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Sample records for oxygen sensor assessment

  1. Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metal coolants: Calibration and assessment of the minimum reading temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassini, S.; Antonelli, A.; Di Piazza, I.; Tarantino, M.

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen sensors for Heavy Liquid Metals (HLMs) such as lead and LBE (lead-bismuth eutectic) will be essential devices in future Lead Fast Reactor (LFR) and Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Potentiometric sensors based on solid electrolytes were developed in recent years to this purpose. Internal reference electrodes such as Pt-air and Bi/Bi2O3 liquid metal/metal-oxide are among the most used but they both have a weak point: Pt-air sensor has a high minimum reading temperature around 400 °C whereas Bi/Bi2O3 suffers from internal stresses induced by Bi volume variations with temperature, which may lead to the sensor failure in the long-term. The present work describes the performance of standard Pt-air and Bi/Bi2O3 sensors and compares them with recent Cu/Cu2O sensor. Sensors with Yttria Partially Stabilized Zirconia (YPSZ) electrolyte were calibrated in oxygen-saturated HLM between 160 and 550 °C and the electric potential compared to the theoretical one to define the accuracy and the minimum reading temperature. Standard Pt-air sensor were also tested using Yttria Totally Stabilized Zirconia (YTSZ) to assess the effect of a different electrolyte on the minimum reading temperature. The performance of Pt-air and Cu/Cu2O sensors with YPSZ electrolyte were then tested together in low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C. The results showed that Pt-air, Bi/Bi2O3 and Cu/Cu2O sensors with YPSZ measured oxygen in HLMs down to 400 °C, 290 °C and 200 °C respectively. When the YTSZ electrolyte was used in place of the YPSZ, the Pt-air sensor measured correctly down to at least 350 °C thanks to the superior ionic conductivity of the YTSZ. When Cu/Cu2O and Pt-air sensors were tested together in the same low-oxygen HLM between 200 and 450 °C, Cu/Cu2O sensor worked predictably in the whole temperature range whereas Pt-air sensor exhibited a correct output only above 400 °C.

  2. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage.

    PubMed

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Lammers, Peter Schulze; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-14

    Oxygen (O₂) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O₂ measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) generated by the introduction of O₂ in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O₂ sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O₂ versus CO₂ (each 0-15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O₂ measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO₂. For the O₂ in situ measurement in silage, all O₂ sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O₂ depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O₂ penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O₂ concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations.

  3. An Assessment of Three Different In Situ Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Silage Production and Storage

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Guilin; Sun, Yurui; Li, Menghua; Jungbluth, Kerstin H.; Maack, Christian; Buescher, Wolfgang; Schütt, Kai-Benjamin; Boeker, Peter; Schulze Lammers, Peter; Zhou, Haiyang; Cheng, Qiang; Ma, Daokun

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) concentration inside the substrate is an important measurement for silage-research and-practical management. In the laboratory gas chromatography is commonly employed for O2 measurement. Among sensor-based techniques, accurate and reliable in situ measurement is rare because of high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) generated by the introduction of O2 in the silage. The presented study focused on assessing three types of commercial O2 sensors, including Clark oxygen electrodes (COE), galvanic oxygen cell (GOC) sensors and the Dräger chip measurement system (DCMS). Laboratory cross calibration of O2 versus CO2 (each 0–15 vol.%) was made for the COE and the GOC sensors. All calibration results verified that O2 measurements for both sensors were insensitive to CO2. For the O2 in situ measurement in silage, all O2 sensors were first tested in two sealed barrels (diameter 35.7 cm; height: 60 cm) to monitor the O2 depletion with respect to the ensiling process (Test-A). The second test (Test-B) simulated the silage unloading process by recording the O2 penetration dynamics in three additional barrels, two covered by dry ice (0.6 kg or 1.2 kg of each) on the top surface and one without. Based on a general comparison of the experimental data, we conclude that each of these in situ sensor monitoring techniques for O2 concentration in silage exhibit individual advantages and limitations. PMID:26784194

  4. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1997-01-01

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures.

  5. Durability of oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snapp, L.

    1985-03-01

    This report describes the results of dynamometer and vehicle durability testing from a variety of sources, as well as common causes of failure for oxygen sensors. The data indicates that oxygen sensors show low failure rates, even at mileages of 80,000 miles and beyond.

  6. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Brosha, E.L.

    1997-12-09

    A potentiometric oxygen sensor is formed having a logarithmic response to a differential oxygen concentration while operating as a Nernstian-type sensor. Very thin films of mixed conducting oxide materials form electrode services while permitting diffusional oxygen access to the interface between the zirconia electrolyte and the electrode. Diffusion of oxygen through the mixed oxide is not rate-limiting. Metal electrodes are not used so that morphological changes in the electrode structure do not occur during extended operation at elevated temperatures. 6 figs.

  7. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, Fernando H.; Chung, Brandon W.; Raistrick, Ian D.; Brosha, Eric L.

    1996-01-01

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  8. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Garzon, F.H.; Chung, B.W.; Raistrick, I.D.; Brosha, E.L.

    1996-08-06

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer. 4 figs.

  9. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.

    1994-01-01

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  10. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  11. Novel nanostructured oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boardman, Alan James

    New government regulations and industry requirements for medical oxygen sensors require the development of alternate materials and process optimization of primary sensor components. Current oxygen sensors are not compliant with the Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) Directive. This work focused on two areas. First, was finding suitable readily available materials for the sensor anodes. Second was optimizing the processing of the sensor cathode membrane for reduced delamination. Oxygen sensors were made using tin (Sn) and bismuth (Bi) electrodes, potassium hydroxide (KOH) and acetic acid (CH3COOH) electrolytes with platinum (Pt) and gold (Au) reference electrodes. Bi electrodes were fabricated by casting and pressing processes. Electrochemical characterization of the Sn and Bi electrodes was performed by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and sensing characterization per BSEN ISO 21647:2009 at various oxygen percentages, 0%, 20.9% and 100% oxygen levels with an automated test apparatus. The Sn anode with both electrolyte solutions showed good oxygen sensing properties and performance in a sensor. This system shows promise for replacement of Pb electrodes as required by the RoHS Directive. The Bi anode with Au cathode in both KOH and CH3COOH electrolytes showed acceptable performance and oxygen sensing properties. The Bi anodes fabricated by separate manufacturing methods demonstrated effectiveness for use in medical oxygen sensors. Gold thin films were prepared by magnetron sputtering on Flouroethylene Polymer (FEP) films. The FEP substrate temperature ranged from -77°C to 50°C. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and 4-point resistivity characterized the effects of substrate temperature to Au thin film particle size. XRD peak broadening and resistivity measurements showed a strong correlation of particle size to FEP substrate temperature. Particle size at 50°C was 594A and the -77°C particle size was 2.4 x 103A. Substrate

  12. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology

    PubMed Central

    O’ Callaghan, Karen A.M.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Kerry, Joseph P.

    2016-01-01

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure. PMID:27331815

  13. An Assessment of the Influence of the Industry Distribution Chain on the Oxygen Levels in Commercial Modified Atmosphere Packaged Cheddar Cheese Using Non-Destructive Oxygen Sensor Technology.

    PubMed

    O' Callaghan, Karen A M; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Kerry, Joseph P

    2016-06-20

    The establishment and control of oxygen levels in packs of oxygen-sensitive food products such as cheese is imperative in order to maintain product quality over a determined shelf life. Oxygen sensors quantify oxygen concentrations within packaging using a reversible optical measurement process, and this non-destructive nature ensures the entire supply chain can be monitored and can assist in pinpointing negative issues pertaining to product packaging. This study was carried out in a commercial cheese packaging plant and involved the insertion of 768 sensors into 384 flow-wrapped cheese packs (two sensors per pack) that were flushed with 100% carbon dioxide prior to sealing. The cheese blocks were randomly assigned to two different storage groups to assess the effects of package quality, packaging process efficiency, and handling and distribution on package containment. Results demonstrated that oxygen levels increased in both experimental groups examined over the 30-day assessment period. The group subjected to a simulated industrial distribution route and handling procedures of commercial retailed cheese exhibited the highest level of oxygen detected on every day examined and experienced the highest rate of package failure. The study concluded that fluctuating storage conditions, product movement associated with distribution activities, and the possible presence of cheese-derived contaminants such as calcium lactate crystals were chief contributors to package failure.

  14. Solid State oxygen Sensor Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Jeffery T.; Johnson, Scott R.

    1994-01-01

    To anticipate future long-duration mission needs for life support sensors, we explored the feasibility of using thin-film metal-oxide semiconductors. The objective of this task was to develop gas sensors for life support applications which would be suitable for long-duration missions. Metal oxides, such as ZnO, SnO2, and TiO2 have been shown to react with oxygen molecules. Oxygen lowers the metal oxide's electrical resistance. Critical to the performance is the application of the oxide in a thin film on an inert substrate: the thinner the film, the more readily the oxygen penetration and hence the more rapid and sensitive the sensor. Metal oxides are not limited to oxygen detection, rather, oxides offer detection and quantification applications to the complete range of gases of interest, not only for life support systems, but for propellants as well.

  15. A new highly sensitive method to assess respiration rates and kinetics of natural planktonic communities by use of the switchable trace oxygen sensor and reduced oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen respiration rates in pelagic environments are often difficult to quantify as the resolutions of our methods for O2 concentration determination are marginal for observing significant decreases during bottle incubations of less than 24 hours. Here we present the assessment of a new highly sensitive method, that combine Switchable Trace Oxygen (STOX) sensors and all-glass bottle incubations, where the O2 concentration was artificially lowered. The detection limit of respiration rate by this method is inversely proportional to the O2 concentration, down to <2 nmol L(-1) h(-1) for water with an initial O2 concentration of 500 nmol L(-1). The method was tested in Danish coastal waters and in oceanic hypoxic waters. It proved to give precise measurements also with low oxygen consumption rates (∼7 nmol L(-1) h(-1)), and to significantly decrease the time required for incubations (≤14 hours) compared to traditional methods. This method provides continuous real time measurements, allowing for a number of diverse possibilities, such as modeling the rate of oxygen decrease to obtain kinetic parameters. Our data revealed apparent half-saturation concentrations (Km values) one order of magnitude lower than previously reported for marine bacteria, varying between 66 and 234 nmol L(-1) O2. Km values vary between different microbial planktonic communities, but our data show that it is possible to measure reliable respiration rates at concentrations ∼0.5-1 µmol L(-1) O2 that are comparable to the ones measured at full air saturation.

  16. Integrated-Optic Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Compact optical oxygen sensors with self-calibration capabilities are undergoing development. A sensor of this type features a single-chip, integrated-optic design implemented by photolithographic fabrication of optical waveguides in a photosensitive porous glass. The porosity serves as both a matrix for retention of an oxygen-sensitive fluorescent indicator chemical and a medium for diffusion of oxygen to the chemical from the ambient air to be monitored. Each sensor includes at least one such waveguide exposed to the atmosphere and at least one covered with metal for isolation from the atmosphere. The covered one serves as a reference channel. In operation, the concentration of oxygen is deduced from the intensity and lifetime of the fluorescence in the exposed channel, with the help of calibration data acquired via the reference channel. Because the sensory chemical is placed directly in and throughout the cross section of the light path, approximately 99 percent of the light in the waveguide is available for interaction with the chemical, in contradistinction to only about 1 percent of the light in an optical sensor that utilizes evanescentwave coupling. Hence, a sensor of this type is significantly more sensitive.

  17. A New Highly Sensitive Method to Assess Respiration Rates and Kinetics of Natural Planktonic Communities by Use of the Switchable Trace Oxygen Sensor and Reduced Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Tiano, Laura; Garcia-Robledo, Emilio; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen respiration rates in pelagic environments are often difficult to quantify as the resolutions of our methods for O2 concentration determination are marginal for observing significant decreases during bottle incubations of less than 24 hours. Here we present the assessment of a new highly sensitive method, that combine Switchable Trace Oxygen (STOX) sensors and all-glass bottle incubations, where the O2 concentration was artificially lowered. The detection limit of respiration rate by this method is inversely proportional to the O2 concentration, down to <2 nmol L−1 h−1 for water with an initial O2 concentration of 500 nmol L−1. The method was tested in Danish coastal waters and in oceanic hypoxic waters. It proved to give precise measurements also with low oxygen consumption rates (∼7 nmol L−1 h−1), and to significantly decrease the time required for incubations (≤14 hours) compared to traditional methods. This method provides continuous real time measurements, allowing for a number of diverse possibilities, such as modeling the rate of oxygen decrease to obtain kinetic parameters. Our data revealed apparent half-saturation concentrations (Km values) one order of magnitude lower than previously reported for marine bacteria, varying between 66 and 234 nmol L−1 O2. Km values vary between different microbial planktonic communities, but our data show that it is possible to measure reliable respiration rates at concentrations ∼0.5–1 µmol L−1 O2 that are comparable to the ones measured at full air saturation. PMID:25127458

  18. Electrochemical Oxygen Sensor Development for Liquid Sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollet, Billy K.

    Safe operation of a sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) requires in-depth understanding of the corrosion implications of liquid sodium coolant on reactor materials. Dissolved oxygen concentration is of particular importance in characterizing sodium attack, so an accurate means of measuring and controlling oxygen is crucial. There is significant room for improvement in current oxygen sensing technology, so extensive research has been conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to address this issue. Experimental facilities and electrochemical oxygen sensors have been developed, tested, and analyzed. This research is discussed in detail in this report. The oxygen sensors tested in this research were developed using a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte whereas many of the past research in this field was conducted with yttria doped thoria (YDT or YST) electrolytes. Thorium, an alpha emitter, is expensive and increasingly difficult to acquire, so motivation to switch to a new material exists. YSZ is commonly used as the electrolyte for solid oxide fuel cells, and ample data is available for high temperature ionic conduction of this material. While some work has been done with YSZ in oxygen sensors (the automotive field, for example, uses YSZ O2 sensors), research on YSZ sensors in sodium is limited. A thorough study of YSZ-based electrochemical oxygen sensors must include detailed corrosion testing and analysis of YSZ in liquid sodium, careful oxygen sensor development and testing, and finally, a comprehensive analysis of the acquired sensor data. The research presented in this report describes the design and development of an electrochemical oxygen sensor for use in sodium using a YSZ electrolyte through the previously-mentioned steps. The designed sensors were subjected to a series of hypotheses which advance common understanding of oxygen sensor signal. These results were used in conjunction with past research to form reliable conclusions.

  19. Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

    1998-09-01

    This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

  20. Nanomaterial-based robust oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Kisholoy; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Alam, Maksudul; Tseng, Derek; Majumdar, Arun K.; Kazemi, Alex A.

    2007-09-01

    Since the TWA flight 800 accident in July 1996, significant emphasis has been placed on fuel tank safety. The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has focused research to support two primary methods of fuel tank protection - ground-based and on-board - both involving fuel tank inerting. Ground-based fuel tank inerting involves some combination of fuel scrubbing and ullage washing with Nitrogen Enriched Air (NEA) while the airplane is on the ground (applicable to all or most operating transport airplanes). On-board fuel tank inerting involves ullage washing with OBIGGS (on-board inert gas generating system), a system that generates NEA during aircraft operations. An OBIGGS generally encompasses an air separation module (ASM) to generate NEA, a compressor, storage tanks, and a distribution system. Essential to the utilization of OBIGGS is an oxygen sensor that can operate inside the aircraft's ullage and assess the effectiveness of the inerting systems. OBIGGS can function economically by precisely knowing when to start and when to stop. Toward achieving these goals, InnoSense LLC is developing an all-optical fuel tank ullage sensor (FTUS) prototype for detecting oxygen in the ullage of an aircraft fuel tank in flight conditions. Data would be presented to show response time and wide dynamic range of the sensor in simulated flight conditions and fuel tank environment.

  1. A flowing liquid test system for assessing the linearity and time-response of rapid fibre optic oxygen partial pressure sensors.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Hahn, C E W; Farmery, A D

    2012-08-15

    The development of a methodology for testing the time response, linearity and performance characteristics of ultra fast fibre optic oxygen sensors in the liquid phase is presented. Two standard medical paediatric oxygenators are arranged to provide two independent extracorporeal circuits. Flow from either circuit can be diverted over the sensor under test by means of a system of rapid cross-over solenoid valves exposing the sensor to an abrupt change in oxygen partial pressure, P O2. The system is also capable of testing the oxygen sensor responses to changes in temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure P CO2 and pH in situ. Results are presented for a miniature fibre optic oxygen sensor constructed in-house with a response time ≈ 50 ms and a commercial fibre optic sensor (Ocean Optics Foxy), when tested in flowing saline and stored blood.

  2. Resistive Oxygen Gas Sensors for Harsh Environments

    PubMed Central

    Moos, Ralf; Izu, Noriya; Rettig, Frank; Reiß, Sebastian; Shin, Woosuck; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Resistive oxygen sensors are an inexpensive alternative to the classical potentiometric zirconia oxygen sensor, especially for use in harsh environments and at temperatures of several hundred °C or even higher. This device-oriented paper gives a historical overview on the development of these sensor materials. It focuses especially on approaches to obtain a temperature independent behavior. It is shown that although in the past 40 years there have always been several research groups working concurrently with resistive oxygen sensors, novel ideas continue to emerge today with respect to improvements of the sensor response time, the temperature dependence, the long-term stability or the manufacture of the devices themselves using novel techniques for the sensitive films. Materials that are the focus of this review are metal oxides; especially titania, titanates, and ceria-based formulations. PMID:22163805

  3. Surface acoustic wave oxygen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collman, James P.; Oglesby, Donald M.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Leighty, Bradley D.; Zhang, Xumu; Herrmann, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    A surface acoustic wave (SAW) device that responds to oxygen pressure was developed by coating a 158 MHz quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device with an oxygen binding agent. Two types of coatings were used. One type was prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer containing the axial ligand. A second type was prepared with an oxygen binding porphyrin solution containing excess axial ligand without a polymer matrix. In the polymer based coatings, the copolymer served to provide the axial ligand to the oxygen binding agent and as a coating matrix on the surface of the SAW device. The oxygen sensing SAW device has been shown to bind oxygen following a Langmuir isotherm and may be used to measure the equilibrium constant of the oxygen binding compound in the coating matrix.

  4. Determining Performance Acceptability of Electrochemical Oxygen Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A method has been developed to screen commercial electrochemical oxygen sensors to reduce the failure rate. There are three aspects to the method: First, the sensitivity over time (several days) can be measured and the rate of change of the sensitivity can be used to predict sensor failure. Second, an improvement to this method would be to store the sensors in an oxygen-free (e.g., nitrogen) environment and intermittently measure the sensitivity over time (several days) to accomplish the same result while preserving the sensor lifetime by limiting consumption of the electrode. Third, the second time derivative of the sensor response over time can be used to determine the point in time at which the sensors are sufficiently stable for use.

  5. Reversible Oxygen Gas Sensor Based On Electrochemiluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Tsow, Francis

    2013-01-01

    A novel and robust oxygen gas sensor based on electrochemiluminescence of Ru(bpy)33+/+ ion annihilation in an ionic liquid is presented. Real-time detection of environmental oxygen concentration together with selective, sensitive and reversible performance is demonstrated. PMID:20386795

  6. High Temperature Langasite SAW Oxygen Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Peng; Chin, Tao-Lun; Greve, David; Oppenheim, Irving; Malone, Vanessa; Cao, Limin

    2011-08-01

    High-temperature langasite SAW oxygen sensors using sputtered ZnO as a resistive gas-sensing layer were fabricated and tested. Sensitivity to oxygen gas was observed between 500°C to 700°C, with a sensitivity peak at about 625°C, consistent with the theoretical predictions of the acoustoelectric effect.

  7. A Fluorescence Based Dissolved Oxygen Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Ronald; Hamilton, M. Coreen

    1987-10-01

    A sensor based on fluorescence quenching has been built to detect oxygen activity in gas and water. The sensor consists of a xenon flash bulb as a light source; an excitation wavelength band pass filter; a dichroic beam splitter; collimating and focussing lenses; a plastic clad silica (PCS) rod with the fluorophore immobilized at the tip of it; an emission wavelength band pass filter; a photomultiplier tube (PMT); a monitor PIN photodiode detector; and interface electronics to couple a computer to the rest of the sensor. The device demonstrates a reversible change in fluorescence quenching for changes in oxygen activity. The fluorescence signal seen by the PMT varies over a factor of 3, being highest at 0 oxygen activity and lowest at atmospheric oxygen activity. The device exhibits a 63 % response time of less than 1 second for gases and less than 10 seconds for oxygen dissolved in water. The noise floor of the sensor is approximately 1%. The present embodiment of the device was designed to allow the sensor to operate in the marine environment. The optical components, computer, batteries, and power supply circuitry are mounted on a rack that is enclosed in a pressure housing. The immobilized fluorophore is exposed to sea water. The light travels along the PCS rod, through a pressure seal, to the rest of the system. Present investigations are centered around long term stability of the fluorophore and constituents of the real ocean that will interfere with the quenching mechanism.

  8. A simple, inexpensive, hyperthermal atomic oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, G. P.; Pettigrew, P. J.; Raikar, G. N.; Gregory, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    With the increasing duration of space flights, the development of a permanent facility in space, and the increasing use of ground-based hyperthermal atomic oxygen sources there is a need for a simple instrument to provide long-term monitoring of the beam flux. Such an instrument can also be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate the material degradation process. Reliance on models of the upper atmosphere to determine the fluence of atomic oxygen is not only necessarily complex but also imprecise due to the strong dependence of oxygen concentration on day/night, latitude, and solar activity. Mass spectroscopy, the traditional method for determining the gas phase species densities at low pressure, is not only expensive but is limited in the area that it can monitor as well as subject to effects of material degradation. Our group has developed a simple and inexpensive dosimeter to measure the atomic oxygen fluence via the change in resistance as the sensor element is gradually oxidized. The sensors consist of thin-film circuit elements of selected material deposited on a suitable substrate. Four-point resistance measurements are used to monitor the change in sensor resistance with respect to time. Results obtained from silver and carbon dosimeters flown on STS-46 (CONCAP-II-01) indicate that such sensors are sensitive enough to monitor the diurnal variations in atomic oxygen distribution and sufficiently durable to last the lifetime of a mission.

  9. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Liu, Yixin; Gao, Haiyong; Gao, Pu-Xian; Lei, Yu

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO NPs film was characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500, 600, and 800°C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF) output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors. PMID:25191652

  10. Hydrogen and oxygen sensor development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farber, E. A.; Mahig, J.; Schaeper, H. R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A reliable and low cost gas sensor was investigated for instantaneously detecting H2 in N2, H2 in air, and O2 in N2. The major portion of the research was spent in developing a sensor which would instantaneously detect H2 to + or - 50 ppm even in the presence of trace amounts of other gases. The experimental procedures used to provide the performance characteristics for the various oscillators are discussed describing the equipment with help of schematics and photographs where applicable. The resulting performance is given in graphical form. In some cases both hydrogen and helium may be present and since both of them effect gas sensors similarly, a method was found to determine the concentration of each. The methods developed are grouped into the following four broad categories: pure metal response, variation in heat conductivity, reduction methods, and exotic processes. From the above it was decided for the present to use a copper oxide reduction process as this process was demonstrated to be capable of determining the concentrations of hydrogen and helium respectively in a gas mixture with air or nitrogen.

  11. EVALUATING AN INNOVATIVE OXYGEN SENSOR FOR REMOTE SUBSURFACE OXYGEN MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M; Brian Riha, B; Warren Hyde, W; Karen Vangelas, K; Brian02 Looney, B

    2006-10-12

    Oxygen is a primary indicator of whether anaerobic reductive dechlorination and similar redox based processes contribute to natural attenuation remedies at chlorinated solvent contaminated sites. Thus, oxygen is a viable indicator parameter for documenting that a system is being sustained in an anaerobic condition. A team of researchers investigated the adaptation of an optical sensor that was developed for oceanographic applications. The optical sensor, because of its design and operating principle, has potential for extended deployment and sensitivity at the low oxygen levels relevant to natural attenuation. The results of the research indicate this tool will be useful for in situ long-term monitoring applications, but that the traditional characterization tools continue to be appropriate for characterization activities.

  12. Thin film oxygen partial pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortman, J. J.; Harrison, J. W.; Honbarrier, H. L.; Yen, J.

    1972-01-01

    The development is described of a laboratory model oxygen partial pressure sensor using a sputtered zinc oxide thin film. The film is operated at about 400 C through the use of a miniature silicon bar. Because of the unique resistance versus temperature relation of the silicon bar, control of the operational temperature is achieved by controlling the resistance. A circuit for accomplishing this is described. The response of sputtered zinc oxide films of various thicknesses to oxygen, nitrogen, argon, carbon dioxide, and water vapor caused a change in the film resistance. Over a large range, film conductance varied approximately as the square root of the oxygen partial pressure. The presence of water vapor in the gas stream caused a shift in the film conductance at a given oxygen partial pressure. A theoretical model is presented to explain the characteristic features of the zinc oxide response to oxygen.

  13. Nanofiber Based Optical Sensors for Oxygen Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ruipeng

    Oxygen sensors based on luminescent quenching of nanofibers were developed for measurement of both gaseous and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Electrospinning was used to fabricate "core-shell" fiber configurations in which oxygen-sensitive transition metal complexes are embedded into a polymer 'core' while a synthetic biocompatible polymer provides a protective 'shell.' Various matrix polymers and luminescent probes were studied in terms of their sensitivity, linear calibration, reversibility, response time, stability and probe-matrix interactions. Due to the small size and high surface area of these nanofibers, all samples showed rapid response and a highly linear response to oxygen. The sensitivity and photostability of the sensors were controlled by the identity of both the probe molecule and the polymer matrix. Such nanofiber sensor forms are particularly suitable in biological applications due to the fact that they do not consume oxygen, are biocompatible and biomimetic and can be easily incorporated into cell culture. Applications of these fibers in cancer cell research, wound healing, breath analysis and waste water treatment were explored.

  14. Oxygen-Partial-Pressure Sensor for Aircraft Oxygen Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Mark; Pettit, Donald

    2003-01-01

    A device that generates an alarm when the partial pressure of oxygen decreases to less than a preset level has been developed to help prevent hypoxia in a pilot or other crewmember of a military or other high-performance aircraft. Loss of oxygen partial pressure can be caused by poor fit of the mask or failure of a hose or other component of an oxygen distribution system. The deleterious physical and mental effects of hypoxia cause the loss of a military aircraft and crew every few years. The device is installed in the crewmember s oxygen mask and is powered via communication wiring already present in all such oxygen masks. The device (see figure) includes an electrochemical sensor, the output potential of which is proportional to the partial pressure of oxygen. The output of the sensor is amplified and fed to the input of a comparator circuit. A reference potential that corresponds to the amplified sensor output at the alarm oxygen-partial-pressure level is fed to the second input of the comparator. When the sensed partial pressure of oxygen falls below the minimum acceptable level, the output of the comparator goes from the low state (a few millivolts) to the high state (near the supply potential, which is typically 6.8 V for microphone power). The switching of the comparator output to the high state triggers a tactile alarm in the form of a vibration in the mask, generated by a small 1.3-Vdc pager motor spinning an eccentric mass at a rate between 8,000 and 10,000 rpm. The sensation of the mask vibrating against the crewmember s nose is very effective at alerting the crewmember, who may already be groggy from hypoxia and is immersed in an environment that is saturated with visual cues and sounds. Indeed, the sensation is one of rudeness, but such rudeness could be what is needed to stimulate the crewmember to take corrective action in a life-threatening situation.

  15. Assessment of sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldmann, C.; Tamburri, M.; Prien, R. D.; Fietzek, P.

    2010-02-01

    There is an international commitment to develop a comprehensive, coordinated and sustained ocean observation system. However, a foundation for any observing, monitoring or research effort is effective and reliable in situ sensor technologies that accurately measure key environmental parameters. Ultimately, the data used for modelling efforts, management decisions and rapid responses to ocean hazards are only as good as the instruments that collect them. There is also a compelling need to develop and incorporate new or novel technologies to improve all aspects of existing observing systems and meet various emerging challenges. Assessment of Sensor Performance was a cross-cutting issues session at the international OceanSensors08 workshop in Warnemünde, Germany, which also has penetrated some of the papers published as a result of the workshop (Denuault, 2009; Kröger et al., 2009; Zielinski et al., 2009). The discussions were focused on how best to classify and validate the instruments required for effective and reliable ocean observations and research. The following is a summary of the discussions and conclusions drawn from this workshop, which specifically addresses the characterisation of sensor systems, technology readiness levels, verification of sensor performance and quality management of sensor systems.

  16. Water-based oxygen-sensor films.

    PubMed

    Habibagahi, Arezoo; Mébarki, Youssef; Sultan, Yasir; Yap, Glenn P A; Crutchley, Robert J

    2009-08-01

    The luminescent cyclometalated iridium complex [Ir(fppy)(2)(t-Bu-iCN)(2)]CF(3)SO(3), 1 (fppy = 4-(2-pyridyl)benzaldehyde, and t-Bu-iCN = tert-butyl isocyanide), was synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography and (1)H NMR, absorption, and emission spectroscopies. Complex 1 was quantitatively bound to the water-soluble amine-functionalized polymer Silamine D208-EDA by reductive amination, to produce 2. The quantum yield of emission and excited state lifetime of 2 (varphi(em) = 0.23 and tau = 20.6 mus) are comparable to that of the model complex [Ir(tpy)(2)(t-Bu-iCN)(2)]CF(3)SO(3), 3 (tpy = 2-(p- tolyl) pyridine) with varphi(em) = 0.28 and tau = 35.6 mus. Aqueous blends of 2 with Silamine and colloidal microcrystalline cellulose (MC) were used to prepare oxygen-sensor films. Oxygen sensitivities of these films were determined as a function of Silamine:MC ratio and obeyed Stern-Volmer kinetics. The optimum oxygen-sensor film composition was 2 in 1:1 Silamine:MC, which had an oxygen sensitivity of 0.502 over an atmospheric pressure range of 0.007-45 psi. Temperature sensitivity (percentage loss of intensity per degrees C) of this film was determined to be -1.1 and -1.4% degrees C(-1) at vacuum and 1 bar atmospheric pressure, respectively. These results were compared to those of films incorporating dispersions of 1 and 3. Luminescence microscopy of 9:1, 1:1, and 1:5 Silamine:MC films of 2 show that the charged iridium complex in 2 associates with the surface of MC and lifetime measurements of these films show an increase in lifetime with increasing MC fraction. The optimum quenching sensitivity observed for the 1:1 Silamine:MC film suggests that the diffusion of oxygen must decrease with increasing fraction of MC and thereby decrease oxygen sensitivity. These novel materials offer an environmentally friendly alternative to the preparation of oxygen-sensor films.

  17. Oxygen sensors and energy sensors act synergistically to achieve a graded alteration in gene expression: consequences for assessing the level of neuroprotection in response to stressors.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Gillian M C; Warburton, Joshua; Girjes, Adeeb

    2004-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are associated with switching to an autoprotected phenotype in response to environmental and physiological stress. Ubiquitous molecular chaperones from the heat shock protein (HSP) superfamily confer neuronal protection that can be blocked by antibodies. Recent research has focused on the interactions between the molecular sensors that affect the increased expression of neuroprotective HSPs above constitutive levels. An examination of the conditions under which the expression of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) was up regulated in a hypoxia and anoxia tolerant tropical species, the epaulette shark (Hemiscyllium ocellatum), revealed that up-regulation was dependent on exceeding a stimulus threshold for an oxidative stressor. While hypoxic-preconditioning confers neuroprotective changes, there was no increase in the level of Hsp70 indicating that its increased expression was not associated with achieving a neuroprotected state in response to hypoxia in the epaulette shark. Conversely, there was a significant increase in Hsp70 in response to anoxic-preconditioning, highlighting the presence of a stimulus threshold barrier and raising the possibility that, in this species, Hsp70 contributes to the neuroprotective response to extreme crises, such as oxidative stress. Interestingly, there was a synergistic effect of coincident stressors on Hsp70 expression, which was revealed when metabolic stress was superimposed upon oxidative stress. Brain energy charge was significantly lower when adenosine receptor blockade, provided by treatment with aminophylline, was present prior to the final anoxic episode, under these circumstances, the level of Hsp70 induced was significantly higher than in the pair-matched saline treated controls. An understanding of the molecular and metabolic basis for neuroprotective switches, which result in an up-regulation of neuroprotective Hsp70 expression in the brain, is needed so that intervention strategies can be devised

  18. Assessment and Use of Optical Oxygen Sensors as Tools to Assist in Optimal Product Component Selection for the Development of Packs of Ready-to-Eat Mixed Salads and for the Non-Destructive Monitoring of in-Pack Oxygen Levels Using Chilled Storage

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Andreas W.; O’Sullivan, Maurice G.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; Kerry, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Optical oxygen sensors were used to ascertain the level of oxygen consumed by individual salad leaves for optimised packaging of ready-to-eat (RTE) Italian salad mixes during refrigerated storage. Seven commonly found leaves in Italian salad mixes were individually assessed for oxygen utilisation in packs. Each leaf showed varying levels of respiration throughout storage. Using the information obtained, an experimental salad mix was formulated (termed Mix 3) which consisted of the four slowest respiring salad leaves—Escarole, Frisee, Red Batavia, Lollo Rosso. Mix 3 was then compared against two commercially available Italian salads; Mix 1 (Escarole, Frisee, Radicchio, Lollo Rosso) and Mix 2 (Cos, Frisee, Radicchio, Lollo Rosso). Optical sensors were used to non-destructively monitor oxygen usage in all mixes throughout storage. In addition to oxygen consumption, all three salad mixes were quality assessed in terms of microbial load and sensorial acceptability. In conclusion, Mix 3 was found to consume the least amount of oxygen over time, had the lowest microbial load and was most sensorially preferred (p < 0.05) in terms of overall appearance and acceptability. This study clearly shows the potential that oxygen sensors possess in terms of assisting in the optimised development of commercial RTE salad products. PMID:28239110

  19. Assessment and Use of Optical Oxygen Sensors as Tools to Assist in Optimal Product Component Selection for the Development of Packs of Ready-to-Eat Mixed Salads and for the Non-Destructive Monitoring of in-Pack Oxygen Levels Using Chilled Storage.

    PubMed

    Hempel, Andreas W; O'Sullivan, Maurice G; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; Kerry, Joseph P

    2013-05-22

    Optical oxygen sensors were used to ascertain the level of oxygen consumed by individual salad leaves for optimised packaging of ready-to-eat (RTE) Italian salad mixes during refrigerated storage. Seven commonly found leaves in Italian salad mixes were individually assessed for oxygen utilisation in packs. Each leaf showed varying levels of respiration throughout storage. Using the information obtained, an experimental salad mix was formulated (termed Mix 3) which consisted of the four slowest respiring salad leaves-Escarole, Frisee, Red Batavia, Lollo Rosso. Mix 3 was then compared against two commercially available Italian salads; Mix 1 (Escarole, Frisee, Radicchio, Lollo Rosso) and Mix 2 (Cos, Frisee, Radicchio, Lollo Rosso). Optical sensors were used to non-destructively monitor oxygen usage in all mixes throughout storage. In addition to oxygen consumption, all three salad mixes were quality assessed in terms of microbial load and sensorial acceptability. In conclusion, Mix 3 was found to consume the least amount of oxygen over time, had the lowest microbial load and was most sensorially preferred (p < 0.05) in terms of overall appearance and acceptability. This study clearly shows the potential that oxygen sensors possess in terms of assisting in the optimised development of commercial RTE salad products.

  20. Enzymatic Glucose Sensor Compensation for Variations in Ambient Oxygen Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, research toward painless glucose sensing continues. Oxygen sensitive phosphors with glucose oxidase (GOx) can be used to determine glucose levels indirectly by monitoring oxygen consumption. This is an attractive combination because of its speed and specificity. Packaging these molecules together in “smart materials” for implantation will enable non-invasive glucose monitoring. As glucose levels increase, oxygen levels decrease; consequently, the luminescence intensity and lifetime of the phosphor increase. Although the response of the sensor is dependent on glucose concentration, the ambient oxygen concentration also plays a key role. This could lead to inaccurate glucose readings and increase the risk of hyper- or hypoglycemia. To mitigate this risk, the dependence of hydrogel glucose sensor response on oxygen levels was investigated and compensation methods explored. Sensors were calibrated at different oxygen concentrations using a single generic logistic equation, such that trends in oxygen-dependence were determined as varying parameters in the equation. Each parameter was found to be a function of oxygen concentration, such that the correct glucose calibration equation can be calculated if the oxygen level is known. Accuracy of compensation will be determined by developing an overall calibration, using both glucose and oxygen sensors in parallel, correcting for oxygen fluctuations in real time by intentionally varying oxygen, and calculating the error in actual and predicted glucose levels. While this method was developed for compensation of enzymatic glucose sensors, in principle it can also be implemented with other kinds of sensors utilizing oxidases. PMID:26257458

  1. A fibre optic oxygen sensor for monitoring of human breathing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongsheng; Farmery, Andrew D.; Chen, Rui; Hahn, Clive E. W.

    2011-11-01

    A reliable and cost effective fibre optic oxygen sensor for monitoring of human breathing has been developed using a normal 200μm silica core/silica cladding optical fibre and a polymer sensing matrix. The fibre optic oxygen sensor is based on the fluorescence quenching of a fluorophore by oxygen. The sensing matrix, containing immobilized Pt(II) complexes, was coated at the end of the silica core/silica cladding optical fibre. The sensitivity and time response of the sensor were evaluated using the method of luminescence lifetime measurement. The polymer substrate influence on the time response of the sensor was improved by using a fibre taper design, and the response time of the optimized sensor was less than 200ms. This silica fibre based optic oxygen sensor is suitable for monitoring of patient breathing in intensive care unit in terms of safety and low cost.

  2. Oxygen Sensors Monitor Bioreactors and Ensure Health and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2014-01-01

    In order to cultivate healthy bacteria in bioreactors, Kennedy Space Center awarded SBIR funding to Needham Heights, Massachusetts-based Polestar Technologies Inc. to develop sensors that could monitor oxygen levels. The result is a sensor now widely used by pharmaceutical companies and medical research universities. Other sensors have also been developed, and in 2013 alone the company increased its workforce by 50 percent.

  3. A flexible transcutaneous oxygen sensor using polymer membranes.

    PubMed

    Kudo, Hiroyuki; Iguchi, Shigehito; Yamada, Takua; Kawase, Tatsuya; Saito, Hirokazu; Otsuka, Kimio; Mitsubayashi, Kohji

    2007-02-01

    A wearable and flexible oxygen sensor for transcutaneous blood gas monitoring was fabricated and tested. The sensor has a laminar film-like structure, which was fabricated by pouching KCl electrolyte solution by both non-permeable (metal weldable) sheet and gas-permeable membrane with Pt- and Ag/AgCl-electrodes patterned using microfabrication process. The electrolyte solution was fixed only by heat-sealing the edges of the weldable membranes without any chemical adhesives. The wearable oxygen sensor (thickness: 84 mum) was applied to the electrochemical measurement with a constant potential of -600 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, thus obtaining the calibration range to dissolved oxygen (DO) from 0.0 to 7.0 mg/l with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 and the quick response time (53.4 s to 90% of a steady-state current), which operate similarly to a commercially available oxygen electrode. The sensor was also utilized to transcutaneous oxygen monitoring for healthy human subject. The sensing region of the wearable oxygen sensor was attached onto the forearm-skin surface of the subject inhaling various concentrations of oxygen. As a result of physiological application, the output current was varied from -6.2 microA to -7.8 microA within 2 min when the concentration of inhaling oxygen was changed from atmospheric air to 60% oxygen. Thus, the transcutaneous oxygen was successfully monitored without any inconveniences such as skin inflammation, etc.

  4. Evaluation of subsurface oxygen sensors for remediation monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.X.; Lundegard, P.D.

    1996-05-01

    Continuous remediation monitoring using sensors is potentially a more effective and inexpensive alternative to current methods of sample collection and analysis. Gaseous components of a system are the most mobile and easiest to monitor. Continuous monitoring of soil gases such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, and contaminant vapors can provide important quantitative information regarding the progress of bioremediation efforts and the area of influence of air sparging or soil venting. Laboratory and field tests of a commercially available oxygen sensor show that the subsurface oxygen sensor provides rapid and accurate data on vapor phase oxygen concentrations. The sensor is well suited for monitoring gas flow and oxygen consumption in the vadose zone during air sparging and bioventing. The sensor performs well in permeable, unsaturated soil environments and recovers completely after being submerged during temporary saturated conditions. Calibrations of the in situ oxygen sensors were found to be stable after one year of continuous subsurface operation. However, application of the sensor in saturated soil conditions is limited. The three major advantages of this sensor for in situ monitoring are as follows: (1) it allows data acquisition at any specified time interval; (2) it provides potentially more accurate data by minimizing disturbance of subsurface conditions; and (3) it minimizes the cost of field and laboratory procedures involved in sample retrieval and analysis.

  5. Fiber optic oxygen sensor leak detection system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Goswami, Kish; Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Lothar U.

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the successful test of a multi-point fiber optic oxygen sensor system during the static firing of an Evolved Expandable Launch Vehicle (EELV)/Delta IV common booster core (CBC) rocket engine at NASA's Stennis Flight Center. The system consisted of microsensors (optrodes) using an oxygen gas sensitive indicator incorporated onto an optically transparent porous substrate. The modular optoelectronics and multiplexing network system was designed and assembled utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor readout unit that monitored the oxygen and temperature response of the individual optrodes in real-time and communicated this information via a serial communication port to a remote laptop computer. The sensor packaging for oxygen consisted of two optrodes - one doped with an indicator sensitive to oxygen, and the other doped with an indicator sensitive to temperature. The multichannel oxygen sensor system is fully reversible. It has demonstrated a dynamic response to oxygen gas in the range of 0% to 100% with 0.1% resolution and a response time of <=10 seconds. The sensor package was attached to a custom fiber optic ribbon cable, which was then connected to a fiber optic trunk communications cable (standard telecommunications-grade fiber) that connected to the optoelectronics module. Each board in the expandable module included light sources, photo-detectors, and associated electronics required for detecting oxygen and temperature. The paper illustrates the sensor design and performance data under field deployment conditions.

  6. Photocatalytic sensor for chemical oxygen demand determination based on oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y C; Lee, K H; Sasaki, S; Hashimoto, K; Ikebukuro, K; Karube, I

    2000-07-15

    The construction and performance evaluation of a novel Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) sensor is described. The sensor measures, using an oxygen electrode, a decrease of dissolved oxygen of a given sample resulting from photocatalytic oxidation of the organic compounds therein. As the photocatalyst, titanium dioxide (TiO2) fine particles adsorbed on a translucent poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) membrane was used. The oxygen electrode with the membrane attached on its tip was used as the sensor probe. The operation characteristics of the sensor are demonstrated using an artificial wastewater and real water samples from lakes in Japan. This method is considered to be reliable, in that the observed parameter is close to the theoretical definition of chemical oxygen demand (COD), the amount of oxygen consumed for oxidation of organic compounds.

  7. Portable optical oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chu, Ssu-Wei

    2014-11-10

    A new, simple signal processing, low-cost technique for the fabrication of a portable oxygen sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence is described. The sensing film uses the oxygen sensing dye platinum meso-tetra (pentfluorophenyl) porphyrin (PtTFPP) embedded in a polymer matrix. The ratio τ0100 measures sensitivity of the sensing film, where τ0 and τ100 represent the detected fluorescence lifetimes from the sensing film exposed to 100% nitrogen and 100% oxygen, respectively. The experimental results reveal that the PtTFPP-doped oxygen sensor has a sensitivity of 2.2 in the 0%-100% range. A preparation procedure for coating the photodiodes with the oxygen sensor film that produces repetitive and reliable sensing devices is proposed. The developed time-resolved optical oxygen sensor is portable, low-cost, has simple signal processing, and lacks optical filter elements. It is a cost-effective alternative to traditional electrochemical-based oxygen sensors and provides a platform for other optical based sensors.

  8. An oxygen pressure sensor using surface acoustic wave devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighty, Bradley D.; Upchurch, Billy T.; Oglesby, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Surface acoustic wave (SAW) piezoelectric devices are finding widespread applications in many arenas, particularly in the area of chemical sensing. We have developed an oxygen pressure sensor based on coating a SAW device with an oxygen binding agent which can be tailored to provide variable sensitivity. The coating is prepared by dissolving an oxygen binding agent in a toluene solution of a copolymer which is then sprayed onto the surface of the SAW device. Experimental data shows the feasibility of tailoring sensors to measure the partial pressure of oxygen from 2.6 to 67 KPa (20 to 500 torr). Potential applications of this technology are discussed.

  9. Hydrogen Sulfide as an Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance Although oxygen (O2)-sensing cells and tissues have been known for decades, the identity of the O2-sensing mechanism has remained elusive. Evidence is accumulating that O2-dependent metabolism of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is this enigmatic O2 sensor. Recent Advances The elucidation of biochemical pathways involved in H2S synthesis and metabolism have shown that reciprocal H2S/O2 interactions have been inexorably linked throughout eukaryotic evolution; there are multiple foci by which O2 controls H2S inactivation, and the effects of H2S on downstream signaling events are consistent with those activated by hypoxia. H2S-mediated O2 sensing has been demonstrated in a variety of O2-sensing tissues in vertebrate cardiovascular and respiratory systems, including smooth muscle in systemic and respiratory blood vessels and airways, carotid body, adrenal medulla, and other peripheral as well as central chemoreceptors. Critical Issues Information is now needed on the intracellular location and stoichometry of these signaling processes and how and which downstream effectors are activated by H2S and its metabolites. Future Directions Development of specific inhibitors of H2S metabolism and effector activation as well as cellular organelle-targeted compounds that release H2S in a time- or environmentally controlled way will not only enhance our understanding of this signaling process but also provide direction for future therapeutic applications. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 377–397. “Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution” —Theodosius Dobzhansky (29) PMID:24801248

  10. A Pyrene@Micelle Sensor for Fluorescent Oxygen Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yan-xia; Peng, Hong-shang; Ping, Jian-tao; Wang, Xiao-hui; You, Fang-tian

    2015-01-01

    For most fluorescent oxygen sensors developed today, their fabrication process is either time-consuming or needs specialized knowledge. In this work, a robust fluorescent oxygen sensor is facilely constructed by dissolving pyrene molecules into CTAB aqueous solution. The as-prepared pyrene@micelle sensors have submicron-sized diameter, and the concentration of utilized pyrene can be reduced as low as 0.8 mM but still can exhibit dominant excimer emission. The excimer fluorescence is sensitive to dissolved oxygen in both intensity and lifetime, and the respective Stern-Volmer plot follows a nonlinear behavior justified by a two-site model. Because of the merits of large Stokes shift (~140 nm), easy fabrication, and robustness, the pyrene@micelle sensors are very attractive for practical determination of oxygen. PMID:26539471

  11. Quantum dots as a possible oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółczyk, Paulina; Kur-Kowalska, Katarzyna; Przybyt, Małgorzata; Miller, Ewa

    Results of studies on optical properties of low toxicity quantum dots (QDs) obtained from copper doped zinc sulfate are discussed in the paper. The effect of copper admixture concentration and solution pH on the fluorescence emission intensity of QDs was investigated. Quenching of QDs fluorescence by oxygen was reported and removal of the oxygen from the environment by two methods was described. In the chemical method oxygen was eliminated by adding sodium sulfite, in the other method oxygen was removed from the solution using nitrogen gas. For elimination of oxygen by purging the solution with nitrogen the increase of fluorescence intensity with decreasing oxygen concentration obeyed Stern-Volmer equation indicating quenching. For the chemical method Stern-Volmer equation was not fulfilled. The fluorescence decays lifetimes were determined and the increase of mean lifetimes at the absence of oxygen support hypothesis that QDs fluorescence is quenched by oxygen.

  12. A fibre-optic oxygen sensor for monitoring human breathing.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongsheng; Formenti, Federico; Obeid, Andy; Hahn, Clive E W; Farmery, Andrew D

    2013-09-01

    The development and construction of a tapered-tip fibre-optic fluorescence based oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is suitable for fast and real-time monitoring of human breathing. The sensitivity and response time of the oxygen sensor were evaluated in vitro with a gas pressure chamber system, where oxygen partial pressure was rapidly changed between 5 and 15 kPa, and then in vivo in five healthy adult participants who synchronized their breathing to a metronome set at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 breaths min(-1). A Datex Ultima medical gas analyser was used to monitor breathing rate as a comparator. The sensor's response time in vitro was less than 150 ms, which allows accurate continuous measurement of inspired and expired oxygen pressure. Measurements of breathing rate by means of our oxygen sensor and of the Datex Ultima were in strong agreement. The results demonstrate that the device can reliably resolve breathing rates up to 60 breaths min(-1), and that it is a suitable cost-effective alternative for monitoring breathing rates and end-tidal oxygen partial pressure in the clinical setting. The rapid response time of the sensor may allow its use for monitoring rapid breathing rates as occur in children and the newborn.

  13. Development of oxygen sensors for use in liquid metal

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Ejenstam, Jesper; Szakalos, Peter

    2015-07-01

    For generation IV reactor concepts, based on liquid metal cooling, there is a need for robust oxygen sensors which can be used in the core of the reactor since corrosion can only be kept sufficiently low by controlling the dissolved oxygen content in the liquid metal. A robust, ceramic membrane type sensor has been developed at IFE/Halden (Norway) and tested in an autoclave system at KTH (Sweden). The sensor has been tested in lead-bismuth at 550 deg. C and performed well. (authors)

  14. Surface acoustic wave oxygen pressure sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Upchurch, Billy T. (Inventor); Leighty, Bradley D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A transducer for the measurement of absolute gas-state oxygen pressure from pressures of less than 100 Pa to atmospheric pressure (1.01 x 10(exp 5) Pa) is based on a standard surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The piezoelectric material of the SAW device is coated with a compound which will selectively and reversibly bind oxygen. When oxygen is bound by the coating, the mass of the coating increases by an amount equal to the mass of the bound oxygen. Such an increase in the mass of the coating causes a corresponding decrease in the resonant frequency of the SAW device.

  15. Development of a highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Ogino, H; Asakura, K

    1995-02-01

    A highly sensitive galvanic cell oxygen sensor was successfully developed for determining parts per billion of oxygen in high purity gases such as nitrogen, argon, etc. The response of this improved sensor was proportional in the range of oxygen concentrations from 10.0 ppm to the detection limit. The response speed in this study was improved to within 90 sec for a 90% response. The detection limit was tentatively found to be less than 0.4 ppb corresponding to S N = 2 .

  16. Optical Oxygen Sensors for Applications in Microfluidic Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Grist, Samantha M.; Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2010-01-01

    The presence and concentration of oxygen in biological systems has a large impact on the behavior and viability of many types of cells, including the differentiation of stem cells or the growth of tumor cells. As a result, the integration of oxygen sensors within cell culture environments presents a powerful tool for quantifying the effects of oxygen concentrations on cell behavior, cell viability, and drug effectiveness. Because microfluidic cell culture environments are a promising alternative to traditional cell culture platforms, there is recent interest in integrating oxygen-sensing mechanisms with microfluidics for cell culture applications. Optical, luminescence-based oxygen sensors, in particular, show great promise in their ability to be integrated with microfluidics and cell culture systems. These sensors can be highly sensitive and do not consume oxygen or generate toxic byproducts in their sensing process. This paper presents a review of previously proposed optical oxygen sensor types, materials and formats most applicable to microfluidic cell culture, and analyzes their suitability for this and other in vitro applications. PMID:22163408

  17. Quality assessment of packaged foods by optical oxygen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papkovsky, Dmitri B.; O'Mahony, Fiach C.; Kerry, Joe P.; Ogurtsov, Vladimir I.

    2005-11-01

    A phase-fluorometric oxygen sensor system has been developed, which allows non-destructive measurement of residual oxygen levels in sealed containers such as packaged foods. It operates with disposable solid-state sensors incorporated in each pack, and a portable detector which interrogates with the sensors through a (semi)transparent packaging material. The system has been optimized for packaging applications and validated in small and medium scale trials with different types of food, including MAP hams, cheese, convenience foods, smoked fish, bakery. It has demonstrated high efficiency in monitoring package integrity, oxygen profiles in packs, performance of packaging process and many other research and quality control tasks, allowing control of 100% of packs. The low-cost batch-calibrated sensors have demonstrated reliability, safety, stability including direct contact with food, high efficiency in the low oxygen range. Another system, which also employs the fluorescence-based oxygen sensing approach, provides rapid assessment of microbial contamination (total viable counts) in complex samples such as food homogenates, industrial waste, environmental samples, etc. It uses soluble oxygen-sensitive probes, standard microtitter plates and fluorescence measurements on conventional plate reader to monitor growth of aerobic bacteria in small test samples (e.g. food homogenates) via their oxygen respiration. The assay provides high sample through put, miniaturization, speed, and can serve as alternative to the established methods such as agar plate colony counts and turbidimetry.

  18. Guide for Oxygen Compatibility Assessments on Oxygen Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosales, Keisa R.; Shoffstall, Michael S.; Stoltzfus, Joel M.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding and preventing fire hazards is necessary when designing, maintaining, and operating oxygen systems. Ignition risks can be minimized by controlling heat sources and using materials that will not ignite or will not support burning in the end-use environment. Because certain materials are more susceptible to ignition in oxygen-enriched environments, a compatibility assessment should be performed before the component is introduced into an oxygen system. This document provides an overview of oxygen fire hazards and procedures that are consistent with the latest versions of American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standards G63 (1999) and G94 (2005) to address fire hazards associated with oxygen systems. This document supersedes the previous edition, NASA Technical Memorandum 104823, Guide for Oxygen Hazards Analyses on Components and Systems (1996). The step-by-step oxygen compatibility assessment method described herein (see Section 4) enables oxygen-system designers, system engineers, and facility managers to determine areas of concern with respect to oxygen compatibility and, ultimately, prevent damage to a system or injury to personnel.

  19. Method of detecting oxygen partial pressure and oxygen partial pressure sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Dees, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured.

  20. In vitro performance of a perfusion and oxygenation optical sensor using a unique liver phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, Tony J.; King, Travis J.; Long, Ruiqi; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, Mark A.; McShane, Michael J.; Coté, Gerard L.

    2012-03-01

    Between the years 1999 and 2008, on average 2,052 people died per year on the waiting list for liver transplants. Monitoring perfusion and oxygenation in transplanted organs in the 7 to 14 days period post-transplant can enhance graft and patient survival rates, and resultantly increase the availability of organs. In this work, we present in vitro results using a unique liver phantom that support the ability of our sensor to detect perfusion changes in the portal vein at low levels (50 mL/min . 4.5% of normal level). Our sensor measures diffuse reflection from three wavelengths (735, 805 and 940 nm) around the hemoglobin isobestic point (805 nm) to determine perfusion and oxygenation separately. To assess the sensitivity of our sensor to flow changes in the low range, we used two peristaltic pumps to pump a dye solution mimicking the optical properties of oxygenated blood, at various rates, through a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical properties of liver tissue. The collected pulsatile signal increased by 120% (2.2X) for every 100 mL/min flow rise for all three wavelengths in the range 50 to 500 mL/min. In addition, we used different dye mixtures to mimic oxygenation changes at constant perfusion/flow levels. The optical properties of the dye mixtures mimic oxygen saturations ranging between 0 and 100%. The sensor was shown to be sensitive to changes in oxygen saturations above 50%.

  1. Chemical Sensors Based On Oxygen Detection By Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Jennifer W.; Cox, M. E.; Dunn, Bruce S.

    1986-08-01

    Fluorescence quenching is shown to be a viable method of measuring oxygen concentration. Two oxygen/optical transducers based on fluorescence quenching have been developed and characterized: one is hydrophobic and the other is hydrophilic. The development of both transducers provides great flexibility in the application of fluorescence to oxygen measurement. One transducer is produced by entrapping a fluorophor, 9,10-diphenyl anthracene, in poly(dimethyl siloxane) to yield a homogeneous composite polymer matrix. The resulting matrix is hydrophobic. This transducer is extremely sensitive to PO2 as a result of oxygen quenching the fluorescence of 9,10-diphenyl anthracene. This quenching is utilized in the novel method employed to measure the transport properties of oxygen within Ulf 2matrix. Results show large values for the diffusion coefficient at 25°C, D = 3.5 x 10-5 cm /s. The fluorescence intensity varies inversely with P02. The second oxygen transducer is fabricated by entrapping 9,10-diphenyl anthracene in poly(hydroxy ethyl methacrylate). Free radical, room temperature polymerization is employed. This transducer is hydrophilic, and contains 37% water. The transport properties of oxygen within this transducer are compared with those of the hydrophobic transducer. The feasibility of generalizing the oxygen transducers to a wider class of chemical sensors through coupling to other chemistries is proposed. An example of such coupling is given in a glucose/oxygen transducer. The glucose transducer is produced by entrapping an enzyme, glucose oxidase, in the composite matrix of the hydrophilic oxygen transducer. Glucose oxidase catalyzes a reaction between glucose and oxygen, thereby lowering the local oxygen concentration. This transducer yields a glucose modified optical oxygen signal. The operation of this transducer and preliminary results of its characterization are presented.

  2. A robust and reliable optical trace oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDowell, G. R.; Holmes-Smith, A. S.; Uttamlal, M.; Mitchell, C.; Shannon, P. H.

    2017-05-01

    In applications of nitrogen (N2) generation, industrial gas manufacturing and food packaging there is a need to ensure oxygen (O2) is absent from the environment, even at the lowest concentration levels. Therefore, there has been an increased growth in the development of trace O2 parts per million (ppm) sensors over the past decade to detect and quantify the concentration of molecular O2 in the environment whether it be dissolved or gaseous O2. The majority of commercially available trace O2 sensors are based on electrochemical, zirconia and paramagnetic technologies. Here, the development of a luminescence-based optical trace O2 sensor is presented. Luminescence-based sensing is now regarded as one of the best techniques for the detection and quantification of O2. This is due to the high detection sensitivity, no O2 is consumed and there are a vast array of luminescent indicators and sensing platforms (polymers) that can be selected to suit the desired application. The sensor will be shown to operate from -30 °C to +60 °C in the 0-1000 ppm and/or 0-1200 μbar partial pressure of oxygen (ppO2) range and is equipped with temperature and pressure compensation. The luminescence non-depleting principle, sensor specifications and miniaturized nature offers an attractive alternative to other sensing technologies and advantages over other luminescence-based O2 ppm sensors.

  3. Polydimethylsiloxane Core-Polycaprolactone Shell Nanofibers as Biocompatible, Real-Time Oxygen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Xue, Ruipeng; Behera, Prajna; Xu, Joshua; Viapiano, Mariano S; Lannutti, John J

    2014-03-01

    Real-time, continuous monitoring of local oxygen contents at the cellular level is desirable both for the study of cancer cell biology and in tissue engineering. In this paper, we report the successful fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanofibers containing oxygen-sensitive probes by electrospinning and the applications of these fibers as optical oxygen sensors for both gaseous and dissolved oxygen. A protective 'shell' layer of polycaprolactone (PCL) not only maintains the fiber morphology of PDMS during the slow curing process but also provides more biocompatible surfaces. Once this strategy was perfected, tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) (Ru(dpp)) and platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) were dissolved in the PDMS core and the resulting sensing performance established. These new core-shell sensors containing different sensitivity probes showed slight variations in oxygen response but all exhibited excellent Stern-Volmer linearity. Due in part to the porous nature of the fibers and the excellent oxygen permeability of PDMS, the new sensors show faster response (<0.5 s) -4-10 times faster than previous reports - than conventional 2D film-based oxygen sensors. Such core-shell fibers are readily integrated into standard cell culture plates or bioreactors. The photostability of these nanofiber-based sensors was also assessed. Culture of glioma cell lines (CNS1, U251) and glioma-derived primary cells (GBM34) revealed negligible differences in biological behavior suggesting that the presence of the porphyrin dyes within the core carries with it no strong cytotoxic effects. The unique combination of demonstrated biocompatibility due to the PCL 'shell' and the excellent oxygen transparency of the PDMS core makes this particular sensing platform promising for sensing in the context of biological environments.

  4. Polydimethylsiloxane Core-Polycaprolactone Shell Nanofibers as Biocompatible, Real-Time Oxygen Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Ruipeng; Behera, Prajna; Xu, Joshua; Viapiano, Mariano S.; Lannutti, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time, continuous monitoring of local oxygen contents at the cellular level is desirable both for the study of cancer cell biology and in tissue engineering. In this paper, we report the successful fabrication of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanofibers containing oxygen-sensitive probes by electrospinning and the applications of these fibers as optical oxygen sensors for both gaseous and dissolved oxygen. A protective ‘shell’ layer of polycaprolactone (PCL) not only maintains the fiber morphology of PDMS during the slow curing process but also provides more biocompatible surfaces. Once this strategy was perfected, tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) (Ru(dpp)) and platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) were dissolved in the PDMS core and the resulting sensing performance established. These new core-shell sensors containing different sensitivity probes showed slight variations in oxygen response but all exhibited excellent Stern-Volmer linearity. Due in part to the porous nature of the fibers and the excellent oxygen permeability of PDMS, the new sensors show faster response (<0.5 s) −4–10 times faster than previous reports – than conventional 2D film-based oxygen sensors. Such core-shell fibers are readily integrated into standard cell culture plates or bioreactors. The photostability of these nanofiber-based sensors was also assessed. Culture of glioma cell lines (CNS1, U251) and glioma-derived primary cells (GBM34) revealed negligible differences in biological behavior suggesting that the presence of the porphyrin dyes within the core carries with it no strong cytotoxic effects. The unique combination of demonstrated biocompatibility due to the PCL ‘shell’ and the excellent oxygen transparency of the PDMS core makes this particular sensing platform promising for sensing in the context of biological environments. PMID:25006274

  5. Long-Term Stability of a Moored Optical Oxygen Sensor in an Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, S. A.; Murphy, D. J.; Janzen, C.; Bennett, S.; Simbeck, S.

    2016-02-01

    Oxygen is a key parameter for understanding biological production, deep water mass transport, biogeochemical cycling, and other oceanographic processes. Improvements and assessments of the long-term stability of oxygen sensors contribute to a better understanding of oxygen data quality. For moored platforms, increased sensor stability can also lead to fewer field servicing visits. In this study, the stability of the Sea-Bird SBE 63 optical dissolved oxygen (ODO) sensor is evaluated over a two-year period. A SBE37SMP-CTD-ODO instrument with Sea-Bird's standard anti-foulant protection was deployed at a high-fouling site in an estuary with the goal of assessing undisturbed sensor drift (without any cleaning or servicing). Periodic field site visits were completed every 1 - 3 months using side-by-side comparisons with a calibrated SBE 43 reference sensor, replicate water sample collection for Winkler titration, and vertical CTD profiles to assess water column structure. After 1.5 years, the moored ODO instrument drifted low of correct by 1.5% compared to Winkler samples and post calibration results. Dry storage drift tests completed at Sea-Bird indicate ODO shelf drift can be on the order of -1.0 to -1.3% per year. Post calibration results after two years agreed well with field test comparisons. Overall, the ODO sensor showed stability within the initial accuracy specification (+/- 2%) and negligible effects from biofouling. Further studies in different environments will continue to provide more information on sensor performance in the field.

  6. Predicting Transitions in Oxygen Saturation Using Phone Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Juen, Joshua; Hsu-Lumetta, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Widespread availability of mobile devices is revolutionizing health monitoring. Smartphones are ubiquitous, but it is unknown what vital signs can be monitored with medical quality. Oxygen saturation is a standard measure of health status. We have shown phone sensors can accurately measure walking patterns. Subjects and Methods: Twenty cardiopulmonary patients performed 6-min walk tests in pulmonary rehabilitation at a regional hospital. They wore pulse oximeters and carried smartphones running our MoveSense software, which continuously recorded saturation and motion. Continuous saturation defined categories corresponding to status levels, including transitions. Continuous motion was used to compute spatiotemporal gait parameters from sensor data. Our existing gait model was then trained with these data and used to predict transitions in oxygen saturation. For walking variation, 10-s windows are units for classifying into status categories. Results: Oxygen saturation clustered into three categories, corresponding to pulmonary function Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) 1 and GOLD 2, with a Transition category where saturation varied around the mean rather than remaining steady with low standard deviation. This category indicates patients who are not clinically stable. The gait model predicted status during each measured window of free walking, with 100% accuracy for the 20 subjects, based on majority voting. Conclusions: Continuous recording of oxygen saturation can predict cardiopulmonary status, including patients in transition between status levels. Gait models using phone sensors can accurately predict these saturation categories from walking motion. This suggests medical devices for predicting clinical stability from passive monitoring using carried smartphones.

  7. Development and Performance of the Oxygen Sensor in the CSA-CP Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Beck, Steve; James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    A combustion products analyzer (CPA) was built for use on Shuttle in response to several thermodegradation incidents that had occurred during early flights. The CPA contained sensors that measured carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, and hydrogen fluoride. These marker compounds, monitored by the CPA, were selected based upon the likely products to be released in a spacecraft fire. When the Toxicology Laboratory group at Johnson Space Center (JSC) began to assess the air quality monitoring needs for the International Space Station (ISS), the CPA was the starting point for design of an instrument to monitor the atmosphere following a thermodegradation event. The final product was significantly different from the CPA and was named the compound specific analyzer-combustion products (CSA-CP). The major change from the CPA that will be the focus of this paper was the replacement of an unreliable hydrogen fluoride (HF) sensor with an oxygen sensor. A reliable HF sensor was not commercially available, but as the toxicology group reviewed the overall monitoring strategy for ISS, it appeared that a portable oxygen sensor to backup the major constituent analyzer was needed. Therefore, an oxygen sensor replaced the HF sensor in the new instrument. This paper will describe the development, deployment, and performance of the CSA-CP oxygen sensor on both Shuttle and ISS. Also, data for CSA-CP oxygen sensor accuracy at nominal and reduced pressures will be presented.

  8. Development and Performance of the Oxygen Sensor in the CSA-CP Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limero, Thomas; Beck, Steve; James, John T.

    2004-01-01

    A combustion products analyzer (CPA) was built for use on Shuttle in response to several thermodegradation incidents that had occurred during early flights. The CPA contained sensors that measured carbon monoxide, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, and hydrogen fluoride. These marker compounds, monitored by the CPA, were selected based upon the likely products to be released in a spacecraft fire. When the Toxicology Laboratory group at Johnson Space Center (JSC) began to assess the air quality monitoring needs for the International Space Station (ISS), the CPA was the starting point for design of an instrument to monitor the atmosphere following a thermodegradation event. The final product was significantly different from the CPA and was named the compound specific analyzer-combustion products (CSA-CP). The major change from the CPA that will be the focus of this paper was the replacement of an unreliable hydrogen fluoride (HF) sensor with an oxygen sensor. A reliable HF sensor was not commercially available, but as the toxicology group reviewed the overall monitoring strategy for ISS, it appeared that a portable oxygen sensor to backup the major constituent analyzer was needed. Therefore, an oxygen sensor replaced the HF sensor in the new instrument. This paper will describe the development, deployment, and performance of the CSA-CP oxygen sensor on both Shuttle and ISS. Also, data for CSA-CP oxygen sensor accuracy at nominal and reduced pressures will be presented.

  9. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.

    1996-01-01

    A gas sensor measures O.sub.2 content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system.

  10. Oxygen sensor for monitoring gas mixtures containing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, R.J.; Basel, R.A.

    1996-03-12

    A gas sensor measures O{sub 2} content of a reformable monitored gas containing hydrocarbons, H{sub 2}O and/or CO{sub 2}, preferably in association with an electrochemical power generation system. The gas sensor has a housing communicating with the monitored gas environment and carries the monitored gas through an integral catalytic hydrocarbon reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst, and over a solid electrolyte electrochemical cell used for sensing purposes. The electrochemical cell includes a solid electrolyte between a sensor electrode that is exposed to the monitored gas, and a reference electrode that is isolated in the housing from the monitored gas and is exposed to a reference gas environment. A heating element is also provided in heat transfer communication with the gas sensor. A circuit that can include controls operable to adjust operations via valves or the like is connected between the sensor electrode and the reference electrode to process the electrical signal developed by the electrochemical cell. The electrical signal varies as a measure of the equilibrium oxygen partial pressure of the monitored gas. Signal noise is effectively reduced by maintaining a constant temperature in the area of the electrochemical cell and providing a monitored gas at chemical equilibria when contacting the electrochemical cell. The output gas from the electrochemical cell of the sensor is fed back into the conduits of the power generating system. 4 figs.

  11. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S.; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C.; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.; Bright, Frank V.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O2) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O2-sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3]2+) encapsulated within sol–gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors. PMID:24493909

  12. Contact CMOS imaging of gaseous oxygen sensor array.

    PubMed

    Daivasagaya, Daisy S; Yao, Lei; Yi Yung, Ka; Hajj-Hassan, Mohamad; Cheung, Maurice C; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P; Bright, Frank V

    2011-10-01

    We describe a compact luminescent gaseous oxygen (O2) sensor microsystem based on the direct integration of sensor elements with a polymeric optical filter and placed on a low power complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imager integrated circuit (IC). The sensor operates on the measurement of excited-state emission intensity of O2-sensitive luminophore molecules tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) ([Ru(dpp)3](2+)) encapsulated within sol-gel derived xerogel thin films. The polymeric optical filter is made with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) that is mixed with a dye (Sudan-II). The PDMS membrane surface is molded to incorporate arrays of trapezoidal microstructures that serve to focus the optical sensor signals on to the imager pixels. The molded PDMS membrane is then attached with the PDMS color filter. The xerogel sensor arrays are contact printed on top of the PDMS trapezoidal lens-like microstructures. The CMOS imager uses a 32 × 32 (1024 elements) array of active pixel sensors and each pixel includes a high-gain phototransistor to convert the detected optical signals into electrical currents. Correlated double sampling circuit, pixel address, digital control and signal integration circuits are also implemented on-chip. The CMOS imager data is read out as a serial coded signal. The CMOS imager consumes a static power of 320 µW and an average dynamic power of 625 µW when operating at 100 Hz sampling frequency and 1.8 V DC. This CMOS sensor system provides a useful platform for the development of miniaturized optical chemical gas sensors.

  13. High-temperature potentiometric oxygen sensor with internal reference

    DOEpatents

    Routbort, Jules L [Hinsdale, IL; Singh, Dileep [Naperville, IL; Dutta, Prabir K [Worthington, OH; Ramasamy, Ramamoorthy [North Royalton, OH; Spirig, John V [Columbus, OH; Akbar, Sheikh [Hilliard, OH

    2011-11-15

    A compact oxygen sensor is provided, comprising a mixture of metal and metal oxide an enclosure containing said mixture, said enclosure capable of isolating said mixture from an environment external of said enclosure, and a first wire having a first end residing within the enclosure and having a second end exposed to the environment. Also provided is a method for the fabrication of an oxygen sensor, the method comprising confining a metal-metal oxide solid mixture to a container which consists of a single material permeable to oxygen ions, supplying an electrical conductor having a first end and a second end, whereby the first end resides inside the container as a reference (PO.sub.2).sup.ref, and the second end resides outside the container in the atmosphere where oxygen partial pressure (PO.sub.2).sup.ext is to be measured, and sealing the container with additional single material such that grain boundary sliding occurs between grains of the single material and grains of the additional single material.

  14. Development of metalloporphyrin-derived interference-free oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xuanzheng

    The main aim of this thesis is to develop novel highly sensitive, membrane-free, inexpensive one-way oxygen sensors that work in neutral solutions at or near 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl to avoid interference from oxidizing or reducing agents in water or blood samples. The theoretical background is to use chemically-modified electrodes with metalloporphyrins as catalysts for dioxygen reduction at or near 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Three approaches are employed to prepare metalloporphyrin-derived electrodes. 1. The first approach is based on a traditional chemical modification technique and commercial voltammetric electrodes. Iron(III)-tetra(3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenyl) porphyrin chloride (FeTMHPP) is dip-coated, dropwise-coated, and electrochemically-polymerized on four different bare electrodes: glassy carbon (GCE), graphite (GE), gold (AuE), and platinum electrodes (PtE), respectively. Their electrocatalytic properties for dioxygen reduction are characterized and compared. These chemically-modified electrodes demonstrate different electrocatalytic behavior for dioxygen reduction in PBS pH7.0. It is demonstrated for the first time that only eletrochemically polymerized poly-FeTMHPP film on bare PtE has a highly electrocatalytic property for dioxygen reduction in PBS pH7.0 with a cathode peak potential, Esb{pc}, ranging from 0 mV to +150 mV vs. Ag/AgCl which is controlled by the polymeric film thickness. The kinetic results show that this system has a four electron transfer mechanism for dioxygen reduction. The results are transferred to a thick film chip oxygen sensor. The poly-FeTMHPP/Pt chip oxygen sensor shows clearly that it has a potential to be a practical oxygen sensor. The dynamic range of the poly-FeTMHPP/Pt oxygen sensor between 50 and 350 muM covers the normal dissolved oxygen range of waste water and blood samples. The detection limit of 337 pM for dissolved oxygen in PBS pH7.0 allows a highly sensitive measurement. 2. In order to improve the stability of the sensor, we also

  15. An Optical Oxygen Sensor for Long-Term Continuous Monitoring of Dissolved Oxygen in Perfused Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, F. G.; Jeevarajan, A. S.; Anderson, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    For long-term growth of man1ITlalian cells in perfused bioreactors, it is essential to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium to quantitate and control level of DO. Continuous measurement of the amount of DO in the cell culture medium in-line under sterile conditions in NASA's perfused bioreactor requires that the oxygen sensor provide increased sensitivity and be sterilizable and nontoxic. Additionally, long-term cell culture experiments require that the calibration be maintained several weeks or months. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An optical oxygen sensor (BOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. Tris( 4,7 -diphenyl-l, 1 O-phenanthroline )ruthenium(II) chloride is employed as the fluorescent dye indicator. The sensing element consists of a glass capillary (OD 4.0 mm; ID 2.0 mm) coated internally with a thin layer of the fluorescent dye in silicone matrix and overlayed with a black shielding layer. Irradiation of the sensing element with blue light (blue LED with emission maximum at 475 nm) generates a red fluorescence centered at 626 nm. The fluorescence intensity is correlated to the concentration of DO present in the culture medium, following the modified non-linear Stern-Volmer equation. By using a pulsed irradiating light source, the problem of dye-bleaching, which is often encountered in long-term continuous measurements of tIns type, 'is minimized. To date we achieved sensor resolution of 0.3 mmHg at 50 mmHg p02, and 0.6 mmHg at 100 mmHg p02, with a response time of about one minute. Calibration was accomplished in sterile phosphate-buffered saline with a blood-gas analyzer (BGA) measurement as reference. Stand-alone software was also developed to control the sensor and bioreactor as well as to

  16. Intravascular oxygen sensors with novel applications for bedside respiratory monitoring.

    PubMed

    Formenti, F; Farmery, A D

    2017-01-01

    Measurement allows us to quantify various parameters and variables in natural systems. In addition, by measuring the effect by which a perturbation of one part of the system influences the system as a whole, insights into the functional mechanisms of the system can be inferred. Clinical monitoring has a different role to that of scientific measurement. Monitoring describes measurements whose prime purpose is not to give insights into underlying mechanisms, but to provide information to 'warn' of imminent events. What is often more important is the description of trends in measured variables. In this article, we give some examples - focussed around oxygen sensors - of how new sensors can make important measurements and might in the future contribute to improved clinical management.

  17. Oxygen saturation in free-diving whales: optical sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Vacas-Jacques, Paulino; Anderson, Rox; Zapol, Warren; Franco, Walfre

    2013-02-01

    Mass stranding of live whales has been explained by proposing many natural or human-related causes. Recent necropsy reports suggest a link between the mass stranding of beaked whales and the use of naval mid-frequency sonar. Surprisingly, whales have experienced symptoms similar to those caused by inert gas bubbles in human divers. Our goal is to develop a compact optical sensor to monitor the consumption of the oxygen stores in the muscle of freely diving whales. To this end we have proposed the use of a near-infrared phase-modulated frequency-domain spectrophotometer, in reflectance mode, to probe tissue oxygenation. Our probe consists of three main components: radiofrequency (RF) modulated light sources, a high-bandwidth avalanche photodiode with transimpedance amplifier, and a RF gain and phase detector. In this work, we concentrate on the design and performance of the light sensor, and its corresponding amplifier unit. We compare three state-of-the-art avalanche photodiodes: one through-hole device and two surface-mount detectors. We demonstrate that the gain due to the avalanche effect differs between sensors. The avalanche gain near maximum bias of the through-hole device exceeds by a factor of 2.5 and 8.3 that of the surface-mount detectors. We present the behavior of our assembled through-hole detector plus high-bandwidth transimpedance amplifier, and compare its performance to that of a commercially available module. The assembled unit enables variable gain, its phase noise is qualitatively lower, and the form factor is significantly smaller. Having a detecting unit that is compact, flexible, and functional is a milestone in the development of our tissue oxygenation tag.

  18. Field comparison of optical and clark cell dissolved-oxygen sensors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.; Garcia, L.

    2005-01-01

    Three multi-parameter water-quality monitors equipped with either Clark cell type or optical type dissolved-oxygen sensors were deployed for 30 days in a brackish (salinity <10 parts per thousand) environment to determine the sensitivity of the sensors to biofouling. The dissolved-oxygen sensors compared periodically to a hand-held dissolved oxygen sensor, but were not serviced or cleaned during the deployment. One of the Clark cell sensors and the optical sensor performed similarly during the deployment. The remaining Clark cell sensor was not aged correctly prior to deployment and did not perform as well as the other sensors. All sensors experienced substantial biofouling that gradually degraded the accuracy of the dissolved-oxygen measurement during the last half of the deployment period. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  19. A new generation of high temperature oxygen sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirig, John V.

    Potentiometric internal reference oxygen sensors were created by embedding a metal/metal oxide mixture within an yttria-stabilized zirconia oxygen-conducting ceramic superstructure. A static internal reference oxygen pressure was produced inside the reference chamber of the sensor at the target application temperature. The metal/metal oxide-containing reference chamber was sealed within the stabilized zirconia ceramic superstructure by a high pressure (3-6 MPa) and high temperature (1200-1300°C) bonding method that initiated grain boundary sliding between the ceramic components. The bonding method created ceramic joints that were pore-free and indistinguishable from the bulk ceramic. The oxygen sensor presented in this study is capable of long-term operation and is resistant to the strains of thermal cycling. The temperature ceiling of this device was limited to 800°C by the glass used to seal the sensor package where the lead wire breached the inner-to-outer environment. Were it possible to create a gas-tight joint between an electron carrier and stabilized zirconia, additional sealing agents would not be necessary during sensor construction. In order to enable this enhancement it is necessary to make a gas-tight joint between two dissimilar materials: a ceramic electrolyte and an efficient ceramic electron carrier. Aluminum-doped lanthanum strontium manganese oxide, La0.77Sr 0.20Al0.9Mn0.1O3, was joined to stabilized tetragonal zirconia polymorph YTZP (ZrO2)0.97(Y 2O3)0.03 by a uniaxial stress (3-6 MPa) and high-temperature (1250-1350°C) bonding method that initiated grain-boundary sliding between the ceramic components. An analysis of reactivity between different Al-dopings of LaxSr1-xAlyMn1-yO3 indicated that the Al:Mn ratio must be high to diminish the reaction between LaxSr1-xAlyMn1-yO3 and stabilized zirconia. While the resulting compound, La0.77Sr 0.20Al0.9Mn0.1O3, was an inefficient electron carrier, the successful bond between an aluminum

  20. Optimizing probe design for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Akl, Tony; Long, Ruiqi; McShane, Michael J.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop an implantable optical perfusion and oxygenation sensor, based on multiwavelength reflectance pulse oximetry, we investigate the effect of source detector separation and other source-detector characteristics to optimize the sensor s signal to background ratio using Monte Carlo (MC) based simulations and in vitro phantom studies. Separations in the range 0.45 to 1.25 mm were found to be optimal in the case of a point source. The numerical aperture (NA) of the source had no effect on the collected signal while the widening of the source spatial profile caused a shift in the optimal source-detector separation. Specifically, for a 4.5 mm flat beam and a 2.4 mm 2.5 mm photodetector, the optimal performance was found to be when the source and detector are adjacent to each other. These modeling results were confirmed by data collected from in vitro experiments on a liver phantom perfused with dye solutions mimicking the absorption properties of hemoglobin for different oxygenation states.

  1. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-03-01

    The atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket campaign WADIS. It includes, amongst others, two of our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source for atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS campaign comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented which was successfully launched in June 2013 from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway. FIPEX data was sampled with 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 10 m. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for up- and downleg respectively.

  2. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, M.; Löhle, S.; Steinbeck, A.; Binder, T.; Fasoulas, S.

    2015-09-01

    The middle- and upper-atmospheric energy budget is largely dominated by reactions involving atomic oxygen (O). Modeling of these processes requires detailed knowledge about the distribution of this oxygen species. Understanding the mutual contributions of atomic oxygen and wave motions to the atmospheric heating is the main goal of the rocket project WADIS (WAve propagation and DISsipation in the middle atmosphere). It includes, amongst others, our instruments for the measurement of atomic oxygen that have both been developed with the aim of resolving density variations on small vertical scales along the trajectory. In this paper the instrument based on catalytic effects (PHLUX: Pyrometric Heat Flux Experiment) is introduced briefly. The experiment employing solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX: Flux φ(Phi) Probe Experiment) is presented in detail. These sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma as a source of atomic oxygen in combination with mass spectrometer reference measurements. The spectrometer was in turn calibrated for O with a method based on methane. In order to get insight into the horizontal variability, the rocket payload had instrument decks at both ends. Each housed several sensor heads measuring during both the up- and downleg of the trajectory. The WADIS project comprises two rocket flights during different geophysical conditions. Results from WADIS-1 are presented, which was successfully launched in June 2013 from the Andøya Space Center, Norway. FIPEX data were sampled at 100 Hz and yield atomic oxygen density profiles with a vertical resolution better than 9 m. This allows density variations to be studied on very small spatial scales. Numerical simulations of the flow field around the rocket were done at several points of the trajectory to assess the influence of aerodynamic effects on the measurement results. Density profiles peak at 3 × 1010 cm-3 at altitudes of 93.6 and 96 km for the up- and downleg, respectively.

  3. Ultra-sensitive optical oxygen sensors for characterisation of nearly anoxic systems

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M.; Klimant, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen quantification in trace amounts is essential in many fields of science and technology. Optical oxygen sensors proved invaluable tools for oxygen measurements in a broad concentration range but until now neither optical nor electrochemical oxygen sensors were able to quantify oxygen in the sub-nanomolar concentration range. Herein we present new optical oxygen sensing materials with unmatched sensitivity. They rely on the combination of ultra-long decaying (several hundred milliseconds lifetime) phosphorescent boron- and aluminium-chelates and highly oxygen-permeable and chemically stable perfluorinated polymers. The sensitivity of the new sensors is improved up to 20-fold compared to state-of-the-art analogues. The limits of detection are as low as 5 parts per billion, volume in gas phase under atmospheric pressure or 7 picomolar in solution. The sensors enable completely new applications for monitoring of oxygen in previously inaccessible concentration ranges. PMID:25042041

  4. Intrinsic artefacts in optical oxygen sensors--how reliable are our measurements?

    PubMed

    Lehner, Philipp; Staudinger, Christoph; Borisov, Sergey M; Regensburger, Johannes; Klimant, Ingo

    2015-03-02

    Optical oxygen sensing is of broad interest in many areas of research, such as medicine, food processing, and micro- and marine biology. The operation principle of optical oxygen sensors is well established and these sensors are routinely employed in lab and field experiments. Ultratrace oxygen sensors, which enable measurements in the sub-nanomolar region (dissolved oxygen), are becoming increasingly important. Such sensors prominently exhibit phenomena that complicate calibration and measurements. However, these phenomena are not constrained to ultratrace sensors; rather, these effects are inherent to the way optical oxygen sensors work and may influence any optical oxygen measurement when certain conditions are met. This scenario is especially true for applications that deal with high-excitation light intensities, such as microscopy and microfluidic applications. Herein, we present various effects that we could observe in our studies with ultratrace oxygen sensors and discuss the reasons for their appearance, the mechanism by which they influence measurements, and how to best reduce their impact. The phenomena discussed are oxygen photoconsumption in the sensor material; depletion of the dye ground state by high-excitation photon-flux values, which can compromise both intensity and ratiometric-based measurements; triplet-triplet annihilation; and singlet-oxygen accumulation, which affects measurements at very low oxygen concentrations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Nox4: A Hydrogen Peroxide-Generating Oxygen Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Nox4 is an oddity among members of the Nox family of NADPH oxidases [seven isoenzymes that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) from molecular oxygen] in that it is constitutively active. All other Nox enzymes except for Nox4 require upstream activators, either calcium or organizer/activator subunits (p47phox, NOXO1/p67phox, and NOXA1). Nox4 may also be unusual as it reportedly releases hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in contrast to Nox1–Nox3 and Nox5, which release superoxide, although this result is controversial in part because of possible membrane compartmentalization of superoxide, which may prevent detection. Our studies were undertaken (1) to identify the Nox4 ROS product using a membrane-free, partially purified preparation of Nox4 and (2) to test the hypothesis that Nox4 activity is acutely regulated not by activator proteins or calcium, but by cellular pO2, allowing it to function as an O2 sensor, the output of which is signaling H2O2. We find that approximately 90% of the electron flux through isolated Nox4 produces H2O2 and 10% forms superoxide. The kinetic mechanism of H2O2 formation is consistent with a mechanism involving binding of one oxygen molecule, which is then sequentially reduced by the heme in two one-electron reduction steps first to form a bound superoxide intermediate and then H2O2; kinetics are not consistent with a previously proposed internal superoxide dismutation mechanism involving two oxygen binding/reduction steps for each H2O2 formed. Critically, Nox4 has an unusually high Km for oxygen (∼18%), similar to the values of known oxygen-sensing enzymes, compared with a Km of 2–3% for Nox2, the phagocyte NADPH oxidase. This allows Nox4 to generate H2O2 as a function of oxygen concentration throughout a physiological range of pO2 values and to respond rapidly to changes in pO2. PMID:25062272

  6. Microbial nar-GFP cell sensors reveal oxygen limitations in highly agitated and aerated laboratory-scale fermentors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jose R; Cha, Hyung J; Rao, Govind; Marten, Mark R; Bentley, William E

    2009-01-01

    Background Small-scale microbial fermentations are often assumed to be homogeneous, and oxygen limitation due to inadequate micromixing is often overlooked as a potential problem. To assess the relative degree of micromixing, and hence propensity for oxygen limitation, a new cellular oxygen sensor has been developed. The oxygen responsive E. coli nitrate reductase (nar) promoter was used to construct an oxygen reporter plasmid (pNar-GFPuv) which allows cell-based reporting of oxygen limitation. Because there are greater than 109 cells in a fermentor, one can outfit a vessel with more than 109 sensors. Our concept was tested in high density, lab-scale (5 L), fed-batch, E. coli fermentations operated with varied mixing efficiency – one verses four impellers. Results In both cases, bioreactors were maintained identically at greater than 80% dissolved oxygen (DO) during batch phase and at approximately 20% DO during fed-batch phase. Trends for glucose consumption, biomass and DO showed nearly identical behavior. However, fermentations with only one impeller showed significantly higher GFPuv expression than those with four, indicating a higher degree of fluid segregation sufficient for cellular oxygen deprivation. As the characteristic time for GFPuv expression (approx 90 min.) is much larger than that for mixing (approx 10 s), increased specific fluorescence represents an averaged effect of oxygen limitation over time and by natural extension, over space. Conclusion Thus, the pNar-GFPuv plasmid enabled bioreactor-wide oxygen sensing in that bacterial cells served as individual recirculating sensors integrating their responses over space and time. We envision cell-based oxygen sensors may find utility in a wide variety of bioprocessing applications. PMID:19146688

  7. Net Community Production in the Southern Ocean Monitored with Nitrate and Oxygen Sensors on Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Riser, S.; Swift, D.; Coletti, L.; Jannasch, H. W.; Plant, J.; Sakamoto, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Southern Ocean is the least observed ocean due to its remote location and severe weather. There are few areas visited regularly by ships and surface moorings are difficult to maintain. Profiling floats equipped with biogeochemical sensors provide one mechanism to sustain long term observations in this region. Here we present results obtained from two Apex profiling floats equipped with In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer (ISUS) nitrate sensors and Aanderaa Optode oxygen sensors. Float 5146 operated for over three years near 55° South in the Indian Ocean sector of the Southern Ocean. It made 230 vertical profiles at 5 day intervals from 1000 m to the surface with 60 nitrate and oxygen measurements on each profile before its batteries were exhausted near the Kerguelen Plateau. Nitrate reported by Float 5146 is shown in the figure. Float 5426 has operated over 2.5 years and made 190 vertical profiles to date. It was initially launched in the near 55° South, 80° West in the Pacific sector and then passed through the Drake Passage and is now near 45° South in the Atlantic sector. Each of these floats provides a unique perspective on changes in net community production along their trajectory. Data quality over the multi-year operating life of each float will first be assessed. Rates of biogeochemical processes that are diagnosed by combining sensor data with a 1-D mixed layer model will then be discussed.

  8. Optical triple sensor for measuring pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Weigl, B H; Holobar, A; Trettnak, W; Klimant, I; Kraus, H; O'Leary, P; Wolfbeis, O S

    1994-02-14

    A triple sensor unit consisting of opto-chemical sensors for measurement of pH, oxygen and carbon dioxide in bioreactors is presented. The pH and the CO2 sensor are based on the color change of a pH-sensitive dye immobilized on a polymeric support. The resulting changes in absorption are monitored through optical fibers. The oxygen sensor is based on the quenching of the fluorescence of a metal-organic dye. All three sensors are fully LED compatible. The sensitive membranes consist of plastic films and can be stored and replaced conveniently. The sensors are sterilizable with hydrogen peroxide and ethanol. In addition, the pH sensor is steam sterilizable. Accuracy, resolution and reproducibility fulfill the requirements for use in biotechnological applications. Calibration procedures for each sensor are presented. The working principle and the performance of all three sensors are described, with particular emphasis given to their application in bioreactors.

  9. Electrochemical nanocomposite-derived sensor for the analysis of chemical oxygen demand in urban wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Capitán, Manuel; Baldi, Antoni; Gómez, Raquel; García, Virginia; Jiménez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Fernández-Sánchez, César

    2015-02-17

    This work reports on the fabrication and comparative analytical assessment of electrochemical sensors applied to the rapid analysis of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in urban waste waters. These devices incorporate a carbon nanotube-polystyrene composite, containing different inorganic electrocatalysts, namely, Ni, NiCu alloy, CoO, and CuO/AgO nanoparticles. The sensor responses were initially evaluated using glucose as standard analyte and then by analyzing a set of real samples from urban wastewater treatment plants. The estimated COD values in the samples were compared with those provided by an accredited laboratory using the standard dichromate method. The sensor prepared with the CuO/AgO-based nanocomposite showed the best analytical performance. The recorded COD values of both the sensor and the standard method were overlapped, considering the 95% confidence intervals. In order to show the feasible application of this approach for the detection of COD online and in continuous mode, the CuO/AgO-based nanocomposite sensor was integrated in a compact flow system and applied to the detection of wastewater samples, showing again a good agreement with the values provided by the dichromate method.

  10. High Throughput Micropatterning of Optical Oxygen Sensor for Single Cell Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haixin; Tian, Yanqing; Bhushan, Shivani; Su, Fengyu; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we present our results from process development and characterization of optical oxygen sensors that are patterned by traditional UV lithography. An oxygen sensitive luminescent probe, platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), was encapsulated in commercially purchased photoresist (AZ5214) to form uniform thin sensor films on fused silica substrates. Plasticizer ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (SR454) was added to the dye-photoresist sensor mixtures to improve the oxygen sensitivity. The optimum sensor mixture composition that can be patterned with maximum sensitivity was identified. The microfabrication process conditions, cell adherence and oxygen sensitivity results from patterned structures were characterized in detail. Down to 3 µm features have been fabricated on fused silica substrates using the developed techniques. The result implies the developed methods can provide a feasible way to miniaturize the optical sensor system for single cell analysis with precise control of sensor volume and response.

  11. High Throughput Micropatterning of Optical Oxygen Sensor for Single Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haixin; Tian, Yanqing; Bhushan, Shivani; Su, Fengyu; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present our results from process development and characterization of optical oxygen sensors that are patterned by traditional UV lithography. An oxygen sensitive luminescent probe, platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP), was encapsulated in commercially purchased photoresist (AZ5214) to form uniform thin sensor films on fused silica substrates. Plasticizer ethoxylated trimethylolpropane triacrylate (SR454) was added to the dye-photoresist sensor mixtures to improve the oxygen sensitivity. The optimum sensor mixture composition that can be patterned with maximum sensitivity was identified. The microfabrication process conditions, cell adherence and oxygen sensitivity results from patterned structures were characterized in detail. Down to 3 µm features have been fabricated on fused silica substrates using the developed techniques. The result implies the developed methods can provide a feasible way to miniaturize the optical sensor system for single cell analysis with precise control of sensor volume and response PMID:23066352

  12. Oxygen Compatibility Assessment of Components and Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel; Sparks, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Fire hazards are inherent in oxygen systems and a storied history of fires in rocket engine propulsion components exists. To detect and mitigate these fire hazards requires careful, detailed, and thorough analyses applied during the design process. The oxygen compatibility assessment (OCA) process designed by NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) can be used to determine the presence of fire hazards in oxygen systems and the likelihood of a fire. This process may be used as both a design guide and during the approval process to ensure proper design features and material selection. The procedure for performing an OCA is a structured step-by-step process to determine the most severe operating conditions; assess the flammability of the system materials at the use conditions; evaluate the presence and efficacy of ignition mechanisms; assess the potential for a fire to breach the system; and determine the reaction effect (the potential loss of life, mission, and system functionality as the result of a fire). This process should be performed for each component in a system. The results of each component assessment, and the overall system assessment, should be recorded in a report that can be used in the short term to communicate hazards and their mitigation and to aid in system/component development and, in the long term, to solve anomalies that occur during engine testing and operation.

  13. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppesen, D.; Trellue, R.

    1997-04-01

    Effective utilization of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) in a theater reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and kill assessment environment requires that a human operator be able to interpret, and collectively assess, the significance of real time data obtained from UGS emplacements over large geographical regions of interest. The products of this UGS data interpretation and assessment activity can then be used in the decision support process for command level evaluation of appropriate courses of action. Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical real time situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule-based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all-source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  14. Oxygen-dependent ATF-4 stability is mediated by the PHD3 oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Köditz, Jens; Nesper, Jutta; Wottawa, Marieke; Stiehl, Daniel P; Camenisch, Gieri; Franke, Corinna; Myllyharju, Johanna; Wenger, Roland H; Katschinski, Dörthe M

    2007-11-15

    The activating transcription factor-4 (ATF-4) is translationally induced under anoxic conditions, mediates part of the unfolded protein response following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and is a critical regulator of cell fate. Here, we identified the zipper II domain of ATF-4 to interact with the oxygen sensor prolyl-4-hydroxylase domain 3 (PHD3). The PHD inhibitors dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) and hypoxia, or proteasomal inhibition, all induced ATF-4 protein levels. Hypoxic induction of ATF-4 was due to increased protein stability, but was independent of the ubiquitin ligase von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL). A novel oxygen-dependent degradation (ODD) domain was identified adjacent to the zipper II domain. Mutations of 5 prolyl residues within this ODD domain or siRNA-mediated down-regulation of PHD3, but not of PHD2, was sufficient to stabilize ATF-4 under normoxic conditions. These data demonstrate that PHD-dependent oxygen-sensing recruits both the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and ATF-4 systems, and hence not only confers adaptive responses but also cell fate decisions.

  15. A novel Multi-Fiber Optode sensor system (MuFO) for monitoring oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop-Jakobsen, K.; Fischer, J.; Wenzhöfer, F.

    2012-04-01

    In the marine environment, dissolved oxygen concentrations often vary significantly spatially as well as temporally. Monitoring these variations is essential for our understanding of the biological and chemical processes controlling the oxygen dynamics in water columns and sediments. Such investigations require a high number of measuring points and a high temporal resolution. A Multi-Fiber Optode sensor system (MuFO) was designed to assess these requirements. The MuFO system simultaneously controls 100 fiber optodes enabling continuous monitoring of oxygen in 100 positions within a 5-10m radius. The measurements are based on quenching of an oxygen sensitive luminophore, which is immobilised at the end of each fiber optode. The optical oxygen measurements are based on lifetime-imaging, which are converted into oxygen concentrations using a multipoint calibration. At a constant temperature of 21C, the system overall had a mean accuracy of 1.3%, a precision of 0.2% air saturation, the average 90% response time was 16 seconds and the detection limit was 0.1% air saturation. The MuFO set-up was build into a waterproof titanium casing for marine field applications. The system is battery-powered and has a maximum operational capacity of 15 hours for continuous measurements. The MuFO system was recently used for various research tasks in the marine environment: Mounted on a lander, the in situ MuFO system was used for investigations of oxygen dynamics in marine water columns placing the fiber optodes in a vertical line on a 7m high pole. For studies of oxygen dynamics in marine wetland rhizospheres, the sensing ends of the fiber optodes were covered with a 50cm protective sleeve made from stainless steel tubing, and the sensors were manually pushed into the rhizosphere. For laboratory measurements of sediment oxygen demand, the MuFO system was used to simultaneously monitor the oxygen consumption in multiple sediment slurry incubations. The MuFO system proved to be a

  16. Probing oxygen consumption in epileptic brain slices with QDs-based FRET sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunfeng; Ingram, Justin; Schiff, Steven; Xu, Jian; Xiao, Min

    2011-02-01

    We developed ratiometric optical oxygen sensors to probe the oxygen consumption during epileptic events in rat brain slices. The oxygen sensors consist of the sensing part of phosphorescence dyes (Platinum (II) octaethylporphine ketone) and reference part of nanocystal quantum dots (NQDs) embedded in polymer blends, with pre-designed excitation through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from NQDs to the oxygen sensitive dyes (OSDs). The ratiometric FRET sensors with fast temporal response and excellent bio-compatibility are suitable for real time quantitative dissolved oxygen (D.O.) probes in biological microenvironment. Coating the sensors onto the micro-pipettes, we performed simultaneous oxygen probes at pyramidal and oriens layers in rat hippocampal CA1. Different spatiotemporal patterns with maximum D.O. decreases of 9.9+/-1.1 mg/L and 4.9+/-0.7 mg/L during seizure events were observed in pyramidal and oriens layers, respectively.

  17. Dual fluorescence sensor for trace oxygen and temperature with unmatched range and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Baleizão, Carlos; Nagl, Stefan; Schäferling, Michael; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-08-15

    An optical dual sensor for oxygen and temperature is presented that is highly oxygen sensitive and covers a broad temperature range. Dual sensing is based on luminescence lifetime measurements. The novel sensor contains two luminescent compounds incorporated into polymer films. The temperature-sensitive dye (ruthenium tris-1,10-phenanthroline) has a highly temperature-dependent luminescence and is incorporated in poly(acrylonitrile) to avoid cross-sensitivity to oxygen. Fullerene C70 was used as the oxygen-sensitive probe owing to its strong thermally activated delayed fluorescence at elevated temperatures that is extremely oxygen sensitive. The cross-sensitivity of C70 to temperature is accounted for by means of the temperature sensor. C70 is incorporated into a highly oxygen-permeable polymer, either ethyl cellulose or organosilica. The two luminescent probes have different emission spectra and decay times, and their emissions can be discriminated using both parameters. Spatially resolved sensing is achieved by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. The response times of the sensor to oxygen are short. The dual sensor exhibits a temperature operation range between at least 0 and 120 degrees C, and detection limits for oxygen in the ppbv range, operating for oxygen concentrations up to at least 50 ppmv. These ranges outperform all dual oxygen and temperature sensors reported so far. The dual sensor presented in this study is especially appropriate for measurements under extreme conditions such as high temperatures and ultralow oxygen levels. This dual sensor is a key step forward in a number of scientifically or commercially important applications including food packaging, for monitoring of hyperthermophilic microorganisms, in space technology, and safety and security applications in terms of detection of oxygen leaks.

  18. Conventional, confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy investigations of polymer-supported oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Bowman, R D; Kneas, K A; Demas, J N; Periasamy, A

    2003-08-01

    Luminescence-based, polymer-supported oxygen sensors, particularly those based on platinum group complexes, continue to be of analytical importance. Commercial applications range from the macroscopic (e.g. aerodynamic investigations in wind tunnels, monitoring of oxygen concentration during fermentation, and measurement of biological oxygen demand) to the microscopic (e.g. imaging of oxygen in blood, tissue, cells and other biological samples). Problems hindering the design of improved oxygen sensors include non-linear Stern-Volmer calibration plots and the multi-exponentiality of measured lifetime decays, both of which are attributed primarily to heterogeneity of the sensor molecule in the polymer support matrix. Conventional, confocal and two-photon fluorescence microscopy have proven to be invaluable tools with which the microscale heterogeneity and response of luminescence-based oxygen sensors can be investigated and compared to the macroscopic response. Results obtained for three ruthenium(II) alpha-diimine complexes in polydimethylsiloxane polymer supports indicate the presence of unquenched microcrystals within the polymer matrix that probably degrade oxygen quenching sensitivity and linearity of the Stern-Volmer quenching plot. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy proved most useful for imaging microcrystals within sensor films, and conventional microscopy allowed direct comparison between microscopic and macroscopic sensor response. The implications of the results in the rational design and mass production of luminescence-based oxygen sensors are significant.

  19. Material condition assessment with eddy current sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfine, Neil J. (Inventor); Washabaugh, Andrew P. (Inventor); Sheiretov, Yanko K. (Inventor); Schlicker, Darrell E. (Inventor); Lyons, Robert J. (Inventor); Windoloski, Mark D. (Inventor); Craven, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tsukernik, Vladimir B. (Inventor); Grundy, David C. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Eddy current sensors and sensor arrays are used for process quality and material condition assessment of conducting materials. In an embodiment, changes in spatially registered high resolution images taken before and after cold work processing reflect the quality of the process, such as intensity and coverage. These images also permit the suppression or removal of local outlier variations. Anisotropy in a material property, such as magnetic permeability or electrical conductivity, can be intentionally introduced and used to assess material condition resulting from an operation, such as a cold work or heat treatment. The anisotropy is determined by sensors that provide directional property measurements. The sensor directionality arises from constructs that use a linear conducting drive segment to impose the magnetic field in a test material. Maintaining the orientation of this drive segment, and associated sense elements, relative to a material edge provides enhanced sensitivity for crack detection at edges.

  20. Methods and Best Practice to Intercompare Dissolved Oxygen Sensors and Fluorometers/Turbidimeters for Oceanographic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pensieri, Sara; Bozzano, Roberto; Schiano, M. Elisabetta; Ntoumas, Manolis; Potiris, Emmanouil; Frangoulis, Constantin; Podaras, Dimitrios; Petihakis, George

    2016-01-01

    In European seas, ocean monitoring strategies in terms of key parameters, space and time scale vary widely for a range of technical and economic reasons. Nonetheless, the growing interest in the ocean interior promotes the investigation of processes such as oxygen consumption, primary productivity and ocean acidity requiring that close attention is paid to the instruments in terms of measurement setup, configuration, calibration, maintenance procedures and quality assessment. To this aim, two separate hardware and software tools were developed in order to test and simultaneously intercompare several oxygen probes and fluorometers/turbidimeters, respectively in the same environmental conditions, with a configuration as close as possible to real in-situ deployment. The chamber designed to perform chlorophyll-a and turbidity tests allowed for the simultaneous acquisition of analogue and digital signals of several sensors at the same time, so it was sufficiently compact to be used in both laboratory and onboard vessels. Methodologies and best practice committed to the intercomparison of dissolved oxygen sensors and fluorometers/turbidimeters have been used, which aid in the promotion of interoperability to access key infrastructures, such as ocean observatories and calibration facilities. Results from laboratory tests as well as field tests in the Mediterranean Sea are presented. PMID:27196908

  1. Field-effect transistor using a solid electrolyte as a new oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yuji; Tsukada, Keiji; Miyagi, Hiroyuki

    1988-04-01

    A novel, FET-type, solid-state oxygen sensor operable at room temperature is proposed. The sensor is fabricated by depositing a thin layer of solid electrolyte (yttria-stabilized zirconia) on a gate insulator of an insulated gate-field-effect transistor (IGFET). Since an IGFET transforms an input signal with a high impedance into an output signal with a low impedance, the FET-type oxygen sensor is operable at room temperature even if a high-resistivity solid electrolyte, such as zirconia, is used. The response of the fabricated sensor showed good reproducibility at 20 C and a linear relationship between ouput voltage and logarithmic partial pressure of oxygen in the range from 0.01 to 1 atm. The FET-type oxygen sensor is potentially applicable to medical uses, process control, and automobiles.

  2. Oxygen monitoring in supercritical carbon dioxide using a fibre optic sensor.

    PubMed

    Tservistas, M; Köneke, R; Comte, A; Scheper, T

    2001-05-07

    Investigations of enzymatic reactions in supercritical CO(2) are often hindered by the high pressure involved in these processes, making reaction monitoring extremely difficult. This paper describes the implementation of a fiber optic based oxygen sensor into a high pressure reactor for supercritical carbon dioxide. The sensor is pressure resistant, working in supercritical carbon dioxide and reusable after depressurisation. The sensor signal is found to be affected by pressure changes, but stable at constant pressure. Oxygen concentration in supercritical CO(2) is monitored using the disproportionation of hydrogen peroxide as a simple oxygen producing reaction.

  3. [Life cycle assessment on oxygen biofuels].

    PubMed

    Yi, Hong-hong; Zhu, Yong-qing; Wang, Jian-xin; Hao, Ji-ming

    2005-11-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was used to compare energy consumption and pollutant emissions of two oxygen biofuels, ethanol and methyl ester, which were mixed with gasoline and diesel oil at levels of 10% and 30% of the biofuel. The future of oxygen-containing biofuels was analyzed and forecasted. The results show that the mixture of biofuels and petroleum products can reduce crude oil consumption, but only methyl ester alternative fuel can reduce fossil fuel consumption. Use of methyl ester mixtures would reduce NOx by 50% compared to gasoline or diesel on a life cycle basis; however, NOx would increase using ethanol. Each alternative fuel mixture reduced PM10 emissions from the vehicle and methyl ester decreased VOCs. The SO2 emissions from the fuel production processes, which account for about 80% of SO2 life cycle emissions, must be strictly controlled.

  4. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kruglik, Sergei G; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H

    2007-05-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR(3)) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR(3) measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron-ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron-histidine band around 217 cm(-1) as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the "oxygen cage" properties of this oxygen sensor protein.

  5. Subpicosecond oxygen trapping in the heme pocket of the oxygen sensor FixL observed by time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kruglik, Sergei G.; Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Yamashita, Taku; Liebl, Ursula; Martin, Jean-Louis; Vos, Marten H.

    2007-01-01

    Dissociation of oxygen from the heme domain of the bacterial oxygen sensor protein FixL constitutes the first step in hypoxia-induced signaling. In the present study, the photodissociation of the heme-O2 bond was used to synchronize this event, and time-resolved resonance Raman (TR3) spectroscopy with subpicosecond time resolution was implemented to characterize the heme configuration of the primary photoproduct. TR3 measurements on heme-oxycomplexes are highly challenging and have not yet been reported. Whereas in all other known six-coordinated heme protein complexes with diatomic ligands, including the oxymyoglobin reported here, heme iron out-of-plane motion (doming) occurs faster than 1 ps after iron–ligand bond breaking; surprisingly, no sizeable doming is observed in the oxycomplex of the Bradyrhizobium japonicum FixL sensor domain (FixLH). This assessment is deduced from the absence of the iron–histidine band around 217 cm−1 as early as 0.5 ps. We suggest that efficient ultrafast oxygen rebinding to the heme occurs on the femtosecond time scale, thus hindering heme doming. Comparing WT oxy-FixLH, mutant proteins FixLH-R220H and FixLH-R220Q, the respective carbonmonoxy-complexes, and oxymyoglobin, we show that a hydrogen bond of the terminal oxygen atom with the residue in position 220 is responsible for the observed behavior; in WT FixL this residue is arginine, crucially implicated in signal transmission. We propose that the rigid O2 configuration imposed by this residue, in combination with the hydrophobic and constrained properties of the distal cavity, keep dissociated oxygen in place. These results uncover the origin of the “oxygen cage” properties of this oxygen sensor protein. PMID:17446273

  6. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors: oxygen sensing and other biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randers-Eichhorn, Lisa; Bartlett, Roscoe A.; Sipior, Jeffrey; Frey, Douglas D.; Carter, Gary M.; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Rao, Govind

    1996-05-01

    Murine hybridomas were cultivated in tissue culture flasks. Dissolved oxygen tensions in the gas and liquid phases during cell growth were measured non-invasively by an optical oxygen sensor. Readings were made with caps both cracked open and completely closed. During cell growth, gas phase oxygen concentrations remained near atmospheric levels, while the oxygen tension at the bottom of the flasks eventually reached zero. These results suggest that the widespread practice of cracking open tissue culture flask caps during cell growth with a view to supplying adequate oxygen to cells is ineffective and unnecessary. The mass transfer characteristics of the tissue culture flask indicate the dominant resistance to oxygen mass transfer to the cells was the liquid media. The mass transfer rates through the liquid layer under standard laboratory conditions were found to be greater than those predicted by diffusion alone, suggesting microscale mixing. Volumetric and specific oxygen consumption rates were calculated from the sensor data, and were comparable to published values. A recently developed single fiber optic oxygen sensor is described. This new sensor will provide oxygen concentrations at various levels in the tissue culture flasks, allowing more accurate modeling of oxygen diffusion.

  7. Sensor based soil health assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Quantification and assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high cost, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolut...

  8. A luminescence lifetime-based capillary oxygen sensor utilizing monolithically integrated organic photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Bernhard; Tschepp, Andreas; Čajlaković, Merima; Sagmeister, Martin; Ribitsch, Volker; Köstler, Stefan

    2013-10-21

    A novel optical sensor device monolithically integrated on a glass capillary is presented. Therefore, we took advantage of the ability to fabricate organic optoelectronic devices on non-planar substrates. The functionality of the concept is demonstrated by realizing an integrated oxygen sensor based on luminescence decay time measurement.

  9. Continuous oxygen monitoring of mammalian cell growth on space shuttle mission STS-93 with a novel radioluminescent oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Reece, Julie S; Miller, Michael J; Arnold, Mark A; Waterhouse, Cris; Delaplaine, Ted; Cohn, Laura; Cannon, Tom

    2003-01-01

    A compact, flow-through oxygen sensor device based on luminescence quenching was used to monitor dissolved oxygen levels during mammalian cell growth on the STS-93 mission of the Columbia space shuttle. Excitation of an oxygen-sensitive ruthenium complex was provided by a radioluminescent light source (0.9 mm in diameter, 2.5 mm long), and the intensity of the resulting luminescence was measured by a simple photodiode detector. The use of radioluminescence for the excitation light source is a unique approach that provides many features important for long-term and remote monitoring applications. For the spaceflight experiment, human lung fibroblast cells (WI-38) were grown in hollow-fiber bioreactors. Oxygen concentration was measured in the flow path both before and after the bioreactor cartridge in order to gain information about the metabolism of the cells. The sensor was found to be nonperturbing to cell growth and withstood the challenging physical conditions of shuttle launch and landing while maintaining a stable calibration function. In addition, the sensor provided physically meaningful oxygen predictions.

  10. Feasibility Study on Advanced Solid-State Oxygen Sensors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    CaO-ZrO2) structure.. 6..............6 3 A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia oxygen ion electrolyte . 8 4 The closed-loop concept of engine...0.645 90.4 6 Sm203 0.869 97.2 Zirconia Electrolyte Cell A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia solid electrolyte is shown in Figure 3 (18, 23, 25-28...oxygen determined by oxygen partial electrolyte oxygen partial pressure P p pressure Po0 0? 0---- Figure 3. A typical galvanic cell using a zirconia V

  11. Fiber Optic Raman Sensor to Monitor Concentration Ratio of Nitrogen and Oxygen in a Cryogenic Mixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang-Yu; Singh, Jagdish P.; SaintCyr, William

    2007-01-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor is developed for a specific need of NASA/SSC for long-term detection and monitoring of the quality of liquid oxygen (LOX) in the delivery line during ground testing of rocket engines. The sensor performance was tested in the laboratory and with different excitation light sources. To evaluate the sensor performance with different excitation light sources for the LOX quality application, we have used the various mixtures of liquid oxygen and liquid nitrogen as samples. The study of the sensor performance shows that this sensor offers a great deal of flexibility and provides a cost effective solution for the application. However, an improved system response time is needed for the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in harsh environment.

  12. Elimination of Flammable Gas Effects in Cerium Oxide Semiconductor-Type Resistive Oxygen Sensors for Monitoring Low Oxygen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Toshio; Izu, Noriya; Akamatsu, Takafumi; Shin, Woosuck; Miki, Yusuke; Hirose, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the catalytic layer in zirconium-doped cerium oxide, Ce0.9Zr0.1O2 (CeZr10) resistive oxygen sensors for reducing the effects of flammable gases, namely hydrogen and carbon monoxide. When the concentration of flammable gases is comparable to that of oxygen, the resistance of CeZr10 is affected by the presence of these gases. We have developed layered thick films, which consist of an oxygen sensor layer (CeZr10), an insulation layer (Al2O3), and a catalytic layer consisting of CeZr10 with 3 wt% added platinum, which was prepared via the screen printing method. The Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer was found to prevent the detrimental effects of the flammable gases on the resistance of the sensor layer. This effect is due to the catalytic layer promoting the oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide through the consumption of ambient O2 and/or the lattice oxygen atoms of the Pt-CeZr10 catalytic layer. PMID:25905705

  13. Pericellular oxygen monitoring with integrated sensor chips for reproducible cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Kieninger, J; Aravindalochanan, K; Sandvik, J A; Pettersen, E O; Urban, G A

    2014-04-01

    Here we present an application, in two tumour cell lines, based on the Sensing Cell Culture Flask system as a cell culture monitoring tool for pericellular oxygen sensing. T-47D (human breast cancer) and T98G (human brain cancer) cells were cultured either in atmospheric air or in a glove-box set at 4% oxygen, in both cases with 5% CO2 in the gas phase. Pericellular oxygen tension was measured with the help of an integrated sensor chip comprising oxygen sensor arrays. Obtained results illustrate variation of pericellular oxygen tension in attached cells covered by stagnant medium. Independent of incubation conditions, low pericellular oxygen concentration levels, usually associated with hypoxia, were found in dense cell cultures. Respiration alone brought pericellular oxygen concentration down to levels which could activate hypoxia-sensing regulatory processes in cultures believed to be aerobic. Cells in culture believed to experience conditions of mild hypoxia may, in reality, experience severe hypoxia. This would lead to incorrect assumptions and suggests that pericellular oxygen concentration readings are of great importance to obtain reproducible results when dealing with hypoxic and normoxic (aerobic) incubation conditions. The Sensing Cell Culture Flask system allows continuous monitoring of pericellular oxygen concentration with outstanding long-term stability and no need for recalibration during cell culture experiments. The sensor is integrated into the flask bottom, thus in direct contact with attached cells. No additional equipment needs to be inserted into the flask during culturing. Transparency of the electrochemical sensor chip allows optical inspection of cells attached on top of the sensor. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Development of sensors for monitoring oxygen and free radicals in plant physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaturvedi, Prachee

    Oxygen plays a critical role in the physiology of photosynthetic organisms, including bioenergetics, metabolism, development, and stress response. Oxygen levels affect photosynthesis, respiration, and alternative oxidase pathways. Likewise, the metabolic rate of spatially distinct plant cells (and therefore oxygen flux) is known to be affected by biotic stress (e.g., herbivory) and environmental stress (e.g., salt/nutrient stress). During aerobic metabolism, cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by product. Plants also produce ROS during adaptation to stress (e.g., abscisic acid (ABA) mediated stress responses). If stress conditions are prolonged, ROS levels surpass the capacity of detoxifying mechanisms within the cell, resulting in oxidative damage. While stress response pathways such as ABA-mediated mechanisms have been well characterized (e.g., water stress, inhibited shoot growth, synthesis of storage proteins in seeds), the connection between ROS production, oxygen metabolism and stress response remains unknown. In part, this is because details of oxygen transport at the interface of cell(s) and the surrounding microenvironment remains nebulous. The overall goal of this research was to develop oxygen and Free radical sensors for studying stress signaling in plants. Recent developments in nanomaterials and data acquisition systems were integrated to develop real-time, non-invasive oxygen and Free radical sensors. The availability of these sensors for plant physiologists is an exciting opportunity to probe the functional realm of cells and tissues in ways that were not previously possible.

  15. Fiber optic oxygen sensor detection system for harsh environments of aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Mendoza, Edgar; Goswami, Kish; Kempen, Lothar

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes the first successful fiber optic oxygen detection sensor systems developed for the Boeing Delta IV Launch Vehicle harsh environment of engine section. It illustrates a novel multi-point fiber optic microsensor (optrode) based on dynamic luminescence quenching that was developed for measuring oxygen leak detection for the space applications. The sensor optrodes employ the quenching by oxygen of the fluorescence from a ruthenium complex. These optrodes were fabricated using Ruthenium-based fluorescent indicator immobilized in a porous glass rod placed at the end of multimode fiber. The light from a blue LED is launched into the optrode via a fiber optic bundle and used as the excitation source. The optrode's fluorescent emission intensity in the range of 0% to 10% oxygen is measured as a function of time. The measuring system is based on high reliability and low cost. The system consists of four units: 1) temperature compensated oxygen optrodes combined with an optical setup, 2) multipoint sensor communication fiber optic network cable, 3) digital/analogue optoelectronic signal processing unit with built-in micro controller for control of data acquisition and processing, and 4) a laptop computer for data display and storage. In testing, the sensor exhibited excellent response time and reversibility. To qualify the sensors, performed detail investigation for thermal, humidity, temperature, vibration and accelerate testing for life expectancy of harsh environmental of engine section. Extensive networking using MatLab were carried out for lab and actual field demonstrations.

  16. Assessment of Sensor Technologies for Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Korsah, Kofi; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Vlim, R.; Kisner, Roger A.; Britton, Jr, Charles L.; Wootan, D. W.; Anheier, Jr, N. C.; Diaz, A. A.; Hirt, E. H.; Chien, H. T.; Sheen, S.; Bakhtiari, Sasan; Gopalsami, S.; Heifetz, A.; Tam, S. W.; Park, Y.; Upadhyaya, B. R.; Stanford, A.

    2016-10-01

    Sensors and measurement technologies provide information on processes, support operations and provide indications of component health. They are therefore crucial to plant operations and to commercialization of advanced reactors (AdvRx). This report, developed by a three-laboratory team consisting of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), provides an assessment of sensor technologies and a determination of measurement needs for AdvRx. It provides the technical basis for identifying and prioritizing research targets within the instrumentation and control (I&C) Technology Area under the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) program and contributes to the design and implementation of AdvRx concepts.

  17. Structurally integrated organic light-emitting device-based sensors for oxygen, glucose, hydrazine, and anthrax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinar, Ruth; Choudhury, Bhaskar; Zhou, Zhaoqun; Wu, Hai-Sheng; Tabatabai, Louisa B.; Shinar, Joseph

    2004-12-01

    Application of the new platform of structurally integrated luminescent chemical and biological sensors, in which the photoluminescence (PL) excitation source is an organic light-emitting device (OLED), is demonstrated for the detection of oxygen, glucose, hydrazine, and anthrax lethal factor (LF). The oxygen sensors are based on the collisional quenching of the PL of tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) Ru (II) (Ru(dpp)) and Pt octaethyl porphyrin (PtOEP) by O2. The glucose sensors are based on the O2 sensors, to which glucose oxidase, which catalyzes the reaction between glucose and O2, is added. The oxygen and glucose sensors are operable in either the PL intensity I mode or the PL lifetime t mode, where the value of I or t yields the oxygen level. In the t mode, the need for sensor calibration, which remains a challenge in real-world sensing applications, is eliminated. The performance of sensors based on [blue 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylvinyl)-1,1'-biphenyl (DPVBi) OLEDs]/[Ru(dpp)] are compared to those of [green tris(8-hydroxy quinoline) Al (Alq3)]/[PtOEP]. The latter are strongly preferred over the former, due to the relatively long t of PtOEP (~130 ms in the absence of O2), and the higher efficiency and brightness of the green Alq3 OLEDs. Demonstration of the hydrazine sensor is based on the reaction between nonluminescent anthracene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde and hydrazine or hydrazine sulfate, which generates a luminescent product. The anthrax LF sensor is based on the cleavage of certain peptides by the anthrax-secreted LF enzyme. As the LF cleaves a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor-acceptor pair-labeled peptide, and the two cleaved segments are separated, the PL of the donor, previously absorbed by the acceptor, becomes detectable by the photodetector.

  18. Preparation and spectroscopic properties of multiluminophore luminescent oxygen and temperature sensor films.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet Erkan; Carroll, Bruce F; Schanze, Kirk S

    2005-09-27

    A new luminescent oxygen and temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes two luminescent dyes, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin platinum(II) (PtTFPP, the oxygen sensor) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) dichloride (Ruphen, the temperature sensor). The two dyes are dispersed in an oxygen-permeable polymer binder consisting of a copolymer of 4-tert-butylstyrene (tBS) and 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate (p-tBS-co-TFEM). To alleviate energy transfer and other quenching interactions between the two luminescent dyes in the p-tBS-co-TFEM binder, the Ruphen temperature sensor is encapsulated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymer nanospheres that are prepared by coprecipitation of PAN and Ruphen from N,N-dimethylformamide solution. The temperature and air-pressure response of the emission from the sensor film is fully characterized by using emission spectroscopy. The emission from the two luminescent dyes is spectrally well-separated. The intensity of the Ruphen emission varies strongly with temperature (approximately 1.4% degrees C(-1)), whereas the intensity of the PtTFPP emission varies with temperature and air pressure. The two-dye luminescent coating is useful as a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP), where the emission from the Ruphen temperature sensor is used to correct for the temperature dependence of the pressure response of the PtTFPP sensor. To demonstrate the PSP application, a coupon coated with the sensor was imaged using a CCD camera, and the CCD images were analyzed by intensity ratio methods. Spectroscopic studies were also carried out on a sensor that contains three dyes in order to demonstrate the feasibility of including an intensity reference dye along with the temperature and pressure dyes into the sensor.

  19. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-01-01

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width. PMID:28796167

  20. Inhomogeneous Oxygen Vacancy Distribution in Semiconductor Gas Sensors: Formation, Migration and Determination on Gas Sensing Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianqiao; Gao, Yinglin; Wu, Xu; Jin, Guohua; Zhai, Zhaoxia; Liu, Huan

    2017-08-10

    The density of oxygen vacancies in semiconductor gas sensors was often assumed to be identical throughout the grain in the numerical discussion of the gas-sensing mechanism of the devices. In contrast, the actual devices had grains with inhomogeneous distribution of oxygen vacancy under non-ideal conditions. This conflict between reality and discussion drove us to study the formation and migration of the oxygen defects in semiconductor grains. A model of the gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy was proposed based on the effects of cooling rate and re-annealing on semiconductive thin films. The model established the diffusion equations of oxygen vacancy according to the defect kinetics of diffusion and exclusion. We described that the steady-state and transient-state oxygen vacancy distributions, which were used to calculate the gas-sensing characteristics of the sensor resistance and response to reducing gases under two different conditions. The gradient-distributed oxygen vacancy model had the applications in simulating the sensor performances, such as the power law, the grain size effect and the effect of depletion layer width.

  1. Oxygen Assessments Ensure Safer Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    A team at White Sands Test Facility developed a test method to evaluate fire hazards in oxygen-enriched environments. Wendell Hull and Associates, located in Las Cruces, New Mexico, entered a Space Act Agreement with NASA and now provides services including fire and explosion investigations, oxygen testing and training, and accident reconstruction and forensic engineering.

  2. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  3. A Fiber Optic Catalytic Sensor for Neutral Atom Measurements in Oxygen Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zaplotnik, Rok; Vesel, Alenka; Mozetic, Miran

    2012-01-01

    The presented sensor for neutral oxygen atom measurement in oxygen plasma is a catalytic probe which uses fiber optics and infrared detection system to measure the gray body radiation of the catalyst. The density of neutral atoms can be determined from the temperature curve of the probe, because the catalyst is heated predominantly by the dissipation of energy caused by the heterogeneous surface recombination of neutral atoms. The advantages of this sensor are that it is simple, reliable, easy to use, noninvasive, quantitative and can be used in plasma discharge regions. By using different catalyst materials the sensor can also be applied for detection of neutral atoms in other plasmas. Sensor design, operation, example measurements and new measurement procedure for systematic characterization are presented. PMID:22666005

  4. Automated Data Quality Assessment of Marine Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Greg P.; de Souza, Paulo A.; Reznik, Leon; Smith, Daniel V.

    2011-01-01

    The automated collection of data (e.g., through sensor networks) has led to a massive increase in the quantity of environmental and other data available. The sheer quantity of data and growing need for real-time ingestion of sensor data (e.g., alerts and forecasts from physical models) means that automated Quality Assurance/Quality Control (QA/QC) is necessary to ensure that the data collected is fit for purpose. Current automated QA/QC approaches provide assessments based upon hard classifications of the gathered data; often as a binary decision of good or bad data that fails to quantify our confidence in the data for use in different applications. We propose a novel framework for automated data quality assessments that uses Fuzzy Logic to provide a continuous scale of data quality. This continuous quality scale is then used to compute error bars upon the data, which quantify the data uncertainty and provide a more meaningful measure of the data’s fitness for purpose in a particular application compared with hard quality classifications. The design principles of the framework are presented and enable both data statistics and expert knowledge to be incorporated into the uncertainty assessment. We have implemented and tested the framework upon a real time platform of temperature and conductivity sensors that have been deployed to monitor the Derwent Estuary in Hobart, Australia. Results indicate that the error bars generated from the Fuzzy QA/QC implementation are in good agreement with the error bars manually encoded by a domain expert. PMID:22163714

  5. Evaluation of the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) Oxygen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.; Corpening, Griffin P.; Jarvis, Michele; Chiles, Harry R.

    1999-01-01

    The Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) was a propulsion flight experiment for advanced space vehicles such as the X-33 and reusable launch vehicle. A linear aerospike rocket engine was integrated into a semi-span of an X-33-like lifting body shape (model), and carried on top of an SR-71 aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Because no flight data existed for aerospike nozzles, the primary objective of the LASRE flight experiment was to evaluate flight effects on the engine performance over a range of altitudes and Mach numbers. Because it contained a large quantity of energy in the form of fuel, oxidizer, hypergolics, and gases at very high pressures, the LASRE propulsion system posed a major hazard for fire or explosion. Therefore, a propulsion-hazard mitigation system was created for LASRE that included a nitrogen purge system. Oxygen sensors were a critical part of the nitrogen purge system because they measured purge operation and effectiveness. Because the available oxygen sensors were not designed for flight testing, a laboratory study investigated oxygen-sensor characteristics and accuracy over a range of altitudes and oxygen concentrations. Laboratory test data made it possible to properly calibrate the sensors for flight. Such data also provided a more accurate error prediction than the manufacturer's specification. This predictive accuracy increased confidence in the sensor output during critical phases of the flight. This paper presents the findings of this laboratory test.

  6. Evaluation of the Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) Oxygen Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennix, Kimberly A.; Corpening, Griffin P.; Jarvis, Michele; Chiles, Harry R.

    1999-01-01

    The Linear Aerospike SR-71 Experiment (LASRE) was a propulsion flight experiment for advanced space vehicles such as the X-33 and reusable launch vehicle. A linear aerospike rocket engine was integrated into a semi-span of an X-33-like lifting body shape (model), and carried on top of an SR-71 aircraft at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Because no flight data existed for aerospike nozzles, the primary objective of the LASRE flight experiment was to evaluate flight effects on the engine performance over a range of altitudes and Mach numbers. Because it contained a large quantity of energy in the form of fuel, oxidizer, hypergolics, and gases at very high pressures, the LASRE propulsion system posed a major hazard for fire or explosion. Therefore, a propulsion-hazard mitigation system was created for LASRE that included a nitrogen purge system. Oxygen sensors were a critical part of the nitrogen purge system because they measured purge operation and effectiveness. Because the available oxygen sensors were not designed for flight testing, a laboratory study investigated oxygen-sensor characteristics and accuracy over a range of altitudes and oxygen concentrations. Laboratory test data made it possible to properly calibrate the sensors for flight. Such data also provided a more accurate error prediction than the manufacturer's specification. This predictive accuracy increased confidence in the sensor output during critical phases of the flight. This paper presents the findings of this laboratory test.

  7. Effect of lumophore and plasticiser concentration on the heterogeneity of oxygen quenching in thin film oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Victoria A; Douglas, Peter

    2006-05-01

    Kinetic heterogeneity of the luminescence decay and oxygen quenching of Pt and Pd octaethylporphyrin/ethyl cellulose (OEP/EC) thin film oxygen sensors has been investigated with respect to (a) concentration of lumophore and (b) addition of plasticiser. The source of kinetic heterogeneity shown by PtOEP films under N2 is a monomer-dimer equilibrium in which the dimer luminescence decays with k = 0.0527 x 10(6) s(-1) and the monomer luminescence with k = 0.0101 x 10(6) s(-1) and KD = 790 (+/-20) mol dm(-3). For PdOEP/EC films there is no detectable aggregation and luminescence decays under N2 show good fits to single exponential curve fits at all concentrations studied. The addition of either tripbutyl phosphate or dimethylphthalate as plasticiser does not decrease kinetic heterogeneity for oxygen quenching of luminescence in the films.

  8. A dual sensor for real-time monitoring of glucose and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liqiang; Su, Fengyu; Buizer, Sean; Lu, Hongguang; Gao, Weimin; Tian, Yanqing; Meldrum, Deirdre

    2013-01-01

    A dual glucose and oxygen sensor in a polymer format was developed. The dual sensor composed of a blue emitter as the glucose probe, a red emitter as an oxygen probe, and a yellow emitter as a built-in reference probe which does not respond to either glucose or oxygen. All the three probes were chemically immobilized in a polyacrylamide-based matrix. Therefore, the dual sensor possesses three well separated emission colors and ratiometric approach is applicable for analysis of the glucose and oxygen concentration at biological conditions. The sensor was applied for real-time monitoring of glucose and oxygen consumption of bacterial cells, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis), and mammalian cells of mouse macrophage J774 and human cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. On the other hand, in order to achieve satisfactory sensing performance for glucose, compositions of the matrices among poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), polyacrylamide, and poly(6-aminohexyl methacrylamide) which is a linker polymer for grafting the glucose probe, were optimized. PMID:24090834

  9. Flight Hydrogen Sensor for use in the ISS Oxygen Generation Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MSadoques, George, Jr.; Makel, Darby B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) used on the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), to be operated on the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrogen sensor ORU is being provided by Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) to monitor the oxygen outlet for the presence of hydrogen. The hydrogen sensor ORU is a triple redundant design where each sensor converts raw measurements to actual hydrogen partial pressure that is reported to the OGA system controller. The signal outputs are utilized for system shutdown in the event that the hydrogen concentration in the oxygen outlet line exceeds the specified shutdown limit. Improvements have been made to the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensing element, screening, and calibration process to meet OGA operating requirements. Two flight hydrogen sensor ORUs have successfully completed the acceptance test phase. This paper also describes the sensor s performance during acceptance testing, additional tests planned to extend the operational performance calibration cycle, and integration with the OGA system.

  10. Advances in OLED-based oxygen sensors with structurally integrated OLED, sensor film, and thin-film Si photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debju; Shinar, Ruth; Cai, Yuankun; Zhou, Zhaoqun; Dalal, Vikram L.; Shinar, Joseph

    2007-09-01

    Steps towards the improvement of a compact photoluminescence (PL)-based sensor array that is fully structurally integrated are described. The approach is demonstrated for oxygen sensing, which can be monitored via its effect on the PL intensity I or decay time τ of oxygen-sensitive dyes such as Pt octaethylporphryn (PtOEP) and its Pd analog (PdOEP). The integrated components include (1) an organic light emitting device (OLED) excitation source, which is an array of coumarin-doped tris(quinolinolate) Al (Alq 3) pixels, (2) the sensor film, i.e., PdOEP embedded in polystyrene, and (3) the photodetector (PD), which is a plasma-enhanced CVD-grown p-i-n or n-i-p structure, based on amorphous or nanocrystalline (Si,Ge):H. These components are fabricated on common or separate substrates that are attached back-to-back, resulting in sensors with a thickness largely determined by that of the substrates. The fully integrated oxygen sensor is demonstrated first by fabricating each of the three components on a separate substrate. The PD was placed in front of a flow cell containing the sensor film, while the OLED array was "behind" the sensor film. This design showed the expected trend in monitoring different concentration of O II via their effect on I, with improved detection sensitivity achieved by shielding the electromagnetic noise synchronous with the pulsed OLED. The detection sensitivity using the I monitoring mode is expected to further increase by reducing the OLED tail emission. The issue of the OLED background can be eliminated by monitoring the oxygen concentration via its effect on τ, where the OLED is pulsed and τ is measured while the OLED is off. Steps therefore focused also on shortening the response time of the PDs, and understanding the factors affecting their speed. Development of a sensor array, where the PD pixels are fabricated between the OLED pixels on the same side of a common substrate, is also discussed.

  11. Methane-oxygen electrochemical coupling in an ionic liquid: a robust sensor for simultaneous quantification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Guo, Min; Baker, Gary A; Stetter, Joseph R; Lin, Lu; Mason, Andrew J; Zeng, Xiangqun

    2014-10-21

    Current sensor devices for the detection of methane or natural gas emission are either expensive and have high power requirements or fail to provide a rapid response. This report describes an electrochemical methane sensor utilizing a non-volatile and conductive pyrrolidinium-based ionic liquid (IL) electrolyte and an innovative internal standard method for methane and oxygen dual-gas detection with high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability. At a platinum electrode in bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (NTf2)-based ILs, methane is electro-oxidized to produce CO2 and water when an oxygen reduction process is included. The in situ generated CO2 arising from methane oxidation was shown to provide an excellent internal standard for quantification of the electrochemical oxygen sensor signal. The simultaneous quantification of both methane and oxygen in real time strengthens the reliability of the measurements by cross-validation of two ambient gases occurring within a single sample matrix and allows for the elimination of several types of random and systematic errors in the detection. We have also validated this IL-based methane sensor employing both conventional solid macroelectrodes and flexible microfabricated electrodes using single- and double-potential step chronoamperometry.

  12. Fiber-optic fluorescence-quenching oxygen partial pressure sensor using platinum octaethylporphyrin.

    PubMed

    Davenport, John J; Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2016-07-20

    The development and bench testing of a fiber-optic oxygen sensor is described. The sensor is designed for measurement of tissue oxygen levels in the mucosa of the digestive tract. The materials and construction are optimized for insertion through the mouth for measurement in the lower esophagus. An oxygen-sensitive fluorescence-quenching film was applied as a solution of platinum octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP) poly(ethyl methacrylate) (PEMA) and dichloromethane and dip coated onto the distal tip of the fiber. The sensor was tested by comparing relative fluorescence when immersed in liquid water at 37°C, at a range of partial pressures (0-101 kPa). Maximum relative fluorescence at most oxygen concentrations was seen when the PtOEP concentration was 0.1  g.L-1, four layers of coating solution were applied, and a fiber core radius of 600 μm was selected, giving a Stern-Volmer constant of 0.129  kPa-1. The performance of the sensor is suitable for many in vivo applications, particularly mucosal measurements. It has sufficient sensitivity, is sterilizable, and is sufficiently flexible and robust for insertion via the mouth without damage to the probe or risk of harm to the patient.

  13. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon; Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R.; Nishi, Yoshio

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  14. Probing oxidative stress: Small molecule fluorescent sensors of metal ions, reactive oxygen species, and thiols

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Lynne M.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature shared by many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Factors that contribute to cellular oxidative stress include elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, diminished availability of detoxifying thiols, and the misregulation of metal ions (both redox-active iron and copper as well as non-redox active calcium and zinc). Deciphering how each of these components interacts to contribute to oxidative stress presents an interesting challenge. Fluorescent sensors can be powerful tools for detecting specific analytes within a complicated cellular environment. Reviewed here are several classes of small molecule fluorescent sensors designed to detect several molecular participants of oxidative stress. We focus our review on describing the design, function and application of probes to detect metal cations, reactive oxygen species, and intracellular thiol-containing compounds. In addition, we highlight the intricacies and complications that are often faced in sensor design and implementation. PMID:23440254

  15. An irradiation system for photodynamic therapy with a fiber-optic sensor for measuring tissue oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintanar, L.; Fabila, D.; Stolik, S.; de la Rosa, J. M.

    2013-11-01

    Photodynamic Therapy is a well known treatment based on the interaction of light of specific wavelength with a photosensitizing drug. In the presence of oxygen molecules, the illumination of the photosensitizer can activate the production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the death of target cells within the treated tissue. In order to obtain the best therapy response, the tissue oxygen concentration should be measured to adjust the therapy parameters before and during the treatment. In this work, an irradiation system for 5-Aminolevulinic Acid Photodynamic Therapy is presented. It allows the application of visible light radiation of 630 nm using as a light source a high-brightness light emitting diode with an optical-power automatic control considering a light depth-distribution model. A module to measure the tissue oxygen saturation has been implemented into the system. It is based on two light emitting diodes of 660 nm and 940 nm as light sources, a photodiode as a detector and a new handheld fiber optic reflectance pulse oximetry sensor for estimating the blood oxygen saturation within the tissue. The pulse oximetry sensor was modeled through multilayered Monte Carlo simulations to study the behavior of the sensor with changes in skin thickness and melanin content.

  16. Magnetically remote-controlled optical sensor spheres for monitoring oxygen or pH.

    PubMed

    Mistlberger, Günter; Koren, Klaus; Borisov, Sergey M; Klimant, Ingo

    2010-03-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor's replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling.

  17. [Oxygen therapy in acute and chronic conditions: Indications, oxygen systems, assessement and follow-up].

    PubMed

    Luna Paredes, M C; Asensio de la Cruz, Oscar; Cortell Aznar, Isidoro; Martínez Carrasco, M C; Barrio Gómez de Agüero, M I; Pérez Ruiz, E; Pérez Frías, J

    2009-08-01

    Oxygen therapy has become a major tool for infants with acute and chronic respiratory failure. Appropriate goals when prescribing supplemental oxygen are reduction and prevention of hypoxemia, prevention and treatment of pulmonary hypertension and decrease in respiratory and cardiac overload. This is commonplace in the acute setting and is also becoming widespread in chronic pathologies. However, there is a lack of consensus on many fundamental issues, such as appropriate indications, desirable targets and outcome measures amongst centres, reflecting a variety of clinical practices. The Techniques Group of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pneumology undertook to design recommendations for a rational approach to oxygen therapy, reviewing the existing literature in order to establish its indications, benefits and potential risks as well as its cost-effectivenes. General aspects of oxygen treatment are reviewed including physiological mechanisms, indications, delivery systems and assessment methods. Management of patients on home oxygen therapy is also addressed with discussion of benefits and potential risks of supplemental oxygen use.

  18. Injectable LiNc-BuO loaded microspheres as in vivo EPR oxygen sensors after co-implantation with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Frank, Juliane; Gündel, Daniel; Drescher, Simon; Thews, Oliver; Mäder, Karsten

    2015-12-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry is a technique which allows accurate and repeatable oxygen measurements. We encapsulated a highly oxygen sensitive particulate EPR spin probe into microparticles to improve its dispersibility and, hence, facilitate the administration. These biocompatible, non-toxic microspheres contained 5-10 % (w/w) spin probe and had an oxygen sensitivity of 0.60 ± 0.01 µT/mmHg. To evaluate the performance of the microparticles as oxygen sensors, they were co-implanted with syngeneic tumor cells in 2 different rat strains. Thus, tissue injury was avoided and the microparticles were distributed all over the tumor tissue. Dynamic changes of the intratumoral oxygen partial pressure during inhalation of 8 %, 21 %, or 100 % oxygen were monitored in vivo by EPR spectroscopy and quantified. Values were verified in vivo by invasive fluorometric measurements using Oxylite probes and ex vivo by pimonidazole adduct accumulation. There were no hints that the tumor physiology or tissue oxygenation had been altered by the microparticles. Hence, these microprobes offer great potential as oxygen sensors in preclinical research, not only for EPR spectroscopy but also for EPR imaging. For instance, the assessment of tissue oxygenation during therapeutic interventions might help understanding pathophysiological processes and lead to an individualized treatment planning or the use of formulations with hypoxia triggered release of active agents.

  19. Fiber optic oxygen sensor using fluorescence quenching for aerospace application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panahi, Allen

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we explore Fluorescence Technology as applied to the design and development of O2 sensors that can be used for aerospace application and discuss the various test and measurement techniques used to estimate the O2 gas concentration. Jet fuel comprised of heavier hydrocarbon components is much less volatile, than jet fuel having a flash point of approximately 37° C and JP-4 having a flash point of approximately -17° C. In contrast, straight-run gasoline has a flash point of approximately -40°C. The flash point is the minimum temperature where a liquid fuel can generate enough vapor to form a flammable mixture with air. If the temperature is below the flash point there isn't enough fuel evaporating to form a flammable fuel-air mixture. Since jet fuel and gasoline have similar flammable concentration limits, gasoline must produce much more vapor at a given temperature to have such a low flash point; hence gasoline is much more volatile than jet fuel. We compare the various intensity based approaches and contrast them with the frequency domain techniques that measure phase to extract fluorescent lifetimes. An innovate compact measurement system using the frequency heterodyning cross correlation technique that can be used for various applications is described in detail while the benefits are explored together with some test data collected. The various inerting fuel tank requirements are explained.

  20. Characterisation of an oxygen sensor based on In/In 2O 3 reference electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colominas, S.; Abellà, J.; Victori, L.

    2004-11-01

    A potentiometric sensor for measuring oxygen activity in LBE has been developed since 2000 until today at 'Institut Quimic de Sarria' electrochemistry laboratories. This sensor is based on In/In 2O 3 reference electrode. The last experiments performed with this sensor have been directed to characterise the sensor. For this purpose, the following experiments in stagnant conditions have been performed: effect of the operating temperature from 300 to 500 °C, different covering gases (N 2 + 5% H 2, Ar 99.999%, and N 2 + 10 mg/L O 2) and comparison of different solid electrolytes (ZrO 2/Y 2O 3 and ZrO 2/MgO). Long-term experiments have also been performed to the see the stability of the signal with time.

  1. PAS Domains: Internal Sensors of Oxygen, Redox Potential, and Light

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barry L.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    1999-01-01

    PAS domains are newly recognized signaling domains that are widely distributed in proteins from members of the Archaea and Bacteria and from fungi, plants, insects, and vertebrates. They function as input modules in proteins that sense oxygen, redox potential, light, and some other stimuli. Specificity in sensing arises, in part, from different cofactors that may be associated with the PAS fold. Transduction of redox signals may be a common mechanistic theme in many different PAS domains. PAS proteins are always located intracellularly but may monitor the external as well as the internal environment. One way in which prokaryotic PAS proteins sense the environment is by detecting changes in the electron transport system. This serves as an early warning system for any reduction in cellular energy levels. Human PAS proteins include hypoxia-inducible factors and voltage-sensitive ion channels; other PAS proteins are integral components of circadian clocks. Although PAS domains were only recently identified, the signaling functions with which they are associated have long been recognized as fundamental properties of living cells. PMID:10357859

  2. The Preliminary Study Of Giant Magnetoresistance Sensor For Detection Of Oxygen In Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Ramli; Muhtadi, Almas Hilman; Sahdan, Muhammad Fauzi; Haryanto, Freddy; Khairurrijal; Djamal, Mitra

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, there has been great progress for applications of nanomaterials in medicine field. Human body consists of many atoms and they can be treated like as nanomaterials. One of them is oxygen. Oxygen is always found in the human blood. Its concentration in human blood gives information about the metabolism in the body. The purpose of this study was to look for a possibility for developing tool to detect the concentration of oxygen in blood. In this study, the giant-magneto-resistance (GMR) sensor is implemented. The GMR sensor has many attractive features, for example: reduced size, low-power consumption, low price, as compared to other magnetic sensors and its electric and magnetic properties can be varied in very wide range. In this experiment, we developed the structure of GMR materials NiCoFe/Cu/NiCoFe sandwich as a GMR sensor. The NiCoFe/Cu/NiCoFe sandwiches were grown onto Si (111) substrates by the dc-opposed target magnetron sputtering (dc-OTMS) technique. The sputtering targets were NiCoFe and Cu. To achieve the aims of this study, the blood transports in human will be simulated using a simple experimental model. This model has some parameters representing those in blood transport. Furthermore, the nanomagnetic material will be made as a contaminant particle in blood. Using this material some properties of the transport will be investigated.

  3. Response of electrochemical oxygen sensors to inert gas-air and carbon dioxide-air mixtures: measurements and mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Walsh, P T; Gant, S E; Dowker, K P; Batt, R

    2011-02-15

    Electrochemical oxygen gas sensors are widely used for monitoring the state of inertisation of flammable atmospheres and to warn of asphyxiation risks. It is well established but not widely known by users of such oxygen sensors that the response of the sensor is affected by the nature of the diluent gas responsible for the decrease in ambient oxygen concentration. The present work investigates the response of electrochemical sensors, with either acid or alkaline electrolytes, to gas mixtures comprising air with enhanced levels of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon or helium. The measurements indicate that both types of sensors over-read the oxygen concentrations when atmospheres contain high levels of helium. Sensors with alkaline electrolytes are also shown to underestimate the severity of the hazard in atmospheres containing high levels of carbon dioxide. This deviation is greater for alkaline electrolyte sensors compared to acid electrolyte sensors. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model is developed to predict the response of an alkaline electrolyte, electrochemical gas sensor. Differences between predicted and measured sensor responses are less than 10% in relative terms for nearly all of the gas mixtures tested, and in many cases less than 5%. Extending the model to simulate responses of sensors with acid electrolytes would be straightforward.

  4. Magnetically Remote-Controlled Optical Sensor Spheres for Monitoring Oxygen or pH

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic sensor macrospheres (MagSeMacs), i.e., stainless steel spheres coated with optical chemical sensors, are presented as an alternative to existing optical sensor patches and fiber-optical dip-probes. Such spheres can either be reversibly attached to the tip of an optical fiber (dip-probe) or trapped inside a vessel for read-out through the side wall. Moving the magnetic separator at the exterior enables measurements at varying positions with a single sensor. Moreover, the sensor’s replacement is rapid and contactless. We measured dissolved oxygen or pH in stirred liquids, rotating flasks, and 24-well plates with a SensorDish-reader device for parallel cell culture monitoring. In these applications, MagSeMacs proved to be advantageous over conventional sensor patches and magnetic optical sensor particles because of their magnetism, spherical shape, reflectance, and size. These properties resulted in strong but reversible fixation, magnetic remote-controllability, short response times, high signal intensities, and simplified handling. PMID:20121206

  5. A New Optical Oxygen Sensor Reveals Spatial and Temporal Variations of Dissolved Oxygen at Ecohydrological Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, T.; Schmidt, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Vieweg, M.; Harjung, A.

    2015-12-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution of dissolved oxygen (DO) at highly reactive aquatic interfaces, e.g. in the hyporheic zone (HZ), is a primary indicator of redox and interlinked biogeochemical zonations. However, continuous measuring of DO over time and depths is challenging due to the dynamic and potentially heterogenic nature of the HZ. We further developed a novel technology for spatially continuous in situ vertical oxygen profiling based on optical sensing (Vieweg et al, 2013). Continuous vertical measurements to a depth of 50 cm are obtained by the motor-controlled insertion of a side-firing Polymer Optical Fiber (POF) into tubular DO probes. Our technology allows minimally invasive DO measurements without DO consumption at high spatial resolution in the mm range. The reduced size of the tubular probe (diameter 5 mm) substantially minimizes disturbance of flow conditions. We tested our technology in situ in the HZ of an intermittent stream during the drying period. Repeated DO measurements were taken over a total duration of six weeks at two locations up- and downstream of a pool-cascade sequence. We were able to precisely map the spatial DO distribution which exhibited sharp gradients and rapid temporal changes as a function of changing hydrologic conditions. Our new vertical oxygen sensing technology will help to provide new insights to the coupling of transport of DO and biogeochemical reactions at aquatic interfaces. Vieweg, M., Trauth, N., Fleckenstein, J. H., Schmidt, C. (2013): Robust Optode-Based Method for Measuring in Situ Oxygen Profiles in Gravelly Streambeds. Environmental Science & Technology. doi:10.1021/es401040w

  6. Structurally integrated organic light emitting device-based sensors for gas phase and dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Shinar, Ruth; Zhou, Zhaoqun; Choudhury, Bhaskar; Shinar, Joseph

    2006-05-24

    A compact photoluminescence (PL)-based O2 sensor utilizing an organic light emitting device (OLED) as the light source is described. The sensor device is structurally integrated. That is, the sensing element and the light source, both typically thin films that are fabricated on separate glass substrates, are attached back-to-back. The sensing elements are based on the oxygen-sensitive dyes Pt- or Pd-octaethylporphyrin (PtOEP or PdOEP, respectively), which are embedded in a polystyrene (PS) matrix, or dissolved in solution. Their performance is compared to that of a sensing element based on tris(4,7-diphenyl-l,10-phenanthroline) Ru II (Ru(dpp)) embedded in a sol-gel film. A green OLED light source, based on tris(8-hydroxy quinoline Al (Alq3), was used to excite the porphyrin dyes; a blue OLED, based on 4,4'-bis(2,2'-diphenylviny1)-1,1'-biphenyl, was used to excite the Ru(dpp)-based sensing element. The O2 level was monitored in the gas phase and in water, ethanol, and toluene solutions by measuring changes in the PL lifetime tau of the O2-sensitive dyes. The sensor performance was evaluated in terms of the detection sensitivity, dynamic range, gas flow rate, and temperature effect, including the temperature dependence of tau in pure Ar and O2 atmospheres. The dependence of the sensitivity on the preparation procedure of the sensing film and on the PS and dye concentrations in the sensing element, whether a solid matrix or solution, were also evaluated. Typical values of the detection sensitivity in the gas phase, S(g) identical with tau(0% O2)/tau(100% O2), at 23 degrees C, were approximately 35 to approximately 50 for the [Alq3 OLED[/[PtOEP dye] pair; S(g) exceeded 200 for the Alq3/PdOEP sensor. For dissolved oxygen (DO) in water and ethanol, S(DO) (defined as the ratio of tau in de-oxygenated and oxygen-saturated solutions) was approximately 9.5 and approximately 11, respectively, using the PtOEP-based film sensor. The oxygen level in toluene was measured with Pt

  7. Investigation of the electrode kinetics in a solid oxide fuel cell and an oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajesh

    This dissertation investigates the electrode kinetics in a solid oxide fuel cell and an oxygen sensor. The first chapter describes the basics of fuel cell and motivation behind the studies. The second chapter investigates the dependence of cathodic charge transfer reaction resistance (Rct), on three-phase boundary length (lTPB) at various temperatures and oxygen partial pressures ( pO2 ). Impedance spectra were obtained using three-electrode configuration on discs having cathodes with definite lTPB to investigate the La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 (LSM)-Y 0.16Zr0.84O2 (YSZ), platinum (Pt)-YSZ and La 0.8Sr0.2CoO3 (LSC)-Ce0.8Sm0.2 O2 (SDC) half cell reactions at temperatures between 650--800°C and pO2 between 10-3 to 1 atm. For LSM-YSZ and Pt-YSZ, 1/Rct varies linearly with lTPB. LSC-SDC system did not show any specific dependence between R ct and lTPB. The third chapter examines the use of an electrolyte supported cell with externally applied voltage to determine the single electrode overpotential and extending the parameters derived to that of an anode supported fuel cell having thin film electrolyte operating under a chemical potential gradient. Spatial distributions of the electrochemical potential of electrons (ϕ) and oxygen ions ( m˜O-2 ), and chemical potential of oxygen ( mO2 ) for these two cases were obtained. Under fuel cell operating conditions, ϕ, m˜O-2 and mO2 , decreases monotonically from higher value to lower value. For electrolyte supported cell under externally applied voltage mO2 does not vary monotonically; it reaches values above or below that of the boundary values, leading to development of internal electromotive forces (EMFs), which can in turn affect the activity of the interface. The fourth chapter describes design microfabrication and characterization of a series connected potentiometric oxygen sensor. A drawback of potentiometric sensors in general is that the output signal is low when the ratio of the partial pressures at the two electrodes is low

  8. Applying Kohonen self-organizing map as a software sensor to predict biochemical oxygen demand.

    PubMed

    Rustum, Rabee; Adeloye, Adebayo J; Scholz, Miklas

    2008-01-01

    The 5 days at 20 degrees C biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) is an important parameter for monitoring organic pollution in water and assessing the biotreatability of wastewater. Moreover, BOD5 is used for wastewater treatment plant discharge consents and other water pollution control purposes. However, the traditional bioassay method for estimating the BOD5 involves the incubation of sample water for 5 days. It follows that BOD5 is not available for real-time decisionmaking and process control purposes. On the other hand, previous efforts to solve this problem by developing more rapid biosensors had limited success. This paper reports on the development of Kohonen self-organizing map (KSOM)-based software sensors for the rapid prediction of BOD5. The findings indicate that the KSOM-based BOD5 estimates were in good agreement with those measured using the conventional bioassay method. This offers significant potential for more timely intervention and cost savings during problem diagnosis in water and wastewater treatment processes.

  9. Long-Term Observations of Ocean Biogeochemistry with Nitrate and Oxygen Sensors in Apex Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. S.; Coletti, L.; Jannasch, H.; Martz, T.; Swift, D.; Riser, S.

    2008-12-01

    Long-term, autonomous observations of ocean biogeochemical cycles are now feasible with chemical sensors in profiling floats. These sensors will enable decadal-scale observations of trends in global ocean biogeochemical cycles. Here, we focus on measurements on nitrate and dissolved oxygen. The ISUS (In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer) optical nitrate sensor has been adapted to operate in a Webb Research, Apex profiling float. The Apex float is of the type used in the Argo array and is designed for multi-year, expendable deployments in the ocean. Floats park at 1000 m depth and make 60 nitrate and oxygen measurements at depth intervals ranging from 50 m below 400 m to 5 m in the upper 100 m as they profile to the surface. All data are transmitted to shore using the Iridium telemetry system and they are available on the Internet in near-real time. Floats equipped with ISUS and an Aanderaa oxygen sensor are capable of making 280 vertical profiles from 1000 m. At a 5 day cycle time, the floats should have nearly a four year endurance. Three floats have now been deployed at the Hawaii Ocean Time series station (HOT), Ocean Station Papa (OSP) in the Gulf of Alaska and at 50 South, 30 East in the Southern Ocean. Two additional floats are designated for deployment at the Bermuda Atlantic Time Series station (BATS) and in the Drake Passage. The HOT float has made 56 profiles over 260 days and should continue operating for 3 more years. Nitrate concentrations are in excellent agreement with the long-term mean observed at HOT. No significant long-term drift in sensor response has occurred. A variety of features have been observed in the HOT nitrate data that are linked to contemporaneous changes in oxygen production and mesoscale dynamics. The impacts of these features will be briefly described. The Southern Ocean float has operated for 200 days and is now observing reinjection of nitrate into surface waters as winter mixing occurs(surface nitrate > 24 micromolar). We

  10. Ratiometric Dissolved Oxygen Sensors Based on Ruthenium Complex Doped with Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zike; Yu, Xinsheng; Zhai, Shikui; Hao, Yingyan

    2017-01-01

    A ratiometric optical sensor has been developed with electrospinning processing method for dissolved oxygen measurement. The sensing film is fabricated by using silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) doped with tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride complex (Ru(DPP)3Cl2) encapsulated in plasticized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). An insensitive 3-(2-benzothiazolyl)-7-(diethy lamino)-(6CI,7CI) (Coumarin6) is adopted as reference. The ratio of oxygenation is calculated at each image pixel of a 3CCD camera to quantify the oxygen concentration in aqueous environment. Compared to Ag-free film, the response time of Ag-containing films were improved from 1.5 s to 1.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and from 65 s to 45 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. The response times of the Ag-free film obtained by knifing was 2.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and 104 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. Results of the evaluation of accuracy, limit of detection, stability, and photostability are presented. An experiment measuring the spatiotemporal variation of oxygen distribution within the photosynthesis and respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanofiber-based optical sensor film could serve as a promising method for rapid oxygen monitoring in aqueous applications. PMID:28282946

  11. Ratiometric Dissolved Oxygen Sensors Based on Ruthenium Complex Doped with Silver Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zike; Yu, Xinsheng; Zhai, Shikui; Hao, Yingyan

    2017-03-09

    A ratiometric optical sensor has been developed with electrospinning processing method for dissolved oxygen measurement. The sensing film is fabricated by using silver nano-particles (Ag NPs) doped with tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride complex (Ru(DPP)₃Cl₂) encapsulated in plasticized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). An insensitive 3-(2-benzothiazolyl)-7-(diethy lamino)-(6CI,7CI) (Coumarin6) is adopted as reference. The ratio of oxygenation is calculated at each image pixel of a 3CCD camera to quantify the oxygen concentration in aqueous environment. Compared to Ag-free film, the response time of Ag-containing films were improved from 1.5 s to 1.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and from 65 s to 45 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. The response times of the Ag-free film obtained by knifing was 2.0 s upon switching from deoxygenated to air saturation and 104 s from air saturation to fully deoxygenated. Results of the evaluation of accuracy, limit of detection, stability, and photostability are presented. An experiment measuring the spatiotemporal variation of oxygen distribution within the photosynthesis and respiration of Chlorella vulgaris is demonstrated. It is shown that the nanofiber-based optical sensor film could serve as a promising method for rapid oxygen monitoring in aqueous applications.

  12. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L.; Farmer, J.P.

    1995-04-01

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements.

  13. Skeletal Muscle and Glioma Oxygenation by Carbogen Inhalation in Rats: A Longitudinal Study by EPR Oximetry Using Single-Probe Implantable Oxygen Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nadeem; Lariviere, Jean; Hodge, Sassan; Chen, Eunice Y.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Eastman, Alan; Williams, Benjamin B.; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Swartz, Harold M.

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of EPR oximetry using a single-probe implantable oxygen sensor (ImOS) was tested for repeated measurement of pO2 in skeletal muscle and ectopic 9L tumors in rats. The ImOS (50 mm length) were constructed using nickel-chromium alloy wires, with lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc, oximetry probe) crystals loaded in the sensor loop and coated with AF 2400® Teflon. These ImOS were implanted into the skeletal muscle in the thigh and subcutaneous 9L tumors. Dynamic changes in tissue pO2 were assessed by EPR oximetry at baseline, during tumor growth, and repeated hyperoxygenation with carbogen breathing. The mean skeletal muscle pO2 of normal rats was stable and significantly increased during carbogen inhalation in experiments repeated for 12 weeks. The 9L tumors were hypoxic with a tissue pO2 of 12.8 ±6.4 mmHg on day 1; however, the response to carbogen inhalation varied among the animals. A significant increase in the glioma pO2 was observed during carbogen inhalation on day 9 and day 14 only. In summary, EPR oximetry with ImOS allowed direct and longitudinal oxygen measurements in deep muscle tissue and tumors. The heterogeneity of 9L tumors in response to carbogen highlights the need to repeatedly monitor pO2 to confirm tumor oxygenation so that such changes can be taken into account in planning therapies and interpreting results. PMID:24729220

  14. A Novel Solid Electrolyte Oxygen Sensor System for In-Situ Measurement and Process Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Frank Uwe; Messerschmid, Ernst; Rogg, Markus

    2010-10-01

    In 1993 the oxygen partial pressure was firstly measured inside a plasma wind tunnel using conventional λ-probes. Since then, a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained in using these sensors in ground test facilities and space. However, these commercially available sensors were too large in scale and weight. Consequently, a new development of solid electrolyte sensors called FIPEX more feasible for space was initiated. Due to space driven benefits, interest arose to use FIPEX technique in terrestrial applications e.g. to monitor sputter plants for float glass coating. Therefore, the VacuSen® sensor was developed. The characterization of VacuSen® at nominal sensor temperature TS = 680° C resulted in a sensor current according to IS = bṡpO20ṡ8±0ṡ05 I[μA] in the operation range between ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 5 Pa. From pulse width modulation (PWM) temperature control, additional information allows to measure ptot according to ptot = aṡRPWM0ṡ107±0ṡ005 thus enlarging the operation range to ptot = 1ṡ10-3 to 1ṡ105Pa. A one point calibration routine with air, ideally at ptot = 5 Pa in order to determine both calibration parameters a and b simultaneously, is proposed.

  15. Influence of colloidal silver nanoparticles on the novel flower-like titanium dioxide oxygen sensor performances.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, L; López-Suárez, A; Tiburcio-Silver, A

    2010-02-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2-anatase phase) thin films, consisting of agglomerated flower-like nanoparticles, have been synthesized using an ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) method in combination with titanium (IV) oxide acetylacetonate [TiO(acac)2], and methanol at 550 degrees C. These thin films were subsequently thermally treated in air, at 950 degrees C for six hours, and the flower-like particles were transformed into smooth surfaces mainly formed by the TiO2-rutile phase. In order to prepare oxygen sensors of good performance, TiO2 thin films were deposited on interdigitated gold electrodes with contacted alumina substrates. The silver colloidal solution was impregnated on the TiO2 thin film. Since the solvent in which the silver nanoparticles are suspended evaporates at 200 degrees C, the thin films were then annealed at this temperature in air for one hour. The effect of colloidal silver nanoparticles on the response of the thin films TiO2 oxygen sensors has been studied, in a mixture with zero-grade air. The gas-sensing properties of TiO2 sensors in an atmosphere of 10(4) ppm of oxygen were measured between 25 and 500 degrees C. The experimental results obtained with colloidal silver nanoparticles as surface additive show that the sensitivity to an O2 concentration of 100 ppm in zero grade air at 300 degrees C reaches a stationary value of 0.40, and 0.03, for TiO2-anatase and -rutile phase films, respectively. This values are as high as those reported for oxygen sensors prepared by more expensive techniques.

  16. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Mari; Takehara, Hiroaki; Akagi, Takanori; Shiono, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min). We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and dentate gyrus (DG).

  17. Flexible Sheet-Type Sensor for Noninvasive Measurement of Cellular Oxygen Metabolism on a Culture Dish

    PubMed Central

    Akagi, Takanori; Shiono, Hirofumi; Ichiki, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    A novel flexible sensor was developed for the noninvasive oxygen metabolism measurement of cultivated cells and tissues. This device is composed of a transparent double-layered polymer sheet of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) having an array of microhole structures of 90 μm diameter and 50 μm depth on its surface. All the microhole structures were equipped with a 1-μm-thick optical chemical sensing layer of platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer on their bottom. The three-dimensional microstructures of the sensor were fabricated by a newly developed simple and low-cost production method named self-aligned hot embossing. The device was designed to be attached slightly above the cells cultivated on a dish to form a temporarily closed microspace over the target cells during measurement. Since the change in oxygen concentration is relatively fast in the microcompartmentalized culture medium, a rapid evaluation of the oxygen consumption rate is possible by measuring the phosphorescence lifetime of the platinum porphyrin-fluoropolymer. The combined use of the device and an automated optical measurement system enabled the high-throughput sensing of cellular oxygen consumption (100 points/min). We monitored the oxygen metabolism of the human breast cancer cell line MCF7 on a Petri dish and evaluated the oxygen consumption rate to be 0.72 ± 0.12 fmol/min/cell. Furthermore, to demonstrate the utility of the developed sensing system, we demonstrated the mapping of the oxygen consumption rate of rat brain slices and succeeded in visualizing a clear difference among the layer structures of the hippocampus, i.e., the cornu ammonis (CA1 and CA3) and dentate gyrus (DG). PMID:26624889

  18. An optical sensor for monitoring of dissolved oxygen based on phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Weiwei; Zhou, Na; Chen, Lingxin; Li, Bowei

    2013-05-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) monitoring is of vital importance to water treatment, sewage treatment, aquaculture and biological research. The traditional method for DO detection is an electrochemical method called the Clark electrode. This electrochemical method has been widely used as it is simple and inexpensive; however, the critical drawback for this kind of sensor is that it is easily affected by pH variations, and by the concentration of H2S and SO2. Optical sensing for DO detection is a newly developed technology, which can avoid most of the drawbacks of the electrochemical sensors. A DO sensor using fluorescence detection is described in this paper. The oxygen concentration measurement principle is based on optical phase detection, which is more precise than the traditional intensity detection method. Emission is carried out by a low-cost, specially designed light emitting diode (LED) source. To avoid an unwanted phase shift, a reference LED is used to improve the degree of accuracy. The sensing material for fluorescence is a ruthenium complex. A discrete Fourier transform (DFT) algorithm was used for the phase calculation. The system was designed into a stainless steel probe, and dissolved oxygen concentration measurement results for various applications are presented in this paper.

  19. A Novel Thermal Sensor for the Sensitive Measurement of Chemical Oxygen Demand.

    PubMed

    Yao, Na; Liu, Zhuan; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Yikai; Xie, Bin

    2015-08-19

    A novel rapid methodology for determining the chemical oxygen demand (COD) based on a thermal sensor with a flow injection analysis system was proposed and experimentally validated. The ability of this sensor to detect and monitor COD was based on the degree of enthalpy increase when sodium hypochlorite reacted with the organic content in water samples. The measurement results were correlated with COD and were compared against the conventional method using potassium dichromate. The assay required only 5-7 min rather than the 2 h required for evaluation by potassium dichromate. The linear range was 5-1000 mg/L COD, and the limit of detection was very low, 0.74 mg/L COD. Moreover, this method exhibited high tolerance to chloride ions; 0.015 mol/L chloride ions had no influence on the response. Finally, the sensor was used to detect the COD of different water samples; the results were verified by the standard dichromate method.

  20. Real time sensor for monitoring oxygen in radio-frequency plasma applications.

    PubMed

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; Faulkner, R; Hopkins, M B

    2007-10-17

    Real time closed loop control of plasma assisted semiconductor manufacturing processes has received significant attention in recent years. Therefore we have developed and tested a customized optical sensor based on buffer gas (argon) actinometry which has been used to determine relative densities of atomic and molecular oxygen in an Ar/O(2) radio-frequency ICP chamber. The operation and accuracy of our optical sensor compared favorably with a high resolution commercial spectrometer but at lower cost and exhibited improved actinometric performance over a low resolution commercial spectrometer. Furthermore, threshold tests have been performed on the validity of buffer gas based actinometry in Ar/O(2) ICP plasmas where Ar is no longer a trace gas through Xe actinometry. The plasma conditions for which this customized optical sensor can be used for closed loop control have been established.

  1. Sensitivity enhancement of carbon nanotube based ammonium ion sensors through surface modification by using oxygen plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Yeo, Sanghak; Woong Jang, Chi; Lee, Seok; Min Jhon, Young; Choi, Changrok

    2013-02-18

    We have shown that the sensitivity of carbon nanotube (CNT) based sensors can be enhanced as high as 74 times through surface modification by using the inductively coupled plasma chemical vapor deposition method with oxygen. The plasma treatment power was maintained as low as 10 W within 20 s, and the oxygen plasma was generated far away from the sensors to minimize the plasma damage. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, we found that the concentration of oxygen increased with the plasma treatment time, which implies that oxygen functional groups or defect sites were generated on the CNT surface.

  2. Inkjet-printed dissolved oxygen and pH sensors on flexible plastic substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moya, A.; Zea, M.; Sowade, E.; Villa, R.; Ramon, E.; Baumann, R. R.; Gabriel, G.

    2017-06-01

    There are a broad range of applications such as analytical sensors, biosensing and medical applications that require the monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH using sensitive, stable, compact and low cost sensors. Here we develop full inkjet printing sensors to measure DO and pH. They have been fabricated using commercially available gold and platinum inks in plastic substrates. The inks are specially designed formulation which allows their sintering at temperatures as low as 150 and 190 °C for Au and Pt respectively. This is a key point in the development of low-cost sensors made on plastic and paper substrates. These sensors integrate in a single platform all the basic elements for pH and DO recording, allowing the measures without any external electrode. The DO is directly measured with a gold working electrode, and the pH sensors is achieved after electrodepositing iridium oxide film over platinum working electrode. The printed electrodes for DO sensing exhibits excellent linearity between 0 and 8 mg L _ 1 range, with correlation factors greater than 0.99, obtaining low limits of detection, 0.17 mgL _ 1 and a sensitivity of 0.06 A(mgL) _ 1. IrOx pH sensors exhibit a super-Nernstian response in sensitivity repeatedly and reversibly between 65 mV/pH in the pH range of 3 to 10. This work demonstrates that these sensors are suitable for the determination of DO and pH and provide a cost-effective solution for future electrochemical monitoring systems.

  3. Quantifying oxygen in paper-based cell cultures with luminescent thin film sensors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Matthew W; Kenney, Rachael M; Truong, Andrew S; Lockett, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for generating 3D tissue-like cultures because paper is readily available and does not require specialized equipment to pattern, cut, or use. By controlling the exchange of fresh culture medium with the paper-based scaffolds, we can engineer diffusion-dominated environments similar to those found in spheroids or solid tumors. Oxygen tension directly regulates cellular phenotype and invasiveness through hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and also has chemotactic properties. To date, gradients of oxygen generated in the paper-based cultures have relied on cellular response-based readouts. In this work, we prepared a luminescent thin film capable of quantifying oxygen tensions in apposed cell-containing paper-based scaffolds. The oxygen sensors, which are polystyrene films containing a Pd(II) tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin dye, are photostable, stable in culture conditions, and not cytotoxic. They have a linear response for oxygen tensions ranging from 0 to 160 mmHg O2, and a Stern-Volmer constant (K sv) of 0.239 ± 0.003 mmHg O2 (-1). We used these oxygen-sensing films to measure the spatial and temporal changes in oxygen tension for paper-based cultures containing a breast cancer line that was engineered to constitutively express a fluorescent protein. By acquiring images of the oxygen-sensing film and the fluorescently labeled cells, we were able to approximate the oxygen consumption rates of the cells in our cultures.

  4. Real-time frequency-domain fiber optic sensor for intra-arterial blood oxygen measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcala, J. R.; Scott, Ian L.; Parker, Jennifer W.; Atwater, Beauford W.; Yu, Clement; Fischer, Russell; Bellingrath, K.

    1993-05-01

    A real time frequency domain phosphorimeter capable of measuring precise and accurate excited state lifetimes for determining oxygen is described. This frequency domain instrument does not make use of cross correlation techniques traditionally used in frequency domain fluorometers. Instead, the electrical signal from the detector is filtered to contain only the first several harmonics. This filtered signal is then sampled and averaged over a few thousand cycles. The absolute phase and absolute modulation of each sampled harmonic of the excitation and of the luminescence is computed by employing fast Fourier transform algorithms. The phase delay and the modulation ratio is then calculated at each harmonic frequency. A least squares fit is performed in the frequency domain to obtain the lifetimes of discrete exponentials. Oxygen concentrations are computed from these lifetimes. Prototypes based on these techniques were built employing commercially available components. Results from measurements in saline solution and in the arterial blood of dogs show that oxygen concentrations can be determined reproducibly. The system drift is less than 1% in over 100 hours of continuous operation. The performance of fiber optic sensors was evaluated in dogs over a period of 10 hours. The sensors tracked changes in arterial oxygen tension over the course of the experiment without instabilities. The overall response of the system was about 90 seconds. The update time was 3 seconds.

  5. Dynamic monitoring of blood oxygen saturation in vivo using double-ring photoacoustic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guangzhi; Xing, Da; Yang, Sihua

    2009-07-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) can distinguish oxygenated main chromophores which are hemoglobin (HbO2) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (Hb) in blood by the optical absorption at multiple optical wavelengths. In this study, a noninvasive PA system with a double-ring sensor was used for fixed-point measurement of hemoglobin oxygen saturation (SO2) continually. The double-ring sensor is an ultrasonic Fresnel zone plate ultrasonic transducer. It has two-zone negative zone plate piezoelectric material pattern with good focusing effect for fixed-point detection of SO2. Three specific optical absorbed wavelengths (760, 805, and 850 nm) of HbO2 and Hb were employed sequentially to obtain PA signals and calculate the SO2 at each blood oxygen level. The capability and accuracy of the system were tested by phantom samples and in vitro blood samples, and the results of the PA detection were in excellent agreement with the data of the control group by the blood-gas analyzer. In in vivo studies, the SO2 of the artery and the vein in a rabbit ear were noninvasively detected. Furthermore, changes in the SO2 from normal to hypoxia and to hyperoxia due to the changed inhale gas were dynamically recorded by the PA system. The experimental results demonstrate that this PA SO2 measurement system has the potential for fixed-point detection and dynamic monitoring of blood oxygen saturation.

  6. Phosphorescent oxygen sensor with dendritic protection and two-photon absorbing antenna.

    PubMed

    Briñas, Raymond P; Troxler, Thomas; Hochstrasser, Robin M; Vinogradov, Sergei A

    2005-08-24

    Imaging oxygen in 3D with submicron spatial resolution can be made possible by combining phosphorescence quenching technique with multiphoton laser scanning microscopy. Because Pt and Pd porphyrin-based phosphorescent dyes, traditionally used as phosphors in biological oxygen measurements, exhibit extremely low two-photon absorption (2PA) cross-sections, we designed a nanosensor for oxygen, in which a 2P absorbing antenna is coupled to a metalloporphyrin core via intramolecular energy transfer (ET) with the purpose of amplifying the 2PA induced phosphorescence of the metalloporphyrin. The central component of the device is a polyfunctionalized Pt porphyrin, whose triplet state emission at ambient temperatures is strong, occurs in the near infrared and is sensitive to O2. The 2PA chromophores are chosen in such a way that their absorption is maximal in the near infrared (NIR) window of tissue (e.g., 700-900 nm), while their fluorescence is overlapped with the absorption band(s) of the core metalloporphyrin, ensuring an efficient antenna-core resonance ET. The metalloporphyrin-antenna construct is embedded inside the protecting dendritic jacket, which isolates the core from interactions with biological macromolecules, controls diffusion of oxygen and makes the entire sensor water-soluble. Several Pt porphyrin-coumarin based sensors were synthesized and their photophyics studied to evaluate the proposed design.

  7. Novel Wireless Sensor System for Monitoring Oxygen, Temperature and Respiration Rate of Horticultural Crops Post Harvest

    PubMed Central

    Løkke, Mette Marie; Seefeldt, Helene Fast; Edwards, Gareth; Green, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In order to design optimal packages, it is of pivotal importance to determine the rate at which harvested fresh fruits and vegetables consume oxygen. The respiration rate of oxygen (RRO2) is determined by measuring the consumed oxygen per hour per kg plant material, and the rate is highly influenced by temperature and gas composition. Traditionally, RRO2 has been determined at discrete time intervals. In this study, wireless sensor networks (WSNs) were used to determine RRO2 continuously in plant material (fresh cut broccoli florets) at 5 °C, 10 °C and 20 °C and at modified gas compositions (decreasing oxygen and increasing carbon dioxide levels). Furthermore, the WSN enabled concomitant determination of oxygen and temperature in the very close vicinity of the plant material. This information proved a very close relationship between changes in temperature and respiration rate. The applied WSNs were unable to determine oxygen levels lower than 5% and carbon dioxide was not determined. Despite these drawbacks in relation to respiration analysis, the WSNs offer a new possibility to do continuous measurement of RRO2 in post harvest research, thereby investigating the close relation between temperature and RRO2. The conclusions are that WSNs have the potential to be used as a monitor of RRO2 of plant material after harvest, during storage and packaging, thereby leading to optimized consumer products. PMID:22164085

  8. Pyrene-Capped CdSe@ZnS Nanoparticles as Sensitive Flexible Oxygen Sensors in Non-Aqueous Media**

    PubMed Central

    González-Carrero, Soranyel; de la Guardia, Miguel; Galian, Raquel E; Pérez-Prieto, Julia

    2014-01-01

    A flexible, highly sensitive sensor of oxygen in non-aqueous solvents is described. It consists of CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles decorated with a considerable number of pyrene units, thus making the formation of the pyrene excimer possible. The emission of the pyrene excimer and that of the nanoparticle are suitably separated from each other and also from the excitation wavelength. This sensor can be applied as a ratiometric oxygen sensor by using the linear response of the pyrene excimer lifetime combined with the linear response of the nanoparticle excited state lifetime. This nanohybrid has been assayed in seven media with different dielectric constants and viscosities over the whole oxygen concentration range. In addition, the sensor versatility provides an easy way for monitoring oxygen diffusion through systems. PMID:25478315

  9. Nondestructive and continuous monitoring of oxygen levels in modified atmosphere packaged ready-to-eat mixed salad products using optical oxygen sensors, and its effects on sensory and microbiological counts during storage.

    PubMed

    Hempel, A; O'Sullivan, M G; Papkovsky, D B; Kerry, J P

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the percentage oxygen consumption of fresh, respiring ready-to-eat (RTE) mixed leaf salad products (Iceberg salad leaf, Caesar salad leaf, and Italian salad leaf). These were held under different modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) conditions (5% O2 , 5% CO2 , 90% N2 (MAPC-commercial control), 21% O2 , 5% CO2 , 74% N2 (MAP 1), 45% O2 , 5% CO2 , 50% N2 (MAP 2), and 60% O2 , 5% CO2 , 35% N2 (MAP 3)) and 4 °C for up to 10 d. The quality and shelf-life stability of all packaged salad products were evaluated using sensory, physiochemical, and microbial assessment. Oxygen levels in all MAP packs were measured on each day of analysis using optical oxygen sensors allowing for nondestructive assessment of packs. Analysis showed that with the exception of control packs, oxygen levels for all MAP treatments decreased by approximately 10% after 7 d of storage. Oxygen levels in control packs were depleted after 7 d of storage. This appears to have had no detrimental effect on either the sensory quality or shelf-life stability of any of the salad products investigated. Additionally, the presence of higher levels of oxygen in modified atmosphere packs did not significantly improve product quality or shelf-life stability; however, these additional levels of oxygen were freely available to fresh respiring produce if required. This study shows that the application of optical sensors in MAP packs was successful in nondestructively monitoring oxygen level, or changes in oxygen level, during refrigerated storage of RTE salad products. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. A gas sensor using a multi-walled carbon nanotube sheet to detect oxygen molecules.

    PubMed

    Jung, Daewoong; Lee, Kyung H; Kim, Donghyun; Overzet, Lawrence J; Lee, Gil S

    2013-12-01

    A gas sensor using a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) sheet, which can detect oxygen (O2) gas, is presented and its output characteristics are evaluated in this study. A simple, cost effective and novel fabrication technique is described compared to dispersing CNTs into a liquid or polymer. The sheets are spun from a MWCNT forest grown on a silicon substrate; its electrical resistance decreases linearly with O2 exposure. The MWCNT sheet has a large surface area and many individual MWCNT contact points; this leads to a linear sensitivity, a fast response time, repeatability, and stability. It is well known that the surface distribution and areal density of MWCNTs have a significantly affect on their sensing characteristics. The sensors fabricated using dispersed CNTs on a substrate, either with separated CNTs of low density or with overlapping CNTs of low resistance, reveal much lower sensitivities. The large surface area and uniform distribution of the gas sensor, however, allow for the higher interaction of the MWCNTs with the O2 molecules, increasing the sensor's characteristics. Moreover, the MWCNT sheet does not need purification or a complex transfer process to be used as a sensor, making it suitable for practical applications.

  11. A micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for detection of hydrogen and atomic oxygen.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Chul; Yoon, Seung-Il; Lee, Chung-il; Kim, Yong-Jun; Song, Soonho

    2009-02-01

    This paper demonstrates the fabrication and performance of a micro-thermoelectric gas sensor for an effective and inexpensive gas analysis system. The proposed micro-thermoelectric gas sensor was fabricated by using a surface micromachining technique. The sensing mechanism, consisting of thermoelectric material and a novel metal catalyst, was fabricated on the highly thermally resistive layer for reduced heat transfer to the substrate allowing for a simple fabrication process. The micro-thermoelectric gas sensor detects target gas species by measuring the reaction heat of the catalytic reaction between the target gas and a novel metal catalyst using Cu-Bi thermopiles. The catalytic reaction occurs only on the hot junction of the sensing thermopile where the metal catalyst is deposited. In order to reduce the external thermal noise, a difference between the output voltage of the sensing and the reference thermopiles was measured by using a differential amplifier. The response of the fabricated sensor was linear to temperature difference. The fabricated sensor can be used to detect various concentrations of hydrogen and atomic oxygen, where the output voltage linearly increased with the gas concentration.

  12. Performance Evaluation of an Oxygen Sensor as a Function of the Samaria Doped Ceria Film Thickness

    SciTech Connect

    Sanghavi, Rahul P.; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Jiang, Weilin; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Kayani, Asghar N.; Prasad, Shalini

    2010-12-01

    The current demand in the automobile industry is in the control of air-fuel mixture in the combustion engine of automobiles. Oxygen partial pressure can be used as an input parameter for regulating or controlling systems in order to optimize the combustion process. Our goal is to identify and optimize the material system that would potentially function as the active sensing material for such a device that monitors oxygen partial pressure in these systems. We have used thin film samaria doped ceria (SDC) as the sensing material for the sensor operation, exploiting the fact that at high temperatures, oxygen vacancies generated due to samarium doping act as conducting medium for oxygen ions which hop through the vacancies from one side to the other contributing to an electrical signal. We have recently established that 6 atom % Sm doping in ceria films has optimum conductivity. Based on this observation, we have studied the variation in the overall conductivity of 6 atom % samaria doped ceria thin films as a function of thickness in the range of 50 nm to 300 nm at a fixed bias voltage of 2 volts. A direct proportionality in the increase in the overall conductivity is observed with the increase in sensing film thickness. For a range of oxygen pressure values from 1 mTorr to 100 Torr, a tolerable hysteresis error, good dynamic response and a response time of less than 10 seconds was observed

  13. Reversible, Fast, and Wide-Range Oxygen Sensor Based on Nanostructured Organometal Halide Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Stoeckel, Marc-Antoine; Gobbi, Marco; Bonacchi, Sara; Liscio, Fabiola; Ferlauto, Laura; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    Nanostructured materials characterized by high surface-volume ratio hold the promise to constitute the active materials for next-generation sensors. Solution-processed hybrid organohalide perovskites, which have been extensively used in the last few years for optoelectronic applications, are characterized by a self-assembled nanostructured morphology, which makes them an ideal candidate for gas sensing. Hitherto, detailed studies of the dependence of their electrical characteristics on the environmental atmosphere have not been performed, and even the effect of a ubiquitous gas such as O2 has been widely overlooked. Here, the electrical response of organohalide perovskites to oxygen is studied. Surprisingly, a colossal increase (3000-fold) in the resistance of perovskite-based lateral devices is found when measured in a full oxygen atmosphere, which is ascribed to a trap healing mechanism originating from an O2 -mediated iodine vacancies filling. A variation as small as 70 ppm in the oxygen concentration can be detected. The effect is fast (<400 ms) and fully reversible, making organohalide perovskites ideal active materials for oxygen sensing. The effect of oxygen on the electrical characteristics of organohalide perovskites must be taken into deep consideration for the design and optimization of any other perovskite-based (opto-) electronic device working in ambient conditions. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Central arterial pressure assessment with intensity POF sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitão, Cátia; Gonçalves, Steve; Antunes, Paulo; Bastos, José M.; Pinto, João. L.; André, Paulo

    2015-09-01

    The central pressure monitoring is considered a new key factor in hypertension assessment and cardiovascular prevention. In this work, it is presented the central arterial systolic pressure assessment with an intensity based POF sensor. The device was tested in four subjects, and stable pulse waves were obtained, allowing the calculation of the central pressure for all the subjects. The results shown that the sensor performs reliably, being a simple and low-cost solution to the intended application.

  15. Disposable sensor for measuring the biochemical oxygen demand for nitrification and inhibition of nitrification in wastewater.

    PubMed

    König, A; Bachmann, T T; Metzger, J W; Schmid, R D

    1999-01-01

    A disposable-type microbial sensor was developed for the determination of both the biochemical oxygen demand for nitrification (N-BOD) and inhibiting effects on nitrifying bacteria. The sensor was based on the respiratory activity of nitrifying bacteria immobilized on a miniature oxygen electrode. Typical response times for measuring N-BOD of ammonium standard solutions as well as of wastewater samples were in the range of 6-12 min. A dynamic evaluation of the signals after a measuring time of 120 s also resulted in good reproducibility and sensitivity. A daily profile of a municipal sewage plant was recorded, comparing the biosensor data with two standard methods. For the measurement of nitrification-inhibiting effects a 120-s dynamic signal evaluation was preferred to a steady-state method because of the long recovery times resulting from extended exposure to inhibitors. However, steady-state measurement techniques allowed allylthiourea detection with a ten times higher sensitivity. Because of the advantages of this miniaturized electrode, e.g. short response time, simple measuring procedure and low costs of production, this sensor system is considered to be suitable for commercial application in environmental analysis.

  16. Development of oxygen and pH sensors for aqueous systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stvartak, C.; Alcock, C.B.; Li, B.; Wang, L.; Fergus, J.W.; Bakshi, N.

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion science has long recognized that two of the most important parameters in characterizing the corrosivity of an aqueous environment are oxygen chemical potential and pH. These parameters not only determine the thermodynamic driving forces for various corrosion reactions, but also characterize the rates of these reactions and hence the lifetime of a particular component. The primary goal of this project is to develop an electrochemical oxygen and pH sensor for continuous use in the cycle chemistry control of power plants. In the past year, electrochemical sensors with a metal/metal oxide or metal/metal hydride internal reference electrode and a fluoride-based electrolyte tube have been developed and tested in this laboratory. The corrosion tests showed that the LaF{sub 3}-based solid electrolyte was very stable both chemically and physically in water. Furthermore, its electrical conductivity is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of stabilized zirconia below 573 K (300{degree}C), which is the main advantage of a fluoride-based electrolyte at low temperatures. With this electrolyte and the selected internal oxygen reference electrode (Ag/Ag{sub 2}O), the electrochemical probe demonstrated Nernstian responses to the oxygen chemical potential and pH of the aqueous solution with good reproducibility. A similar cell with Zr/ZrH{sub 1+x} as the internal hydrogen reference electrode showed promising pH sensing characteristics. It is proposed that these two cells be combined to form a double-headed electrochemical probe to determine oxygen chemical potential and pH in the solution simultaneously.

  17. Fiber-optic dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide sensors using fluorophores encapsulated in sol gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyeog-Chan

    Fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for oxygen, dissolved oxygen (DO), and dissolved CO2 sensing using thin films of fluorophores encapsulated in sol-gel matrices were made and tested. The DO/O2 sensor used ruthenium(II) tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline) perchlorate (Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2) as the oxygen sensitive fluorophore and methyltrimethoxysilane (MTMS) sol-gel as the encapsulating matrix material. For the DCO2 sensor, 8-hydroxy-1,3,6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) co-doped with sodium bicarbonate was used as the DCO2 sensitive fluorophore-chemical system and diisobutoxy-alumino triethoxysilane (ASE) sol-gel was used as the encapsulating matrix material. It was found that oxygen quenches the excited state Ru(Ph2Phen)Cl 2 by diffusing through the MTMS matrix. Continuous excitation of Ru(Ph 2Phen)Cl2 during MTMS drying resulted in long, single exponential lifetimes of the metal complex and increased sensor sensitivity. When the sensor was field tested, it was found to have an excellent match compared to conventional titration method for determining dissolved oxygen concentrations and had fast response times. It was determined that this sensor measured the vapor pressure of oxygen rather than the absolute concentration of dissolved oxygen. For DCO2 sensing, it was found that the dynamic response of the senor could be tuned by varying the HPTS to NaHCO3 ratios. The sensor had fast response times compared to other fiber optic DCO 2 sensors reported which typically have response times of minutes.

  18. Prediction of oxygen uptake dynamics by machine learning analysis of wearable sensors during activities of daily living

    PubMed Central

    Beltrame, T.; Amelard, R.; Wong, A.; Hughson, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Currently, oxygen uptake () is the most precise means of investigating aerobic fitness and level of physical activity; however, can only be directly measured in supervised conditions. With the advancement of new wearable sensor technologies and data processing approaches, it is possible to accurately infer work rate and predict during activities of daily living (ADL). The main objective of this study was to develop and verify the methods required to predict and investigate the dynamics during ADL. The variables derived from the wearable sensors were used to create a predictor based on a random forest method. The temporal dynamics were assessed by the mean normalized gain amplitude (MNG) obtained from frequency domain analysis. The MNG provides a means to assess aerobic fitness. The predicted during ADL was strongly correlated (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) with the measured and the prediction bias was 0.2 ml·min−1·kg−1. The MNG calculated based on predicted was strongly correlated (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) with MNG calculated based on measured data. This new technology provides an important advance in ambulatory and continuous assessment of aerobic fitness with potential for future applications such as the early detection of deterioration of physical health. PMID:28378815

  19. Prediction of oxygen uptake dynamics by machine learning analysis of wearable sensors during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Beltrame, T; Amelard, R; Wong, A; Hughson, R L

    2017-04-05

    Currently, oxygen uptake () is the most precise means of investigating aerobic fitness and level of physical activity; however, can only be directly measured in supervised conditions. With the advancement of new wearable sensor technologies and data processing approaches, it is possible to accurately infer work rate and predict during activities of daily living (ADL). The main objective of this study was to develop and verify the methods required to predict and investigate the dynamics during ADL. The variables derived from the wearable sensors were used to create a predictor based on a random forest method. The temporal dynamics were assessed by the mean normalized gain amplitude (MNG) obtained from frequency domain analysis. The MNG provides a means to assess aerobic fitness. The predicted during ADL was strongly correlated (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) with the measured and the prediction bias was 0.2 ml·min(-1)·kg(-1). The MNG calculated based on predicted was strongly correlated (r = 0.71, P < 0.001) with MNG calculated based on measured data. This new technology provides an important advance in ambulatory and continuous assessment of aerobic fitness with potential for future applications such as the early detection of deterioration of physical health.

  20. Microfabricated Collector-Generator Electrode Sensor for Measuring Absolute pH and Oxygen Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Adam K; Wightman, R Mark; McCarty, Gregory S

    2015-10-20

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) has attracted attention for studying in vivo neurotransmission due to its subsecond temporal resolution, selectivity, and sensitivity. Traditional FSCV measurements use background subtraction to isolate changes in the local electrochemical environment, providing detailed information on fluctuations in the concentration of electroactive species. This background subtraction removes information about constant or slowly changing concentrations. However, determination of background concentrations is still important for understanding functioning brain tissue. For example, neural activity is known to consume oxygen and produce carbon dioxide which affects local levels of oxygen and pH. Here, we present a microfabricated microelectrode array which uses FSCV to detect the absolute levels of oxygen and pH in vitro. The sensor is a collector-generator electrode array with carbon microelectrodes spaced 5 μm apart. In this work, a periodic potential step is applied at the generator producing transient local changes in the electrochemical environment. The collector electrode continuously performs FSCV enabling these induced changes in concentration to be recorded with the sensitivity and selectivity of FSCV. A negative potential step applied at the generator produces a transient local pH shift at the collector. The generator-induced pH signal is detected using FSCV at the collector and correlated to absolute solution pH by postcalibration of the anodic peak position. In addition, in oxygenated solutions a negative potential step at the generator produces hydrogen peroxide by reducing oxygen. Hydrogen peroxide is detected with FSCV at the collector electrode, and the magnitude of the oxidative peak is proportional to absolute oxygen concentrations. Oxygen interference on the pH signal is minimal and can be accounted for with a postcalibration.

  1. Net community production at Ocean Station Papa observed with nitrate and oxygen sensors on profiling floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Joshua N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Coletti, Luke J.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    Six profiling floats equipped with nitrate and oxygen sensors were deployed at Ocean Station P in the Gulf of Alaska. The resulting six calendar years and 10 float years of nitrate and oxygen data were used to determine an average annual cycle for net community production (NCP) in the top 35 m of the water column. NCP became positive in February as soon as the mixing activity in the surface layer began to weaken, but nearly 3 months before the traditionally defined mixed layer began to shoal from its winter time maximum. NCP displayed two maxima, one toward the end of May and another in August with a summertime minimum in June corresponding to the historical peak in mesozooplankton biomass. The average annual NCP was determined to be 1.5 ± 0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 using nitrate and 1.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 using oxygen. The results from oxygen data proved to be quite sensitive to the gas exchange model used as well as the accuracy of the oxygen measurement. Gas exchange models optimized for carbon dioxide flux generally ignore transport due to gas exchange through the injection of bubbles, and these models yield NCP values that are two to three time higher than the nitrate-based estimates. If nitrate and oxygen NCP rates are assumed to be related by the Redfield model, we show that the oxygen gas exchange model can be optimized by tuning the exchange terms to reproduce the nitrate NCP annual cycle.

  2. Intrinsic and metal-doped gallium oxide based high-temperature oxygen sensors for combustion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Ernesto Javier

    Currently, there is enormous interest in research, development and optimization of the combustion processes for energy harvesting. Recent statistical and economic analyses estimated that by improving the coal-based firing/combustion processes in the power plants, savings up to $450-500 million yearly can be achieved. Advanced sensors and controls capable of withstanding extreme environments such as high temperatures, highly corrosive atmospheres, and high pressures are critical to such efficiency enhancement and cost savings. For instance, optimization of the combustion processes in power generation systems can be achieved by sensing, monitoring and control of oxygen, which is a measure of the completeness of the process and can lead to enhanced efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. However, despite the fact that there exists a very high demand for advanced sensors, the existing technologies suffer from poor 'response and recovery times' and 'long-term stability.' Motivated by the aforementioned technological challenges, the present work was focused on high-temperature (≥700 °C) oxygen sensors for application in power generation systems. The objective of the present work is to investigate nanostructured gallium oxide (2O3) based sensors for oxygen sensing, where we propose to conduct in-depth exploration of the role of refractory metal (tungsten, W, in this case) doping into 2O 3 to enhance the sensitivity, selectivity, stability ("3S" criteria) and reliability of such sensors while keeping cost economical. Tungsten (W) doped gallium oxide (2O3) thin films were deposited via rf-magnetron co-sputtering of W-metal and Ga2O3-ceramic targets. Films were produced by varying the sputtering power applied to the W-target in order to achieve variable W content into 2O3 films while substrate temperature was kept constant at 500 °C. Chemical composition, chemical valence states, microstructure and crystal structure of as-grown and post-annealed W-doped 2O3

  3. Toward Microbioreactor Arrays: A Slow-Responding Oxygen Sensor for Monitoring of Microbial Cultures in Standard 96-Well Plates.

    PubMed

    Glauche, Florian; John, Gernot T; Arain, Sarina; Knepper, Andreas; Neubauer, Antje; Goelling, Detlef; Lang, Christine; Violet, Norman; King, Rudibert; Neubauer, Peter

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a slow-responding chemo-optical sensor for dissolved oxygen (DO) integrated into a 96-well plate was developed. The slow response time ensures that the measured oxygen value does not change much during plate transport to the microplate reader. The sensor therefore permits at-line DO measurement of microbial cultures. Moreover, it eliminates the necessity of individual optical measurement systems for each culture plate, as many plates can be measured successively. Combined with the 96-well format, this increases the experimental throughput enormously. The novel sensor plate (Slow OxoPlate) consists of fluorophores suspended in a polymer matrix that were placed into u-bottom 96-well plates. Response time was measured using sodium sulfite, and a t90 value of 9.7 min was recorded. For application, DO values were then measured in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures grown under fed-batch-like conditions. Depending on the DO sensor's response time, different information on the oxygenation state of the culture plate was obtained: a fast sensor variant detects disturbance through sampling, whereas the slow sensor indicates oxygen limitation during incubation. A combination of the commercially available OxoPlate and the Slow OxoPlate enables operators of screening facilities to validate their cultivation procedures with regard to oxygen availability. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  4. WO3/W Nanopores Sensor for Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) Determination under Visible Light

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejin; Bai, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Li, Jianyong; Zhou, Baoxue

    2014-01-01

    A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and the results showed that taking NaNO3 solution at the concentration of 2.5 mol·L−1 as electrolyte under the light intensity of 214 μW·cm−2 and applied bias of 2.5 V, the proposed method is accurate and well reproducible, even in a wide range of pH values. Furthermore, the COD values obtained by the WO3 sensor were fitted well with the theoretical COD value in the range of 3–60 mg·L−1 with a limit value of 1 mg·L−1, which reveals that the proposed sensor may be a practical device for monitoring and controlling surface water quality as well as slightly polluted water. PMID:24940868

  5. WO₃/W nanopores sensor for chemical oxygen demand (COD) determination under visible light.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Bai, Jing; Liu, Qiang; Li, Jianyong; Zhou, Baoxue

    2014-06-17

    A sensor of a WO3 nanopores electrode combined with a thin layer reactor was proposed to develop a Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) determination method and solve the problem that the COD values are inaccurately determined by the standard method. The visible spectrum, e.g., 420 nm, could be used as light source in the sensor we developed, which represents a breakthrough by limiting of UV light source in the photoelectrocatalysis process. The operation conditions were optimized in this work, and the results showed that taking NaNO3 solution at the concentration of 2.5 mol·L(-1) as electrolyte under the light intensity of 214 μW·cm(-2) and applied bias of 2.5 V, the proposed method is accurate and well reproducible, even in a wide range of pH values. Furthermore, the COD values obtained by the WO3 sensor were fitted well with the theoretical COD value in the range of 3-60 mg·L(-1) with a limit value of 1 mg·L(-1), which reveals that the proposed sensor may be a practical device for monitoring and controlling surface water quality as well as slightly polluted water.

  6. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular “pulse” of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  7. Feature Identification and Filtering for Engine Misfire Detection (EMD) Using Zirconia Oxygen Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauzi, Muhammad Zaim Mohamed; Abu Bakar, Elmi; Fauzi Ismail, Mohd

    2016-02-01

    Vehicles as transportation are popular and mainly use among peoples around the world for various kind of purpose either personal or not. Over hundreds of year internal combustion engines widely used because of high efficiency and low maintenance compare to new technology which are using cells of battery. Nevertheless, emission cause of incomplete combustion such engine misfire normally occurs as well. For instances, some mechanical, sensors or actuators failure and environmental condition contribute to the engine misfire. The importance of engine misfire detection (EMD) is to ensure engine emissions not harmful to the environments and avoid damage of catalytic converter. By using low cost narrowband oxygen sensor to acquire air to fuel ratio (AFR) signal behavior under misfire condition and analyst by digital signal processing method using Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) algorithm for Digital Butterworth Filter designation is discussed in this paper.

  8. Nanostructured oxygen sensor--using micelles to incorporate a hydrophobic platinum porphyrin.

    PubMed

    Su, Fengyu; Alam, Ruhaniyah; Mei, Qian; Tian, Yanqing; Youngbull, Cody; Johnson, Roger H; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic platinum(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)-porphyrin (PtTFPP) was physically incorporated into micelles formed from poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) to enable the application of PtTFPP in aqueous solution. Micelles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show an average diameter of about 140 nm. PtTFPP showed higher quantum efficiency in micellar solution than in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and dichloromethane (CH₂Cl₂). PtTFPP in micelles also exhibited higher photostability than that of PtTFPP suspended in water. PtTFPP in micelles exhibited good oxygen sensitivity and response time. This study provided an efficient approach to enable the application of hydrophobic oxygen sensors in a biological environment.

  9. Nanostructured Oxygen Sensor - Using Micelles to Incorporate a Hydrophobic Platinum Porphyrin

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fengyu; Alam, Ruhaniyah; Mei, Qian; Tian, Yanqing; Youngbull, Cody; Johnson, Roger H.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrophobic platinum(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenyl)-porphyrin (PtTFPP) was physically incorporated into micelles formed from poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) to enable the application of PtTFPP in aqueous solution. Micelles were characterized using dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to show an average diameter of about 140 nm. PtTFPP showed higher quantum efficiency in micellar solution than in tetrahydrofuran (THF) and dichloromethane (CH2Cl2). PtTFPP in micelles also exhibited higher photostability than that of PtTFPP suspended in water. PtTFPP in micelles exhibited good oxygen sensitivity and response time. This study provided an efficient approach to enable the application of hydrophobic oxygen sensors in a biological environment. PMID:22457758

  10. Improving Blood Compatibility of Intravascular Oxygen Sensors Via Catalytic Decomposition of S-Nitrosothiols to Generate Nitric Oxide In Situ.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiduo; Rojas, Alvaro P; Griffith, Grant W; Skrzypchak, Amy M; Lafayette, Nathan; Bartlett, Robert H; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2007-01-30

    Reliable, real-time, in vivo sensing (intravascular) of blood gases and electrolytes remains a difficult challenge owing to biocompatibility issues that occur when chemical sensors are implanted into the blood stream. Recently, local release of nitric oxide (NO) at the sensor/blood interface has been suggested as a potential solution to this problem. However, the lifetime of NO release from thin polymer films coated on implanted sensors is limited by the reservoir of NO donor loaded within the polymeric coating. To continuously produce NO at the sensor/blood interface, a novel approach to catalytically decompose endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs) in blood to generate NO in situ is reported herein. Metallic copper particles of two different sizes (3 μm and 80 nm) are embedded as catalysts in thin polymer coatings on the surface intravascular electrochemical oxygen sensing catheters. Oxygen levels (partial pressure of oxygen; PO(2)) provided by the copper particle/polymer coated sensors are, on average, more accurate than values obtained from non-NO generating control sensors when both types of sensors are implanted in porcine arteries for 19-20 h. Upon termination of each in vivo study, catheters were explanted and examined for surface thrombosis via both visual image and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay. The results indicate that the Cu(0)-catalyst coatings significantly reduce the occurrence of surface thrombosis, likely from the ability to generate NO from endogenous RSNO species at the sensor/blood interface.

  11. Resistive oxygen sensor using ceria-zirconia sensor material and ceria-yttria temperature compensating material for lean-burn engine.

    PubMed

    Izu, Noriya; Nishizaki, Sayaka; Shin, Woosuck; Itoh, Toshio; Nishibori, Maiko; Matsubara, Ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Temperature compensating materials were investigated for a resistive oxygen sensor using Ce(0.9)Zr(0.1)O(2) as a sensor material for lean-burn engines. The temperature dependence of a temperature compensating material should be the same as the sensor material; therefore, the Y concentration in CeO(2)-Y(2)O(3) was optimized. The resistance of Ce(0.5)Y(0.5)O(2-δ) was independent of the air-to-fuel ratio (oxygen partial pressure), so that it was confirmed to function as a temperature compensating material. Sensor elements comprised of Ce(0.9)Zr(0.1)O(2) and Ce(0.5)Y(0.5)O(2-δ) were fabricated and the output was determined to be approximately independent of the temperature in the wide range from 773 to 1,073 K.

  12. Laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors of oxygen dissolved in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasov, V. L.; Konovalov, B. V.; Mosharov, V. E.; Radchenko, V. N.; Khanaev, S. A.; Khlebnikov, D. V.

    2010-02-01

    The laboratory and marine study of photoluminescent sensors developed at the TsAGI has been conducted to create a highly sensitivity gauge of the oxygen dissolved in seawater. The advantages of the photoluminescent gauge over the electrochemical ones are the following: zero sensitivity to electromagnetic fields, the pH of the water, and the hydrogen sulphide and ions of heavy metals in the water; zero oxygen consumption; and no need for the water to be pumped through the device. A breadboard model of the photoluminescent gauge with LED excitation of the luminescence has been built. The laboratory tests of the model demonstrated the accuracy of the gauge to be as high as 0.05 ml/1 in air at a response time of 0.3 s for 63% relaxation. Comparative field tests of the breadboard model and the SBE 43 electrochemical oxygen gauge (Sea-Bird Electronics Corp.) have shown good agreement of the estimates of the oxygen content in the water and clarified the prospects of model’s performance improvement.

  13. Measurement of atomic oxygen in the middle atmosphere using solid electrolyte sensors and catalytic probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhart, Martin; Stefanos Fasoulas, -; Loehle, Stefan; Steinbeck, Andreas

    Local atomic oxygen (AOX) density is an important information in the physics and energy balance of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In consequence, determination of AOX density profiles is fundamental for understanding and modelling of the underlying processes. We present two rocket-borne techniques based on solid electrolyte sensors (FIPEX) and on the analysis of catalytic effects (PHLUX) that provide in-situ measurement of AOX along the flight trajectory. FIPEX sensors feature both gold and platinum electrodes to distinguish atomic from molecular oxygen. The PHLUX gauge determines temperature differences between surfaces with different catalytic efficiencies towards AOX recombination. All FIPEX sensors were laboratory calibrated using a microwave plasma source in combination with a mass spectrometer reference measurement. The spectrometer in turn was calibrated for AOX with a method based on a CH _{4} reference. For PHLUX, only a theoretical analysis was applied to derive densities from the measured temperatures. Both sensor systems were launched in June 2012 from Andoya Rocket Range, Norway, as a part of the joint WADIS campaign. Led by the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn this project aims at determining turbulence structures and AOX concentrations in altitudes between 60 and 120km. In total 6 FIPEX and 4 PHLUX sensors were positioned on the forward and aft instrument decks and were operated during up- and downleg. PHLUX was originally designed for operation in darkness and had to be adapted to daylight conditions during the flight. A sapphire window was placed on one of the gauges to separate temperature changes due to sunlight. Data was sampled with 100Hz which represents a minimal altitude resolution of around 10 meters. Sensor data renders number density profiles that peak at 1E11cm (-3) in 95km altitude and agree reasonably well to the literature. Within this paper, the sensing principles and the applied calibration methods

  14. Assessing Arthroscopic Skills Using Wireless Elbow-Worn Motion Sensors.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Georgina S J; Guyver, Paul; Strickland, Louise; Alvand, Abtin; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Hargrove, Caroline; Lo, Benny P L; Rees, Jonathan L

    2015-07-01

    Assessment of surgical skill is a critical component of surgical training. Approaches to assessment remain predominantly subjective, although more objective measures such as Global Rating Scales are in use. This study aimed to validate the use of elbow-worn, wireless, miniaturized motion sensors to assess the technical skill of trainees performing arthroscopic procedures in a simulated environment. Thirty participants were divided into three groups on the basis of their surgical experience: novices (n = 15), intermediates (n = 10), and experts (n = 5). All participants performed three standardized tasks on an arthroscopic virtual reality simulator while wearing wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors. Video output was recorded and a validated Global Rating Scale was used to assess performance; dexterity metrics were recorded from the simulator. Finally, live motion data were recorded via Bluetooth from the wireless wrist and elbow motion sensors and custom algorithms produced an arthroscopic performance score. Construct validity was demonstrated for all tasks, with Global Rating Scale scores and virtual reality output metrics showing significant differences between novices, intermediates, and experts (p < 0.001). The correlation of the virtual reality path length to the number of hand movements calculated from the wireless sensors was very high (p < 0.001). A comparison of the arthroscopic performance score levels with virtual reality output metrics also showed highly significant differences (p < 0.01). Comparisons of the arthroscopic performance score levels with the Global Rating Scale scores showed strong and highly significant correlations (p < 0.001) for both sensor locations, but those of the elbow-worn sensors were stronger and more significant (p < 0.001) than those of the wrist-worn sensors. A new wireless assessment of surgical performance system for objective assessment of surgical skills has proven valid for assessing arthroscopic skills. The elbow

  15. Portable Nanoparticle-Based Sensors for Food Safety Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology-derived products in the development of sensors and analytical measurement methodologies has increased significantly over the past decade. Nano-based sensing approaches include the use of nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures to enhance sensitivity and selectivity, design new detection schemes, improve sample preparation and increase portability. This review summarizes recent advancements in the design and development of NP-based sensors for assessing food safety. The most common types of NPs used to fabricate sensors for detection of food contaminants are discussed. Selected examples of NP-based detection schemes with colorimetric and electrochemical detection are provided with focus on sensors for the detection of chemical and biological contaminants including pesticides, heavy metals, bacterial pathogens and natural toxins. Current trends in the development of low-cost portable NP-based technology for rapid assessment of food safety as well as challenges for practical implementation and future research directions are discussed. PMID:26690169

  16. Portable Nanoparticle-Based Sensors for Food Safety Assessment.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Gonca; Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Silvana

    2015-12-05

    The use of nanotechnology-derived products in the development of sensors and analytical measurement methodologies has increased significantly over the past decade. Nano-based sensing approaches include the use of nanoparticles (NPs) and nanostructures to enhance sensitivity and selectivity, design new detection schemes, improve sample preparation and increase portability. This review summarizes recent advancements in the design and development of NP-based sensors for assessing food safety. The most common types of NPs used to fabricate sensors for detection of food contaminants are discussed. Selected examples of NP-based detection schemes with colorimetric and electrochemical detection are provided with focus on sensors for the detection of chemical and biological contaminants including pesticides, heavy metals, bacterial pathogens and natural toxins. Current trends in the development of low-cost portable NP-based technology for rapid assessment of food safety as well as challenges for practical implementation and future research directions are discussed.

  17. Optimizing source detector separation for an implantable perfusion and oxygenation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akl, T. J.; King, T. J.; Long, R.; Baba, J. S.; McShane, M. J.; Ericson, M. N.; Wilson, M. A.; Coté, G. L.

    2011-03-01

    Each year thousands of patients are added to the waiting list for liver transplants. The first 7-10 days after transplant have proven to be the most critical in patient recovery and it is hypothesized that monitoring organ vital signals in this period can increase patient and graft survival rates. An implantable sensor to monitor the organ perfusion and oxygenation signals following surgery is being developed by our group. The sensor operates based on measuring diffuse reflection from three light emitting diodes (735, 805 and 940 nm). In this work the optimal source detector spacing to maximize oxygenation signal level is investigated for a portal vein model. Monte Carlo simulations provided signal levels and corresponding penetration depths as a function of separation between a point optical source and detector. The modeling results indicated a rapid decay in the optical signal with increasing distance. Through further analysis, it was found that there exists an optimal range of point source to detector spacing, between roughly 1 and 2 mm, in which the blood signal from the simulated portal vein was maximized. Overall, these results are being used to guide the placement and configuration of our probe for in vivo animal studies.

  18. Hypoxia. 1. Intracellular sensors for oxygen and oxidative stress: novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Toshio; Takizawa, Shunya; van Ypersele de Strihou, Charles

    2011-02-01

    A variety of human disorders, e.g., ischemic heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eventually share the deleterious consequences of a common, hypoxic and oxidative stress pathway. In this review, we utilize recent information on the cellular defense mechanisms against hypoxia and oxidative stress with the hope to propose new therapeutic tools. The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) is a key player as it activates a broad range of genes protecting cells against hypoxia. Its level is determined by its degradation rate by intracellular oxygen sensors prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). There are three different PHD isoforms (PHD1-3). Small molecule PHD inhibitors improve hypoxic injury in experimental animals but, unfortunately, may induce adverse effects associated with PHD2 inhibition, e.g., angiogenesis. As yet, no inhibitor specific for a distinct PHD isoform is currently available. Still, the specific disruption of the PHD1 gene is known to induce hypoxic tolerance, without angiogenesis and erythrocytosis, by reprogramming basal oxygen metabolism with an attendant decreased oxidative stress in hypoxic mitochondria. A specific PHD1 inhibitor might therefore offer a novel therapy against hypoxia. The nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the basal and inducible expression of numerous antioxidant stress genes. Disruption of its gene exacerbates oxidative tissue injury. Nrf2 activity is modulated by Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an intracellular sensor for oxidative stress. Inhibitors of Keap 1 may prove therapeutic against oxidative tissue injury.

  19. Performance of an electrochemical COD (chemical oxygen demand) sensor with an electrode-surface grinding unit.

    PubMed

    Geun Jeong, Bong; Min Yoon, Seok; Ho Choi, Chang; Koang Kwon, Kil; Sik Hyun, Moon; Heui Yi, Dong; Soo Park, Hyung; Kim, Mia; Joo Kim, Hyung

    2007-12-01

    An electrochemical COD (chemical oxygen demand) sensor using an electrode-surface grinding unit was investigated. The electrolyzing (oxidizing) action of copper on an organic species was used as the basis of the COD measuring sensor. Using a simple three-electrode cell and a surface grinding unit, the organic species is activated by the catalytic action of copper and oxidized at a working electrode, poised at a positive potential. When synthetic wastewater was fed into the system, the measured Coulombic yields were found to be dependent on the COD of the synthetic wastewater. A linear correlation between the Coulombic yields and the COD of the synthetic wastewater was established (10-1000 mg L(-1)) when the electrode-surface grinding procedure was activated briefly at 8 h intervals. When various kinds of wastewater samples obtained from various sewage treatment plants were measured, linear correlations (r(2)> or = 0.92) between the measured EOD (electrochemical oxygen demand) value and COD of the samples were observed. At a practical wastewater treatment plant, the measurement system was successfully operated with high accuracy and good stability over 3 months. These experimental results show that the application of the measurement system would be a rapid and practical method for the determination of COD in water industries.

  20. Optical PEBBLE nanosensors and fiber optic sensors for real-time intracellular imaging and analysis of magnesium and oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Edwin J.

    A highly selective magnesium fluorescent optical nanosensor, made possible by PEBBLE (Probe Encapsulated By Biologically Localized Embedding) technology is presented. Ratiometric sensors were prepared, via a microemulsion polymerization process, by co-immobilizing a highly selective magnesium dye with a reference dye inside a polymer matrix. The resultant spherical sensors are ˜40 nm in diameter. Several dyes were investigated with coumarin 343 (C343) providing the best selectivity towards Mg2+ vs. ions such as Ca 2+, Na+, and K+. The dynamic range of the sensors was 1 to 30 mM (linear from 1 to 10 mM) with a response time of less than 4 s. The fully reversible sensors exhibit minimal leaching and photobleaching. In vitro intracellular changes in Mg2+ concentration were monitored in C6 Glioma cells. Preliminary experiments demonstrated the capability of these sensors thus they were used to investigate the PhoP/Q transmembrane protein system on the internal membrane of salmonella . The sensors were used to monitor the magnesium levels inside salmonella containing vacuoles. Previously believed hypotheses on changes in magnesium concentration are challenged with the newly obtained results. The selectivity for Mg2+ along with the biocompatibility of the matrix of these sensors provides a new and reliable tool for intracellular magnesium measurements. A second sensor platform was developed for the detection of intracellular dissolved oxygen, using a fiber optic probe. The design and fabrication of an oxygen fiber optic sensor based on the fluorescence quenching properties of the oxygen sensitive platinum (II) octaethylporphine ketone (PtOEPK) is presented. Octaethyl porphyrin (OEP) or bodipy maleimide 577/618, was also entrapped, as a reference dye, in a polyvinyl chloride matrix including the plasticizing agent bis 2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DOS). The multi mode fibers were pulled down to submicron dimensions and a dip coating procedure was used to apply the sensing

  1. Monitoring sediment oxygen demand for assessment of dissolved oxygen distribution in river.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Wei-Bo

    2012-09-01

    Sediment oxygen demand (SOD) has become an integral part of modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) within surface water bodies. Because very few data on SOD are available, it is common for modeler to take SOD values from literature for use within DO models. SOD is such an important parameter in modeling DO that this approach may lead to erroneous results. This paper reported on developing an approach for monitoring sediment oxygen demand conducted with undisturbed sediment core samples, where the measured results were incorporated into a water quality model for simulating and assessing dissolved oxygen distribution in the Xindian River of northern Taiwan. The measured results indicate that a higher freshwater discharge results in a lower SOD. Throughout a 1-year observation in 2004, the measured SOD ranged from 0.367 to 1.246 g/m(2)/day at the temperature of 20°C. The mean values of the measured SOD at each station were adopted in a vertical two-dimensional water quality model to simulate the DO distribution along the Xindian River. The simulating results accurately depict the field-measured DO distribution during the low and high flow conditions. Model sensitivity analyses were also conducted with increasing and decreasing SOD values for the low and high flow conditions and revealed that SOD had a significant impact on the DO distribution along the Xindian River. The present work combined with field measurements and numerical simulation should assist in river water quality management.

  2. Tuning the dynamic range and sensitivity of optical oxygen-sensors by employing differently substituted polystyrene-derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Koren, Klaus; Hutter, Lukas; Enko, Barbara; Pein, Andreas; Borisov, Sergey M.; Klimant, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    Ten different polystyrene-derivatives were tested with respect to their potential use as matrix materials for optical oxygen sensors in combination with the platinum(II) meso-tetra(4-fluorophenyl)tetrabenzoporphyrin as indicator dye. Either halogen atoms or bulky residues were introduced as substituents on the phenyl ring. A fine-tuning of the sensor sensitivity was achieved, without compromising solubility of the indicator in the matrix by providing a chemical environment very similar to polystyrene (PS), a standard matrix in optical oxygen sensors. To put the results into perspective, the studied materials were compared to PS regarding sensitivity of the sensor, molecular weight and glass-transition temperature. The materials promise to be viable alternatives to PS with respect to the requirements posed in various sensor application fields. Some of the polymers (e.g. poly(2,6-dichlorostyrene)) promise to be of use in applications requiring measurements from 0 to 100% oxygen due to linearity across this range. Poly(4-tert-butylstyrene) and poly(2,6-fluorostyrene), on the other hand, yield sensors with increased sensitivity. Sensor stability was evaluated as a function of the matrix, a topic which has not received a lot of interest so far. PMID:23576846

  3. A Novel Thermal Sensor for the Sensitive Measurement of Chemical Oxygen Demand

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Na; Liu, Zhuan; Chen, Ying; Zhou, Yikai; Xie, Bin

    2015-01-01

    A novel rapid methodology for determining the chemical oxygen demand (COD) based on a thermal sensor with a flow injection analysis system was proposed and experimentally validated. The ability of this sensor to detect and monitor COD was based on the degree of enthalpy increase when sodium hypochlorite reacted with the organic content in water samples. The measurement results were correlated with COD and were compared against the conventional method using potassium dichromate. The assay required only 5–7 min rather than the 2 h required for evaluation by potassium dichromate. The linear range was 5–1000 mg/L COD, and the limit of detection was very low, 0.74 mg/L COD. Moreover, this method exhibited high tolerance to chloride ions; 0.015 mol/L chloride ions had no influence on the response. Finally, the sensor was used to detect the COD of different water samples; the results were verified by the standard dichromate method. PMID:26295397

  4. Optical monitoring of kidney oxygenation and hemodynamics using a miniaturized near-infrared sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Macnab, Andrew; Nigro, Mark; Nguan, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Background: Following human renal allograft transplant primary graft dysfunction can occur early in the postoperative period as a result of acute tubular necrosis, acute rejection, drug toxicity, and vascular complications. Successful treatment of graft dysfunction requires early detection and accurate diagnosis so that disease-specific medical and/or surgical intervention can be provided promptly. However, current diagnostic methods are not sensitive or specific enough, so that identifying the cause of graft dysfunction is problematic and often delayed. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an established optical method that monitors changes in tissue hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. We report the feasibility of directly monitoring kidney the kidney in an animal model using NIRS to detect renal ischemia and hypoxia. Methods: In an anesthetized pig, a customized continuous wave spatially resolved (SR) NIRS sensor was fixed directly to the surface of the surgically exposed kidney. Changes in the concentration of oxygenated (O2Hb) deoxygenated (HHb) and total hemoglobin (THb) were monitored before, during and after renal artery clamping and reperfusion, and the resulting fluctuations in chromophore concentration from baseline used to measure variations in renal perfusion and oxygenation. Results: On clamping the renal artery THb and O2Hb concentrations declined progressively while HHb rose. With reperfusion after releasing the artery clamp O2Hb and THb rose while HHb fell with all parameters returning to its baseline. This pattern was similar in all three trials. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that a miniaturized NIRS sensor applied directly to the surface of a kidney in an animal model can detect the onset of renal ischemia and tissue hypoxia. With modification, our NIRS-based method may contribute to early detection of renal vascular complications and graft dysfunction following renal transplant.

  5. Microencapsulated 3-Dimensional Sensor for the Measurement of Oxygen in Single Isolated Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Gamal; Sweet, Ian R.; Shen, Amy Q.

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxygen consumption reflects multiple processes in pancreatic islets including mechanisms contributing to insulin secretion, oxidative stress and viability, providing an important readout in studies of islet function, islet viability and drug testing. Due to the scarcity, heterogeneity, and intrinsic kinetic properties of individual islets, it would be of great benefit to detect oxygen consumption by single islets. We present a novel method we have developed to image oxygen in single islets. Methodology/Principal Findings Using a microfluidics system, individual islets and a fluorescent oxygen-sensitive dye were encased within a thin alginate polymer layer. Insulin secretion by the encapsulated islets was normal. Fluorescent signal from the encased dye, detected using a standard inverted fluorescence microscope and digital camera, was stable and proportional to the amount of oxygen in the media. When integrated into a perifusion system, the sensing system detected changes in response to metabolic substrates, mitochondrial poisons, and induced-oscillations. Glucose responses averaged 30.1±7.1% of the response to a metabolic inhibitor (cyanide), increases were observed in all cases (n = 6), and the system was able to resolve changes in oxygen consumption that had a period greater than 0.5 minutes. The sensing system operated similarly from 2–48 hours following encapsulation, and viability and function of the islets were not significantly affected by the encapsulation process. Conclusions/Significance An oxygen-dependent dye situated around and within a pancreatic islet encapsulated by a thin layer of alginate was sensitive to changes in oxygen consumption, and was not harmful to the function or viability of islets over the course of two days. The microcapsule-based sensing method is particularly suited to assessing the effects of compounds (dose responses and time courses) and chronic changes occurring over the course of days. The approach should be

  6. Yeast-based Biochemical Oxygen Demand Sensors Using Gold-modified Boron-doped Diamond Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Ivandini, Tribidasari A; Harmesa; Saepudin, Endang; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2015-01-01

    A gold nanoparticle modified boron-doped diamond electrode was developed as a transducer for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) measurements. Rhodotorula mucilaginosa UICC Y-181 was immobilized in a sodium alginate matrix, and used as a biosensing agent. Cyclic voltammetry was applied to study the oxygen reduction reaction at the electrode, while amperometry was employed to detect oxygen, which was not consumed by the microorganisms. The optimum waiting time of 25 min was observed using 1-mm thickness of yeast film. A comparison against the system with free yeast cells shows less sensitivity of the current responses with a linear dynamic range (R(2) = 0.99) of from 0.10 mM to 0.90 mM glucose (equivalent to 10 - 90 mg/L BOD) with an estimated limit of detection of 1.90 mg/L BOD. However, a better stability of the current responses could be achieved with an RSD of 3.35%. Moreover, less influence from the presence of copper ions was observed. The results indicate that the yeast-immobilized BOD sensors is more suitable to be applied in a real condition.

  7. SnO2-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors based oxygen sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, S.T.; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chen, Chin Ching; Lo, C. F.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Kravchenko, Ivan I

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermally grown SnO2 was integrated with AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) sensor as the gate electrode for oxygen detection. The crystalline of the SnO2 was improved after annealing at 400 C. The grain growth kinetics of the SnO2 nanomaterials, together with the O2 gas sensing properties and sensing mechanism of the SnO2 gated HEMT sensors were investigated. Detection of 1% oxygen in nitrogen at 100 C was possible. A low operation temperature and low power consumption oxygen sensor can be achieved by combining the SnO2 films with the AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure

  8. Multiplex bacterial growth monitoring in 24-well microplates using a dual optical sensor for dissolved oxygen and pH.

    PubMed

    Kocincová, Anna S; Nagl, Stefan; Arain, Sarina; Krause, Christian; Borisov, Sergey M; Arnold, Matthias; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2008-06-15

    Non-invasive, simultaneous optical monitoring of oxygen and pH during bacterial cultivation in 24-well microplates is presented using an integrated dual sensor for dissolved oxygen and pH values. The dual sensor is based on oxygen-sensitive organosilica microparticles and pH-sensitive microbeads from a polymethacrylate derivative embedded into a polyurethane hydrogel. The readout is based on a phase-domain fluorescence lifetime-based method referred to as modified frequency domain dual lifetime referencing using a commercially available detector system for 24-well microplates. The sensor was used for monitoring the growth of Pseudomonas putida bacterial cultures. The method is suitable for parallelized, miniaturized bioprocessing, and cell-based high-throughput screening applications. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Studies of Hematopoietic Cell Differentiation with a Ratiometric and Reversible Sensor of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Amandeep; Jankowska, Karolina; Pilgrim, Chelsea; Fraser, Stuart T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Chronic elevations in cellular redox state are known to result in the onset of various pathological conditions, but transient increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS)/reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are necessary for signal transduction and various physiological functions. There is a distinct lack of reversible fluorescent tools that can aid in studying and unraveling the roles of ROS/RNS in physiology and pathology by monitoring the variations in cellular ROS levels over time. In this work, we report the development of ratiometric fluorescent sensors that reversibly respond to changes in mitochondrial redox state. Results: Photophysical studies of the developed flavin–rhodamine redox sensors, flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 1 (FRR1) and flavin–rhodamine redox sensor 2 (FRR2), confirmed the reversible response of the probes upon reduction and re-oxidation over more than five cycles. The ratiometric output of FRR1 and FRR2 remained unaltered in the presence of other possible cellular interferants (metals and pH). Microscopy studies indicated clear mitochondrial localization of both probes, and FRR2 was shown to report the time-dependent increase of mitochondrial ROS levels after lipopolysaccharide stimulation in macrophages. Moreover, it was used to study the variations in mitochondrial redox state in mouse hematopoietic cells at different stages of embryonic development and maturation. Innovation: This study provides the first ratiometric and reversible probes for ROS, targeted to the mitochondria, which reveal variations in mitochondrial ROS levels at different stages of embryonic and adult blood cell production. Conclusions: Our results suggest that with their ratiometric and reversible outputs, FRR1 and FRR2 are valuable tools for the future study of oxidative stress and its implications in physiology and pathology. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 667–679. PMID:26865422

  10. Microencapsulation of carbon particles used as oxygen sensors in EPR oximetry to stabilize their responsiveness to oxygen in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiang; Beghein, Nelson; Clarkson, Robert B.; Swartz, Harold M.; Gallez, Bernard

    2001-12-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of some paramagnetic materials exhibit a pO2 (partial pressure of oxygen)-dependent linewidth. By recording the EPR linewidth in vivo using low-frequency EPR spectrometers, it is possible to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in tissues. It has been found, however, that some of the paramagnetic materials with optimal spectroscopic properties in vitro may lose or change their responsiveness to oxygen in tissues. The aim of this study was to microencapsulate paramagnetic particles by biopolymers in order to stabilize their responsiveness to oxygen. Carbohydrate char particles (Bubinga) were encapsulated with different biopolymers: cellulose acetate or cellulose triacetate, silicone and polyurethane. The performance of the materials was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. X-band EPR spectroscopy was used to test the variation of the calibration curve (EPR linewidth as a function of the pO2) after incubation in saline and after prolonged residence in tissues. The stability of the responsiveness to pO2 in vivo was carried out by L-band EPR spectroscopy using mice that received injection of the oxygen sensors in the muscles. After residence in saline and prolonged residence in tissues, only the calibration curve of the silicone-coated (coating weight of 0.5% (w/w)) paramagnetic materials remained unchanged, while those of oxygen sensors coated with cellulose acetate, cellulose triacetate and polyurethane changed.

  11. Feasibility of using inertial sensors to assess human movement.

    PubMed

    Saber-Sheikh, Kambiz; Bryant, Elizabeth C; Glazzard, Charlotte; Hamel, Alicia; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the suitability of inertial sensors for motion analysis research. Inertial sensors (Xsens Technologies, Netherlands) consisting of 3D gyroscopes, accelerometers and a magnetometer were compared against an electromagnetic motion tracking system (Fastrak, Polhemus, USA) for measuring motions of an artificial hinge joint and random 3D motions. Subsequently, to assess the feasibility of using inertial sensors for human motion analysis, the movements of the hip joint during walking were recorded in 20 normal asymptomatic subjects. The comparative study demonstrated good agreement between the inertial and electromagnetic systems. Measurements obtained for hip joint movement during walking (flexion, extension and step length) were similar to those reported in previous studies (flexion 38.8 degrees , extension 6.6 degrees , step frequency 1.02Hz). We conclude that the inertial sensors studied have the potential to be used for motion analysis and clinical research.

  12. Impedance-based damage assessment using piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Mi-Sun; Yoo, Seung-Jae; Lee, In; Song, Jae-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Won

    2011-04-01

    Recently structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are being focused because they make it possible to assess the health of structures at real-time in many application fields such as aircraft, aerospace, civil and so on. Piezoelectric materials are widely used for sensors of SHM system to monitor damage of critical parts such as bolted joints. Bolted joints could be loosened by vibration, thermal cycling, shock, corrosion, and they cause serious mechanical failures. In this paper, impedance-based method using piezoelectric sensors was applied for real-time SHM. A steel beam specimen fastened by bolts was tested, and polymer type piezoelectric materials, PVDFs were used for sensors to monitor the condition of bolted joint connections. When structure has some damage, for example loose bolts, the impedance of PVDF sensors showed different tendency with normal structure which has no loose bolts. In the case of loose bolts, impedance values are decreased and admittance values are increased.

  13. Role of distal arginine in early sensing intermediates in the heme domain of the oxygen sensor FixL.

    PubMed

    Jasaitis, Audrius; Hola, Klara; Bouzhir-Sima, Latifa; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Balland, Veronique; Vos, Marten H; Liebl, Ursula

    2006-05-16

    FixL is a bacterial heme-based oxygen sensor, in which release of oxygen from the sensing PAS domain leads to activation of an associated kinase domain. Static structural studies have suggested an important role of the conserved residue arginine 220 in signal transmission at the level of the heme domain. To assess the role of this residue in the dynamics and properties of the initial intermediates in ligand release, we have investigated the effects of R220X (X = I, Q, E, H, or A) mutations in the FixLH heme domain on the dynamics and spectral properties of the heme upon photolysis of O(2), NO, and CO using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparison of transient spectra for CO and NO dissociation with steady-state spectra indicated less strain on the heme in the ligand dissociation species for all mutants compared to the wild type (WT). For CO and NO, the kinetics were similar to those of the wild type, with the exception of (1) a relatively low yield of picosecond NO rebinding to R220A, presumably related to the increase in the free volume of the heme pocket, and (2) substantial pH-dependent picosecond to nanosecond rebinding of CO to R220H, related to formation of a hydrogen bond between CO and histidine 220. Upon excitation of the complex bound with the physiological sensor ligand O(2), a 5-8 ps decay phase and a nondecaying (>4 ns) phase were observed for WT and all mutants. The strong distortion of the spectrum associated with the decay phase in WT is substantially diminished in all mutant proteins, indicating an R220-induced role of the heme in the primary intermediate in signal transmission. Furthermore, the yield of dissociated oxygen after this phase ( approximately 10% in WT) is increased in all mutants, up to almost unity in R220A, indicating a key role of R220 in caging the oxygen near the heme through hydrogen bonding. Molecular dynamics simulations corroborate these findings and suggest motions of O(2) and arginine 220 away from the heme

  14. The oxygen sensor MgFnr controls magnetite biomineralization by regulation of denitrification in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of synthesizing magnetosomes only under oxygen-limited conditions. However, the mechanism of the aerobic repression on magnetite biomineralization has remained unknown. In Escherichia coli and other bacteria, Fnr (fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) proteins are known to be involved in controlling the switch between microaerobic and aerobic metabolism. Here, we report on an Fnr-like protein (MgFnr) and its role in growth metabolism and magnetite biomineralization in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. Results Deletion of Mgfnr not only resulted in decreased N2 production due to reduced N2O reductase activity, but also impaired magnetite biomineralization under microaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. Overexpression of MgFnr in the WT also caused the synthesis of smaller magnetite particles under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. These data suggest that proper expression of MgFnr is required for WT-like magnetosome synthesis, which is regulated by oxygen. Analyses of transcriptional gusA reporter fusions revealed that besides showing similar properties to Fnr proteins reported in other bacteria, MgFnr is involved in the repression of the expression of denitrification genes nor and nosZ under aerobic conditions, possibly owing to several unique amino acid residues specific to MTB-Fnr. Conclusions We have identified and thoroughly characterized the first regulatory protein mediating denitrification growth and magnetite biomineralization in response to different oxygen conditions in a magnetotactic bacterium. Our findings reveal that the global oxygen regulator MgFnr is a genuine O2 sensor. It is involved in controlling expression of denitrification genes and thereby plays an indirect role in maintaining proper redox conditions required for magnetite biomineralization. PMID:24915802

  15. The oxygen sensor MgFnr controls magnetite biomineralization by regulation of denitrification in Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Sabaty, Monique; Borg, Sarah; Silva, Karen T; Pignol, David; Schüler, Dirk

    2014-06-10

    Magnetotactic bacteria are capable of synthesizing magnetosomes only under oxygen-limited conditions. However, the mechanism of the aerobic repression on magnetite biomineralization has remained unknown. In Escherichia coli and other bacteria, Fnr (fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) proteins are known to be involved in controlling the switch between microaerobic and aerobic metabolism. Here, we report on an Fnr-like protein (MgFnr) and its role in growth metabolism and magnetite biomineralization in the alphaproteobacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense. Deletion of Mgfnr not only resulted in decreased N2 production due to reduced N2O reductase activity, but also impaired magnetite biomineralization under microaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. Overexpression of MgFnr in the WT also caused the synthesis of smaller magnetite particles under anaerobic and microaerobic conditions in the presence of nitrate. These data suggest that proper expression of MgFnr is required for WT-like magnetosome synthesis, which is regulated by oxygen. Analyses of transcriptional gusA reporter fusions revealed that besides showing similar properties to Fnr proteins reported in other bacteria, MgFnr is involved in the repression of the expression of denitrification genes nor and nosZ under aerobic conditions, possibly owing to several unique amino acid residues specific to MTB-Fnr. We have identified and thoroughly characterized the first regulatory protein mediating denitrification growth and magnetite biomineralization in response to different oxygen conditions in a magnetotactic bacterium. Our findings reveal that the global oxygen regulator MgFnr is a genuine O2 sensor. It is involved in controlling expression of denitrification genes and thereby plays an indirect role in maintaining proper redox conditions required for magnetite biomineralization.

  16. Characterization of a dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber coated with ruthenium-incorporated solgel

    SciTech Connect

    Chu Fenghong; Yang Junjie; Cai Haiwen; Qu Ronghui; Fang Zujie

    2009-01-10

    A dissolved oxygen sensor made of plastic optical fiber as the substrate and dichlorotris (1, 10-phenanthroline) ruthenium as a fluorescence indicator is studied. Oxygen quenching characteristics of both intensity and phase were measured; the obtained characteristics showed deviation from the linear relation described by the Stern-Volmer equation. A two-layer model is proposed to explain the deviation, and main parameters can be deduced with the model.

  17. Pipeline corrosion assessment using embedded Fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiao; Huang, Ying; Galedari, Sahar Abuali; Azarmi, Fardad

    2015-04-01

    Corrosion is a leading cause of failure in metallic transmission pipelines. It significantly impacts the reliability and safety of metallic pipelines. An accurate assessment of corrosion status of the pipelines would contribute to timely pipeline maintenance and repair and extend the service life of the associated pipelines. To assess pipeline corrosion, various technologies have been investigated and the pipe-to-soil voltage potential measurement was commonly applied. However, remote and real-time corrosion assessment approaches are in urgent needs but yet achieved. Fiber optic sensors, especially, fiber Bragg gating (FBG) sensors, with unique advantages of real-time sensing, compactness, immune to EMI and moisture, capability of quasi-distributed sensing, and long life cycle, will be a perfect candidate for longterm pipeline corrosion assessment. In this study, FBG sensors are embedded inside pipeline external coating for corrosion monitoring of on-shore buried metallic transmission pipelines. Detail sensing principle, sensor calibration and embedment are introduced in this paper together with experimental corrosion evaluation testing ongoing. Upon validation, the developed sensing system could serve the purpose of corrosion monitoring to the numerous metallic pipelines across nation and would possibly reduce the pipeline corrosion induced tragedies.

  18. Fugitive methane assessment with mobile and fence line sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is no published abstract for this short panel talk. The panel presentation titled “Fugitive methane assessment with mobile and fence line sensors” provides a basic introduction to the topic of next generation sensor technologies for identifying and fixing emiss...

  19. Fugitive methane assessment with mobile and fence line sensors

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is no published abstract for this short panel talk. The panel presentation titled “Fugitive methane assessment with mobile and fence line sensors” provides a basic introduction to the topic of next generation sensor technologies for identifying and fixing emiss...

  20. Sensor data fusion for soil health assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high cost, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolution soil health dat...

  1. Sensor Selection and Optimization for Health Assessment of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Kopasakis, George; Santi, Louis M.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Aerospace systems are developed similarly to other large-scale systems through a series of reviews, where designs are modified as system requirements are refined. For space-based systems few are built and placed into service. These research vehicles have limited historical experience to draw from and formidable reliability and safety requirements, due to the remote and severe environment of space. Aeronautical systems have similar reliability and safety requirements, and while these systems may have historical information to access, commercial and military systems require longevity under a range of operational conditions and applied loads. Historically, the design of aerospace systems, particularly the selection of sensors, is based on the requirements for control and performance rather than on health assessment needs. Furthermore, the safety and reliability requirements are met through sensor suite augmentation in an ad hoc, heuristic manner, rather than any systematic approach. A review of the current sensor selection practice within and outside of the aerospace community was conducted and a sensor selection architecture is proposed that will provide a justifiable, dependable sensor suite to address system health assessment requirements.

  2. Sensor Selection and Optimization for Health Assessment of Aerospace Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, William A.; Kopasakis, George; Santi, Louis M.; Sowers, Thomas S.; Chicatelli, Amy

    2008-01-01

    Aerospace systems are developed similarly to other large-scale systems through a series of reviews, where designs are modified as system requirements are refined. For space-based systems few are built and placed into service these research vehicles have limited historical experience to draw from and formidable reliability and safety requirements, due to the remote and severe environment of space. Aeronautical systems have similar reliability and safety requirements, and while these systems may have historical information to access, commercial and military systems require longevity under a range of operational conditions and applied loads. Historically, the design of aerospace systems, particularly the selection of sensors, is based on the requirements for control and performance rather than on health assessment needs. Furthermore, the safety and reliability requirements are met through sensor suite augmentation in an ad hoc, heuristic manner, rather than any systematic approach. A review of the current sensor selection practice within and outside of the aerospace community was conducted and a sensor selection architecture is proposed that will provide a justifiable, defendable sensor suite to address system health assessment requirements.

  3. An optode sensor array for long-term in situ oxygen measurements in soil and sediment.

    PubMed

    Rickelt, L F; Askaer, L; Walpersdorf, E; Elberling, B; Glud, R N; Kühl, M

    2013-07-01

    Long-term measurements of molecular oxygen (O) dynamics in wetlands are highly relevant for understanding the effects of water level changes on net greenhouse gas budgets in these ecosystems. However, such measurements have been limited due to a lack of suitable measuring equipment. We constructed an O optode sensor array for long-term in situ measurements in soil and sediment. The new device consists of a 1.3-m-long, cylindrical, spear-shaped rod equipped with 10 sensor spots along the shaft. Each spot contains a thermocouple fixed with a robust fiberoptic O optode made by immobilizing a layer of Pt(II) meso-tetra(pentafluorophenyl)porphine in polystyrene at the end of a 2-mm polymethyl methacrylate plastic fiber. Temperature and O optode readings are collected continuously by a data logger and a multichannel fiberoptic O meter. The construction and measuring characteristics of the sensor array system are presented along with a novel approach for temperature compensation of O optodes. During in situ application over several months in a peat bog, we used the new device to document pronounced variations in O distribution after marked shifts in water level. The measurements showed anoxic conditions below the water level but also diel variations in O concentrations in the upper layer presumably due to rhizospheric oxidation by the main vegetation The new field instrument thus enables new and more detailed insights to the in situ O dynamics in wetlands. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Assessment of Wearable Sensor Technologies for Biosurveillance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    intelligence (AI) and biometric data, the device captures electrodermal activity in real time to assess emotional states. Using the technique of...Biometric smartwear Hexoskin Breathing rate, volume, cadence, ECG, sleep position, heart rate, and other physiological data Wearable Wellnes...watches. Google Fit’s fitness tracking will display data such as heart rate, or detect whether its wearer has been physically active . Google’s

  5. Critical evaluation of oxygen-uptake assessment in swimming.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana; Figueiredo, Pedro; Pendergast, David; Kjendlie, Per-Ludvik; Vilas-Boas, João P; Fernandes, Ricardo J

    2014-03-01

    Swimming has become an important area of sport science research since the 1970s, with the bioenergetic factors assuming a fundamental performance-influencing role. The purpose of this study was to conduct a critical evaluation of the literature concerning oxygen-uptake (VO2) assessment in swimming, by describing the equipment and methods used and emphasizing the recent works conducted in ecological conditions. Particularly in swimming, due to the inherent technical constraints imposed by swimming in a water environment, assessment of VO2max was not accomplished until the 1960s. Later, the development of automated portable measurement devices allowed VO2max to be assessed more easily, even in ecological swimming conditions, but few studies have been conducted in swimming-pool conditions with portable breath-by-breath telemetric systems. An inverse relationship exists between the velocity corresponding to VO2max and the time a swimmer can sustain it at this velocity. The energy cost of swimming varies according to its association with velocity variability. As, in the end, the supply of oxygen (whose limitation may be due to central-O2 delivery and transportation to the working muscles-or peripheral factors-O2 diffusion and utilization in the muscles) is one of the critical factors that determine swimming performance, VO2 kinetics and its maximal values are critical in understanding swimmers' behavior in competition and to develop efficient training programs.

  6. Assessment of the pivot shift using inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Stefano; Signorelli, Cecilia; Grassi, Alberto; Yue, Han; Raggi, Federico; Urrizola, Francisco; Bonanzinga, Tommaso; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2016-06-01

    The pivot shift test is an important clinical tool used to assess the stability of the knee following an injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Previous studies have shown that significant variability exists in the performance and interpretation of this manoeuvre. Accordingly, a variety of techniques aimed at standardizing and quantifying the pivot shift test have been developed. In recent years, inertial sensors have been used to measure the kinematics of the pivot shift. The goal of this study is to present a review of the literature and discuss the principles of inertial sensors and their use in quantifying the pivot shift test.

  7. Digital temperature sensor performance assessment report. [in simulated shuttle environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canniff, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Performance assessment data accumulated during exposure of the digital temperature sensor to simulated shuttle flight type environments are presented. The test parameters were specifically designed to check the sensor for its: (1) ability to resolve temperature relative to the design specifications; (2) ability to maintain accuracy after interchanging the temperature probes with each electronics interface assembly; (3) stability (i.e., satisfactory operation and accuracy during and after exposure to flight environments); and (4) repeatability, or its ability to produce the same output on subsequent exposures to the identical stimulus. Equipment list, test descriptions, data summary, and conclusions are included.

  8. Nanosized TiO[subscript 2] for Photocatalytic Water Splitting Studied by Oxygen Sensor and Data Logger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ruinan; Liu, Song; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan; Choi, Martin M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting by semiconductor photocatalysts has attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. In this experiment, nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO[subscript 2]) particles are used to photocatalytically split water, which is then monitored by an oxygen sensor. Sacrificial reagents such as organics (EDTA) and metal…

  9. Nanosized TiO[subscript 2] for Photocatalytic Water Splitting Studied by Oxygen Sensor and Data Logger

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Ruinan; Liu, Song; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan; Choi, Martin M. F.

    2012-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting by semiconductor photocatalysts has attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. In this experiment, nanosized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO[subscript 2]) particles are used to photocatalytically split water, which is then monitored by an oxygen sensor. Sacrificial reagents such as organics (EDTA) and metal…

  10. 'In situ' diagnostics of solid electrolyte sensors measuring oxygen activity in melts by a developed impedance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuiykov, Serge

    2006-06-01

    An impedance method for the periodic 'in situ' diagnostics of the solid electrolyte/liquid-metal electrode interface during the lifespan of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) based sensors measuring oxygen partial pressure in melts was developed. Polarization effects on the YSZ, resulting from the corrosive measuring environment (molten alkaline metals), may be interpreted as a blocking reaction layer on the electrolyte/liquid-metal electrode interface. The proposed impedance method allows information to be obtained about the level of polarization of the YSZ/liquid-metal electrode interface that is characterized by a second semi-arc of a hodograph of impedance. The second semi-arc represents the parameters of polarization resistance (Rf) and capacitance of the double electrical layer on the interface YSZ/liquid metal (CD). Analysis of the impedance method on the single crystal zirconia sensor measuring dissolved oxygen in molten lead at temperatures of 380-480 °C revealed that this sensor, with a Bi-Bi2O3 reference electrode, showed a negligible level of polarization effects on the electrode/electrolyte interface at temperatures as low as 380 °C. The results of the present work may be applicable for the diagnostics of oxygen sensors with more complicated applications, such as in the measurement of oxygen activity in lead-bismuth, sodium or lithium heat carriers in liquid-metal nuclear facilities.

  11. Threat assessment and sensor management in a modular architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, S. F.; Oldfield, J. P.; Islip, S.; Benfold, B.; Brandon, R.; Thomas, P. A.; Stubbins, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    Many existing asset/area protection systems, for example those deployed to protect critical national infrastructure, are comprised of multiple sensors such as EO/IR, radar, and Perimeter Intrusion Detection Systems (PIDS), loosely integrated with a central Command and Control (C2) system. Whilst some sensors provide automatic event detection and C2 systems commonly provide rudimentary multi-sensor rule based alerting, the performance of such systems is limited by the lack of deep integration and autonomy. As a result, these systems have a high degree of operator burden. To address these challenges, an architectural concept termed "SAPIENT" was conceived. SAPIENT is based on multiple Autonomous Sensor Modules (ASMs) connected to a High-Level Decision Making Module (HLDMM) that provides data fusion, situational awareness, alerting, and sensor management capability. The aim of the SAPIENT concept is to allow for the creation of a surveillance system, in a modular plug-and-play manner, that provides high levels of autonomy, threat detection performance, and reduced operator burden. This paper considers the challenges associated with developing an HLDMM aligned with the SAPIENT concept, through the discussion of the design of a realised HLDMM. Particular focus is drawn to how high levels of system level performance can be achieved whilst retaining modularity and flexibility. A number of key aspects of our HLDMM are presented, including an integrated threat assessment and sensor management framework, threat sequence matching, and ASM trust modelling. The results of real-world testing of the HLDMM, in conjunction with multiple Laser, Radar, and EO/IR sensors, in representative semi-urban environments, are discussed.

  12. Modeling of a three-source perfusion and blood oxygenation sensor for transplant monitoring using multilayer Monte Carlo code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibey, Bennett L.; Lee, Seungjoon; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark A.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2004-06-01

    A Multi-Layer Monte Carlo (MLMC) model was developed to predict the results of in vivo blood perfusion and oxygenation measurement of transplanted organs as measured by an indwelling optical sensor. A sensor has been developed which uses three-source excitation in the red and infrared ranges (660, 810, 940 nm). In vitro data was taken using this sensor by changing the oxygenation state of whole blood and passing it through a single-tube pump system wrapped in bovine liver tissue. The collected data showed that the red signal increased as blood oxygenation increased and infrared signal decreased. The center wavelength of 810 nanometers was shown to be quite indifferent to blood oxygenation change. A model was developed using MLMC code that sampled the wavelength range from 600-1000 nanometers every 6 nanometers. Using scattering and absorption data for blood and liver tissue within this wavelength range, a five-layer model was developed (tissue, clear tubing, blood, clear tubing, tissue). The theoretical data generated from this model was compared to the in vitro data and showed good correlation with changing blood oxygenation.

  13. MEMS-based sensors for post-earthquake damage assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, M.; Zonta, D.; Trapani, D.; Athanasopoulos, N.; Amditis, A. J.; Bimpas, M.; Garetsos, A.; Stratakos, Y. E.; Ulieru, D.

    2011-07-01

    The evaluation of seismic damage is today almost exclusively based on visual inspection, as building owners are generally reluctant to install permanent sensing systems, due to their high installation, management and maintenance costs. To overcome this limitation, the EU-funded MEMSCON project aims to produce small size sensing nodes for measurement of strain and acceleration, integrating Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags in a single package that will be attached to reinforced concrete buildings and will transmit data using a wireless interface. During the first phase of the project completed so far, sensor prototypes were produced by assembling preexisting components. This paper outlines the device operating principles, production scheme and operation at both unit and network levels. It also reports on validation campaigns conducted in the laboratory to assess system performance. Accelerometer sensors were tested on a reduced scale metal frame mounted on a shaking table, while strain sensors were embedded in both reduced and full-scale reinforced concrete specimens undergoing increasing deformation cycles up to extensive damage and collapse. The performance of the sensors developed for the project and their applicability to long-term seismic monitoring are discussed.

  14. C. elegans Body Cavity Neurons Are Homeostatic Sensors that Integrate Fluctuations in Oxygen Availability and Internal Nutrient Reserves.

    PubMed

    Witham, Emily; Comunian, Claudio; Ratanpal, Harkaranveer; Skora, Susanne; Zimmer, Manuel; Srinivasan, Supriya

    2016-02-23

    It is known that internal physiological state, or interoception, influences CNS function and behavior. However, the neurons and mechanisms that integrate sensory information with internal physiological state remain largely unknown. Here, we identify C. elegans body cavity neurons called URX(L/R) as central homeostatic sensors that integrate fluctuations in oxygen availability with internal metabolic state. We show that depletion of internal body fat reserves increases the tonic activity of URX neurons, which influences the magnitude of the evoked sensory response to oxygen. These responses are integrated via intracellular cGMP and Ca(2+). The extent of neuronal activity thus reflects the balance between the perception of oxygen and available fat reserves. The URX homeostatic sensor ensures that neural signals that stimulate fat loss are only deployed when there are sufficient fat reserves to do so. Our results uncover an interoceptive neuroendocrine axis that relays internal state information to the nervous system.

  15. Application of Gas Sensor Arrays in Assessment of Wastewater Purification Effects

    PubMed Central

    Guz, Łukasz; Łagód, Grzegorz; Jaromin-Gleń, Katarzyna; Suchorab, Zbigniew; Sobczuk, Henryk; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    A gas sensor array consisting of eight metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) type gas sensors was evaluated for its ability for assessment of the selected wastewater parameters. Municipal wastewater was collected in a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in a primary sedimentation tank and was treated in a laboratory-scale sequential batch reactor (SBR). A comparison of the gas sensor array (electronic nose) response to the standard physical-chemical parameters of treated wastewater was performed. To analyze the measurement results, artificial neural networks were used. E-nose—gas sensors array and artificial neural networks proved to be a suitable method for the monitoring of treated wastewater quality. Neural networks used for data validation showed high correlation between the electronic nose readouts and: (I) chemical oxygen demand (COD) (r = 0.988); (II) total suspended solids (TSS) (r = 0.938); (III) turbidity (r = 0.940); (IV) pH (r = 0.554); (V) nitrogen compounds: N-NO3 (r = 0.958), N-NO2 (r = 0.869) and N-NH3 (r = 0.978); (VI) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) (r = 0.987). Good correlation of the abovementioned parameters are observed under stable treatment conditions in a laboratory batch reactor. PMID:25545263

  16. Fast pesticide detection inside microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Tahirbegi, Islam Bogachan; Ehgartner, Josef; Sulzer, Philipp; Zieger, Silvia; Kasjanow, Alice; Paradiso, Mirco; Strobl, Martin; Bouwes, Dominique; Mayr, Torsten

    2017-02-15

    The necessities of developing fast, portable, cheap and easy to handle pesticide detection platforms are getting attention of scientific and industrial communities. Although there are some approaches to develop microchip based pesticide detection platforms, there is no compact microfluidic device for the complementary, fast, cheap, reusable and reliable analysis of different pesticides. In this work, a microfluidic device is developed for in-situ analysis of pesticide concentration detected via metabolism/photosynthesis of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algal cells (algae) in tap water. Algae are grown in glass based microfluidic chip, which contains integrated optical pH and oxygen sensors in a portable system for on-site detection. In addition, intrinsic algal fluorescence is detected to analyze the pesticide concentration in parallel to pH and oxygen sensors with integrated fluorescence detectors. The response of the algae under the effect of different concentrations of pesticides is evaluated and complementary inhibition effects depending on the pesticide concentration are demonstrated. The three different sensors allow the determination of various pesticide concentrations in the nanomolar concentration range. The miniaturized system provides the fast quantification of pesticides in less than 10min and enables the study of toxic effects of different pesticides on Chlamydomonas reinhardtii green algae. Consequently, the microfluidic device described here provides fast and complementary detection of different pesticides with algae in a novel glass based microfluidic device with integrated optical pH, oxygen sensors and algal fluorescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Advances in reflective oxygen saturation monitoring with a novel in-ear sensor system: results of a human hypoxia study.

    PubMed

    Venema, Boudewijn; Blanik, Nikolai; Blazek, Vladimir; Gehring, Hartmut; Opp, Alexander; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2012-07-01

    Pulse oximetry is a well-established, noninvasive photoplethysmographic method to monitor vital signs. It allows us to measure cardiovascular parameters, such as heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation, and is considered an essential monitoring tool in clinical routine. However, since many of the conventional systems work in transmission mode, they can only be applied to the thinner or peripheral parts of the body, such as a finger tip. This has the major disadvantage that, in case of shock-induced centralization and a resulting drop in perfusion, such systems cannot ensure valid measurements. Therefore, we developed a reflective in-ear sensor system that can be worn in the ear channel like a headphone. Because the sensor is integrated in an ear mold and positioned very close to the trunk, reliable measurement is expected even in case of centralization. An additional advantage is that the sensor is comfortable to wear and has considerable resistance to motion artifacts. In this paper, we report on hypoxia studies with ten healthy participants which were performed to analyze the system with regard to the detection of heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation. It was shown earlier that, due to the high signal quality, heart rate can easily be detected. Using the conventional calculation principle, based on Beer-Lambert's law combined with a single-point calibration method, we now demonstrate that the detection of arterial oxygen saturation in the human ear canal is possible using reflective saturation sensors.

  18. A fibre optic oxygen sensor that detects rapid PO2 changes under simulated conditions of cyclical atelectasis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Formenti, Federico; Chen, Rongsheng; McPeak, Hanne; Matejovic, Martin; Farmery, Andrew D; Hahn, Clive E W

    2014-01-15

    Two challenges in the management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome are the difficulty in diagnosing cyclical atelectasis, and in individualising mechanical ventilation therapy in real-time. Commercial optical oxygen sensors can detect [Formula: see text] oscillations associated with cyclical atelectasis, but are not accurate at saturation levels below 90%, and contain a toxic fluorophore. We present a computer-controlled test rig, together with an in-house constructed ultra-rapid sensor to test the limitations of these sensors when exposed to rapidly changing [Formula: see text] in blood in vitro. We tested the sensors' responses to simulated respiratory rates between 10 and 60 breaths per minute. Our sensor was able to detect the whole amplitude of the imposed [Formula: see text] oscillations, even at the highest respiratory rate. We also examined our sensor's resistance to clot formation by continuous in vivo deployment in non-heparinised flowing animal blood for 24h, after which no adsorption of organic material on the sensor's surface was detectable by scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Robin E; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F; Song, Junho

    2016-05-31

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved.

  20. Probabilistic Assessment of High-Throughput Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin E.; Mechitov, Kirill; Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, Billie F.; Song, Junho

    2016-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) using wireless smart sensors (WSS) has the potential to provide rich information on the state of a structure. However, because of their distributed nature, maintaining highly robust and reliable networks can be challenging. Assessing WSS network communication quality before and after finalizing a deployment is critical to achieve a successful WSS network for SHM purposes. Early studies on WSS network reliability mostly used temporal signal indicators, composed of a smaller number of packets, to assess the network reliability. However, because the WSS networks for SHM purpose often require high data throughput, i.e., a larger number of packets are delivered within the communication, such an approach is not sufficient. Instead, in this study, a model that can assess, probabilistically, the long-term performance of the network is proposed. The proposed model is based on readily-available measured data sets that represent communication quality during high-throughput data transfer. Then, an empirical limit-state function is determined, which is further used to estimate the probability of network communication failure. Monte Carlo simulation is adopted in this paper and applied to a small and a full-bridge wireless networks. By performing the proposed analysis in complex sensor networks, an optimized sensor topology can be achieved. PMID:27258270

  1. Thermally assisted sensor for conformity assessment of biodiesel production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, M. S.; Kamikawachi, R. C.; Fabris, J. L.; Muller, M.

    2015-02-01

    Although biodiesel can be intentionally tampered with, impairing its quality, ineffective production processes may also result in a nonconforming final fuel. For an incomplete transesterification reaction, traces of alcohol (ethanol or methanol) or remaining raw material (vegetable oil or animal fats) may be harmful to consumers, the environment or to engines. Traditional methods for biodiesel assessment are complex, time consuming and expensive, leading to the need for the development of new and more versatile processes for quality control. This work describes a refractometric fibre optic based sensor that is thermally assisted, developed to quantify the remaining methanol or vegetable oil in biodiesel blends. The sensing relies on a long period grating to configure an in-fibre interferometer. A complete analytical routine is demonstrated for the sensor allowing the evaluation of the biodiesel blends without segregation of the components. The results show the sensor can determine the presence of oil or methanol in biodiesel with a concentration ranging from 0% to 10% v/v. The sensor presented a resolution and standard combined uncertainty of 0.013% v/v and 0.62% v/v for biodiesel-oil samples, and 0.007% v/v and 0.22% v/v for biodiesel-methanol samples, respectively.

  2. Oxygen sensing with an absolute optical sensor based on biluminescence (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas Redondo, Caterin; Reineke, Sebastian

    2017-06-01

    exciton dynamic range extended up to nine orders of magnitude between nanosecond-lifetime fluorescence and millisecond-lifetime phosphorescence. In this presentation, we will report on the oxygen sensing characteristics of this luminescent system compared to a benchmarked single state optical sensor. Such properties can be evaluated because of the sensitivity of the triplet state to oxygen and therefore, we investigate the dependence of the persistent phosphorescence on the oxygen content. Furthermore, we will address our efforts towards the potential integration of novel optical biluminescent sensing into organic electronics.

  3. Conversion of a heme-based oxygen sensor to a heme oxygenase by hydrogen sulfide: effects of mutations in the heme distal side of a heme-based oxygen sensor phosphodiesterase (Ec DOS).

    PubMed

    Du, Yongming; Liu, Gefei; Yan, Yinxia; Huang, Dongyang; Luo, Wenhong; Martinkova, Marketa; Man, Petr; Shimizu, Toru

    2013-10-01

    The heme-based oxygen-sensor phosphodiesterase from Escherichia coli (Ec DOS), is composed of an N-terminal heme-bound oxygen sensing domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. Oxygen (O2) binding to the heme Fe(II) complex in Ec DOS substantially enhances catalysis. Addition of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to the heme Fe(III) complex in Ec DOS also remarkably stimulates catalysis in part due to the heme Fe(III)-SH and heme Fe(II)-O2 complexes formed by H2S. In this study, we examined the roles of the heme distal amino acids, M95 (the axial ligand of the heme Fe(II) complex) and R97 (the O2 binding site in the heme Fe(II)-O2 complex) of the isolated heme-binding domain of Ec DOS (Ec DOS-PAS) in the binding of H2S under aerobic conditions. Interestingly, R97A and R97I mutant proteins formed an oxygen-incorporated modified heme, verdoheme, following addition of H2S combined with H2O2 generated by the reactions. Time-dependent mass spectroscopic data corroborated the findings. In contrast, H2S did not interact with the heme Fe(III) complex of M95H and R97E mutants. Thus, M95 and/or R97 on the heme distal side in Ec DOS-PAS significantly contribute to the interaction of H2S with the Fe(III) heme complex and also to the modification of the heme Fe(III) complex with reactive oxygen species. Importantly, mutations of the O2 binding site of the heme protein converted its function from oxygen sensor to that of a heme oxygenase. This study establishes the novel role of H2S in modifying the heme iron complex to form verdoheme with the aid of reactive oxygen species.

  4. Dual Optical Sensor for Oxygen and Temperature Based on the Combination of Time Domain and Frequency Domain Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hung; Rao, Govind; Loureiro, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    In measuring specific conditions in the real world, there are many situations where both the oxygen concentration and the temperature have to be determined simultaneously. Here we describe a dual optical sensor for oxygen and temperature that can be adapted for different applications. The measurement principle of this sensor is based on the luminescence decay times of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium complex tris-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline ruthenium(III) [Rudpp] and the temperature-sensitive europium complex tris(dibenzoylmethane) mono(5-amino-1,10-phenanthroline)europium(III) [Eudatp]. The excitation and emission spectra of the two luminophores overlap significantly and cannot be discriminated in the conventional way using band pass filters or other optical components. However, by applying both the frequency and time domain techniques, we can separate the signals from the individual decay time of the complexes. The europium complex is entrapped in a poly-(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) layer and the ruthenium complex is physically adsorbed on silica gel and incorporated in a silicone layer. The two layers are attached to each other by a double sided silicone based tape. The europium sensing film was found to be temperature-sensitive between 10 and 70ºC and the ruthenium oxygen-sensitive layer can reliably measure between 0 and 21% oxygen. PMID:21315899

  5. New ratiometric optical oxygen and pH dual sensors with three emission colors for measuring photosynthetic activity in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongguang; Jin, Yuguang; Tian, Yanqing; Zhang, Weiwen; Holl, Mark R; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2011-01-01

    Photosynthetic algae and cyanobacteria have been proposed for producing biofuels through a direct photoconversion process. To accelerate the efforts of discovering and screening microbes for biofuel production, sensitive and high throughput methods to measure photosynthetic activity need to be developed. Here we report the development of new ratiometric optical oxygen and pH dual sensors with three emission colors for measuring photosynthetic activities directly. The dual sensor system can measure oxygen (O(2)) generation and pH increase resulted from carbon dioxide (CO(2)) consumption simultaneously. The sensor was prepared by a copolymerization of three monomeric probes, an intra-reference probe (IRP) which does not respond to pH or O(2), a probe for pH sensing (pHS), and an O(2) probe for O(2) sensing (OS) with 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and acrylamide (AM). After polymerization, the three probes were chemically immobilized in an ion and O(2) permeable poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-co-polyacrylamide (PHEMA-co-PAM) matrix. The resulted sensing films (membranes) exhibited three emission colors with well separated emission spectra, covering blue, green, and red emission windows, under 380 nm light excitation. Responses of the sensors to pH and dissolved O(2) were investigated in buffers and cyanobacterial cell cultures (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803). In spite of the strong autofluorescence from cyanobacteria, the sensors were able to determine the pH values and dissolved O(2) concentrations accurately and reproducibly. The measured results using the optical sensors were well in accordance with measurements using electrodes with minimal experimental variations. The sensors were further applied for evaluation of photosynthetic activities of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 at the exponential and stationary phases. The results were consistent with biological observation that the photosynthetic activity in the exponential phase was higher than that in the

  6. A system for assessing motion artifacts in the signal of a micro-optic in-ear vital signs sensor.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Stefan; Hülsbusch, Markus; Starke, Dietmar; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are among the most common causes of death in developed industrial nations. It is of great interest of both physician and patient to determine the cardiovascular risk factors early in order to take preventive measures. To assist these investigations we develop a wearable in-ear measuring system (IN-MONIT) for 24/7 monitoring of heart rate and oxygen saturation (SpO2). The central component is a micro-optic remission/reflection sensor (MORES) located inside the auditory canal. From the measured photoplethysmographic curves the aforementioned vital signs can be derived. In the following we present a recording system for assessing motion artifact influence in the in-ear sensor data. Two accelerometer sensors record posture and motion while at the same time SpO2, heart rate and PPG are measured using both a commercial sensor and the in-ear sensor. The data is transmitted wirelessly to a control PC for storage and further investigation. Using this system we assessed the influence of motion artifacts produced by daily life activities on infrared and red in-ear PPG data and on readings of the reference sensor.

  7. A fibre optic oxygen sensor that detects rapid PO2 changes under simulated conditions of cyclical atelectasis in vitro☆

    PubMed Central

    Formenti, Federico; Chen, Rongsheng; McPeak, Hanne; Matejovic, Martin; Farmery, Andrew D.; Hahn, Clive E.W.

    2014-01-01

    Two challenges in the management of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome are the difficulty in diagnosing cyclical atelectasis, and in individualising mechanical ventilation therapy in real-time. Commercial optical oxygen sensors can detect PaO2 oscillations associated with cyclical atelectasis, but are not accurate at saturation levels below 90%, and contain a toxic fluorophore. We present a computer-controlled test rig, together with an in-house constructed ultra-rapid sensor to test the limitations of these sensors when exposed to rapidly changing PO2 in blood in vitro. We tested the sensors’ responses to simulated respiratory rates between 10 and 60 breaths per minute. Our sensor was able to detect the whole amplitude of the imposed PO2 oscillations, even at the highest respiratory rate. We also examined our sensor's resistance to clot formation by continuous in vivo deployment in non-heparinised flowing animal blood for 24 h, after which no adsorption of organic material on the sensor's surface was detectable by scanning electron microscopy. PMID:24184746

  8. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: Neurotoxicity evaluation

    PubMed Central

    O’Callaghan, James P.; Daughtrey, Wayne C.; Clark, Charles R.; Schreiner, Ceinwen A.; White, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from “baseline gasoline” (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000 mg/mg3 and exposures were for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiple brain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration. PMID:24879970

  9. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: neurotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, James P; Daughtrey, Wayne C; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential neurotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) and exposures were for 6h/day, 5days/week for 13weeks. The functional observation battery (FOB) with the addition of motor activity (MA) testing, hematoxylin and eosin staining of brain tissue sections, and brain regional analysis of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were used to assess behavioral changes, traditional neuropathology and astrogliosis, respectively. FOB and MA data for all agents, except G/TBA, were negative. G/TBA behavioral effects resolved during recovery. Neuropathology was negative for all groups. Analyses of GFAP revealed increases in multiplebrain regions largely limited to males of the G/EtOH group, findings indicative of minor gliosis, most significantly in the cerebellum. Small changes (both increases and decreases) in GFAP were observed for other test agents but effects were not consistent across sex, brain region or exposure concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of the uncertainty budget for the amperometric measurement of dissolved oxygen.

    PubMed

    Fisicaro, Paola; Adriaens, Annemie; Ferrara, Enzo; Prenesti, Enrico

    2007-07-30

    This work aimed at identifying the main sources of uncertainty for the measurement of dissolved oxygen concentration in aqueous solutions. The experimental apparatus consists of an amperometric cell based on the Clark-type sensor. The corresponding uncertainty budget was assessed, this being a fundamental step for the validation of a measurement method. The principle of the measurement, as well as the procedure for the set-up and the characterisation of the cell, are described. The measurement equation was defined as a combination of Faraday's and Fick's laws, and a method was worked out for the empirical determination of the diffusivity parameter. In this connection, the solutions of oxygen were standardised by way of the Winkler's titration, as suggested by the ISO Guide 5813 and 5814. With this approach we aimed at contributing to the development of a potential primary method of measurement. A discussion of all the contributions to the overall uncertainty is reported, allowing operators to locate the largest ones and plan specific improvements.

  11. Fiber optic Raman sensor to monitor the concentration ratio of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P; Cyr, William St; Khijwania, Sunil K

    2007-06-01

    A spontaneous Raman scattering optical fiber sensor was developed for a specific need of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for long-term detection and monitoring of the purity of liquid oxygen (LO(2)) in the oxidizer feed line during ground testing of rocket engines. The Raman peak intensity ratios for liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) and LO(2) with varied weight ratios (LN(2)/LO(2)) were analyzed for their applicability to impurity sensing. The study of the sensor performance with different excitation light sources has helped to design a miniaturized, cost-effective system for this application. The optimal system response time of this miniaturized sensor for LN(2)/LO(2) measurement was found to be in the range of a few seconds. It will need to be further reduced to the millisecond range for real-time, quantitative monitoring of the quality of cryogenic fluids in a harsh environment.

  12. Enzyme-based online monitoring and measurement of antioxidant activity using an optical oxygen sensor coupled to an HPLC system.

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Michela; Nugroho Prasetyo, Endry; Koren, Klaus; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Murkovic, Michael; Klimant, Ingo; Guebitz, Georg M

    2013-03-01

    It is estimated that up to 50% of the adult population take antioxidant products on a daily basis to promote their health status. Strangely, despite the well-recognized importance of antioxidants, currently there is no international standard index for labeling owing to the lack of standardized methods for antioxidant measurement in complex products. Here, an online high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based method to detect and measure the total antioxidant capacity of antioxidant samples is presented. In this approach, complex samples containing antioxidants are separated by the HPLC system, which is further coupled to an antioxidant measuring system consisting of an optical oxygen sensor, laccase, and tetramethoxy azobismethylene quinone (TMAMQ). The antioxidants, separated via HPLC, reduce TMAMQ to syringaldazine, which is then reoxidized by laccase while simultaneously consuming O(2). The amount of consumed oxygen is directly proportional to the concentration of antioxidants and is measured by the optical oxygen sensor. The sensor is fabricated by coating a glass capillary with an oxygen-sensitive thin layer made of platinum(II) meso-tetra(4-fluorophenyl)tetrabenzoporphyrin and polystyrene, which makes real-time analysis possible (t(90) = 1.1 s in solution). Four selected antioxidants (3 mM), namely, catechin, ferulic acid, naringenin (used as a control), and Trolox, representing flavonol, hydrocinnamic acid, flavanone, and vitamin E, respectively, were injected into the online antioxidant monitoring system, separated, and then mixed with the TMAMQ/laccase solution, which resulted in oxygen consumption. This study shows that, with the use of such a system, the antioxidant activity of individual antioxidant molecules in a sample and their contribution to the total antioxidant activity of the sample can be correctly assigned.

  13. Breast tumor oxygenation in response to carbogen intervention assessed simultaneously by three oxygen-sensitive parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yueqing; Bourke, Vincent; Kim, Jae Gwan; Xia, Mengna; Constantinescu, Anca; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2003-07-01

    Three oxygen-sensitive parameters (arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation SaO2, tumor vascular oxygenated hemoglobin concentration [HbO2], and tumor oxygen tension pO2) were measured simultaneously by three different optical techniques (pulse oximeter, near infrared spectroscopy, and FOXY) to evaluate dynamic responses of breast tumors to carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) intervention. All three parameters displayed similar trends in dynamic response to carbogen challenge, but with different response times. These response times were quantified by the time constants of the exponential fitting curves, revealing the immediate and the fastest response from the arterial SaO2, followed by changes in global tumor vascular [HbO2], and delayed responses for pO2. The consistency of the three oxygen-sensitive parameters demonstrated the ability of NIRS to monitor therapeutic interventions for rat breast tumors in-vivo in real time.

  14. Effect of sensor location on regional cerebral oxygen saturation measured by INVOS 5100 in on-pump cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ah-Reum; Kwon, Jae-Young; Kim, Choongrak; Hong, Jung-Min; Kang, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy sensors often cannot be attached at the commercially recommended locations because combined use of neurological monitoring systems is common during on-pump cardiac surgery. The primary purpose of this study was to compare the incidence of regional cerebral oxygen desaturation and regional cerebral oxygen saturation values detected using near-infrared spectroscopy between the upper and lower forehead during on-pump cardiac surgery. A prospective observational study was conducted with 25 adult patients scheduled for elective on-pump cardiac surgery. Regional cerebral oxygen saturations at the left upper and lower forehead and other clinical measurements were monitored intraoperatively. McNemar's test was used to analyze differences in the incidence of cerebral regional oxygen desaturation between the left upper and lower forehead. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni correction was used to compare the regional cerebral oxygen saturation at each time point. There was a significantly higher incidence of regional cerebral oxygen desaturation at the upper than lower forehead only at 1 h after initiation of aortic cross-clamping. There were significant differences between the left upper and lower regional cerebral oxygen saturation values throughout the observation period. Regional cerebral oxygen saturation was significantly lower at the upper than lower forehead during on-pump cardiac surgery. However, disagreements in detection of cerebral regional oxygen desaturation were only significant at 1 h after initiation of aortic cross-clamping. WHO-ICTRP, Clinical Research Information Service (CRiS). ID: KCT0000971. URL: https://cris.nih.go.kr/cris/search/search_result_st01_en.jsp?seq=3678&type=my .

  15. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, M. R.; Haves, P.; McDonald, S. C.; Torcellini, P.; Hansen, D.; Holmberg, D. R.; Roth, K. W.

    2005-04-01

    This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies.

  16. Enhanced response of microbial fuel cell using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone membrane as a biochemical oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Ayyaru, Sivasankaran; Dharmalingam, Sangeetha

    2014-03-25

    The present study is focused on the development of single chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC) using sulfonated poly ether ether ketone (SPEEK) membrane to determine the biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) matter present in artificial wastewater (AW). The biosensor produces a good linear relationship with the BOD concentration up to 650 ppm when using artificial wastewater. This sensing range was 62.5% higher than that of Nafion(®). The most serious problem in using MFC as a BOD sensor is the oxygen diffusion into the anode compartment, which consumes electrons in the anode compartment, thereby reducing the coulomb yield and reducing the electrical signal from the MFC. SPEEK exhibited one order lesser oxygen permeability than Nafion(®), resulting in low internal resistance and substrate loss, thus improving the sensing range of BOD. The system was further improved by making a double membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with an increased electrode surface area which provide high surface area for electrically active bacteria.

  17. EEG sensor based classification for assessing psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Begum, Shahina; Barua, Shaibal

    2013-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) reflects the brain activity and is widely used in biomedical research. However, analysis of this signal is still a challenging issue. This paper presents a hybrid approach for assessing stress using the EEG signal. It applies Multivariate Multi-scale Entropy Analysis (MMSE) for the data level fusion. Case-based reasoning is used for the classification tasks. Our preliminary result indicates that EEG sensor based classification could be an efficient technique for evaluation of the psychological state of individuals. Thus, the system can be used for personal health monitoring in order to improve users health.

  18. An Oxidase-Based Electrochemical Fluidic Sensor with High-Sensitivity and Low-Interference by On-Chip Oxygen Manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Nitin; Park, Jongwon; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Utilizing a simple fluidic structure, we demonstrate the improved performance of oxidase-based enzymatic biosensors. Electrolysis of water is utilized to generate bubbles to manipulate the oxygen microenvironment close to the biosensor in a fluidic channel. For the proper enzyme reactions to occur, a simple mechanical procedure of manipulating bubbles was developed to maximize the oxygen level while minimizing the pH change after electrolysis. The sensors show improved sensitivities based on the oxygen dependency of enzyme reaction. In addition, this oxygen-rich operation minimizes the ratio of electrochemical interference signal by ascorbic acid during sensor operation (i.e., amperometric detection of hydrogen peroxide). Although creatinine sensors have been used as the model system in this study, this method is applicable to many other biosensors that can use oxidase enzymes (e.g., glucose, alcohol, phenol, etc.) to implement a viable component for in-line fluidic sensor systems. PMID:23012527

  19. Nano-based sensor for assessment of weaponry structural degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, Christina L.; Edwards, Eugene; Ruffin, Paul B.; Kranz, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Missiles and weaponry-based systems are composed of metal structures that can degrade after prolonged exposure to environmental elements. A particular concern is accumulation of corrosion that generally results from prolonged environmental exposure. Corrosion, defined as the unintended destruction or deterioration of a material due to its interaction with the environment, can negatively affect both equipment and infrastructure. System readiness and safety can be reduced if corrosion is not detected, prevented and managed. The current corrosion recognition methods (Visual, Radiography, Ultrasonics, Eddy Current, and Thermography) are expensive and potentially unreliable. Visual perception is the most commonly used method for determining corrosion in metal. Utilization of an inductance-based sensor system is being proposed as part of the authors' research. Results from this research will provide a more efficient, economical, and non-destructive sensing approach. Preliminary results demonstrate a highly linear degradation within a corrosive environment due to the increased surface area available on the sensor coupon. The inductance of the devices, which represents a volume property of the coupon, demonstrated sensitivity to corrosion levels. The proposed approach allows a direct mass-loss measurement based on the change in the inductance of the coupon when placed in an alternating magnetic field. Prototype devices have demonstrated highly predictable corrosion rates that are easily measured using low-power small electronic circuits and energy harvesting methods to interrogate the sensor. Preliminary testing demonstrates that the device concept is acceptable and future opportunities for use in low power embedded applications are achievable. Key results in this paper include the assessment of typical Army corrosion cost, degradation patterns of varying metal materials, and application of wireless sensors elements.

  20. Evaluation of intrusion sensors and video assessment in areas of restricted passage

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, C.E.; Ringler, C.E.

    1996-04-01

    This report discusses an evaluation of intrusion sensors and video assessment in areas of restricted passage. The discussion focuses on applications of sensors and video assessment in suspended ceilings and air ducts. It also includes current and proposed requirements for intrusion detection and assessment. Detection and nuisance alarm characteristics of selected sensors as well as assessment capabilities of low-cost board cameras were included in the evaluation.

  1. Highly distributed multi-point, temperature and pressure compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensors (FOxSense) for aircraft fuel tank environment and safety monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development and qualification of a highly distributed, multi-point, all optical pressure and temperature compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSense™) system for closed-loop monitoring and safety of the oxygen ullage environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The alloptical FOxSense™ system uses a passive, multi-parameter (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensor probe with no electrical connections leading to the sensors install within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. The all optical sensor consists of an integrated multi-parameter fiber optic sensor probe that integrates a fuel insensitive fluorescence based optical oxygen optrode with built-in temperature and pressure optical optrodes for compensation of temperature and pressure variants induced in the fluorescence response of the oxygen optrode. The distributed (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensors installed in the fuel tanks of the aircraft are connected to the FOxSense optoelectronic system via a fiber optic cable conduit reaching to each fuel tank in the aircraft. A multichannel frequency-domain fiber optic sensor read-out (FOxSense™) system is used to interrogate the optical signal of all three sensors in real-time and to display the fuel tank oxygen environment suitable for aircraft status and alarm applications. Preliminary testing of the all optical fiber optic oxygen sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank in the range of 0% O2 to 40% O2 concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from 0-ft to 40,000-ft.

  2. Photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with controlled defects as a highly sensitive oxygen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Taku; Ito, Tsuyohito; Shimizu, Yoshiki; Yasuda, Hidehiro

    2016-07-11

    Conductance of photoexcited ZnO nanoparticles with various defects has been investigated in oxygen. ZnO nanoparticles, which show strong photoluminescence peaks originating from interstitial zinc atom (Zn{sub i}) and singly charged oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}{sup +}), show oxygen-pressure-dependent conductance changes caused by photoexcitation. Herein, a model is proposed to simulate the conductance changes.

  3. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent MRI to Assess Renal Oxygenation in Renal Diseases: Progresses and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Pruijm, Menno; Milani, Bastien; Burnier, Michel

    2017-01-01

    BOLD-MRI (blood oxygenation-level dependent magnetic resonance imaging) allows non-invasive measurement of renal tissue oxygenation in humans, without the need for contrast products. BOLD-MRI uses the fact that magnetic properties of hemoglobin depend of its oxygenated state:: the higher local deoxyhemoglobin, the higher the so called apparent relaxation rate R2* (sec−1), and the lower local tissue oxygen content. Several factors other than deoxyhemoglobin (such as hydration status, dietary sodium intake, and susceptibility effects) influence the BOLD signal, and need to be taken into account when interpreting results. The last 5 years have witnessed important improvements in the standardization of these factors, and the appearance of new, highly reproducible analysis techniques of BOLD-images, that are reviewed in this article. Using these new BOLD-MRI analysis techniques, it has recently been shown that persons suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD) have lower cortical oxygenation than normotensive controls, thus confirming the chronic hypoxia hypothesis. The acute alterations in R2* after the administration of furosemide are smaller in CKD, and represent an estimate of the oxygen-dependent tubular transport of sodium. BOLD-MRI-alone or in combination with other functional MRI methods- can be used to monitor the renal effects of drugs, and is increasingly used in the preclinical setting. The near future will tell whether or not BOLD-MRI represents a new tool to predict renal function decline an adverse renal outcome. PMID:28105019

  4. Optical sensor based on fluorescent quenching and pulsed blue LED excitation for long-term monitoring of dissolved oxygen in NASA space bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Frank G; Fay, James M; Mathew, Grace; Jeevarajan, Antony S; Anderson, Melody M

    2005-01-01

    There is a need to monitor the concentration of dissolved oxygen (DO) present in the culture medium for NASA's space cell biology experiments, as well as in earth-based cell cultures. Continuous measurement of DO concentration in the cell culture medium in perfused bioreactors requires that the oxygen sensor provide adequate sensitivity and low toxicity to the cells, as well as maintain calibration over several weeks. Although there are a number of sensors for dissolved oxygen on the market and under development elsewhere, very few meet these stringent conditions. An in-house optical oxygen sensor (HOXY) based on dynamic fluorescent quenching of Tris(4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)ruthenium(II) chloride and a pulsed blue LED light source was developed in our laboratory to address these requirements. The sensing element consisted of the fluorescent dye embedded in a silicone matrix and coated onto a glass capillary. Photobleaching was minimized by a pulsed LED light source. The total noise in the sensor output is 2% and the sensor dynamic range is 0 to 200 mm Hg. The resolution of the sensor is 0.1 mm Hg at 50 mm Hg, and 0.25 mm Hg at 130 mm Hg, while the accuracy is 5%. The LED-based oxygen sensor exhibited stable performance and low drift, making it compatible for space-flight bioreactor systems.

  5. Optical sensor for dual sensing of oxygen and carbon dioxide based on sensing films coated on filter paper.

    PubMed

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Syu, Jhih-Jheng

    2017-02-01

    An optical sensor for the dual sensing of oxygen (O2) and carbon dioxide (CO2) based on sensing films coated on filter paper is proposed. Ethyl cellulose (EC) doped with platinum(II) meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrin (PtTFPP) and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin serve as the oxygen sensing material and reference blue emission dye for the pH indicator, respectively. The CO2 sensing layer includes the pH-sensitive fluorescent indicator 1-hydroxy-3,6,8-pyrenetrisulfonic acid trisodium salt immobilized within the EC. The O2- and CO2-sensitive materials can both be excited with a 405 nm LED, and the two emission wavelengths can be detected separately. The experimental result reveals that the optical O2 and CO2 sensors have sensitivities of IN2 /I100%O2 =22.8 and IN2 /I100%CO2 =3.6, respectively. The response times of the optical O2 sensor were 15 s upon switching from nitrogen to O2 and 41 s when moving from O2 to nitrogen (N2). The response times of the optical CO2 sensor were 7 s upon switching from 100% N2 to 100% CO2 and 39 s when moving from 100% CO2 to 100% N2. The proposed optical dual sensor can be used for the simultaneous sensing of O2 and CO2 concentrations in environmental applications.

  6. Fabrication and laser patterning of polystyrene optical oxygen sensor films for lab-on-a-chip applications.

    PubMed

    Grist, S M; Oyunerdene, N; Flueckiger, J; Kim, J; Wong, P C; Chrostowski, L; Cheung, K C

    2014-11-21

    We present a novel and simple method for patterning oxygen-sensitive polystyrene thin films and demonstrate its potential for integration with microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices. Optical oxygen sensing films composed of polystyrene with an embedded luminescent oxygen-sensitive dye present a convenient option for the measurement of oxygen levels in microfluidic and lab-on-a-chip devices; however, patterning and integrating the films with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic devices has proven difficult due to a residue after dry etch patterning that inhibits subsequent PDMS bonding. Our new method uses mask-less laser ablation by a commercial laser ablation system to define the outline of the structures and subsequent bulk film removal by aqueous lift-off. Because the bulk film is peeled or lifted off of the substrate rather than etched, the process is compatible with standard PDMS plasma bonding. We used ToF-SIMS analysis to investigate how laser ablation facilitates this fabrication process as well as why dry etching polystyrene inhibits PDMS plasma bonding. The results of this analysis showed evidence of chemical species formed during the laser ablation and dry etching processes that can produce these effects. Our new method's mask-less nature, simplicity, speed, and compatibility with PDMS bonding make it ideally suited for single-use lab-on-a-chip applications. To demonstrate the method's compatibility with PDMS microfluidics, we also present a demonstration of the sensors' integration into a microfluidic oxygen gradient generator device.

  7. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vidhu S; Luanje, Appolinaire T; Kalluru, Rajamohan R; Yueh, Fang Y; Singh, Jagdish P

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN(2)) in liquid oxygen (LO(2)) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO(2) in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN(2)/LO(2)) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN(2) and LO(2). The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN(2) and LO(2). Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN(2)) and oxygen (GO(2)).

  8. An integrated laser Raman optical sensor for fast detection of nitrogen and oxygen in a cryogenic mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Luanje, Appolinaire T.; Kalluru, Rajamohan R.; Yueh, Fang Y.; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2011-04-01

    An integrated fiber optic Raman sensor was designed for real-time, nonintrusive detection of liquid nitrogen (LN2) in liquid oxygen (LO2) at high pressures and high flow rates. This was intended to monitor the quality of LO2 in oxidizer feed lines during the ground testing of rocket engines. Various issues related to optical diagnosis of cryogenic fluids (LN2/LO2) in supercritical environment of rocket engine test facility, such as fluorescence from impurity in optical window of feed line, signal-noise ratio, and fast data acquisition time, etc., are well addressed. The integrated sensor employed a frequency doubled 532-nm continuous wave Nd:YAG laser as an excitation light source. The other optical components included were InPhotonics Raman probes, spectrometers, and photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). The spectrometer was used to collect the Raman spectrum of LN2 and LO2. The PMT detection unit was integrated with home-built LABVIEW software for fast monitoring of concentration ratios LN2 and LO2. Prior to designing an integrated sensor system, its optical components were also tested with gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and oxygen (GO2).

  9. Development of new oxygen sensor for Argo profiling floats: Fast responsivity and long-term stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, K.; Takai, S. I.; Uchida, H.; Sato, K.; Hosoda, S.; Kobayashi, T.

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is one of key parameters governing physical/biochemical processes in the ocean. JFE Advantech's RINKO series is widely known for markedly fast response optical DO sensors and can assist in revealing a small-scale DO structure, which will contribute to understanding new aspects of the processes. Long-term stability is of secondary importance for the conventional RINKO series and the highest accuracy is being maintained by a regular recalibration. Meanwhile, Argo profiling floats require satisfying a high accuracy for multiple years without a recalibration because the floats are generally not recovered and post-calibrated. The RINKO FT is a new member of the RINKO series and has overcome a well-known tradeoff between fast responsivity and stability of a DO sensing foil. The RINKO FT not only retains the fast response time (63%: less than 1 s in water) identical to that of conventional RINKO series but also has greater accuracy and stability by incorporating a high-quality multipoint calibration and improving the sensing method. Two MRV S3A floats with RINKO FT were launched in the northwestern Pacific Ocean in July 2014 and one of the floats is still operating in the field. The DO sampling interval was 2 dbar throughout the water column (from 2000 m to the surface) to take advantage of the fast responsivity. The RINKO FT data of the first dive agreed well with the Winkler titration data sampled near the dive point. The vertical high-resolution measurement detected thin layers with DO maximum/minimum in the subsurface. The linear trend of the DO data obtained from the RINKO FT indicates no significant time drift of less than 1 μmol/kg per year along a potential density of 27.6 σθ lying at a depth of 1600 - 1900 m. Although the RINKO FT is primarily designed to target Argo float operations, its compact, lightweight design and commonly used communication protocols widen the choice of platforms for installation.

  10. Using soil oxygen sensors to inform understanding of soil greenhouse gas dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarecke, K. M.; Loecke, T.; Burgin, A. J.; Franz, T. E.; Rubol, S.

    2015-12-01

    Hot spots and hot moments of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes can contribute significantly to overall GHG budgets. Hot spots and hot moments occur when dynamic soil hydrology triggers important shifts in soil biogeochemical and physical processes that control GHG emissions. Soil oxygen (O2), a direct control on biogenic GHG production (i.e., nitrous oxide-N2O, carbon dioxide-CO2 and methane-CH4), may serve as both an important proxy for determining sudden shifts in subsurface biogenic GHG production, as well as the physical transport of soil GHG to the atmosphere. Recent technological advancements offer opportunities to link in-situ, near-continuous measurements of soil O2 concentration to soil biogeochemical processes and soil gas transport. Using high frequency data, this study asked: Do soil O2 dynamics correspond to changes in soil GHG concentrations and GHG surface fluxes? We addressed this question using precipitation event-based and weekly sampling (19 months in duration) data sets from a restored riparian wetland in Ohio, USA. During and after precipitation events, changes in subsurface (10 and 20 cm) CO2 and N2O concentrations were inversely related to short-term (< 48 h) changes in soil O2 concentrations. Subsurface CH4 concentrations changes during precipitation events, however, did not change in response to soil O2 dynamics. Changing subsurface GHG concentrations did not necessarily translate into altered surface (soil to atmosphere) GHG fluxes; soil O2 dynamics at 10 cm did not correspond with changes in surface N2O and CH4 fluxes. However, changes in soil O2 concentration at 10 cm had a significant positive linear relationship with change in surface CO2­ flux. We used a random forest approach to identify the soil sensor data (O2, temperature, moisture) which contribute the most to predicting weekly GHG fluxes. Our study suggests that monitoring near-continuous soil O2 concentration under dynamic soil hydrology may lead to greater understanding of GHG

  11. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: immunotoxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    White, Kimber L; Peachee, Vanessa L; Armstrong, Sarah R; Twerdok, Lorraine E; Clark, Charles R; Schreiner, Ceinwen A

    2014-11-01

    Female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed via inhalation to vapor condensates of either gasoline or gasoline combined with various fuel oxygenates to assess potential immunotoxicity of evaporative emissions. Test articles included vapor condensates prepared from "baseline gasoline" (BGVC), or gasoline combined with methyl tertiary butyl ether (G/MTBE), ethyl t-butyl ether (G/ETBE), t-amyl methyl ether (G/TAME), diisopropyl ether (G/DIPE), ethanol (G/EtOH), or t-butyl alcohol (G/TBA). Target concentrations were 0, 2000, 10,000 or 20,000mg/mg(3) administered for 6h/day, 5days/week for 4weeks. The antibody-forming cell (AFC) response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep erythrocyte (sRBC), was used to determine the effects of the gasoline vapor condensates on the humoral components of the immune system. Exposure to BGVC, G/MTBE, G/TAME, and G/TBA did not result in significant changes in the IgM AFC response to sRBC, when evaluated as either specific activity (AFC/10(6) spleen cells) or as total spleen activity (AFC/spleen). Exposure to G/EtOH and G/DIPE resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the AFC response, reaching the level of statistical significance only at the high 20,000mg/m(3) level. Exposure to G/ETBE resulted in a statistically significant decrease in the AFC response at the middle (10,000mg/m(3)) and high (20,000mg/m(3)) exposure concentrations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of hand kinematics using inertial and magnetic sensors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of hand kinematics is important when evaluating hand functioning. Major drawbacks of current sensing glove systems are lack of rotational observability in particular directions, labour intensive calibration methods which are sensitive to wear and lack of an absolute hand orientation estimate. Methods We propose an ambulatory system using inertial sensors that can be placed on the hand, fingers and thumb. It allows a full 3D reconstruction of all finger and thumb joints as well as the absolute orientation of the hand. The system was experimentally evaluated for the static accuracy, dynamic range and repeatability. Results The RMS position norm difference of the fingertip compared to an optical system was 5±0.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) for flexion-extension and 12.4±3.0 mm for combined flexion-extension abduction-adduction movements of the index finger. The difference between index and thumb tips during a pinching movement was 6.5±2.1 mm. The dynamic range of the sensing system and filter was adequate to reconstruct full 80 degrees movements of the index finger performed at 116 times per minute, which was limited by the range of the gyroscope. Finally, the reliability study showed a mean range difference over five subjects of 1.1±0.4 degrees for a flat hand test and 1.8±0.6 degrees for a plastic mold clenching test, which is smaller than other reported data gloves. Conclusion Compared to existing data gloves, this research showed that inertial and magnetic sensors are of interest for ambulatory analysis of the human hand and finger kinematics in terms of static accuracy, dynamic range and repeatability. It allows for estimation of multi-degree of freedom joint movements using low-cost sensors. PMID:24746123

  13. Assessment of hand kinematics using inertial and magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Kortier, Henk G; Sluiter, Victor I; Roetenberg, Daniel; Veltink, Peter H

    2014-04-21

    Assessment of hand kinematics is important when evaluating hand functioning. Major drawbacks of current sensing glove systems are lack of rotational observability in particular directions, labour intensive calibration methods which are sensitive to wear and lack of an absolute hand orientation estimate. We propose an ambulatory system using inertial sensors that can be placed on the hand, fingers and thumb. It allows a full 3D reconstruction of all finger and thumb joints as well as the absolute orientation of the hand. The system was experimentally evaluated for the static accuracy, dynamic range and repeatability. The RMS position norm difference of the fingertip compared to an optical system was 5±0.5 mm (mean ± standard deviation) for flexion-extension and 12.4±3.0 mm for combined flexion-extension abduction-adduction movements of the index finger. The difference between index and thumb tips during a pinching movement was 6.5±2.1 mm. The dynamic range of the sensing system and filter was adequate to reconstruct full 80 degrees movements of the index finger performed at 116 times per minute, which was limited by the range of the gyroscope. Finally, the reliability study showed a mean range difference over five subjects of 1.1±0.4 degrees for a flat hand test and 1.8±0.6 degrees for a plastic mold clenching test, which is smaller than other reported data gloves. Compared to existing data gloves, this research showed that inertial and magnetic sensors are of interest for ambulatory analysis of the human hand and finger kinematics in terms of static accuracy, dynamic range and repeatability. It allows for estimation of multi-degree of freedom joint movements using low-cost sensors.

  14. Assessment of Lower Limb Prosthesis through Wearable Sensors and Thermography

    PubMed Central

    Cutti, Andrea Giovanni; Perego, Paolo; Fusca, Marcello C.; Sacchetti, Rinaldo; Andreoni, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the application of infrared thermography in combination with ambulatory wearable monitoring of temperature and relative humidity, to assess the residual limb-to-liner interface in lower-limb prosthesis users. Five male traumatic transtibial amputees were involved, who reported no problems or discomfort while wearing the prosthesis. A thermal imaging camera was used to measure superficial thermal distribution maps of the stump. A wearable system for recording the temperature and relative humidity in up to four anatomical points was developed, tested in vitro and integrated with the measurement set. The parallel application of an infrared camera and wearable sensors provided complementary information. Four main Regions of Interest were identified on the stump (inferior patella, lateral/medial epicondyles, tibial tuberosity), with good inter-subject repeatability. An average increase of 20% in hot areas (P < 0.05) is shown after walking compared to resting conditions. The sensors inside the cuff did not provoke any discomfort during recordings and provide an inside of the thermal exchanges while walking and recording the temperature increase (a regime value is ∼+1.1 ± 0.7 °C) and a more significant one (∼+4.1 ± 2.3%) in humidity because of the sweat produced. This study has also begun the development of a reference data set for optimal socket/liner-stump construction. PMID:24618782

  15. Clinical frailty syndrome assessment using inertial sensors embedded in smartphones.

    PubMed

    Galán-Mercant, A; Cuesta-Vargas, A I

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the series of kinematic variables demonstrating the greatest precision in discriminating between the function of two groups of elderly persons (frail and non-frail) in the 10 m expanded timed up and go (ETUG) test using inertial sensors embedded in the iPhone 4(®). A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify the kinematic variables with the highest degree of precision in discriminating between the two groups. The predicted capability of the kinematic variables was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curves. The sample comprised 30 participants over 65 years old, 14 frail and 16 non-frail, assessed for frailty syndrome using the Fried criteria. Acceleration variables discriminated between the participant groups in the study; specifically these were the peak negative acceleration variables for motion axes x, y and z. In terms of sensitivity, the values were greater than or equal to those for the variable traditionally used to discriminate in the ETUG test, namely time. The kinematic parameters obtained from the internal inertial sensors in the iPhone 4(®) are promising additions to the ETUG analysis. There are encouraging signs that the analyses of these parameters in the separate phases of the ETUG procedure offer the potential for improved discrimination between frail and non-frail individuals. However, further in-depth study is required to verify the findings.

  16. Assessing Walking Strategies Using Insole Pressure Sensors for Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Munoz-Organero, Mario; Parker, Jack; Powell, Lauren; Mawson, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Insole pressure sensors capture the different forces exercised over the different parts of the sole when performing tasks standing up such as walking. Using data analysis and machine learning techniques, common patterns and strategies from different users to achieve different tasks can be automatically extracted. In this paper, we present the results obtained for the automatic detection of different strategies used by stroke survivors when walking as integrated into an Information Communication Technology (ICT) enhanced Personalised Self-Management Rehabilitation System (PSMrS) for stroke rehabilitation. Fourteen stroke survivors and 10 healthy controls have participated in the experiment by walking six times a distance from chair to chair of approximately 10 m long. The Rivermead Mobility Index was used to assess the functional ability of each individual in the stroke survivor group. Several walking strategies are studied based on data gathered from insole pressure sensors and patterns found in stroke survivor patients are compared with average patterns found in healthy control users. A mechanism to automatically estimate a mobility index based on the similarity of the pressure patterns to a stereotyped stride is also used. Both data gathered from stroke survivors and healthy controls are used to evaluate the proposed mechanisms. The output of trained algorithms is applied to the PSMrS system to provide feedback on gait quality enabling stroke survivors to self-manage their rehabilitation. PMID:27706077

  17. A micro oxygen sensor based on a nano sol-gel TiO2 thin film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hairong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiaxin; Sun, Quantao; Zhao, Yulong

    2014-09-03

    An oxygen gas microsensor based on nanostructured sol-gel TiO2 thin films with a buried Pd layer was developed on a silicon substrate. The nanostructured titania thin films for O2 sensors were prepared by the sol-gel process and became anatase after heat treatment. A sandwich TiO2 square board with an area of 350 μm × 350 μm was defined by both wet etching and dry etching processes and the wet one was applied in the final process due to its advantages of easy control for the final structure. A pair of 150 nm Pt micro interdigitated electrodes with 50 nm Ti buffer layer was fabricated on the board by a lift-off process. The sensor chip was tested in a furnace with changing the O2 concentration from 1.0% to 20% by monitoring its electrical resistance. Results showed that after several testing cycles the sensor's output becomes stable, and its sensitivity is 0.054 with deviation 2.65 × 10(-4) and hysteresis is 8.5%. Due to its simple fabrication process, the sensor has potential for application in environmental monitoring, where lower power consumption and small size are required.

  18. A Micro Oxygen Sensor Based on a Nano Sol-Gel TiO2 Thin Film

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hairong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Jiaxin; Sun, Quantao; Zhao, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    An oxygen gas microsensor based on nanostructured sol-gel TiO2 thin films with a buried Pd layer was developed on a silicon substrate. The nanostructured titania thin films for O2 sensors were prepared by the sol-gel process and became anatase after heat treatment. A sandwich TiO2 square board with an area of 350 μm × 350 μm was defined by both wet etching and dry etching processes and the wet one was applied in the final process due to its advantages of easy control for the final structure. A pair of 150 nm Pt micro interdigitated electrodes with 50 nm Ti buffer layer was fabricated on the board by a lift-off process. The sensor chip was tested in a furnace with changing the O2 concentration from 1.0% to 20% by monitoring its electrical resistance. Results showed that after several testing cycles the sensor's output becomes stable, and its sensitivity is 0.054 with deviation 2.65 × 10−4 and hysteresis is 8.5%. Due to its simple fabrication process, the sensor has potential for application in environmental monitoring, where lower power consumption and small size are required. PMID:25192312

  19. Definition and use of the experimental sensible parameters to characterize sensitivity and precision of a generic oxygen optical sensor.

    PubMed

    Badocco, Denis; Pastore, Paolo

    2008-03-15

    Experimental data, obtained with an oxygen optical sensor constituted by a polysulfone layer embedding ruthenium(II)(4,7-diphenyl-l,l0-phenanthroline)octylsulfate (Ru(dpp)OS), were rationalized by using the digital simulation technique and generalized for different sensors. The experimental, asymmetric, emission shape was used to define two sensible parameters, ASY (asymmetry factor) and DeltaI(%) (percent variation of emission intensity), to characterize the sensitivity of a generic oxygen optical sensor (represented by the Stern-Volmer constant, K'(sv)). Correlations between ASY and K'(sv) and between DeltaI(%) and K'(sv) were established, and a double working curve was proposed to evaluate with a single light emission measurement the K'(sv) value with the best precision. Sensitive membranes (-log K'(sv) = pK'(sv) < 0.5) had high precision only for low %O(2) values; poorly sensitive membrane (pK'(sv)> 2.5) had constant but scarce precisions in a large %O(2) interval. For %O(2) up to 21% (air) good values are pK'(sv)= 0.5-1.0. In order to monitor a wider %O(2) range, pK'(sv) = 1.5-2.0 are good choices. A simple mathematical model allowed one to estimate the oxygen diffusion coefficient inside the layer, D(O2), and its solubility in the polymer matrix, s(O2), from the simple measurement of the membrane thickness, response time, t(90), and luminescence lifetime. D(O2) = 2 x 10(-8) cm2 s(-1) and s(O2) = 2.2 x 10(-3) mol atm(-1) dm(-3) [corrected] were estimated for our membranes. The proposed working curves gave very good results even with literature data.

  20. Designing a Microfluidic Device with Integrated Ratiometric Oxygen Sensors for the Long-Term Control and Monitoring of Chronic and Cyclic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Grist, Samantha M.; Schmok, Jonathan C.; Liu, Meng-Chi (Andy); Chrostowski, Lukas; Cheung, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Control of oxygen over cell cultures in vitro is a topic of considerable interest, as chronic and cyclic hypoxia can alter cell behaviour. Both static and transient hypoxic levels have been found to affect tumour cell behaviour; it is potentially valuable to include these effects in early, in vitro stages of drug screening. A barrier to their inclusion is that rates of transient hypoxia can be a few cycles/hour, which is difficult to reproduce in traditional in vitro cell culture environments due to long diffusion distances from control gases to the cells. We use a gas-permeable three-layer microfluidic device to achieve spatial and temporal oxygen control with biologically-relevant switching times. We measure the oxygen profiles with integrated, ratiometric optical oxygen sensors, demonstrate sensor and system stability over multi-day experiments, and characterize a pre-bleaching process to improve sensor stability. We show, with both finite-element modelling and experimental data, excellent control over the oxygen levels by the device, independent of fluid flow rate and oxygenation for the operating flow regime. We measure equilibration times of approximately 10 min, generate complex, time-varying oxygen profiles, and study the effects of oxygenated media flow rates on the measured oxygen levels. This device could form a useful tool for future long-term studies of cell behaviour under hypoxia. PMID:26287202

  1. Measurement in a marine environment using low cost sensors of temperature and dissolved oxygen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godshall, F.A.; Cory, R.L.; Phinney, D.E.

    1974-01-01

    Continuous records of physical parameters of the marine environment are difficult as well as expensive to obtain. This paper describes preliminary results of an investigative program with the purpose of developing low cost time integrating measurement and averaging devices for water temperature and dissolved oxygen. Measurements were made in an estuarine area of the Chesapeake Bay over two week periods. With chemical thermometers average water temperature for the two week period was found to be equal to average water temperature measured with thermocouples plus or minus 1.0 C. The slow diffusion of oxygen through the semipermiable sides of plastic bottles permitted the use of water filled bottles to obtain averaged oxygen measurements. Oxygen measurements for two week averaging times using 500 ml polyethylene bottles were found to vary from conventionally measured and averaged dissolved oxygen by about 1.8 mg/l. ?? 1974 Estuarine Research Federation.

  2. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  3. Transition metal substituted SrTiO3 perovskite oxides as promising functional materials for oxygen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sunasira

    2012-07-01

    Modern industries employ several gases as process fluids. Leakage of these gases in the operating area could lead to undesirable consequences. Even in chemical industries, which use large quantities of inert gases in confined areas, accidental leakage of these process gases would result in the reduction of oxygen partial pressure in atmospheric air. For instance, large amounts of gaseous nitrogen and argon are used in pharmaceutical industries, gas filling/bottling plants, operating area of Fast Breeder reactors, etc. Fall of concentration of oxygen in air below 17% could lead to life risk (Asphyxiation) of the working personnel that has to be checked well in advance. Further, when the leaking gas is of explosive nature, its damage potential would be very high if its concentration level in air increases beyond its lower explosive limit. Surveillance of the ambient within these industries at the critical areas and also in the environment around them for oxygen therefore becomes highly essential. Sensitive and selective gas sensors made of advanced materials are required to meet this demand of monitoring environmental pollution. The perovskite class of oxides (ABO3) is chemically stable even at high temperatures and can tolerate large levels of dopants without phase transformations. The electronic properties of this parent functional material can be tailored by adding appropriate dopants that exhibit different valence states. Aliovalent transition metal substituted SrTiO3 perovskites are good mixed ionic and electronic conductors and potential candidates for sensing oxygen at percentage level exploiting their oxygen pressure dependent electrical conductivity. This paper presents the preparation, study of electrical conductivity and oxygen-sensing characteristics of iron and cobalt substituted SrTiO3.

  4. Inertial-magnetic sensors for assessing spatial cognition in infants.

    PubMed

    Campolo, Domenico; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico; Schiavone, Giuseppina; Keller, Flavio; Guglielmelli, Eugenio

    2011-05-01

    This letter describes a novel approach to the assessment of spatial cognition in children. In particular, we present a wireless instrumented toy embedding magneto-inertial sensors for orientation tracking, specifically developed to assess the ability to insert objects into holes. To be used in naturalistic environments (e.g., day cares), we also describe an in-field calibration procedure based on a sequence of manual rotations, not relying on accurate motions or sophisticated equipment. The final accuracy of the proposed system, after the mentioned calibration procedure, is derived by direct comparison with a gold-standard motion tracking device. In particular, both systems are subjected to a sequence of ten single-axis rotations (approximately 90°, back and forth), about three different axes. The rms of the angular error between the two measurements (gold-standard versus proposed systems) was evaluated for each trial. In particular, the average rms error is under 2°. This study indicates that a technological approach to ecological assessment of spatial cognition in infants is indeed feasible. As a consequence, prevention through screening of large number of infants is at reach.

  5. Multiple approaches for enhancing all-organic electronics photoluminescent sensors: simultaneous oxygen and pH monitoring.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Xiao, Teng; Cui, Weipan; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2013-05-17

    Key issues in using organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) as excitation sources in structurally integrated photoluminescence (PL)-based sensors are the low forward light outcoupling, the OLEDs' broad electroluminescence (EL) bands, and the long-lived remnant EL that follows an EL pulse. The outcoupling issue limits the detection sensitivity (S) as only ~20% of the light generated within standard OLEDs can be forward outcoupled and used for sensor probe excitation. The EL broad band interferes with the analyte-sensitive PL, leading to a background that reduces S and dynamic range. In particular, these issues hinder designing compact sensors, potentially miniaturizable, that are devoid of optical filters and couplers. We address these shortcomings by introducing easy-to-employ multiple approaches for outcoupling improvement, PL enhancement, and background EL reduction leading to novel, compact all-organic device architectures demonstrated for simultaneous monitoring of oxygen and pH. The sensor comprises simply-fabricated, directionally-emitting, narrower-band, multicolor microcavity OLED excitation and small molecule- and polymer-based organic photodetectors (OPDs) with a more selective spectral response. Additionally, S and PL intensity for oxygen are enhanced by using polystyrene (PS):polyethylene glycol (PEG) blends as the sensing film matrix. By utilizing higher molecular weight PS, the ratio τ0/τ100 (PL decay time τ at 0% O2/τ at 100% O2) that is often used to express S increases ×1.9 to 20.7 relative to the lower molecular weight PS, where this ratio is 11.0. This increase reduces to ×1.7 when the PEG is added (τ0/τ100=18.2), but the latter results in an increase ×2.7 in the PL intensity. The sensor's response time is <10s in all cases. The microporous structure of these blended films, with PEG decorating PS pores, serves a dual purpose. It results in light scattering that reduces the EL that is waveguided in the substrate of the OLEDs and

  6. Oxygen-Sensing Paint-On Bandage: Calibration of a Novel Approach in Tissue Perfusion Assessment.

    PubMed

    Koolen, Pieter G L; Li, Zongxi; Roussakis, Emmanuel; Paul, Marek A; Ibrahim, Ahmed M S; Matyal, Robina; Huang, Thomas; Evans, Conor L; Lin, Samuel J

    2017-07-01

    Knowledge of tissue oxygenation status is fundamental in the prevention of postoperative flap failure. Recently, the authors introduced a novel oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage that incorporated an oxygen-sensing porphyrin with a commercially available liquid bandage matrix. In this study, the authors extend validation of their oxygen-sensing bandage by comparing it to the use of near-infrared tissue oximetry in addition to Clark electrode measurements. The oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage was applied to the left hind limb in a rodent model. Simultaneously, a near-infrared imaging device and Clark electrode were attached to the right and left hind limbs, respectively. Tissue oxygenation was measured under normal, ischemic (aortic ligation), and reperfused conditions. On average, the oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage measured a decrease in transdermal oxygenation from 85.2 mmHg to 64.1 mmHg upon aortic ligation. The oxygen-sensing dye restored at 81.2 mmHg after unclamping. Responses in both control groups demonstrated a similar trend. Physiologic changes from normal to ischemic and reperfused conditions were statistically significantly different in all three techniques (p < 0.001). The authors' newly developed oxygen-sensing paint-on bandage exhibits a comparable trend in oxygenation recordings in a rat model similar to conventional oxygenation assessment techniques. This technique could potentially prove to be a valuable tool in the routine clinical management of flaps following free tissue transfer. Incorporating oxygen-sensing capabilities into a simple wound dressing material has the added benefit of providing both wound protection and constant wound oxygenation assessment.

  7. A remote assessment system with a vision robot and wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Wang, Jue; Ren, Yumiao; Li, Jianjun

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an ongoing researched remote rehabilitation assessment system that has a 6-freedom double-eyes vision robot to catch vision information, and a group of wearable sensors to acquire biomechanical signals. A server computer is fixed on the robot, to provide services to the robot's controller and all the sensors. The robot is connected to Internet by wireless channel, and so do the sensors to the robot. Rehabilitation professionals can semi-automatically practise an assessment program via Internet. The preliminary results show that the smart device, including the robot and the sensors, can improve the quality of remote assessment, and reduce the complexity of operation at a distance.

  8. Methodology for the assessment of oxygen as an energy carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ming Wei

    Due to the energy intensity of the oxygen generating process, the electric power grid would benefit if the oxygen generating process was consumed electric power only during low demand periods. Thus, the question to be addressed in this study is whether oxygen production and/or usage can be modified to achieve energy storage and/or transmission objectives at lower cost. The specific benefit to grid would be a leveling, over time, of the demand profile and thus would require less installation capacity. In order to track the availability of electricity, a compressed air storage unit is installed between the cryogenic distillation section and the main air compressor of air separation unit. A profit maximizing scheme for sizing storage inventory and related equipments is developed. The optimum scheme is capable of market responsiveness. Profits of steel maker, oxy-combustion, and IGCC plants with storage facilities can be higher than those plants without storage facilities, especially, at high-price market. Price tracking feature of air storage integration will certainly increase profit margins of the plants. The integration may push oxy-combustion and integrated gasification combined cycle process into economic viability. Since oxygen is used in consumer sites, it may generate at remote locations and transport to the place needed. Energy losses and costs analysis of oxygen transportation is conducted for various applications. Energy consumptions of large capacity and long distance GOX and LOX pipelines are lower than small capacity pipelines. However, transportation losses and costs of GOX and LOX pipelines are still higher than electricity transmission.

  9. Non Invasive Assessment of Tissue Oxygenation and Blood Flow as a Tool for Staging Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sujatha, N.; Anand, B. S. Suresh; Jayanthy, A. K.; Murthy, V. B. Narayana; Sheshadri; Poddar, Richa

    2011-10-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and laser speckle imaging have been identified as an effective tool in characterizing/assessing tissue oxygenation and blood flow in real time tissues. In this paper we are exploring the possibility of finding out blood flow/oxygenation at different areas of feet of subjects with different levels of diabetes. Tissue blood flow is determined by assessing the contrast variations in the laser speckle image of the foot and tissue oxygenation is assessed by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. A combination of both techniques offers an effective and purely non invasive mode of examination in the staging of Diabetes.

  10. Do cytochromes function as oxygen sensors in the regulation of nitrate reductase biosynthesis?

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, C H; Bishop, C W

    1977-01-01

    The observation that oxygen represses nitrate reductase biosynthesis in a hemA mutant grown aerobically with or without delta-aminolevulinic acid indicates that cytochromes are not responsible for nitrate reductase repression in aerobically grown cells. PMID:326768

  11. Assessing Vascular Oxygen Dynamics for Breast Tumor Prognosis: Comparison Between MR BOLD and Near Infrared Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    treat- ments, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy (37). In summary, changes in breast tumor temperature and vascular oxygenation have been... Breast Tumor Prognosis: Comparison Between MR BOLD and Near Infrared Method PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Hanli Liu, Ph.D...CONTRACT NUMBER Assessing Vascular Oxygen Dynamics for Breast Tumor Prognosis: Comparison Between MR BOLD and Near Infrared Method

  12. Monitoring the impact of pressure on the assessment of skin perfusion and oxygenation using a novel pressure device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Ho, Thuan; Le, Du; Ghassemi, Pejhman; Nguyen, Thu; Lichy, Alison; Groah, Suzanne

    2013-03-01

    Skin perfusion and oxygenation is easily disrupted by imposed pressure. Fiber optics probes, particularly those spectroscopy or Doppler based, may relay misleading information about tissue microcirculation dynamics depending on external forces on the sensor. Such forces could be caused by something as simple as tape used to secure the fiber probe to the test subject, or as in our studies by the full weight of a patient with spinal cord injury (SCI) sitting on the probe. We are conducting a study on patients with SCI conducting pressure relief maneuvers in their wheelchairs. This study aims to provide experimental evidence of the optimal timing between pressure relief maneuvers. We have devised a wireless pressure-controlling device; a pressure sensor positioned on a compression aluminum plate reads the imposed pressure in real time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the sample. This apparatus was used to monitor the effect of increasing values of pressure on spectroscopic fiber probes built to monitor tissue oxygenation and Doppler probes used to assess tissue perfusion.

  13. In situ measurement of atomic oxygen flux using a silver film sensor onboard "TianTuo 1" nanosatellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yun; Chen, Xiaoqian; Sheng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Research into the measurement of atomic oxygen (AO) flux in a low Earth orbit (LEO) is highly significant for the development of spacecraft surface materials as well as for enhancing the reliability of space instruments. In the present study, we studied a silver film resistance method for AO flux measurement and we established a quantitative calculation model. Moreover, we designed a silver film sensor for space flight tests with a mass of about 100 g and a peak power consumption of less than 0.2 W. The effect of AO on the silver film was demonstrated in a ground-based simulation experiment and compared with the Kapton-mass-loss method. For the space flight test, the AO flux was estimated by monitoring the change in the resistance in the linear part of the silver/AO reaction regime. Finally, the sensor was carried onboard our nanosatellite ;TianTuo 1; to obtain in situ measurements of the AO flux during a 476 km sun synchronous orbit. The result was critically compared with theoretical predictions, which validated the design of this sensor.

  14. Determination of dissolved oxygen in the cryosphere: a comprehensive laboratory and field evaluation of fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Bagshaw, E A; Wadham, J L; Mowlem, M; Tranter, M; Eveness, J; Fountain, A G; Telling, J

    2011-01-15

    Recent advances in the Cryospheric Sciences have shown that icy environments are host to consortia of microbial communities, whose function and dynamics are often controlled by the concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) in solution. To date, only limited spot determinations of DO have been possible in these environments. They reveal the potential for rates of change that exceed realistic manual sampling rates, highlighting the need to explore methods for the continuous measurement of DO concentrations. We report the first comprehensive field and laboratory performance tests of fiber-optic sensors (PreSens, Regensburg, Germany) for measuring DO in icy ecosystems. A series of laboratory tests performed at low and standard temperatures (-5 to 20 °C) demonstrates high precision (0.3% at 50 μmol/kg and 1.3% at 300 μmol/kg), rapid response times (<20 s), and minimal drift (<0.4%). Survival of freeze thaw was problematic, unless the sensor film was mechanically fixed to the fiber and protected by a stainless steel sheath. Results of two field deployments of sensors to the Swiss Alps and Antarctica largely demonstrate a performance consistent with laboratory tests and superior to traditional methods.

  15. A Macroporous TiO2 Oxygen Sensor Fabricated Using Anodic Aluminium Oxide as an Etching Mask

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Jun-Wei; Chang, Chien-Kuo; Wu, Sheng-Po

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fabrication method to produce a macroporous Si surface by employing an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) nanopore array layer as an etching template is presented. Combining AAO with a reactive ion etching (RIE) processes, a homogeneous and macroporous silicon surface can be effectively configured by modulating AAO process parameters and alumina film thickness, thus hopefully replacing conventional photolithography and electrochemical etch methods. The hybrid process integration is considered fully CMOS compatible thanks to the low-temperature AAO and CMOS processes. The gas-sensing characteristics of 50 nm TiO2 nanofilms deposited on the macroporous surface are compared with those of conventional plain (or non-porous) nanofilms to verify reduced response noise and improved sensitivity as a result of their macroporosity. Our experimental results reveal that macroporous geometry of the TiO2 chemoresistive gas sensor demonstrates 2-fold higher (∼33%) improved sensitivity than a non-porous sensor at different levels of oxygen exposure. In addition, the macroporous device exhibits excellent discrimination capability and significantly lessened response noise at 500 °C. Experimental results indicate that the hybrid process of such miniature and macroporous devices are compatible as well as applicable to integrated next generation bio-chemical sensors. PMID:22315561

  16. A macroporous TiO2 oxygen sensor fabricated using anodic aluminium oxide as an etching mask.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Yong-Sheng; Huang, Jun-Wei; Chang, Chien-Kuo; Wu, Sheng-Po

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fabrication method to produce a macroporous Si surface by employing an anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) nanopore array layer as an etching template is presented. Combining AAO with a reactive ion etching (RIE) processes, a homogeneous and macroporous silicon surface can be effectively configured by modulating AAO process parameters and alumina film thickness, thus hopefully replacing conventional photolithography and electrochemical etch methods. The hybrid process integration is considered fully CMOS compatible thanks to the low-temperature AAO and CMOS processes. The gas-sensing characteristics of 50 nm TiO(2) nanofilms deposited on the macroporous surface are compared with those of conventional plain (or non-porous) nanofilms to verify reduced response noise and improved sensitivity as a result of their macroporosity. Our experimental results reveal that macroporous geometry of the TiO(2) chemoresistive gas sensor demonstrates 2-fold higher (∼33%) improved sensitivity than a non-porous sensor at different levels of oxygen exposure. In addition, the macroporous device exhibits excellent discrimination capability and significantly lessened response noise at 500 °C. Experimental results indicate that the hybrid process of such miniature and macroporous devices are compatible as well as applicable to integrated next generation bio-chemical sensors.

  17. Influence of patient variables and sensor location on regional cerebral oxygen saturation measured by INVOS 4100 near-infrared spectrophotometers.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Katsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Yoshitani, Kenji; Nagahata, Toshihiro; Furuya, Hitoshi

    2003-10-01

    Cerebral oximeter based on near-infrared spectroscopy has been used as a continuous, noninvasive monitoring of regional cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2). Although the absolute rSO2 values have a wide range of variability, the factors affecting a variability of rSO2 values have not been extensively investigated. The authors investigated the influence of patient variables and sensor location on rSO2 measured by the cerebral oximeter INVOS 4100 in 111 patients anesthetized with sevoflurane, fentanyl, and nitrous oxide in oxygen. The sensors for rSO2 measurements were applied on the right forehead (R), 1 cm lateral to R (R1), on the left forehead (L), 1 cm lateral to L (L1), and on the center of the forehead (C). The relationship between the rSO2 values and patient variables were also analyzed. Values of rSO2 at R1 and L1 were significantly lower than those at R and L, respectively. Values of rSO2 at C were significantly higher compared with those at other sites. There were no significant correlations between the rSO2 values and values of weight, height, and head size. Values of rSO2 were similar between males and females. A significant negative correlation between the rSO2 values and age and a positive correlation between the rSO2 values and hemoglobin concentration were observed. These data indicate that patient age, hemoglobin concentration at the measurement, and sensor location can affect rSO2 values.

  18. Oxygenation in cervical cancer and normal uterine cervix assessed using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) MRI at 3T.

    PubMed

    Hallac, Rami R; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Qing; McColl, Roderick W; Lea, Jayanthi; Sims, Robert D; Weatherall, Paul T; Mason, Ralph P

    2012-12-01

    Hypoxia is reported to be a biomarker for poor prognosis in cervical cancer. However, a practical noninvasive method is needed for the routine clinical evaluation of tumor hypoxia. This study examined the potential use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast MRI as a noninvasive technique to assess tumor vascular oxygenation at 3T. Following Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent and in compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, successful results were achieved in nine patients with locally advanced cervical cancer [International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IIA to IVA] and three normal volunteers. In the first four patients, dynamic T₂*-weighted MRI was performed in the transaxial plane using a multi-shot echo planar imaging sequence whilst patients breathed room air followed by oxygen (15 dm³/min). Later, a multi-echo gradient echo examination was added to provide quantitative R₂* measurements. The baseline T₂*-weighted signal intensity was quite stable, but increased to various extents in tumors on initiation of oxygen breathing. The signal in normal uterus increased significantly, whereas that in the iliacus muscle did not change. R₂* responded significantly in healthy uterus, cervix and eight cervical tumors. This preliminary study demonstrates that BOLD MRI of cervical cancer at 3T is feasible. However, more patients must be evaluated and followed clinically before any prognostic value can be determined. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Oligomeric state affects oxygen dissociation and diguanylate cyclase activity of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Deer, D Douglas; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is regulated by enzymes, such as diguanylate cyclases, that respond to environmental signals and alter c-di-GMP levels. Diguanylate cyclase activity of two globin coupled sensors is shown to be regulated by gaseous ligands, with cyclase activity and O2 dissociation affected by protein oligomeric state.

  20. Raman-based Oxygen and Nitrogen Sensor for Monitoring Empty Airplane Fuel Tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peter C.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a Raman-based method for detecting oxygen and nitrogen in empty fuel tanks. The need for such a method comes from the potential danger of allowing explosive oxygen-fuel mixtures to accumulate in empty airplane fuel tanks. An explosion resulting from such a mixture is believed to have caused the Flight TWA 800 disaster in 1996. Recently, (e.g., February 17,2004 press release) the FAA announced its intentions to make fuel tank inerting mandatory. One potential solution to this problem is to use an inert gas such as nitrogen to flood the empty fue1 tanks in order to reduce the concentration of oxygen.

  1. A mitochondrial redox oxygen sensor in the pulmonary vasculature and ductus arteriosus1

    PubMed Central

    Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Hong, Zhigang G; Xiong, Ping Y; Del Paggio, Joseph C; Herr, Julia E; Johri, Amer M; Archer, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian homeostatic oxygen sensing system (HOSS) initiates changes in vascular tone, respiration, and neurosecretion that optimize oxygen uptake and tissue oxygen delivery within seconds of detecting altered environmental or arterial PO2. The HOSS includes carotid body type 1 cells, adrenomedullary cells, neuroepithelial bodies, and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in pulmonary arteries (PA), ductus arteriosus (DA) and fetoplacental arteries. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimises ventilation-perfusion matching. In utero, HPV diverts placentally-oxygenated blood from the non-ventilated lung through the DA. At birth, increased alveolar and arterial oxygen tension dilate the pulmonary vasculature and, constrict the DA, respectively, thereby transitioning the newborn to an air-breathing organism. Though modulated by endothelial-derived relaxing and constricting factors, O2-sensing is intrinsic to PA- and DASMCs. Within the SMC’s dynamic mitochondrial network, changes in PO2 alter the reduction-oxidation state of redox couples (NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH) and the production of reactive oxygen species, ROS (e.g. H2O2) by Complexes I and III of the electron transport chain (ETC). ROS and redox couples regulate ion channels, transporters, and enzymes, changing intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i and calcium sensitivity and eliciting homeostatic responses to hypoxia. In PASMC, hypoxia inhibits ROS production and reduces redox couples, thereby inhibiting O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, depolarizing the plasma membrane, activating voltage-gated calcium channels (CaL), increasing [Ca2+]i and causing vasoconstriction. In DASMC, elevated PO2 causes mitochondrial fission, increasing ETC Complex I activity and ROS production. The DASMC’s downstream response to elevated PO2 (Kv channel inhibition, CaL activation, increased [Ca2+]i and rho kinase activation) is similar to the PASMC’s hypoxic response. Impaired O2-sensing contributes to human diseases

  2. A mitochondrial redox oxygen sensor in the pulmonary vasculature and ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J; Hong, Zhigang G; Xiong, Ping Y; Del Paggio, Joseph C; Herr, Julia E; Johri, Amer M; Archer, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian homeostatic oxygen sensing system (HOSS) initiates changes in vascular tone, respiration, and neurosecretion that optimize oxygen uptake and tissue oxygen delivery within seconds of detecting altered environmental or arterial PO2. The HOSS includes carotid body type 1 cells, adrenomedullary cells, neuroepithelial bodies, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in pulmonary arteries (PAs), ductus arteriosus (DA), and fetoplacental arteries. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) optimizes ventilation-perfusion matching. In utero, HPV diverts placentally oxygenated blood from the non-ventilated lung through the DA. At birth, increased alveolar and arterial oxygen tension dilates the pulmonary vasculature and constricts the DA, respectively, thereby transitioning the newborn to an air-breathing organism. Though modulated by endothelial-derived relaxing and constricting factors, O2 sensing is intrinsic to PASMCs and DASMCs. Within the SMC's dynamic mitochondrial network, changes in PO2 alter the reduction-oxidation state of redox couples (NAD(+)/NADH, NADP(+)/NADPH) and the production of reactive oxygen species, ROS (e.g., H2O2), by complexes I and III of the electron transport chain (ETC). ROS and redox couples regulate ion channels, transporters, and enzymes, changing intracellular calcium [Ca(2+)]i and calcium sensitivity and eliciting homeostatic responses to hypoxia. In PASMCs, hypoxia inhibits ROS production and reduces redox couples, thereby inhibiting O2-sensitive voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, depolarizing the plasma membrane, activating voltage-gated calcium channels (CaL), increasing [Ca(2+)]i, and causing vasoconstriction. In DASMCs, elevated PO2 causes mitochondrial fission, increasing ETC complex I activity and ROS production. The DASMC's downstream response to elevated PO2 (Kv channel inhibition, CaL activation, increased [Ca(2+)]i, and rho kinase activation) is similar to the PASMC's hypoxic response. Impaired O2 sensing contributes to

  3. Method of assessing blood oxygenation in microcirculation vessels based on Doppler approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, Vladimir G.; Korsi, Larissa V.; Egorov, Sergei Y.

    2001-06-01

    Combination of laser Doppler flowmetry and pulse oximetry methods allows for the direct assessment of oxygen supply to tissues at the microcirculatory level, namely, in that part of the vascular network where the transcapillary exchange takes place that is responsible for saturating tissues with oxygen. The microcirculation system comprises arterial and venous microvascular parts that differ in blood flow velocities. Frequency separation of the photodetector signal components related to different velocity ranges makes possible to distinguish the hemodynamic processes in these two parts of the microvascular system. Moreover, numerous studies of collective oscillatory processes in hemodynamics reveal that cardio-oscillations are more pronounced in arterioles, whereas venous hemodynamics is mostly influenced by the breath rhythm. Taking account of the above phenomena allows developing a signal-filtration system for separate characterization of blood-oxygenation states in arterial and venous blood flows. Light absorbance in the skin depends on both light wavelength and blood-oxygenation level. Processing the signals obtained with a two-channel dual-wavelength (630 and 1115 nm) laser Doppler flowmeter provides information about blood oxygenation levels at the entrance and exit of the microvascular system and allows assessing the specific levels of oxygenation levels at the entrance and exit of the microvascular system and allows assessing the specific levels of oxygen consumption in tissues. In particular, this approach allows revealing pathogenic processes resulting from hyper- and hypo-oxygenation in tissues. For instance, rapidly growing malignant tumors are characterized by intensive metabolism, rapid formation of capillaries, and active transcapillary oxygen exchange that results in higher level of oxygen diffusion into tissue, while the level of oxygen is lowered in the microvascular veins.

  4. Spatial interpolation quality assessments for soil sensor transect datasets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Near-ground geophysical soil sensors provide extremely valuable information for precision agriculture applications. Indeed, their readings can be used as proxy for many soil parameters. Typically, leave-one-out (loo) cross-validation (CV) of spatial interpolation of sensor data returns overly optimi...

  5. Estimating Orientation Using Magnetic and Inertial Sensors and Different Sensor Fusion Approaches: Accuracy Assessment in Manual and Locomotion Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bergamini, Elena; Ligorio, Gabriele; Summa, Aurora; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Cappozzo, Aurelio; Sabatini, Angelo Maria

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic and inertial measurement units are an emerging technology to obtain 3D orientation of body segments in human movement analysis. In this respect, sensor fusion is used to limit the drift errors resulting from the gyroscope data integration by exploiting accelerometer and magnetic aiding sensors. The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of sensor fusion methods under different experimental conditions. Manual and locomotion tasks, differing in time duration, measurement volume, presence/absence of static phases, and out-of-plane movements, were performed by six subjects, and recorded by one unit located on the forearm or the lower trunk, respectively. Two sensor fusion methods, representative of the stochastic (Extended Kalman Filter) and complementary (Non-linear observer) filtering, were selected, and their accuracy was assessed in terms of attitude (pitch and roll angles) and heading (yaw angle) errors using stereophotogrammetric data as a reference. The sensor fusion approaches provided significantly more accurate results than gyroscope data integration. Accuracy improved mostly for heading and when the movement exhibited stationary phases, evenly distributed 3D rotations, it occurred in a small volume, and its duration was greater than approximately 20 s. These results were independent from the specific sensor fusion method used. Practice guidelines for improving the outcome accuracy are provided. PMID:25302810

  6. Atomic Oxygen (AO) and Nitrogen (AN) In-situ Flux Sensor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-10

    source of atomic oxygen and nitrogen fluxes. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy is a well- established method for the detection of atomic species in the...delivered and installed in our lab at the end of March 2016. Block Diagram of the Resonance ONAMS-UHV Atomic Absorption System for in-situ

  7. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  8. Luminescent metal-organic framework films as highly sensitive and fast-response oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Dou, Zhongshang; Yu, Jiancan; Cui, Yuanjing; Yang, Yu; Wang, Zhiyu; Yang, Deren; Qian, Guodong

    2014-04-16

    Luminescent metal-organic framework films, CPM-5⊃Tb(3+) and MIL-100(In)⊃Tb(3+), have been constructed by postfunctionalization of two porous indium-organic frameworks with different structures, respectively. The MIL-100(In)⊃Tb(3+) film shows high oxygen sensitivity (KSV = 7.59) and short response/recovery time (6 s/53 s).

  9. The Determination of the Percent of Oxygen in Air Using a Gas Pressure Sensor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, James; Chancey, Katherine

    2005-01-01

    The experiment of determination of the percent of oxygen in air is performed in a general chemistry laboratory in which students compare the results calculated from the pressure measurements obtained with the calculator-based systems to those obtained in a water-measurement method. This experiment allows students to explore a fundamental reaction…

  10. Non-Invasive NIR Sensor for Quantification of Deep Tissue Oxygenation. Phase 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-10-01

    be determined by differential absorption spectroscopy using two wavelengths, 0/oSat- ga(, l)/p[a(X2)I [ Hielscher , et al., 1993; Haida and Chance...Biol 345:829-35, 1994. Hielscher AH, Tittel FK, and Jacques SL: Non-invasive monitoring of blood oxygenation by phase resolved transmission spectroscopy

  11. Parylene MEMS patency sensor for assessment of hydrocephalus shunt obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Brian J; Jin, Willa; Baldwin, Alexander; Yu, Lawrence; Christian, Eisha; Krieger, Mark D; McComb, J Gordon; Meng, Ellis

    2016-10-01

    Neurosurgical ventricular shunts inserted to treat hydrocephalus experience a cumulative failure rate of 80 % over 12 years; obstruction is responsible for most failures with a majority occurring at the proximal catheter. Current diagnosis of shunt malfunction is imprecise and involves neuroimaging studies and shunt tapping, an invasive measurement of intracranial pressure and shunt patency. These patients often present emergently and a delay in care has dire consequences. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) patency sensor was developed to enable direct and quantitative tracking of shunt patency in order to detect proximal shunt occlusion prior to the development of clinical symptoms thereby avoiding delays in treatment. The sensor was fabricated on a flexible polymer substrate to eventually allow integration into a shunt. In this study, the sensor was packaged for use with external ventricular drainage systems for clinical validation. Insights into the transduction mechanism of the sensor were obtained. The impact of electrode size, clinically relevant temperatures and flows, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plasma sterilization on sensor function were evaluated. Sensor performance in the presence of static and dynamic obstruction was demonstrated using 3 different models of obstruction. Electrode size was found to have a minimal effect on sensor performance and increased temperature and flow resulted in a slight decrease in the baseline impedance due to an increase in ionic mobility. However, sensor response did not vary within clinically relevant temperature and flow ranges. H2O2 plasma sterilization also had no effect on sensor performance. This low power and simple format sensor was developed with the intention of future integration into shunts for wireless monitoring of shunt state and more importantly, a more accurate and timely diagnosis of shunt failure.

  12. A non-invasive fluorescence-based oxygen sensor and platform for studying cell responses to metabolic agents in real-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchapudi, Koutilya Reddy

    A fluorescence-based sensor in a transverse flow/stop measurement platform has been developed to determine real-time changes in oxygen consumption rates for cell metabolic studies. The oxygen sensitive fluorophore platinum octaethylporphyrin was embedded in a cellulose acetate matrix and affixed to a fiber optic bundle, which provided for transmission of the excitation and emission wavelengths of the film. The fiber optic bundle was sealed in a sensor head that can be used in standard 24-well plates common to research labs. The utility of the sensor and sensing platform were determined by measuring the changes in oxygen consumption rates of Candida albicans during 90/30 s flow/stop cycles. Exposure of these cells to metabolic antagonists and an enhancer showed the expected decrease and increase in oxygen consumption rates in real time. The applicability of the platform to biological studies is illustrated by determination of synergistic activities between antifungal drugs and fluoride exposure in Candida albicans. The robustness of the fluorophore film is demonstrated by perfusion with different media and analyte conditions in the absence of cells. For stop cycle time intervals less than 1 minute the sensor exhibited a rapid and fairly linear change in fluorescence intensity to changing oxygen concentrations in the measurement chamber. Flow cycle fluorescence intensities were used as a baseline correction for treating the stop cycle fluorescence peaks.

  13. New and Fast Method To Quantify Respiration Rates of Bacterial and Plankton Communities in Freshwater Ecosystems by Using Optical Oxygen Sensor Spots▿

    PubMed Central

    Warkentin, Mareike; Freese, Heike M.; Karsten, Ulf; Schumann, Rhena

    2007-01-01

    A new method of respiration rate measurement based on oxygen luminescence quenching in sensor spots was evaluated for the first time for aquatic bacterial communities. The commonly used Winkler and Clark electrode methods to quantify oxygen concentration both require long incubation times, and the latter additionally causes signal drift due to oxygen consumption at the cathode. The sensor spots proved to be advantageous over those methods in terms of precise and quick oxygen measurements in natural bacterial communities, guaranteeing a respiration rate estimate during a time interval short enough to neglect variations in organism composition, abundance, and activity. Furthermore, no signal drift occurs during measurements, and respiration rate measurements are reliable even at low temperatures and low oxygen consumption rates. Both a natural bacterioplankton sample and a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river were evaluated in order to optimize the new method for aquatic microorganisms. A minimum abundance of 2.2 × 106 respiring cells ml−1 of a bacterial isolate was sufficient to obtain a distinct oxygen depletion signal within 20 min at 20°C with the new oxygen sensor spot method. Thus, a culture of a bacterial isolate from a eutrophic river (OW 144; 20 × 106 respiring bacteria ml−1) decreased the oxygen saturation about 8% within 20 min. The natural bacterioplankton sample respired 2.8% from initially 94% oxygen-saturated water in 30 min. During the growth season in 2005, the planktonic community of a eutrophic river consumed between 0.7 and 15.6 μmol O2 liter−1 h−1. The contribution of bacterial respiration to the total plankton community oxygen consumption varied seasonally between 11 and 100%. PMID:17766446

  14. Oxygen sensitive microwells.

    PubMed

    Sinkala, Elly; Eddington, David T

    2010-12-07

    Oxygen tension is critical in a number of cell pathways but is often overlooked in cell culture. One reason for this is the difficulty in modulating and assessing oxygen tensions without disturbing the culture conditions. Toward this end, a simple method to generate oxygen-sensitive microwells was developed through embossing polystyrene (PS) and platinum(ii) octaethylporphyrin ketone (PtOEPK) thin films. In addition to monitoring the oxygen tension, microwells were employed in order to isolate uniform clusters of cells in microwells. The depth and width of the microwells can be adapted to different experimental parameters easily by altering the thin film processing or embossing stamp geometries. The thin oxygen sensitive microwell substrate is also compatible with high magnification modalities such as confocal imaging. The incorporation of the oxygen sensor into the microwells produces measurements of the oxygen tension near the cell surface. The oxygen sensitive microwells were calibrated and used to monitor oxygen tensions of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney Cells (MDCKs) cultured at high and low densities as a proof of concept. Wells 500 µm in diameter seeded with an average of 330 cells exhibited an oxygen level of 12.6% whereas wells seeded with an average of 20 cells per well exhibited an oxygen level of 19.5%, a 35.7% difference. This platform represents a new tool for culturing cells in microwells in a format amenable to high magnification imaging while monitoring the oxygen state of the culture media.

  15. TiO2 nanotube sensor for online chemical oxygen demand determination in conjunction with flow injection technique.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Yin, Weiping; Li, Jianyong; Bai, Jing; Huang, Ke; Li, Jinhua; Zhou, Baoxue

    2014-06-01

    A simple, rapid and environmental friendly online chemical oxygen demand (COD) analytical method based on TiO2 nanotube sensor in conjunction with the flow injection technique was proposed to determine the COD of aqueous samples, especially for refractory organics, low-concentration wastewater, and surface water. The new method can overcome the drawbacks of the conventional COD determination methods. The results show that with the new method, each analysis takes only about 1 to 3 min, the linear range is up to 1 to 500 mg x L(-1) of the compound of interest, and the detection limit is 1 mg x L(-1). The COD values obtained by the proposed method are more accurate than those obtained by the conventional method.

  16. Pinhole cameras as sensors for atomic oxygen in orbit: Application to attitude determination of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Images produced by pinhole cameras using film sensitive to atomic oxygen provide information on the ratio of spacecraft orbital velocity to the most probable thermal speed of oxygen atoms, provided the spacecraft orientation is maintained stable relative to the orbital direction. Alternatively, information on the spacecraft attitude relative to the orbital velocity can be obtained, provided that corrections are properly made for thermal spreading and a corotating atmosphere. The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) orientation, uncorrected for a corotating atmosphere, was determined to be yawed 8.0 +/- 0.4 degrees from its nominal attitude, with an estimated +/- 0.35 degree oscillation in yaw. The integrated effect of inclined orbit and corotating atmosphere produces an apparent oscillation in the observed yaw direction, suggesting that the LDEF attitude measurement will indicate even better stability when corrected for a corotating atmosphere. The measured thermal spreading is consistent with major exposure occurring during high solar activity, which occurred late during the LDEF mission.

  17. Atomic Oxygen Sensors Based on Nanograin ZnO Films Prepared by Pulse Laser Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yunfei; Chen Xuekang; Li Zhonghua; Zheng Kuohai; Wang Lanxi; Feng Zhanzu; Yang Shengsheng

    2009-01-05

    High-quality nanograin ZnO thin films were deposited on c-plane sapphire (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) substrates by pulse laser deposition (PLD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the samples. The structural and morphological properties of ZnO films under different deposition temperature have been investigated before and after atomic oxygen (AO) treatment. XRD has shown that the intensity of the (0 0 2) peak increases and its FWHM value decreases after AO treatment. The AO sensing characteristics of nano ZnO film also has been investigated in a ground-based atomic oxygen simulation facility. The results show that the electrical conductivity of nanograin ZnO films decreases with increasing AO fluence and that the conductivity of the films can be recovered by heating.

  18. The design and fabrication of three-chamber microscale cell culture analog devices with integrated dissolved oxygen sensors.

    PubMed

    Sin, Aaron; Chin, Katherine C; Jamil, Muhammad F; Kostov, Yordan; Rao, Govind; Shuler, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    Whole animal testing is an essential part in evaluating the toxicological and pharmacological profiles of chemicals and pharmaceuticals, but these experiments are expensive and cumbersome. A cell culture analog (CCA) system, when used in conjunction with a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, provides an in vitro supplement to animal studies and the possibility of a human surrogate for predicting human response in clinical trials. A PBPK model mathematically simulates animal metabolism by modeling the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination kinetics of a chemical in interconnected tissue compartments. A CCA uses mammalian cells cultured in interconnected chambers to physically represent the corresponding PBPK. These compartments are connected by recirculating tissue culture medium that acts as a blood surrogate. The purpose of this article is to describe the design and basic operation of the microscale manifestation of such a system. Microscale CCAs offer the potential for inexpensive, relatively high throughput evaluation of chemicals while minimizing demand for reagents and cells. Using microfabrication technology, a three-chamber ("lung"-"liver"-"other") microscale cell culture analog (microCCA) device was fabricated on a 1 in. (2.54 cm) square silicon chip. With a design flow rate of 1.76 microL/min, this microCCA device achieves approximate physiological liquid-to-cell ratio and hydrodynamic shear stress while replicating the liquid residence time parameters in the PBPK model. A dissolved oxygen sensor based on collision quenching of a fluorescent ruthenium complex by oxygen molecules was integrated into the system, demonstrating the potential to integrate real-time sensors into such devices.

  19. Fabry-Pérot based refractive index optical fiber sensor for measurement of oxygen concentration levels in hypoxic tumors during radiotherapy treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viphavakit, Charusluk; Duraibabu, DineshBabu; O'Keeffe, Sinead; Lewis, Elfed

    2017-04-01

    An optical fiber sensor based on Fabry-Pérot interferometer to measure the refractive index changes due to oxygenation level changes in hypoxic tumors for radiotherapy treatments is proposed. The sensors have an outer diameter of 220μm with a 20-30μm length air-cavity and a 30μm thickness end cap located at the tip of the sensor. The sensors are used to measure the phase change in the received optical spectrum when there is a change in refractive index using a Fast Fourier Transform based analysis method. The refractive index change is measured in order to determine the oxygenation level in hypoxic tumors. In this paper, different concentrations of iso-propanol solution are prepared to produce refractive index values between 1.3438 and 1.3655 in order to mimic the refractive index of hemoglobin. The sensors are coated with a 100 nm thick gold layer and a comparison is made with non-coated sensors. The coated sensors have a resolution in order of 10-3 RIU.

  20. Cavity Ring Down Absorption of Oxygen in Air as a Temperature Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzanares, Carlos; Nyaupane, Parashu R.

    2016-06-01

    The A-band of oxygen has been measured at low resolution at temperatures between 90 K and 373 K using the phase shift cavity ring down (PS-CRD) technique. For temperatures between 90 K and 295 K, the PS-CRD technique presented here involves an optical cavity attached to a cryostat. The static cell and mirrors of the optical cavity are all inside a vacuum chamber at the same temperature of the cryostat. The temperature of the cell can be changed between 77 K and 295 K. For temperatures above 295 K, a hollow glass cylindrical tube without windows has been inserted inside an optical cavity to measure the temperature of air flowing through the tube. The cavity consists of two highly reflective mirrors which are mounted parallel to each other and separated by a distance of 93 cm. In this experiment, air is passed through a heated tube. The temperature of the air flowing through the tube is determined by measuring the intensity of the oxygen absorption as a function of the wavenumber. The A-band of oxygen is measured between 298 K and 373 K, with several air flow rates. Accuracy of the temperature measurement is determined by comparing the calculated temperature from the spectra with the temperature obtained from a calibrated thermocouple inserted at the center of the tube.

  1. Using a robotic arm to assess the variability of motion sensors.

    PubMed

    Gorzelniak, Lukas; Dias, André; Soyer, Hubert; Knoll, Alois; Horsch, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    For the assessment of physical activity, motion sensors have become increasingly important. To assure a high accuracy of the generated sensor data, the measurement error of these devices needs to be determined. Sensor variability has been assessed with various types of mechanical shakers. We conducted a small feasibility study to explore if a programmable robotic arm can be a suitable tool for the assessment of variability between different accelerometers (inter-device variability). We compared the output of the accelerometers GT1M and GT3X (both ActiGraph) and RT3 (Stayhealthy) for two different movement sequences.

  2. Machine vision guided sensor positioning system for leaf temperature assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Ling, P. P.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor positioning system was developed for monitoring plants' well-being using a non-contact sensor. Image processing algorithms were developed to identify a target region on a plant leaf. A novel algorithm to recover view depth was developed by using a camera equipped with a computer-controlled zoom lens. The methodology has improved depth recovery resolution over a conventional monocular imaging technique. An algorithm was also developed to find a maximum enclosed circle on a leaf surface so the conical field-of-view of an infrared temperature sensor could be filled by the target without peripheral noise. The center of the enclosed circle and the estimated depth were used to define the sensor 3-D location for accurate plant temperature measurement.

  3. Machine vision guided sensor positioning system for leaf temperature assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Y.; Ling, P. P.; Janes, H. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor positioning system was developed for monitoring plants' well-being using a non-contact sensor. Image processing algorithms were developed to identify a target region on a plant leaf. A novel algorithm to recover view depth was developed by using a camera equipped with a computer-controlled zoom lens. The methodology has improved depth recovery resolution over a conventional monocular imaging technique. An algorithm was also developed to find a maximum enclosed circle on a leaf surface so the conical field-of-view of an infrared temperature sensor could be filled by the target without peripheral noise. The center of the enclosed circle and the estimated depth were used to define the sensor 3-D location for accurate plant temperature measurement.

  4. Dos, a heme-binding PAS protein from Escherichia coli, is a direct oxygen sensor.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Nixon, V M; Gonzalez, G; Gilles-Gonzalez, M A

    2000-03-14

    A direct sensor of O(2), the Dos protein, has been found in Escherichia coli. Previously, the only biological sensors known to respond to O(2) by direct and reversible binding were the FixL proteins of Rhizobia. A heme-binding region in Dos is 60% homologous to the O(2)-sensing PAS domain of the FixL protein, but the remainder of Dos does not resemble FixL. Specifically, the C-terminal domain of Dos, presumed to be a regulatory partner that couples to its heme-binding domain, is not a histidine kinase but more closely resembles a phosphodiesterase. The absorption spectra of Dos indicate that both axial positions of the heme iron are coordinated to side chains of the protein. Nevertheless, O(2) and CO bind to Dos with K(d) values of 13 and 10 microM, respectively, indicating a strong discrimination against CO binding. Association rate constants for binding of O(2) (3 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)), CO (1 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)) and even NO (2 mM(-)(1) s(-)(1)) are extraordinarily low and very similar. Displacement of an endogenous ligand, probably Met 95, from the heme iron in Dos triggers a conformational change that alters the activity of the enzymatic domain. This sensing mechanism differs from that of FixL but resembles that of the CO sensor CooA of Rhodospirillum rubrum. Overall the results provide evidence for a heme-binding subgroup of PAS-domain proteins whose working range, signaling mechanisms, and regulatory partners can vary considerably.

  5. MoS{sub 2} oxygen sensor with gate voltage stress induced performance enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Yu; Lin, Zhenhua; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, Daniel S. H.; Zhu, Chunxiang

    2015-09-21

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have recently attracted wide attention and rapidly established themselves in various applications. In particular, 2D materials are regarded as promising building blocks for gas sensors due to their high surface-to-volume ratio, ease in miniaturization, and flexibility in enabling wearable electronics. Compared with other 2D materials, MoS{sub 2} is particularly intriguing because it has been widely researched and exhibits semiconducting behavior. Here, we have fabricated MoS{sub 2} resistor based O{sub 2} sensors with a back gate configuration on a 285 nm SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The effects of applying back gate voltage stress on O{sub 2} sensing performance have been systematically investigated. With a positive gate voltage stress, the sensor response improves and the response is improved to 29.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 9.9 × 10{sup −5} millibars with a +40 V back-gate bias compared to 21.2% at O{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 × 10{sup −4} millibars without back-gate bias; while under a negative gate voltage stress of −40 V, a fast and full recovery can be achieved at room temperature. In addition, a method in determining O{sub 2} partial pressure with a detectability as low as 6.7 × 10{sup −7} millibars at a constant vacuum pressure is presented and its potential as a vacuum gauge is briefly discussed.

  6. Oxygenation of the calf muscle during an incremental, intermittent walking exercise assessed by NIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtel, S.; Kutzner, C.; Schneider, D.; Grieger, S.; Neumaier, M.; Kohl-Bareis, M.

    2011-07-01

    We use near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for the non-invasive assessment of calf oxygenation during a new walking protocol in healthy subjects of different fitness levels. The protocol increases the exercise power by an increase of the skew rather than speed, and the incremental power steps are intermitted by a 30 s rest which serves for blood sampling. The NIRS measurement parameter of tissue oxygenation are discussed, and a high correlation of the oxygen saturation (tissue oxygenation index) difference between exercise and rest period with exercise power is observed. This difference parameter can be interpreted as strongly linked to blood flow rather than oxygenation. This finding is supported by comparison with spirometry data. The effect of training is discussed. The exercise protocol is suited for testing unfit, or older subjects and the data discussed here servers as a test for a larger trial with heart clinic patients.

  7. Evaluation of the CINDI-C/NOFS Ram Wind Sensor in a Ground State Atomic Oxygen Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddy, P. A.; Earle, G. D.; Stephen, T. M.; Heelis, R. A.

    2003-04-01

    The Ram Wind Sensor (RWS) is a flow-through retarding potential analyzer equipped with an ionization source that is designed to measure the ram component of neutral particle energy. RWS and the Cross-track wind sensor (XTRK) function together as the Neutral Wind Meter (NWM) being developed for NASA's Coupled Ion-Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) that will enable in-situ measurements of the 3-D neutral wind field. The CINDI mission will be launched in late 2003 aboard the US Air Force's Communications/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite. The efficiency, energy resolution, and angular variability of RWS are being tested in a ground state atomic oxygen (AO) beam facility at the University of Denver in order to simulate the space environment. The AO beam has energies variable from 4 eV to 1000 eV with a 1.5 eV FWHM energy distribution and fluxes on the order of 1012 atoms/cm2 s. The instrument being tested is mechanically identical to the CINDI flight instrument, but is equipped with pulse counting electronics to enable measurements in the low flux AO beam system. The results of these laboratory tests along with their implications for the precision, accuracy, and overall effectiveness of RWS and NWM will be presented.

  8. A miniature photoelectrochemical sensor based on organic electrochemical transistor for sensitive determination of chemical oxygen demand in wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jianjun; Lin, Shiwei; Zeng, Min; Yang, Yue

    2016-05-01

    A three-electrode configuration is often required in the conventional photoelectrochemical measurements. Nevertheless, one common drawback is the reference electrode and the counter electrode used in the measurements, which has been proved to be an impediment for the miniaturization. In this study, a simple, cost-effective and miniature photoelectrochemical sensor based on high sensitive organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) is developed and used for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in wastewaters. The devices show detection limit down to 0.01 mg/L COD, which is two orders of magnitude better than that of the conventional photoelectrochemical method. The excellent sensing performance can be contributed to the novel sensing mechanism of OECT devices. That is, the devices are sensitive to the potential changes induced by the photoelectrochemical reaction on TiO2 nanotube arrays gate electrodes. Real sample analyses are also carried out. The results demonstrate that the measured COD values using the OECT devices and the standard dichromate methods are in a good agreement. Since the proposed sensor is constructed on a miniature transistor, it is expected that the device shows a promising application on the integrated COD monitoring platform.

  9. A Lab Assembled Microcontroller-Based Sensor Module for Continuous Oxygen Measurement in Portable Hypoxia Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Mathupala, Saroj P.; Kiousis, Sam; Szerlip, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-based cell culture experiments are routine and essential components of in vitro cancer research. Most laboratories use low-cost portable modular chambers to achieve hypoxic conditions for cell cultures, where the sealed chambers are purged with a gas mixture of preset O2 concentration. Studies are conducted under the assumption that hypoxia remains unaltered throughout the 48 to 72 hour duration of such experiments. Since these chambers lack any sensor or detection system to monitor gas-phase O2, the cell-based data tend to be non-uniform due to the ad hoc nature of the experimental setup. Methodology With the availability of low-cost open-source microcontroller-based electronic project kits, it is now possible for researchers to program these with easy-to-use software, link them to sensors, and place them in basic scientific apparatus to monitor and record experimental parameters. We report here the design and construction of a small-footprint kit for continuous measurement and recording of O2 concentration in modular hypoxia chambers. The low-cost assembly (US$135) consists of an Arduino-based microcontroller, data-logging freeware, and a factory pre-calibrated miniature O2 sensor. A small, intuitive software program was written by the authors to control the data input and output. The basic nature of the kit will enable any student in biology with minimal experience in hobby-electronics to assemble the system and edit the program parameters to suit individual experimental conditions. Results/Conclusions We show the kit’s utility and stability of data output via a series of hypoxia experiments. The studies also demonstrated the critical need to monitor and adjust gas-phase O2 concentration during hypoxia-based experiments to prevent experimental errors or failure due to partial loss of hypoxia. Thus, incorporating the sensor-microcontroller module to a portable hypoxia chamber provides a researcher a capability that was previously available

  10. A Lab Assembled Microcontroller-Based Sensor Module for Continuous Oxygen Measurement in Portable Hypoxia Chambers.

    PubMed

    Mathupala, Saroj P; Kiousis, Sam; Szerlip, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-based cell culture experiments are routine and essential components of in vitro cancer research. Most laboratories use low-cost portable modular chambers to achieve hypoxic conditions for cell cultures, where the sealed chambers are purged with a gas mixture of preset O2 concentration. Studies are conducted under the assumption that hypoxia remains unaltered throughout the 48 to 72 hour duration of such experiments. Since these chambers lack any sensor or detection system to monitor gas-phase O2, the cell-based data tend to be non-uniform due to the ad hoc nature of the experimental setup. With the availability of low-cost open-source microcontroller-based electronic project kits, it is now possible for researchers to program these with easy-to-use software, link them to sensors, and place them in basic scientific apparatus to monitor and record experimental parameters. We report here the design and construction of a small-footprint kit for continuous measurement and recording of O2 concentration in modular hypoxia chambers. The low-cost assembly (US$135) consists of an Arduino-based microcontroller, data-logging freeware, and a factory pre-calibrated miniature O2 sensor. A small, intuitive software program was written by the authors to control the data input and output. The basic nature of the kit will enable any student in biology with minimal experience in hobby-electronics to assemble the system and edit the program parameters to suit individual experimental conditions. We show the kit's utility and stability of data output via a series of hypoxia experiments. The studies also demonstrated the critical need to monitor and adjust gas-phase O2 concentration during hypoxia-based experiments to prevent experimental errors or failure due to partial loss of hypoxia. Thus, incorporating the sensor-microcontroller module to a portable hypoxia chamber provides a researcher a capability that was previously available only to labs with access to sophisticated (and

  11. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  12. Model-based cell number quantification using online single-oxygen sensor data for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, T; Papantoniou, I; Sonnaert, M; Schrooten, J; Aerts, J-M

    2014-10-01

    Online and non-invasive quantification of critical tissue engineering (TE) construct quality attributes in TE bioreactors is indispensable for the cost-effective up-scaling and automation of cellular construct manufacturing. However, appropriate monitoring techniques for cellular constructs in bioreactors are still lacking. This study presents a generic and robust approach to determine cell number and metabolic activity of cell-based TE constructs in perfusion bioreactors based on single oxygen sensor data in dynamic perfusion conditions. A data-based mechanistic modeling technique was used that is able to correlate the number of cells within the scaffold (R(2)  = 0.80) and the metabolic activity of the cells (R(2)  = 0.82) to the dynamics of the oxygen response to step changes in the perfusion rate. This generic non-destructive measurement technique is effective for a large range of cells, from as low as 1.0 × 10(5) cells to potentially multiple millions of cells, and can open-up new possibilities for effective bioprocess monitoring.

  13. Microplates with integrated oxygen sensors for kinetic cell respiration measurement and cytotoxicity testing in primary and secondary cell lines.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Rahul Ravi; Koch-Kirsch, Yvonne; Maas, Ruth; John, Gernot T; Krause, Christian; Heinzle, Elmar

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a cytotoxicity and cell respiration assay that is nondestructive and kinetic. It makes use of 96-well microplates integrated with oxygen sensors. The oxygen signal monitored on-line gives an indication of the cell viability. We show its application for suspension cell lines (Chinese hamster ovary and HL60 cells) as well as adherent (Caco2 cells) and primary (rat hepatocytes) cells using well-known cytotoxic compounds (sodium azide, diclofenac, clozapine, sodium dodecyl sulfate, 2-thiouracil, tamoxifen, and tranylcypromine). The 50% lethality concentration (LC50) obtained from the assay is compared with the standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2- yl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide end-point assay. The cells can be grown directly in the plates, and the assay requires no further reagents or processing. The cells can be harvested for further analysis, if required. The on-line dynamic measurement allows the calculation of LC50 as a function of exposure time. LC50 was shown to decrease with time in HL60 cells. The dynamics of this process was considerably different for the three compounds sodium dodecyl sulfate, tamoxifen, and diclofenac, indicating a large potential of application of this method for cell death studies. The assay system can be applied to almost any cell-based systems with little adaptation. The assay is robust, flexible, and applicable for medium- to high-throughput systems requiring only minimal handling and no additional agent.

  14. Photoacoustic ultrasound spectroscopy for assessing red blood cell aggregation and oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-12-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) aggregation and oxygenation are important markers for a variety of blood disorders. No current technique is capable of simultaneously measuring aggregation/oxygenation levels noninvasively. We propose using photoacoustic ultrasound spectroscopy (PAUS) for assessing both phenomena. This technique relies on frequency-domain analysis of the PA signals by extracting parameters such as the ultrasound spectral slope and the midband fit. To investigate the effect of hematocrit, aggregation, and oxygenation levels on PAUS parameters, a Monte Carlo-based theoretical model and an experimental protocol using porcine RBCs were developed. The samples were illuminated at 750 and 1064 nm and changes in the PAUS parameters were compared to the oxygen-dependent optical absorption coefficients to assess the oxygenation level. Good agreement between the theoretical and experimental spectral parameters was obtained for the spectral slope of the nonaggregated spectra (˜0.3 dB/MHz). The experimental midband fit increased by ˜5 dB for the largest aggregate size. Based on the analysis of the PA signals, the oxygen saturation level of the most aggregated sample was >20% greater than the nonaggregated sample. The results provide a framework for using PA signals' spectroscopic parameters for monitoring the aggregation and oxygenation levels of RBCs.

  15. A novel method for assessing the 3-D orientation accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors.

    PubMed

    Faber, Gert S; Chang, Chien-Chi; Rizun, Peter; Dennerlein, Jack T

    2013-10-18

    A novel method for assessing the accuracy of inertial/magnetic sensors is presented. The method, referred to as the "residual matrix" method, is advantageous because it decouples the sensor's error with respect to Earth's gravity vector (attitude residual error: pitch and roll) from the sensor's error with respect to magnetic north (heading residual error), while remaining insensitive to singularity problems when the second Euler rotation is close to ±90°. As a demonstration, the accuracy of an inertial/magnetic sensor mounted to a participant's forearm was evaluated during a reaching task in a laboratory. Sensor orientation was measured internally (by the inertial/magnetic sensor) and externally using an optoelectronic measurement system with a marker cluster rigidly attached to the sensor's enclosure. Roll, pitch and heading residuals were calculated using the proposed novel method, as well as using a common orientation assessment method where the residuals are defined as the difference between the Euler angles measured by the inertial sensor and those measured by the optoelectronic system. Using the proposed residual matrix method, the roll and pitch residuals remained less than 1° and, as expected, no statistically significant difference between these two measures of attitude accuracy was found; the heading residuals were significantly larger than the attitude residuals but remained below 2°. Using the direct Euler angle comparison method, the residuals were in general larger due to singularity issues, and the expected significant difference between inertial/magnetic sensor attitude and heading accuracy was not present.

  16. Investigation of the feasibility of non-invasive optical sensors for the quantitative assessment of dehydration.

    PubMed

    Visser, Cobus; Kieser, Eduard; Dellimore, Kiran; van den Heever, Dawie; Smith, Johan

    2017-10-01

    This study explores the feasibility of prospectively assessing infant dehydration using four non-invasive, optical sensors based on the quantitative and objective measurement of various clinical markers of dehydration. The sensors were investigated to objectively and unobtrusively assess the hydration state of an infant based on the quantification of capillary refill time (CRT), skin recoil time (SRT), skin temperature profile (STP) and skin tissue hydration by means of infrared spectrometry (ISP). To evaluate the performance of the sensors a clinical study was conducted on a cohort of 10 infants (aged 6-36 months) with acute gastroenteritis. High sensitivity and specificity were exhibited by the sensors, in particular the STP and SRT sensors, when combined into a fusion regression model (sensitivity: 0.90, specificity: 0.78). The SRT and STP sensors and the fusion model all outperformed the commonly used "gold standard" clinical dehydration scales including the Gorelick scale (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.56), CDS scale (sensitivity: 1.0, specificity: 0.2) and WHO scale (sensitivity: 0.13, specificity: 0.79). These results suggest that objective and quantitative assessment of infant dehydration may be possible using the sensors investigated. However, further evaluation of the sensors on a larger sample population is needed before deploying them in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pinhole cameras as sensors for atomic oxygen in orbit; application to attitude determination of the LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Palmer N.; Gregory, John C.

    1991-01-01

    Images produced by pinhole cameras using film sensitive to atomic oxygen provide information on the ratio of spacecraft orbital velocity to the most probable thermal speed of oxygen atoms, provided the spacecraft orientation is maintained stable relative to the orbital direction. Alternatively, as it is described, information on the spacecraft attitude relative to the orbital velocity can be obtained, provided that corrections are properly made for thermal spreading and a co-rotating atmosphere. The LDEF orientation, uncorrected for a co-rotating atmosphere, was determined to be yawed 8.0 minus/plus 0.4 deg from its nominal attitude, with an estimated minus/plus 0.35 deg oscillation in yaw. The integrated effect of inclined orbit and co-rotating atmosphere produces an apparent oscillation in the observed yaw direction, suggesting that the LDEF attitude measurement will indicate even better stability when corrected for a co-rotating atmosphere. The measured thermal spreading is consistent with major exposure occurring during high solar activity, which occurred late during the LDEF mission.

  18. Low Power Resistive Oxygen Sensor Based on Sonochemical SrTi0.6Fe0.4O2.8 (STFO40)

    PubMed Central

    Stratulat, Alisa; Serban, Bogdan-Catalin; de Luca, Andrea; Avramescu, Viorel; Cobianu, Cornel; Brezeanu, Mihai; Buiu, Octavian; Diamandescu, Lucian; Feder, Marcel; Ali, Syed Zeeshan; Udrea, Florin

    2015-01-01

    The current paper reports on a sonochemical synthesis method for manufacturing nanostructured (typical grain size of 50 nm) SrTi0.6Fe0.4O2.8 (Sono-STFO40) powder. This powder is characterized using X ray-diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), and results are compared with commercially available SrTi0.4Fe0.6O2.8 (STFO60) powder. In order to manufacture resistive oxygen sensors, both Sono-STFO40 and STFO60 are deposited, by dip-pen nanolithography (DPN) method, on an SOI (Silicon-on-Insulator) micro-hotplate, employing a tungsten heater embedded within a dielectric membrane. Oxygen detection tests are performed in both dry (RH = 0%) and humid (RH = 60%) nitrogen atmosphere, varying oxygen concentrations between 1% and 16% (v/v), at a constant heater temperature of 650 °C. The oxygen sensor, based on the Sono-STFO40 sensing layer, shows good sensitivity, low power consumption (80 mW), and short response time (25 s). These performance are comparable to those exhibited by state-of-the-art O2 sensors based on STFO60, thus proving Sono-STFO40 to be a material suitable for oxygen detection in harsh environments. PMID:26205267

  19. Arteriolar oxygen reactivity: where is the sensor and what is the mechanism of action?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Arterioles in the peripheral microcirculation are exquisitely sensitive to changes in PO2 in their environment: increases in PO2 cause vasoconstriction while decreases in PO2 result in vasodilatation. However, the cell type that senses O2 (the O2 sensor) and the signalling pathway that couples changes in PO2 to changes in arteriolar tone (the mechanism of action) remain unclear. Many (but not all) ex vivo studies of isolated cannulated resistance arteries and large, first‐order arterioles support the hypothesis that these vessels are intrinsically sensitive to PO2 with the smooth muscle, endothelial cells, or red blood cells serving as the O2 sensor. However, in situ studies testing these hypotheses in downstream arterioles have failed to find evidence of intrinsic O2 sensitivity, and instead have supported the idea that extravascular cells sense O2. Similarly, ex vivo studies of isolated, cannulated resistance arteries and large first‐order arterioles support the hypotheses that O2‐dependent inhibition of production of vasodilator cyclooxygenase products or O2‐dependent destruction of nitric oxide mediates O2 reactivity of these upstream vessels. In contrast, most in vivo studies of downstream arterioles have disproved these hypotheses and instead have provided evidence supporting the idea that O2‐dependent production of vasoconstrictors mediates arteriolar O2 reactivity, with significant regional heterogeneity in the specific vasoconstrictor involved. Oxygen‐induced vasoconstriction may serve as a protective mechanism to reduce the oxidative burden to which a tissue is exposed, a process that is superimposed on top of the local mechanisms which regulate tissue blood flow to meet a tissue's metabolic demand. PMID:27324312

  20. Accuracy of different sensors for the estimation of pollutant concentrations (total suspended solids, total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand) in wastewater and stormwater.

    PubMed

    Lepot, Mathieu; Aubin, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Many field investigations have used continuous sensors (turbidimeters and/or ultraviolet (UV)-visible spectrophotometers) to estimate with a short time step pollutant concentrations in sewer systems. Few, if any, publications compare the performance of various sensors for the same set of samples. Different surrogate sensors (turbidity sensors, UV-visible spectrophotometer, pH meter, conductivity meter and microwave sensor) were tested to link concentrations of total suspended solids (TSS), total and dissolved chemical oxygen demand (COD), and sensors' outputs. In the combined sewer at the inlet of a wastewater treatment plant, 94 samples were collected during dry weather, 44 samples were collected during wet weather, and 165 samples were collected under both dry and wet weather conditions. From these samples, triplicate standard laboratory analyses were performed and corresponding sensors outputs were recorded. Two outlier detection methods were developed, based, respectively, on the Mahalanobis and Euclidean distances. Several hundred regression models were tested, and the best ones (according to the root mean square error criterion) are presented in order of decreasing performance. No sensor appears as the best one for all three investigated pollutants.

  1. Stochastic sensors designed for assessment of biomarkers specific to obesity.

    PubMed

    Cioates Negut, Catalina; Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Ungureanu, Eleonora-Mihaela; Udeanu, Denisa Ioana

    2016-09-05

    Two stochastic sensors based on the following oleamides: 1-adamantyloleamide and N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-oleylamidoethyl)amine physically immobilized on graphite paste were designed. The sensors were able to determine simultaneously from the whole blood of Wistar rats three biomarkers specific to obesity: leptin, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1). The whole blood samples were obtained from Wistar rats treated with oleoylethanolamide (OEA), (Z)-N-[(1S)-2-hidroxy-1-(phenylmethyl) ethyl]-9octadecenamide (OLA), and with the aqueous solution of 1% Tween 80 used as solvent for oleamides formulations (control samples). The proposed sensors were very sensitive and reliable for the assay of obesity biomarkers in whole blood of rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of hypoxia-inducible factor-alpha/Sima.

    PubMed

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-11-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-alpha polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-alpha/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima.

  3. Reversion of lethality and growth defects in Fatiga oxygen-sensor mutant flies by loss of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-α/Sima

    PubMed Central

    Centanin, Lázaro; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Wappner, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF) prolyl hydroxylase domains (PHDs) have been proposed to act as sensors that have an important role in oxygen homeostasis. In the presence of oxygen, they hydroxylate two specific prolyl residues in HIF-α polypeptides, thereby promoting their proteasomal degradation. So far, however, the developmental consequences of the inactivation of PHDs in higher metazoans have not been reported. Here, we describe novel loss-of-function mutants of fatiga, the gene encoding the Drosophila PHD oxygen sensor, which manifest growth defects and lethality. We also report a null mutation in dHIF-α/sima, which is unable to adapt to hypoxia but is fully viable in normoxic conditions. Strikingly, loss-of-function mutations of sima rescued the developmental defects observed in fatiga mutants and enabled survival to adulthood. These results indicate that the main functions of Fatiga in development, including control of cell size, involve the regulation of dHIF/Sima. PMID:16179946

  4. Assessment of space sensors for ocean pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Tomiyasu, K.; Gulatsi, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several passive and active microwave, as well as passive optical remote sensors, applicable to the monitoring of oil spills and waste discharges at sea, are considered. The discussed types of measurements relate to: (1) spatial distribution and properties of the pollutant, and (2) oceanic parameters needed to predict the movement of the pollutants and their impact upon land. The sensors, operating from satellite platforms at 700-900 km altitudes, are found to be useful in mapping the spread of oil in major oil spills and in addition, can be effective in producing wind and ocean parameters as inputs to oil trajectory and dispersion models. These capabilities can be used in countermeasures.

  5. Suomi NPP OMPS limb profiler initial sensor performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaross, Glen; Chen, Grace; Kowitt, Mark; Warner, Jeremy; Xu, Philippe; Kelly, Thomas; Linda, Michael; Flittner, David

    2012-11-01

    Following the successful launch of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) aboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) spacecraft, the NASA OMPS Limb team began an evaluation of sensor and data product performance in relation to the original goals for this instrument. Does the sensor design work as well as expected, and can limb scatter measurements by NPP OMPS and successor instruments form the basis for accurate long-term monitoring of ozone vertical profiles? While this paper does not address the latter question, the answer to the former is a qualified Yes given this early stage of the mission.

  6. Assessment of space sensors for ocean pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, U. R.; Tomiyasu, K.; Gulatsi, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Several passive and active microwave, as well as passive optical remote sensors, applicable to the monitoring of oil spills and waste discharges at sea, are considered. The discussed types of measurements relate to: (1) spatial distribution and properties of the pollutant, and (2) oceanic parameters needed to predict the movement of the pollutants and their impact upon land. The sensors, operating from satellite platforms at 700-900 km altitudes, are found to be useful in mapping the spread of oil in major oil spills and in addition, can be effective in producing wind and ocean parameters as inputs to oil trajectory and dispersion models. These capabilities can be used in countermeasures.

  7. An assessment of the impacts of molecular oxygen on the evolution of proteomes.

    PubMed

    Vieira-Silva, Sara; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2008-09-01

    Oxygen is not only one of life's essential elements but also a source of protein damage, mutagenesis, and ageing. Many proteome adaptations have been proposed to tackle such stresses and we assessed them using comparative genomics in a phylogenetic context. First, we find that aerobiosis is a trait with important phylogenetic inertia but that oxygen content in proteins is not. Instead, oxygen content is close to the expected values given the nucleotide composition. Accordingly, we find no evidence of oxygen being a scarce resource for protein synthesis even among anaerobes. Second, we searched for counterselection of amino acids more prone to oxidation among aerobes. Only cysteine follows the expected trend, whereas tryptophan follows the inverse one. When analyzing composition in the context of protein structures and residue accessibility, we find that all oxidable residues are avoided at the surface of proteins. Yet, there is no difference between aerobes and anaerobes in this respect, and the effect might be explained by the hydrophobicity of these residues. Third, we revisited the hypothesis that atmospheric enrichment in molecular oxygen led to the development of the communication capabilities of eukaryotes. With a larger data set and adequate controls, we confirm the trend of longer oxygen-rich outer domains in transmembrane proteins of eukaryotes. Yet, we find no significant association between oxygen concentration in the environment and this trait within prokaryotes, suggesting that this difference is clade specific and independent of oxygen availability. We find that genes involved in cellular responses to oxygen are much more frequent among aerobes, and we suggest that they erase most expected differences in terms of proteome composition between organisms facing high and low oxygen concentrations.

  8. Sensing properties of an oxygen sensor using BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} ceramics as electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Noboru; Yasumoto, Eiichi; Nakagiri, Yasushi; Gamo, Takaharu

    1998-05-01

    Limiting-current-type oxygen sensors using BaCe{sub 0.8}Gd{sub 0.2}O{sub 3{minus}{alpha}} (BCG) ceramics as electrolytes were constructed on a trial basis and their sensing properties investigated in order to develop a new oxygen sensor to replace the zirconia type. BCG ceramics exhibited high conductivity in the temperature range 200--1,000 C, and it was verified that the oxide ion could be a conductive carrier in BCG in oxygen at low temperatures (300 C). The oxygen sensors using BCGs worked at 300 C, and their output currents linearly increased with an increase in oxygen concentration in the range 1--22%. They could respond within 30 s between 1 and 21%, and humidity only slightly affected sensing performance. BCG seems to be a promising electrolyte material for an oxygen sensor operating at low temperatures (300 C).

  9. Micelle-Encapsulated Quantum Dot-Porphyrin Assemblies as in Vivo Two-Photon Oxygen Sensors.

    PubMed

    Lemon, Christopher M; Karnas, Elizabeth; Han, Xiaoxing; Bruns, Oliver T; Kempa, Thomas J; Fukumura, Dai; Bawendi, Moungi G; Jain, Rakesh K; Duda, Dan G; Nocera, Daniel G

    2015-08-12

    Micelles have been employed to encapsulate the supramolecular assembly of quantum dots with palladium(II) porphyrins for the quantification of O2 levels in aqueous media and in vivo. Förster resonance energy transfer from the quantum dot (QD) to the palladium porphyrin provides a means for signal transduction under both one- and two-photon excitation. The palladium porphyrins are sensitive to O2 concentrations in the range of 0-160 Torr. The micelle-encapsulated QD-porphyrin assemblies have been employed for in vivo multiphoton imaging and lifetime-based oxygen measurements in mice with chronic dorsal skinfold chambers or cranial windows. Our results establish the utility of the QD-micelle approach for in vivo biological sensing applications.

  10. p38alpha MAP kinase as a sensor of reactive oxygen species in tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Dolado, Ignacio; Swat, Aneta; Ajenjo, Nuria; De Vita, Gabriella; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-02-01

    p38alpha is a stress-activated protein kinase that negatively regulates malignant transformation induced by oncogenic H-Ras, although the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Here, we show that p38alpha is not a general inhibitor of oncogenic signaling, but that it specifically modulates transformation induced by oncogenes that produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). This inhibitory effect is due to the ROS-induced activation of p38alpha early in the process of transformation, which induces apoptosis and prevents the accumulation of ROS and their carcinogenic effects. Accordingly, highly tumorigenic cancer cell lines have developed a mechanism to uncouple p38alpha activation from ROS production. Our results indicate that oxidative stress sensing plays a key role in the inhibition of tumor initiation by p38alpha.

  11. Micelle-Encapsulated Quantum Dot-Porphyrin Assemblies as in Vivo Two-Photon Oxygen Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Lemon, Christopher M.; Karnas, Elizabeth; Han, Xiaoxing; Bruns, Oliver T.; Kempa, Thomas J.; Fukumura, Dai; Bawendi, Moungi G.; Jain, Rakesh K.; Duda, Dan G.; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    Micelles have been employed to encapsulate the supramolecular assembly of quantum dots with palladium(II) porphyrins for the quantification of O2 levels in aqueous media and in vivo. Förster resonance energy transfer from the quantum dot (QD) to the palladium porphyrin provides a means for signal transduction under both one- and two-photon excitation. The palladium porphyrins are sensitive to O2 concentrations in the range of 0–160 Torr. The micelle-encapsulated QD-porphyrin assemblies have been employed for in vivo multiphoton imaging and lifetime-based oxygen measurements in mice with chronic dorsal skinfold chambers or cranial windows. Our results establish the utility of the QD-micelle approach for in vivo biological sensing applications. PMID:26149349

  12. Earbud-Based Sensor for the Assessment of Energy Expenditure, Heart Rate, and VO2max

    PubMed Central

    LeBoeuf, Steven F.; Aumer, Michael E.; Kraus, William E.; Johnson, Johanna L.; Duscha, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction/Purpose The goal of this program was to determine the feasibility of a novel noninvasive, highly miniaturized optomechanical earbud sensor for accurately estimating total energy expenditure (TEE) and maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). The optomechanical sensor module, small enough to fit inside commercial audio earbuds, was previously developed to provide a seamless way to measure blood flow information during daily life activities. The sensor module was configured to continuously measure physiological information via photoplethysmography (PPG) and physical activity information via accelerometry. This information was digitized and sent to a microprocessor where digital signal processing (DSP) algorithms extract physiological metrics in real-time. These metrics were streamed wirelessly from the earbud to a computer. Methods In this study, 23 subjects of multiple physical habitus were divided into a training group of 14 subjects and a validation group of 9 subjects. Each subject underwent the same exercise measurement protocol consisting of treadmill-based cardiopulmonary exercise (CPX) testing to reach VO2max. Benchmark sensors included a 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG) sensor for measuring heart rate, a calibrated treadmill for measuring distance and speed, and a gas-exchange analysis instrument for measuring TEE and VO2max. The earbud sensor was the device under test (DUT). Benchmark and DUT data collected from the 14-person training dataset study were integrated into a preconceived statistical model for correlating benchmark data with earbud sensor data. Coefficients were optimized, and the optimized model was validated in the 9-person validation dataset. Results It was observed that the earbud sensor estimated TEE and VO2max with mean ± SD percent estimation errors of −0.7 ± 7.4% and −3.2 ± 7.3% respectively. Conclusion The earbud sensor can accurately estimate TEE and VO2max during CPX testing. PMID:24743110

  13. Earbud-based sensor for the assessment of energy expenditure, HR, and VO2max.

    PubMed

    Leboeuf, Steven Francis; Aumer, Michael E; Kraus, William E; Johnson, Johanna L; Duscha, Brian

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the feasibility of a novel noninvasive, highly miniaturized optomechanical earbud sensor for accurately estimating total energy expenditure (TEE) and maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max). The optomechanical sensor module, small enough to fit inside commercial audio earbuds, was previously developed to provide a seamless way to measure blood flow information during daily life activities. The sensor module was configured to continuously measure physiological information via photoplethysmography and physical activity information via accelerometry. This information was digitized and sent to a microprocessor where digital signal-processing algorithms extract physiological metrics in real time. These metrics were streamed wirelessly from the earbud to a computer. In this study, 23 subjects of multiple physical habitus were divided into a training group of 14 subjects and a validation group of 9 subjects. Each subject underwent the same exercise measurement protocol consisting of treadmill-based cardiopulmonary exercise testing to reach VO2max. Benchmark sensors included a 12-lead ECG sensor for measuring HR, a calibrated treadmill for measuring distance and speed, and a gas-exchange analysis instrument for measuring TEE and VO2max. The earbud sensor was the device under test. Benchmark and device under test data collected from the 14-person training data set study were integrated into a preconceived statistical model for correlating benchmark data with earbud sensor data. Coefficients were optimized, and the optimized model was validated in the 9-person validation data set. It was observed that the earbud sensor estimated TEE and VO2max with mean ± SD percent estimation errors of -0.7 ± 7.4% and -3.2 ± 7.3%, respectively. The earbud sensor can accurately estimate TEE and VO2max during cardiopulmonary exercise testing.

  14. Performance Evaluation of Proximal Sensors for Soil Assessment in Smallholder Farms in Embu County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Piikki, Kristin; Söderström, Mats; Eriksson, Jan; Muturi John, Jamleck; Ireri Muthee, Patrick; Wetterlind, Johanna; Lund, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Four proximal soil sensors were tested at four smallholder farms in Embu County, Kenya: a portable X-ray fluorescence sensor (PXRF), a mobile phone application for soil color determination by photography, a dual-depth electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor, and a LED-based soil optical reflectance sensor. Measurements were made at 32–43 locations at each site. Topsoil samples were analyzed for plant-available nutrients (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Fe), pH, total nitrogen (TN) and total carbon (TC), soil texture, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and exchangeable aluminum (Al). Multivariate prediction models of each of the lab-analyzed soil properties were parameterized for 576 sensor-variable combinations. Prediction models for K, N, Ca and S, B, Zn, Mn, Fe, TC, Al, and CEC met the setup criteria for functional, robust, and accurate models. The PXRF sensor was the sensor most often included in successful models. We concluded that the combination of a PXRF and a portable soil reflectance sensor is a promising combination of handheld soil sensors for the development of in situ soil assessments as a field-based alternative or complement to laboratory measurements. PMID:27869774

  15. Performance Evaluation of Proximal Sensors for Soil Assessment in Smallholder Farms in Embu County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Piikki, Kristin; Söderström, Mats; Eriksson, Jan; Muturi John, Jamleck; Ireri Muthee, Patrick; Wetterlind, Johanna; Lund, Eric

    2016-11-19

    Four proximal soil sensors were tested at four smallholder farms in Embu County, Kenya: a portable X-ray fluorescence sensor (PXRF), a mobile phone application for soil color determination by photography, a dual-depth electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensor, and a LED-based soil optical reflectance sensor. Measurements were made at 32-43 locations at each site. Topsoil samples were analyzed for plant-available nutrients (N, P, K, Mg, Ca, S, B, Mn, Zn, Cu, and Fe), pH, total nitrogen (TN) and total carbon (TC), soil texture, cation exchange capacity (CEC), and exchangeable aluminum (Al). Multivariate prediction models of each of the lab-analyzed soil properties were parameterized for 576 sensor-variable combinations. Prediction models for K, N, Ca and S, B, Zn, Mn, Fe, TC, Al, and CEC met the setup criteria for functional, robust, and accurate models. The PXRF sensor was the sensor most often included in successful models. We concluded that the combination of a PXRF and a portable soil reflectance sensor is a promising combination of handheld soil sensors for the development of in situ soil assessments as a field-based alternative or complement to laboratory measurements.

  16. NPP ATMS Prelaunch Performance Assessment and Sensor Data Record Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-29

    Joint Airborne IASI Yalidation Experiment (JAlYEx 2007, Houston, TX). Radiance differences between the NAST-M sensor and the Advanced Microwave...34Evaluation OfCRIS/ATMS Proxy RadianceslRetrievais With IASI Retrievals, ECMWF Analysis and RAOB Measurements," IEEE Proc. IGARSS, July, 20 I O. G. A

  17. Psychophysical assessments of image-sensor fused imagery.

    PubMed

    Krebs, William K; Sinai, Michael J

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the perceptual advantages of multiband sensor-fused (achromatic and chromatic) imagery over conventional single-band nighttime (image-intensified and infrared) imagery for a wide range of visual tasks, including detection, orientation, and scene recognition. Participants were 151 active-duty military observers whose reaction time and accuracy scores were recorded during a visual search task. Data indicate that sensor fusion did not improve performance relative to that obtained with single-band imagery on a target detection task but did facilitate object recognition, judgments of spatial orientation, and scene recognition. Observers' recognition and orientation judgments were improved by the emergent information within the image-fused imagery (i.e., combining dominant information from two or more sensors into a single displayed image). Actual or potential applications of this research include the deployment of image-sensor fused systems for automobile, aviation, and maritime displays to increase operators' visual processing during low-light conditions.

  18. Microfluidic surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors based on nanopillar forests realized by an oxygen-plasma-stripping-of-photoresist technique.

    PubMed

    Mao, Haiyang; Wu, Wengang; She, Didi; Sun, Gongchen; Lv, Pengpeng; Xu, Jun

    2014-01-15

    A novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensor is developed for real-time and highly repeatable detection of trace chemical and biological indicators. The sensor consists of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel cap and a nanopillar forest-based open SERS-active substrate. The nanopillar forests are fabricated based on a new oxygen-plasma-stripping-of-photoresist technique. The enhancement factor (EF) of the SERS-active substrate reaches 6.06 × 10(6) , and the EF of the SERS sensor is about 4 times lower due to the influence of the PDMS cap. However, the sensor shows much higher measurement repeatability than the open substrate, and it reduces the sample preparation time from several hours to a few minutes, which makes the device more reliable and facile for trace chemical and biological analysis.

  19. The functioning of oxygen concentrators in resource-limited settings: a situation assessment in two countries.

    PubMed

    La Vincente, S F; Peel, D; Carai, S; Weber, M W; Enarson, P; Maganga, E; Soyolgerel, G; Duke, T

    2011-05-01

    The paediatric wards of hospitals in Malawi and Mongolia. To describe oxygen concentrator functioning in two countries with widespread, long-term use of concentrators as a primary source of oxygen for treating children. A systematic assessment of concentrators in the paediatric wards of 15 hospitals in Malawi and nine hospitals in Mongolia. Oxygen concentrators had been installed for a median of 48 months (interquartile range [IQR] 6-60) and 36 months (IQR 12-96), respectively, prior to the evaluation in Malawi and Mongolia. Concentrators were the primary source of oxygen. Three quarters of the concentrators assessed in Malawi (28/36) and half those assessed in Mongolia (13/25) were functional. Concentrators were found to remain functional with up to 30 000 h of use. However, several concentrators were functioning very poorly despite limited use. Concentrators from a number of different manufacturers were evaluated, and there was marked variation in performance between brands. Inadequate resources for maintenance were reported in both countries. Years after installation of oxygen concentrators, many machines were still functioning, indicating that widespread use can be sustained in resource-limited settings. However, concentrator performance varied substantially. Procurement of high-quality and appropriate equipment is critical, and resources should be made available for ongoing maintenance.

  20. Regional Oxygen Saturation Index: A Novel Criterion for Free Flap Assessment Using Tissue Oximetry.

    PubMed

    Akita, Shinsuke; Mitsukawa, Nobuyuki; Tokumoto, Hideki; Kubota, Yoshitaka; Kuriyama, Motone; Sasahara, Yoshitaro; Yamaji, Yoshihisa; Satoh, Kaneshige

    2016-09-01

    Tissue oximetry is a useful tool for postoperative free flap monitoring. Reported criterion values have been accurate; however, there are various complicated author-dependent criteria, and sometimes it is too late for flap salvage. The authors offer a new, simple criterion for faster and accurate detection of perfusion problems. Intraoperatively, perfusion areas of various free perforator flaps were assessed by both indocyanine green angiography and regional oxygen saturation. The elevated flap was categorized into the early-stained area, the delayed-stained area, and the no-stained area by indocyanine green angiography. The regional oxygen saturation index (regional oxygen saturation on the flap on the control nondissected portion) of each area was calculated. Postoperative continuous flap monitoring was conducted, recording the value of the regional oxygen saturation index at the early-stained area. The blood glucose measurement index was also recorded periodically. In 60 cases of perforator-based free flaps, intraoperative indocyanine green areas were significantly correlated with the values of regional oxygen saturation index. The postoperative regional oxygen saturation index showed very stable values in various types of perforator flaps, provided that no vascular problem occurred, and it never went below 0.75. When vascular problems occurred, the regional oxygen saturation index dropped below 0.75 in all three cases before the blood glucose measurement index and the absolute value of regional oxygen saturation dropped below the criterion value. The regional oxygen saturation index may be a simple and fast criterion for detecting vascular problems following free flap reconstruction compared with existing criteria. Diagnostic, II.

  1. Brain oxygen saturation assessment in neonates using T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Alderliesten, Thomas; De Vis, Jill B; Lemmers, Petra Ma; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Groenendaal, Floris; van Bel, Frank; Benders, Manon Jnl; Petersen, Esben T

    2017-03-01

    Although near-infrared spectroscopy is increasingly being used to monitor cerebral oxygenation in neonates, it has a limited penetration depth. The T2-prepared Blood Imaging of Oxygen Saturation (T2-BIOS) magnetic resonance sequence provides an oxygen saturation estimate on a voxel-by-voxel basis, without needing a respiratory calibration experiment. In 15 neonates, oxygen saturation measured by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation and near-infrared spectroscopy were compared. In addition, these measures were compared to cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus. A strong linear relation was found between the oxygen saturation measured by magnetic resonance imaging and the oxygen saturation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy ( R(2 )= 0.64, p < 0.001). Strong linear correlations were found between near-infrared spectroscopy oxygen saturation, and magnetic resonance imaging measures of frontal cerebral blood flow, whole brain cerebral blood flow and venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R(2 )= 0.71, 0.50, 0.65; p < 0.01). The oxygen saturation obtained by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation correlated with venous oxygen saturation in the sagittal sinus ( R(2 )= 0.49, p = 0.023), but no significant correlations could be demonstrated with frontal and whole brain cerebral blood flow. These results suggest that measuring oxygen saturation by T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation is feasible, even in neonates. Strong correlations between the various methods work as a cross validation for near-infrared spectroscopy and T2-prepared blood imaging of oxygen saturation, confirming the validity of using of these techniques for determining cerebral oxygenation.

  2. Principal component analysis calibration method for dual-luminophore oxygen and temperature sensor films: application to luminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Köse, Muhammet Erkan; Omar, Ahmed; Virgin, Christopher A; Carroll, Bruce F; Schanze, Kirk S

    2005-09-27

    Oxygen sensor films are frequently used to image air-pressure distributions on surfaces in aerodynamic wind tunnels. In this application, the sensor film is referred to as a pressure-sensitive paint (PSP). A Stern-Volmer calibration is used to relate the emission intensity ratio of a long-lifetime luminescent dye (the pressure-sensitive luminophore, PSL) to surface air pressure. A major problem in PSP measurements arises because the Stern-Volmer calibration of the PSL's emission varies with temperature. To correct for the temperature dependence, a second luminescent dye that has an emission that varies with temperature (the temperature-sensitive luminophore, TSL) is incorporated into the sensor film. With such a dual-luminophore PSP (DL-PSP), it is possible to measure the surface-temperature distribution with the TSL emission, and this information is then used to correct the temperature dependence of the PSL's pressure response. In the present article, we report the application of a DL-PSP to obtain high-resolution air-pressure distributions on a surface that is subjected to a 20 degrees C temperature gradient. Two different calibration methods are used to generate surface-temperature and air-pressure distributions from the luminescence imaging data, and a quantitative comparison of the results obtained from the two methods is provided. The first method is based on an intensity-ratio calibration that uses luminescence images collected at two wavelengths, one corresponding to the TSL emission and the second corresponding to the PSL emission. The second method is based on principal component analysis (PCA) of luminescence images obtained at four wavelengths throughout the spectral region of the TSL and PSL emission (hyperspectral imaging, 550-750 nm). The results demonstrate that the PCA method allows the measurement of surface air pressure with higher accuracy and precision compared to those of the intensity-ratio method. The improvement is especially significant at

  3. Design and Characterization of a Sensorized Microfluidic Cell-Culture System with Electro-Thermal Micro-Pumps and Sensors for Cell Adhesion, Oxygen, and pH on a Glass Chip.

    PubMed

    Bonk, Sebastian M; Stubbe, Marco; Buehler, Sebastian M; Tautorat, Carsten; Baumann, Werner; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-07-30

    We combined a multi-sensor glass-chip with a microfluidic channel grid for the characterization of cellular behavior. The grid was imprinted in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Mouse-embryonal/fetal calvaria fibroblasts (MC3T3-E1) were used as a model system. Thin-film platinum (Pt) sensors for respiration (amperometric oxygen electrode), acidification (potentiometric pH electrodes) and cell adhesion (interdigitated-electrodes structures, IDES) allowed us to monitor cell-physiological parameters as well as the cell-spreading behavior. Two on-chip electro-thermal micro-pumps (ETμPs) permitted the induction of medium flow in the system, e.g., for medium mixing and drug delivery. The glass-wafer technology ensured the microscopic observability of the on-chip cell culture. Connecting Pt structures were passivated by a 1.2 μm layer of silicon nitride (Si3N4). Thin Si3N4 layers (20 nm or 60 nm) were used as the sensitive material of the pH electrodes. These electrodes showed a linear behavior in the pH range from 4 to 9, with a sensitivity of up to 39 mV per pH step. The oxygen sensors were circular Pt electrodes with a sensor area of 78.5 μm(2). Their sensitivity was 100 pA per 1% oxygen increase in the range from 0% to 21% oxygen (air saturated). Two different IDES geometries with 30- and 50-μm finger spacings showed comparable sensitivities in detecting the proliferation rate of MC3T3 cells. These cells were cultured for 11 days in vitro to test the biocompatibility, microfluidics and electric sensors of our system under standard laboratory conditions.

  4. Design and Characterization of a Sensorized Microfluidic Cell-Culture System with Electro-Thermal Micro-Pumps and Sensors for Cell Adhesion, Oxygen, and pH on a Glass Chip

    PubMed Central

    Bonk, Sebastian M.; Stubbe, Marco; Buehler, Sebastian M.; Tautorat, Carsten; Baumann, Werner; Klinkenberg, Ernst-Dieter; Gimsa, Jan

    2015-01-01

    We combined a multi-sensor glass-chip with a microfluidic channel grid for the characterization of cellular behavior. The grid was imprinted in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Mouse-embryonal/fetal calvaria fibroblasts (MC3T3-E1) were used as a model system. Thin-film platinum (Pt) sensors for respiration (amperometric oxygen electrode), acidification (potentiometric pH electrodes) and cell adhesion (interdigitated-electrodes structures, IDES) allowed us to monitor cell-physiological parameters as well as the cell-spreading behavior. Two on-chip electro-thermal micro-pumps (ETμPs) permitted the induction of medium flow in the system, e.g., for medium mixing and drug delivery. The glass-wafer technology ensured the microscopic observability of the on-chip cell culture. Connecting Pt structures were passivated by a 1.2 μm layer of silicon nitride (Si3N4). Thin Si3N4 layers (20 nm or 60 nm) were used as the sensitive material of the pH electrodes. These electrodes showed a linear behavior in the pH range from 4 to 9, with a sensitivity of up to 39 mV per pH step. The oxygen sensors were circular Pt electrodes with a sensor area of 78.5 μm2. Their sensitivity was 100 pA per 1% oxygen increase in the range from 0% to 21% oxygen (air saturated). Two different IDES geometries with 30- and 50-μm finger spacings showed comparable sensitivities in detecting the proliferation rate of MC3T3 cells. These cells were cultured for 11 days in vitro to test the biocompatibility, microfluidics and electric sensors of our system under standard laboratory conditions. PMID:26263849

  5. Assessing Routing Strategies for Cognitive Radio Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Suleiman; Fisal, Norsheila; Baguda, Yakubu S.; Saleem, Kashif

    2013-01-01

    Interest in the cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) paradigm has gradually grown among researchers. This concept seeks to fuse the benefits of dynamic spectrum access into the sensor network, making it a potential player in the next generation (NextGen) network, which is characterized by ubiquity. Notwithstanding its massive potential, little research activity has been dedicated to the network layer. By contrast, we find recent research trends focusing on the physical layer, the link layer and the transport layers. The fact that the cross-layer approach is imperative, due to the resource-constrained nature of CRSNs, can make the design of unique solutions non-trivial in this respect. This paper seeks to explore possible design opportunities with wireless sensor networks (WSNs), cognitive radio ad-hoc networks (CRAHNs) and cross-layer considerations for implementing viable CRSN routing solutions. Additionally, a detailed performance evaluation of WSN routing strategies in a cognitive radio environment is performed to expose research gaps. With this work, we intend to lay a foundation for developing CRSN routing solutions and to establish a basis for future work in this area. PMID:24077319

  6. Fiber optic sensor for the assessment of breathing effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babchenko, Anatoly; Turinvenko, Sergei; Khanokh, Boris; Nitzan, Meir

    1995-01-01

    Several methods have been developed for the qualitative and quantitative measurement of breathing effort. The most useful kind of breathing pattern monitor includes devices for recording chest and abdomen dimension changes, such as impedance plethysmography and respiratory induction plethysmography. These devices can measure the tidal volume in relative terms, and even measure it in absolute terms after suitable calibration. In this study a novel method for measuring chest circumference based on an optical fiber is presented. The sensor is based on the measurement of light transmitted through a bent optical fiber, which is connected to an elastic band, wrapped around the chest, and whose radius of curvature changes due to the respiratory act. The amount of transmitted light is related to the radius of curvature of the fiber which depends on the chest circumference. The output of the respiratory sensor was checked qualitatively by changing the respiration rate and depth. The changes in breathing effort were clearly demonstrated in the sensor output recording. The respiratory effort was also correlated with the heart rate, measured by photoplethysmography. Statistically significant correlation was found between the lungs' volume and the heart rate, but the correlation coefficient was not high.

  7. Assessing routing strategies for cognitive radio sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Suleiman; Fisal, Norsheila; Baguda, Yakubu S; Saleem, Kashif

    2013-09-26

    Interest in the cognitive radio sensor network (CRSN) paradigm has gradually grown among researchers. This concept seeks to fuse the benefits of dynamic spectrum access into the sensor network, making it a potential player in the next generation (NextGen) network, which is characterized by ubiquity. Notwithstanding its massive potential, little research activity has been dedicated to the network layer. By contrast, we find recent research trends focusing on the physical layer, the link layer and the transport layers. The fact that the cross-layer approach is imperative, due to the resource-constrained nature of CRSNs, can make the design of unique solutions non-trivial in this respect. This paper seeks to explore possible design opportunities with wireless sensor networks (WSNs), cognitive radio ad-hoc networks (CRAHNs) and cross-layer considerations for implementing viable CRSN routing solutions. Additionally, a detailed performance evaluation of WSN routing strategies in a cognitive radio environment is performed to expose research gaps. With this work, we intend to lay a foundation for developing CRSN routing solutions and to establish a basis for future work in this area.

  8. A novel approach to the assess biotic oxygen consumption in marine sediment communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, Victor; Queiros, Ana; Widdicombe, Stephen; Stephens, Nick; Lessin, Gennadi; Krause, Stefan; Lewandowski, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Bioturbation , the mixing of the sediment matrix by burrowing animals impacts sediment metabolism, including respiration through redistribution of particulate organics, changes in bacterial biota diversity and acitivity, as well as via burrowing fauna's own metabolism. Bioturbation, reflecting faunal activity, is also a proxy for the general sedimentary ecosystem health, and can be impacted by many of emerging marine environmental issues such as ocean acidification, warming and the occurrence of heat waves. Sedimentary oxygen consumption is often taken as a proxy for the activity of bioturbating fauna, but determining baselines can be difficult because of the confounding effects of other fauna and microbes present in sediments, as well as irnorganic processes that consume oxygen. Limitations therefore exist in current methodologies, and numerous confounding factors are hampering progress in this area. Here, we present novel method for the assessment of sediment respiration which is expected to be affected only by the biogenic oxygen consumption (namely aerobic respiration). As long as tracer reduction "immune" to inorganic oxygen consumption, so that measurements using this method can be used, alongside traditional methods, to decouple biological respiration from inorganic oxygen consumption reactions. The tracer is easily detectable, non-toxic and can be applied in systems with constant oxygen supply. The latter allow for incubation without the need to to work with unsealed experimental units, bringing procedural advantage over traditional methods. Consequently assessed bioturbating fauna is not exposed to hypoxia and additional stress. Here, we had applied system for the first time to investigate impacts of a common North-Atlantic bioturbator, the brittle star Amphiura filiformis, - on respiration of marine sediments. Two series of experiments were conducted with animals and sediment collected from Cawsand Bay, Plymouth, UK Preliminary results show that tracer

  9. Semi-specific Microbacterium phyllosphaerae-based microbial sensor for biochemical oxygen demand measurements in dairy wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kibena, Elo; Raud, Merlin; Jõgi, Eerik; Kikas, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Although the long incubation time of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD7) measurements has been addressed by the use of microbial biosensors, the resulting sensor-BOD values gained from the measurements with specific industrial wastewaters still underestimates the BOD value of such samples. This research aims to provide fast and more accurate BOD measurements in the dairy wastewater samples. Unlike municipal wastewater, wastewater from the dairy industry contains many substrates that are not easily accessible to a majority of microorganisms. Therefore, a bacterial culture, Microbacterium phyllosphaerae, isolated from dairy wastewater was used to construct a semi-specific microbial biosensor. A universal microbial biosensor based on Pseudomonas fluorescens, which has a wide substrate spectrum but is nonspecific to dairy wastewater, was used as a comparison. BOD biosensors were calibrated with OECD synthetic wastewater, and experiments with different synthetic and actual wastewater samples were carried out. Results show that the semi-specific M. phyllosphaerae-based microbial biosensor is more sensitive towards wastewaters that contain milk derivates and butter whey than the P. fluorescens-based biosensor. Although the M. phyllosphaerae biosensor underestimates the BOD7 value of actual dairy wastewaters by 25-32%, this bacterial culture is more suitable for BOD monitoring in dairy wastewater than P. fluorescens, which underestimated the same samples by 46-61%.

  10. An intracellular redox sensor for reactive oxygen species at the M3-M4 linker of GABAAρ1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán González, Andrea N; Gasulla, Javier; Calvo, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are normally involved in cell oxidative stress but also play a role as cellular messengers in redox signalling; for example, modulating the activity of neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels. However, the direct actions of ROS on GABAA receptors were not previously demonstrated. In the present work, we studied the effects of ROS on GABAAρ1 receptor function. Experimental Approach GABAAρ1 receptors were expressed in oocytes and GABA-evoked responses electrophysiologically recorded in the presence or absence of ROS. Chemical protection of cysteines by selective sulfhydryl reagents and site-directed mutagenesis studies were used to identify protein residues involved in ROS actions. Key Results GABAAρ1 receptor-mediated responses were significantly enhanced in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner by H2O2. Potentiating effects were attenuated by a free radical scavenger, lipoic acid or an inhibitor of the Fenton reaction, deferoxamine. Each ρ1 subunit contains only three cysteine residues, two extracellular at the Cys-loop (C177 and C191) and one intracellular (C364) at the M3-M4 linker. Mutant GABAAρ1 receptors in which C364 was exchanged by alanine were completely insensitive to modulation, implying that this site, rather than a cysteine in the Cys-loop, is essential for ROS modulation. Conclusion and Implications Our results show that the function of GABAAρ1 receptors is enhanced by ROS and that the intracellular C364 is the sensor for ROS actions. PMID:24428763

  11. Factors affecting the performance of a single-chamber microbial fuel cell-type biological oxygen demand sensor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gai-Xiu; Sun, Yong-Ming; Kong, Xiao-Ying; Zhen, Feng; Li, Ying; Li, Lian-Hua; Lei, Ting-Zhou; Yuan, Zhen-Hong; Chen, Guan-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to degrade organic matter or sludge present in wastewater (WW), and thereby generate electricity. We developed a simple, low-cost single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SCMFC)-type biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) sensor using carbon felt (anode) and activated sludge, and demonstrated its feasibility in the construction of a real-time BOD measurement system. Further, the effects of anodic pH and organic concentration on SCMFC performance were examined, and the correlation between BOD concentration and its response time was analyzed. Our results demonstrated that the SCMFC exhibited a stable voltage after 132 min following the addition of synthetic WW (BOD concentration: 200 mg/L). Notably, the response signal increased with an increase in BOD concentration (range: 5-200 mg/L) and was found to be directly proportional to the substrate concentration. However, at higher BOD concentrations (>120 mg/L) the response signal remained unaltered. Furthermore, we optimized the SCMFC using synthetic WW, and tested it with real WW. Upon feeding real WW, the BOD values exhibited a standard deviation from 2.08 to 8.3% when compared to the standard BOD5 method, thus demonstrating the practical applicability of the developed system to real treatment effluents.

  12. Globin-coupled heme containing oxygen sensor soluble adenylate cyclase in Leishmania prevents cell death during hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sen Santara, Sumit; Roy, Jayasree; Mukherjee, Supratim; Bose, Moumita; Saha, Rina; Adak, Subrata

    2013-10-15

    Globin and adenylate cyclase play individually numerous crucial roles in eukaryotic organisms. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of globins and adenylate cyclase from prokaryotic to eukaryotic organisms suggests that they share an early common ancestor, even though these proteins execute different functions in these two kingdoms. The latest studies of biological signaling molecules in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms have discovered a new class of heme-containing proteins that act as sensors. The protein of the globin family is still unknown in the trypanosomatid parasites, Trypanosome and Leishmania. In addition, globin-coupled heme containing adenylate cyclase is undescribed in the literature. Here we report a globin-coupled heme containing adenylate cyclase (HemAC-Lm) in the unicellular eukaryotic organism Leishmania. The protein exhibits spectral properties similar to neuroglobin and cytoglobin. Localization studies and activity measurements demonstrate that the protein is present in cytosol and oxygen directly stimulates adenylate cyclase activity in vivo and in vitro. Gene knockdown and overexpression studies suggest that O2-dependent cAMP signaling via protein kinase A plays a fundamental role in cell survival through suppression of oxidative stress under hypoxia. In addition, the enzyme-dependent cAMP generation shows a stimulatory as well as inhibitory role in cell proliferation of Leishmania promastigotes during normoxia. Our work begins to clarify how O2-dependent cAMP generation by adenylate cyclase is likely to function in cellular adaptability under various O2 tensions.

  13. Assessment of tumor oxygenation and its impact on treatment response in bevacizumab-treated recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, David; Mouridsen, Kim; Radbruch, Alexander; Kurz, Felix T; Eidel, Oliver; Wick, Antje; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Østergaard, Leif; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Antiantiogenic therapy with bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma is currently understood to both reduce microvascular density and to prune abnormal tumor microvessels. Microvascular pruning and the resulting vascular normalization are hypothesized to reduce tumor hypoxia and increase supply of systemic therapy to the tumor; however, the underlying pathophysiological changes and their timing after treatment initiation remain controversial. Here, we use a novel dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI-based method, which allows simultaneous assessment of tumor net oxygenation changes reflected by the tumor metabolic rate of oxygen and vascular normalization represented by the capillary transit time heterogeneity. We find that capillary transit time heterogeneity, and hence the oxygen extraction fraction combine with the tumoral blood flow (cerebral blood flow) in such a way that the overall tumor oxygenation appears to be worsened despite vascular normalization. Accordingly, hazards for both progression and death are found elevated in patients with a greater reduction of tumor metabolic rate of oxygen in response to bevacizumab and patients with higher intratumoral tumor metabolic rate of oxygen at baseline. This implies that tumors with a higher degree of angiogenesis prior to bevacizumab-treatment retain a higher level of angiogenesis during therapy despite a greater antiangiogenic effect of bevacizumab, hinting at evasive mechanisms limiting bevacizumab efficacy in that a reversal of their biological behavior and relative prognosis does not occur.

  14. A Bayesian Framework for the Automated Online Assessment of Sensor Data Quality

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel; Timms, Greg; De Souza, Paulo; D'Este, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Online automated quality assessment is critical to determine a sensor's fitness for purpose in real-time applications. A Dynamic Bayesian Network (DBN) framework is proposed to produce probabilistic quality assessments and represent the uncertainty of sequentially correlated sensor readings. This is a novel framework to represent the causes, quality state and observed effects of individual sensor errors without imposing any constraints upon the physical deployment or measured phenomenon. It represents the casual relationship between quality tests and combines them in a way to generate uncertainty estimates of samples. The DBN was implemented for a particular marine deployment of temperature and conductivity sensors in Hobart, Australia. The DBN was shown to offer a substantial average improvement (34%) in replicating the error bars that were generated by experts when compared to a fuzzy logic approach. PMID:23012554

  15. Let's get Physiqual - An intuitive and generic method to combine sensor technology with ecological momentary assessments.

    PubMed

    Blaauw, F J; Schenk, H M; Jeronimus, B F; van der Krieke, L; de Jonge, P; Aiello, M; Emerencia, A C

    2016-10-01

    The emergence of wearables and smartwatches is making sensors a ubiquitous technology to measure daily rhythms in physiological measures, such as movement and heart rate. An integration of sensor data from wearables and self-report questionnaire data about cognition, behaviors, and emotions can provide new insights into the interaction of mental and physiological processes in daily life. Hitherto no method existed that enables an easy-to-use integration of sensor and self-report data. To fill this gap, we present 'Physiqual', a platform for researchers that gathers and integrates data from commercially available sensors and service providers into one unified format for use in Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMA) or Experience Sampling Methods (ESM), and Quantified Self (QS). Physiqual currently supports sensor data provided by two well-known service providers and therewith a wide range of smartwatches and wearables. To demonstrate the features of Physiqual, we conducted a case study in which we assessed two subjects by means of data from an EMA study combined with sensor data as aggregated and exported by Physiqual. To the best of our knowledge, the Physiqual platform is the first platform that allows researchers to conveniently aggregate and integrate physiological sensor data with EMA studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of HIF-1 signaling pathway in Pelteobagrus vachelli using RNA-Seq: effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guosong; Zhao, Cheng; Wang, Qintao; Gu, Yichun; Li, Zecheng; Tao, Panfeng; Chen, Jiawei; Yin, Shaowu

    2017-03-28

    Oxygen is a vital element in aquatic environments. The concentration of oxygen to which aquatic organisms are exposed is influenced by salinity, water temperature, weather, and surface water runoff. Hypoxia has a serious effect on fish populations, and can lead to the loss of habitat and die-offs. Therefore, in the present study we used next-generation sequencing technology to characterize the transcriptomes of Pelteobagrus vachelli and identified 70 candidate genes in the HIF-1 signaling pathway that are important for the hypoxic response in all metazoan species. For the first time, the present study reported the effects of acute hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxygen sensors, respiratory metabolism, and hematology indices in P. vachelli. The predicted physiological adjustments show that P. vachelli's blood oxygen-carrying capacity was increased through increased RBC, HB, and SI after hypoxia exposure. Glycolysis-related enzyme activities (PFK, HK, and PK) and LDH in the brain and liver also increased, indicating a rise in anaerobic metabolism. The observed reduction in oxidative enzyme level (CS) in the liver during hypoxia suggests a concomitant depression in aerobic metabolism. There were significant increases in oxygen sensor mRNA expression and HIF-1α protein expression during hypoxia and reoxygenation exposure, suggesting that the HIF-1 signaling pathway was activated in the liver and brain of P. vachelli in response to acute hypoxia and reoxygenation. Our findings suggest that oxygen sensors (e.g., HIF-1α) of P. vachelli are potentially useful biomarkers of environmental hypoxic exposure. These data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the hypoxia signaling pathway in fish under hypoxia and reoxygenation.

  17. Assessment of macro- and micro-oxygenation parameters during fractional fluid infusion: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marc-Olivier; Bonnet, Vincent; Lorne, Emmanuel; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Rebet, Olivier; Courteille, Benoît; Lemétayer, Charlotte; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Gérard, Jean-Louis; Fellahi, Jean-Luc; Hanouz, Jean-Luc

    2017-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to assess whether maximal fluid infusion improves both oxygen delivery (DO2) and micro-circulatory parameters during hemodilution. The secondary objective was to assess the ability of baseline micro-circulatory parameters to predict oxygen consumption (VO2) response following fluid infusion. In a postoperative cardiac ICU, patients received repeated fluid infusion until stroke volume (SV) was maximized. Before and after each fluid expansion, macro- (DO2, VO2) and micro-circulatory oxygenation parameters were recorded [central venous oxygen saturation (ScVO2), blood lactate, difference in veno-arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(v-a)CO2), somatic and cerebral oxygen saturation (rSO2)]. Patients were classified as VO2-Responders or VO2-Non-Responders according to an increase in VO2 above or below 15%, respectively. After maximal fluid infusion, all patients showed improved macro- and micro-circulatory oxygenation parameters, but VO2-Responders had lower values (especially for ScVO2 and cerebral rSO2). Only baseline ScVO2 and cerebral rSO2 were useful to predict the VO2 response to maximal fluid infusion (ROCAUC 0.80 (95% CI: 0.54-0.95, P=0.012) and 0.83 (95% CI: 0.57-0.96, P=0.001). Maximal fluid infusion improves macro- and micro-circulatory oxygenation parameters. For VO2-Responders, only ScVO2 and cerebral rSO2 could serve as markers of tissue hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A multifrequency evaluation of active and passive microwave sensors for oil spill detection and assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenner, R. G.; Reid, S. C.; Solie, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation is given of how active and passive microwave sensors can best be used in oil spill detection and assessment. Radar backscatter curves taken over oil spills are presented and their effect on synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are discussed. Plots of microwave radiometric brightness variations over oil spills are presented and discussed. Recommendations as to how to select the best combination of frequency, viewing angle, and sensor type for evaluation of various aspects of oil spills are also discussed.

  19. Oxygen for children and newborns in non-tertiary hospitals in South-west Nigeria: A needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Graham, H R; Ayede, A I; Bakare, A A; Oyewole, O B; Peel, D; Falade, A G; Duke, T

    2016-05-01

    Oxygen is important for the treatment of hypoxaemia associated with pneumonia, malaria, and other medical, obstetric, and surgical conditions. Access to oxygen therapy is limited in many of the high mortality settings where it would be of most benefit. A needs assessment of 12 non-tertiary hospitals in south-west Nigeria, assessing structural, technical and clinical barriers to the provision of safe and effective oxygen therapy. Oxygen supply was reported to be a major challenge by hospital directors. All hospitals had some access to oxygen cylinders, which were expensive and frequently ran out. Nine (75%) hospitals used oxygen concentrators, which were limited by inadequate power supply and lack of maintenance capacity. Appropriate oxygen delivery and monitoring devices (nasal prongs, catheters, pulse oximeters) were poorly available, and no hospitals had clinical guidelines pertaining to the use of -oxygen for children. Oxygen was expensive to patients (median US$20/day) and to hospitals. Estimated oxygen demand is reported using both a constant mean-based estimate and adjustment for seasonal and other variability. Making oxygen available to sick children and neonates in Nigerian hospitals will require: improving detection of hypoxaemia through routine use of pulse oximetry; improving access to oxygen through equipment, training, and maintenance structures; and commitment to building hospital and state structures that can sustain and expand oxygen initiatives.

  20. Lung ultrasonography for assessment of oxygenation response to prone position ventilation in ARDS.

    PubMed

    Haddam, Malik; Zieleskiewicz, Laurent; Perbet, Sebastien; Baldovini, Alice; Guervilly, Christophe; Arbelot, Charlotte; Noel, Alexandre; Vigne, Coralie; Hammad, Emmanuelle; Antonini, François; Lehingue, Samuel; Peytel, Eric; Lu, Qin; Bouhemad, Belaid; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Langeron, Olivier; Martin, Claude; Muller, Laurent; Rouby, Jean-Jacques; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Papazian, Laurent; Leone, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Prone position (PP) improves oxygenation and outcome of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <150 mmHg. Regional changes in lung aeration can be assessed by lung ultrasound (LUS). Our aim was to predict the magnitude of oxygenation response after PP using bedside LUS. We conducted a prospective multicenter study that included adult patients with severe and moderate ARDS. LUS data were collected at four time points: 1 h before (baseline) and 1 h after turning the patient to PP, 1 h before and 1 h after turning the patient back to the supine position. Regional lung aeration changes and ultrasound reaeration scores were assessed at each time. Overdistension was not assessed. Fifty-one patients were included. Oxygenation response after PP was not correlated with a specific LUS pattern. The patients with focal and non-focal ARDS showed no difference in global reaeration score. With regard to the entire PP session, the patients with non-focal ARDS had an improved aeration gain in the anterior areas. Oxygenation response was not associated with aeration changes. No difference in PaCO2 change was found according to oxygenation response or lung morphology. In ARDS patients with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio ≤150 mmHg, bedside LUS cannot predict oxygenation response after the first PP session. At the bedside, LUS enables monitoring of aeration changes during PP.

  1. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2006-01-01

    The geopositional accuracy of the standard geocorrected product from the Advanced Wide Field Sensor (AWiFS) was evaluated using digital orthophoto quarter quadrangles and other reference sources of similar accuracy. Images were analyzed from summer 2004 through spring 2005. Forty to fifty check points were collected manually per scene and analyzed to determine overall circular error, estimates of horizontal bias, and other systematic errors. Measured errors were somewhat higher than the specifications for the data, but they were consistent with the analysis of the distributing vendor.

  2. In vitro and in vivo studies of new photoluminescent oxygen sensors for non-invasive intravascular pO2 measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak-Sliwinska, Patrycja; Forte, Eddy; van den Bergh, Hubert; Wagnières, Georges

    2009-06-01

    The concentration of oxygen and its rate of consumption are important factors playing a role in PDT and radiotherapy. One of the methods for measuring the tissular oxygen partial pressure (pO2) is based on the use of luminophores presenting an oxygen-dependent quenching of their phosphorescence. The time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy of palladium (PdTCPP) or ruthenium (RuDPP) porphyrin complexes is used for this purpose. Unfortunately, these porphyrin derivatives are phototoxic and leak rapidly out of the blood vessels, making them unsuitable for measuring tissular and or intravascular pO2. Therefore, this research aimed at developing and testing new biocompatible, non-phototoxic oxygen sensors based on palladium complexes incorporated into oxygen permeable, polysaccharide-based nanoparticles appropriate for noninvasive in situ and in vivo measurements of the pO2. In vitro studies, performed with an optical fiber-based time-resolved spectrophotometer, showed that the incorporation of such pO2 probes in nanovectors reduces their sensitivity to oxygen as well as their photobleaching by less than one order of magnitude. However, in vivo biocompatibility studies performed on the chick's embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model demonstrated that the luminescence of those oxygen probes tends to be heterogeneously distributed within the vasculature. In addition, these probes induce a 'clumping tendency', resulting in a more or less decreased viability of the embryos.

  3. Model of glucose sensor error components: identification and assessment for new Dexcom G4 generation devices.

    PubMed

    Facchinetti, Andrea; Del Favero, Simone; Sparacino, Giovanni; Cobelli, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    It is clinically well-established that minimally invasive subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) sensors can significantly improve diabetes treatment. However, CGM readings are still not as reliable as those provided by standard fingerprick blood glucose (BG) meters. In addition to unavoidable random measurement noise, other components of sensor error are distortions due to the blood-to-interstitial glucose kinetics and systematic under-/overestimations associated with the sensor calibration process. A quantitative assessment of these components, and the ability to simulate them with precision, is of paramount importance in the design of CGM-based applications, e.g., the artificial pancreas (AP), and in their in silico testing. In the present paper, we identify and assess a model of sensor error of for two sensors, i.e., the G4 Platinum (G4P) and the advanced G4 for artificial pancreas studies (G4AP), both belonging to the recently presented "fourth" generation of Dexcom CGM sensors but different in their data processing. Results are also compared with those obtained by a sensor belonging to the previous, "third," generation by the same manufacturer, the SEVEN Plus (7P). For each sensor, the error model is derived from 12-h CGM recordings of two sensors used simultaneously and BG samples collected in parallel every 15 ± 5 min. Thanks to technological innovations, G4P outperforms 7P, with average mean absolute relative difference (MARD) of 11.1 versus 14.2%, respectively, and lowering of about 30% the error of each component. Thanks to the more sophisticated data processing algorithms, G4AP resulted more reliable than G4P, with a MARD of 10.0%, and a further decrease to 20% of the error due to blood-to-interstitial glucose kinetics.

  4. Quantitative assessment of multiple sclerosis using inertial sensors and the TUG test.

    PubMed

    Greene, Barry R; Healy, Michael; Rutledge, Stephanie; Caulfield, Brian; Tubridy, Niall

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive neurological disorder affecting between 2 and 2.5 million people globally. Tests of mobility form part of clinical assessments of MS. Quantitative assessment of mobility using inertial sensors has the potential to provide objective, longitudinal monitoring of disease progression in patients with MS. The mobility of 21 patients (aged 25-59 years, 8 M, 13 F), diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS was assessed using the Timed up and Go (TUG) test, while patients wore shank-mounted inertial sensors. This exploratory, cross-sectional study aimed to examine the reliability of quantitative measures derived from inertial sensors during the TUG test, in patients with MS. Furthermore, we aimed to determine if disease status (as measured by the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) and the Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS)) can be predicted by assessment using a TUG test and inertial sensors. Reliability analysis showed that 32 of 52 inertial sensors parameters obtained during the TUG showed excellent intrasession reliability, while 11 of 52 showed moderate reliability. Using the inertial sensors parameters, regression models of the EDSS and MSIS-29 scales were derived using the elastic net procedure. Using cross validation, an elastic net regularized regression model of MSIS yielded a mean square error (MSE) of 334.6 with 25 degrees of freedom (DoF). Similarly, an elastic net regularized regression model of EDSS yielded a cross-validated MSE of 1.5 with 6 DoF. Results suggest that inertial sensor parameters derived from MS patients while completing the TUG test are reliable and may have utility in assessing disease state as measured using EDSS and MSIS.

  5. Micro-encapsulated sensors for in vivo assessment of the oxidative stress in aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovoy, Anton; Teh, Cathleen; Escobar, Marco; Meglinski, Igor; Korzh, Vladimir

    2012-03-01

    Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen spices (ROS). ROS are natural byproducts of normal metabolism of oxygen and have important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Many heart related diseases like heart failure and myocardial infarction develop as a result of oxidative stress. Current treatment cannot improve the progressive decline in heart function experienced by all patients. Therefore heart failure is the cause of around 25% of all deaths in the Asia Pacific region. Thus any step taken to address the oxidative stress problem is essential for enhancing human health and improve their quality of life. Current approach is dedicated to develop micron-size oxidation stress-sensor for in-vivo measuring level of ROS in KillerRed expressing transgenic zebrafish larvae. Central to our investigation is the light-inducible heart failure animal model we developed in zebrafish that expressed KillerRed in the heart. By utilizing the photosensitizer properties of KillerRed to produce ROS upon green light illumination, heart failure can be repeatedly induced in a non-invasive manner. Importantly, the use of this biological platform permits the development of physiologically sensitive ROS sensor and identifies efficient antioxidants that improve heart contractility. The biosensor approach is based on utilizing biocompatible polyelectrolyte microcapsules as a carry of fluorescent dyes sensitive to amount of reactive oxygen spices. Microcapsule prevents dye diffusion in tissue that makes use toxic dyes possible. Microcapsule's wall is permeable for environment with size less than 500 Da. The oxidation stress-sensors are injected directly in zebrafish pericardium with further circulation along blood system. Detecting of ROS is obtained by using laser scanning microscopy by illuminating oxidation stress-sensors and detecting changing excitation signal from the fluorescent dye.

  6. Micro-encapsulated sensors for in vivo assessment of the oxidative stress in aquatic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadovoy, Anton; Teh, Cathleen; Escobar, Marco; Meglinski, Igor; Korzh, Vladimir

    2011-10-01

    Oxidative stress results from an imbalance between the production and detoxification of reactive oxygen spices (ROS). ROS are natural byproducts of normal metabolism of oxygen and have important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Many heart related diseases like heart failure and myocardial infarction develop as a result of oxidative stress. Current treatment cannot improve the progressive decline in heart function experienced by all patients. Therefore heart failure is the cause of around 25% of all deaths in the Asia Pacific region. Thus any step taken to address the oxidative stress problem is essential for enhancing human health and improve their quality of life. Current approach is dedicated to develop micron-size oxidation stress-sensor for in-vivo measuring level of ROS in KillerRed expressing transgenic zebrafish larvae. Central to our investigation is the light-inducible heart failure animal model we developed in zebrafish that expressed KillerRed in the heart. By utilizing the photosensitizer properties of KillerRed to produce ROS upon green light illumination, heart failure can be repeatedly induced in a non-invasive manner. Importantly, the use of this biological platform permits the development of physiologically sensitive ROS sensor and identifies efficient antioxidants that improve heart contractility. The biosensor approach is based on utilizing biocompatible polyelectrolyte microcapsules as a carry of fluorescent dyes sensitive to amount of reactive oxygen spices. Microcapsule prevents dye diffusion in tissue that makes use toxic dyes possible. Microcapsule's wall is permeable for environment with size less than 500 Da. The oxidation stress-sensors are injected directly in zebrafish pericardium with further circulation along blood system. Detecting of ROS is obtained by using laser scanning microscopy by illuminating oxidation stress-sensors and detecting changing excitation signal from the fluorescent dye.

  7. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D.; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  8. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1 μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics.

  9. Long-term performance of Aanderaa optodes and sea-bird SBE-43 dissolved-oxygen sensors bottom mounted at 32 m in Massachusetts Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martini, Marinna; Butman, Bradford; Mickelson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    A field evaluation of two new dissolved-oxygen sensing technologies, the Aanderaa Instruments AS optode model 3830 and the Sea-Bird Electronics, Inc., model SBE43, was carried out at about 32-m water depth in western Massachusetts Bay. The optode is an optical sensor that measures fluorescence quenching by oxygen molecules, while the SBE43 is a Clark polarographic membrane sensor. Optodes were continuously deployed on bottom tripod frames by exchanging sensors every 4 months over a 19-month period. A Sea-Bird SBE43 was added during one 4-month deployment. These moored observations compared well with oxygen measurements from profiles collected during monthly shipboard surveys conducted by the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority. The mean correlation coefficient between the moored measurements and shipboard survey data was >0.9, the mean difference was 0.06 mL L−1, and the standard deviation of the difference was 0.15 mL L−1. The correlation coefficient between the optode and the SBE43 was >0.9 and the mean difference was 0.07 mL L−1. Optode measurements degraded when fouling was severe enough to block oxygen molecules from entering the sensing foil over a significant portion of the sensing window. Drift observed in two optodes beginning at about 225 and 390 days of deployment is attributed to degradation of the sensing foil. Flushing is necessary to equilibrate the Sea-Bird sensor. Power consumption by the SBE43 and required pump was 19.2 mWh per sample, and the optode consumed 0.9 mWh per sample, both within expected values based on manufacturers’ specifications.

  10. Oxygen diffusion model of the mixed (U,Pu)O2 ± x: Assessment and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Emily; Guéneau, Christine; Crocombette, Jean-Paul

    2017-03-01

    The uranium-plutonium (U,Pu)O2 ± x mixed oxide (MOX) is used as a nuclear fuel in some light water reactors and considered for future reactor generations. To gain insight into fuel restructuring, which occurs during the fuel lifetime as well as possible accident scenarios understanding of the thermodynamic and kinetic behavior is crucial. A comprehensive evaluation of thermo-kinetic properties is incorporated in a computational CALPHAD type model. The present DICTRA based model describes oxygen diffusion across the whole range of plutonium, uranium and oxygen compositions and temperatures by incorporating vacancy and interstitial migration pathways for oxygen. The self and chemical diffusion coefficients are assessed for the binary UO2 ± x and PuO2 - x systems and the description is extended to the ternary mixed oxide (U,Pu)O2 ± x by extrapolation. A simulation to validate the applicability of this model is considered.

  11. ZigBee-based wireless multi-sensor system for physical activity assessment.

    PubMed

    Mo, Lingfei; Liu, Shaopeng; Gao, Robert X; John, Dinesh; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty

    2011-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) is important for assessing human exposure to the environment. This paper presents a ZigBee-based Wireless wearable multi-sensor Integrated Measurement System (WIMS) for in-situ PA measurement. Two accelerometers, a piezoelectric displacement sensor, and an ultraviolet (UV) sensor have been used for the physical activity assessment. Detailed analysis was performed for the hardware design and embedded program control, enabling efficient data sampling and transmission, compact design, and extended battery life to meet requirements for PA assessment under free-living conditions. Preliminary testing of the WIMS has demonstrated the functionality of the design, while performance comparison of the WIMS with a wired version on an electromagnetic shaker has demonstrated the signal validity.

  12. Performance of an Ultraviolet Photoconductive Sensor Using Well-Aligned Aluminium-Doped Zinc-Oxide Nanorod Arrays Annealed in an Air and Oxygen Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz Mamat, Mohamad; Khusaimi, Zuraida; Zahidi, Musa Mohamed; Rusop Mahmood, Mohamad

    2011-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photoconductive sensors were fabricated using an aluminium (Al)-doped zinc-oxide (ZnO) nanorod array with a diameter between 40 and 150 nm and thickness of approximately 1.1 µm. The nanorod arrays were prepared using a sonicated sol-gel immersion and annealed at 500 °C under different ambient conditions of air and oxygen. The annealing process induced the formation of nanoholes on the nanorod surfaces, which increased the nanorod surface area. The nanoholes existed in larger quantities on the nanorod surfaces annealed in air compared with the nanorods annealed in an oxygen environment. This condition reduced the rise and decay time constants of the air-annealed UV sensor. However, the sample annealed in an oxygen ambient shows the highest responsivity of 1.55 A/W for UV light (365 nm, 5 mW/cm2) under a 10 V bias mainly due to defect reduction and improvement in stoichiometric properties. To the best of our knowledge, a UV photoconductive sensor using this ZnO nanostructure has not yet been reported.

  13. Performance of an Ultraviolet Photoconductive Sensor Using Well-Aligned Aluminium-Doped Zinc-Oxide Nanorod Arrays Annealed in an Air and Oxygen Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamat, Mohamad Hafiz; Khusaimi, Zuraida; Zahidi, Musa Mohamed; Mahmood, Mohamad Rusop

    2011-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) photoconductive sensors were fabricated using an aluminium (Al)-doped zinc-oxide (ZnO) nanorod array with a diameter between 40 and 150 nm and thickness of approximately 1.1 μm. The nanorod arrays were prepared using a sonicated sol--gel immersion and annealed at 500 °C under different ambient conditions of air and oxygen. The annealing process induced the formation of nanoholes on the nanorod surfaces, which increased the nanorod surface area. The nanoholes existed in larger quantities on the nanorod surfaces annealed in air compared with the nanorods annealed in an oxygen environment. This condition reduced the rise and decay time constants of the air-annealed UV sensor. However, the sample annealed in an oxygen ambient shows the highest responsivity of 1.55 A/W for UV light (365 nm, 5 mW/cm2) under a 10 V bias mainly due to defect reduction and improvement in stoichiometric properties. To the best of our knowledge, a UV photoconductive sensor using this ZnO nanostructure has not yet been reported.

  14. [Fabrication of sensor for reactive oxygen species using gold electrodes modified with electropolymerized porphyrins and application for detection of stress of plants].

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Makoto; Oyaizu, Kenichi; Murata, Hidenori; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Kobayashi, Chihiro

    2007-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Spiecies (ROS) such as superoxide anion radical (.O(2)(-)) act as signals for the activation of stress-response and defense pathways. However, excess ROS generated by perturbing .O(2)(-) homeostasis stimulated many environmental stress, including intense light, drought, temperature stress, herbicides, induce high radical toxicity. Consequently, quantitative analysis of .O(2)(-) is a subject of intense research, since most of ROS are derived from .O(2)(-). Iron meso-tetrakis(3-thienyl)porphyrin complexes were electropolymerized onto a Au wire electrode. The modified Au electrode were applied to .O(2)(-) sensor to detect catalytic oxidation current of .O(2)(-) which was generated as an intermediate during the oxidation of xanthine by catalystic XOD. It was revealed that the sensor was quantitative to measure .O(2)(-). The modified Au electrode were applied to measure oxidation current of .O(2)(-) in mung beans under environmental stress condition. Plants were grown in atmosphere, 25 degrees C and in black darkness. The other plants were exposed to oxygen excess. The oxidation current of .O(2)(-) were increased plants were grown by high-oxygen environment compared to plants were grown at atmosphere. This experiment was indicated that environmental stress such as hyperoxia induced excess .O(2)(-) and Au wire sensor using iron porphyrin complexes is capable of .O(2)(-) detection in plants under environmental stresses.

  15. Estimating the oxygenated zone beneath building foundations for petroleum vapor intrusion assessment.

    PubMed

    Verginelli, Iason; Yao, Yijun; Wang, Yue; Ma, Jie; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-07-15

    Previous studies show that aerobic biodegradation can effectively reduce hydrocarbon soil gas concentrations by orders of magnitude. Increasingly, oxygen limited biodegradation is being included in petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) guidance for risk assessment at leaking underground storage tank sites. The application of PVI risk screening tools is aided by the knowledge of subslab oxygen conditions, which, however, are not commonly measured during site investigations. Here we introduce an algebraically explicit analytical method that can estimate oxygen conditions beneath the building slab, for PVI scenarios with impervious or pervious building foundations. Simulation results by this new model are then used to illustrate the role of site-specific conditions in determining the oxygen replenishment below the building for both scenarios. Furthermore, critical slab-width-to-source-depth ratios and critical source depths for the establishment of a subslab "oxygen shadow" (i.e. anoxic zone below the building) are provided as a function of key parameters such as vapor source concentration, effective diffusion coefficients of concrete and building depth. For impervious slab scenarios the obtained results are shown in good agreement with findings by previous studies and further support the recommendation by U.S. EPA about the inapplicability of vertical exclusion distances for scenarios involving large buildings and high source concentrations. For pervious slabs, results by this new model indicate that even relatively low effective diffusion coefficients of concrete can facilitate the oxygen transport into the subsurface below the building and create oxygenated conditions below the whole slab foundation favorable for petroleum vapor biodegradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Limiting Current Oxygen Sensor Based on LSGM as a Solid Electrolyte and LSGMN ( N = Fe, Co) as a Dense Diffusion Barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Gao, Xiang; He, Bei-Gang; Yu, Jing-Kun

    2016-07-01

    The La0.8Sr0.2(Ga1- x Co x )0.8Mg0.2O3- δ (LSGMC x = 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2, 0.25) and La0.8Sr0.2(Ga1- x Fe x )0.8Mg0.2O3- δ (LSGMF x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.3) samples were prepared by solid-state reaction. The structure, conductivity, thermal expansion behavior, and chemical compatibility were studied by XRD, dilatometry, and four-terminal method. A limiting current oxygen sensor was prepared with La0.8Sr0.2Ga0.83Mg0.17O2.815 as a solid electrolyte and La0.8Sr0.2(Ga0.75Co0.25)0.8Mg0.2O3- δ as a dense diffusion barrier. The oxygen-sensitive characteristic was measured at different oxygen concentrations. The results show that the phase structure of samples is cubic, except La0.8Sr0.2(Ga0.75Co0.25)0.8Mg0.2O3- δ , which has a hexagonal structure. The change in activation energy for electrical conductivity and the increase in thermal expansion coefficient are confirmed to correlate with an increasing concentration of oxygen vacancies. The limiting current oxygen sensor exhibits a good limiting current platform and the limiting current depends linearly on the oxygen concentration: I L(mA) = 12.8519 + 2.2667 x_{{{O}_{{2}} }} (mol%, 0 < x_{{{{O}}_{ 2} }} < 3.31) at 750 °C, I L(mA) = 14.3222 + 3.5180 x_{{{O}_{{2}} }} (mol%, 0 < x_{{{{O}}_{ 2} }} < 4.16) at 800 °C, and I L(mA) = 15.2872 + 5.0269x_{{{O}_{{2}} }}(mol%, 0 < x_{{{{O}}_{ 2} }} < 4.12) at 850 °C. The sensor has the best sensitivity at 850 °C. As the oxygen concentration increases, the interface resistance of the sensor decreases at 850 °C.

  17. Brazing of zirconia to metal for development of oxygen and pH sensors for high-temperature, high-pressure aqueous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, G.P.; Biswas, R.; Bertuch, A.

    1997-11-01

    Zirconia electrodes are routinely used as oxygen sensors at temperatures of 600{degrees}C and are now extensively used as pH sensors in high-temperature high-pressure aqueous systems (300{degrees}C and 3000 psi). Brazing of zirconia tubes to metal is one approach to making such sensors. A variety of metal supports (304L SS, Ni, Cu), three braze alloys in the Ag-Cu-Ti system and their combinations were investigated in bonding with the zirconia tubes. The important issues were the weakening of the zirconia matrix during brazing, bonding with the metal, and corrosion of the braze under operating conditions of 300{degrees}C and 3000 psi in aqueous environments. The results obtained are discussed along with guidelines for further investigations.

  18. A PAS domain with an oxygen labile [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster in the oxygen sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus.

    PubMed

    Müllner, Martin; Hammel, Oliver; Mienert, Bernd; Schlag, Steffen; Bill, Eckhard; Unden, Gottfried

    2008-12-30

    The cytoplasmic histidine sensor kinase NreB of Staphylococcus carnosus responds to O(2) and controls together with the response regulator NreC the expression of genes of nitrate/nitrite respiration. nreBC homologous genes were found in Staphylococcus strains and Bacillus clausii, and a modified form was found in some Lactobacillus strains. NreB contains a sensory domain with similarity to heme B binding PAS domains. Anaerobically prepared NreB of S. carnosus exhibited a (diamagnetic) [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster when assessed by Mossbauer spectroscopy. Upon reaction with air, the cluster was degraded with a half-life of approximately 2.5 min. No significant amounts of Mossbauer or EPR detectable intermediates were found during the decay, but magnetic Mossbauer spectra revealed formation of diamagnetic [2Fe-2S](2+) clusters. After extended exposure to air, NreB was devoid of a FeS cluster. Photoreduction with deazaflavin produced small amounts of [4Fe-4S](+), which were degraded subsequently. The magnetically perturbed Mossbauer spectrum of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster corroborated the S = 0 spin state and revealed uniform electric field gradient tensors of the iron sites, suggesting full delocalization of the valence electrons and binding of each of the Fe ions by four S ligands, including the ligand to the protein. Mutation of each of the four Cys residues inactivated NreB function in vivo in accordance with their role as ligands. [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster-containing NreB had high kinase activity. Exposure to air decreased the kinase activity and content of the [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster with similar half-lives. We conclude that the sensory domain of NreB represents a new type of PAS domain containing a [4Fe-4S](2+) cluster for sensing and function.

  19. Inkjet printing of nanoporous gold electrode arrays on cellulose membranes for high-sensitive paper-like electrochemical oxygen sensors using ionic liquid electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chengguo; Bai, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yingkai; Jin, Wei; Zhang, Xuan; Hu, Shengshui

    2012-04-17

    A simple approach to the mass production of nanoporous gold electrode arrays on cellulose membranes for electrochemical sensing of oxygen using ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes was established. The approach, combining the inkjet printing of gold nanoparticle (GNP) patterns with the self-catalytic growth of these patterns into conducting layers, can fabricate hundreds of self-designed gold arrays on cellulose membranes within several hours using an inexpensive inkjet printer. The resulting paper-based gold electrode arrays (PGEAs) had several unique properties as thin-film sensor platforms, including good conductivity, excellent flexibility, high integration, and low cost. The porous nature of PGEAs also allowed the addition of electrolytes from the back cellulose membrane side and controllably produced large three-phase electrolyte/electrode/gas interfaces at the front electrode side. A novel paper-based solid-state electrochemical oxygen (O(2)) sensor was therefore developed using an IL electrolyte, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIMPF(6)). The sensor looked like a piece of paper but possessed high sensitivity for O(2) in a linear range from 0.054 to 0.177 v/v %, along with a low detection limit of 0.0075% and a short response time of less than 10 s, foreseeing its promising applications in developing cost-effective and environment-friendly paper-based electrochemical gas sensors.

  20. Real-time damage assessment using fiber optic grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvert, Sean G.; Conte, Joel P.; Moaveni, Babak; Schulz, Whitten L.; de Callafon, Raymond

    2003-11-01

    Over the past few years Blue Road Research and the University of California at San Diego have been collaborating to develop a bridge health monitoring system using long gage length fiber optic strain sensors and modal analysis. Two programs supporting this effort have been funded by the National Science Foundation and from this work several papers have been published showing its strong progress1-5. In 2002, the Federal Highway Administration and Caltrans performed a full-scale test on some of the components that will be used for the planned I-5/Gilman Advanced technology Bridge in California, USA. As a part of this test Blue Road Research used its developmental system to validate the use of this damage detection technique and to compare the results with conventional modal analysis tools.

  1. The damage assessment methodology in cooperation with smart sensors and inspection robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitta, Yoshihiro; Ishida, Masami; Onai, Toshio; Watakabe, Morimasa; Nishitani, Akira; Matsui, Chisa

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a damage assessment methodology for the non-structural elements, especially the ceiling, in cooperation with the smart sensors and the inspection blimp robot with the Wi-Fi camera. The developed smart sensors use the infrared LEDs in sending the measured data to the inspection blimp robot. The inspection blimp robot integrated in the proposed system has a Wi-Fi camera and an infrared remote control receiver for receiving the data from the smart sensor. In the proposed methodology, the distributed smart sensors firstly detect the damage occurrence. Next, the inspection blimp robots can gather the data from the smart sensors, which transmit the measured data by using an infrared remote control receiver and LED signals. The inspection blimp robot also can inspect the damage location and captures the photographic image of the damage condition. The inspection blimp robot will be able to estimate the damage condition without any process of engineers' on-site-inspection involved. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the inspection blimp robot, the blimp robot is utilized to estimate the aging ceiling of a real structure. For demonstrating the feasibility or possibility of the proposed damage assessment methodology in cooperation with the smart sensors and the inspection blimp robot, the conceptual laboratory experiment is conducted. The proposed methodology will provide valuable information for the repair and maintenance decision making of a damaged structure.

  2. Using Kinect™ sensor in observational methods for assessing postures at work.

    PubMed

    Diego-Mas, Jose Antonio; Alcaide-Marzal, Jorge

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines the potential use of Kinect™ range sensor in observational methods for assessing postural loads. Range sensors can detect the position of the joints at high sampling rates without attaching sensors or markers directly to the subject under study. First, a computerized OWAS ergonomic assessment system was implemented to permit the data acquisition from Kinect™ and data processing in order to identify the risk level of each recorded postures. Output data were compared with the results provided by human observers, and were used to determine the influence of the sensor view angle relative to the worker. The tests show high inter-method agreement in the classification of risk categories (Proportion agreement index = 0.89 κ = 0.83) when the tracked subject is facing the sensor. The camera's point of view relative to the position of the tracked subject significantly affects the correct classification of the postures. Although the results are promising, some aspects involved in the use of low-cost range sensors should be further studied for their use in real environments.

  3. Laboratory validation of MEMS-based sensors for post-earthquake damage assessment image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, Matteo; Zonta, Daniele; Santana, Juan; Colin, Mikael; Saillen, Nicolas; Torfs, Tom; Amditis, Angelos; Bimpas, Matthaios; Stratakos, Yorgos; Ulieru, Dumitru; Bairaktaris, Dimitirs; Frondistou-Yannas, Stamatia; Kalidromitis, Vasilis

    2011-04-01

    The evaluation of seismic damage is today almost exclusively based on visual inspection, as building owners are generally reluctant to install permanent sensing systems, due to their high installation, management and maintenance costs. To overcome this limitation, the EU-funded MEMSCON project aims to produce small size sensing nodes for measurement of strain and acceleration, integrating Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags in a single package that will be attached to reinforced concrete buildings. To reduce the impact of installation and management, data will be transmitted to a remote base station using a wireless interface. During the project, sensor prototypes were produced by assembling pre-existing components and by developing ex-novo miniature devices with ultra-low power consumption and sensing performance beyond that offered by sensors available on the market. The paper outlines the device operating principles, production scheme and working at both unit and network levels. It also reports on validation campaigns conducted in the laboratory to assess system performance. Accelerometer sensors were tested on a reduced scale metal frame mounted on a shaking table, back to back with reference devices, while strain sensors were embedded in both reduced and full-scale reinforced concrete specimens undergoing increasing deformation cycles up to extensive damage and collapse. The paper assesses the economical sustainability and performance of the sensors developed for the project and discusses their applicability to long-term seismic monitoring.

  4. Longitudinal in vivo imaging to assess blood flow and oxygenation in implantable engineered tissues.

    PubMed

    White, Sean M; Hingorani, Ryan; Arora, Rajan P S; Hughes, Christopher C W; George, Steven C; Choi, Bernard

    2012-09-01

    The functionality of vascular networks within implanted prevascularized tissues is difficult to assess using traditional analysis techniques, such as histology. This is largely due to the inability to visualize hemodynamics in vivo longitudinally. Therefore, we have developed dynamic imaging methods to measure blood flow and hemoglobin oxygen saturation in implanted prevascularized tissues noninvasively and longitudinally. Using laser speckle imaging, multispectral imaging, and intravital microscopy, we demonstrate that fibrin-based tissue implants anastomose with the host (severe combined immunodeficient mice) in as short as 20 h. Anastomosis results in initial perfusion with highly oxygenated blood, and an increase in average hemoglobin oxygenation of 53%. However, shear rates in the preformed vessels were low (20.8±12.8 s(-1)), and flow did not persist in the vast majority of preformed vessels due to thrombus formation. These findings suggest that designing an appropriate vascular network structure in prevascularized tissues to maintain shear rates above the threshold for thrombosis may be necessary to maintain flow following implantation. We conclude that wide-field and microscopic functional imaging can dynamically assess blood flow and oxygenation in vivo in prevascularized tissues, and can be used to rapidly evaluate and improve prevascularization strategies.

  5. The calcium sensor GhCaM7 promotes cotton fiber elongation by modulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wenxin; Tu, Lili; Yang, Xiyan; Tan, Jiafu; Deng, Fenglin; Hao, Juan; Guo, Kai; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong

    2014-04-01

    Fiber elongation is the key determinant of fiber quality and output in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Although expression profiling and functional genomics provide some data, the mechanism of fiber development is still not well understood. Here, a gene encoding a calcium sensor, GhCaM7, was isolated based on its high expression level relative to other GhCaMs in fiber cells at the fast elongation stage. The level of expression of GhCaM7 in the wild-type and the fuzzless/lintless mutant correspond to the presence and absence, respectively, of fiber initials. Overexpressing GhCaM7 promotes early fiber elongation, whereas GhCaM7 suppression by RNAi delays fiber initiation and inhibits fiber elongation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play important roles in early fiber development. ROS induced by exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) and Ca(2+) starvation promotes early fiber elongation. GhCaM7 overexpression fiber cells show increased ROS concentrations compared with the wild-type, while GhCaM7 RNAi fiber cells have reduced concentrations. Furthermore, we show that H2 O2 enhances Ca(2+) influx into the fiber and feedback-regulates the expression of GhCaM7. We conclude that GhCaM7, Ca(2+) and ROS are three important regulators involved in early fiber elongation. GhCaM7 might modulate ROS production and act as a molecular link between Ca(2+) and ROS signal pathways in early fiber development. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  6. A wavelet-based structural damage assessment approach with progressively downloaded sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhu, Songye

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents a wavelet-based on-line damage assessment approach based on the use of progressively transmitted multi-resolution sensor data. In extreme events like strong earthquakes, real-time retrieval of structural monitoring data and on-line damage assessment of civil infrastructures are crucial for emergency relief and disaster assistance efforts such as resource allocation and evacuation route arrangement. Due to the limited communication bandwidth available to data transmission during and immediately after major earthquakes, innovative methods for integrated sensor data transmission and on-line damage assessment are highly desired. The proposed approach utilizes a lifting scheme wavelet transform to generate multi-resolution sensor data, which are transmitted progressively in increasing resolution. Multi-resolution sensor data enable interactive on-line condition assessment of structural damages. To validate this concept, a hysteresis-based damage assessment method, proposed by Iwan for extreme-event use, is selected in this study. A sensitivity study on the hysteresis-based damage assessment method under varying data resolution levels was conducted using simulation data from a six-story steel braced frame building subjected to earthquake ground motion. The results of this study show that the proposed approach is capable of reducing the raw sensor data size by a significant amount while having a minor effect on the accuracy of hysteresis-based damage assessment. The proposed approach provides a valuable decision support tool for engineers and emergency response personnel who want to access the data in real time and perform on-line damage assessment in an efficient manner.

  7. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  8. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Vogel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energy-efficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  9. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  10. Quantitative wearable sensors for objective assessment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Domingos, Josefa; Srulijes, Karin; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2013-10-01

    There is a rapidly growing interest in the quantitative assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated signs and disability using wearable technology. Both persons with PD and their clinicians see advantages in such developments. Specifically, quantitative assessments using wearable technology may allow for continuous, unobtrusive, objective, and ecologically valid data collection. Also, this approach may improve patient-doctor interaction, influence therapeutic decisions, and ultimately ameliorate patients' global health status. In addition, such measures have the potential to be used as outcome parameters in clinical trials, allowing for frequent assessments; eg, in the home setting. This review discusses promising wearable technology, addresses which parameters should be prioritized in such assessment strategies, and reports about studies that have already investigated daily life issues in PD using this new technology.

  11. In vivo assessment of human vaginal oxygen and carbon dioxide levels during and post menses.

    PubMed

    Hill, Donna R; Brunner, Marianne E; Schmitz, Deborah C; Davis, Catherine C; Flood, Janine A; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wang-Weigand, Sherry Z; Osborn, Thomas W

    2005-10-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo animal studies showed that O(2) and CO(2) concentrations can affect virulence of pathogenic bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The objective of this work was to measure O(2) and CO(2) levels in the vaginal environment during tampon wear using newly available sensor technology. Measurements by two vaginal sensors showed a decrease in vaginal O(2) levels after tampon insertion. These decreases were independent of the type of tampons used and the time of measurement (mid-cycle or during menstruation). These results are not in agreement with a previous study that concluded that oxygenation of the vaginal environment during tampon use occurred via delivery of a bolus of O(2) during the insertion process. Our measurements of gas levels in menses showed the presence of both O(2) and CO(2) in menses. The tampons inserted into the vagina contained O(2) and CO(2) levels consistent with atmospheric conditions. Over time during tampon use, levels of O(2) in the tampon decreased and levels of CO(2) increased. Tampon absorbent capacity, menses loading, and wear time influenced the kinetics of these changes. Colonization with S. aureus had no effect on the gas profiles during menstruation. Taken collectively, these findings have important implications on the current understanding of gaseous changes in the vaginal environment during menstruation and the potential role(s) they may play in affecting bacterial virulence factor production.

  12. Integration of Grid and Sensor Web for Flood Monitoring and Risk Assessment from Heterogeneous Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussul, Nataliia; Skakun, Sergii; Shelestov, Andrii

    2013-04-01

    Over last decades we have witnessed the upward global trend in natural disaster occurrence. Hydrological and meteorological disasters such as floods are the main contributors to this pattern. In recent years flood management has shifted from protection against floods to managing the risks of floods (the European Flood risk directive). In order to enable operational flood monitoring and assessment of flood risk, it is required to provide an infrastructure with standardized interfaces and services. Grid and Sensor Web can meet these requirements. In this paper we present a general approach to flood monitoring and risk assessment based on heterogeneous geospatial data acquired from multiple sources. To enable operational flood risk assessment integration of Grid and Sensor Web approaches is proposed [1]. Grid represents a distributed environment that integrates heterogeneous computing and storage resources administrated by multiple organizations. SensorWeb is an emerging paradigm for integrating heterogeneous satellite and in situ sensors and data systems into a common informational infrastructure that produces products on demand. The basic Sensor Web functionality includes sensor discovery, triggering events by observed or predicted conditions, remote data access and processing capabilities to generate and deliver data products. Sensor Web is governed by the set of standards, called Sensor Web Enablement (SWE), developed by the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC). Different practical issues regarding integration of Sensor Web with Grids are discussed in the study. We show how the Sensor Web can benefit from using Grids and vice versa. For example, Sensor Web services such as SOS, SPS and SAS can benefit from the integration with the Grid platform like Globus Toolkit. The proposed approach is implemented within the Sensor Web framework for flood monitoring and risk assessment, and a case-study of exploiting this framework, namely the Namibia SensorWeb Pilot Project, is

  13. Real time RULA assessment using Kinect v2 sensor.

    PubMed

    Manghisi, Vito Modesto; Uva, Antonio Emmanuele; Fiorentino, Michele; Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Trotta, Gianpaolo Francesco; Monno, Giuseppe

    2017-03-07

    The evaluation of the exposure to risk factors in workplaces and their subsequent redesign represent one of the practices to lessen the frequency of work-related musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper we present K2RULA, a semi-automatic RULA evaluation software based on the Microsoft Kinect v2 depth camera, aimed at detecting awkward postures in real time, but also in off-line analysis. We validated our tool with two experiments. In the first one, we compared the K2RULA grand-scores with those obtained with a reference optical motion capture system and we found a statistical perfect match according to the Landis and Koch scale (proportion agreement index = 0.97, k = 0.87). In the second experiment, we evaluated the agreement of the grand-scores returned by the proposed application with those obtained by a RULA expert rater, finding again a statistical perfect match (proportion agreement index = 0.96, k = 0.84), whereas a commercial software based on Kinect v1 sensor showed a lower agreement (proportion agreement index = 0.82, k = 0.34).

  14. Turbine Rotor Disk Health Monitoring Assessment Based on Sensor Technology and Spin Tests Data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on presenting data obtained from spin test experiments of a turbine engine like rotor disk and assessing their correlation to the development of a structural health monitoring and fault detection system. The data were obtained under various operating conditions such as the rotor disk being artificially induced with and without a notch and rotated at a rotational speed of up to 10,000 rpm under balanced and imbalanced state. The data collected included blade tip clearance, blade tip timing measurements, and shaft displacements. Two different sensor technologies were employed in the testing: microwave and capacitive sensors, respectively. The experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Rotordynamics Laboratory using a high precision spin system. Disk flaw observations and related assessments from the collected data for both sensors are reported and discussed. PMID:23844396

  15. Turbine rotor disk health monitoring assessment based on sensor technology and spin tests data.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The paper focuses on presenting data obtained from spin test experiments of a turbine engine like rotor disk and assessing their correlation to the development of a structural health monitoring and fault detection system. The data were obtained under various operating conditions such as the rotor disk being artificially induced with and without a notch and rotated at a rotational speed of up to 10,000 rpm under balanced and imbalanced state. The data collected included blade tip clearance, blade tip timing measurements, and shaft displacements. Two different sensor technologies were employed in the testing: microwave and capacitive sensors, respectively. The experimental tests were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Rotordynamics Laboratory using a high precision spin system. Disk flaw observations and related assessments from the collected data for both sensors are reported and discussed.

  16. Damage assessment of small-scale wind turbine blade using piezoelectric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rim, Mi-Sun; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kim, Eun-Ho; Lee, In

    2012-04-01

    Real-time structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are applied many fields. Recently, the interest about wind energy was increased by the demand of clean energy in the world and many researches were actively performed for applying SHM technology to wind turbine systems. Piezoelectric sensor is one kind of sensor which is widely used for SHM system to assess damage creation. In this paper, the small scale wind turbine blade was fabricated and health monitoring of the blade was performed using the piezoelectric sensor. The quasi-static bending test of the blade was carried out and the PVDF (Polyvinylidene fluoride) sensors, which are polymer type piezoelectric materials, were used for health monitoring. Two-cycle test was performed; the load was applied during 350 sec and removed at the first cycle, and load was applied again until the blade was broken completely at the second cycle. The voltage of PVDF sensors were measured during the quasi-static bending test in order to find out the moment when the damage occurrence started. The voltage of the sensor critically changed at the moment of damage occurred.

  17. Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

  18. Calibration and performance assessment of a temperature sensor prototype using a 1-point calibration procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapon, P. A.; Gauthier, A.; Bulla, J.; Moussay, S.

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to assess the relevance of 1-point calibration procedure, within the framework of the development of a new telemetric temperature sensor. The criteria used for performance assessment were the level of accuracy, and the time of inertia of the temperature sensor prototype (TSP) tested. First, the stability of the calibration bath was assessed. Then, the accuracy of 16 prototypes was evaluated for 7 target temperatures (ranging from 29 °C to 45 °C). Finally, the inertia of TSP response was evaluated while increasing and decreasing the bath temperature. The difference between prototype and target temperature increases as bath temperature moves away from 37 °C; however, the accuracy of the sensor conforms to applicable standards. Most TSP remain in the range of ±0.2 °C for each temperature level tested, but a linear, decreasing slope is observed; prototypes underestimate high temperatures and overestimate low temperatures. Data from time of inertia assessment show that probes were within the range of ±0.2 °C from the target temperature with a maximal delay of 150 s which satisfy standard norms. However, results indicate that a 1-point calibration procedure of the sensors appears non optimal, a 2-point calibration procedure should be performed to avoid the observed temperature data slope.

  19. Oxygenation in Cervical Cancer and Normal Uterine Cervix assessed using BOLD MRI at 3 T1

    PubMed Central

    Hallac, Rami R.; Ding, Yao; Yuan, Qing; McColl, Roderick W.; Lea, Jayanthi; Sims, Robert D.; Weatherall, Paul T.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia is reported to be a biomarker for poor prognosis in cervical cancer. However, a practical non-invasive method is needed for routine clinical evaluation of tumor hypoxia. This study examined the potential use of BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast MRI as a non-invasive technique to assess tumor vascular oxygenation at 3 T. Following IRB-approved informed consent and in compliance with HIPAA, successful results were achieved in nine patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (FIGO stage IIA to IVA) and three normal volunteers. In the first four patients, dynamic T2*-weighted MRI was performed in the transaxial plane using a multi-shot EPI sequence while patients breathed room air followed by oxygen (15 dm3/min). Later, a multi-echo gradient echo examination was added to provide quantitative R2* measurements. Baseline T2*-weighted signal intensity was quite stable, but increased to various extents in tumors upon initiation of oxygen breathing. Signal in normal uterus increased significantly, while iliacus muscle did not change. R2* responded significantly in healthy uterus, cervix, and eight cervical tumors. This preliminary study demonstrates that BOLD MRI of cervical cancer at 3 T is feasible. However, more patients must be evaluated and followed clinically before any prognostic value can be determined. PMID:22619091

  20. Multi-modal sensor system for plant water stress assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant stress critically affects plant growth and causes significant loss of productivity and quality. When the plant is under water stress, it impedes photosynthesis and transpiration, resulting in changes in leaf color and temperature. Leaf discoloration in photosynthesis can be assessed by measu...

  1. Proximal soil sensing and sensor fusion for soil health assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assessment of soil health involves determining how well a soil is performing its biological, chemical, and physical functions relative to its inherent potential. Due to high costs, labor requirements, and soil disturbance, traditional laboratory analyses cannot provide high resolution soil health da...

  2. Towards a Uniform Metrological Assessment of Grating-Based Optical Fiber Sensors: From Refractometers to Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Gouveia, Carlos A. J.; Jorge, Pedro A. S.; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    A metrological assessment of grating-based optical fiber sensors is proposed with the aim of providing an objective evaluation of the performance of this sensor category. Attention was focused on the most common parameters, used to describe the performance of both optical refractometers and biosensors, which encompassed sensitivity, with a distinction between volume or bulk sensitivity and surface sensitivity, resolution, response time, limit of detection, specificity (or selectivity), reusability (or regenerability) and some other parameters of generic interest, such as measurement uncertainty, accuracy, precision, stability, drift, repeatability and reproducibility. Clearly, the concepts discussed here can also be applied to any resonance-based sensor, thus providing the basis for an easier and direct performance comparison of a great number of sensors published in the literature up to now. In addition, common mistakes present in the literature made for the evaluation of sensor performance are highlighted, and lastly a uniform performance assessment is discussed and provided. Finally, some design strategies will be proposed to develop a grating-based optical fiber sensing scheme with improved performance. PMID:28635665

  3. Towards a Uniform Metrological Assessment of Grating-Based Optical Fiber Sensors: From Refractometers to Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Chiavaioli, Francesco; Gouveia, Carlos A J; Jorge, Pedro A S; Baldini, Francesco

    2017-06-21

    A metrological assessment of grating-based optical fiber sensors is proposed with the aim of providing an objective evaluation of the performance of this sensor category. Attention was focused on the most common parameters, used to describe the performance of both optical refractometers and biosensors, which encompassed sensitivity, with a distinction between volume or bulk sensitivity and surface sensitivity, resolution, response time, limit of detection, specificity (or selectivity), reusability (or regenerability) and some other parameters of generic interest, such as measurement uncertainty, accuracy, precision, stability, drift, repeatability and reproducibility. Clearly, the concepts discussed here can also be applied to any resonance-based sensor, thus providing the basis for an easier and direct performance comparison of a great number of sensors published in the literature up to now. In addition, common mistakes present in the literature made for the evaluation of sensor performance are highlighted, and lastly a uniform performance assessment is discussed and provided. Finally, some design strategies will be proposed to develop a grating-based optical fiber sensing scheme with improved performance.

  4. Dietary intake assessment using integrated sensors and software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Junqing; Pepin, Eric; Johnson, Eric; Hazel, David; Teredesai, Ankur; Kristal, Alan; Mamishev, Alexander

    2012-02-01

    The area of dietary assessment is becoming increasingly important as obesity rates soar, but valid measurement of the food intake in free-living persons is extraordinarily challenging. Traditional paper-based dietary assessment methods have limitations due to bias, user burden and cost, and therefore improved methods are needed to address important hypotheses related to diet and health. In this paper, we will describe the progress of our mobile Diet Data Recorder System (DDRS), where an electronic device is used for objective measurement on dietary intake in real time and at moderate cost. The DDRS consists of (1) a mobile device that integrates a smartphone and an integrated laser package, (2) software on the smartphone for data collection and laser control, (3) an algorithm to process acquired data for food volume estimation, which is the largest source of error in calculating dietary intake, and (4) database and interface for data storage and management. The estimated food volume, together with direct entries of food questionnaires and voice recordings, could provide dietitians and nutritional epidemiologists with more complete food description and more accurate food portion sizes. In this paper, we will describe the system design of DDRS and initial results of dietary assessment.

  5. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems' health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour.

  6. Using Optical Oxygen Sensors and Injection Experiments to Determine in situ Microbial Rate Constants for Methane Oxidation and Heterotrophic Respiration in a Boreal Bog and Fen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldo, N.; Moorberg, C.; Waldrop, M. P.; Turetsky, M. R.; Neumann, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Wetlands are the largest natural source of methane to the atmosphere, and play a key role in feedback cycles to climate change. In recognition of this, many researchers are developing process-based models of wetland methane emissions at various scales. In these models, the three key biogeochemical reactions are methane production, methane oxidation, and heterotrophic respiration, and they are modeled using Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The majority of Michaelis-Menten rate constants used in models are based on experiments involving slurries of peat incubated in vials. While these slurries provide a highly controlled setting, they are different from in situ conditions in multiple ways; notably they lack live plants and the centimeter-scale heterogeneities that exist in the field. To determine rate constants in a system more representative of in situ conditions, we extracted peat cores intact from a bog and fen located in the Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest near Fairbanks, Alaska and part of the Alaska Peatland Experiment (APEX) research program. Into those cores we injected water with varying concentrations of methane and oxygen at multiple depths. We used planar oxygen sensors installed on the peat cores to collect high resolution, two dimensional oxygen concentration data during the injections and used oxygen consumption rates under various conditions to calculate rate constants. Results were compared to a similar but smaller set of injection experiments conducted against planar oxygen sensors installed in the bog. Results will inform parametrization of microbial processes in wetland models, improving estimates of methane emissions both under current climate conditions and in the future.

  7. Dissolved Oxygen Sensor in Animal-Borne Instruments: An Innovation for Monitoring the Health of Oceans and Investigating the Functioning of Marine Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Bailleul, Frederic; Vacquie-Garcia, Jade; Guinet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The current decline in dissolved oxygen concentration within the oceans is a sensitive indicator of the effect of climate change on marine environment. However the impact of its declining on marine life and ecosystems’ health is still quite unclear because of the difficulty in obtaining in situ data, especially in remote areas, like the Southern Ocean (SO). Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) proved to be a relevant alternative to the traditional oceanographic platforms to measure physical and biogeochemical structure of oceanic regions rarely observed. In this study, we use a new stage of development in biologging technology to draw a picture of dissolved oxygen concentration in the SO. We present the first results obtained from a dissolved oxygen sensor added to Argos CTD-SRDL tags and deployed on 5 female elephant seals at Kerguelen. From October 2010 and October 2011, 742 oxygen profiles associated with temperature and salinity measurements were recorded. Whether a part of the data must be considered cautiously, especially because of offsets and temporal drifts of the sensors, the range of values recorded was consistent with a concomitant survey conducted from a research vessel (Keops-2 project). Once again, elephant seals reinforced the relationship between marine ecology and oceanography, delivering essential information about the water masses properties and the biological status of the Southern Ocean. But more than the presentation of a new stage of development in animal-borne instrumentation, this pilot study opens a new field of investigation in marine ecology and could be enlarged in a near future to other key marine predators, especially large fish species like swordfish, tuna or sharks, for which dissolved oxygen is expected to play a crucial role in distribution and behaviour. PMID:26200780

  8. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution. PMID:25734405

  9. Integrated safety assessment of an oxygen reduction project at Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power's Haddam Neck plant

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCo) has implemented an Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP) for the integrated evaluation and prioritization of plant-specific licensing issues, regulatory policy issues, and plant improvement projects. As part of the ISAP process, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) is utilized to evaluate the net safety impact of plant modification projects. On a few occasions, implementation of this approach has resulted in the identification of projects with negative safety impacts that could not be quantified via the normal design review and 10CFR50.59 safety evaluation process. An example is a plant modification that was proposed to reduce the oxygen in the Haddam Neck plant's demineralized water storage tank (DWST). The project involved the design and installation of a nitrogen blanketing system on the DWST. The purpose of the project was to reduce the oxygen content on the secondary side, consistent with recommendations from the Electric Power Research Institute Steam Generator Owners Group. Oxygen is one of the contributors to the corrosion process in systems in contact with the feedwater and can cause damage to associated components if not controlled.

  10. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-03-01

    We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO₂). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO₂ reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO₂. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO₂ can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO₂ imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO₂ in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO₂ imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution.

  11. Second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygenation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jiwei; Zhang, Shiwu; Gnyawali, Surya; Sen, Chandan K.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-03-01

    We report a second derivative multispectral algorithm for quantitative assessment of cutaneous tissue oxygen saturation (StO2). The algorithm is based on a forward model of light transport in multilayered skin tissue and an inverse algorithm for StO2 reconstruction. Based on the forward simulation results, a parameter of a second derivative ratio (SDR) is derived as a function of cutaneous tissue StO2. The SDR function is optimized at a wavelength set of 544, 552, 568, 576, 592, and 600 nm so that cutaneous tissue StO2 can be derived with minimal artifacts by blood concentration, tissue scattering, and melanin concentration. The proposed multispectral StO2 imaging algorithm is verified in both benchtop and in vivo experiments. The experimental results show that the proposed multispectral imaging algorithm is able to map cutaneous tissue StO2 in high temporal resolution with reduced measurement artifacts induced by different skin conditions in comparison with other three commercial tissue oxygen measurement systems. These results indicate that the multispectral StO2 imaging technique has the potential for noninvasive and quantitative assessment of skin tissue oxygenation with a high temporal resolution.

  12. Summary of the NASA Science Instrument, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS) Technology Assessment Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2011-01-01

    In August 2010, the NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) commissioned an assessment of 15 different technology areas of importance to the future of NASA. Technology Assessment #8 (TA8) was Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems (SIOSS). SIOSS assessed the needs for optical technology ranging from detectors to lasers, x-ray mirrors to microwave antenna, in-situ spectrographs for on-surface planetary sample characterization to large space telescopes. This needs assessment looked across the entirety of NASA and not just the Science Mission Directorate. This paper summarizes the SIOSS findings and recommendations.

  13. Percolated pore networks of oxygen plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for fast response, high sensitivity capacitive humidity sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, H. P.; Jung, K. H.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, K. H.; Lee, C. J.; Yun, K. N.; Min, N. K.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the preparation of capacitive-type relative humidity sensors incorporating plasma-activated multi-wall carbon nanotube (p-MWCNT) electrodes and on their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Highly open porous conductive electrodes, which are almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes, are fabricated by spray-depositing MWCNT networks on a polyimide layer. Oxygen plasma activation of the MWCNTs is also explored to improve the water adsorption of the MWCNT films, by introducing oxygen-containing functional groups on the CNT surface. Polyimide humidity sensors with optimized p-MWCNT network electrodes exhibit exceptionally fast response times (1.5 for adsorption and 2 s for desorption) and high sensitivity (0.75 pF/% RH). These results may be partially due to their percolated pore structure being more accessible for water molecules, expending the diffusion of moisture to the polyimide sensing film, and partially due to the oxygenated surface of p-MWCNT films, allocating more locations for adsorption or attraction of water molecules to contribute to the sensitivity.

  14. Percolated pore networks of oxygen plasma-activated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for fast response, high sensitivity capacitive humidity sensors.

    PubMed

    Hong, H P; Jung, K H; Kim, J H; Kwon, K H; Lee, C J; Yun, K N; Min, N K

    2013-03-01

    We report on the preparation of capacitive-type relative humidity sensors incorporating plasma-activated multi-wall carbon nanotube (p-MWCNT) electrodes and on their performance compared with existing commercial technology. Highly open porous conductive electrodes, which are almost impossible to obtain with conventional metal electrodes, are fabricated by spray-depositing MWCNT networks on a polyimide layer. Oxygen plasma activation of the MWCNTs is also explored to improve the water adsorption of the MWCNT films, by introducing oxygen-containing functional groups on the CNT surface. Polyimide humidity sensors with optimized p-MWCNT network electrodes exhibit exceptionally fast response times (1.5 for adsorption and 2 s for desorption) and high sensitivity (0.75 pF/% RH). These results may be partially due to their percolated pore structure being more accessible for water molecules, expending the diffusion of moisture to the polyimide sensing film, and partially due to the oxygenated surface of p-MWCNT films, allocating more locations for adsorption or attraction of water molecules to contribute to the sensitivity.

  15. Model-based pH monitor for sensor assessment.

    PubMed

    van Schagen, Kim; Rietveld, Luuk; Veersma, Alex; Babuska, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Owing to the nature of the treatment processes, monitoring the processes based on individual online measurements is difficult or even impossible. However, the measurements (online and laboratory) can be combined with a priori process knowledge, using mathematical models, to objectively monitor the treatment processes and measurement devices. The pH measurement is a commonly used measurement at different stages in the drinking water treatment plant, although it is a unreliable instrument, requiring significant maintenance. It is shown that, using a grey-box model, it is possible to assess the measurement devices effectively, even if detailed information of the specific processes is unknown.

  16. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to provide independent verification of IRS geopositional accuracy claims and of the internal geopositional characterization provided by Lutes (2005). Six sub-scenes (quads) were assessed; Three from each AWiFS camera. Check points were manually matched to digital orthophoto quarter quadrangle (DOQQ) reference (assumed accuracy approx. 5 m, RMSE) Check points were selected to meet or exceed Federal Geographic Data Committee's guidelines. Used ESRI ArcGIS for data collection and SSC-written MATLAB scripts for data analysis.

  17. Assessment of atomic oxygen erosion of silver interconnects on Intelsat 6, F3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunnet, A.; Kirkendall, T. D.

    1991-01-01

    Intelsat 6 F-3 was launched from Cape Canaveral on a Titan 3 launch vehicle. Failure of the launch vehicle resulted in the satellite being marooned in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). During its sojourn in LEO, Intelsat 6 is exposed to an unanticipated environment consisting primarily of atomic oxygen, which will subject the unprotected silver interconnects (nominally 12.5 microns thick) on the solar panel to oxidation and erosion. Rescue by Space Shuttle is being examined. Consequently, Intelsat and Comsat have joined in an effort to determine the condition of the silver interconnects at the anticipated time of reboost and to assess the long term risks to the intended geostationary mission. Ground based tests, theoretical analysis, and a flight experiment aboard STS-41 were executed, and new software was written to calculate the expected total atomic oxygen fluence on the interconnects.

  18. Frequency variation and sensor contribution assessment: Application to an offshore platform in the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fushun; Li, Huajun; Wang, Weiying; Li, Wei; Wang, Bin

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a time-frequency and multiple-sensor assessment method is presented and then applied to an offshore platform in the South China Sea with the goal of providing a more suitable time duration of measured signals and evaluating each sensor's contribution to mode shapes of interest. By processing all measured signals simultaneously, a series of linear parameters are used to fit the measured signals. A moving window in overlapping steps along the time record of a non-stationary signal is used for time-frequency analysis while a series of amplitude matrices are obtained for all sliced segments. These segments are then used to evaluate each sensor's contribution to some mode(s) of interest. Compared with the short-time Fourier transform (STFT) or S-transform method, the frequencies used in this time-frequency analysis are shared by the sensors involved so that the variations in the results due to the characteristics of different sensors are avoided. In addition, the approach requires only a short-duration segment to obtain high-frequency resolution, which will improve the computing efficiency of modal analysis using measured seat est data. The proposed method could also be used to estimate damping ratios and each sensor's contribution to modes of interest based on the analysis of the series of amplitude matrices; this could be used to guide the installation of sensors in field tests of offshore structures. To demonstrate the proposed method with a time-frequency analysis, a numerical example of a synthesized signal with five segments, each with its owns different frequency componentsincluding a relatively weaker component, is constructed; numerical results from the analysis of this example signal indicate that the approach could yield a sharper image with a good computing efficiency. The second example simulates three signals that represent multiple measurements; this example is used to study each sensor

  19. Measurement of changes in blood oxygenation using Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) allows assessment of tumor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with the spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We aim to demonstrate that MSOT can be used to monitor the development of tumor vasculature. To establish the relationship between MSOT derived imaging biomarkers and biological changes during tumor development, we performed MSOT on nude mice (n=10) bearing subcutaneous xenograft U87 glioblastoma tumors using a small animal optoacoustic tomography system. The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified between 21% and 100%. The measurements from early (week 4) and late (week 7) stages of tumor development were compared. To further explore the functionality of the blood vessels, we examined the evolution of changes in the abundance of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin in the tumors in response to a gas challenge. We found that the kinetics of the change in oxygen saturation (SO2) were significantly different between small tumors and the healthy blood vessels in nearby normal tissue (p=0.0054). Furthermore, we showed that there was a significant difference in the kinetics of the gas challenge between small and large tumors (p=0.0015). We also found that the tumor SO2 was significantly correlated (p=0.0057) with the tumor necrotic fraction as assessed by H&E staining in histology. In the future, this approach may be of use in the clinic as a method for tumor staging and assessment of treatment response.

  20. Mobile Phone-Connected Wearable Motion Sensors to Assess Postoperative Mobilization.

    PubMed

    Appelboom, Geoff; Taylor, Blake E; Bruce, Eliza; Bassile, Clare C; Malakidis, Corinna; Yang, Annie; Youngerman, Brett; D'Amico, Randy; Bruce, Sam; Bruyère, Olivier; Reginster, Jean-Yves; Dumont, Emmanuel Pl; Connolly, E Sander

    2015-07-28

    Early mobilization after surgery reduces the incidence of a wide range of complications. Wearable motion sensors measure movements over time and transmit this data wirelessly, which has the potential to monitor patient recovery and encourages patients to engage in their own rehabilitation. We sought to determine the ability of off-the-shelf activity sensors to remotely monitor patient postoperative mobility. Consecutive subjects were recruited under the Department of Neurosurgery at Columbia University. Patients were enrolled during physical therapy sessions. The total number of steps counted by the two blinded researchers was compared to the steps recorded on four activity sensors positioned at different body locations. A total of 148 motion data points were generated. The start time, end time, and duration of each walking session were accurately recorded by the devices and were remotely available for the researchers to analyze. The sensor accuracy was significantly greater when placed over the ankles than over the hips (P<.001). Our multivariate analysis showed that step length was an independent predictor of sensor accuracy. On linear regression, there was a modest positive correlation between increasing step length and increased ankle sensor accuracy (r=.640, r(2)=.397) that reached statistical significance on the multivariate model (P=.03). Increased gait speed also correlated with increased ankle sensor accuracy, although less strongly (r=.444, r(2)=.197). We did not note an effect of unilateral weakness on the accuracy of left- versus right-sided sensors. Accuracy was also affected by several specific measures of a patient's level of physical assistance, for which we generated a model to mathematically adjust for systematic underestimation as well as disease severity. We provide one of the first assessments of the accuracy and utility of widely available and wirelessly connected activity sensors in a postoperative patient population. Our results show that

  1. Acoustic emission detection for composite damage assessment using embedded ordinary single-mode fiber-optic interferometric sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kexing; Ferguson, Suzanne M.; McEwen, Keith; Tapanes, Edward; Measures, Raymond M.

    1990-12-01

    An interferometric fiber optic sensor using ordinary single-mode fibers is developed to detect acoustic emission (AE) for damage assessment of composite materials. This fiber sensor has been embedded in both graphite/epoxy and Kevlar/epoxy composite specimens and used to produce the fast direct correlation of acoustic emission with their concomitant forms of damage, such as matrix crack or material fiber rupture. Applications of the sensor for assessment of damage due to impact and out-of-plane loading are presented. Limitations of the sensor are also discussed.

  2. Development of a mobile sensor for robust assessment of river bed grain forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniatis, G.; Hoey, T.; Sventek, J.; Hodge, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    The forces experienced by sediment grains at entrainment and during transport, and those exerted on river beds, are significant for the development of river systems and landscape evolution. The assessment of local grain forces has been approached using two different methodologies. The first approach uses static impact sensors at points or cross-sections to measure velocity and/or acceleration. A second approach uses mobile natural or artificial 'smart' pebbles instrumented with inertia micro-sensors for directly measuring the local forces experienced by individual grains. The two approaches have yielded significantly different magnitudes of impact forces. Static sensors (piezoelectric plates connected to accelerometers) temporally smooth the impacts from several grains and infrequently detect the higher forces (up to ×100g) generated by direct single-grain impacts. The second method is currently unable to record the full range of impacts in real rivers due to the low measurement range of the deployed inertia sensors (×3g). Laboratory applications have required only low-range accelerometers, so excluding the magnitude of natural impacts from the design criteria. Here we present the first results from the development of a mobile sensor, designed for the purpose of measuring local grain-forces in a natural riverbed. We present two sets of measurements. The first group presents the calibration of a wide range micro-accelerometer from a set of vertical drop experiments (gravitational acceleration) and further experiments on a shaking table moving with pre-defined acceleration. The second group of measurements are from incipient motion experiments performed in a 9m x0.9m flume (slope 0.001 to 0.018) under steadily increasing discharge. Initially the spherical sensor grain was placed on an artificial surface of hemispheres of identical diameter to the sensor (111mm). Incipient motion was assessed under both whole and half-diameter exposure for each slope. Subsequently

  3. Towards a social and context-aware multi-sensor fall detection and risk assessment platform.

    PubMed

    De Backere, F; Ongenae, F; Van den Abeele, F; Nelis, J; Bonte, P; Clement, E; Philpott, M; Hoebeke, J; Verstichel, S; Ackaert, A; De Turck, F

    2015-09-01

    For elderly people fall incidents are life-changing events that lead to degradation or even loss of autonomy. Current fall detection systems are not integrated and often associated with undetected falls and/or false alarms. In this paper, a social- and context-aware multi-sensor platform is presented, which integrates information gathered by a plethora of fall detection systems and sensors at the home of the elderly, by using a cloud-based solution, making use of an ontology. Within the ontology, both static and dynamic information is captured to model the situation of a specific patient and his/her (in)formal caregivers. This integrated contextual information allows to automatically and continuously assess the fall risk of the elderly, to more accurately detect falls and identify false alarms and to automatically notify the appropriate caregiver, e.g., based on location or their current task. The main advantage of the proposed platform is that multiple fall detection systems and sensors can be integrated, as they can be easily plugged in, this can be done based on the specific needs of the patient. The combination of several systems and sensors leads to a more reliable system, with better accuracy. The proof of concept was tested with the use of the visualizer, which enables a better way to analyze the data flow within the back-end and with the use of the portable testbed, which is equipped with several different sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing UAV platform types and optical sensor specifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altena, B.; Goedemé, T.

    2014-05-01

    Photogrammetric acquisition with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) has grown extensively over the last couple of years. Such mobile platforms and their processing software have matured, resulting in a market which offers off-the-shelf mapping solutions to surveying companies and geospatial enterprises. Different approaches in platform type and optical instruments exist, though its resulting products have similar specifications. To demonstrate differences in acquisitioning practice, a case study over an open mine was flown with two different off-the-shelf UAVs (a fixed-wing and a multi-rotor). The resulting imagery is analyzed to clarify the differences in collection quality. We look at image settings, and stress the fact of photographic experience if manual setting are applied. For mapping production it might be safest to set the camera on automatic. Furthermore, we try to estimate if blur is present due to image motion. A subtle trend seems to be present, for the fast flying platform though its extent is of similar order to the slow moving one. It shows both systems operate at their limits. Finally, the lens distortion is assessed with special attention to chromatic aberration. Here we see that through calibration such aberrations could be present, however detecting this phenomena directly on imagery is not straightforward. For such effects a normal lens is sufficient, though a better lens and collimator does give significant improvement.

  5. Development of a colorimetric sensor array for squid spoilage assessment.

    PubMed

    Zaragozá, Patricia; Fuentes, Ana; Ruiz-Rico, María; Vivancos, José-Luis; Fernández-Segovia, Isabel; Ros-Lis, José V; Barat, José M; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2015-05-15

    The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate a rapid, easy-to-use optoelectronic system for the shelf-life assessment of squid in cold storage. For this purpose, an optoelectronic nose was designed, which consisted of an array containing six sensing materials prepared by combining different dyes and two inorganic supports (aluminium oxide and silica gel). Samples were packaged with the colorimetric array and kept in cold storage for 12 days. Squid spoilage was monitored simultaneously by the colorimetric array and by the physico-chemical and microbial analyses during storage. Samples exceeded the acceptability limits for microbial counts on the third day. PCA analysis carried out with CIELab showed that the colorimetric array was able to discriminate between fresh squid fit for consumption and spoiled squid. The statistical models obtained by PLS, with the optoelectronic nose, successfully predicted CO2 and O2 content in the headspace as well as microbial growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessment of skin flaps using optically based methods for measuring blood flow and oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Payette, Jeri R; Kohlenberg, Elicia; Leonardi, Lorenzo; Pabbies, Arone; Kerr, Paul; Liu, Kan-Zhi; Sowa, Michael G

    2005-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare two noninvasive techniques, laser Doppler and optical spectroscopy, for monitoring hemodynamic changes in skin flaps. Animal models for assessing these changes in microvascular free flaps and pedicle flaps were investigated. A 2 x 3-cm free flap model based on the epigastric vein-artery pair and a reversed MacFarlane 3 x 10-cm pedicle flap model were used in this study. Animals were divided into four groups, with groups 1 (n = 6) and 2 (n = 4) undergoing epigastric free flap surgery and groups 3 (n = 3) and 4 (n = 10) undergoing pedicle flap surgery. Groups 1 and 4 served as controls for each of the flap models. Groups 2 and 3 served as ischemia-reperfusion models. Optical spectroscopy provides a measure of hemoglobin oxygen saturation and blood volume, and the laser Doppler method measures blood flow. Optical spectroscopy proved to be consistently more reliable in detecting problems with arterial in flow compared with laser Doppler assessments. When spectroscopy was used in an imaging configuration, oxygen saturation images of the entire flap were generated, thus creating a visual picture of global flap health. In both single-point and imaging modes the technique was sensitive to vessel manipulation, with the immediate post operative images providing an accurate prediction of eventual outcome. This series of skin flap studies suggests a potential role for optical spectroscopy and spectroscopic imaging in the clinical assessment of skin flaps.

  7. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13

    Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

  8. Human body parts tracking and kinematic features assessment based on RSSI and inertial sensor measurements.

    PubMed

    Blumrosen, Gaddi; Luttwak, Ami

    2013-08-23

    Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN), capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts' displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  9. Human Body Parts Tracking and Kinematic Features Assessment Based on RSSI and Inertial Sensor Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Blumrosen, Gaddi; Luttwak, Ami

    2013-01-01

    Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN), capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts' displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs. PMID:23979481

  10. A statistical assessment of ambient electromagnetic field using body-worn multiaxial sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roblin, Christophe

    2015-11-01

    The electromagnetic field exposure of the population due to wireless communications originates from both down-link and up-link emissions. Although the main contribution comes generally from the latter (e.g., higher by three to five orders of magnitude for the 2G), the former must be considered as well, because they are continual, and as contributions can be competitive for some cases (e.g., in femtocells). Sensor and exposimeter networks (NW) can be deployed by the operators themselves (to enrich feedback information from their own NW) or by independent external stakeholders such as regulatory agencies or local authorities. When sensors are directly worn by a user, body proximity effects - notably the masking effect - can introduce significant errors in the ambient field measurement. A methodology of the statistical assessment of this harmful effect is proposed in this article. It is mainly based on electromagnetic simulations (and partly on measurements) of a triaxial sensor - composed of three orthogonal wideband probes devoted to the evaluation of the field components - placed at different positions of a set of whole body phantoms. The main original contribution of the proposed approach is that both the isolated sensor calibration procedure and the assessment of the measurement errors are based on statistical analyses accounting for the propagation environment. The quantitative results are obtained using statistical channel models for polarimetric and non-polarimetric measurements in various propagation scenarios. Some quantitative results examples are presented. Eventually, preliminary corrections schemes are proposed.

  11. A remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment framework for stroke patients based on wearable sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-05-01

    To extend the use of wearable sensor networks for stroke patients training and assessment in non-clinical settings, this paper proposes a novel remote quantitative Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) framework, in which two accelerometer and seven flex sensors were used to monitoring the movement function of upper limb, wrist and fingers. The extreme learning machine based ensemble regression model was established to map the sensor data to clinical FMA scores while the RRelief algorithm was applied to find the optimal features subset. Considering the FMA scale is time-consuming and complicated, seven training exercises were designed to replace the upper limb related 33 items in FMA scale. 24 stroke inpatients participated in the experiments in clinical settings and 5 of them were involved in the experiments in home settings after they left the hospital. Both the experimental results in clinical and home settings showed that the proposed quantitative FMA model can precisely predict the FMA scores based on wearable sensor data, the coefficient of determination can reach as high as 0.917. It also indicated that the proposed framework can provide a potential approach to the remote quantitative rehabilitation training and evaluation.

  12. Health assessment of gasoline and fuel oxygenate vapors: generation and characterization of test materials.

    PubMed

    Henley, Michael; Letinski, Daniel J; Carr, John; Caro, Mario L; Daughtrey, Wayne; White, Russell

    2014-11-01

    In compliance with the Clean Air Act regulations for fuel and fuel additive registration, the petroleum industry, additive manufacturers, and oxygenate manufacturers have conducted comparative toxicology testing on evaporative emissions of gasoline alone and gasoline containing fuel oxygenates. To mimic real world exposures, a generation method was developed that produced test material similar in composition to the re-fueling vapor from an automotive fuel tank at near maximum in-use temperatures. Gasoline vapor was generated by a single-step distillation from a 1000-gallon glass-lined kettle wherein approximately 15-23% of the starting material was slowly vaporized, separated, condensed and recovered as test article. This fraction was termed vapor condensate (VC) and was prepared for each of the seven test materials, namely: baseline gasoline alone (BGVC), or gasoline plus an ether (G/MTBE, G/ETBE, G/TAME, or G/DIPE), or gasoline plus an alcohol (G/EtOH or G/TBA). The VC test articles were used for the inhalation toxicology studies described in the accompanying series of papers in this journal. These studies included evaluations of subchronic toxicity, neurotoxicity, immunotoxicity, genotoxicity, reproductive and developmental toxicity. Results of these studies will be used for comparative risk assessments of gasoline and gasoline/oxygenate blends by the US Environmental Protection Agency.

  13. Using broadband spatially resolved NIRS to assess muscle oxygenation during altered running protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukourakis, Georg; Vafiadou, Maria; Steimers, André; Geraskin, Dmitri; Neary, Patrick; Kohl-Bareis, Matthias

    2009-07-01

    We used spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy (SRS-NIRS) to assess calf and thigh muscle oxygenation during running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two protocols were used: An incremental speed protocol (velocity = 6 - 12 km/h, ▵v = 2 km/h) was performed in 3 minute stages, while a pacing paradigm modulated step frequency alternatively (2.3 Hz [SLow]; 3.3 Hz [SHigh]) during a constant velocity for 2 minutes each. A SRS-NIRS broadband system (600 - 1000 nm) was used to measure total haemoglobin concentration and oxygen saturation (SO2). An accelerometer was placed on the hip joints to measure limb acceleration through the experiment. The data showed that the calf (SO2 58 to 42%) desaturated to a significantly lower level than the thigh (61 to 54%). During the pacing protocol, SO2 was significantly different between the SLow vs. SHigh trials. Additionally, physiological data as measured by spirometry were different between the SLow vs. SHigh pacing trials (VO2 (2563+/- 586 vs. 2503 +/- 605 mL/min). Significant differences in VO2 at the same workload (speed) indicate alterations in mechanical efficiency. These data suggest that SRS broadband NIRS can be used to discern small changes in muscle oxygenation, making this device useful for metabolic exercise studies in addition to spirometry and movement monitoring by accelerometers.

  14. Testing and Oxygen Assessment Results for a Next Generation Extravehicular Activity Portable Life Support System Fan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Rivera, Fatonia L.; Martin, Devin

    2011-01-01

    NASA is designing a next generation Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Portable Life Support System (PLSS) for use in future surface exploration endeavors. To meet the new requirements for ventilation flow at nominal and buddy modes, a fan has been developed and tested. This paper summarizes the results of the performance and life cycle testing efforts conducted at the NASA Johnson Space Center. Additionally, oxygen compatibility assessment results from an evaluation conducted at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) are provided, and lessons learned and future recommendations are outlined.

  15. Uncooled midwave infrared sensors for spaceborne assessment of fire characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngo Phong, Linh; Picard, Francis; Paultre, Jacques-Edmond; Généreux, Francis; Dufour, Denis; Châteauneuf, François

    2017-02-01

    Spaceborne assessment of fire characteristics relies on radiance measurement of fire pixels and non-fire pixels mainly in the midwave infrared (MWIR). Because ambient temperature non-fire pixels have low thermal emission in this spectral range, it remains a challenge to retrieve fire characteristics with the desired accuracy. This paper reports on uncooled microbolometers specially designed with low noise equivalent power (NEP) to enable fire diagnosis at MWIR wavelengths. Each microbolometer forming a 512x3 format array includes a Wheatstone bridge of one active, one blind, and two thermally shunted pixels followed by its own signal chain. Design analyses suggest the conditions for achieving the best NEP performance are: (i) the active, blind, and one shunt pixel have equal electrical resistances while the other shunt pixel has a larger resistance; (ii) the temperature difference between the active pixel and heat sink corresponds to about one-third the heat sink temperature; and (iii) the active and blind pixels have low thermal mass and conductance. Hardwired devices having different structural layouts were prepared for the validation of physical parameters and performance so that the suitable designs could be identified. After this, focal planes of 512x3 microbolometers were fabricated on readout electronics to allow further performance evaluation and development of staggered 1017x3 format arrays for a planned mission. The active pixel designs on the fabricated arrays exhibit a MWIR absorptance as high as 0.83 through implementation of a Salisbury screen absorber, a thermal conductance of 67 nW/K, and a response time shorter than 10 ms. Their responsivities are found to be in good agreement with predictions of the design analysis. The effectiveness of an Al shield platform erected above the blind pixel was investigated, showing that certain designs are capable of attenuating the incident power by up to 24 times. Under optimal operating conditions an NEP of 64 p

  16. A Compressed Sensing-Based Wearable Sensor Network for Quantitative Assessment of Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-02-05

    Clinical rehabilitation assessment is an important part of the therapy process because it is the premise for prescribing suitable rehabilitation interventions. However, the commonly used assessment scales have the following two drawbacks: (1) they are susceptible to subjective factors; (2) they only have several rating levels and are influenced by a ceiling effect, making it impossible to exactly detect any further improvement in the movement. Meanwhile, energy constraints are a primary design consideration in wearable sensor network systems since they are often battery-operated. Traditionally, for wearable sensor network systems that follow the Shannon/Nyquist sampling theorem, there are many data that need to be sampled and transmitted. This paper proposes a novel wearable sensor network system to monitor and quantitatively assess the upper limb motion function, based on compressed sensing technology. With the sparse representation model, less data is transmitted to the computer than with traditional systems. The experimental results show that the accelerometer signals of Bobath handshake and shoulder touch exercises can be compressed, and the length of the compressed signal is less than 1/3 of the raw signal length. More importantly, the reconstruction errors have no influence on the predictive accuracy of the Brunnstrom stage classification model. It also indicated that the proposed system can not only reduce the amount of data during the sampling and transmission processes, but also, the reconstructed accelerometer signals can be used for quantitative assessment without any loss of useful information.

  17. Modeling forest defoliation using simulated BRDF and assessing its effect on reflectance and sensor reaching radiance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rengarajan, Rajagopalan; Schott, John R.

    2016-09-01

    Remote sensing techniques such as change detection are widely used for mapping and monitoring forest cover to detect the declining health and vigor of forests. These techniques rely on the assumption that the biophysical variation in the forest introduces a corresponding variation in its reflectance. The biophysical variations are assessed by foresters, but these assessment techniques are expensive and cannot be performed frequently to identify a specific level of change in the forest, for example, infection due to gypsy moths that results in forest defoliation. Further, the interaction of atmosphere, sensor characteristics, and phenology that are inherent in the remotely sensed images makes it difficult to separate biophysical changes from observational effects. We have addressed these limitations by developing a method to model the spectral reflectance properties of forests with varying degrees of defoliation using the Digital Image and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) tool. This paper discusses the in-canopy radiative approach and the impact of defoliation on the reflectance and radiance observed by sensors such as Landsat. The results indicate that the relative variation in forest reflectance between a non-defoliated and a 30% defoliated deciduous forest can be as high as 10% in the NIR spectral band. A function can be fit to predict the level of defoliation from the relative variation in radiance. The modeling and analysis techniques can be extended to assess the impact of atmospheric factors and sensor characteristics relative to the biophysical changes as well as for assessing other biophysical variables in forests.

  18. A Compressed Sensing-Based Wearable Sensor Network for Quantitative Assessment of Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lei; Xiong, Daxi; Guo, Liquan; Wang, Jiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical rehabilitation assessment is an important part of the therapy process because it is the premise for prescribing suitable rehabilitation interventions. However, the commonly used assessment scales have the following two drawbacks: (1) they are susceptible to subjective factors; (2) they only have several rating levels and are influenced by a ceiling effect, making it impossible to exactly detect any further improvement in the movement. Meanwhile, energy constraints are a primary design consideration in wearable sensor network systems since they are often battery-operated. Traditionally, for wearable sensor network systems that follow the Shannon/Nyquist sampling theorem, there are many data that need to be sampled and transmitted. This paper proposes a novel wearable sensor network system to monitor and quantitatively assess the upper limb motion function, based on compressed sensing technology. With the sparse representation model, less data is transmitted to the computer than with traditional systems. The experimental results show that the accelerometer signals of Bobath handshake and shoulder touch exercises can be compressed, and the length of the compressed signal is less than 1/3 of the raw signal length. More importantly, the reconstruction errors have no influence on the predictive accuracy of the Brunnstrom stage classification model. It also indicated that the proposed system can not only reduce the amount of data during the sampling and transmission processes, but also, the reconstructed accelerometer signals can be used for quantitative assessment without any loss of useful information. PMID:26861337

  19. Cumulative or sequential assessment during hermit crab shell fights: effects of oxygen on decision rules.

    PubMed

    Briffa, M; Elwood, R W

    2000-12-07

    Agonistic interactions between animals are often settled by the use of repeated signals which advertise the resource-holding potential of the sender. According to the sequential assessment game this repetition increases the accuracy with which receivers may assess the signal, but under the cumulative assessment model the repeated performances accumulate to give a signal of stamina. These models may be distinguished by the temporal pattern of signalling they predict and by the decision rules used by the contestants. Hermit crabs engage in shell fights over possession of the gastropod shells that they inhabit. During these interactions the two roles of signaller and receiver may be examined separately because they are fixed for the duration of the encounter. Attackers rap their shell against that of the defender in a series of bouts whereas defenders remain tightly withdrawn into their shells for the duration of the contest. At the end of a fight the attacker may evict the defender from its shell or decide to give up without first effecting an eviction; the decision for defenders is either to maintain a grip on its shell or to release the shell and allow itself to be evicted. We manipulated fatigue levels separately for attackers and defenders, by varying the oxygen concentration of the water that they are held in prior to fighting, and examined the effects that this has on the likelihood of each decision and on the temporal pattern of rapping. We show that the vigour of rapping and the likelihood of eviction are reduced when the attacker is subjected to low oxygen but that this treatment has no effect on rates of eviction when applied to defenders. We conclude that defenders compare the vigour of rapping with an absolute threshold rather than with a relative threshold when making their decision. The data are compatible with the cumulative assessment model and with the idea that shell rapping signals the stamina of attackers, but do not fit the predictions of the

  20. Next-Generation Psychiatric Assessment: Using Smartphone Sensors to Monitor Behavior and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Scherer, Emily A.; Wang, Rui; Xie, Haiyi; Campbell, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Optimal mental health care is dependent upon sensitive and early detection of mental health problems. The current study introduces a state-of-the-art method for remote behavioral monitoring that transports assessment out of the clinic and into the environments in which individuals negotiate their daily lives. The objective of this study was examine whether the information captured with multi-modal smartphone sensors can serve as behavioral markers for one’s mental health. We hypothesized that: a) unobtrusively collected smartphone sensor data would be associated with individuals’ daily levels of stress, and b) sensor data would be associated with changes in depression, stress, and subjective loneliness over time. Methods A total of 47 young adults (age range: 19–30 y.o.) were recruited for the study. Individuals were enrolled as a single cohort and participated in the study over a 10-week period. Participants were provided with smartphones embedded with a range of sensors and software that enabled continuous tracking of their geospatial activity (using GPS and WiFi), kinesthetic activity (using multi-axial accelerometers), sleep duration (modeled using device use data, accelerometer inferences, ambient sound features, and ambient light levels), and time spent proximal to human speech (i.e., speech duration using microphone and speech detection algorithms). Participants completed daily ratings of stress, as well as pre/post measures of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), stress (Perceived Stress Scale), and loneliness (Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale). Results Mixed-effects linear modeling showed that sensor-derived geospatial activity (p<.05), sleep duration (p<.05), and variability in geospatial activity (p<.05), were associated with daily stress levels. Penalized functional regression showed associations between changes in depression and sensor-derived speech duration (p<.05), geospatial activity (p<.05), and sleep duration (p<.05). Changes

  1. Next-generation psychiatric assessment: Using smartphone sensors to monitor behavior and mental health.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zeev, Dror; Scherer, Emily A; Wang, Rui; Xie, Haiyi; Campbell, Andrew T

    2015-09-01

    Optimal mental health care is de