was found that the reduction reactions are always faster than oxidation reactions; reaction temperature and particle size do not significantly affect the reaction performance of CuO/bentonite. Multicycle CLC tests conducted in a high-pressure flow reactor showed stable reactivity for production of CO2 from fuel gas at 800 and 900 °C and full consumption of hydrogen during the reaction. Results of the tapered element oscillating microbalance showed a negative effect of pressure on the global rates of reduction-oxidation reactions at higher fractional conversions. X-ray diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of CuO in the bulk phase of the oxidized sample. Electron microanalysis showed significant morphology changes of reacted CuO/bentonite samples after the 10 oxidation-reduction cycles above 700 °C in an atmospheric thermogravimetric analyzer. The nanostructured CuO-BHA carrier also showed excellent stability and, in comparison to the CuO/bentonite system, slightly accelerated redox kinetics albeit at the expense of significantly increased complexity of manufacturing. Overall, both types of CuO carriers exhibited excellent reaction performance and thermal stability for the CLC process at 700-900 °C.

  1. Electron ranaway and ion-ion plasma formation in afterglow low-pressure plasma of oxygen-containing gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Bogdanov, Eugene; Kosykh, Nikolay; Gutsev, Sergey

    2012-10-01

    Experimental investigation of temporal evolution of charged plasma species in afterglow plasma of oxygen-containing mixtures have been investigated. The probe VAC and the time dependence of the saturation positive and negative particles currents to a probe in a fixed bias voltage were performed. The decay of afterglow low-pressure electronegative gas plasmas take place in two distinct stages (the electron-ion stage, and the ion-ion stage) as it was shown in [1] for pure oxygen. In the first stage, the negative ions are locked within a discharge volume and plasma is depleted of electrons and positive ions. The electron density decay is faster, than exponential, and practically all electrons leave plasma volume during finite time followed by the ion--ion (electron-free) plasma formation. The decay of the ion-ion plasma depends on the presence of detachment. With a large content of electronegative gas (oxygen) in a mixture, when there is a ``detachment particles,'' a small fraction of the electrons appearing as a result of the detachment continue to hold all negative ions in the discharge volume. In this case, the densities of all charged plasma components decay according to the same exponential law with a characteristic detachment time. At a low oxygen content in the gas mixture there is no detachment and plasma decays by an ion--ion ambipolar diffusion mechanism.[4pt][1]. S.A.Gutsev, A.A.Kudryavtsev, V.A.Romanenko. Tech.Phys. 40, 1131, (1995).

  2. Pulse radiolysis of alkyl iodides and oxygen in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Using a pulse radiolysis facility for the study of fast chemical kinetics in the gas phase established at the University of Florida Radiation Chemistry Laboratories, parameters relevant to a linear electron beam initiated atomic iodine laser, which would lase on the transition 5/sup 2/P/sub 1/2/ (I*) ..-->.. 5/sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ (I), have been investigated. Kinetic data for the parent compound quenching of I* were obtained by variation of the parent compound pressure at constant buffer gas pressure and observing I* decay rates versus time. Deactivation rate constants for the perfluoroalkyl iodides were found to be much lower than for alkyl iodides (in cm/sup 3//molec s): CH/sub 3/I, 2.0 +- 0.1 x 10/sup -13/; C/sub 2/H/sub 5/I, 5.0 +- 0.3 x 10/sup -13/; CF/sub 3/I, 8.8 +- 1.5 x 10/sup -16/; C/sub 2/F/sub 5/I, 9.7 +- 1.0 x 10/sup -15/; i-C/sub 3/F/sub 7/I, 1.7 +- 0.1 x 10/sup -15/; C/sub 4/F/sub 9/I, 1.8 +- 0.1 x 10/sup -14/. The extent of population inversion was investigated by measuring initial excited state and ground state atomic iodine concentrations and calculating the branching ratio, (I*)/sub 0//(I*)/sub 0//(I)/sub 0/: CH/sub 3/I, 2.7; CF/sub 3/I, 3.8; C/sub 2/F/sub 5/I, 2.7; i-C/sub 3/F/sub 7/I, 3.2; C/sub 4/FgI, 1.8. Perflouromethyl iodide showed the largest population inversion from electron beam irradiation. Using formation of O/sub 3/ from O/sub 2/ as the dosimeter (G = 13.8 molecules/100 eV for ozone), energy deposited per electron pulse in 750 torr O/sub 2/ was 7.3 x 10/sup 1/a* eV/g. Spectrophotometric detection of ozone utilized the 253.7 nm Hg line. The rate of formation of ground vibrational state ozone in the pulse radiolysis of oxygen was followed using the 253.7 nm Hg line. The rate of formation was found to be early second-order with a rate constant of 4.1 +- 0.4 x 10/sup -15/ cm/sup 3//molec s. It is formed from direct combination of oxygen atoms and oxygen molecules and from collisional quenching of vibrationally excited ozone and/or an

  3. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, John C.; Jackson, Joshua G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca2+ signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca2+ channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca2+ indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca2+ signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca2+ through reversed Na+/Ca2+ exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca2+ signaling in astrocytic processes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the

  4. Transient Oxygen/Glucose Deprivation Causes a Delayed Loss of Mitochondria and Increases Spontaneous Calcium Signaling in Astrocytic Processes.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, John C; Jackson, Joshua G; Robinson, Michael B

    2016-07-06

    Recently, mitochondria have been localized to astrocytic processes where they shape Ca(2+) signaling; this relationship has not been examined in models of ischemia/reperfusion. We biolistically transfected astrocytes in rat hippocampal slice cultures to facilitate fluorescent confocal microscopy, and subjected these slices to transient oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) that causes delayed excitotoxic death of CA1 pyramidal neurons. This insult caused a delayed loss of mitochondria from astrocytic processes and increased colocalization of mitochondria with the autophagosome marker LC3B. The losses of neurons in area CA1 and mitochondria in astrocytic processes were blocked by ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) antagonists, tetrodotoxin, ziconotide (Ca(2+) channel blocker), two inhibitors of reversed Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange (KB-R7943, YM-244769), or two inhibitors of calcineurin (cyclosporin-A, FK506). The effects of OGD were mimicked by NMDA. The glutamate uptake inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)benzoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-l-aspartate increased neuronal loss after OGD or NMDA, and blocked the loss of astrocytic mitochondria. Exogenous glutamate in the presence of iGluR antagonists caused a loss of mitochondria without a decrease in neurons in area CA1. Using the genetic Ca(2+) indicator Lck-GCaMP-6S, we observed two types of Ca(2+) signals: (1) in the cytoplasm surrounding mitochondria (mitochondrially centered) and (2) traversing the space between mitochondria (extramitochondrial). The spatial spread, kinetics, and frequency of these events were different. The amplitude of both types was doubled and the spread of both types changed by ∼2-fold 24 h after OGD. Together, these data suggest that pathologic activation of glutamate transport and increased astrocytic Ca(2+) through reversed Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange triggers mitochondrial loss and dramatic increases in Ca(2+) signaling in astrocytic processes. Astrocytes, the most abundant cell type in the brain

  5. Organic matter stoichiometry, flux, and oxygen control nitrogen loss in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Keil, Richard G; Devol, Allan H; Ward, Bess B

    2014-04-25

    Biologically available nitrogen limits photosynthesis in much of the world ocean. Organic matter (OM) stoichiometry had been thought to control the balance between the two major nitrogen removal pathways-denitrification and anammox-but the expected proportion of 30% anammox derived from mean oceanic OM is rarely observed in the environment. With incubations designed to directly test the effects of stoichiometry, however, we showed that the ratio of anammox to denitrification depends on the stoichiometry of OM supply, as predicted. Furthermore, observed rates of nitrogen loss increase with the magnitude of OM supply. The variable ratios between denitrification and anammox previously observed in the ocean are thus attributable to localized variations in OM quality and quantity and do not necessitate a revision to the global nitrogen cycle.

  6. The effect on the transmission loss of a double wall panel of using helium gas in the gap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwal, M. S.; Crocker, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    The possibility of increasing the sound-power transmission loss of a double panel by using helium gas in the gap is investigated. The transmission loss of a panel is defined as ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of the sound power incident on the panel to the sound power transmitted to the space on the other side of the panel. The work is associated with extensive research being done to develop new techniques for predicting the interior noise levels on board high-speed advanced turboprop aircraft and reducing the noise levels with a minimum weight penalty. Helium gas was chosen for its inert properties and its low impedance compared with air. With helium in the gap, the impedance mismatch experienced by the sound wave will be greater than that with air in the gap. It is seen that helium gas in the gap increases the transmission loss of the double panel over a wide range of frequencies.

  7. Effect of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural gas flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samaniego, J. -M.; Egolfopoulos, F. N.; Bowman, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of chemistry and turbulence on NO formation in oxygen-natural turbulent diffusion flames gas flames have been investigated. The chemistry of nitric oxides has been studied numerically in the counterflow configuration. Systematic calculations with the GRI 2.11 mechanism for combustion of methane and NO chemistry were conducted to provide a base case. It was shown that the 'simple' Zeldovich mechanism accounts for more than 75% of N2 consumption in the flame in a range of strain-rates varying between 10 and 1000 s-l. The main shortcomings of this mechanism are: 1) overestimation (15%) of the NO production rate at low strain-rates because it does not capture the reburn due to the hydrocarbon chemistry, and 2) underestimation (25%) of the NO production rate at high strainrates because it ignores NO production through the prompt mechanism. Reburn through the Zeldovich mechanism alone proves to be significant at low strain-rates. A one-step model based on the Zeldovich mechanism and including reburn has been developed. It shows good agreement with the GRI mechanism at low strain-rates but underestimates significantly N2 consumption (about 50%) at high strain-rates. The role of turbulence has been assessed by using an existing 3-D DNS data base of a diffusion flame in decaying turbulence. Two PDF closure models used in practical industrial codes for turbulent NO formation have been tested. A simpler version of the global one-step chemical scheme for NO compared to that developed in this study was used to test the closure assumptions of the PDF models, because the data base could not provide all the necessary ingredients. Despite this simplification, it was possible to demonstrate that the current PDF models for NO overestimate significantly the NO production rate due to the fact that they neglect the correlations between the fluctuations in oxygen concentration and temperature. A single scalar PDF model for temperature that accounts for such correlations based

  8. Silicon alleviates cadmium toxicity in Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. seedlings in relation to root anatomy and radial oxygen loss.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiong; Yan, Chongling; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Wang, Wenyun; Du, Jingna; Duan, Hanhui

    2013-11-15

    The effects of Si on growth, the anatomy of the roots, radial oxygen loss (ROL) and Fe/Mn plaque on the root surface were investigated in Avicennia marina (Forsk.) Vierh. seedlings under Cd stress. Si prompted the growth of seedlings and reduced the Cd concentration in the root, stem and leaf of A. marina. Si prompted the development of the apoplastic barrier in the roots, which may be related to the reduction of Cd uptake. The higher amount of ROL and Mn plaque on the root surface due to Si were also related to the promotion of Cd tolerance in A. marina seedlings. Therefore, it is concluded that the alteration of the anatomy of the roots, the increase of ROL and Mn plaque of A. marina seedlings play an important role in alleviation of Cd toxicity due to Si. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) of liquefied petroleum gas. (i) For storage in excess of 2,000 cubic feet (56 m3) total gas capacity of cylinders or 300 (135.9 kg) pounds of liquefied petroleum gas, a separate room or compartment... exceeding 300 pounds (135.9 kg) of liquefied petroleum gas or 3,000 cubic feet (84 m 3) of other...

  10. 29 CFR 1910.253 - Oxygen-fuel gas welding and cutting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) of liquefied petroleum gas. (i) For storage in excess of 2,000 cubic feet (56 m3) total gas capacity of cylinders or 300 (135.9 kg) pounds of liquefied petroleum gas, a separate room or compartment... exceeding 300 pounds (135.9 kg) of liquefied petroleum gas or 3,000 cubic feet (84 m 3) of other...

  11. Edge of Field Nitrate Loss and Oxygen-18 Dynamics in a Dryland Agriculture Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wannamaker, C. N.; Goodwin, A. J.; Keller, C.; Allen-King, R.; Smith, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Four complete water years of nitrate concentrations and oxygen isotope (δ O18) ratios have been monitored in a tile drain and adjacent soil-water sampling lysimeters beneath a dryland, agricultural field in the Palouse Region of Washington State, USA. The Palouse is semi-arid and is characterized by undulating loess hills and swales drained by ephemeral to perennial streams. Soil type is dominated by silt-loam Mollisols. Our field is subject to typical farming practices and crop rotations, receiving ammonia fertilizer during fall and spring planting at a rate of ˜70kg of nitrogen per acre. Tile drains play an essential role in environmental nitrogen dynamics in this region as they are widely utilized to drain water from lower fields. Nitrate concentrations in tile drainage fluctuate on a seasonal basis ranging from low concentrations of ˜1mg/ NO3-N/L in late October/November to higher concentrations of 20-30mg NO3-N/L in late January/February. Rise in concentration occurs rapidly with the onset of high flow conditions differing from a typical dilution effect. Lysimeter waters show similar nitrate patterns ranging in concentration from ~10mg NO3-N/L to as high as 120mg NO3-N/L. In the lysimeters, nitrate concentrations are apparently positively correlated with δ O18 values. Precipitation collected at the field site shows a 12 per mil seasonal variation in δ O18. A seasonal pattern is also observed in soil water with a smaller range of about 6 per mil. These seasonal fluctuations are not observed in tile drainage, where values vary only 2 per mil with a mean of -15 per ml. We hypothesize that residence-time and scaling effects can explain the δ O18 fluctuation differences between soil water and tile drainage. The very large nitrate fluctuations throughout the system may be due in part to the seasonality of soil nitrogen cycling.

  12. Pulsed laser irradiation of GaAs under oxygen and silane atmosphere: Incorporation, losses, influence of native oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, C.; Siejka, J.; Berti, M.; Drigo, A. V.; Bentini, G. G.; Pribat, D.; Jannitti, E.

    1984-06-01

    Gallium arsenide single crystals and thin GaAs amorphous deposits (in the 100-nm range) on Si have been irradiated by pulsed (15 ns) ruby laser under various pressures of 16O2. All the samples were anodically preoxidized in order to obtain a 10-nm-thick 18O enriched oxide, the aim being to study the influence of native oxide on oxygen incorporation during irradiation. Nuclear microanalysis and channeling experiments provide information on (i) 16O incorporation, (ii) 18O losses and concentration profile, (iii) Ga and As atoms out of crystallographic sites for single crystal irradiations, and (iv) Ga and As losses for thin films irradations. Our results demonstrate that a surface oxide is formed with a composition near the Ga2O3-As2O3 stoichiometry via oxygen penetration in the melted layer once the native oxide has been evaporated at irradiation energies above 1 J/cm2. Before complete evaporation,this latter oxide diffuses in GaAs and is responsible for defect creation at irradiation energies as low as 0.4 J/cm2. We also find that for irradiation in vacuum the surface composition varies continuously, from Ga to As rich, when the irradiation energy density goes from 0.4 to 1.5 J/cm2. Pulsed irradiations at 0.53 μm under silane atmosphere lead to strong Si doping. We show that the mechanism involved is pyrolisis of SiH4, surface deposition of the Si formed and finally diffusion of the deposited layer in GaAs during melting.

  13. Using the local gas-phase oxygen abundances to explore a metallicity dependence in SNe Ia luminosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Raya, M. E.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Mollá, M.; Galbany, L.; Vílchez, J. M.; Carnero, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present an analysis of the gas-phase oxygen abundances of a sample of 28 galaxies in the local Universe (z < 0.02) hosting Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The data were obtained with the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. We derive local oxygen abundances for the regions where the SNe Ia exploded by calculating oxygen gradients through each galaxy (when possible) or assuming the oxygen abundance of the closest H II region. The sample selection only considered galaxies for which distances not based on the SN Ia method are available. Then, we use a principal component analysis to study the dependence of the absolute magnitudes on the colour of the SN Ia, the oxygen abundances of the region where they exploded and the stretch of the SN light curve. We demonstrate that our previous result suggesting a metallicity dependence on the SN Ia luminosity for non-reddened SNe Ia can be extended to our whole sample. These results reinforce the need of including a metallicity proxy, such as the oxygen abundance of the host galaxy, to minimize the systematic effect induced by the metallicity dependence of the SN Ia luminosity in future studies of SNe Ia at cosmological distances.

  14. Drp1 loss-of-function reduces cardiomyocyte oxygen dependence protecting the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Zepeda, Ramiro; Kuzmicic, Jovan; Parra, Valentina; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Pennanen, Christian; Riquelme, Jaime A; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Sánchez, Gina; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-06-01

    Mitochondria are key organelles for ATP production in cardiomyocytes, which is regulated by processes of fission and fusion. We hypothesized that the mitochondria fusion protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) inhibition, attenuates ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury through modifications in mitochondrial metabolism. Rats were subjected to I/R through coronary artery ligation, and isolated cardiomyocytes were treated with an ischemia-mimicking solution. In vivo, cardiac function, myocardial infarction area, and mitochondrial morphology were determined, whereas in vitro, viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, intracellular ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rate (OCR) were assessed. In both models, an adenovirus expressing Drp1 dominant-negative K38A (Drp1K38A) was used to induce Drp1 loss-of-function. Our results showed that I/R stimulated mitochondrial fission. Myocardial infarction size and cell death induced by I/R were significantly reduced, whereas cardiac function after I/R was improved in Drp1K38A-treated rats compared with controls. Drp1K38A-transduced cardiomyocytes showed lower OCR with no decrease in intracellular ATP levels, and on I/R, a larger decrease in OCR with a smaller reduction in intracellular ATP level was observed. However, proton leak-associated oxygen consumption was comparatively higher in Drp1K38A-treated cardiomyocytes, suggesting a protective mitochondrial uncoupling effect against I/R. Collectively, our results show that Drp1 inhibition triggers cardioprotection by reducing mitochondrial metabolism during I/R.

  15. Oxygen Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... stored as a gas or liquid in special tanks. These tanks can be delivered to your home and contain ... they won’t run out of oxygen. Portable tanks and oxygen concentrators may make it easier for ...

  16. Microbial Ecological Niche Partitioning Affects N2 gas Production in the Largest Marine Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchsman, C. A.; Penn, J. L.; Devol, A.; Palevsky, H. I.; Deutsch, C. A.; Keil, R.; Ward, B. B.; Rocap, G.

    2016-02-01

    Up to half of oceanic N2 production occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). In the Eastern Tropical North Pacific OMZ in April 2012, we measured a nine station coast to open ocean transect of N2 gas in the heart of the ETNP OMZ. Depth profiles of excess N2 gas had dual maxima located at the top of the OMZ and at 300m. An ecosystem biogeochemical model of the ETNP was also found to produce dual maxima at stations with a shallow OMZ. The model indicated that high N2 production rates caused the upper N2 maxima while long water residence time caused the deeper maxima. At a low productivity open ocean station where dual N2 maxima were observed, we obtained a depth profile of metagenomic sequences from both free living and >30 μm fractions to determine which N2 producing microbes were living in these three ecological niches. We use a phylogenetically-aware approach to identify metagenomic sequences by placing them on reference trees, which allows us to utilize them in a semi-quantitative manner. Overall, genes for denitrification (napA, nirS, nirK, qnor, nosZ) were enriched on particles while anammox was free-living. However, separation of genes into phylotypes indicated that the system is more complicated. For example, 4 out of 5 N2O reductase denitrifier phylotypes were actually free-living, while the fifth, most abundant phylotype was particle-attached. In the water column, denitrifier and anammox genes were spatially separated with depth with denitrifiers focused on the top section of the OMZ and with anammox becoming abundant slightly deeper and being more dominant at the deep N2 maxima. Interestingly, different phylotypes of denitrifiers have different depth profiles, implying individual adaptations and niches. The presence of measurable ammonia (>200 nM) at the top 20m of the OMZ along with the very low numbers of anammox bacteria is consistent with recent shoaling of the OMZ at the time of sampling. Thus the spatial separation of denitrifiers and anammox at the

  17. Using soil oxygen sensors to inform understanding of soil greenhouse gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarecke, K. M.; Loecke, T.; Burgin, A. J.; Franz, T. E.; Rubol, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hot spots and hot moments of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes can contribute significantly to overall GHG budgets. Hot spots and hot moments occur when dynamic soil hydrology triggers important shifts in soil biogeochemical and physical processes that control GHG emissions. Soil oxygen (O2), a direct control on biogenic GHG production (i.e., nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and methane-CH4), may serve as both an important proxy for determining sudden shifts in subsurface biogenic GHG production, as well as the physical transport of soil GHG to the atmosphere. Recent technological advancements offer opportunities to link in-situ, near-continuous measurements of soil O2 concentration to soil biogeochemical processes and soil gas transport. Using high frequency data, this study asked: Do soil O2 dynamics correspond to changes in soil GHG concentrations and GHG surface fluxes? We addressed this question using precipitation event-based and weekly sampling (19 months in duration) data sets from a restored riparian wetland in Ohio, USA. During and after precipitation events, changes in subsurface (10 and 20 cm) CO2 and N2O concentrations were inversely related to short-term (< 48 h) changes in soil O2 concentrations. Subsurface CH4 concentrations changes during precipitation events, however, did not change in response to soil O2 dynamics. Changing subsurface GHG concentrations did not necessarily translate into altered surface (soil to atmosphere) GHG fluxes; soil O2 dynamics at 10 cm did not correspond with changes in surface N2O and CH4 fluxes. However, changes in soil O2 concentration at 10 cm had a significant positive linear relationship with change in surface CO2­ flux. We used a random forest approach to identify the soil sensor data (O2, temperature, moisture) which contribute the most to predicting weekly GHG fluxes. Our study suggests that monitoring near-continuous soil O2 concentration under dynamic soil hydrology may lead to greater understanding of GHG

  18. THE MASS-LOSS RETURN FROM EVOLVED STARS TO THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. DUST PROPERTIES FOR OXYGEN-RICH ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Meixner, M.; Gordon, Karl D.; Srinivasan, S.; Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Speck, A. K.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Hony, S.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G. C.

    2010-06-10

    We model multi-wavelength broadband UBVIJHK{sub s} and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry and Infrared Spectrograph spectra from the SAGE and SAGE-Spectroscopy observing programs of two oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch (O-rich AGB) stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) using radiative transfer (RT) models of dust shells around stars. We chose a star from each of the bright and faint O-rich AGB populations found by earlier studies of the SAGE sample in order to derive a baseline set of dust properties to be used in the construction of an extensive grid of RT models of the O-rich AGB stars found in the SAGE surveys. From the bright O-rich AGB population, we chose HV 5715, and from the faint O-rich AGB population we chose SSTISAGE1C J052206.92-715017.6 (SSTSAGE052206). We found the complex indices of refraction of oxygen-deficient silicates from Ossenkopf et al. and a power law with exponential decay grain size distribution like what Kim et al. used but with {gamma} of -3.5, a {sub min} of 0.01 {mu}m, and a {sub 0} of 0.1 {mu}m to be reasonable dust properties for these models. There is a slight indication that the dust around the faint O-rich AGB may be more silica-rich than that around the bright O-rich AGB. Simple models of gas emission suggest a relatively extended gas envelope for the faint O-rich AGB star modeled, consistent with the relatively large dust shell inner radius for the same model. Our models of the data require the luminosity of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 to be {approx}5100 L {sub sun} and {approx}36,000 L {sub sun}, respectively. This, combined with the stellar effective temperatures of 3700 K and 3500 K, respectively, that we find best fit the optical and near-infrared data, suggests stellar masses of {approx}3 M {sub sun} and {approx}7 M {sub sun}. This, in turn, suggests that HV 5715 is undergoing hot-bottom burning and that SSTSAGE052206 is not. Our models of SSTSAGE052206 and HV 5715 require dust shells of inner radius {approx}17 and

  19. Effects of ambient oxygen tension on flight performance, metabolism, and water loss of the honeybee.

    PubMed

    Joos, B; Lighton, J R; Harrison, J F; Suarez, R K; Roberts, S P

    1997-01-01

    Although the metabolic rate of resting insects is relatively insensitive to atmospheric O2 tensions, metabolic rates during flight increase by 20- to 100-fold above resting levels. In this study we test whether O2 delivery limits metabolic rate during unladen hovering flight of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Below 10 kPa PO2, wing-stroke frequency decreased, and at 5 kPa, bees could not fly. However, for PO2's ranging from 39 to 10 kPa, metabolic rate and wing-stroke frequency were unaffected by PO2. Evaporative water loss rates increased by 40% at the lowest O2 tensions, which suggests that flying honeybees compensated for decreasing ambient PO2 by modulating convective ventilatory flow. Under normal sea-level conditions, O2 delivery does not limit flight metabolic rate in unladen, hovering honeybees and does not limit maximal metabolic rate. At altitudes above 3,000 m, the convective component of O2 delivery may, however, limit flight metabolic rate and flight capacity in honeybees.

  20. Detonation mode and frequency analysis under high loss conditions for stoichiometric propane-oxygen

    DOE PAGES

    Jackson, Scott I.; Lee, Bok Jik; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2016-03-24

    In this paper, the propagation characteristics of galloping detonations were quantified with a high-time-resolution velocity diagnostic. Combustion waves were initiated in 30-m lengths of 4.1-mm inner diameter transparent tubing filled with stoichiometric propane–oxygen mixtures. Chemiluminescence from the resulting waves was imaged to determine the luminous wave front position and velocity every 83.3 μ. As the mixture initial pressure was decreased from 20 to 7 kPa, the wave was observed to become increasingly unsteady and transition from steady detonation to a galloping detonation. While wave velocities averaged over the full tube length smoothly decreased with initial pressure down to half ofmore » the Chapman–Jouguet detonation velocity (DCJ) at the quenching limit, the actual propagation mechanism was seen to be a galloping wave with a cycle period of approximately 1.0 ms, corresponding to a cycle length of 1.3–2.0 m or 317–488 tube diameters depending on the average wave speed. The long test section length of 7300 tube diameters allowed observation of up to 20 galloping cycles, allowing for statistical analysis of the wave dynamics. In the galloping regime, a bimodal velocity distribution was observed with peaks centered near 0.4 DCJ and 0.95 DCJ. Decreasing initial pressure increasingly favored the low velocity mode. Galloping frequencies ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 kHz and were insensitive to initial mixture pressure. Wave deflagration-to-detonation transition and detonation failure trajectories were found to be repeatable in a given test and also across different initial mixture pressures. The temporal duration of wave dwell at the low and high velocity modes during galloping was also quantified. It was found that the mean wave dwell duration in the low velocity mode was a weak function of initial mixture pressure, while the mean dwell time in the high velocity mode depended exponentially on initial mixture pressure. Analysis of the velocity

  1. Detonation mode and frequency analysis under high loss conditions for stoichiometric propane-oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Scott I.; Lee, Bok Jik; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2016-03-24

    In this paper, the propagation characteristics of galloping detonations were quantified with a high-time-resolution velocity diagnostic. Combustion waves were initiated in 30-m lengths of 4.1-mm inner diameter transparent tubing filled with stoichiometric propane–oxygen mixtures. Chemiluminescence from the resulting waves was imaged to determine the luminous wave front position and velocity every 83.3 μ. As the mixture initial pressure was decreased from 20 to 7 kPa, the wave was observed to become increasingly unsteady and transition from steady detonation to a galloping detonation. While wave velocities averaged over the full tube length smoothly decreased with initial pressure down to half of the Chapman–Jouguet detonation velocity (DCJ) at the quenching limit, the actual propagation mechanism was seen to be a galloping wave with a cycle period of approximately 1.0 ms, corresponding to a cycle length of 1.3–2.0 m or 317–488 tube diameters depending on the average wave speed. The long test section length of 7300 tube diameters allowed observation of up to 20 galloping cycles, allowing for statistical analysis of the wave dynamics. In the galloping regime, a bimodal velocity distribution was observed with peaks centered near 0.4 DCJ and 0.95 DCJ. Decreasing initial pressure increasingly favored the low velocity mode. Galloping frequencies ranged from 0.8 to 1.0 kHz and were insensitive to initial mixture pressure. Wave deflagration-to-detonation transition and detonation failure trajectories were found to be repeatable in a given test and also across different initial mixture pressures. The temporal duration of wave dwell at the low and high velocity modes during galloping was also quantified. It was found that the mean wave dwell duration in the low velocity mode was a weak function of initial mixture pressure, while the mean dwell time in the high velocity mode depended exponentially on initial mixture pressure. Analysis

  2. The Decompression Sickness and Venous Gas Emboli Consequences of Air Breaks During 100% Oxygen Prebreathe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Powell, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    Not enough is known about the increased risk of hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) and production of venous (VGE) and arterial (AGE) gas emboli following an air break in an otherwise normal 100% resting oxygen (O2) prebreathe (PB), and certainly a break in PB when exercise is used to accelerate nitrogen (N2) elimination from the tissues. Current Aeromedical Flight Rules at the Johnson Space Center about additional PB payback times are untested, possibly too conservative, and therefore not optimized for operational use. A 10 min air break at 90 min into a 120 min PB that includes initial dual-cycle ergometry for 10 min will show a measurable increase in the risk of DCS and VGE after ascent to 4.3 psia compared to a 10 min break at 15 min into the PB, or when there is no break in PB. Data collection with humans begins in 2005, but here we first evaluate the hypothesis using three models of tissue N2 kinetics: Model I is a simple single half-time compartment exponential model, Model II is a three compartment half-time exponential model, and Model III is a variable half-time compartment model where the percentage of maximum O2 consumption for the subject during dual-cycle ergometry exercise defines the half-time compartment. Model I with large rate constants to simulate an exercise effect always showed a late break in PB had the greatest consequence. Model II showed an early break had the greatest consequence. Model III showed there was no difference between early or late break in exercise PB. Only one of these outcomes will be observed when humans are tested. Our results will favor one of these models, and so advance our understanding of tissue N2 kinetics, and of altitude DCS after an air break in PB.

  3. Pulmonary gas exchange response to oxygen breathing in acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Santos, C; Ferrer, M; Roca, J; Torres, A; Hernández, C; Rodriguez-Roisin, R

    2000-01-01

    The mechanisms and time course of the pulmonary gas exchange response to 100% O(2) breathing in acute respiratory failure needing mechanical ventilation were studied in eight patients with acute lung injury (ALI) (48 +/- 18 yr [mean +/- SD]) and in four patients (66 +/- 2 yr) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We postulated that, in patients with ALI while breathing 100% O(2), the primary mechanism of hypoxemia, i.e., increased intrapulmonary shunt, would further worsen (increase) as a result of reabsorption atelectasis. Respiratory and inert gases, and systemic and pulmonary hemodynamics were measured at maintenance fraction of inspired oxygen (FI(O(2))-m), at 30 and 60 min while breathing 100% O(2), and then at 30 min of resuming FI(O(2))-m. During 100% O(2) breathing, in patients with ALI, Pa(O(2)) (by 207 and 204 mm Hg; p < 0.01 each), Pa(CO(2)) (by 4 mm Hg each) (p < 0.05 each), and intrapulmonary shunt (from 16 +/- 10% to 22 +/- 11% and 23 +/- 11%) (p < 0.05 each) increased respectively. By contrast, in patients with COPD, Pa(O(2)) (by 387 and 393 mm Hg; p < 0.001 each), Pa(CO(2)) (by 4 and 5 mm Hg) and the dispersion of pulmonary blood flow (log SDQ) (from 1.33 +/- 0.10 to 1.60 +/- 0.20 and 1.80 +/- 0.30 [p < 0.05]) increased, respectively. In patients with ALI, the breathing of 100% O(2) deteriorates intrapulmonary shunt owing to collapse of unstable alveolar units with very low ventilation-perfusion (V A/Q) ratios, as opposed to patients with COPD, in whom only the dispersion of the blood flow distribution is disturbed, suggesting release of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction.

  4. Role of the bound-state wave function in capture-loss rates: Slow proton in an electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Alducin, M.; Nagy, I.

    2003-07-01

    Capture and loss rates for protons moving in an electron gas are calculated using many-body perturbation theory. The role of the form of the bound-state wave function for weakly bound states around the proton is analyzed. We find significant differences (up to a factor of 2 higher) in the values of Auger capture and loss rates when using Hulthen-type instead of hydrogenic wave functions. Its relevance in stopping power is briefly discussed.

  5. Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on the magnetic flux of a high moment write pole material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jinqiu; Liu Feng; Chen Lifan; Miloslavsky, Lena

    2010-05-15

    Effect of reactive gas (oxygen/chlorine/fluorine) etching on NiFe magnetic properties was investigated. Experimental data showed 40% magnetic property degradation for F-containing gas etching, 10% degradation for O-containing gas etching, and 5% degradation for Cl-containing gas etching processes. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the crystallographic orientation remained the same upon the reactive gas etching, which is due to the low ion energy in plasma etching process as opposed to ion milling process with high input energy. It is proposed that the reported magnetic property degradation was mainly caused by the nonmagnetic dead layer formation, rather than the changes in the crystallographic orientation. The dead layer was determined by the NiFe thickness dependence of remnant magnetic flux variations between pre-etched and postetched samples. The dead layer remained nearly constant for O-containing gas etching process with increasing plasma processing time. The nonmagnetic dead layer of {approx}40-50 A formed in O-containing etching gas was observed in transmission electron microscopy cross-sectional image and was in very good agreement with the calculated value based on magnetic flux measurements. Combined magnetic and physical characterizations suggest that the dead layer thickness saturates at the initial stage of the plasma etching and magnetic property remained unchanged with increasing etching duration upon formation of the dead layer.

  6. Investigation of Pinus mugo essential oil oxygenated fraction by combined use of gas chromatography and dry column chromatography.

    PubMed

    A, M B; Coran, S A; Giannellini, V; Vincieri, F F; Moneti, G

    1981-09-01

    The oxygenated compounds of Pinus mugo Turra essential oil were investigated by a combination of GC and dry column chromatography (DCC) coordinated by GC data processing. The collected data resulted in a bar graph ("normalized" gas chromatogram) giving the RRT's and relative amounts of 68 components; 38 of them were identified by MS and IR. The described procedure may be used for essential oil analysis in general.

  7. Impact of bypass flow rate and catheter position in veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation on gas exchange in vivo.

    PubMed

    Togo, Konomi; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Katagiri, Nobumasa; Fujii, Yutaka; Kishimoto, Satoru; Date, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yuji; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-06-01

    The clinical use of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VVECMO) in adult patients with respiratory failure is rapidly increasing. However, recirculation of blood oxygenated by ECMO back into the circuit may occur in VVECMO, resulting in insufficient oxygenation. The cannula position and bypass flow rate are two major factors influencing recirculation, but the relationship and ideal configuration of these factors are not fully understood. In the present study, we attempted to clarify these parameters for effective gas exchange. VVECMO was performed in eight adult goats under general anesthesia. The position of the drainage cannula was fixed in the inferior vena cava (IVC), but the return cannula position was varied between the IVC, right atrium (RA), and superior vena cava (SVC). At each position, the recirculation rates calculated, and the adequacy of oxygen delivery by ECMO in supplying systemic oxygen demand was assessed by measuring the arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and pressure (PaO2). Although the recirculation rates increased as the bypass flow rates increased, SaO2 and PaO2 also increased in any position of return cannula. The recirculation rates and PaO2 were 27 ± 2% and 162 ± 16 mmHg, 36 ± 6% and 139 ± 11 mmHg, and 63 ± 6% and 77 ± 9 mmHg in the SVC, RA and IVC position at 4 L/min respectively. In conclusion, the best return cannula position was the SVC, and a high bypass flow rate was advantageous for effective oxygenation. Both the bypass flow rates and cannula position must be considered to achieve effective oxygenation.

  8. Dependence of Ozone Generation on Gas Temperature Distribution in AC Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge in Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Go; Akashi, Haruaki

    AC atmospheric pressure multi-filament dielectric barrier discharge in oxygen has been simulated using two dimensional fluid model. In the discharge, three kinds of streamers have been obtained. They are primary streamers, small scale streamers and secondary streamers. The primary streamers are main streamers in the discharge and the small scale streamers are formed after the ceasing of the primary streamers. And the secondary streamers are formed on the trace of the primary streamers. In these streamers, the primary and the small scale streamers are very effective to generate O(3P) oxygen atoms which are precursor of ozone. And the ozone is generated mainly in the vicinity of the dielectrics. In high gas temperature region, ozone generation decreases in general. However, increase of the O(3P) oxygen atom density in high gas temperature region compensates decrease of ozone generation rate coefficient. As a result, amount of ozone generation has not changed. But if the effect of gas temperature was neglected, amount of ozone generation increases 10%.

  9. The Mass Loss Return from Evolved Stars to the Large Magellanic Cloud: Oxygen-Rich Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, S.; Meixner, M.; Kemper, F.; Tielens, X.; Speck, A.; Matsuura, M.; Bernard, J.; Hony, S.; Gordon, K.; Indebetouw, R.; Marengo, M.; Sloan, G.; Woods, P.; Vijh, U. P.

    2010-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Legacy program Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE; PI: M. Meixner) has observed over 6 million stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud with both the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS) instruments to explore the life-cycle of matter in a galaxy. Over 17000 of these stars were found to be candidate Oxygen-rich Asymptotic Giant Branch (O-rich AGB) stars. We combine photometry from Spitzer and elsewhere in constructing Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) for the SAGE candidate O-rich AGB stars. These SEDs are then modeled using the radiative transfer program 2Dust, with the goal of determining the O-rich AGB star candidates' mass-loss rates. Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra are available as part of the Spitzer Legacy program SAGE-Spectroscopy (PI: F. Kemper) for a number of SAGE O-rich AGB star candidates; for two of these, IRS spectra in addition to the photometry are modeled with 2Dust to determine reasonable dust grain parameters to use for the candidate O-rich AGB stars in the rest of the SAGE sample. Using these dust grain properties, a grid of radiative transfer models was computed using 2Dust, varying stellar effective temperature and luminosity, dust shell inner radius, and dust shell optical depth at 10 microns wavelength. Synthetic photometry from models and observed photometry are plotted on color-color and color-magnitude diagrams, and model SEDs are directly compared to observed SEDs. The mass-loss rates from all O-rich AGB stars, especially those with the highest mass-loss rates, in the LMC are estimated and compared to its mass budget. Dust composition is also discussed in light of the results of the model grids.

  10. Oxygen partial pressures on gas-diffusion layer surface and gas-flow channel wall in polymer electrolyte fuel cell during power generation studied by visualization technique combined with numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishigami, Yuta; Waskitoaji, Wihatmoko; Yoneda, Masakazu; Takada, Kenji; Hyakutake, Tsuyoshi; Suga, Takeo; Uchida, Makoto; Nagumo, Yuzo; Inukai, Junji; Nishide, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    Visualization of the oxygen partial pressures was carried out at the surface of a gas diffusion layer (GDL) for the first time together with the upper part of the gas-flow channel of the cathode of a running polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) using two different oxygen-sensitive luminescent dye films. The visualized distributions of the oxygen partial pressures at the GDL and the upper gas-flow channel during the PEFC operation were very different in a conventional test cell. The change in the distribution of the oxygen partial pressures was observed by changing the oxygen utilization, which should be connected with the reactive locations in the membrane-electrode assembly (MEA). A numerical calculation was carried out to understand the distributions of water and current density inside the MEA. The water distribution inside the MEA was confirmed to strongly affect the distributions of the current density and the oxygen /partial pressure.

  11. Thermofluid analysis of the SSME preburner using a gas-gas diffusion model for oxygen and hydrogen combustion at supercritical pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, C.; Singhal, A. K.; Shafer, C.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses the thermofluid analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuelside preburner. The governing equations have been solved numerically to predict flow, heat transfer, mixing, and combustion. A two-fluid approach is adopted in which oxygen is regarded as one fluid and hydrogen is regarded as the other fluid. The chemical kinetics is assumed to be very fast so that combustion is primarily controlled by the rate of mixing between oxygen and hydrogen. The preburner pressure is much greater than the critical pressures of oxygen and hydrogen; hence, a gas-gas diffusion model (rather than an evaporation model) has been developed to compute the rate of interphase mixing. Empirical correlations have been incorporated to account for the effect of slip on the interphase exchange. A sensitivity study has been performed with various model parameters. It is observed that the model can predict possibility of incomplete combustion and local regions of high temperatures under steady operating conditions. Some of these anomalies have been observed in actual tests, and the numerical model is useful for understanding possible causes and remedies. At least some measurements are needed for quantitative verification of the model.

  12. Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

    1995-04-01

    To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

  13. Measurement of fuel oxygenates in tap water using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cardinali, Frederick L; Blount, Benjamin C; Schmidt, Rachael; Morrow, John

    2008-01-01

    The presence of alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in drinking water supplies has raised public health concerns because of possible adverse health effects from chronic exposure to these compounds. To enable large exposure studies exploring possible relationships between chronic exposure to alkyl ether fuel oxygenates and health effects, we developed an improved analytical method, using headspace solid-phase microextraction coupled with capillary gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. This method quantifies trace levels of methyl tertiary-butyl ether, ethyl tertiary-butyl ether, di-isopropyl ether, and tertiary-amyl methyl ether in tap water. The method achieves detection limits of less than 0.025 microg/L for all analytes and linear ranges of three orders of magnitude in the measurement of the alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in 5-mL tap water samples. The relative percentage of recoveries of the alkyl ether fuel oxygenates ranged from 97% to 105%. The relative standard deviation ranged from 2% to 6%. Methyl tertiary-butyl ether was detected in samples of tap water taken from geographically diverse regions of the United States. The improved throughput and sensitivity of this method will enable large epidemiologic field studies of the prevalence and magnitude of exposure to alkyl ether fuel oxygenates in the general population.

  14. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; ...

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high asmore » 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.« less

  15. Gas-solid interfacial modification of oxygen activity in layered oxide cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Bao; Zhang, Minghao; Wu, Lijun; Wang, Jun; Xia, Yonggao; Qian, Danna; Liu, Haodong; Chen, Yan; An, Ke; Zhu, Yimei; Liu, Zhaoping; Meng, Ying Shirley; Hy, Sunny

    2016-07-01

    Lattice oxygen can play an intriguing role in electrochemical processes, not only maintaining structural stability, but also influencing electron and ion transport properties in high-capacity oxide cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Here, we report the design of a gas–solid interface reaction to achieve delicate control of oxygen activity through uniformly creating oxygen vacancies without affecting structural integrity of Li-rich layered oxides. Theoretical calculations and experimental characterizations demonstrate that oxygen vacancies provide a favourable ionic diffusion environment in the bulk and significantly suppress gas release from the surface. The target material is achievable in delivering a discharge capacity as high as 301 mAh g–1 with initial Coulombic efficiency of 93.2%. After 100 cycles, a reversible capacity of 300 mAh g–1 still remains without any obvious decay in voltage. Lastly, this study sheds light on the comprehensive design and control of oxygen activity in transition-metal-oxide systems for next-generation Li-ion batteries.

  16. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: Implication for runoff and nutrient losses associated with broiler litter use on pastures on Ultisols

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In two controlled rainfall simulation experiments (June 2009 & May 2011), runoff, nutrient (N, P, Ca, Mg) losses, and total suspended solids in runoff were compared among six treatments consisting of four rates of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) (0, 2.2, 4.5, 9.0 Mg ha-1) with 13.5 Mg ha-1 ea...

  17. Influence of plasma DNA on acid-base balance, blood gas measurement, and oxygen transport in health and stroke.

    PubMed

    Konorova, Irina L; Veiko, Natalya N; Novikov, Viktor E

    2008-08-01

    Hyperoxia and alkalemia, as a result of pulmonary hyperventilation and elevation of plasma DNA (pDNA), are seen during the first 24 h after ischemic stroke. In this study we have examined the correlation between pDNA and these blood parameters in health and stroke. Acid-base equilibrium, oxygen status, hemoglobin affinity to oxygen and concentration of pDNA in arterial blood were measured after the intravenous injection of homologous long-chain DNA to healthy rats and rats subjected to common carotid arterial occlusion. In addition the effect of adding homologous DNA to human and rat venous blood samples was studied in vitro. Hyperoxia, alkalemia, and an increase in hemoglobin affinity to oxygen were seen in rats with artificial stroke. A marked decrease in pulmonary hyperventilation and hemoglobin affinity to oxygen was observed after injection of homologous genomic DNA (10(-6) g/mL of blood). After the DNA injection, blood gas measurement and concentration of pDNA were correlated. Addition of DNA at a concentration of 10(-7) g/mL to venous blood samples in vitro increased oxygen saturation that disappeared when the dose of the DNA increased 10-fold. Thus, a change of pDNA concentration or size can alter acid-base equilibrium, oxygen status, and oxygen transport. These results may be important for a better understanding of the mechanisms of stroke and other diseases associated with the elevation of pDNA concentration, and they open the possibility of new therapeutic approaches.

  18. High-Resolution Electron Energy Loss Studies of Oxygen, Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrous Oxide Adsorption on Germanium Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entringer, Anthony G.

    The first high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) studies of the oxidation and nitridation of germanium surfaces are reported. Both single crystal Ge(111) and disordered surfaces were studied. Surfaces were exposed to H, O_2, NO, N _2O, and N, after cleaning in ultra-high vacuum. The Ge surfaces were found to be non-reactive to molecular hydrogen (H_2) at room temperature. Exposure to atomic hydrogen (H) resulted hydrogen adsorption as demonstrated by the presence of Ge-H vibrational modes. The HREEL spectrum of the native oxide of Ge characteristic of nu -GeO_2 was obtained by heating the oxide to 200^circC. Three peaks were observed at 33, 62, and 106 meV for molecular oxygen (O_2) adsorbed on clean Ge(111) at room temperature. These peaks are indicative of dissociative bonding and a dominant Ge-O-Ge bridge structure. Subsequent hydrogen exposure resulted in a shift of the Ge-H stretch from its isolated value of 247 meV to 267 meV, indicative of a dominant +3 oxidation state. A high density of dangling bonds and defects and deeper oxygen penetration at the amorphous Ge surface result in a dilute bridge structure with a predominant +1 oxidation state for similar exposures. Molecules of N_2O decompose at the surfaces to desorbed N_2 molecules and chemisorbed oxygen atoms. In contrast, both oxygen and nitrogen are detected at the surfaces following exposure to NO molecules. Both NO and N_2O appear to dissociate and bond at the top surface layer. Molecular nitrogen (N_2) does not react with the Ge surfaces, however, a precursor Ge nitride is observed at room temperature following exposure to nitrogen atoms and ions. Removal of oxygen by heating of the NO-exposed surface to 550^circC enabled the identification of the Ge-N vibrational modes. These modes show a structure similar to that of germanium nitride. This spectrum is also identical to that of the N-exposed surface heated to 550^circC. Surface phonon modes of the narrow-gap semiconducting

  19. Precise spatial and temporal control of oxygen within in vitro brain slices via microfluidic gas channels.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Gerardo; Fall, Christopher P; Eddington, David T

    2012-01-01

    The acute brain slice preparation is an excellent model for studying the details of how neurons and neuronal tissue respond to a variety of different physiological conditions. But open slice chambers ideal for electrophysiological and imaging access have not allowed the precise spatiotemporal control of oxygen in a way that might realistically model stroke conditions. To address this problem, we have developed a microfluidic add-on to a commercially available perfusion chamber that diffuses oxygen throughout a thin membrane and directly to the brain slice. A microchannel enables rapid and efficient control of oxygen and can be modified to allow different regions of the slice to experience different oxygen conditions. Using this novel device, we show that we can obtain a stable and homogeneous oxygen environment throughout the brain slice and rapidly alter the oxygen tension in a hippocampal slice. We also show that we can impose different oxygen tensions on different regions of the slice preparation and measure two independent responses, which is not easily obtainable with current techniques.

  20. On tracking the course of cerebral oxygen saturation and pilot performance during gravity-induced loss of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Lloyd D; Warm, Joel S; Matthews, Gerald; Chiu, Peter Y; Bracken, R Bruce

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this study was to track the course of cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) and pilot performance during an episode of gravity-induced loss of consciousness (GLOC). GLOC, a major problem facing pilots of high-performance aircraft, is brought about by a sudden reduction in rSO2 as a result of increased +Gz force. It consists of 24 s of complete functional impairment followed by a prolonged period of performance recovery. This study tested the hypothesis that delayed recovery in GLOC is caused by a slow return of rSO2 following removal of the g-force that induced the episode. GLOC was induced in U.S. Air Force personnel via a centrifuge with math and tracking tasks emulating flight performance. A near-infrared spectroscopy unit provided the rSO2 measure. Declines in rSO2 from baseline pinpointed when pilots would cease active flight control and when GLOC would set in. Counter to expectation, rSO2 returned to baseline levels shortly after the centrifuge came to a complete stop following GLOC onset. Nevertheless, performance deficits continued for 49.45 s thereafter. The prolonged performance recovery time in GLOC cannot be attributed to delays in the return of rSO2. This finding explains why previous ergonomic efforts to shorten the duration of GLOC episodes by increasing the rate of return of rSO2 have not been fruitful. Evidently, another approach is needed. Such an approach might use the close linkage between loss of rSO2, performance deterioration, and GLOC onset to develop a warning system that would permit pilots to take effective action to avoid GLOC incapacitation.

  1. Modeling of fission gas effects observed in TREAT loss-of-flow test R8 using SAS3D. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.; Morris, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The TREAT loss-of-flow test R8 has been analyzed using a modified version of the SAS3D accident analysis code in order to establish experimental verification of SAS3D modeling changes introduced to assess the effects of fission gas release from the upper gas plenum on coolant voiding dynamics and clad motion prior to the onset of fuel motion in whole core accident studies. The specific motivation for the analysis was the necessity of investigating the potential for fuel compaction by the fission gas stored in the gas plena at the upper end of the fuel pins in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP). These investigations were required to support licensing activities underway just prior to the demise of the project. In test R8, an unirradiated, seven-pin fuel bundle was subjected to a simulated Fast Flux Test Facility flow coastdown. The power was held constant at its nominal value.

  2. Oxygen-limited thermal tolerance is seen in a plastron-breathing insect and can be induced in a bimodal gas exchanger

    PubMed Central

    Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bilton, David T.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Thermal tolerance has been hypothesized to result from a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. However, the generality of this hypothesis has been challenged by studies on various animal groups, including air-breathing adult insects. Recently, comparisons across taxa have suggested that differences in gas exchange mechanisms could reconcile the discrepancies found in previous studies. Here, we test this suggestion by comparing the behaviour of related insect taxa with different gas exchange mechanisms, with and without access to air. We demonstrate oxygen-limited thermal tolerance in air-breathing adults of the plastron-exchanging water bug Aphelocheirus aestivalis. Ilyocoris cimicoides, a related, bimodal gas exchanger, did not exhibit such oxygen-limited thermal tolerance and relied increasingly on aerial gas exchange with warming. Intriguingly, however, when denied access to air, oxygen-limited thermal tolerance could also be induced in this species. Patterns in oxygen-limited thermal tolerance were found to be consistent across life-history stages in these insects, with nymphs employing the same gas exchange mechanisms as adults. These results advance our understanding of oxygen limitation at high temperatures; differences in the degree of respiratory control appear to modulate the importance of oxygen in setting tolerance limits. PMID:25964420

  3. Oxygen-limited thermal tolerance is seen in a plastron-breathing insect and can be induced in a bimodal gas exchanger.

    PubMed

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Bilton, David T

    2015-07-01

    Thermal tolerance has been hypothesized to result from a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand. However, the generality of this hypothesis has been challenged by studies on various animal groups, including air-breathing adult insects. Recently, comparisons across taxa have suggested that differences in gas exchange mechanisms could reconcile the discrepancies found in previous studies. Here, we test this suggestion by comparing the behaviour of related insect taxa with different gas exchange mechanisms, with and without access to air. We demonstrate oxygen-limited thermal tolerance in air-breathing adults of the plastron-exchanging water bug Aphelocheirus aestivalis. Ilyocoris cimicoides, a related, bimodal gas exchanger, did not exhibit such oxygen-limited thermal tolerance and relied increasingly on aerial gas exchange with warming. Intriguingly, however, when denied access to air, oxygen-limited thermal tolerance could also be induced in this species. Patterns in oxygen-limited thermal tolerance were found to be consistent across life-history stages in these insects, with nymphs employing the same gas exchange mechanisms as adults. These results advance our understanding of oxygen limitation at high temperatures; differences in the degree of respiratory control appear to modulate the importance of oxygen in setting tolerance limits.

  4. Effects of sample storage time, temperature and syringe type on blood gas tensions in samples with high oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed Central

    Pretto, J. J.; Rochford, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Although plastic arterial sampling syringes are now commonly used, the effects of sample storage time and temperature on blood gas tensions are poorly described for samples with a high oxygen partial pressure (PaO2) taken with these high density polypropylene syringes. METHODS--Two ml samples of tonometered whole blood (PaO2 86.7 kPa, PaCO2 4.27 kPa) were placed in glass syringes and in three brands of plastic blood gas syringes. The syringes were placed either at room temperature or in iced water and blood gas analysis was performed at baseline and after 5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. RESULTS--In the first 10 minutes measured PaO2 in plastic syringes at room temperature fell by an average of 1.21 kPa/min; placing the sample on ice reduced the rate of PaO2 decline to 0.19 kPa/min. The rate of fall of PaO2 in glass at room temperature was 0.49 kPa/min. The changes in PaCO2 were less dramatic and at room temperature averaged increases of 0.47 kPa for plastic syringes and 0.71 kPa for glass syringes over the entire two hour period. These changes in gas tension for plastic syringes would lead to an overestimation of pulmonary shunt measured by the 100% oxygen technique of 0.6% for each minute left at room temperature before analysis. CONCLUSIONS--Glass syringes are superior to plastic syringes in preserving samples with a high PaO2, and prompt and adequate cooling of such samples is essential for accurate blood gas analysis. PMID:8016801

  5. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  6. Effects of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate on on-line oxygen isotope measurement as studied by on-column CO injection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Xi-Jie; Zhou, Youping

    2015-08-01

    Although deemed important to δ(18) O measurement by on-line high-temperature conversion techniques, how the GC conditions affect δ(18) O measurement is rarely examined adequately. We therefore directly injected different volumes of CO or CO-N2 mix onto the GC column by a six-port valve and examined the CO yield, CO peak shape, CO-N2 separation, and δ(18) O value under different GC temperatures and carrier gas flow rates. The results show the CO peak area decreases when the carrier gas flow rate increases. The GC temperature has no effect on peak area. The peak width increases with the increase of CO injection volume but decreases with the increase of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate. The peak intensity increases with the increase of GC temperature and CO injection volume but decreases with the increase of carrier gas flow rate. The peak separation time between N2 and CO decreases with an increase of GC temperature and carrier gas flow rate. δ(18) O value decreases with the increase of CO injection volume (when half m/z 28 intensity is <3 V) and GC temperature but is insensitive to carrier gas flow rate. On average, the δ(18) O value of the injected CO is about 1‰ higher than that of identical reference CO. The δ(18) O distribution pattern of the injected CO is probably a combined result of ion source nonlinearity and preferential loss of C(16) O or oxygen isotopic exchange between zeolite and CO. For practical application, a lower carrier gas flow rate is therefore recommended as it has the combined advantages of higher CO yield, better N2 -CO separation, lower He consumption, and insignificant effect on δ(18) O value, while a higher-than-60 °C GC temperature and a larger-than-100 µl CO volume is also recommended. When no N2 peak is expected, a higher GC temperature is recommended, and vice versa. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-03-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3•0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes.

  8. An in-situ gas chromatography investigation into the suppression of oxygen gas evolution by coated amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles on oxide electrode

    PubMed Central

    Gim, Jihyeon; Song, Jinju; Kim, Sungjin; Jo, Jeonggeun; Kim, Seokhun; Yoon, Jaegu; Kim, Donghan; Hong, Suk-Gi; Park, Jin-Hwan; Mathew, Vinod; Han, Junhee; Song, Sun-Ju; Kim, Jaekook

    2016-01-01

    The real time detection of quantitative oxygen release from the cathode is performed by in-situ Gas Chromatography as a tool to not only determine the amount of oxygen release from a lithium-ion cell but also to address the safety concerns. This in-situ gas chromatography technique monitoring the gas evolution during electrochemical reaction presents opportunities to clearly understand the effect of surface modification and predict on the cathode stability. The oxide cathode, 0.5Li2MnO3∙0.5LiNi0.4Co0.2Mn0.4O2, surface modified by amorphous cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles (a-CoPO4) is prepared by a simple co-precipitation reaction followed by a mild heat treatment. The presence of a 40 nm thick a-CoPO4 coating layer wrapping the oxide powders is confirmed by electron microscopy. The electrochemical measurements reveal that the a-CoPO4 coated overlithiated layered oxide cathode shows better performances than the pristine counterpart. The enhanced performance of the surface modified oxide is attributed to the uniformly coated Co-P-O layer facilitating the suppression of O2 evolution and offering potential lithium host sites. Further, the formation of a stable SEI layer protecting electrolyte decomposition also contributes to enhanced stabilities with lesser voltage decay. The in-situ gas chromatography technique to study electrode safety offers opportunities to investigate the safety issues of a variety of nanostructured electrodes. PMID:27001370

  9. Analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to achieve high Mach numbers and high thrust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henneberry, Hugh M.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of gas turbine engines using water and oxygen injection to enhance performance by increasing Mach number capability and by increasing thrust is described. The liquids are injected, either separately or together, into the subsonic diffuser ahead of the engine compressor. A turbojet engine and a mixed-flow turbofan engine (MFTF) are examined, and in pursuit of maximum thrust, both engines are fitted with afterburners. The results indicate that water injection alone can extend the performance envelope of both engine types by one and one-half Mach numbers at which point water-air ratios reach 17 or 18 percent and liquid specific impulse is reduced to some 390 to 470 seconds, a level about equal to the impulse of a high energy rocket engine. The envelope can be further extended, but only with increasing sacrifices in liquid specific impulse. Oxygen-airflow ratios as high as 15 percent were investigated for increasing thrust. Using 15 percent oxygen in combination with water injection at high supersonic Mach numbers resulted in thrust augmentation as high as 76 percent without any significant decrease in liquid specific impulse. The stoichiometric afterburner exit temperature increased with increasing oxygen flow, reaching 4822 deg R in the turbojet engine at a Mach number of 3.5. At the transonic Mach number of 0.95 where no water injection is needed, an oxygen-air ratio of 15 percent increased thrust by some 55 percent in both engines, along with a decrease in liquid specific impulse of 62 percent. Afterburner temperature was approximately 4700 deg R at this high thrust condition. Water and/or oxygen injection are simple and straightforward strategies to improve engine performance and they will add little to engine weight. However, if large Mach number and thrust increases are required, liquid flows become significant, so that operation at these conditions will necessarily be of short duration.

  10. Do radial oxygen loss and external aeration affect iron plaque formation and arsenic accumulation and speciation in rice?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chuan; Ye, Zhihong; Li, Hui; Wu, Shengchun; Deng, Dan; Zhu, Yongguan; Wong, Minghung

    2012-01-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of radial oxygen loss (ROL) and external aeration on iron (Fe) plaque formation, and arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The data showed that there were significant correlations between ROL and Fe concentrations in Fe plaque produced on different genotypes of rice. There were also significant differences in the amounts of Fe plaque formed between different genotypes in different positions of roots and under different aeration conditions (aerated, normal, and stagnant treatments). In aerated treatments, rice tended to have a higher Fe plaque formation than in a stagnant solution, with the greatest formation at the root tip decreasing with increasing distances away, in accordance with a trend of spatial ROL. Genotypes with higher rates of ROL induced higher degrees of Fe plaque formation. Plaques sequestered As on rice roots, with arsenate almost double that with arsenite, leading to decreased As accumulation in both roots and shoots. The major As species detected in roots and shoots was arsenite, ranging from 34 to 78% of the total As in the different treatments and genotypes. These results contribute to our understanding of genotypic differences in As uptake by rice and the mechanisms causing rice genotypes with higher ROL to show lower overall As accumulation. PMID:22345639

  11. The formation of the first low-mass stars from gas with low carbon and oxygen abundances.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker; Loeb, Abraham

    2003-10-23

    The first stars in the Universe are predicted to have been much more massive than the Sun. Gravitational condensation, accompanied by cooling of the primordial gas via molecular hydrogen, yields a minimum fragmentation scale of a few hundred solar masses. Numerical simulations indicate that once a gas clump acquires this mass it undergoes a slow, quasi-hydrostatic contraction without further fragmentation; lower-mass stars cannot form. Here we show that as soon as the primordial gas--left over from the Big Bang--is enriched by elements ejected from supernovae to a carbon or oxygen abundance as small as approximately 0.01-0.1 per cent of that found in the Sun, cooling by singly ionized carbon or neutral oxygen can lead to the formation of low-mass stars by allowing cloud fragmentation to smaller clumps. This mechanism naturally accommodates the recent discovery of solar-mass stars with unusually low iron abundances (10(-5.3) solar) but with relatively high (10(-1.3) solar) carbon abundance. The critical abundances that we derive can be used to identify those metal-poor stars in our Galaxy with elemental patterns imprinted by the first supernovae. We also find that the minimum stellar mass at early epochs is partially regulated by the temperature of the cosmic microwave background.

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen pretreatment according to the gas micronuclei denucleation hypothesis reduces neurologic deficit in decompression sickness in rats.

    PubMed

    Katsenelson, K; Arieli, R; Arieli, Y; Abramovich, A; Feinsod, M; Tal, D

    2009-08-01

    During sudden or too rapid decompression, gas is released within supersaturated tissues in the form of bubbles, the cause of decompression sickness. It is widely accepted that these bubbles originate in the tissue from preexisting gas micronuclei. Pretreatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) has been hypothesized to shrink the gas micronuclei, thus reducing the number of emerging bubbles. The effectiveness of a new HBO pretreatment protocol on neurologic outcome was studied in rats. This protocol was found to carry the least danger of oxygen toxicity. Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were chosen to serve as a measure of neurologic damage. SSEPs in rats given HBO pretreatment before a dive were compared with SSEPs from rats not given HBO pretreatment and SSEPs from non-dived rats. The incidence of abnormal SSEPs in the animals subjected to decompression without pretreatment (1,013 kPa for 32 min followed by decompression) was 78%. In the pretreatment group (HBO at 304 kPa for 20 min followed by exposure to 1,013 kPa for 33 min and decompression) this was significantly reduced to 44%. These results call for further study of the pretreatment protocol in higher animals.

  13. Reliability of the Gas Supply in the Air Force Emergency Passenger Oxygen System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    to be intact. A hypodermic needle was attached to the sampling line of a mass spectrometer (Perkin-El- mer, Model MGA-1100). The needle was inserted...Emergency Passenger Oxygen System (EPOS; Fig. 1) was alleged to have significant numbers of inadequate oxygen cylinders. In theory , this could prevent the...hypothetical analysis demonstrates the disparity between a manufacturing specifi cation of a component and the overall performance of a device. This

  14. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha/Sima.

    PubMed

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-11-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-alpha polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-alpha/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima.

  15. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-α/Sima

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-α polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-α/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima. PMID:16179946

  16. a Comparative Study of Oxygen Loss on in Situ Heating in PrMnO3 and BaMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, K. B.; Heinonen, M.; Nordblad, P.; Dalela, S. D.; Panwar, N.; Sen, V.; Agarwal, S. K.; Sharma, Neha

    We have thoroughly investigated the oxygen loss in PrMnO3 and BaMnO3, the end members of the AMnO3 system, on in situ heating in a reducing atmosphere. This was done to drive some oxygen out from them and thus possibly alter the valence of the Mn cation. Sample characterization was done through X-ray diffraction and SEM measurements. The core-level photoemission point to oxygen loss from only BaMnO3 changing some of Mn4+ to Mn3+ in it, transfer of some spectral weight to the highly localized Fehrenbacher-Rice states and an increased Mn 3d-O 2p hybridization. Magnetization measurements show that at low temperatures, the samples depict a canted antiferromagnetic ordering.

  17. Gas hold-up and oxygen mass transfer in three pneumatic bioreactors operating with sugarcane bagasse suspensions.

    PubMed

    Esperança, M N; Cunha, F M; Cerri, M O; Zangirolami, T C; Farinas, C S; Badino, A C

    2014-05-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is a low-cost and abundant by-product generated by the bioethanol industry, and is a potential substrate for cellulolytic enzyme production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of air flow rate (QAIR), solids loading (%S), sugarcane bagasse type, and particle size on the gas hold-up (εG) and volumetric oxygen transfer coefficient (kLa) in three different pneumatic bioreactors, using response surface methodology. Concentric tube airlift (CTA), split-cylinder airlift (SCA), and bubble column (BC) bioreactor types were tested. QAIR and %S affected oxygen mass transfer positively and negatively, respectively, while sugarcane bagasse type and particle size (within the range studied) did not influence kLa. Using large particles of untreated sugarcane bagasse, the loop-type bioreactors (CTA and SCA) exhibited higher mass transfer, compared to the BC reactor. At higher %S, SCA presented a higher kLa value (0.0448 s−1) than CTA, and the best operational conditions in terms of oxygen mass transfer were achieved for %S < 10.0 g L−1 and QAIR > 27.0 L min−1. These results demonstrated that pneumatic bioreactors can provide elevated oxygen transfer in the presence of vegetal biomass, making them an excellent option for use in three-phase systems for cellulolytic enzyme production by filamentous fungi.

  18. A one-dimensional analytical calculation method for obtaining normal shock losses in supersonic real gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passmann, Maximilian; aus der Wiesche, Stefan; Joos, Franz

    2017-03-01

    The calculation of isentropic flow and normal shock waves of real gases are important, especially in the preliminary design of turbo-machinery and test rigs. In an ideal gas, the relations for one-dimensional isentropic flow and normal shock waves are well known and can be found in standard textbooks. However, for fluids exhibiting strong deviations from the ideal gas assumption universal relations do not exist due to complex equations of state. This paper presents a analytical method for the prediction of isentropic real gas flows and normal shock waves, based on the Redlich-Kwong (RK) equation of state. Explicit expressions based on a series expansion for describing isentropic flow of Novec™ 649 are compared to Refprop data and ideal gas equations. For moderate pressures the RK method is in very good agreement with the Refprop data, while the ideal gas equations fail to predict the real gas behaviour. The same observations are made for normal shock calculations, where both real gas methods yield very close results. Especially the predicted stagnation pressure losses across a shock wave are in excellent agreement.

  19. Oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture. A critical evaluation of the various methods clarifies positive and negative aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Besides oxygen, several other gases such as NO, CO, H2, H2S, Xe and O3 have come to age over the past few years. With regards to O3, its mechanisms of action in medicine have been clarified during the last two decades so that now a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending ozone therapy in various pathologies is available. O3 used within the determined therapeutic window is absolutely safe and more effective than golden standard medications in numerous pathologies, like vascular diseases. However, ozone therapy is mostly in practitioners' hands and some recent developments for increasing cost effectiveness and speed of treatment are neither standardized, nor evaluated toxicologically. Hence, the aim of this article is to emphasize the need to objectively assess the pros and cons of oxygen/ozone as a medical gas mixture in the hope that ozone therapy will be accepted by orthodox medicine in the near future. PMID:22146387

  20. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, E.; Veltri, P.; Cavenago, M.; Serianni, G.

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  1. Background gas density and beam losses in NIO1 beam source

    SciTech Connect

    Sartori, E. Veltri, P.; Serianni, G.; Cavenago, M.

    2016-02-15

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a versatile ion source designed to study the physics of production and acceleration of H- beams up to 60 keV. In ion sources, the gas is steadily injected in the plasma source to sustain the discharge, while high vacuum is maintained by a dedicated pumping system located in the vessel. In this paper, the three dimensional gas flow in NIO1 is studied in the molecular flow regime by the Avocado code. The analysis of the gas density profile along the accelerator considers the influence of effective gas temperature in the source, of the gas temperature accommodation by collisions at walls, and of the gas particle mass. The calculated source and vessel pressures are compared with experimental measurements in NIO1 during steady gas injection.

  2. Charge state distribution studies of pure and oxygen mixed krypton ECR plasma - signature of isotope anomaly and gas mixing effect.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pravin; Mal, Kedar; Rodrigues, G

    2016-11-01

    We report the charge state distributions of the pure, 25% and 50% oxygen mixed krypton plasma to shed more light on the understanding of the gas mixing and the isotope anomaly [A. G. Drentje, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 63 (1992) 2875 and Y Kawai, D Meyer, A Nadzeyka, U Wolters and K Wiesemann, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 10 (2001) 451] in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas. The krypton plasma was produced using a 10 GHz all-permanent-magnet ECR ion source. The intensities of the highly abundant four isotopes, viz. (82) Kr (~11.58%), (83) Kr (~11.49%), (84) Kr (~57%) and (86) Kr (17.3%) up to ~ +14 charge state have been measured by extracting the ions from the plasma and analysing them in the mass and the energy using a large acceptance analyzer-cum-switching dipole magnet. The influence of the oxygen gas mixing on the isotopic krypton ion intensities is clearly evidenced beyond +9 charge state. With and without oxygen mixing, the charge state distribution of the krypton ECR plasma shows the isotope anomaly with unusual trends. The anomaly in the intensities of the isotopes having quite closer natural abundance, viz. (82) Kr, (86) Kr and (83) Kr, (86) Kr is prominent, whereas the intensity ratio of (86) Kr to (84) Kr shows a weak signature of it. The isotope anomaly tends to disappear with increasing oxygen mixing in the plasma. The observed trends in the intensities of the krypton isotopes do not follow the prediction of linear Landau wave damping in the plasma. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  4. Performance characteristics of a transverse-flow, oxygen-iodine chemical laser in a low gas-flow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, K.; Kashiwabara, S.; Sawai, K.; Toshima, S.; Fujimoto, R.

    1983-03-01

    Performance characteristics are reported for a transverse-flow, oxygen-iodine chemical laser which operates at a low level (8 m/s) of linear flow gas velocity using a small size vacuum pump. This is the first time that dependences of laser output power have experimentally been found on Cl2 and I2 flow rates. Output powers in excess of 10 W have been efficiently extracted from a 50 x 0.5-cm rectangular flow duct. A total energy of 11 kJ from one gram of iodine has been obtained. The reaction mechanisms associated with the power decrease in high concentrations of I2 are carefully discussed.

  5. An investigation of the effects of mass loss, shape change and real gas aerodynamics on a Jovian atmospheric reconstruction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walberg, G. D.; Jones, J. J.; Olstad, W. B.; Sutton, K.; Moss, J. N.; Powell, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the effects of mass loss, shape change and real-gas aerodynamics on a Jovian atmospheric reconstruction experiment is carried out. Techniques used to reconstruct atmospheric profiles from entry probe measurements are discussed and some of the parameters which affect their accuracy are identified. Trajectory analyses and real-gas, radiatively-coupled flow field analyses (which include the effects of mass loss and shape change) are carried out for several candidate probe configurations. From these analyses, uncertainties in the atmospheric reconstruction procedure are estimated. Finally, the prospects for reducing these uncertainties by optimizing probe configuration and by instrumentation of the probe heat shield to measure actual shape change are considered.

  6. On-line derivatization for hourly measurements of gas- and particle-phase Semi-Volatile oxygenated organic compounds by Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatography (SV-TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Yee, L. D.; Worton, D. R.; Chan, A. W. H.; Moss, J. A.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-07-01

    Laboratory oxidation studies have identified a large number of oxygenated organic compounds that can be used as tracers to understand sources and oxidation chemistry of atmospheric particulate matter. Quantification of these compounds in ambient environments has traditionally relied on low time-resolution collection of filter samples followed by offline sample treatment with a derivatizing agent to allow analysis by gas chromatography of otherwise non-elutable organic chemicals with hydroxyl groups. We present here an automated in situ instrument for the measurement of highly polar organic semi-volatile and low-volatility compounds in both the gas- and particle-phase with hourly time-resolution. The dual-cell Semi-Volatile Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (SV-TAG) with derivatization collects particle-only and combined particle-plus-vapor samples on two parallel sampling cells that are analyzed in series by thermal desorption into helium saturated with derivatizing agent. Introduction of MSTFA, a silylating agent, yields complete derivatization of all tested compounds, including alkanoic acids, polyols, diacids, sugars, and multifunctional compounds. In laboratory tests, derivatization is found to be highly reproducible (< 3% variability). During field deployment, a regularly injected internal standard is used to correct for variability in detector response, derivatization efficiency, desorption efficiency, and transfer efficiency. Error in quantification from instrument fluctuations is found to be less than 10% for hydrocarbons and less than 15% for all oxygenates for which a functionally similar internal standard is available. After internal standard corrections, calibration curves are found to be linear for all compounds over the span of one month with comparable response on both of the parallel sampling cells.

  7. Effects of heliox as carrier gas on ventilation and oxygenation in an animal model of piston-type HFOV: a crossover experimental study.

    PubMed

    Zeynalov, Bakhtiyar; Hiroma, Takehiko; Nakamura, Tomohiko

    2010-11-12

    This study aimed to compare gas exchange with heliox and oxygen-enriched air during piston-type high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV). We hypothesized that helium gas would improve both carbon dioxide elimination and arterial oxygenation during piston-type HFOV. Five rabbits were prepared and ventilated by piston-type HFOV with carrier 50% helium/oxygen (heliox50) or 50% oxygen/nitrogen (nitrogen50) gas mixture in a crossover study. Changing the gas mixture from nitrogen50 to heliox50 and back was performed five times per animal with constant ventilation parameters. Arterial blood gas, vital function and respiratory test indices were recorded. Compared with nitrogen50, heliox50 did not change PaCO2 when stroke volume remained constant, but significantly reduced PaCO2 after alignment of amplitude pressure. No significant changes in PaO2 were seen despite significant decreases in mean airway pressure with heliox50 compared with nitrogen50. This study demonstrated that heliox enhances CO2 elimination and maintains oxygenation at the same amplitude but with lower airway pressure compared to air/O2 mix gas during piston-type HFOV.

  8. Changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and blood flow during hypoxic gas ventilation therapy in HLHS and CoA/IAA complex with markedly increased pulmonary blood flow.

    PubMed

    Toiyama, Kentaro; Hamaoka, Kenji; Oka, Tatsujiro; Kobayashi, Naho; Noritake, Kanae; Kato, Ryuichi; Kawai, Yoko; Ozawa, Seiichiro; Nishida, Masashi; Itoi, Toshiyuki

    2010-10-01

    Hypoxic gas ventilation therapy has recently been performed to prevent post-birth increased pulmonary blood flow in cases of congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. However, how the oxygen supply to the tissues changes during breathing a hypoxic gas mixture, remains unknown. The changes in cerebral oxygen saturation and blood supply during hypoxic gas ventilation therapy using a nitrogen gas mixture were studied. Cerebral regional oxygen saturation (cerebral rSO(2)) was measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, and changes in middle cerebral artery (MCA) blood flow and an index of vascular resistance (RI) were assessed in 8 consecutive patients having congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. In all patients, urinary volume increased significantly, and the respiratory rate showed a clear decrease. Percutaneous oxygen saturation showed no significant change. The average of cerebral rSO(2) was 67.3% before hypoxic gas ventilation, but increased to 69.4%, 69.1%, and 70.7% within 1, 12, and 24 h after initiation of treatment, respectively. MCA blood flow significantly increased in the diastolic phase, and RI significantly improved from 0.80 to 0.68 within 12 h after initiation of therapy. These results indicate that hypoxic gas ventilation therapy does not decrease cerebral oxygen saturation, but safely improves the cerebral blood supply in cases of congenital heart diseases with increased pulmonary blood flow. 

  9. Leptin integrates vertebrate evolution: from oxygen to the blood-gas barrier.

    PubMed

    Torday, J S; Powell, F L; Farmer, C G; Orgeig, S; Nielsen, H C; Hall, A J

    2010-08-31

    The following are the proceedings of a symposium held at the Second International Congress for Respiratory Science in Bad Honnef, Germany. The goals of the symposium were to delineate the blood-gas barrier phenotype across vertebrate species; to delineate the interrelationship between the evolution of the blood-gas barrier, locomotion and metabolism; to introduce the selection pressures for the evolution of the surfactant system as a key to understanding the physiology of the blood-gas barrier; to introduce the lung lipofibroblast and its product, leptin, which coordinately regulates pulmonary surfactant, type IV collagen in the basement membrane and host defense, as the cell-molecular site of selection pressure for the blood-gas barrier; to drill down to the gene regulatory network(s) involved in leptin signaling and the blood-gas barrier phenotype; to extend the relationship between leptin and the blood-gas barrier to diving mammals. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensorineural hearing loss at 9-13 years of age in children with a history of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Murray, Melissa; Nield, Toni; Larson-Tuttle, Claudine; Seri, Istvan; Friedlich, Philippe

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the incidence of late-onset sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and study the association between neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and SNHL in survivors of neonatal ECMO between 9 and 13 years of age. Retrospective analysis of medical records of 212 neonatal ECMO survivors treated between 1987 and 1991 to identify children with complete hearing evaluation at 9-13 years of age. Patients were categorised into normal hearing (NH) and SNHL groups. Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis was used to take into account the variable age at follow-up and to assess the independent effect of each risk factor for SNHL. Forty-eight of the 212 patients had complete hearing evaluations at 9-13 years of age and eight of 48 patients were diagnosed as having SNHL. In two patients, SNHL was first detected between 9 and 13 years. A significant difference between the SNHL and NH groups was found in median 5 min Apgar scores, mean ECMO support duration, proportion of infants with pre-ECMO Paco(2) of <30 mm Hg, and pre-ECMO use of furosemide. No differences were found in the mean cumulative dose or duration of diuretic, muscle relaxant or aminoglycoside treatments. The occurrence of clinical seizures before ECMO and the duration of ECMO therapy were independently associated with SNHL. Clinical seizure activity prior to ECMO and the duration of ECMO therapy are independently associated with SNHL. These data confirm that there is an increased incidence of SNHL in neonatal ECMO survivors at 9-13 years of age and suggest that SNHL may also present later in childhood in this patient population. Upon recovery from acute respiratory failure and after discharge from the hospital, longitudinal neurodevelopmental follow-up of infants treated with ECMO during the neonatal period is essential.

  11. Radial oxygen loss by the cushion plant Eriocaulon schimperi prevents methane emissions from an East-African mountain mire.

    PubMed

    Dullo, B W; Grootjans, A P; Roelofs, J G M; Senbeta, A F; Fritz, C; Lamers, L P M

    2017-09-01

    Groundwater-fed fens are known sources of methane (CH4 ) emissions to the atmosphere, and these are known to be mediated by the vegetation. In a fen located in the Bale Mountains, Ethiopia, we assessed the effects of a cushion plant (Eriocaulon schimperi) and a sedge (Carex monostachya) on rhizosphere biogeochemistry. Methane and CO2 concentrations and pH were measured in pore-water at different depths in the profile. Redox potentials and NaCl-extractable element concentrations were analysed in soil samples from sites dominated by either E. schimperii or C. monostachya. Nutrient and element concentration were analysed in plant tissues. At Carex-dominated sites, CH4 concentrations increased from 70 μmol·l(-1) at a depth of 10 cm to 130 μmol·l(-1) at a depth of 100 cm. CH4 concentrations at Eriocaulon-dominated sites were almost zero (<1 μmol·l(-1) ) to a depth of 100 cm. Simultaneously, soil redox potentials and CO2 concentrations were higher at Eriocaulon-dominated sites, indicating a low potential for CH4 production and a high potential for CH4 oxidation. Eriocaulon schimperi displayed a root investment strategy to cope with the harsh environment, similar to the cushion plant Astelia pumila in Patagonian bogs. This strategy is characterised by high root/shoot ratios, high root porosity and density under high redox conditions. Both cushion plant species create an aerobic rhizosphere through radial oxygen loss from deep roots, which strongly reduce CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Membrane oxygenator heat exchanger failure detected by unique blood gas findings.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Justin L

    2014-03-01

    Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator.

  13. Study of oxygen gas production phenomenon during stand and discharge in silver-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Standard production procedures for manufacturing silver zinc batteries are evaluated and modified to reduce oxygen generation during open circuit stand and discharge. Production predictions of several variable combinations using analysis models are listed for minimum gassing, with emphasis on the concentration of potassium hydroxide in plate formation. A recommendation for work optimizing the variables involved in plate processing is included.

  14. Membrane Oxygenator Heat Exchanger Failure Detected by Unique Blood Gas Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Justin L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Failure of components integrated into the cardiopulmonary bypass circuit, although rare, can bring about catastrophic results. One of these components is the heat exchanger of the membrane oxygenator. In this compartment, unsterile water from the heater cooler device is separated from the sterile blood by stainless steel, aluminum, or by polyurethane. These areas are glued or welded to keep the two compartments separate, maintaining sterility of the blood. Although quality control testing is performed by the manufacturer at the factory level, transport presents the real possibility for damage. Because of this, each manufacturer has included in the instructions for use a testing procedure for testing the integrity of the heat exchanger component. Water is circulated through the heat exchanger before priming and a visible check is made of the oxygenator bundle to check for leaks. If none are apparent, then priming of the oxygenator is performed. In this particular case, this procedure was not useful in detecting communication between the water and blood chambers of the oxygenator. PMID:24779125

  15. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  16. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  17. Transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs useful as water gas shift catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Levi T.; Patt, Jeremy; Moon, Dong Ju; Phillips, Cory

    2003-09-23

    Mono- and bimetallic transition metal carbides, nitrides and borides, and their oxygen containing analogs (e.g. oxycarbides) for use as water gas shift catalysts are described. In a preferred embodiment, the catalysts have the general formula of M1.sub.A M2.sub.B Z.sub.C O.sub.D, wherein M1 is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, and combinations thereof; M2 is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Ni, Cu, Co, and combinations thereof; Z is selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, boron, and combinations thereof; A is an integer; B is 0 or an integer greater than 0; C is an integer; O is oxygen; and D is 0 or an integer greater than 0. The catalysts exhibit good reactivity, stability, and sulfur tolerance, as compared to conventional water shift gas catalysts. These catalysts hold promise for use in conjunction with proton exchange membrane fuel cell powered systems.

  18. The effects of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture on maximal pulmonary ventilation and maximal oxygen consumption during exercise in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takeshi; Calbet, Jose A L; Honda, Yasushi; Fujii, Naoto; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that maximal exercise pulmonary ventilation (VE max) is a limiting factor affecting maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) in moderate hypobaric hypoxia (H), we examined the effect of breathing a helium-oxygen gas mixture (He-O(2); 20.9% O(2)), which would reduce air density and would be expected to increase VE max. Fourteen healthy young male subjects performed incremental treadmill running tests to exhaustion in normobaric normoxia (N; sea level) and in H (atmospheric pressure equivalent to 2,500 m above sea level). These exercise tests were carried out under three conditions [H with He-O(2), H with normal air and N] in random order. VO2 max and arterial oxy-hemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)) were, respectively, 15.2, 7.5 and 4.0% higher (all p < 0.05) with He-O(2) than with normal air (VE max, 171.9 ± 16.1 vs. 150.1 ± 16.9 L/min; VO2 max, 52.50 ± 9.13 vs. 48.72 ± 5.35 mL/kg/min; arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation (SaO(2)), 79 ± 3 vs. 76 ± 3%). There was a linear relationship between the increment in VE max and the increment in VO2 max in H (r = 0.77; p < 0.05). When subjects were divided into two groups based on their VO2 max, both groups showed increased VE max and SaO(2) in H with He-O(2), but VO2 max was increased only in the high VO2 max group. These findings suggest that in acute moderate hypobaric hypoxia, air-flow resistance can be a limiting factor affecting VE max; consequently, VO2 max is limited in part by VE max especially in subjects with high VO2 max.

  19. Estimation of economic losses caused by disruption of lifeline service: An analysis of the Memphis Light, Gas and Water system

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.E.; Seligson, H.A.; Eguchi, R.T.

    1995-12-31

    The assessment of economic impact remains an important missing link in earthquake loss estimation procedures. This paper presents a general methodology for evaluating the economic losses caused by seismically-induced disruption of lifeline service in an urban area. The methodology consists of three steps: (1) development of a lifeline usage model on an industry basis; (2) estimation of the spatial distribution of economic activity throughout the urban area; and (3) assessment of direct losses through evaluation of the spatial coincidence of economic activity with lifeline service disruption. To demonstrate this methodology, a pilot analysis was conducted on the Memphis Light, Gas and Water electric power system for a Magnitude 7.5 earthquake in New Madrid seismic Zone. Using newly-available empirical data, business interruption in Shelby County, Tennessee, was estimated for major industries in the local economy. Extensions of the methodology are also discussed.

  20. Gas-phase Oxygen Abundances and Radial Metallicity Gradients in the Two nearby Spiral Galaxies NGC 7793 and NGC 4945

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanghellini, Letizia; Magrini, Laura; Casasola, Viviana

    2015-10-01

    Gas-phase abundances in H ii regions of two spiral galaxies, NGC 7793 and NGC 4945, have been studied to determine their radial metallicity gradients. We used the strong-line method to derive oxygen abundances from spectra acquired with GMOS-S, the multi-object spectrograph on the 8 m Gemini South telescope. We found that NGC 7793 has a well-defined gas-phase radial oxygen gradient of -0.321 ± 0.112 dex {R}25-1 (or -0.054 ± 0.019 dex kpc-1) in the galactocentric range 0.17 < RG/R25 < 0.82, not dissimilar from gradients calculated with direct abundance methods in galaxies of similar mass and morphology. We also determined a shallow radial oxygen gradient in NGC 4945, -0.253 ± 0.149 dex {R}25-1 (or -0.019 ± 0.011 dex kpc-1) for 0.04 < RG/R25 < 0.51, where the larger relative uncertainty derives mostly from the larger inclination of this galaxy. NGC 7793 and NGC 4945 have been selected for this study because they are similar, in mass and morphology, to M33 and the Milky Way, respectively. Since at zeroth order we expect the radial metallicity gradients to depend on mass and galaxy type, we compared our galaxies in the framework of radial metallicity models best suited for M33 and the Galaxy. We found a good agreement between M33 and NGC 7793, pointing toward similar evolution for the two galaxies. We notice instead differences between NGC 4945 and the radial metallicity gradient model that best fits the Milky Way. We found that these differences are likely related to the presence of an active galactic nucleus combined with a bar in the central regions of NGC 4945, and to its interacting environment.

  1. Probing ‘Spin-Forbidden’ Oxygen Atom Transfer: Gas-Phase Reactions of Chromium-Porphyrin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Fornarini, Simonetta; Lanucara, Francesco; Warren, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Oxygen-atom transfer reactions of metalloporphyrin species play an important role in biochemical and synthetic oxidation reactions. An emerging theme in this chemistry is that spin-state changes can play important roles, and a ‘two-state’ reactivity model has been extensively applied especially in iron-porphyrin systems. Herein we explore the gas phase oxygen-atom transfer chemistry of meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (TPFPP) chromium complexes, as well as some other tetradentate macrocyclic ligands. Electrospray ionization in concert with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometry has been used to characterize and observe reactivity of the ionic species [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ (1) and [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ (2). These are an attractive system to examine the effects of spin state change on oxygen atom transfer because the d1 CrV species are doublets while the CrIII complexes have quartet ground states with high-lying doublet excited states. In the gas phase, [(TPFPP)CrIII]+ forms adducts with a variety of neutral donors but O-atom transfer is only observed for NO2. Pyridine N-oxide adducts of 1 do yield 2 upon collision induced dissociation (CID), but the ethylene oxide, DMSO, and TEMPO analogs do not. [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ is shown by its reactivity and by CID experiments to be a terminal metal-oxo with a single vacant coordination site. It also displays limited reaction chemistry, being deoxygenated only by the very potent reductant P(OMe)3. In general, [(TPFPP)CrVO]+ species are much less reactive than the Fe and Mn analogs. Thermochemical analysis of the reactions points towards the involvement of spin issues in the lower observed reactivity of the chromium complexes. PMID:20218631

  2. Study of oxygen gas production phenomenon during stand and discharge in silver-zinc batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The effects of a number of cell process and performance variables upon the oxygen evolution rate of silver/silver oxide cathodes are studied to predict and measure the conditions which would result in the production of a minimum of oxygen. The following five tasks comprise the study: the design and fabrication of two pilot test cells to be used for electrode testing; the determination of the sensitivity and accuracy of the test cell; the determination of total volumes and rates of generation by cathodes of standard production procedures; the construction of a sequential test plan; and the construction of a series of positive formation cells in which formation process factors can be controlled.

  3. Production of singlet oxygen by the reaction of non-basic hydrogen peroxide with chlorine gas.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wenming; Shi, Wenbo; Yang, Heping; Cui, Rongrong; Deng, Liezheng

    2012-10-14

    Non-basic hydrogen peroxide was found to be very easy to react with Cl(2) to produce singlet oxygen O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) (i.e. the molecular oxygen in its first electronic excited state) when an H(+) absorbent such as C(5)H(5)N, CH(3)COONH(4), HCOONH(4) or NH(4)F was added into H(2)O(2) aqueous solution, and the long concealed fact that molecular H(2)O(2) can react with Cl(2) to produce O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) was then uncovered. It is only when an H(+) absorbent has provided a stronger base than H(2)O to absorb the H(+) produced during the reaction that O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) can be produced.

  4. Investigation of biphasic tumor oxygen dynamics induced by hyperoxic gas intervention: the dynamic phantom approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Liu, Hanli

    2008-01-01

    We have developed dynamic tumor vascular phantoms and utilized them to investigate the biphasic behavior of increases in light absorption, which is directly associated with oxygenated hemoglobin concentration that was observed in vivo from rat breast tumor experiments during carbogen/oxygen inhalation. The experimental setup for the phantom study included a continuous-wave, multichannel, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) system and syringe pumps to drive the simulated blood through the dynamic vascular phantoms. The results from such phantom experiments clearly show that the two time constants observed in tumor oxygenation dynamics in vivo can result from two different perfusion rates or two different blood flow velocities. We provide experimental support for our previous hypothesis: the biphasic tumor hemodynamic feature stems from a well-perfused and poorly perfused region that could be detected with the two time constants of the NIRS signals. With a multichannel approach, noninvasive NIRS measurements may have useful and prognostic values to quantify the therapeutic effects of cancer treatments.

  5. Nanocomposite oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion of sulfur-contaminated synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rahul D. Solunke; Goetz Veser

    2009-09-15

    Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is an emerging technology for clean combustion. We have previously demonstrated that the embedding of metal nanoparticles into a nanostructured ceramic matrix can result in unusually active and sinter-resistant nanocomposite oxygen carrier materials for CLC, which combine the high reactivity of metals with the high-temperature stability of ceramics. In the present study, we investigate the effect of H{sub 2}S in a typical coal-derived syngas on the stability and redox kinetics of Ni- and Cu-based nanostructured oxygen carriers. Both carriers show excellent structural stability and only mildly changed redox kinetics upon exposure to H{sub 2}S, despite a significant degree of sulfide formation. Surprisingly, partial sulfidation of the support results in a strong increase in oxygen carrier capacity in both cases because of the addition of a sulfide-sulfate cycle. Overall, the carriers show great potential for use in CLC of high-sulfur fuels. 21 refs., 13 figs. 1 tab.

  6. Surface Casing Pressure As an Indicator of Well Integrity Loss and Stray Gas Migration in the Wattenberg Field, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Greg; Rajaram, Harihar; Sherwood, Owen A; Burke, Troy L; Ryan, Joseph N

    2017-03-21

    The risk of environmental contamination by oil and gas wells depends strongly on the frequency with which they lose integrity. Wells with compromised integrity typically exhibit pressure in their outermost annulus (surface casing pressure, SfCP) due to gas accumulation. SfCP is an easily measured but poorly documented gauge of well integrity. Here, we analyze SfCP data from the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission database to evaluate the frequency of well integrity loss in the Wattenberg Test Zone (WTZ), within the Wattenberg Field, Colorado. Deviated and horizontal wells were found to exhibit SfCP more frequently than vertical wells. We propose a physically meaningful well-specific critical SfCP criterion, which indicates the potential for a well to induce stray gas migration. We show that 270 of 3923 wells tested for SfCP in the WTZ exceeded critical SfCP. Critical SfCP is strongly controlled by the depth of the surface casing. Newer horizontal wells, drilled during the unconventional drilling boom, exhibited critical SfCP less frequently than other wells because they were predominantly constructed with deeper surface casings. Thus, they pose a lower risk for inducing stray gas migration than legacy vertical or deviated wells with surface casings shorter than modern standards.

  7. Influence of Oxygen Gas Ratio on the Properties of Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Films Prepared by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minha; Jang, Yong-Jun; Jung, Ho-Sung; Song, Woochang; Kang, Hyunil; Kim, Eung Kwon; Kim, Donguk; Yi, Junsin; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO) thin films were deposited on glass and polyimide substrates using radio frequency magnetron sputtering. We investigated the effects of the oxygen gas ratio on the properties of the AZO films for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell applications. The structural and optical properties of the AZO thin films were measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and UV-Visible-NIR spectrophotometry. The oxygen gas ratio played a crucial role in controlling the optical as well as electrical properties of the films. When oxygen gas was added into the film, the surface AZO thin films became smoother and the grains were enlarged while the preferred orientation changed from (0 0 2) to (1 0 0) plane direction of the hexagonal phase. An improvement in the transmittance of the AZO thin films was achieved with the addition of 2.5-% oxygen gas. The electrical resistivity was highly increased even for a small amount of the oxygen gas addition.

  8. Gas-liquid slug-flow oxygen transport and non-invasive biomass estimation in hollow-fiber reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.J.

    1989-01-01

    Maintenance of non-limiting concentrations of dissolved gases at the surface of a particulate biocatalyst is a formidable barrier to the development of ultra-compact bioreactors. The method proposed here for supplying dissolved gases resembles the microcirculation of vertebrates. In the microcirculation, two phases, oxygen-rich hemoglobin-packed erythrocytes and nutrient-rich plasma, pass alternately through the capillaries. In slug-flow membrane bioreactors, two phases, oxygen-rich gas bubbles and slugs of aqueous nutrient medium, flow alternately on one side of a semipermeable membrane while cells grow on the opposite side. Protein synthesis rates were measured for Bacillus licheniformis 749C cultures immobilized in slug-flow hollow-fiber membrane reactors. The cultures required oxygen for growth and protein synthesis. A mathematical model of slug-flow identified the operating conditions corresponding to either continuous or periodic oxygen supply within the reactors. Synthesis rates within the slug-flow reactors were higher than those predicted by the model; the model apparently underestimated concentrations of soluble nutrients in the biomass. Non-invasive estimates of the total immobilized biomass are needed to monitor and control the biomass density, and hence the transport properties of the biomass phase. Investigators have used two non-invasive methods: in situ monitoring of an aggregate property, such as electrical conductivity; and inferential estimates based on substrate consumption and metabolic models. Techniques were developed to estimate immobilized biomass concentrations and growth rates from sulfur mass balances. Additionally, global mass balances showed that time-averaged biomass specific growth rates can be estimated from effluent concentrations of any substrate with a finite yield coefficient.

  9. Thermodynamic approach to oxygen delivery in vivo by natural and artificial oxygen carriers.

    PubMed

    Bucci, Enrico

    2009-06-01

    Oxygen is a toxic gas, still indispensable to aerobic life. This paper explores how normal physiology uses the physico-chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of oxygen for transforming a toxic gas into a non toxic indispensable metabolite. Plasma oxygen concentration is in the range of 10(-5) M, insufficient to sustain metabolism. Oxygen carriers, present in blood, release oxygen into plasma, thereby replacing consumed oxygen and buffering PO(2) near their P(50). They are the natural cell-bound carriers, like hemoglobin inside red cells, myoglobin inside myocytes, and artificial cell-free hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) dissolved in plasma. Metabolic oxygen replacement can be defined as cell-bound and cell-free delivery. Cell-bound delivery is retarded by the slow diffusion of oxygen in plasma and interstitial fluids. The 40% hematocrit of normal blood compensates for the delay, coping with the fast oxygen consumption by mitochondria. Facilitated oxygen diffusion by HBOCs corrects for the slow diffusion, making cell-free delivery relatively independent from P(50). At all oxygen affinities, HBOCs produce hyperoxygenations that are compensated by vasoconstrictions. There is a strict direct correlation between the rate of oxygen replacement and hemoglobin content of blood. The free energy loss of the gradient adds a relevant regulation of tissues oxygenation. Oxygen is retained intravascularly by the limited permeability to gases of vessel walls.

  10. GAS-PHASE OXYGEN GRADIENTS IN STRONGLY INTERACTING GALAXIES. I. EARLY-STAGE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rupke, David S. N.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Chien, L.-H.

    2010-11-10

    A consensus is emerging that interacting galaxies show depressed nuclear gas metallicities compared to isolated star-forming galaxies. Simulations suggest that this nuclear underabundance is caused by interaction-induced inflow of metal-poor gas and that this inflow concurrently flattens the radial metallicity gradients in strongly interacting galaxies. We present metallicities of over 300 H II regions in a sample of 16 spirals that are members of strongly interacting galaxy pairs with mass ratio near unity. The deprojected radial gradients in these galaxies are about half of those in a control sample of isolated, late-type spirals. Detailed comparison of the gradients with simulations shows remarkable agreement in gradient distributions, the relationship between gradients and nuclear underabundances, and the shape of profile deviations from a straight line. Taken together, this evidence conclusively demonstrates that strongly interacting galaxies at the present day undergo nuclear metal dilution due to gas inflow, as well as significant flattening of their gas-phase metallicity gradients, and that current simulations can robustly reproduce this behavior at a statistical level.

  11. Nonlinear stopping power and energy-loss straggling of an interacting electron gas for slow ions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, I.; Arnau, A.; Echenique, P. M.

    1989-07-15

    Theoretical calculations of the basic quantities that characterize thestopping of an interacting electron gas for slow ions are presented. Anappropriate low-frequency expansion for the imaginary part of the densityresponse function has been used to modify well-known results for thenoninteracting electron gas. The inner dissipative nature of the elementaryelectron-hole excitation is characterized by a complex local-field correctionfunction. The basic quantities are expressed in terms of the phase shiftsdetermined from a nonlinear density-functional formalism.

  12. Quantitation of platelet loss with indium-111 labeled platelets in a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator and arterial filter during extracorporeal circulation in a pig model

    SciTech Connect

    Palatianos, G.M.; Dewanjee, M.K.; Robinson, R.P.; Novak, S.; Dewanjee, P.K.; Kapadvanjwala, M.; Hsu, L.C.; Sfakianakis, G.N.; Kaiser, G.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Platelet consumption in a hollow-fiber membrane oxygenator (HFMO) and arterial filter (AF) during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) was quantified in five pigs using Indium-111 labeled autologous platelets. Platelet labeling was performed 20-24 hours before CPB. After general endotracheal anesthesia, the pigs were systemically heparinized and were placed on CPB via a median sternotomy. After 3 hours of CPB, radioactivity was quantified with a gamma camera and an ionization chamber. The percent of injected dose (mean {plus minus} SD) was 0.79 +/- 0.45 in the HFMO, 2.52 {plus minus} 0.93 in AF, 4.3 {plus minus} 1.2 in blood loss during CPB. Platelet consumption in HFMO during CPB was lower than in bubble oxygenators (19%) or silicone membrane oxygenators (12%) as observed in previous studies.

  13. Nutrient losses and greenhouse gas emissions from dairy production in China: Lessons learned from historical changes and regional differences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nannan; Bai, Zhaohai; Luo, Jiafa; Ledgard, Stewart; Wu, Zhiguo; Ma, Lin

    2017-11-15

    The dairy industry in China was rapidly expanded and intensified from 1980 to 2010, engendering potential long-term impacts on the environment and natural resources. However, impacts of dairy intensification on nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) losses and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions were unknown. This study was undertaken to examine these relations using the NUtrient flows in Food chains, Environment and Resources use (NUFER)-dairy model. Results showed that milk yield increased by 64% from 1980 to 2010 on average, and the use of concentrate feeds increased by 57% associated with a shift of production from traditional and grassland systems to collective and industrialized systems. At herd level, the N use efficiency (NUE; conversion of N inputs to products) doubled from 7 to 15%, and the P use efficiency (PUE) increased from 10 to 17%, primarily resulting from increased milk yield per cow. In contrast, at the system level, NUE showed a small increase (from 10 to 15%, associated with reduced gaseous losses) while PUE decreased from 46 to 30% due to a large increase in manure discharges. This is attributed to decoupling of feed and dairy production, as the proportion of manure N and P recycled to cropland decreased by 52% and 54%, respectively. Despite this, the average total N loss decreased from 63 to 48gkg(-1) milk, and the average GHG emissions from 1.7 to 1.1kgCO2equivalentkg(-1) milk associated with increased per-cow productivity. However, average P loss increased from 1.4 to 2.8gPkg(-1) milk due to higher discharge rate to wastewater and landfill in collective and industrialized systems. Anyhow, average N and P losses exceeded levels in developed countries. There were large regional variations in nutrient use efficiency, nutrient losses and GHG emissions in China, largely determined by the dairy production structure. Average N losses and GHG emissions per unit of milk showed a negative correlation with production intensification based on the proportion of

  14. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and

  15. Combined Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen and Antimicrobials in a Model of Gas Gangrene.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-30

    effect on growth or survival of the bacteria (16). However, alpha toxin production was inhibited by the same dose of HBO (16). The purpose of the...this model. 14L S•euc’T Time IS. NiR OF PAG1s Hyperbaric Oxygen, Clostridial nVonecr1-osis, aluha toxin , antinicrobials I, LmOO COW "II. SI•CT Q.AMSSO...temperature. Organisms were recultured every two weeks. Prior to each experiment, bacteria were cultured in aerobic and anaerobic conditions on

  16. West Siberian gas accumulations - the origin of methane and losses to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, B.; Littke, R.; Braun, A. )

    1996-01-01

    West Siberia is the most prolific gas producing sedimentary basin of the world. Nevertheless the problem of the origin of these large gas accumulations has not yet been solved. Late thermogenic gas generation from Jurassic strata (usually 3500 m and deeper) and early thermogenic or bacterial gas generation from Cenomanian to Aptian strata (usually at 600 to 2500 m depth) are the processes currently in discussion. Organic-geochemical analyses of 150 core samples as well as compositional and isotopic data of about 120 gases provided the database of this study. The Cenomanian reservoirs contain almost pure methane (average 98.6% CH[sub 4]) with [delta][sup 13]C of methane as light as -55[per thousand], while the gases from Neocomian and Jurassic reservoirs show more positive values, which are typical for high maturity source rocks. A model of linear mixing between Cenomanian and Jurassic gases fits fairly well with the observed compositional trends. This model indicates that up to 90% of the Cenomanian methane was probably generated in the Cenomanian-Aptian sequence. The question of bacterial versus early thermogenic generation will be discussed. Wireline log interpretation allowed the detection of up to three layers of permafrost in this region, which might be effective seals to prevent upward gas migration. Surface geochemical measurements show no detectable amounts of methane diffusing from the reservoirs into the atmosphere.

  17. West Siberian gas accumulations - the origin of methane and losses to the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, B.; Littke, R.; Braun, A.

    1996-12-31

    West Siberia is the most prolific gas producing sedimentary basin of the world. Nevertheless the problem of the origin of these large gas accumulations has not yet been solved. Late thermogenic gas generation from Jurassic strata (usually 3500 m and deeper) and early thermogenic or bacterial gas generation from Cenomanian to Aptian strata (usually at 600 to 2500 m depth) are the processes currently in discussion. Organic-geochemical analyses of 150 core samples as well as compositional and isotopic data of about 120 gases provided the database of this study. The Cenomanian reservoirs contain almost pure methane (average 98.6% CH{sub 4}) with {delta}{sup 13}C of methane as light as -55{per_thousand}, while the gases from Neocomian and Jurassic reservoirs show more positive values, which are typical for high maturity source rocks. A model of linear mixing between Cenomanian and Jurassic gases fits fairly well with the observed compositional trends. This model indicates that up to 90% of the Cenomanian methane was probably generated in the Cenomanian-Aptian sequence. The question of bacterial versus early thermogenic generation will be discussed. Wireline log interpretation allowed the detection of up to three layers of permafrost in this region, which might be effective seals to prevent upward gas migration. Surface geochemical measurements show no detectable amounts of methane diffusing from the reservoirs into the atmosphere.

  18. Computational study of the reaction of atomic oxygen with acetone in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hua; Li, Yuzhen; Wang, Baoshan

    2006-12-14

    Mechanisms and kinetics of the reaction of atomic oxygen with acetone have been investigated using ab initio quantum chemistry methods and transition state theory. The structures of the stationary points along the possible reaction pathways were obtained using the second-order Møller-Plesset theory and the coupled-cluster theory with single and double excitations with the triple-zeta quality basis sets. The energetics of the reaction pathways were calculated at the reduced second-order Gaussian-3 level and the extrapolated full coupled-cluster/complete basis set limit. The rate coefficients were calculated in the temperature range 200-3000 K, with the detailed consideration of the hindered internal rotation and the tunneling effect using Eckart and the semiclassical WKB approximations. It is shown that the predominant mechanism is the direct hydrogen abstraction producing hydroxyl and acetonyl radicals. Although the nucleophilic OC addition/elimination channel leading to CH3 and CO2 involves comparable barrier with the direct hydrogen abstraction channel, kinetically it cannot play any role in the overall reaction. It is predicted that the rate coefficients show positive temperature dependence in the range 200-3000 K and strong non-Arrhenius behavior. The tunneling effect plays a significant role. Moreover, the reaction has strong kinetic isotope effect. The calculated results are in good agreement with the available experimental data. The present rigorous theoretical work is helpful for the understanding of the characteristics of the reaction of atomic oxygen with acetone.

  19. Nitrogen gas propagation in a liquid helium cooled vacuum tube following a sudden vacuum loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhuley, R. C.; Van Sciver, S. W.

    2017-02-01

    We present experimental measurements and analysis of propagation of the nitrogen gas that was vented to a high vacuum tube immersed in liquid helium (LHe). The scenario resembles accidental venting of atmospheric air to a SRF beam-line and was investigated to understand how the in-flowing air would propagate in such geometry. The gas front propagation speed in the tube was measured using pressure probes and thermometers installed at regular intervals over the tube length. The experimental data show the front speed to decrease along the vacuum tube. The empirical and analytical models developed to characterize the front deceleration are summarized.

  20. Using photo-ionisation models to derive carbon and oxygen gas-phase abundances in the rest UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Montero, Enrique; Amorín, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    We present a new method to derive oxygen and carbon abundances using the ultraviolet (UV) lines emitted by the gas-phase ionised by massive stars. The method is based on the comparison of the nebular emission-line ratios with those predicted by a large grid of photo-ionisation models. Given the large dispersion in the O/H - C/O plane, our method firstly fixes C/O using ratios of appropriate emission lines and, in a second step, calculates O/H and the ionisation parameter from carbon lines in the UV. We find abundances totally consistent with those provided by the direct method when we apply this method to a sample of objects with an empirical determination of the electron temperature using optical emission lines. The proposed methodology appears as a powerful tool for systematic studies of nebular abundances in star-forming galaxies at high redshift.

  1. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometric study of 19-oxygenation of the aromatase inhibitor 19-methylandrostenedione with human placental microsomes.

    PubMed

    Numazawa, Mitsuteru; Nagaoka, Masao; Handa, Wakako; Yamada, Akane

    2006-06-01

    To gain insight into the catalytic function of aromatase, we studied 19-oxygenation of 19-methyl-substituted derivative of the natural substrate androstenedione (AD), compound 1, with human placental aromatase by use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Incubation of the 19-methyl derivative 1 with human placental microsomes in the presence of NADPH under an aerobic condition did not yield a detectable amount of [19S]19-hydroxy product 2 or its [19R]-isomer 3 when the product was analyzed as the bis-methoxime-trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative by GC-MS; moreover, the production of estrogen was not detected as the bis-TMS derivative of estradiol (detection limit: about 3 ng and 10 pg per injection for the 19-ol and estradiol, respectively). The results reveal that the 19-methyl steroid 1 does not serve as a substrate of aromatase, although it does serve as a powerful inhibitor of the enzyme.

  2. Computation of decompression schedules for single inert gas-oxygen dives using a hand-held programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ranade, A; Peterson, R E

    1980-08-01

    An algorithm for on-site computation with a hand-held programmable calculator (TI-59, Texas Instruments) of single inert-gas decompression schedules is described. This program is based on Workman's 'M-value' method. It can compute decompression schedules with changes in the oxygen content of the breathing mixture and extension of stay at any decompression stop. The features of the program that enable calculation of atypical dive profiles, along with the portability of small calculators, would make such an algorithm suitable for on-site applications. However, since dive profiles generated by the program have not yet been tested, divers are warned not to generate schedules until their safety has been established by field tests.

  3. Use of transcutaneous oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions for assessing indices of gas exchange during exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Carter, R; Banham, S W

    2000-04-01

    The slow response characteristics of the combined transcutaneous electrode have been viewed as a major disadvantage when compared with other types of non-invasive assessment of gas exchange during exercise testing. We have previously shown that by using the highest recommended temperature of 45 degrees C to reduce response times, and combining this with an exercise protocol of gradual work load increments, that this allows changes in arterial blood gases to be closely followed by transcutaneous values. In the present study we have validated the use of a transcutaneous electrode for estimation of alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient (AaO2) and dead space to tidal volume ratio (V(D)/V(T)) during exercise, against values calculated from direct arterial blood gas analysis. One hundred measurements were made in 20 patients with various cardiopulmonary disorders who underwent exercise testing. Exercise testing was performed by bicycle ergometry with a specific protocol involving gradual work load increments at 2 min intervals. Transcutaneous gas tensions were measured by a heated combined O2 and CO2 electrode. Arterial blood was sampled at the midpoint of each stage of exercise and transcutaneous tensions noted at the end of each stage. The mean difference of the AaO2 gradient calculated from blood gas tensions obtained by the two methods was 0.14 kPa. The limits of agreement were -0.26 and 0.63 kPa. The same values for V(D)/V(T) calculated from gas tensions measured by the two methods were: mean difference 0001; limits of agreement -0.0242 and 0.0252. For both these parameters there was an even scatter around the mean value on Bland and Altman analysis. The findings of this study suggest that estimation of parameters of gas exchange using transcutaneous values during exercise testing is reliable, provided the electrode is heated to a slightly higher temperature than usual and the work load increments are gradual, allowing for the latency in the response time of the system

  4. Experimental load capacity and power loss of herringbone grooved gas lubricated journal bearings.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, R. E.; Fleming, D. P.; Anderson, W. J.

    1971-01-01

    Load capacity, attitude angle, and power loss were determined for 1-1/2-in.-diam herringbone grooved journal bearings operating in air to speeds of 60,000 rpm. Results showed that groove-to-ridge-clearance ratios of 2.0 to 2.4 give a greater load capacity than do ratios outside this optimum range. Agreement with a small-eccentricity pressure perturbation theory was good for groove-to-ridge-clearance ratios in the optimum range. Power loss, relative to that calculated for a plain bearing of the same dimensions, did not vary widely for the range of geometric variables used. Relative power loss generally increased with speed and was generally comparable to that for a plain bearing.

  5. Decreasing phosphorus loss in tile-drained landscapes using flue gas desulfurization gypsum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated phosphorus (P) loading from agricultural non-point source pollution continues to impair inland waterbodies throughout the world. The application of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum to agricultural fields has been suggested to decrease P loading because of its high calcium content and P...

  6. Gas/particle partitioning of n-alkanes, PAHs and oxygenated PAHs in urban Denver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hannigan, Michael P.; Barsanti, Kelley C.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a medium volume sampler equipped with quartz fiber filters (QFFs) and a polyurethane foam (PUF)/XAD-4/PUF sandwich (PXP) was used to collect semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in both gaseous and particle (PM2.5) phases. A backup QFF (bQFF) was used to evaluate possible sampling artifact of particulate organics due to vapor-phase adsorption. A series of n-alkanes (molecular weight: 170-562) and PAHs (128-300), and two oxy-PAHs (acenaphthenone, 168; fluorenone, 180) were measured. Breakthrough experiments demonstrated that the PXP could collect all gas-phase target compounds with high efficiency, even the low molecular weight (MW) species (e.g., naphthalene). Comparing species concentrations across different sampling matrices encountered at the Denver, Colorado field site, the light n-alkanes (MW < 282) and PAHs (MW < 192) were mostly distributed into the gas phase; while those heavy n-alkanes (MW > 324) and PAHs (MW > 202) were primarily in the particle phase (Average temperature, 12.5 ± 10.1 °C). Log values of measured gas/particle (G/P) partitioning coefficients (Kmp,OM) of selected SVOCs (docosane, tricosane, fluoranthene, pyrene, acenaphthenone and fluorenone) were linearly regressed to those of theoretically-based partitioning coefficients (Ktp,OM) for comparison. Prior to Kmp,OM calculation, the gas- and particle-phase concentrations of SVOCs were corrected following two different approaches based on bQFF measurements. The first approach assumed that the bQFF associated SVOCs were from the adsorption of gaseous SVOCs (positive artifact); the second approach assumed equal contributions from positive and negative (organics evaporated from top QFF and adsorbed by bQFF) artifacts. Under both corrections, significant correlations (p < 0.05) were observed between log Kmp,OM and log Ktp,OM for the six selected SVOCs, suggesting that the predicted G/P partitioning can reasonably capture the measured G/P partitioning behavior. The large

  7. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P; Aramendi, José F; Gorostiaga, Esteban M

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of -0.18% and -0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5-6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8-9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise.

  8. Gas analyzer's drift leads to systematic error in maximal oxygen uptake and maximal respiratory exchange ratio determination

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Tabar, Ibai; Eclache, Jean P.; Aramendi, José F.; Gorostiaga, Esteban M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to examine the drift in the measurements of fractional concentration of oxygen (FO2) and carbon dioxide (FCO2) of a Nafion-using metabolic cart during incremental maximal exercise in 18 young and 12 elderly males, and to propose a way in which the drift can be corrected. The drift was verified by comparing the pre-test calibration values with the immediate post-test verification values of the calibration gases. The system demonstrated an average downscale drift (P < 0.001) in FO2 and FCO2 of −0.18% and −0.05%, respectively. Compared with measured values, corrected average maximal oxygen uptakevalues were 5–6% lower (P < 0.001) whereas corrected maximal respiratory exchange ratio values were 8–9% higher (P < 0.001). The drift was not due to an electronic instability in the analyzers because it was reverted after 20 min of recovery from the end of the exercise. The drift may be related to an incomplete removal of water vapor from the expired gas during transit through the Nafion conducting tube. These data demonstrate the importance of checking FO2 and FCO2 values by regular pre-test calibrations and post-test verifications, and also the importance of correcting a possible shift immediately after exercise. PMID:26578980

  9. Decrease in the etch rate of polymers in the oxygen afterglow with increasing gas flow rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the variation of the etch rate of polymers in the afterglow of a radio frequency discharge in oxygen as a function of total flow rate in the range 2-10 cu cm (STP)/min. The measurements were made at ambient temperature with the O(P-3) concentration held essentially constant. Results are reported on three polymers: cis-polybutadiene, a polybutadiene with 33 percent 1,2 double bonds, and a polybutadiene with 40 percent 1,2 double bonds. It has been observed that the etch rate of these polymers decreases significantly with increasing flow rate, strongly suggesting that the vapor-phase products of polymer degradation contribute to the degradation process.

  10. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  11. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  12. Growth concentration effect on oxygen vacancy induced band gap narrowing and optical CO gas sensing properties of ZnO nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chun Hui; Tan, Sin Tee; Lee, Hock Beng; Yap, Chi Chin; Yahaya, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    Band gap energy and surface defect on the nanostructure play an important role especially in determining the performance and properties of the optical based gas sensor. In this report, ZnO nanorods (ZNRs) with various growth concentrations were successfully synthesized using a facile wet chemical approach. The gas sensing performance of the ZNRs samples with different concentrations were tested toward the highly hazardous carbon monoxide (CO) gas at a concentration of 10 ppm operated at room temperature. It was found that the 40 mM ZNRs sample exhibited the highest response coupled with the shortest response time (123.3 ± 1.3 s) and recovery time (7.7 ± 0.3 s). The high response and accelerated sensing reaction were attributed to the band gap narrowing of the 40 mM ZNRs induced by the increase in oxygen vacancy related defect states, and it is directly proportional to the CO gas sensing activity. These defects acted as the oxygen trap sites which will promote the oxygen adsorption on the surface of ZNRs and enhanced its gas sensing capability. The ZNRs reported herein which exhibits a high sensitivity, fast and reversible response with rapid recovery have great potential to be used in toxic gas sensing applications at room temperature.

  13. On the oxygen abundance of neutral gas in I ZW 18.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettini, M.; Lipman, K.

    1995-05-01

    Whether the H II regions of dwarf emission line galaxies are self-polluted by the nucleosynthetic products of massive stars remains an open question, despite recent claims to the contrary. We show that the finding by Kunth and collaborators that the neutral interstellar medium of I Zw 18 has a metallicity one order of magnitude lower than that of the ionized gas is highly uncertain. The range of possible values of (O/H) admitted by the saturated O I absorption line used in their analysis is very large, spanning a factor of ~1000. We suggest that future observations of the intrinsically weaker S II λ1256 multiplet offer the best prospects for measuring the true degree of metal enrichment of this dwarf galaxy.

  14. Thermal analysis of magnesium reactions with nitrogen/oxygen gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chunmiao, Yuan; Lifu, Yu; Chang, Li; Gang, Li; Shengjun, Zhong

    2013-09-15

    The thermal behavior and kinetic parameters of magnesium powder subjected to a nitrogen-rich atmosphere was investigated in thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) experiments with oxygen/nitrogen mixtures heated at rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 °C/min. At higher temperature increase rates, the observed oxidation or nitridation steps shifted toward higher temperatures. The comparison of mass gain and heat of reaction in different nitrogen concentrations is helpful in interpreting the inerting effect of nitrogen on magnesium powder explosion in closed vessels. Activation energies for oxidation in air calculated by the Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS) method are generally consistent with previously published reports, but the method was not successful for the entire nitridation process. The change of activation energy with temperature was related to protective properties of the corresponding coating layer at particle surfaces. Two main coating layer growth processes were found in magnesium oxidation and nitridation using a modified Dreizin method which was also employed to determine activation energy for both magnesium oxidation and nitridation. For magnesium powder oxidation, activation energy calculated by the Dreizin method was close to that by KAS. Variation in activation energies was a function of different mechanisms inherent in the two methods.

  15. Tuning graphene for energy and environmental applications: Oxygen reduction reaction and greenhouse gas mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Enamul; Sarkar, Shuranjan; Hassan, Mahbub; Hossain, Md. Shahriar; Minett, Andrew I.; Dou, Shi Xue; Gomes, Vincent G.

    2016-10-01

    Porous nitrogen-doped graphene samples were synthesized and tuned via pyrolysis of solid nitrogen precursor dimethyl-aminoterephthalate with graphene oxide as template. Our investigations show that the extent of thermal treatment, total concentration of nitrogen and the nature of nitrogen moieties play important roles in enhancing oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and CO2 uptake. N-doped graphene synthesized at 650 °C (NG-650) with specific BET surface area of 278 m2/g, exhibits enhanced CO2 sorption capacity of 4.43 mmol/g (at 298 K, 1 bar) with exceptional selectivity (CO2:N2 = 42) and cyclic regeneration stability. In contrast, nitrogen-doped graphene synthesized at 750 °C (NG-750) demonstrated excellent catalytic activity for ORR via favourable 4e- transfer, performance stability with tests conducted up to 5000 cycles, and is unaffected by methanol cross-over effect. Thus, NG-750 shows potential to replace metal-based electrodes for fuel cell application. The comparative results for ORR with non-doped and nitrogen-doped graphene electrodes showed that graphitic nitrogen sites play vital role in enhancing catalytic activity.

  16. On-line gas analysis in animal cell cultivation: II. Methods for oxygen uptake rate estimation and its application to controlled feeding of glutamine.

    PubMed

    Eyer, K; Oeggerli, A; Heinzle, E

    1995-01-05

    Different methods for oxygen uptake rate (OUR) determinations in animal cell cultivation were investigated using a high quality mass spectrometer. Dynamic measurements have considerable disadvantages because of disturbances of the growing cells by the necessary variations of dissolved oxygen concentration. Only infrequent discrete measurements are possible using this method. Stationary liquid phase balance yielded better results with much higher frequency. Gas phase balancing has the advantage of not requiring dissolved oxygen measurement and knowledge of K(L)a, both of them are easily biased. It was found that simple gas phase balancing is either very inaccurate (error larger than expected signal) or very slow, with gas phase residence times of several hours. Therefore, a new method of aeration was designed. Oxygen and CO(2) transfer are mainly achieved via sparging. The gas released to the headspace is diluted with a roughly 100-fold stream of an inert gas (helium). Through this dilution, gas ratios are not changed for O(2), CO(2), Ar, and N(2). The measurement of lower concentrations (parts per million and below) is easy using mass spectrometry with a secondary electron multiplier. With this new method an excellent accuracy and sufficient speed of analysis were obtained. All these on-line methods for OUR measurement were tested during the cultivation of animal cells. The new method allowed better study of the kinetics of animal cell cultures as was shown with a hybridoma cell line (HFN 7.1, ATCC CRL 1606) producing monoclonal antibodies against human fibronectin. With the aid of these methods it was possible to find a correlation between a rapid decrease in oxygen uptake rate (OUR) and glutamine concentration. The sudden decrease in OUR can be attributed to glutamine depletion. This provided a basis for the controlled addition of glutamine to reduce the formation of ammonia produced by hydrolysis. This control method based on OUR measurement resulted in

  17. Degradation mechanisms of 4-chlorophenol in a novel gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor by pulsed high voltage system with oxygen or nitrogen bubbling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhou, Minghua; Hao, Xiaolong; Lei, Lecheng

    2007-03-01

    The effect of gas bubbling on the removal efficiency of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in aqueous solution has been investigated using a novel pulsed high voltage gas-liquid hybrid discharge reactor, which generates gas-phase discharge above the water surface simultaneously with the spark discharge directly in the liquid. The time for 100% of 4-CP degradation in the case of oxygen bubbling (7 min) was much shorter than that in the case of nitrogen bubbling (25 min) as plenty of hydrogen peroxide and ozone formed in oxygen atmosphere enhanced the removal efficiency of 4-CP. Except for the main similar intermediates (4-chlorocatechol, hydroquinone and 1,4-benzoquinone) produced in the both cases of oxygen and nitrogen bubbling, special intermediates (5-chloro-3-nitropyrocatechol, 4-chloro-2-nitrophenol, nitrate and nitrite ions) were produced in nitrogen atmosphere. The reaction pathway of 4-CP in the case of oxygen bubbling was oxygen/ozone attack on the radical hydroxylated derivatives of 4-CP. However, in the case of nitrogen bubbling, hydroxylation was the main reaction pathway with effect of N atom on degradation of 4-CP.

  18. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 2.3: Sulfur Primer

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is Subtask 2.3 of Task 2, Gas Cleanup Design and Cost Estimates, of NREL Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Subtask 2.3 builds upon the sulfur removal information first presented in Subtask 2.1, Gas Cleanup Technologies for Biomass Gasification by adding additional information on the commercial applications, manufacturers, environmental footprint, and technical specifications for sulfur removal technologies. The data was obtained from Nexant's experience, input from GTI and other vendors, past and current facility data, and existing literature.

  19. High-resolution TALIF measurements of atomic oxygen: determination of gas temperature and collisional broadening coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Drag, Cyril; Engeln, Richard; Golda, Judith; Schultz-von der Gathern, Volker

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) is a well-established technique to measure relative (and with appropriate calibration techniques, absolute) densities of atoms in plasmas and flames. The excitation line profiles can provide additional information, but this is usually overlooked due to the mediocre spectral resolution of commercial pulsed dye laser systems. We have investigated O-atom TALIF excitation line profiles using a house-built narrow line-width pulsed UV laser system, based on pulsed Ti:Sa ring laser seeded by a cw infrared diode laser. The observed Doppler profiles allow unambiguous measurement of gas temperature with high precision in O2 and CO2 DC glow discharges. Sub-Doppler measurements, performed by reflecting the laser beam back through excitation zone, allow the pressure-broadened line shapes to be observed, both in a pure O2 DC discharge (up to 10 Torr pressure) and in an atmospheric pressure RF plasma jet in He/O2. Pressure broadening coefficients of the 3p3PJ state of O were determined for O2 and He bath gases, and were found to be an order of magnitude bigger than that predicted from the measured quenching rate. Work performed in the LABEX Plas@par project, with financial state aid (ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02 and ANR-13-BS09-0019).

  20. Using stable isotopes of dissolved oxygen for the determination of gas exchange in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Terra S; Schiff, Sherry L; Taylor, William D

    2013-02-01

    Gas exchange can be a key component of the dissolved oxygen (DO) mass balance in aquatic ecosystems. Quantification of gas transfer rates is essential for the estimation of DO production and consumption rates, and determination of assimilation capacities of systems receiving organic inputs. Currently, the accurate determination of gas transfer rate is a topic of debate in DO modeling, and there are a wide variety of approaches that have been proposed in the literature. The current study investigates the use of repeated measures of stable isotopes of O₂ and DO and a dynamic dual mass-balance model to quantify gas transfer coefficients (k) in the Grand River, Ontario, Canada. Measurements were conducted over a longitudinal gradient that reflected watershed changes from agricultural to urban. Values of k in the Grand River ranged from 3.6 to 8.6 day⁻¹, over discharges ranging from 5.6 to 22.4 m³ s⁻¹, with one high-flow event of 73.1 m³ s⁻¹. The k values were relatively constant over the range of discharge conditions studied. The range in discharge observed in this study is generally representative of non-storm and summer low-flow events; a greater range in k might be observed under a wider range of hydrologic conditions. Overall, k values obtained with the dual model for the Grand River were found to be lower than predicted by the traditional approaches evaluated, highlighting the importance of determining site-specific values of k. The dual mass balance approach provides a more constrained estimate of k than using DO only, and is applicable to large rivers where other approaches would be difficult to use. The addition of an isotopic mass balance provides for a corroboration of the input parameter estimates between the two balances. Constraining the range of potential input values allows for a direct estimate of k in large, productive systems where other k-estimation approaches may be uncertain or logistically infeasible.

  1. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  2. Multiscale Computational Analysis of Nitrogen and Oxygen Gas-Phase Thermochemistry in Hypersonic Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Jason D.

    Understanding hypersonic aerodynamics is important for the design of next-generation aerospace vehicles for space exploration, national security, and other applications. Ground-level experimental studies of hypersonic flows are difficult and expensive; thus, computational science plays a crucial role in this field. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of extremely high-speed flows require models of chemical and thermal nonequilibrium processes, such as dissociation of diatomic molecules and vibrational energy relaxation. Current models are outdated and inadequate for advanced applications. We describe a multiscale computational study of gas-phase thermochemical processes in hypersonic flows, starting at the atomic scale and building systematically up to the continuum scale. The project was part of a larger effort centered on collaborations between aerospace scientists and computational chemists. We discuss the construction of potential energy surfaces for the N4, N2O2, and O4 systems, focusing especially on the multi-dimensional fitting problem. A new local fitting method named L-IMLS-G2 is presented and compared with a global fitting method. Then, we describe the theory of the quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) approach for modeling molecular collisions. We explain how we implemented the approach in a new parallel code for high-performance computing platforms. Results from billions of QCT simulations of high-energy N2 + N2, N2 + N, and N2 + O2 collisions are reported and analyzed. Reaction rate constants are calculated and sets of reactive trajectories are characterized at both thermal equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. The data shed light on fundamental mechanisms of dissociation and exchange reactions -- and their coupling to internal energy transfer processes -- in thermal environments typical of hypersonic flows. We discuss how the outcomes of this investigation and other related studies lay a rigorous foundation for new macroscopic models for

  3. Microbial communities and greenhouse gas production from a thermokarst bog chronosequence: Mechanisms of rapid carbon loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldrop, M. P.; Jones, M.; Manies, K.; Mcfarland, J. W.; Blazewicz, S.; Keller, J.; Haw, M.; Harden, J. W.; Medvedeff, C.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change in northern latitudes is expected to cause widespread permafrost thaw in Interior Alaska over the 21st century. Permafrost thaw may result in land subsidence and the formation of thermokarst bogs. In decades following thaw, previously forest floor (silvic) carbon (C) may be rapidly decomposed, likely due to accelerated microbial activities in young bog environments, resulting in a decadal to century scale positive feedback to climate warming. We examined rates and mechanisms of C loss from a thermokarst bog chronosequence (0-500 ybp) at the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX), part of the Bonanza Creek LTER near Fairbanks, AK. Silvic C losses were within ranges observed at other thermokarst chronosequence studies. Incubation studies and modeling results indicate that there are accelerated rates of microbial activity within the deeper silvic and humic soil horizons of the youngest bog. We hypothesized two potential mechanisms of rapid C loss and higher microbial activity in young thermokarst bogs: 1) higher availability of electron acceptors from thawed permafrost that fuel microbial activity, and 2) increased availability of labile C from both soil organic matter and dissolved organic matter in young bogs fuel microbial activity. We tested these hypotheses using anaerobic soil incubations and assays of sulfate reduction, Fe reduction, humic substance (HS) reduction, and nitrate reduction, combined with quantitative PCR of microbial functional groups associated with those processes. Assay results indicated that although sulfate reduction and denitrification were detectable in several of the bogs, only HS reduction was unique to the deep layers of the young thermokarst bog. The most striking difference among different aged bogs was dissolved organic matter, which was elevated in the youngest bogs. These results support both of our hypotheses: microbial activity is stimulated by the availability of labile C in the young bog as both a source of C for

  4. Microbial sulfate reduction rates and sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionations at oil and gas seeps in deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, Paul; Fu, Baoshun

    2000-01-01

    Sulfate reduction and anaerobic methane oxidation are the dominant microbial processes occurring in hydrate-bearing sediments at bathyal depths in the Gulf of Mexico where crude oil and methane are advecting through fault conduits to the seafloor. The oil and gas seeps are typically overlain by chemosynthetic communities consisting of thiotrophic bacterial mats (Beggiatoa spp.) and methanotrophic mussels (Bathymodiolus spp.), respectively. Cores were recovered with a manned submersible from fine-grained sediments containing dispersed gas hydrates at the threshold of stability. Estimated sulfate reduction rates are variable but generally are substantially higher in crude oil seeps (up to 50 times) and methane seeps (up to 600 times) relative to a non-seep reference sediment (0.0043 μmol SO 42- cm -3 day -1). Sulfur and oxygen isotope fractionation factors are highest in the reference sediment (α S = 1.027; α O = 1.015) but substantially lower in the seep sediments (α S = 1.018 to 1.009; α O = 1.006 to 1.002) and are controlled primarily by kinetic factors related to sulfate reduction rates. Kinetic effects also control the δ 34S/δ 18O ratios such that slow microbial rates yield low ratios whereas faster rates yield progressively higher ratios. The seep data contradict previous claims that δ 34S/δ 18O ratios are diagnostic of either microbial sulfate reduction at a fixed δ 34S/δ 18O ratio of 4/1 or lower ratios caused by SO 4-H 2O equilibration at ambient temperatures. The new results offer a better understanding of methane removal via anaerobic oxidation in the sulfate reduction zone of hydrate-bearing sediments and have significant implications regarding the origin and geochemical history of sedimentary sulfate reconstructed on the basis of δ 34S and δ 18O compositions.

  5. Loss of Homeostatic Gas Exchange in Eastern Hemlock in Response to Pollution and Rising CO2?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayback, S. A.; Gagen, M. H.; Lini, A.; Cogbill, C. V.

    2014-12-01

    In eastern North American, multiple environmental effects, natural and anthropogenic, may impinge upon tree-ring based stable carbon isotope ratios when examined over long time periods. Investigation of relationships between a Vermont (USA) eastern hemlock δ¹³C (1849-2010) chronology and local and regional climate variables, as well as a regional sulfur dioxide time series revealed the decoupling of δ¹³C from significant climate drivers such as May-August maximum temperature (r=0.50, p<0.01) and, raise the possibility that this decoupling can be attributed to foliar and soil leaching of calcium due to acidic deposition since the 1960s. Further, investigation of derived photosynthetic isotope discrimination (Δ¹³C) time series showed an overall decreasing trend in Δ¹³C in response to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (ca), but with a slight rise in Δ¹³C in the last decade. Comparison of time series of leaf intercellular CO2 concentration (ci), ci/ca, and intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE) showed homeostatic maintenance of ci levels against ca until 1965 and rising iWUE. Then, ci increased proportional (1965-2000) and later at the same rate as ca (2001-2010) and iWUE leveled off indicating a potential loss of sensitivity to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. This more recent passive response may be an indication of a loss of homeostatic maintenance of stomatal control and/or may be linked to changing climate in the region (e.g., wetter conditions).

  6. Gas

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine. Certain foods may cause gas. Foods that produce gas in one person may not cause gas in another. You can reduce the amount of gas you have by Drinking lots of water and non-fizzy drinks Eating more slowly so you swallow less air ...

  7. Effect of body weight loss on cardiopulmonary function assessed by 6-minute walk test and arterial blood gas analysis in obese dogs.

    PubMed

    Manens, J; Ricci, R; Damoiseaux, C; Gault, S; Contiero, B; Diez, M; Clercx, C

    2014-01-01

    Few studies show the detrimental effect of canine obesity on cardiopulmonary function (CPF). The 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is a noninvasive exercise test easy to perform in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of obesity and body weight loss (BWL) on CPF assessed by the 6MWT and arterial blood gas analysis. Six experimental Beagles and 9 privately owned obese dogs were enrolled in a diet-induced BWL program. Arterial blood gas analysis and 6MWT were repeated in obese subjects (BCS 8-9/9), in the middle of BWL (overweight, BCS 6-7/9), and in lean dogs (BCS 5/9). Heart rate (HRp) and oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) were measured by pulse oximetry before the 6MWT, at midtest, and during a 5-minute recovery period. Twelve dogs completed the BWL program (initial BW, 27.3 ± 2.9 kg; final BW, 20.85 ± 2.9, lsmeans ± SE, P ≤ .001). BWL caused a significant increase in 6MWT walked distance (WD; obese: 509 ± 35 m; overweight: 575 ± 36 m; lean: 589 ± 36 m; P ≤ .05). Resting arterial blood gas results were not influenced by BWL. Including all time points, obese dogs showed higher HRp and lower SpO2 compared to overweight and lean dogs. SpO2 at the end of the walk was significantly lower in obese dogs. Obesity negatively affects 6MWT performances in dogs. The 6MWT may be used to demonstrate the efficacy of BWL to improve CPF and quality of life in obese dogs. Although BWL induced significant improvement of cardiopulmonary parameters before ideal BW, WD improved until the end of the BWL program. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Loss-of-Function GAS8 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Disrupt the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex

    PubMed Central

    Olbrich, Heike; Cremers, Carolin; Loges, Niki T.; Werner, Claudius; Nielsen, Kim G.; Marthin, June K.; Philipsen, Maria; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Edelbusch, Christine; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Schwartz, Oliver; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Rommelmann, Frank; Omran, Heymut

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated epithelial cells protect the upper and lower airways from chronic bacterial infections by moving mucus and debris outward. Congenital disorders of ciliary beating, referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), are characterized by deficient mucociliary clearance and severe, recurrent respiratory infections. Numerous genetic defects, most of which can be detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are so far known to cause different abnormalities of the ciliary axoneme. However, some defects are not regularly discernable by TEM because the ciliary architecture of the axoneme remains preserved. This applies in particular to isolated defects of the nexin links, also known as the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC), connecting the peripheral outer microtubular doublets. Immunofluorescence analyses of respiratory cells from PCD-affected individuals detected a N-DRC defect. Genome-wide exome sequence analyses identified recessive loss-of-function mutations in GAS8 encoding DRC4 in three independent PCD-affected families. PMID:26387594

  9. Beam Losses and Background Loads on Collider Detectors Due to Beam-Gas Interactions in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2009-04-01

    With a fully-operational high-efficient collimation system in the LHC, nuclear interactions of circulating protons with residual gas in the machine beam pipe can be a major source of beam losses in the vicinity of the collider detectors, responsible for the machine-induced backgrounds. Realistic modeling of Coulomb scattering, elastic and inelastic interactions of 7-TeV protons with nuclei in the vacuum chamber of the cold and warm sections of the LHC ring--with an appropriate pressure profile--is performed with the STRUCT and MARS15 codes. Multi-turn tracking of the primary beams, propagation of secondaries through the lattice, their interception by the tertiary collimators TCT as well as properties of corresponding particle distributions at the CMS and ATLAS detectors are studied in great detail and results presented in this paper.

  10. Desorption of Oxygen from Cationic Niobium Oxide Clusters Revealed by Gas Phase Thermal Desorption Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, Daigo; Nagata, Toshiaki; Mafuné, Fumitaka

    2017-03-16

    Thermal dissociation of cationic niobium oxide clusters (NbnOm(+)) was investigated by gas phase thermal desorption spectrometry. The dominant species formed at 300 K were NbnO(5/2)n+p(+) (n = 2, 4, 6, ...; p = 0, 1, 2, ...) and NbnO((5/2)n-1/2)+q(+) (n = 3, 5, ...; q = 0, 1, 2, ...). At higher temperatures, the more oxygen-rich clusters were observed to release O2. However, the desorption of O2 from NbnOm(+) was found to be insignificant in comparison with VnOm(+) because Nb tends to have a +5 oxidation state exclusively, whereas V can have both +4 and +5 oxidation states. The propensity for the release of O atoms was manifested in the formation of NbnO(5/2)n-1/2(+) from NbnO((5/2)n-1/2)+1(+) for odd values of n, whereas VnO((5/2)n-1/2)+1(+) released O2 molecules instead. The energetics of the O and O2 release from the Nb and V oxide clusters, respectively, was consistent with the results of DFT calculations.

  11. Gas temperature measurements in oxygen plasmas by high-resolution Two-Photon Absorption Laser-induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, J.-P.; Marinov, D.; Foucher, M.; Guaitella, O.; Bresteau, D.; Cabaret, L.; Drag, C.

    2015-11-01

    One of the most important, and difficult to measure, parameters of laboratory discharges in molecular gases is the gas translational temperature. We propose a novel technique to measure directly, with excellent spatial and temporal resolution, the velocity distribution of ground-state atoms (oxygen atoms in this case) in plasmas from the Doppler broadening of their laser excitation spectra. The method is based on the well-known Two-Photon Laser-induced Fluorescence (TALIF) technique, but uses a specially-built pulsed tunable ultraviolet laser with very narrow bandwidth which allows the Doppler profiles to be measured with high precision. This laser consists of a pulsed Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire ring cavity which is injection-seeded by a single-mode cw Ti:sapphire laser. The single-mode infrared output pulses are frequency quadrupled by two non-linear crystals to reach the necessary UV wavelength (226 nm, 0.2 mJ) for TALIF excitation. This technique should be applicable to a wide range of discharges, ranging from low-pressure RF plasmas for surface processing to atmospheric pressure plasmas. Results of preliminary tests on low-pressure O2 DC discharges are presented.

  12. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  13. Determining the optimal transmembrane gas pressure for nitrification in membrane-aerated biofilm reactors based on oxygen profile analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rongchang; Xiao, Fan; Wang, Yanan; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of transmembrane gas pressure (P g) on the specific ammonium removal rate in a membrane-aerated biofilm reactor (MABR). Our experimental results show that the specific ammonium removal rate increased from 4.98 to 9.26 gN m(-2) day(-1) when P g increased from 2 to 20 kPa in an MABR with a biofilm thickness of approximately 600 μm. However, this improvement was not linear; there was a threshold of P g separating the stronger and weaker effects of P g. The ammonium removal rate was improved less significantly when P g was over the threshold, indicating that there is an optimal threshold of P g for maximizing ammonium removal in an MABR. The change in oxygen penetration depth (d p) is less sensitive to P g in the ammonia-oxidizing active layer than in the inactive layer in membrane-aerated biofilm. The location of the P g threshold is at the same point as the thickness of the active layer on the curve of d p versus P g; thus, the active layer thickness and the optimal P g can be determined on the basis of the changes in the slope of d p to P g.

  14. Gas turbine engine adapted for use in combination with an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from compressed air

    DOEpatents

    Bland, Robert J [Oviedo, FL; Horazak, Dennis A [Orlando, FL

    2012-03-06

    A gas turbine engine is provided comprising an outer shell, a compressor assembly, at least one combustor assembly, a turbine assembly and duct structure. The outer shell includes a compressor section, a combustor section, an intermediate section and a turbine section. The intermediate section includes at least one first opening and at least one second opening. The compressor assembly is located in the compressor section to define with the compressor section a compressor apparatus to compress air. The at least one combustor assembly is coupled to the combustor section to define with the combustor section a combustor apparatus. The turbine assembly is located in the turbine section to define with the turbine section a turbine apparatus. The duct structure is coupled to the intermediate section to receive at least a portion of the compressed air from the compressor apparatus through the at least one first opening in the intermediate section, pass the compressed air to an apparatus for separating a portion of oxygen from the compressed air to produced vitiated compressed air and return the vitiated compressed air to the intermediate section via the at least one second opening in the intermediate section.

  15. Study of an Ozone Composing Mechanism derived from the Third Element on Surface of Electrode using Oxygen Gas: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Akira; Nakajima, Tsuyoshi

    In our third experiment, we changed the density of nitrogen through the addition of heat energy to the anode. A computer simulation confirmed the same phenomenon. Then the copper anode was replaced with an antimony anode. We found that antimony worked better than nitrogen as a third element. Finally, in the fourth experiment, we used an industrial ozone generator including ceramic dielectrics and a titanium expanded metal electrode. A decrease in the temperature of the cooling water led to a proportional increase in ozone. It follows the formula of van't Hoff. After spattering the surface of the electrodes with argon gas and supplying the ozone generator with 99% oxygen, we were able to produce ozone which was more than 20% higher in concentration than primary state ozone under the same conditions. The ozone generator produced ozone in high yield efficiency due to the optimum density of a third element like nitrogen on the surface of the electrodes. Antimony works better than nitrogen does as a third element.

  16. Effects of silicon (Si) on arsenic (As) accumulation and speciation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes with different radial oxygen loss (ROL).

    PubMed

    Wu, Chuan; Zou, Qi; Xue, Shengguo; Mo, Jingyu; Pan, Weisong; Lou, Laiqing; Wong, Ming Hung

    2015-11-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of paddy soils has adversely affected the health of millions of people those consuming rice for staple food. The present study was aimed at investigating the effects of silicon (Si) fertilization on As uptake, speciation in rice plants with different radial oxygen loss (ROL). Six genotypes were planted in pot soils under greenhouse conditions until late tillering state. The results showed that the rates of ROL were higher in hybrid rice genotypes varying from 19.76 to 27 μmol O2 g(-1) root dry weight h(-1) than that in conventional indica rice genotypes varying from 9.55 to 15.41 μmol O2 g(-1) root dry weight h(-1). Si addition significantly increased straw biomass (p<0.005), but with no significant effects on root biomass. Si fertilization significantly reduced shoot and root total As concentrations (p<0.001) in six genotypes grown in 40 mg As/kg soil. Si addition decreased the inorganic As in shoots of 'Xiangfengyou-9' with lower ROL and 'Xiangwanxian-12' with higher ROL by 31% and 25% respectively and had the tendency to increase DMA concentrations. It is potential to reduce As contamination of rice efficiently by combining Si fertilization and selecting genotypes with high radial oxygen loss. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An improved oxygen diffusion model to explain the effect of low-temperature baking on high field losses in niobium superconducting cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2006-07-01

    Radio-frequency (RF) superconducting cavities made of high purity niobium are widely used to accelerate charged particle beams in particle accelerators. The major limitation to achieve RF field values approaching the theoretical limit for niobium is represented by ''anomalous'' losses which degrade the quality factor of the cavities starting at peak surface magnetic fields of about 100 mT, in absence of field emission. These high field losses are often referred to as ''Q-drop''. It has been observed that the Q-drop is drastically reduced by baking the cavities at 120 C for about 48 h under ultrahigh vacuum. An improved oxygen diffusion model for the niobium-oxide system is proposed to explain the benefit of the low-temperature baking on the Q-drop in niobium superconducting rf cavities. The model shows that baking at 120 C for 48 h allows oxygen to diffuse away from the surface, and therefore increasing the lower critical field towards the value for pure niobium.

  18. [The effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to different degree of hearing loss and types of threshold curve in sudden deafness patients].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yangyun; Sun, Dajiang; Shao, Shan; Jiang, Wen; Sun, Zhengliang; Li, Zhengxian

    2010-10-01

    To investigate the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy to different degrees of hearing loss and different types of threshold curve in sudden deafness patients, and establish a personalized therapy, so as to promote clinical effect to sudden deafness. One hundred and twenty cases were divided into two groups respectively (each group 60 cases). Drug treatment had been used in group A for two weeks. The patients in group B received drug treatment combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy for two weeks. According to the different degrees of hearing loss and the types of audiogram in two groups, the statistical analysis to the difference of hyperbaric oxygen therapeutic effect was done. The effective rates was statistically different (chi2 = 8.044, P < 0.01) between group A (60.00%, 36/60) and group B (83.33%, 50/60). There was no statistical difference between two treatment program in mild and the profound deafness patients. The statistical difference could been found between moderate and the severe deafness, the value of chi2 and p were 4.969, 5.560 and 0.040, 0.035, respectively. In group A, the statistical difference could only been found between mild and the profound deafness patients (chi2 = 6.739, P < 0.05). In group B, the statistical difference could been found in mild and the profound deafness, the moderate and the profound deafness, the severe and the profound deafness patients. The value of chi2 were 11.500, 15.058,10.221 and P < 0.01 respectively. The effective rates was no statistical difference in two treatment programs in the upsloping audiogram and the profound deafness. The statistical difference could been found between the downsloping and the flat audiogram, with the value of chi2 and p were 5.144 and 5.969, P < 0.05, respectively. In group A, the statistical difference could been found between the ascending and descending audiogram, the ascending and the flat audiogram,the ascending type and the profound deafness. The value of chi2 were 6.188, 7

  19. Comparative investigation on chemical looping combustion of coal-derived synthesis gas containing H2S over supported NiO oxygen carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ksepko, E.; Siriwardane, R.; Tian, H.; Simonyi, T.; Sciazko, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical looping combustion (CLC) of simulated coal-derived synthesis gas was conducted with NiO oxygen carriers supported on SiO2, ZrO2, TiO2, and sepiolite. The effect of H2S on the performance of these samples for the CLC process was also evaluated. Five-cycle thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests at 800 C indicated that all oxygen carriers had a stable performance at 800 C, except NiO/SiO2. Full reduction/oxidation reactions of the oxygen carrier were obtained during the five-cycle test. It was found that support had a significant effect on reaction performance of NiO both in reduction and oxidation rates. The reduction reaction was significantly faster than the oxidation reaction for all oxygen carriers, while the oxidation reaction is fairly slow due to oxygen diffusion on NiO layers. The reaction profile was greatly affected by the presence of H2S, but there was no effect on the capacity due to the presence of H2S in synthesis gas. The presence of H2S decreased reduction reaction rates significantly, but oxidation rates of reduced samples increased. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data of the oxidized samples after a five-cycle test showed stable crystalline phases without any formation of sulfides or sulfites/sulfates. Increase in reaction temperature to 900 C had a positive effect on the performance.

  20. Reliability of the determination of whole-blood oxygen affinity by means of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters.

    PubMed

    Kwant, G; Oeseburg, B; Zijistra, W G

    1989-05-01

    Determination of the oxygen affinity of human whole blood with the help of blood-gas analyzers and multi-wavelength oximeters is compared with an accurate method for recording hemoglobin oxygen dissociation curves (Clin Chem 1982;28:1287-92). P50 (oxygen tension at half saturation; So2 = 50%) and Hill's n (delta log [So2/(1-So2)]/delta log Po2) were determined in blood of 24 healthy donors. Three slightly different procedures were used for determination of P50 on the basis of Po2, pH, Pco2, and So2 measured with each of four different blood-gas analyzer/oximeter combinations. These methods were not able to discriminate between high and low values for P50 within the normal reference interval, but never failed to detect the high oxygen affinity of blood stored for 12 days, reflected in low values of P50. The methods thus proved suitable for detecting clinically significant deviations in oxygen affinity such as occur in patients with, e.g., abnormal hemoglobins, anemias, or carbon monoxide poisoning. Determination of Hill's n by these methods did not produce useful results.

  1. Role of biochar amendment in mitigation of nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas emission during sewage sludge composting.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Wang, Quan; Ren, Xiuna; Zhao, Junchao; Huang, Hui; Awasthi, Sanjeev Kumar; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Li, Ronghua; Zhou, Lina; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to mitigate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during composting of dewatered fresh sewage sludge (DFSS) employing biochar combined with zeolite (B+Z) and low dosage of lime (B+L). The 12% biochar was mixed at a 10%, 15% and 30% of zeolite and 1% lime, while without any additives was used as control. The results indicated that the combine use of B+Z was significantly increased the enzymatic activities and reduced the ammonia loss 58.03-65.17% as compare to B+L amended treatment, while CH4 92.85-95.34% and N2O 95.14-97.28% decreased than control. The B+L1% amendment significantly increased the organic matter degradation but the reduction was lower than B+Z and that could reduce the CH4 and N2O emission by 55.17-63.08% and 62.24-65.53% as compare to control, respectively. Overall our results demonstrated that 12%B+Z10% addition into DFSS can be potentially used to improve the DFSS composting by mitigation of GHG emission and nitrogen loss.

  2. Loss of benzaldehyde in the fragmentation of protonated benzoylamines: Benzoyl cation as a hydride acceptor in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Chai, Yunfeng; Shao, Yunlong; Wang, Lu; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-14

    In electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of protonated 1-benzoylamines (1-benzoylpiperadine, 1-benzoylmorpholine, and 1-benzoyl-4-methylpiperazine), the dominant fragmentation pathway was amide bond cleavage to form benzoyl cation and neutral amine. Meanwhile, in their fragmentations, an interesting loss of benzaldehyde (106 Da) was observed and identified to derive from hydride transfer reaction between the benzoyl cation and amine. A stepwise mechanism for loss of 106 Da (benzene and CO) could be excluded with the aid of deuterium labeling experiment. Theoretical calculations indicated that hydride transfers from amines (piperadine, morpholine and 1-methylpiperazine) to benzoyl cation were thermodynamically permitted and 1-methylpiperazine was the best hydride donor among the three amines. The mass spectrometric experimental results were consistent with the computational results. The relative abundance of the iminium cation (relative to the benzoyl cation) in the fragmentation of protonated 1-benzoyl-4-methylpiperazine was higher than that in the fragmentation of the other two protonated 1-benzoylamines. By comparing the fragmentations of protonated 1-benzyl-4-methylpiperazine and protonated 1-benzoyl-4-methylpiperazine and the energetics of their hydride transfer reactions, this study revealed that benzoyl cation was a hydride acceptor in the gas phase, but which was weaker than benzyl cation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. High cell density suspension culture of mammalian anchorage independent cells: oxygen transfer by gas sparging and defoaming with a hydrophobic net.

    PubMed

    Ishida, M; Haga, R; Nishimura, N; Matuzaki, H; Nakano, R

    1990-11-01

    Gas sparging directly into the culture-broth is not done in cell culture, except when the gas flow rate is very small, because much foaming occurs. During screening of defoaming methods, foam was observed to be broken up effectively when it made contact with a net fabricated from hydrophobic materials. Providing a highly efficient oxygen supply to suspension culture was tried using the new defoaming method. In a 5 l reactor equipped with the foam-eliminating net fabricated with polysiloxane, oxygen was transferred at 21 mmole/l.h equivalent to a consumption rate of 1 X 10(8) cells/ml, even at a low oxygen gas flow rate of 0.1 cm/s corresponding to a fourth of the gas flow rate when foam leaked through the net. Perfusion culture of rat ascites hepatoma cell JTC-1 was successfully carried out in the 5 l scale culture system with the net and a hydrophobic membrane for cell filtration. The viable cell concentration reached 2.7 X 10(7) cells/ml after twenty-seven days, in spite of the nutrient-deficient condition of the lower medium exchange rate, that is, a working volume a day, and viability was maintained at more than 90%. In a 1.21 scale culture of mouse-mouse hybridoma cell STK-1, viable cell concentration reached 4 X 10(7) cells/ml. These results showed that oxygen transfer by gas sparging with defoaming was useful for high density suspension culture. A foam-breaking mechanism was proposed.

  4. Flue gas desulfurization gypsum: implication for runoff and nutrient losses associated with broiler litter use on pastures on ultisols.

    PubMed

    Endale, Dinku M; Schomberg, Harry H; Fisher, Dwight S; Franklin, Dorcas H; Jenkins, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Gypsum has been shown to reduce runoff on soils prone to crust formation in the southeastern United States. Increased infiltration from gypsum applications could therefore help reduce runoff P and other nutrient losses from application of broiler litter (BL), a nutrient-rich fertilizer. In rainfall simulation experiments in June 2009 and May 2011, runoff and nutrient (N, P, Ca, Mg) losses in runoff were compared among treatments consisting of 0, 2.2, 4.5, and 9.0 Mg ha flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) combined with 13.5 Mg ha of BL and two control treatments of (0-0) and (9.0-0.0) Mg ha (FGDG-BL). A randomized block design with three replications was set up on a Cecil (Typic Kanhapludult) soil growing Coastal bermudagrass ( L.) for hay near Watkinsville, Georgia. Amendments were applied each April from 2009 to 2011. A reduction in runoff of 30% each year from the (9.0-13.5) compared with the (0-0) treatment was not statistically significant. Gypsum was effective in reducing concentration and load in one of the two study years: P and NH-N in 2009 (up to 83%) and NO-N in 2011 (up to 73%). A combination of factors related to weather extremes, timing of FGDG and BL applications, and their implication on soil and vegetation responses at different landscape positions might have caused the different responses between years. Additional studies focused on isolating the impacts of such factors would be helpful to ascertain the effectiveness of multiyear applications of FGDG as a best management practice to reduce P and other nutrient losses in soils of the southeastern United States. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Chemical bonding, interface strength, and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structure of the Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interface

    SciTech Connect

    Mizoguchi, Teruyasu; Sasaki, Takeo; Matsunaga, Katsuyuki; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shingo; Kohyama, Masanori; Yamamoto, Takahisa

    2006-12-15

    Chemical bondings and oxygen K electron-energy-loss near-edge structures (ELNES) of oxygen terminated Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} heterointerfaces with hollow and on-top configurations were theoretically investigated by using a first principles orthogonalized linear combination of atomic orbitals method. From the chemical bonding analysis, it was found that the hollow configuration has stronger ionic and covalent bondings as compared with the on-top configuration, and the weakness of the on-top configuration originates from the strong antibonding interactions between an interfacial oxygen and the second near neighbor Cu. Detailed analysis using overlap population diagrams revealed the formation mechanism of the strong antibonding interactions in the on-top configuration. In the oxygen K ELNES calculation, a prepeak feature appears in both configurations and it was predicted that the prepeak for the on-top configuration is larger than that for the hollow configuration. The overlap population diagrams elucidated that the prepeak is mainly composed of the O-Cu antibonding interactions, and the larger prepeak of the on-top configuration originates from the larger O-Cu interactions. The dependence of O-K ELNES on the direction of the momentum transfer vector was also discussed. Knowledge of the responsible direction of the momentum transfer vector in relation to the interface orientation was concluded to be indispensable in order to discuss detailed profiles of the ELNES from metal/ceramic heterointerfaces. This study reveals the effect of the atomic configuration of the interface to the chemical bondings, interface strength, and ELNES.

  6. Frontal cortical oxygenation changes during gravity-induced loss of consciousness in humans: a near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Koichi; Kikukawa, Azusa; Kobayashi, Asao; Nakadate, Toshio

    2007-10-01

    Gravity (G)-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC), which is presumably caused by a reduction of cerebral blood flow resulting in a decreased oxygen supply to the brain, is a major threat to pilots of high-performance fighter aircraft. The application of cerebral near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to monitor gravity-induced cerebral oxygenation debt has generated concern over potential sources of extracranial contamination. The recently developed NIR spatially resolved spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) has been confirmed to provide frontal cortical tissue hemoglobin saturation [tissue oxygenation index (TOI)]. In this study, we monitored the TOI and the standard NIRS measured chromophore concentration changes of oxygenated hemoglobin and deoxygenated hemoglobin in 141 healthy male pilots during various levels of +G(z) (head-to-foot inertial forces) exposure to identify the differences between subjects who lose consciousness and those who do not during high +G(z) exposure. Subjects were exposed to seven centrifuge profiles, with +G(z) levels from 4 to 8 G(z) and an onset rate from 0.1 to 6.0 G(z)/s. The SRS-NIRS revealed an approximately 15% decrease in the TOI in G-LOC. The present study also demonstrated the TOI to be a useful variable to evaluate the effect of the anti-G protection system. However, there was no significant difference found between conditions with and without G-LOC in subjects with terminated G exposure. Further studies that elucidate the mechanism(s) behind the wide variety of individual differences may be needed for a method of G-LOC prediction to be effectively realized.

  7. Effect of oxygen atoms dissociated by non-equilibrium plasma on flame of methane oxygen and argon pre-mixture gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akashi, Haruaki; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Sasaki, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    For more efficient way of combustion, plasma-assisted combustion has been investigated by many researchers. But it is very difficult to clarify the effect of plasma even on the flame of methane. Because there are many complex chemical reactions in combustion system. Sasaki et al. has reported that the flame length of methane and air premixed burner shortened by irradiating microwave power. They also measured emission from Second Positive Band System of nitrogen during the irradiation. The emission indicates existence of high energy electrons which are accelerated by the microwave. The high energy electrons also dissociate oxygen molecules easily and oxygen atom would have some effects on the flame. But the dissociation ratio of oxygen molecules by the non-equilibrium plasma is significantly low, compared to that in the combustion reaction. To clarify the effect of dissociated oxygen atoms on the flame, dependence of dissociation ratio of oxygen on the flame has been examined using CHEMKIN. It is found that in the case of low dissociation ratio of 10-6, the ignition of the flame becomes slightly earlier. It is also found that in the case of high dissociation ratio of 10-3, the ignition time becomes significantly earlier by almost half. This work was supported by KAKENHI (22340170).

  8. Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine: Parasitic Loss Control through Surface Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Farshid Sadeghi; Chin-Pei Wang

    2008-12-31

    This report presents results of our investigation on parasitic loss control through surface modification in reciprocating engine. In order to achieve the objectives several experimental and corresponding analytical models were designed and developed to corroborate our results. Four different test rigs were designed and developed to simulate the contact between the piston ring and cylinder liner (PRCL) contact. The Reciprocating Piston Test Rig (RPTR) is a novel suspended liner test apparatus which can be used to accurately measure the friction force and side load at the piston-cylinder interface. A mixed lubrication model for the complete ring-pack and piston skirt was developed to correlate with the experimental measurements. Comparisons between the experimental and analytical results showed good agreement. The results revealed that in the reciprocating engines higher friction occur near TDC and BDC of the stroke due to the extremely low piston speed resulting in boundary lubrication. A Small Engine Dynamometer Test Rig was also designed and developed to enable testing of cylinder liner under motored and fired conditions. Results of this study provide a baseline from which to measure the effect of surface modifications. The Pin on Disk Test Rig (POD) was used in a flat-on-flat configuration to study the friction effect of CNC machining circular pockets and laser micro-dimples. The results show that large and shallow circular pockets resulted in significant friction reduction. Deep circular pockets did not provide much load support. The Reciprocating Liner Test Rig (RLTR) was designed to simplifying the contact at the PRCL interface. Accurate measurement of friction was obtained using 3-axis piezoelectric force transducer. Two fiber optic sensors were used to measure the film thickness precisely. The results show that the friction force is reduced through the use of modified surfaces. The Shear Driven Test Rig (SDTR) was designed to simulate the mechanism of the

  9. Auger electron spectroscopy, electron loss spectroscopy and low energy electron diffraction of oxygen and carbon monoxide adsorption of Pd films

    SciTech Connect

    Vook, R.W.; De Cooman, B.C.; Vankar, V.D.

    1983-01-01

    The adsorption of oxygen and carbon monoxide at room temperature on polycrystalline and (111) monocrystalline thin films of Pd vapor deposited on mice was investigated by AES, ELS, and LEED. The results show that adsorbate coverage depends strongly on surface microstructure, composition, and topography. Polycrystalline or Cl contaminated surfaces adsorb large amounts of the gases, while flat, monocrystalline surfaces will adsorb almost none. These results are quite different from those observed earlier using sputter etched and annealed bulk single cyrstals where adsorbate superlattices formed after rather low gaseous exposures. In the present work no superlattices were observed after exposures ranging up to several thousand langmuirs. The contradictory results obtained in the two cases are attributed to probable differences in surface microtopography and microstructure.

  10. Spatiotemporal dynamics of phosphorus release, oxygen consumption and greenhouse gas emissions after localised soil amendment with organic fertilisers.

    PubMed

    Christel, Wibke; Zhu, Kun; Hoefer, Christoph; Kreuzeder, Andreas; Santner, Jakob; Bruun, Sander; Magid, Jakob; Jensen, Lars Stoumann

    2016-06-01

    Organic fertilisation inevitably leads to heterogeneous distribution of organic matter and nutrients in soil, i.e. due to uneven surface spreading or inhomogeneous incorporation. The resulting localised hotspots of nutrient application will induce various biotic and abiotic nutrient turnover processes and fixation in the residue sphere, giving rise to distinct differences in nutrient availability, soil oxygen content and greenhouse gas (GHG) production. In this study we investigated the spatiotemporal dynamics of the reaction of manure solids and manure solids char with soil, focusing on their phosphorus (P) availability, as current emphasis on improving societal P efficiency through recycling waste or bio-based fertilisers necessitates a sound understanding of their behaviour. Soil layers amended at a constant P application rate with either pig manure solids or char made from pig manure solids were incubated for three weeks between layers of non-amended, P-depleted soil. Spatial and temporal changes in and around the amendment layers were simultaneously investigated in this study using a sandwich sensor consisting of a planar oxygen optode and multi-element diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) gels, combined with GHG emission measurements. After three weeks of incubation, the soil containing a layer amended with manure solids had a lower overall O2 content and had emitted significantly more CO2 than the non-amended control or the char-amended soil. The P availability from manure solids was initially higher than that from the char, but decreased over time, whereas from the char-amended layer P availability increased in the same period. In both treatments, increases in P availability were confined to the amended soil layer and did not greatly affect P availability in the directly adjacent soil layers during the three-week incubation. These results highlight the importance of placing organic P fertilisers close to where the plant roots will grow in order to

  11. The differences in welfare loss and greenhouse gas emission reductions across socioeconomic groups in the United States from a Pigouvian tax on gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Greening, L.A.; Schipper, L.; Bell, G.

    1995-12-31

    Considered are the welfare consequences of a Pigouvian tax, the goal of which, is to affect shifts in gasoline consumption, vehicle miles traveled, and ultimately, greenhouse gas emissions. Due to simultaneous choices made by a household during the production and consumption of gasoline-powered transportation services, some of the consumer surplus losses from an increase in the price of gasoline may be ameliorated through efficiency gains, even as the goals of the tax are being realized. Conjunct to this, it is shown that neither changes in efficiency, welfare losses, nor the associated reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are distributed equally across socioeconomic groups.

  12. Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup, and Oxygen Separation Equipment; Task 9: Mixed Alcohols From Syngas -- State of Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Nexant Inc.

    2006-05-01

    This deliverable is for Task 9, Mixed Alcohols from Syngas: State of Technology, as part of National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Award ACO-5-44027, ''Equipment Design and Cost Estimation for Small Modular Biomass Systems, Synthesis Gas Cleanup and Oxygen Separation Equipment''. Task 9 supplements the work previously done by NREL in the mixed alcohols section of the 2003 technical report Preliminary Screening--Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas.

  13. Fine temporal control of the medium gas content and acidity and on-chip generation of series of oxygen concentrations for cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Polinkovsky, Mark; Gutierrez, Edgar; Levchenko, Andre; Groisman, Alex

    2009-04-21

    We describe the design, operation, and applications of two microfluidic devices that generate series of concentrations of oxygen, [O(2)], by on-chip gas mixing. Both devices are made of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and have two layers of channels, the flow layer and the gas layer. By using in-situ measurements of [O(2)] with an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent dye, we show that gas diffusion through PDMS leads to equilibration of [O(2)] in an aqueous solution in the flow layer with [O(2)] in a gas injected into the gas layer on a time scale of approximately 1 sec. Injection of carbon dioxide into the gas layer causes the pH in the flow layer to drop within approximately 0.5 sec. Gas-mixing channel networks of both devices generate series of 9 gas mixtures with different [O(2)] from two gases fed to the inlets, thus creating regions with 9 different [O(2)] in the flow layer. The first device generates nitrogen-oxygen mixtures with [O(2)] varying linearly between 0 and 100%. The second device generates nitrogen-air mixtures with [O(2)] varying exponentially between 0 and 20.9%. The flow layers of the devices are designed for culturing bacteria in semi-permeable microchambers, and the second device is used to measure growth curves of E. coli colonies at 9 different [O(2)] in a single experiment. The cell division rates at [O(2)] of 0, 0.2, and 0.5% are found to be significantly different, further validating the capacity of the device to set [O(2)] in the flow layer with high precision and resolution. The degree of control of [O(2)] achieved in the devices and the robustness with respect to oxygen consumption due to respiration would be difficult to match in a traditional large-scale culture. The proposed devices and technology can be used in research on bacteria and yeast under microaerobic conditions and on mammalian cells under hypoxia.

  14. Rhenium/Oxygen Interactions at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, Nathan; Myers, Dwight; Zhu, Dong-Ming; Humphrey, Donald

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of pure rhenium is examined from 600-1400 C in oxygen/argon mixtures. Linear weight loss kinetics are observed. Gas pressures, flow rates, and temperatures are methodically varied to determine the rate controlling steps. The reaction at 600 and 800 C appears to be controlled by a chemical reaction step at the surface; whereas the higher temperature reactions appear to be controlled by gas phase diffusion of oxygen to the rhenium surface. Attack of the rhenium appears to be along grain boundaries and crystallographic planes.

  15. Oxygen energization and loss during the main phase of the 17 March 2015 storm: Van Allen Probes observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keika, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Nose, M.; Machida, S.; Seki, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gkioulidou, M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.

    2016-12-01

    We examine mass-dependent development of the Earth's ring current during an intense storm that occurred on 17 March 2015, using Van Allen Probes observations. We primarily use data from the RBSPICE and HOPE instruments which cover a wide energy range of ions and determine composition. During the storm event, Van Allen Probes traveled in the pre-midnight sector on the outbound path and around midnight on the inbound path. The geocentric distance of spacecraft perigee and apogee is 1.1 RE and 5.8 RE, respectively; the orbital period is 9 hours. The spacecraft completed four full orbits during the main phase of the storm, enabling us to examine temporal variations of the radial profile of ion energy density. The Dst index displayed a typical two-step decrease during the main phase. The proton energy density was enhanced at an L range of 3 to 6 with a peak at L 4. The inner edge was displaced earthward to L 2.5 during the second Dst decrease. The energy density peaked at L = 3 - 4. The energy range that make the dominant contribution to the energy density differed between the two phases. The energy density was primarily dominated by 20-80 keV at L 3.5 (0.01-0.1 keV/nT) during the first phase, while it was contributed predominantly from 80-120 keV at L 4 (0.1-0.5 keV/nT) during the second phase. It is also noted that higher energetic protons with energies of 100-300 keV at L 3 (0.1-1.0 keV/nT) made a significant or even dominant contribution near the Dst minimum. The results indicate that the proton energy density increased in three steps. The oxygen energy density showed different temporal variations and radial profile from the proton energy density. It was enhanced during the first phase up to the proton energy density level in an L range of 3 to 5. However, it decreased by about an order of magnitude around the beginning of the second phase. It was increased again during the second phase, and its inner edge was displaced earthward to L 3. It was further increased by

  16. Feasibility study of noninvasive ventilation with helium-oxygen gas flow for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during exercise.

    PubMed

    Allan, Patrick F; Thomas, Kimbreca V; Ward, Michael R; Harris, Anthony D; Naworol, Gregory A; Ward, John A

    2009-09-01

    Individually, noninvasive ventilation (NIV) and helium-oxygen gas mixtures (heliox) diminish ventilatory workload and improve exercise tolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). NIV in combination with heliox may have additive effects on exercise tolerance in severe COPD. We assessed the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of heliox and NIV during exercise in patients with severe COPD. Pulmonary rehabilitation facility in an academic tertiary-care medical center. Twelve patients with severe COPD were enrolled. Using a sequential randomized placebo-controlled crossover study design, the patients performed 4 separate constant-work stationary bicycle cardiopulmonary exercise studies at 80% of maximal workload during application of sham NIV, NIV, 60:40 heliox with sham NIV, and 60:40 heliox with NIV. Tolerability, safety, and exercise duration as determined by constant-work cardiopulmonary exercise test were the primary outcome measures. Secondary outcome measures at peak exercise and iso-time included rate of perceived exertion, dyspnea, leg pain, heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, tympanic temperature, and oxyhemoglobin saturation. No adverse effects occurred during or after application of NIV, heliox, or NIV with heliox. Exercise duration using heliox with NIV was significantly longer than both heliox (P = .01) and NIV (P = .007), but not placebo (P = .09). Relative to placebo, all treatment arms permitted lower respiratory rates at peak exercise. Heliox, with or without NIV, was associated with significant improvements in oxyhemoglobin saturation at peak exercise, relative to placebo or NIV alone. The adjunctive use of NIV with heliox during exercise proved both safe and tolerable in patients with severe COPD. The lack of demonstrable efficacy to any of the treatment arms relative to placebo (P = .09) may be the result of the small sample size (ie, type 2 error)-a conclusion emphasized by the large

  17. The metabolism of norethandrolone in the horse: characterization of 16-, 20- and 21-oxygenated metabolites by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    McKinney, A R; Ridley, D D; Suann, C J

    2001-02-01

    After oral administration to a thoroughbred gelding, the anabolic steroid norethandrolone was converted into a complex mixture of oxygenated metabolites. These metabolites were extracted from the urine, deconjugated by methanolysis and converted to their O-methyloxime trimethylsilyl derivatives. Gas chromatographic/mass spectrometric analysis indicated the major metabolites to be 19-norpregnane-3,16,17-triols, 19-norpregnane-3,17,20-triols and 3,17-dihydroxy-19-norpregnan-21-oic acids. Some minor metabolites were also detected.

  18. The effects of 2 levels of the inspired oxygen fraction on blood gas variables in propofol-anesthetized dogs with high intracranial pressure

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Luis Gustavo Gosuen Gonçalves; Nunes, Newton; Lopes, Patrícia Cristina Ferro; de Almeida, Ricardo Miyasaka; Neto, Gláucia Bueno Pereira; de Souza, Ana Letícia Groszewicz; de Almeida Belmonte, Emílio

    2009-01-01

    The influence of 2 different levels of the inspired oxygen fraction (FiO2) on blood gas variables was evaluated in dogs with high intracranial pressure (ICP) during propofol anesthesia (induction followed by a continuous rate infusion [CRI] of 0.6 mg/kg/min) and intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV). Eight adult mongrel dogs were anesthetized on 2 occasions, 21 d apart, and received oxygen at an FiO2 of 1.0 (G100) or 0.6 (G60) in a randomized crossover fashion. A fiberoptic catheter was implanted on the surface of the right cerebral cortex for assessment of the ICP. An increase in the ICP was induced by temporary ligation of the jugular vein 50 min after induction of anesthesia and immediately after baseline measurement of the ICP. Blood gas measurements were taken 20 min later and then at 15-min intervals for 1 h. Numerical data were submitted to Morrison’s multivariate statistical methods. The ICP, the cerebral perfusion pressure and the mean arterial pressure did not differ significantly between FiO2 levels or measurement times after jugular ligation. The only blood gas values that differed significantly (P < 0.05) were the arterial oxygen partial pressure, which was greater with G100 than with G60 throughout the procedure, and the venous haemoglobin saturation, that was greater with G100 than with G60 at M0. There were no significant differences between FiO2 levels or measurement times in the following blood gas variables: arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure, arterial hemoglobin saturation, base deficit, bicarbonate concentration, pH, venous oxygen partial pressure, venous carbon dioxide partial pressure and the arterial-to-end-tidal carbon dioxide difference. PMID:19436579

  19. Reversible Formation of 2D Electron Gas at the LaFeO3 /SrTiO3 Interface via Control of Oxygen Vacancies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pengfa; Han, Wei; Rice, Philip M; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G; Mohseni, Katayoon; Meyerheim, Holger L; Ostanin, Sergey; Maznichenko, Igor V; Mertig, Ingrid; Gross, Eberhard K U; Ernst, Arthur; Parkin, Stuart S P

    2017-03-01

    A conducting 2D electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the interface between epitaxial LaFeO3 layers >3 unit cells thick and the surface of SrTiO3 single crystals. The 2DEG is exquisitely sensitive to cation intermixing and oxygen nonstoichiometry. It is shown that the latter thus allows the controllable formation of the 2DEG via ionic liquid gating, thereby forming a nonvolatile switch.

  20. Oxygen deficient α-Fe2O3 photoelectrodes: a balance between enhanced electrical properties and trap-mediated losses.

    PubMed

    Forster, Mark; Potter, Richard J; Ling, Yichuan; Yang, Yi; Klug, David R; Li, Yat; Cowan, Alexander J

    2015-07-15

    Intrinsic doping of hematite through the inclusion of oxygen vacancies (VO) is being increasingly explored as a simple, low temperature route to preparing active water splitting α-Fe2O3-x photoelectrodes. Whilst it is widely accepted that the introduction of VO leads to improved conductivities, little else is verified regarding the actual mechanism of enhancement. Here we employ transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy to build a comprehensive kinetic model for water oxidation on α-Fe2O3-x . In contrast to previous suggestions, the primary effect of introducing VO is to block very slow (ms) surface hole - bulk electron recombination pathways. In light of our mechanistic research we are also able to identify and address a cause of the high photocurrent onset potential, a common issue with this class of electrodes. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al2O3 is found to be particularly effective with α-Fe2O3-x , leading to the photocurrent onset potential shifting by ca. 200 mV. Significantly TA measurements on these ALD passivated electrodes also provide important insights into the role of passivating layers, that are relevant to the wider development of α-Fe2O3 photoelectrodes.

  1. A novel organ preservation for small partial liver transplantations in rats: venous systemic oxygen persufflation with nitric oxide gas.

    PubMed

    Yagi, S; Nagai, K; Kadaba, P; Afify, M; Teramukai, S; Uemoto, S; Tolba, R H

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis for recipients of small liver grafts is poor. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of venous systemic oxygen persufflation (VSOP) with nitric oxide (NO) gas for 30% partial liver preservation and transplantation in rats. After we determined optimal NO concentration as 40 ppm in vitro with the isolated perfused rat liver model, we assessed liver injury and regeneration in vivo at 1, 3, 24 and 168 h after transplantation in the following three groups after 3 h-cold storage (n = 20 per group): control group = static storage; VSOP group = oxygen persufflation and VSOP+NO group = oxygen with NO persufflation. The liver graft persufflation was achieved with medical gas via the suprahepatic vena cava; In comparison with control group after transplantation, VSOP+NO preservation (1) increased portal circulation, (2) reduced AST and ALT release, (3) upregulated hepatic endothelial NO synthase, (4) reduced hepatocyte and bileductule damage and (5) improved liver regeneration. These results suggest that gaseous oxygen with NO persufflation is a novel and safe preservation method for small partial liver grafts, not only alleviating graft injury but also improve liver regeneration after transplantation. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Control of the Position of Oxygen Delivery in Soybean Lipoxygenase-1 by Amino Acid Side Chains within a Gas Migration Channel.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Lara; Klinman, Judith P

    2016-04-22

    Understanding gas migration pathways is critical to unraveling structure-function relationships in enzymes that process gaseous substrates such as O2, H2, and N2 This work investigates the role of a defined pathway for O2 in regulating the peroxidation of linoleic acid by soybean lipoxygenase 1. Computational and mutagenesis studies provide strong support for a dominant delivery channel that shuttles molecular oxygen to a specific region of the active site, thereby ensuring the regio- and stereospecificity of product. Analysis of reaction kinetics and product distribution in channel mutants also reveals a plasticity to the gas migration pathway. The findings show that a single site mutation (I553W) limits oxygen accessibility to the active site, greatly increasing the fraction of substrate that reacts with oxygen free in solution. They also show how a neighboring site mutation (L496W) can result in a redirection of oxygen toward an alternate position of the substrate, changing the regio- and stereospecificity of peroxidation. The present data indicate that modest changes in a protein scaffold may modulate the access of small gaseous molecules to enzyme-bound substrates.

  3. Characterization of novel single-variety oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions via headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry.

    PubMed

    Van Opstaele, Filip; Praet, Tatiana; Aerts, Guido; De Cooman, Luc

    2013-11-06

    The volatile composition of novel varietal oxygenated sesquiterpenoid hop oil fractions ("spicy essences") was characterized by headspace solid-phase microextraction in combination with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Oxygenated sesquiterpenes represent the major chemical compound class, accounting for at least 65% of the total volatile fraction. In addition to oxygenated sesquiterpenes, spicy hop essences consist of several ketones, sesquiterpene and monoterpene hydrocarbons, and a relatively high number of unidentified compounds. On the basis of their relative composition, spicy hop essences can be fully differentiated according to their varietal origin. Multidimensional gas chromatography in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry on spicy hop essence cv. Spalter Select further demonstrated the enormous complexity of this particular hop oil fraction. The aromagram obtained via gas chromatography-olfactometry comprised nine odor-active regions described in terms of "citrus", "green", "haylike", "earthy", "woody", and "spicy". 2-Undecanone, 2-tridecanone, γ-cadinene, α-calacorene, calarene, humuladienone, caryolan-1-ol, caryophyllene oxide enantiomers, and humulene epoxide II are tentatively identified in the odor-active zones.

  4. Kinetics of oxygen-enhanced water gas shift on bimetallic catalysts and the roles of metals and support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugai, Junichiro

    The post-processing of reformate is an important step in producing hydrogen (H2) with low carbon monoxide (CO) for low temperature fuel cells from syn-gas. However, the conventional process consists of three steps, i.e. two steps of water gas shift (WGS) and preferential oxidation (PROX) of CO, and it is not suitable for mobile applications due to the large volume of water gas shift (WGS) catalysts and conditioning and/or regeneration necessary for these catalysts. Aiming at replacing those three steps by a simple one-step process, small amount of oxygen was added to WGS (the reaction called oxygen-enhanced water gas shift or OWGS) to promote the reaction kinetics and low pyrophoric ceria-supported bimetallic catalysts were employed for stable performance in this reaction. Not only CO conversion, but also H2 yield was found to increase by the O2 addition on CeO2-supported catalysts. The characteristics of OWGS, high H2 production rate at 200 to 300°C at short contact time where unreacted O2 exists, evidenced the impact of O2 addition on surface species on the catalyst. Around 1.5 of reaction order in CO for various CeO2-supported metal catalysts for OWGS compared to reaction orders in CO ranging from -0.1 to 0.6 depending on metal species for WGS shows O2 addition decreases CO coverage to free up the active sites for co-reactant (H2O) adsorption and activation. Among the monometallic and bimetallic catalysts, Pt-Cu and Pd-Cu bimetallic catalysts were superior to monometallic catalysts in OWGS. These bimetallic components were found to form alloys where noble metal is surrounded mainly by Cu to have strong interaction between noble metal and copper resulting in high OWGS activity and low pyrophoric property. The metal loadings were optimized for CeO2-supported Pd-Cu bimetallic system and 2 wt% Pd with 5 -- 10 wt% Cu were found to be the optimum for the present OWGS condition. In the kinetic study, Pd in Pd-Cu was shown to increase the active sites for H2O

  5. Prevalence and risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss among liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) cylinder infusion workers in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Ju; Chang, Chin-Kuo

    2009-12-01

    We assessed the exposure levels of noise, estimated prevalence, and identify risk factors of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) among male workers with a cross-sectional study in a liquefied petroleum gas cylinder infusion factory in Taipei City. Male in-field workers exposed to noise and administrative controls were enrolled in 2006 and 2007. Face-to-face interviews were applied for demographics, employment history, and drinking/smoking habit. We then performed the measurements on noise levels in field and administration area, and hearing thresholds on study subjects with standard apparatus and protocols. Existence of hearing loss > 25 dBHL for the average of 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz was accordingly determined for NIHL. The effects from noise exposure, predisposing characteristics, employment-related factors, and personal habits to NIHL were estimated by univariate and multivariate logistic regressions. A total of 75 subjects were involved in research and 56.8% of in-field workers had NIHL. Between the in-field and administration groups, hearing thresholds on the worse ear showed significant differences at frequencies of 4 k, 6 k, and 8 kHz with aging considered. Adjusted odds ratio for field noise exposure (OR=99.57, 95% CI: 3.53, 2,808.74) and frequent tea or coffee consumption (OR=0.03, 95% CI: 0.01, 0.51) were found significant. Current study addressed NIHL in a specific industry in Taiwan. Further efforts in minimizing its impact are still in need.

  6. Oxygen vacancies lead to loss of domain order, particle fracture, and rapid capacity fade in lithium manganospinel (LiMn₂O₄) batteries.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaoguang; Lin, Xianke; Lu, Wei; Bartlett, Bart M

    2014-07-23

    Spinel-structured lithium manganese oxide (LiMn2O4) has attracted much attention because of its high energy density, low cost, and environmental impact. In this article, structural analysis methods such as powder neutron diffraction (PND), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopies (TEM & SEM) reveal the capacity fading mechanism of LiMn2O4 as it relates to the mechanical degradation of the material. Micro-fractures form after the first charge (to 4.45 V vs. Li(+/0)) of a commercial lithium manganese oxide phase, best represented by the formula LiMn2O3.88. Diffraction methods show that the grain size decreases and multiple phases form after 850 electrochemical cycles at 0.2 C current. The microfractures are directly observed through microscopy studies as particle cracks propagate along the (1 1 1) planes, with clear lattice twisting observed along this direction. Long-term galvanostatic cycling results in increased charge-transfer resistance and capacity loss. Upon preparing samples with controlled oxygen contents, LiMn2O4.03 and LiMn2O3.87, the mechanical failure of the lithium manganese oxide can be correlated to the oxygen vacancies in the materials, providing guidance for better synthesis methods.

  7. Geo-Effective Solar Flare Events In December 2006: Space Weather Effect on Mars and Venus Oxygen Loss to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futaana, Y.; Barabash, S.; Yamauchi, M.; Lundin, R.; McKenna-Lawlor, S.

    2007-12-01

    In Dec. 2006, single sunspot region produced a series of proton solar flares, up to X9.0 level on 5 Dec 2006 10:35 UT. One unique feature of this X9.0 flare is that MeV particles originated from this proton flare were observed at Venus and Mars by Venus Express (VEX) and Mars Express (MEX), which are respectively located away from Earth by nearly +160° and -160° as viewed from the Sun. On 5 Dec 2006, the plasma instruments ASPERA-3 and ASPERA-4 on board MEX and VEX have detected a large enhancement in their respective background count level, which is a typical signature of intensive MeV particle flux. The timing of these enhancements were consistent with the estimated field-aligned travel time along the Parker spiral from the site of X9.0 flare to Venus and Mars. The Mars Express data indicate a one-order enhancement in the heavy ion outflow from the Martian atmosphere during the SEP period. This is the first observation of the increase of escaping flux at Mars during a violent solar activity. This suggests that the solar EUV flux levels also significantly affect the atmospheric loss from unmagnetized planets.

  8. 20th century human pressures drive reductions in deepwater oxygen leading to losses of benthic methane-based food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belle, Simon; Millet, Laurent; Verneaux, Valérie; Lami, Andrea; David, Etienne; Murgia, Laurie; Parent, Claire; Musazzi, Simona; Gauthier, Emilie; Bichet, Vincent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Freshwater lakes play a key role in the global carbon cycle as sinks (organic carbon sequestration) and sources (greenhouse gas emissions). Understanding the carbon cycle response to environmental changes is becoming a crucial challenge in the context of global warming and the preponderance of human pressures. We reconstructed the long-term (1500 years) evolution of trophic functioning of the benthic food web, based on methanotrophic ancient DNA and chironomid isotope analyses). In addition, human land use is also reconstructed in three different lakes (eastern France, Jura Mountains). Our findings confirm that the benthic food web can be highly dependent on methane-derived carbon (up to 50% of the chironomid biomass) and reveal that the activation of this process can correspond to a natural functioning or be a consequence of anthropic perturbation. The studied lakes also showed a similar temporal evolution over the last century with the disappearance of the profundal aquatic insects (Chironomidae, Diptera), considered as keystone for the whole lake food web (e.g., coupling benthic-pelagic), inducing a potential collapse in the transfer of methane to top consumers. This functional state, also called the dead zone expansion, was caused by the change in human land-use occurring at the beginning of the 20th century. The strong modification of agro-pastoral practices (e.g., fertilization practices, intensive grazing, and sewage effluent) modified the influx of nutrients (by diffuse and/or point-source inputs) and induced a significant increase in the trophic status and organic matter sedimentation to reach unprecedented values. Further studies should be planned to assess dead zone expansion and, according to the regime shift theory, to provide environmental tipping points for sustainable resource management.

  9. The effect of discontinuous gas exchange on respiratory water loss in grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) varies across an aridity gradient.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Talal, Stav; Ayali, Amir; Gefen, Eran

    2015-08-01

    The significance of discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC) in reducing respiratory water loss (RWL) in insects is contentious. Results from single-species studies are equivocal in their support of the classic 'hygric hypothesis' for the evolution of DGC, whereas comparative analyses generally support a link between DGC and water balance. In this study, we investigated DGC prevalence and characteristics and RWL in three grasshopper species (Acrididae, subfamily Pamphaginae) across an aridity gradient in Israel. In order to determine whether DGC contributes to a reduction in RWL, we compared the DGC characteristics and RWL associated with CO2 release (transpiration ratio, i.e. the molar ratio of RWL to CO2 emission rates) among these species. Transpiration ratios of DGC and continuous breathers were also compared intraspecifically. Our data show that DGC characteristics, DGC prevalence and the transpiration ratios correlate well with habitat aridity. The xeric-adapted Tmethis pulchripennis exhibited a significantly shorter burst period and lower transpiration ratio compared with the other two mesic species, Ocneropsis bethlemita and Ocneropsis lividipes. However, DGC resulted in significant water savings compared with continuous exchange in T. pulchripennis only. These unique DGC characteristics for T. pulchripennis were correlated with its significantly higher mass-specific tracheal volume. Our data suggest that the origin of DGC may not be adaptive, but rather that evolved modulation of cycle characteristics confers a fitness advantage under stressful conditions. This modulation may result from morphological and/or physiological modifications.

  10. Improvement of activated carbons as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral solutions by ammonia gas treatment and their performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Nieto Delgado, Cesar; Logan, Bruce E.

    2013-11-01

    Commercially available activated carbon (AC) powders from different precursor materials (peat, coconut shell, coal, and hardwood) were treated with ammonia gas at 700 °C to improve their performance as oxygen reduction catalysts in neutral pH solutions used in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The ammonia treated ACs exhibited better catalytic performance in rotating ring-disk electrode tests than their untreated precursors, with the bituminous based AC most improved, with an onset potential of Eonset = 0.12 V (untreated, Eonset = 0.08 V) and n = 3.9 electrons transferred in oxygen reduction (untreated, n = 3.6), and the hardwood based AC (treated, Eonset = 0.03 V, n = 3.3; untreated, Eonset = -0.04 V, n = 3.0). Ammonia treatment decreased oxygen content by 29-58%, increased nitrogen content to 1.8 atomic %, and increased the basicity of the bituminous, peat, and hardwood ACs. The treated coal based AC cathodes had higher maximum power densities in MFCs (2450 ± 40 mW m-2) than the other AC cathodes or a Pt/C cathode (2100 ± 1 mW m-2). These results show that reduced oxygen abundance and increased nitrogen functionalities on the AC surface can increase catalytic performance for oxygen reduction in neutral media.

  11. Oxygen exchange at gas/oxide interfaces: how the apparent activation energy of the surface exchange coefficient depends on the kinetic regime.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Peter; Borchardt, Günter

    2016-08-10

    In the dedicated literature the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the equilibrium oxygen exchange rate [Fraktur R] are considered to be directly proportional to each other regardless of the experimental circumstances. Recent experimental observations, however, contradict the consequences of this assumption. Most surprising is the finding that the apparent activation energy of KO depends dramatically on the kinetic regime in which it has been determined, i.e. surface exchange controlled vs. mixed or diffusion controlled. This work demonstrates how the diffusion boundary condition at the gas/solid interface inevitably entails a correlation between the oxygen surface exchange coefficient KO and the oxygen self-diffusion coefficient DO in the bulk ("on top" of the correlation between KO and [Fraktur R] for the pure surface exchange regime). The model can thus quantitatively explain the range of apparent activation energies measured in the different regimes: in the surface exchange regime the apparent activation energy only contains the contribution of the equilibrium exchange rate, whereas in the mixed or in the diffusion controlled regime the contribution of the oxygen self-diffusivity has also to be taken into account, which may yield significantly higher apparent activation energies and simultaneously quantifies the correlation KO ∝ DO(1/2) observed for a large number of oxides in the mixed or diffusion controlled regime, respectively.

  12. The induction of reactive oxygen species and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 is associated with S-nitrosoglutathione-induced apoptosis in human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qibing; Liu Lulu; Lu Yingmei; Tao Rongrong; Huang Jiyun; Shioda, Norifumi; Moriguchi, Shigeki; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han Feng; Lou Yijia

    2010-05-01

    The pathophysiological relevance of S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO)-induced endothelial cell injury remains unclear. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of GSNO-induced oxidative stress in endothelial cells. Morphological evaluation through DAPI staining and propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis. In cultured EA.hy926 endothelial cells, exposure to GSNO led to a time- and dose-dependent apoptotic cascade. When intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured in GSNO-treated cells with the fluorescent probes 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, we observed elevated ROS levels and a concomitant loss in mitochondrial membrane potential, indicating that GSNO-induced death signaling is mediated through a ROS-mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, we found that peroxynitrite formation and Omi/HtrA2 release from mitochondria were involved in this phenomenon, whereas changes of death-receptor dependent signaling were not detected in the same context. The inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation and Omi/HtrA2 by a pharmacological approach provided significant protection against caspase-3 activation and GSNO-induced cell death, confirming that GSNO triggers the death cascade in endothelial cells in a mitochondria-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that ROS overproduction and loss of mitochondrial Omi/HtrA2 play a pivotal role in reactive nitrogen species-induced cell death, and the modulation of these pathways can be of significant therapeutic benefit.

  13. [Reduction of radiation-induced vitamin E- and B1- losses by irradiation of foodstuffs at low temperature and by exclusion of atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Diehl, J F

    1979-10-01

    The protective effect of low temperatures during irradiation on vitamin B1 and E levels in foods is not abolished by subsequent storage or heating. Egg powder irradiated at 1 Mrad in the presence of air and stored for 4 months at ambient temperature lost 68% of its thiamin content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 33% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Sunflower oil irradiated at 3 Mrad in the presence of air and subsequently heated for 1 hour at 180 degrees C lost 98% of its alpha-tocopherol content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 65% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Exclusion of atmospheric oxygen by packaging under nitrogen reduced the loss of alpha-tocopherol in irradiated (0.1 Mrad) rolled oats after 8 months of storage from 56 to 5% and the loss of thiamin from 86 to 26%. Vacuum packaging was equally effective during the first 3 months and somewhat less effective during the following 5 months. Packaging under carbon dioxide showed no advantage over packaging in air. Sensory evaluation of rolled oats, raw or cooked, 1 and 3 months after irradiation with 0.1 Mrad indicated no significant quality difference between unirradiated and irradiated samples packaged under nitrogen.

  14. Conversion rate of para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen: implications for PHIP gas storage and utilization.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Shawn

    2014-06-01

    To determine the storability of para-hydrogen before reestablishment of the room temperature thermal equilibrium mixture. Para-hydrogen was produced at near 100% purity and mixed with different oxygen quantities to determine the rate of conversion to the thermal equilibrium mixture of 75: 25% (ortho: para) by detecting the ortho-hydrogen (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance using a 9.4 T imager. The para-hydrogen to ortho-hydrogen velocity constant, k, near room temperature (292 K) was determined to be 8.27 ± 1.30 L/mol · min(-1). This value was calculated utilizing four different oxygen fractions. Para-hydrogen conversion to ortho-hydrogen by oxygen can be minimized for long term storage with judicious removal of oxygen contamination. Prior calculated velocity rates were confirmed demonstrating a dependence on only the oxygen concentration.

  15. Relevance of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass volumetry using 3-dimensional gastric computed tomography with gas to predict weight loss at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Robert, Maud; Pechoux, Albane; Marion, Denis; Laville, Martine; Gouillat, Christian; Disse, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Causes of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) failures are still controversial. Literature data suggest that gastric pouch or gastrojejunal anastomosis distentions over time could be a key factor. Making the hypothesis that progressive distention of RYGB volumes is 1 of the main factors of weight loss failure, the aim of our study was to evaluate bypass volumes changes using repeated 3-dimensional gastric computed tomography with gas and the possible negative correlation with weight loss results at 1 year. Thirty-nine patients eligible for RYGB were prospectively included. Gastric bypass volumes were assessed at 3 and 12 months postsurgery performing 3-dimensional gastric computed tomography with gas and weight loss outcomes were recorded during the first postoperative year. There was no loss to follow up. Mean % excess body mass index lost (%EBMIL) at 1 year was 66.7%. Seven patients (17.9%) did not reach Reinhold criteria and were considered as RYGB failures. We found no linear correlation between the 1 year %EBMIL and mean values of the gastric pouch (r=.01; P=.94), and the neo stomach (r=.09 ; P=.57) at 3 months. Revisional surgery was correlated negatively with %EBMIL at 1 year. Weight loss at 1 year does not seem to be correlated to RYGB volume changes. Behavioral factors probably play a major role in weight loss failure. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comparison of the Nitrogen Gas Excess Versus the Fixed Nitrogen Deficit in Two Major Oxygen Deficient Zones of the World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devol, A. H.; Chang, B. X.

    2006-12-01

    This study compares the nitrogen gas excesses in the oxygen deficient zones (ODZs) of the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and the Arabian Sea. These are two of the three largest ODZs in the world. In the near absence of oxygen, heterotrophic denitrification is the dominant form of respiration in these regions which, coupled to the sheer vastness of the ODZs, makes them a globally significant sink of marine fixed nitrogen. Thus, understanding how nitrogen is cycled in the ODZs is important to understanding the global nitrogen cycle. We measured profiles of nitrogen gas and argon concentrations through the ODZs of the ETSP and the Arabian Sea in the fall of 2005 and 2004, respectively. Nitrogen gas concentrations were normalized to argon concentrations to eliminate variations due to physical changes in the water mass. Any nitrogen gas in excess of the background nitrogen gas concentration was interpreted to be from denitrification. In the Arabian Sea ODZ, we found the nitrogen gas excess up to 18 uM N. Using stoichiometric relationships of nitrate and phosphate specific to the Arabian Sea, previous workers have estimated the nitrate deficit in the Arabian Sea ODZ to be no more than 12 uM N, which is only two-thirds of the nitrogen gas excess. In the ODZ of the ETSP, we found the nitrogen