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Sample records for oxygen species involved

  1. Redox Processes in Neurodegenerative Disease Involving Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been devoted to neurodegenerative diseases involving redox processes. This review comprises an update involving redox processes reported in the considerable literature in recent years. The mechanism involves reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, usually in the brain. There are many examples including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, prions, Down’s syndrome, ataxia, multiple sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and Tardive Dyskinesia. Evidence indicates a protective role for antioxidants, which may have clinical implications. A multifaceted approach to mode of action appears reasonable. PMID:23730253

  2. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided.

  3. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided. PMID:26233903

  4. Reactive oxygen species involved in regulating fruit senescence and fungal pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shiping; Qin, Guozheng; Li, Boqiang

    2013-08-01

    Senescence is a vital aspect of fruit life cycles, and directly affects fruit quality and resistance to pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), as the primary mediators of oxidative damage in plants, are involved in senescence. Mitochondria are the main ROS and free radical source. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins caused by ROS is implicated in the process of senescence, and a number of senescence-related disorders in a variety of organisms. However, the specific sites of ROS generation in mitochondria remain largely unknown. Recent discoveries have ascertained that fruit senescence is greatly related to ROS and incidental oxidative damage of mitochondrial protein. Special mitochondrial proteins involved in fruit senescence have been identified as the targets of ROS. We focus in discussion on our recent advances in exploring the mechanisms of how ROS regulate fruit senescence and fungal pathogenicity.

  5. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  6. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nickel inhibition of dna repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Yew, F.H.; Chen, K.S.; Jan, K.Y.

    1997-06-01

    Nickel has been shown to inhibit DNA repair in a way that may play a role in its toxicity. Since nickel treatment increases cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have investigated the involvement of ROS in nickel inhibition of DNA repair. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis or catalase activity increased the enhancing effect of nickel on the cytotoxicity of ultraviolet (UV) light. Inhibition of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities also enhanced the retardation effect of nickel on the rejoining of DNA strand breaks accumulated by hydroxyurea plus cytosine-{beta}-D-arabinofuranoside in UV-irradiated cells. Since DNA polymerization and ligation are involved in the DNA-break rejoining, we have investigated the effect of ROS on these two steps in an extract of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Nickel inhibition of the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)dTTP into the DNase l-activated calf thymus DNA was stronger than the ligation of poly(dA){center_dot}oligo(dT), whereas H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was more potent in inhibiting DNA ligation than DNA polymerization. Nickel, in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, exhibited a synergistic inhibition on both DNA polymerization and ligation and caused protein fragmentation. In addition, glutathione could completely recover the inhibition by nickel or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone but only partially recover the inhibition by nickel plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Therefore, nickel may bind to DNA-repair enzymes and generate oxygen-free radicals to cause protein degradation in situ. This irreversible damage to the proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, recombination, and transcription could be important for the toxic effects of nickel. 60 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the UV-B damage to the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.

    PubMed

    He, Yu Ying; Häder, Donat P

    2002-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved the damage of living organisms under environmental stress including UV radiation. Cyanobacteria, photoautotrophic prokaryotic organisms, also suffer from increasing UV-B due to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. The increased UV-B induces the production of ROS in vivo detected by using the ROS-sensitive probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) scavenged ROS effectively, while alpha-tocopherol acetate or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) did not. The presence of rose bengal and hypocrellin A increased the ROS level by photodynamic action in the visible light. The presence of the herbicide, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), increased ROS production slightly, and ROS formation was greatly enhanced by the addition of methyl viologen due to the fact that this redox system diverts electrons from PSI to oxygen and thus forms ROS. UV-B induces ROS generation by photodynamic action and inhibition of the electron transport by damaging the electron receptors or enzymes associated with the electron transport chain during photosynthesis.

  8. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in BMP-Induced Dendritic Growth in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. PMID:26079955

  10. Reactive oxygen species are involved in insulin-dependent regulation of autophagy in primary rat podocytes.

    PubMed

    Audzeyenka, Irena; Rogacka, Dorota; Piwkowska, Agnieszka; Rychlowski, Michal; Bierla, Joanna Beata; Czarnowska, Elżbieta; Angielski, Stefan; Jankowski, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular defense mechanism responsible for the turnover of damaged or non-functional cellular constituents. This process provides cells with energy and essential compounds under unfavorable environmental conditions-such as oxidative stress and hyperglycemia, which are both observed in diabetes. The most common diabetes complication is diabetic nephropathy (DN), which can lead to renal failure. This condition often includes impaired podocyte function. Here we investigated autophagic activity in rat podocytes cultured with a high insulin concentration (300nM). Autophagy was activated after 60min of insulin stimulation. Moreover, this effect was abolished following pharmacological (apocynin) or genetic (siRNA) inhibition of NAD(P)H oxidase activity, indicating that insulin-dependent autophagy stimulation involved reactive oxygen species (ROS). We also observed a continuous and time-dependent increase of podocyte albumin permeability in response to insulin, and this process was slightly improved by autophagy inhibition following short-term insulin exposure. Our results suggest that insulin may be a factor affecting the development of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27026581

  11. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the mechanisms associated with cervical cancer specific treatment.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, S; Anghel, R; Gruia, M I; Beuran, M

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer represents a genuine health issue in Romania.The courses of treatment applied are complex, and the accompanying biochemical mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. Thus, radiotherapy, which induces reactive oxygen species, can lead to failure of treatment in hypoxic tissues,tissues which are difficult to identify due to the small quantity in which these cytotoxic species are produced. As a result, the aim of this paper is to identify the production and role of reactive oxygen species, as well as the manner of activation of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms in cervical cancer patients admitted to the Oncologic Institute of Bucharest. To this purpose the biochemical parameters of oxidative stress were identified in 30 patients with cervical tumour localization, prior to surgery. The results obtained have showed that a production of reactive oxygen species is identifiable in these patients, having lipids as a primary target and leading to their peroxidation. The extension of protein oxidative degradation takes place at a much lower value, as well as the activation of endogenous antioxidant defence systems, comparing to our expectations. To conclude,we consider that when the production of active oxygen metabolites takes place in small concentrations, associated with hypoxia, the signals transmitted are towards modifying the phenotype under anaerobic conditions into one activating neo vascularization, angiogenesis initiation, new cell growth and proliferation. The moment that this phase is overcome anew oxidative stress is installed, one potentially destructive for biomolecules essential to life, but also useful for further treatment, such as radiotherapy.

  12. Motorcycle exhaust particulates enhance vasoconstriction in organ culture of rat aortas and involve reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Hui-Ping; Yang, Rong-Sen; Ueng, Tzuu-Huei; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn; Liu, Shing-Hwa

    2003-09-01

    The effects of motorcycle exhaust particulate on vasoconstriction were determined using rat thoracic aortas under organ culture conditions treated with organic extracts of motorcycle exhaust particulate from a two-stroke engine. The motorcycle exhaust particulate extract (MEPE) induced a concentration-dependent enhancement of vasoconstriction elicited by phenylephrine in the organ cultures of both intact and endothelium-denuded aortas for 18 h. Nifedipine (an L-type Ca2+ channel blocker), manganese acetate (an inorganic Ca2+ channel blocker), and staurosporine (a nonselective protein kinase C inhibitor), but not the selective protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine, inhibited the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. Staurosporine has also been reported as a myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor, so we tested whether the MLCK pathway was involved in the effect of MEPE. The results showed that ML-9 (a selective MLCK inhibitor) could inhibit the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. The phosphorylation of a 20-kDa myosin light chain in a primary culture of rat vascular smooth muscle cells was also enhanced by MEPE. Moreover, we also examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the stimulatory effect of MEPE on vasoconstriction. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited the enhancement of vasoconstriction by MEPE. A time-dependent increase in ROS production by MEPE was also detected in primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells. These results indicate that MEPE induces a marked enhancement of vasoconstriction in aortas under organ culture conditions and imply that a ROS-Ca2+-MLCK pathway may be involved in this MEPE-induced response.

  13. Reactive oxygen species are involved in regulation of pollen wall cytomechanics.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Matveyeva, N P; Yermakov, I P

    2014-01-01

    Production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in somatic plant cells is developmentally regulated and plays an important role in the modification of cell wall mechanical properties. Here we show that H2O2 and the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) can regulate germination of tobacco pollen by modifying the mechanical properties of the pollen intine (inner layer of the pollen wall). Pollen germination was affected by addition of exogenous H2O2, (•)OH, and by antioxidants scavenging endogenous ROS: superoxide dismutase, superoxide dismutase/catalase mimic Mn-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)21H, 23H-porphin, or a spin-trap α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone, which eliminates (•)OH. The inhibiting concentrations of exogenous H2O2 and (•)OH did not decrease pollen viability, but influenced the mechanical properties of the wall. The latter were estimated by studying the resistance of pollen to hypo-osmotic shock. (•)OH caused excess loosening of the intine all over the surface of the pollen grain, disrupting polar growth induction. In contrast, H2O2, as well as partial removal of endogenous (•)OH, over-tightened the wall, impeding pollen tube emergence. Feruloyl esterase (FAE) was used as a tool to examine whether H2O2-inducible inter-polymer cross-linking is involved in the intine tightening. FAE treatment caused loosening of the intine and stimulated pollen germination and pollen tube growth, revealing ferulate cross-links in the intine. Taken together, the data suggest that pollen intine properties can be regulated differentially by ROS. (•)OH is involved in local loosening of the intine in the germination pore region, while H2O2 is necessary for intine strengthening in the rest of the wall through oxidative coupling of feruloyl polysaccharides.

  14. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling.

  15. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  16. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  17. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling. PMID:22291200

  18. Signaling Networks Involving Reactive Oxygen Species and Ca2+ in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although plants never evolved central information processing organs such as brains, plants have evolved distributed information processing systems and are able to sense various environmental changes and reorganize their body plan coordinately without moving. Recent molecular biological studies revealed molecular bases for elementary processes of signal transduction in plants. Though reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly toxic substances produced through aerobic respiration and photosynthesis, plants possess ROS-producing enzymes whose activity is highly regulated by binding of Ca2+. In turn, Ca2+- permeable channel proteins activated by ROS are shown to be localized to the cell membrane. These two components are proposed to constitute a positive feedback loop to amplify cellular signals. Such molecular physiological studies should be important steps to understand information processing systems in plants and future application for technology related to environmental, energy and food sciences.

  19. Cardiac melanocytes influence atrial reactive oxygen species involved with electrical and structural remodeling in mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hayoung; Liu, Fang; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Huang, Jianhe; Schillinger, Kurt J; Patel, Vickas V

    2015-09-01

    Cardiac melanocyte-like cells (CMLCs) contribute to atrial arrhythmias when missing the melanin synthesis enzyme dopachrome tautomerase (Dct). While scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) in Dct-null mice partially suppressed atrial arrhythmias, it remains unclear if CMLCs influence atrial ROS and structure or if the electrical response of CMLCs to ROS differs from that of atrial myocytes. This study is designed to determine if CMLCs contribute to overall atrial oxidative stress or structural remodeling, and if ROS affects the electrophysiology of CMLCs differently than atrial myocytes. Immunohistochemical analysis showed higher expression of the oxidative marker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in Dct-null atria versus Dct-heterozygous (Dct-het) atria. Exposing isolated CMLCs from Dct-het and Dct-null mice to hydrogen peroxide increased superoxide anion more in Dct-null CMLCs. Trichrome staining showed increased fibrosis in Dct-null atria, and treating Dct-null mice with the ROS scavenger Tempol reduced atrial fibrosis. Action potential recordings from atrial myocytes and isolated Dct-het and Dct-null CMLCs in response to hydrogen peroxide showed that the EC50 for action potential duration (APD) prolongation of Dct-null CMLCs was 8.2 ± 1.7 μmol/L versus 16.8 ± 2.0 μmol/L for Dct-het CMLCs, 19.9 ± 2.1 μmol/L for Dct-null atrial myocytes, and 20.5 ± 1.9 μmol/L for Dct-het atrial myocytes. However, APD90 was longer in CMLCs versus atrial myocytes in response to hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide also induced more afterdepolarizations in CMLCs compared to atrial myocytes. These studies suggest that Dct within CMLCs contributes to atrial ROS balance and remodeling. ROS prolongs APD to a greater extent and induces afterdepolarizations more frequently in CMLCs than in atrial myocytes.

  20. AMPK is involved in mediation of erythropoietin influence on metabolic activity and reactive oxygen species production in white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-09-01

    Erythropoietin, discovered for its indispensable role during erythropoiesis, has been used in therapy for selected red blood cell disorders in erythropoietin-deficient patients. The biological activities of erythropoietin have been found in animal models to extend to non-erythroid tissues due to the expression of erythropoietin receptor. We previously demonstrated that erythropoietin promotes metabolic activity and white adipocytes browning to increase mitochondrial function and energy expenditure via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and Sirtuin1. Here we report that AMP-activated protein kinase was activated by erythropoietin possibly via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase in adipocytes as well as in white adipose tissue from diet induced obese mice. Erythropoietin increased cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide via increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, possibly leading to Sirtuin1 activation. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down reduced erythropoietin mediated increase in cellular oxidative function including the increased oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid utilization and induction of key metabolic genes. Under hypoxia, adipocytes were found to generate more reactive oxygen species, and erythropoietin reduced the reactive oxygen species and increased antioxidant gene expression, suggesting that erythropoietin may provide protection from oxidative stress in adipocytes. Erythropoietin also reversed increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by hypoxia via increased AMP-activated protein kinase. Additionally, AMP-activated protein kinase is found to be involved in erythropoietin stimulated increase in oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial gene expression. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down impaired erythropoietin stimulated increases in antioxidant gene expression. Collectively, our findings identify the AMP-activated protein kinase involvement in erythropoietin signaling in

  1. PKD1 Protein Is Involved in Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated Mitochondrial Depolarization in Cooperation with Protein Kinase Cδ (PKCδ)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Thianzhou; Sell, Philip; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used gene targeting in mice to identify the in vivo functions of PKD1. In addition to phenotypically characterizing the resulting knock-out animals, we also used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate the associated signaling pathways in detail. This study is the first to use genetic deletion to reveal that PKD1 is a key regulator involved in determining the threshold of mitochondrial depolarization that leads to the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we also provide clear evidence that PKCδ is upstream of PKD1 in this process and acts as the activating kinase of PKD1. Therefore, our in vivo data indicate that PKD1 functions not only in the context of aging but also during nutrient deprivation, which occurs during specific phases of tumor growth. PMID:25759386

  2. Reactive oxygen species-mediated DJ-1 monomerization modulates intracellular trafficking involving karyopherin β2.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Puno, Marc Rhyan; Odell, Mark; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 are a cause of recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Although oxidative stress and mitochondrial integrity have been implicated in PD, it is largely unknown why neurons degenerate. DJ-1 is involved in oxidative stress-mediated responses and in mitochondrial maintenance; however, its specific function remains vague. Here we show that DJ-1 exhibits neuronal dynamic intracellular trafficking, with dimeric/monomeric cycling modulated by the oxidative environment. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances monomerization of wild-type cytosolic DJ-1, leading to nuclear recruitment. The pathogenic DJ-1/E163K variant is unable to homodimerize but is retained in the cytosol upon wild-type DJ-1 heterodimerization. We found that this wild-type/pathogenic heterodimer is disrupted by oxidative stress, leading to DJ-1/E163K mitochondrial translocation. We further demonstrated that endogenously expressed wild-type DJ-1 is imported into neuronal nuclei as a monomer and that nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is oxidative stress mediated. We identified a novel proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) in DJ-1, and we found that nuclear monomeric DJ-1 import is mediated by an oxidative stress-dependent interaction with karyopherin β2. Our study provides evidence that oxidative stress-mediated intracellular trafficking of DJ-1, mediated by dynamic DJ-1 dimeric/monomeric cycling, is implicated in PD pathogenesis. PMID:24912681

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated DJ-1 monomerization modulates intracellular trafficking involving karyopherin β2.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Puno, Marc Rhyan; Odell, Mark; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in DJ-1 are a cause of recessive, early-onset Parkinson's disease (PD). Although oxidative stress and mitochondrial integrity have been implicated in PD, it is largely unknown why neurons degenerate. DJ-1 is involved in oxidative stress-mediated responses and in mitochondrial maintenance; however, its specific function remains vague. Here we show that DJ-1 exhibits neuronal dynamic intracellular trafficking, with dimeric/monomeric cycling modulated by the oxidative environment. We demonstrate that oxidative stress enhances monomerization of wild-type cytosolic DJ-1, leading to nuclear recruitment. The pathogenic DJ-1/E163K variant is unable to homodimerize but is retained in the cytosol upon wild-type DJ-1 heterodimerization. We found that this wild-type/pathogenic heterodimer is disrupted by oxidative stress, leading to DJ-1/E163K mitochondrial translocation. We further demonstrated that endogenously expressed wild-type DJ-1 is imported into neuronal nuclei as a monomer and that nucleo-cytoplasmic transport is oxidative stress mediated. We identified a novel proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal (PY-NLS) in DJ-1, and we found that nuclear monomeric DJ-1 import is mediated by an oxidative stress-dependent interaction with karyopherin β2. Our study provides evidence that oxidative stress-mediated intracellular trafficking of DJ-1, mediated by dynamic DJ-1 dimeric/monomeric cycling, is implicated in PD pathogenesis.

  4. Calcium-dependent trichosanthin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-04-01

    The type-I ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) has a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities, including abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-HIV. We found for the first time that TCS induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in JAR cells by using fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate with confocal laser scanning microscopy. TCS-induced ROS showed dependence on the increase in intracellular calcium and on the presence of extracellular calcium. The production of ROS increased rapidly after the application of TCS, which paralleled TCS-indued increase in intracellular calcium monitored using fluo 3-AM, suggesting that TCS-induced ROS might mediate by the increase in intracellular Ca2PLU concentration. Simultaneous observation of the nuclear morphological changes and production of ROS in JAR cells with two-photon laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells, which was confirmed by that antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol prevented TCS-induced ROS formation and cell death. The finding that calcium-dependent TCS-induced ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells might provide new insight into the anti-tumor and anti-HIV mechanism of TCS.

  5. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  6. Autophagy and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Involved in Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by C. albicans Morphotypes.

    PubMed

    Kenno, Samyr; Perito, Stefano; Mosci, Paolo; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Monari, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular enzymes, such as elastase and myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that Candida albicans hyphal (CAH) cells and yeast (CAY) cells induce differential amounts, kinetics and mechanisms of NET release. CAH cells induced larger quantities of NET compared to CAY cells and can stimulate rapid NET formation up to 4 h of incubation. CAY cells are, also, able to induce rapid NET formation, but this ability was lost at 4 h. Both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy are implicated in NET induced by CAH and CAY cells, but with a time-different participation of these two mechanisms. In particular, in the early phase (15 min) CAH cells stimulate NET via autophagy, but not via ROS, while CAY cells induce NET via both autophagy and ROS. At 4 h, only CAH cells stimulate NET formation using autophagy as well as ROS. Finally, we demonstrate that NET release, in response to CAH cells, involves NF-κB activation and is strongly implicated in hyphal destruction. PMID:27375599

  7. Cytotoxic responses to 405nm light exposure in mammalian and bacterial cells: Involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Praveen; Maclean, Michelle; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G; Grant, M Helen

    2016-06-01

    Light at wavelength 405 nm is an effective bactericide. Previous studies showed that exposing mammalian cells to 405 nm light at 36 J/cm(2) (a bactericidal dose) had no significant effect on normal cell function, although at higher doses (54 J/cm(2)), mammalian cell death became evident. This research demonstrates that mammalian and bacterial cell toxicity induced by 405 nm light exposure is accompanied by reactive oxygen species production, as detected by generation of fluorescence from 6-carboxy-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. As indicators of the resulting oxidative stress in mammalian cells, a decrease in intracellular reduced glutathione content and a corresponding increase in the efflux of oxidised glutathione were observed from 405 nm light treated cells. The mammalian cells were significantly protected from dying at 54 J/cm(2) in the presence of catalase, which detoxifies H2O2. Bacterial cells were significantly protected by sodium pyruvate (H2O2 scavenger) and by a combination of free radical scavengers (sodium pyruvate, dimethyl thiourea (OH scavenger) and catalase) at 162 and 324 J/cm(2). Results therefore suggested that the cytotoxic mechanism of 405 nm light in mammalian cells and bacteria could be oxidative stress involving predominantly H2O2 generation, with other ROS contributing to the damage.

  8. Autophagy and Reactive Oxygen Species Are Involved in Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Release Induced by C. albicans Morphotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kenno, Samyr; Perito, Stefano; Mosci, Paolo; Vecchiarelli, Anna; Monari, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are a combination of DNA fibers and granular enzymes, such as elastase and myeloperoxidase. In this study, we demonstrate that Candida albicans hyphal (CAH) cells and yeast (CAY) cells induce differential amounts, kinetics and mechanisms of NET release. CAH cells induced larger quantities of NET compared to CAY cells and can stimulate rapid NET formation up to 4 h of incubation. CAY cells are, also, able to induce rapid NET formation, but this ability was lost at 4 h. Both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and autophagy are implicated in NET induced by CAH and CAY cells, but with a time-different participation of these two mechanisms. In particular, in the early phase (15 min) CAH cells stimulate NET via autophagy, but not via ROS, while CAY cells induce NET via both autophagy and ROS. At 4 h, only CAH cells stimulate NET formation using autophagy as well as ROS. Finally, we demonstrate that NET release, in response to CAH cells, involves NF-κB activation and is strongly implicated in hyphal destruction. PMID:27375599

  9. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection. PMID:27627069

  10. Reactive oxygen species and calcium signals in skeletal muscle: A crosstalk involved in both normal signaling and disease.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Alejandra; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) have been profusely studied as agents of potential damage to living cells and they have been related to a number of pathological processes. Increasing evidence points to a more positive role of ROS in cell signaling and the detailed mechanism that regulates the precise amount of ROS needed for cell functioning without the deleterious effects of excess ROS still needs to be resolved in detail. In skeletal muscle the main source of ROS during normal functioning appears to be NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2), which is activated by electrical stimuli (or exercise) through a cascade of events that include ATP release through pannexin1 channels. NOX2 is a protein complex that assembles in the T-tubule membrane before activation and ROS production by NOX2 appears to be important for muscle adaptation through gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as for improving glucose transport after insulin action. Excess ROS production (or diminished antioxidant defenses) plays a role in a number of pathological processes in skeletal muscle. Together with increased reactive nitrogen species, an increase in ROS appears to have a deleterious role in a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as well as muscle wasting in other diseases such as aging sarcopenia and cancer cachexia. In addition, ROS is involved in obesity and muscle insulin resistance, both of which are causally related to type 2 diabetes. A detailed description of the fine-tuning of ROS (including all sources of ROS) in skeletal muscle in health and disease will significantly contribute to our knowledge of both muscle adaptation and muscle related pathologies.

  11. Reactive oxygen species and calcium signals in skeletal muscle: A crosstalk involved in both normal signaling and disease.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Alejandra; Henríquez-Olguín, Carlos; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2016-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) have been profusely studied as agents of potential damage to living cells and they have been related to a number of pathological processes. Increasing evidence points to a more positive role of ROS in cell signaling and the detailed mechanism that regulates the precise amount of ROS needed for cell functioning without the deleterious effects of excess ROS still needs to be resolved in detail. In skeletal muscle the main source of ROS during normal functioning appears to be NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2), which is activated by electrical stimuli (or exercise) through a cascade of events that include ATP release through pannexin1 channels. NOX2 is a protein complex that assembles in the T-tubule membrane before activation and ROS production by NOX2 appears to be important for muscle adaptation through gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis as well as for improving glucose transport after insulin action. Excess ROS production (or diminished antioxidant defenses) plays a role in a number of pathological processes in skeletal muscle. Together with increased reactive nitrogen species, an increase in ROS appears to have a deleterious role in a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy as well as muscle wasting in other diseases such as aging sarcopenia and cancer cachexia. In addition, ROS is involved in obesity and muscle insulin resistance, both of which are causally related to type 2 diabetes. A detailed description of the fine-tuning of ROS (including all sources of ROS) in skeletal muscle in health and disease will significantly contribute to our knowledge of both muscle adaptation and muscle related pathologies. PMID:26965208

  12. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·(-) and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·(-) and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·(-), H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·(-), peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination.

  13. Colistin-Induced Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma-2a Cells Involves the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Velkov, Tony; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-09-01

    Neurotoxicity remains a poorly characterized adverse effect associated with colistin therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of colistin-induced neurotoxicity using the mouse neuroblastoma2a (N2a) cell line. Colistin treatment (0-200 μM) of N2a neuronal cells induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity was associated with a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with a concomitant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the glutathione (GSH) levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evident from the dissipation of membrane potential and the increase of Bax/Bcl-2, followed by the release of cytochrome c (CytC). Caspase-3/7, -8, and -9 activations were also detected. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity significantly increased the gene expression of p53 (1.6-fold), Bax (3.3-fold), and caspase-8 (2.2-fold) (all p < 0.01). The formation of autophagic vacuoles was evident with the significant increases (all p < 0.05 or 0.01) of both of Beclin 1 and LC3B following colistin treatment (50-200 μM). Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) enhanced colistin-induced apoptosis via caspase activation, which could be attenuated by co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. In summary, our study reveals that colistin-induced neuronal cell death involves ROS-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. A knowledge base of the neuronal signaling pathways involved in colistin-induced neurotoxicity will greatly facilitate the discovery of neuroprotective agents for use in combination with colistin to prevent this undesirable side effect. PMID:26316077

  14. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·– and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·– and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·–, H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·–, peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination. PMID:24744430

  15. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in endosperm cap weakening and embryo elongation growth during lettuce seed germination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Chen, Bingxian; Xu, Zhenjiang; Shi, Zhaowan; Chen, Shanli; Huang, Xi; Chen, Jianxun; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-07-01

    Endosperm cap (CAP) weakening and embryo elongation growth are prerequisites for the completion of lettuce seed germination. Although it has been proposed that the cell wall loosening underlying these processes results from an enzymatic mechanism, it is still unclear which enzymes are involved. Here it is shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are non-enzymatic factors, may be involved in the two processes. In Guasihong lettuce seeds imbibed in water, O2·(-) and H2O2 accumulated and peroxidase activity increased in the CAP, whereas its puncture force decreased. In addition, in the radicle, the increase in embryo growth potential was accompanied by accumulation of O2·(-) and an increase in peroxidase activity. Imbibing seeds in 0.3% sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDIC) reduced endosperm viability and the levels of O2·(-), H2O2, and peroxidase activity in the CAP, whereas the decrease in its puncture force was inhibited. However, in the embryo, SDIC did not affect the accumulation of O2·(-), peroxidase activity, and the embryo growth potential. As a result, SDIC caused atypical germination, in which the endosperm ruptured at the boundary between the CAP and lateral endosperm. ROS scavengers and ROS generation inhibitors inhibited the CAP weakening and also decreased the embryo growth potential, thus decreasing the percentage of seed germination. Exogenous ROS and ROS generation inducers increased the percentage of CAP rupture to some extent, and the addition of H2O2 to 0.3% SDIC enabled some seeds to undergo typical germination. PMID:24744430

  16. Effect of somatostatin analog on high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome: involvement of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Shi, Yong-hui; Yang, Rui-li; Cui, Jue; Xiao, Ying; Wang, Bin; Le, Guo-wei

    2010-04-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in overnutrition-induced metabolic syndrome. Somatostatin (SST) inhibits a wide variety of physiologic functions in the gastrointestinal tract, which may in turn control the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from ingestion of macronutrients. In this study, the involvement of SST in the progression of metabolic syndrome in response to a high-fat diet (HFD) was investigated. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a normal diet (4.89% fat) or a high-fat diet (21.45% fat) for 4 weeks. The SST analog octreotide (20 microg/kg/day) was then administered intraperitoneally to half of the HFD mice throughout the 10-day experimental period. Body weight, adipose tissue weight, gastric acidity, total bile acid, and lipase activity were measured. Plasma lipid, glucose, insulin, SST, the levels of ROS and GSH/GSSG, and lipid peroxidation in the stomach, small intestine, pancreas, and liver were also evaluated. Following HFD intake for 38 days, a decrease in the plasma levels of SST and GSH/GSSG ratio was observed, while there was an increase in body weight, adipose tissue weight, plasma glucose, triglyceride, and levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation of the stomach, small intestine, pancreas, and liver. However, simultaneous administration of SST analog octreotide to HFD-fed mice significantly reduced ROS production of the digestive system and resulted in the improvement of all the aforesaid adverse changes, suggesting the involvement of SST in the progression of HFD-induced metabolic syndrome.

  17. TRPA1 activation leads to neurogenic vasodilatation: involvement of reactive oxygen nitrogen species in addition to CGRP and NO

    PubMed Central

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Kodji, Xenia; Abdul‐Kader, Nayaab; Heads, Richard; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Bevan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential ankyrin‐1 (TRPA1) activation is known to mediate neurogenic vasodilatation. We investigated the mechanisms involved in TRPA1‐mediated peripheral vasodilatation in vivo using the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. Experimental Approach Changes in vascular ear blood flow were measured in anaesthetized mice using laser Doppler flowmetry. Key Results Topical application of cinnamaldehyde to the mouse ear caused a significant increase in blood flow in the skin of anaesthetized wild‐type (WT) mice but not in TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. Cinnamaldehyde‐induced vasodilatation was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of the potent microvascular vasodilator neuropeptide CGRP and neuronal NOS‐derived NO pathways. Cinnamaldehyde‐mediated vasodilatation was significantly reduced by treatment with reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) scavenger such as catalase and the SOD mimetic TEMPOL, supporting a role of RONS in the downstream vasodilator TRPA1‐mediated response. Co‐treatment with a non‐selective NOS inhibitor L‐NAME and antioxidant apocynin further inhibited the TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation. Cinnamaldehyde treatment induced the generation of peroxynitrite that was blocked by the peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS and shown to be dependent on TRPA1, as reflected by an increase in protein tyrosine nitration in the skin of WT, but not in TRPA1 KO mice. Conclusion and Implications This study provides in vivo evidence that TRPA1‐induced vasodilatation mediated by cinnamaldehyde requires neuronal NOS‐derived NO, in addition to the traditional neuropeptide component. A novel role of peroxynitrite is revealed, which is generated downstream of TRPA1 activation by cinnamaldehyde. This mechanistic pathway underlying TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation may be important in understanding the role of TRPA1 in pathophysiological situations. PMID:27189253

  18. Reactive oxygen species are involved in group I mGluR-mediated facilitation of nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangchen; Neugebauer, Volker

    2010-07-01

    Recent biochemical and behavioral data implicate reactive oxygen species (ROS) in peripheral and spinal pain mechanisms. However, pain-related functions of ROS in the brain and mechanisms of pain-related ROS activation remain to be determined. Our previous studies showed that the amygdala plays a key role in emotional-affective pain responses and pain modulation. Hyperactivity of amygdala neurons in an animal pain model depends on group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (subtypes mGluR1 and mGluR5), but their signaling pathway remains to be determined. Here we tested the hypothesis that activation of group I mGluRs increases nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons through a mechanism that involves ROS. Extracellular single-unit recordings were made from neurons in the laterocapsular division of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC) in anesthetized adult male rats. Administration of a group I mGluR agonist (DHPG) into the CeLC by microdialysis increased the responses to innocuous and noxious somatosensory (knee joint compression) and visceral (colorectal distention [CRD]) stimuli. A ROS scavenger (PBN) and a superoxide dismutase mimetic (TEMPOL) reversed the facilitatory effects of DHPG. An mGluR5 antagonist (MPEP) also inhibited the effects of DHPG on the responses to innocuous and noxious somatosensory and visceral stimuli, whereas an mGluR1 antagonist (LY367385) decreased only the responses to visceral stimulation. The results show for the first time that ROS mediate group I mGluR-induced facilitation of nociceptive processing in amygdala neurons. The antagonist data may suggest differential contributions of subtypes mGluR1 and mGluR5 to the processing of somatosensory and visceral nociceptive information in the amygdala.

  19. Testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells via extrinsic apoptotic pathway with mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species involvement.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Neves, Karla Bianca; Pestana, Cezar Rangel; Queiroz, André Lima; Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto; Chignalia, Andréia Z; Valim, Yara Maria; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curti, Carlos; Tostes, Rita C

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone exerts both beneficial and harmful effects on the cardiovascular system. Considering that testosterone induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ROS activate cell death signaling pathways, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via mitochondria-dependent ROS generation. Potential mechanisms were addressed. Cultured VSMCs were stimulated with testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or vehicle (2-12 h) in the presence of flutamide (10(-5) mol/l), CCCP (10(-6) mol/l), mimetic manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP; 3 × 10(-5) mol/l), Z-Ile-Glu(O-ME)-Thr-Asp(O-Me) fluoromethyl ketone (Z-IETD-FMK; 10(-5) mol/l), or vehicle. ROS were determined with lucigenin and dichlorodihydrofluorescein; apoptosis, with annexin V and calcein; O2 consumption, with a Clark-type electrode, and procaspases, caspases, cytochrome c, Bax, and Bcl-2 levels by immunoblotting. Testosterone induced ROS generation (relative light units/mg protein, 2 h; 162.6 ± 16 vs. 100) and procaspase-3 activation [arbitrary units, (AU), 6 h; 166.2 ± 19 vs. 100]. CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. Testosterone increased annexin-V fluorescence (AU, 197.6 ± 21.5 vs. 100) and decreased calcein fluorescence (AU, 34.4 ± 6.4 vs. 100), and O2 consumption (nmol O2/min, 18.6 ± 2.0 vs. 34.4 ± 3.9). Testosterone also reduced Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio but not cytochrome-c release from mitochondria. Moreover, testosterone (6 h) induced cleavage of procaspase 8 (AU, 161.1 ± 13.5 vs. 100) and increased gene expression of Fas ligand (2(ΔΔCt), 3.6 ± 1.2 vs. 0.7 ± 0.5), and TNF-α (1.7 ± 0.4 vs. 0.3 ± 0.1). CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. These data indicate that testosterone induces apoptosis in VSMCs via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway with the involvement of androgen receptor activation and mitochondria-generated ROS.

  20. Age dependence of the level of the enzymes involved in the protection against active oxygen species in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpa, M.; Rigo, A.; Viglino, P.; Stevanato, R.; Bracco, F.; Battistin, L.

    1987-06-01

    Levels of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (CuSOD), Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were assessed in the rat brain cortex. The concentrations of Cu- and MnSOD were found to increase linearly with the logarithm of the age of the animal from 3 days before birth to 30 months, both in the whole cortex tissue and in its cytoplasmic fraction. Catalase and GPx levels showed different trends; in particular, GPx, which appears to play a key role in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, after an initial fall increases steadily with age. The enhancement of the levels of SOD and GPx could be related to protection against an increased production of reactive oxygen species in the aging process.

  1. Putative role of proteins involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species in the early response to gravitropic stimulation of poplar stems

    PubMed Central

    Wassim, Azri; Ichrak, Ben Rejeb; Saïda, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    Gravity perception and gravitropic response are essential for plant development. In herbaceous species it is widely accepted that one of the primary events in gravity perception involves the displacement of amyloplasts within specialized cells. However the signaling cascade leading to stem reorientation is not fully known especially in woody species in which primary and secondary growth occur. Several different second messengers and proteins have been suggested to be involved in signal transduction of gravitropism. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated as second messengers in several plant hormone responses. It has been shown that ROS are asymmetrically generated in roots by gravistimulation to regions of reduced growth. Proteins involved in detoxification of ROS and defense were identified by mass spectrometry: i.e., Thioredoxin h (Trx h), CuZn superoxide dismutase (CuZn SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX2), oxygen evolving enhancer 1 (OEE1), oxygen evolving enhancer 2 (OEE2), and ATP synthase. These differentially accumulated proteins that correspond to detoxification of ROS were analyzed at the mRNA level. The mRNA levels showed different expression patterns than those of the corresponding proteins, and revealed that transcription levels were not completely concomitant with translation. Our data showed that these proteins may play a role in the early response to gravitropic stimulation. PMID:23104108

  2. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun; Wang, Zhaohui; Zheng, Jingtang; Wu, Mingbo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO4(-) and OH, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO6(2-) can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant. PMID:26610099

  3. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Proteins in Biophoton Emission in Roots of Soybean Plants under Flooding Stress.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-05-01

    To understand the mechanism of biophoton emission, ROS and mitochondrial proteins were analyzed in soybean plants under flooding stress. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission were increased in the flooding stress samples when assayed in reaction mixes specific for antioxidant enzymes and reactive oxygen species; although the level of the hydroxyl radicals was increased at day 4 (2 days of flooding) compared to nonflooding at day 4, the emission of biophotons did not change. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the roots of soybean plants grown under flooding stress by using a Percoll gradient, and proteins were analyzed by a gel-free proteomic technique. Out of the 98 mitochondrial proteins that significantly changed abundance under flooding stress, 47 increased and 51 decreased at day 4. The mitochondrial enzymes fumarase, glutathione-S-transferase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase increased at day 4 in protein abundance and enzyme activity. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission decreased at day 4 by the assay of lipoxygenase under stress. Aconitase, acyl CoA oxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, and NADH ubiquinone dehydrogenase were up-regulated at the transcription level. These results indicate that oxidation and peroxide scavenging might lead to biophoton emission and oxidative damage in the roots of soybean plants under flooding stress. PMID:25806999

  4. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Mitochondrial Proteins in Biophoton Emission in Roots of Soybean Plants under Flooding Stress.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Abu Hena Mostafa; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2015-05-01

    To understand the mechanism of biophoton emission, ROS and mitochondrial proteins were analyzed in soybean plants under flooding stress. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission were increased in the flooding stress samples when assayed in reaction mixes specific for antioxidant enzymes and reactive oxygen species; although the level of the hydroxyl radicals was increased at day 4 (2 days of flooding) compared to nonflooding at day 4, the emission of biophotons did not change. Mitochondria were isolated and purified from the roots of soybean plants grown under flooding stress by using a Percoll gradient, and proteins were analyzed by a gel-free proteomic technique. Out of the 98 mitochondrial proteins that significantly changed abundance under flooding stress, 47 increased and 51 decreased at day 4. The mitochondrial enzymes fumarase, glutathione-S-transferase, and aldehyde dehydrogenase increased at day 4 in protein abundance and enzyme activity. Enzyme activity and biophoton emission decreased at day 4 by the assay of lipoxygenase under stress. Aconitase, acyl CoA oxidase, succinate dehydrogenase, and NADH ubiquinone dehydrogenase were up-regulated at the transcription level. These results indicate that oxidation and peroxide scavenging might lead to biophoton emission and oxidative damage in the roots of soybean plants under flooding stress.

  5. Salicylic acid determines differential senescence produced by two Turnip mosaic virus strains involving reactive oxygen species and early transcriptomic changes.

    PubMed

    Manacorda, Carlos Augusto; Mansilla, Carmen; Debat, Humberto Julio; Zavallo, Diego; Sánchez, Flora; Ponz, Fernando; Asurmendi, Sebastián

    2013-12-01

    Losses produced by virus diseases depend mostly on symptom severity. Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is one of the most damaging and widespread potyvirus infecting members of the family Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana. We used JPN1 and UK1 TuMV strains to characterize viral infections regarding symptom development, senescence progression, antioxidant response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, and transcriptional profiling. Both isolates, despite accumulating similar viral titers, induced different symptomatology and strong differences in oxidative status. Early differences in several senescence-associated genes linked to the ORE1 and ORS1 regulatory networks as well as persistent divergence in key ROS production and scavenging systems of the plant were detected. However, at a later stage, both strains induced nutrient competition, indicating that senescence rates are influenced by different mechanisms upon viral infections. Analyses of ORE1 and ORS1 levels in infected Brassica juncea plants showed a similar pattern, suggesting a conserved differential response to both strains in Brassicaceae spp. Transcriptional analysis of the ORE1 and ORS1 regulons showed similarities between salicylic acid (SA) response and the early induction triggered by UK1, the most severe strain. By means of SA-defective NahG transgenic plants, we found that differential senescence progression and ROS accumulation between strains rely on an intact SA pathway. PMID:23945002

  6. S1P3-mediated cardiac fibrosis in sphingosine kinase 1 transgenic mice involves reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Noriko; Ohkura, Sei-Ichiro; Takashima, Shin-Ichiro; Ohtani, Keisuke; Okamoto, Yasuo; Tanaka, Tamotsu; Hirano, Kaoru; Usui, Soichiro; Wang, Fei; Du, Wa; Yoshioka, Kazuaki; Banno, Yoshiko; Sasaki, Motoko; Ichi, Ikuyo; Okamura, Miwa; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Mizugishi, Kiyomi; Nakanuma, Yasuni; Ishii, Isao; Takamura, Masayuki; Kaneko, Shuichi; Kojo, Shosuke; Satouchi, Kiyoshi; Mitumori, Kunitoshi; Chun, Jerold; Takuwa, Yoh

    2010-01-01

    Aims Sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), its product sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and S1P receptor subtypes have been suggested to play protective roles for cardiomyocytes in animal models of ischaemic preconditioning and cardiac ischaemia/reperfusion injury. To get more insight into roles for SPHK1 in vivo, we have generated SPHK1-transgenic (TG) mice and analysed the cardiac phenotype. Methods and results SPHK1-TG mice overexpressed SPHK1 in diverse tissues, with a nearly 20-fold increase in enzymatic activity. The TG mice grew normally with normal blood chemistry, cell counts, heart rate, and blood pressure. Unexpectedly, TG mice with high but not low expression levels of SPHK1 developed progressive myocardial degeneration and fibrosis, with upregulation of embryonic genes, elevated RhoA and Rac1 activity, stimulation of Smad3 phosphorylation, and increased levels of oxidative stress markers. Treatment of juvenile TG mice with pitavastatin, an established inhibitor of the Rho family G proteins, or deletion of S1P3, a major myocardial S1P receptor subtype that couples to Rho GTPases and transactivates Smad signalling, both inhibited cardiac fibrosis with concomitant inhibition of SPHK1-dependent Smad-3 phosphorylation. In addition, the anti-oxidant N-2-mercaptopropyonylglycine, which reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS), also inhibited cardiac fibrosis. In in vivo ischaemia/reperfusion injury, the size of myocardial infarct was 30% decreased in SPHK1-TG mice compared with wild-type mice. Conclusion These results suggest that chronic activation of SPHK1-S1P signalling results in both pathological cardiac remodelling through ROS mediated by S1P3 and favourable cardioprotective effects. PMID:19755413

  7. Involvement of seminal leukocytes, reactive oxygen species, and sperm mitochondrial membrane potential in the DNA damage of the human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lobascio, A M; De Felici, M; Anibaldi, M; Greco, P; Minasi, M G; Greco, E

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) producing leukocytes in semen has been a standard component of the semen analysis, but its true significance remains still unknown. In this study, we have correlated the number of seminal leukocytes to various semen parameters. We found a negative correlation between the leukocyte number and sperm concentration (rs  = -0.22; p = 0.01) and motility (rs  = -0.20; p = 0.02). In contrast, a positive correlation between the number of leukocytes and both seminal ROS (rs  = 0.70, p < 0.001; n = 125) and the number of spermatozoa with DNA fragmentation (rs  = 0.43, p = 0.032; n = 25) was found. However, only a trend of positive correlation between ROS and the number of spermatozoa with TUNEL-detected DNA fragmentation was observed. Moreover, this latter was not correlated with loss of sperm mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) (10% vs 35%, rs  = 0.25, p = 0.08; n = 50). Overall these results indicate that the presence of high number of leukocytes in the ejaculate negatively affects key semen parameters, as sperm concentration and motility, associated with infertility conditions. Moreover, they suggest that leukocytes are the major source of the seminal ROS and cause of sperm DNA fragmentation. However, the absence of a clear correlation between ROS and sperm DNA fragmentation, and spermatozoa with damaged DNA and MMP loss, suggest that ROS produced by leukocytes might be not the only cause of DNA damage in spermatozoa and that intrinsic mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathways might not have a major impact on sperm DNA fragmentation.

  8. Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brominated Diphenyl Ether-47-induced Inflammatory Cytokine Release from Human Extravillous Trophoblasts in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hae-Ryung; Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24 h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  9. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in brominated diphenyl ether-47-induced inflammatory cytokine release from human extravillous trophoblasts in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hae-Ryung Kamau, Patricia W.; Loch-Caruso, Rita

    2014-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used flame retardant compounds. Brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-47 is one of the most prevalent PBDE congeners found in human breast milk, serum and placenta. Despite the presence of PBDEs in human placenta, effects of PBDEs on placental cell function are poorly understood. The present study investigated BDE-47-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and its role in BDE-47-stimulated proinflammatory cytokine release in a first trimester human extravillous trophoblast cell line, HTR-8/SVneo. Exposure of HTR-8/SVneo cells for 4 h to 20 μM BDE-47 increased ROS generation 1.7 fold as measured by the dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay. Likewise, superoxide anion production increased approximately 5 fold at 10 and 15 μM and 9 fold at 20 μM BDE-47 with a 1-h exposure, as measured by cytochrome c reduction. BDE-47 (10, 15 and 20 μM) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 47–64.5% at 4, 8 and 24 h as assessed with the fluorescent probe Rh123. Treatment with 15 and 20 μM BDE-47 stimulated cellular release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 after 12 and 24-h exposures: the greatest increases were a 35-fold increased mRNA expression at 12 h and a 12-fold increased protein concentration at 24 h for IL-6. Antioxidant treatments (deferoxamine mesylate, (±)α-tocopherol, or tempol) suppressed BDE-47-stimulated IL-6 release by 54.1%, 56.3% and 37.7%, respectively, implicating a role for ROS in the regulation of inflammatory pathways in HTR-8/SVneo cells. Solvent (DMSO) controls exhibited statistically significantly decreased responses compared with non-treated controls for IL-6 release and IL-8 mRNA expression, but these responses were not consistent across experiments and times. Nonetheless, it is possible that DMSO (used to dissolve BDE-47) may have attenuated the stimulatory actions of BDE-47 on cytokine responses. Because abnormal activation of proinflammatory responses can disrupt trophoblast functions

  10. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the induction of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine accumulation by beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide elicitors in potato tuber tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, F; Miyagawa, H; Ueno, T

    2001-01-01

    Treatment of potato tuber tissues with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide induces accumulation of (S)-N-p-coumaroyloctopamine (p-CO). We examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the signal transduction leading to p-CO accumulation. Induction was suppressed by an NADPH-oxidase inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium chloride, and oxygen radical scavengers. H2O2 was generated in the tuber tissue within a few minutes of treatment with beta-1,3-glucooligosaccharide. On the other hand, treatment with NO specific scavenger, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and serine protease inhibitor did not inhibit p-CO induction. Our findings suggest that ROS generated by the action of NADPH-oxidase play an important role in this system, while NO and serine protease are unlikely to be involved in this process. PMID:11371013

  11. Apoptosis Induction by the Total Flavonoids from Arachniodes exilis in HepG2 Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysfunction Involving MAPK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chaomei; Wei, Han; Yin, Changchang; Ruan, Jinlan

    2014-01-01

    Arachniodes exilis is used as a folk medicine in China and proved to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and sedative activities. In the present study, the antitumor effect of the total flavonoids of A. exilis (TFAE) against HepG2 cells was evaluated. The results showed that TFAE inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dosage- and time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry and Hoechst 33342 fluorescence staining results showed that TFAE could significantly increase the apoptosis ratio of HepG2 cells, which is accompanied with increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Western blotting indicated that TFAE downregulated the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, increased cytochrome c release, and activated the caspases-3 and -9. Further analysis showed that TFAE stimulated the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, treatment with NAC (reactive oxygen species scavenger) and MAPK-specific inhibitors (SP600125 and SB203580) could reverse the changes of these apoptotic-related proteins. These results suggested that TFAE possessed potential anticancer activity in HepG2 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction involving MAPK pathway. PMID:24976852

  12. The outer membrane localization of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae MsrA/B is involved in survival against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Eric P.; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Quick, J.; Judd, Ralph C.; Weissbach, Herbert; Etienne, Frantzy; Brot, Nathan; Seifert, H. Steven

    2002-01-01

    The PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae has been reported to be involved in the regulation of pilin gene transcription, but it also possesses significant homology to the peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase family of enzymes, specifically MsrA and MsrB from Escherichia coli. MsrA and MsrB in E. coli are able to reduce methionine sulfoxide residues in proteins to methionines. In addition, the gonococcal PilB protein encodes for both MsrA and MsrB activity associated with the repair of oxidative damage to proteins. In this work, we demonstrate that the PilB protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is not involved in pilus expression. Additionally, we show that wild-type N. gonorrhoeae produces two forms of this polypeptide, one of which contains a signal sequence and is secreted from the bacterial cytoplasm to the outer membrane; the other lacks a signal sequence and is cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that the secreted form of the PilB protein is involved in survival in the presence of oxidative damage. PMID:12096194

  13. Cytochromes P450 in benzene metabolism and involvement of their metabolites and reactive oxygen species in toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gut, I.; Nedelcheva, V.; Soucek, P.

    1996-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 was the most efficient CYP enzyme that oxidized benzene to soluble and covalently bound metabolites in rat and human liver microsomes. The covalent binding was due mostly to the formation of benzoquinone (BQ), the oxidation product of hydroquinone (HQ), and was inversely related to the formation of soluble metabolites. In rats, inhalation of benzene K mgAiter of air caused a rapid destruction of CYP281 previously induced by phenobarbital. The ability of benzene metabolites to destroy liver microsomal CYP in vitro decreased in the order BQ > HQ > catechol > phenol. The destruction was reversed by ascorbate and diminished by {alpha}-tocopherol, suggesting that HQ was not toxic, whereas BO and serniquinone radical (SO) caused the effect. In the presence of nicotinamide adenine clinucleoticle phosphate, reduced (NADPH) the microsomes did not oxidize HQ to BQ, while the formation of superoxide anion radical from both HQ and BQ was markedly quenched. Destruction of CYP in vitro caused by HQ or BQ was not mediated by hydroxyl radical formation or by lipid peroxiclation. On the contrary, HQ and BQ inhibited NADPH-mediated lipid peroxidation. Ascorbate induced high levels of hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation, which were differentially affected by quinones, indicating different mechanisms. Despite reducing the toxicity of HQ and BQ, ascorbate appeared to induce its own toxicity, reflected in high levels of lipid peroxiclation. Iron redox cycling played a significant role in the NADPH-induced hydroxyl radical formation but not in that caused by ascorbate; however, lipid peroxiclation induced by NADPH or ascorbate was suppressed by ethylenediaminetraacetate, indicating a crucial role of iron. Thus, the data indicate that the quinones destroyed CYP directly and not via oxygen activation or lipid peroxiclation. 35 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Cytochromes P450 in benzene metabolism and involvement of their metabolites and reactive oxygen species in toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gut, I; Nedelcheva, V; Soucek, P; Stopka, P; Tichavská, B

    1996-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 was the most efficient CYP enzyme that oxidized benzene to soluble and covalently bound metabolites in rat and human liver microsomes. The covalent binding was due mostly to the formation of benzoquinone (BQ), the oxidation product of hydroquinone (HQ), and was inversely related to the formation of soluble metabolites. In rats, inhalation of benzene (4 mg/liter of air) caused a rapid destruction of CYP2B1 previously induced by phenobarbital. The ability of benzene metabolites to destroy liver microsomal CYP in vitro decreased in the order BQ > HQ > catechol > phenol. The destruction was reversed by ascorbate and diminished by alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that HQ was not toxic, whereas BQ and semiquinone radical (SQ) caused the effect. In the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (NADPH) the microsomes did not oxidize HQ to BQ, while the formation of superoxide anion radical from both HQ and BQ was markedly quenched. Destruction of CYP in vitro caused by HQ or BQ was not mediated by hydroxyl radical formation or by lipid peroxidation. On the contrary, HQ and BQ inhibited NADPH-mediated lipid peroxidation. Ascorbate induced high levels of hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation, which were differentially affected by quinones, indicating different mechanisms. Despite reducing the toxicity of HQ and BQ, ascorbate appeared to induce its own toxicity, reflected in high levels of lipid peroxidation. Iron redox cycling played a significant role in the NADPH-induced hydroxyl radical formation but not in that caused by ascorbate; however, lipid peroxidation induced by NADPH or ascorbate was suppressed by ethylenediaminetraacetate, indicating a crucial role of iron. Thus, the data indicate that the quinones destroyed CYP directly and not via oxygen activation or lipid peroxidation.

  15. Cytochromes P450 in benzene metabolism and involvement of their metabolites and reactive oxygen species in toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Gut, I; Nedelcheva, V; Soucek, P; Stopka, P; Tichavská, B

    1996-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1 was the most efficient CYP enzyme that oxidized benzene to soluble and covalently bound metabolites in rat and human liver microsomes. The covalent binding was due mostly to the formation of benzoquinone (BQ), the oxidation product of hydroquinone (HQ), and was inversely related to the formation of soluble metabolites. In rats, inhalation of benzene (4 mg/liter of air) caused a rapid destruction of CYP2B1 previously induced by phenobarbital. The ability of benzene metabolites to destroy liver microsomal CYP in vitro decreased in the order BQ > HQ > catechol > phenol. The destruction was reversed by ascorbate and diminished by alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that HQ was not toxic, whereas BQ and semiquinone radical (SQ) caused the effect. In the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (NADPH) the microsomes did not oxidize HQ to BQ, while the formation of superoxide anion radical from both HQ and BQ was markedly quenched. Destruction of CYP in vitro caused by HQ or BQ was not mediated by hydroxyl radical formation or by lipid peroxidation. On the contrary, HQ and BQ inhibited NADPH-mediated lipid peroxidation. Ascorbate induced high levels of hydroxyl radical formation and lipid peroxidation, which were differentially affected by quinones, indicating different mechanisms. Despite reducing the toxicity of HQ and BQ, ascorbate appeared to induce its own toxicity, reflected in high levels of lipid peroxidation. Iron redox cycling played a significant role in the NADPH-induced hydroxyl radical formation but not in that caused by ascorbate; however, lipid peroxidation induced by NADPH or ascorbate was suppressed by ethylenediaminetraacetate, indicating a crucial role of iron. Thus, the data indicate that the quinones destroyed CYP directly and not via oxygen activation or lipid peroxidation. PMID:9118895

  16. Additional Evidence of the Trypanocidal Action of (−)-Elatol on Amastigote Forms through the Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Desoti, Vânia Cristina; Lazarin-Bidóia, Danielle; Sudatti, Daniela Bueno; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Ueda-Nakamura, Tania; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Oliveira Silva, Sueli

    2014-01-01

    Chagas’ disease, a vector-transmitted infectious disease, is caused by the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Drugs that are currently available for the treatment of this disease are unsatisfactory, making the search for new chemotherapeutic agents a priority. We recently described the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol, extracted from the macroalga Laurencia dendroidea. However, nothing has been described about the mechanism of action of this compound on amastigotes that are involved in the chronic phase of Chagas’ disease. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of (−)-elatol on the formation of superoxide anions (O2•−), DNA fragmentation, and autophagy in amastigotes of T. cruzi to elucidate the possible mechanism of the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol. Treatment of the amastigotes with (−)-elatol increased the formation of O2•− at all concentrations of (−)-elatol assayed compared with untreated parasites. Increased fluorescence was observed in parasites treated with (−)-elatol, indicating DNA fragmentation and the formation of autophagic compartments. The results suggest that the trypanocidal action of (−)-elatol might involve the induction of the autophagic and apoptotic death pathways triggered by an imbalance of the parasite’s redox metabolism. PMID:25257785

  17. Oral Efficacy of Apigenin against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy as a Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca-Silva, Fernanda; Inacio, Job D. F.; Canto-Cavalheiro, Marilene M.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Almeida-Amaral, Elmo E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. The lack of affordable therapy has necessitated the urgent development of new drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Natural products are a major source for the discovery of new and selective molecules for neglected diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on Leishmania amazonensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of action against intracellular amastigotes of L. amazonensis. Methodology/Principal Finding Apigenin reduced the infection index in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 4.3 μM and a selectivity index of 18.2. Apigenin induced ROS production in the L. amazonensis-infected macrophage, and the effects were reversed by NAC and GSH. Additionally, apigenin induced an increase in the number of macrophages autophagosomes after the infection, surrounding the parasitophorous vacuole, suggestive of the involvement of host autophagy probably due to ROS generation induced by apigenin. Furthermore, apigenin treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers. Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, our study suggests that apigenin exhibits leishmanicidal effects against L. amazonensis-infected macrophages. ROS production, as part of the mechanism of action, could occur through the increase in host autophagy and thereby promoting parasite death. Furthermore, our data suggest that apigenin is effective in the treatment of L. amazonensis-infected BALB/c mice by oral administration, without altering serological toxicity markers. The selective in vitro activity of apigenin, together with excellent theoretical predictions of oral availability, clear decreases in parasite load and lesion size, and no observed compromises to the overall health

  18. Catalytic therapy of cancer by ascorbic acid involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Shamim, U; Bhatt, S H; Azmi, A S

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic therapy is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through administration of ascorbate/medicinal herbal extracts and copper. It is known that antioxidants such as ascorbate also exhibit prooxidant activity in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Based on our work and that in the literature, in this review we propose a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of ascorbate against cancer cells. It involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of ROS leading to oxidative DNA breakage. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and the Comet assay, we have shown that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative breakage in cellular DNA. Such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine (a Cu(I) sequestering agent) and scavengers of ROS indicating that the cellular DNA breakage involves the generation of Cu(I) and formation of ROS. Similar results are also obtained with plant polyphenol antioxidants that are important constituents of medicinal herbal extracts. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and ascorbate/plant polyphenols to generate ROS. In this review we cite evidence to indicate that in catalytic therapy cytotoxic action against cancer cells involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions.

  19. Endogenous abscisic acid is involved in methyl jasmonate-induced reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production but not in cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxiu; Hossain, Mohammad Anowar; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Mori, Izumi C; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-09-01

    We recently demonstrated that endogenous abscisic acid (ABA) is involved in methyl jasmonate (MeJA)-induced stomatal closure in Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous ABA is involved in MeJA-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production and cytosolic alkalization in guard cells using an ABA-deficient Arabidopsis mutant, aba2-2, and an inhibitor of ABA biosynthesis, fluridon (FLU). The aba2-2 mutation impaired MeJA-induced ROS and NO production. FLU inhibited MeJA-induced ROS production in wild-type guard cells. Pretreatment with 0.1 μM ABA, which does not induce stomatal closure in the wild type, complemented the insensitivity to MeJA of the aba2-2 mutant. However, MeJA induced cytosolic alkalization in both wild-type and aba2-2 guard cells. These results suggest that endogenous ABA is involved in MeJA-induced ROS and NO production but not in MeJA-induced cytosolic alkalization in Arabidopsis guard cells.

  20. Nicotine-induced contraction in the rat coronary artery: possible involvement of the endothelium, reactive oxygen species and COX-1 metabolites.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, K; Shirahase, H; Nakamura, S; Tarumi, T; Koshino, Y; Wang, A M; Nishihashi, T; Shimizu, Y

    2001-10-01

    Nicotine caused a contraction of the rat coronary artery in the presence of Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and arachidonic acid, and did not in the absence of these agents. The present experiments were undertaken to pharmacologically characterize the nicotine-induced contraction in ring preparations of the rat coronary artery. The contraction was abolished by chemical removal of endothelium saponin. Oxygen radical scavengers, superoxide dismutase and catalase, significantly attenuated the contraction. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) inhibitors (flurbiprofen, ketoprofen and ketrolack) attenuated the nicotine-induced contraction in a concentration-dependent manner, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors at high concentrations (nimesulide and NS-389) slightly attenuated the contraction. A TXA2 synthetase inhibitor (OKY-046) attenuated the contraction to a small extent only at high concentrations. A TXA2 receptor antagonist (S-1452) attenuated the contraction in a concentration-dependent manner. A nicotinic receptor antagonist (hexamethonium) attenuated the contraction in part and an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist (prazosin) nearly abolished the contraction. From these results, it was suggested that the contraction induced by nicotine in the rat coronary artery in the presence of L-NAME and arachidonic acid is endothelium dependent, and involves reactive oxygen species and endothelial COX-1 metabolites of arachidonic acid. Part of the contraction is probably due to release of norepinephrine. PMID:11811354

  1. Ionizing radiation accelerates Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fission, which involves delayed mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production in normal human fibroblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report first time that ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial dynamic changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced mitochondrial fission was caused by Drp1 localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found that radiation causes delayed ROS from mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Down regulation of Drp1 rescued mitochondrial dysfunction after radiation exposure. -- Abstract: Ionizing radiation is known to increase intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through mitochondrial dysfunction. Although it has been as a basis of radiation-induced genetic instability, the mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction remains unclear. Here we studied the dynamics of mitochondrial structure in normal human fibroblast like cells exposed to ionizing radiation. Delayed mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-} production was peaked 3 days after irradiation, which was coupled with accelerated mitochondrial fission. We found that radiation exposure accumulated dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to mitochondria. Knocking down of Drp1 expression prevented radiation induced acceleration of mitochondrial fission. Furthermore, knockdown of Drp1 significantly suppressed delayed production of mitochondrial O{sub 2}{sup {center_dot}-}. Since the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which was induced by radiation was prevented in cells knocking down of Drp1 expression, indicating that the excessive mitochondrial fission was involved in delayed mitochondrial dysfunction after irradiation.

  2. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in stimuli-induced shedding of heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor.

    PubMed

    Umata, Toshiyuki

    2014-06-01

    Heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a critical growth factor for a number of physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing, atherosclerosis and cancer proliferation. HB-EGF is synthesized as a membrane form (proHB-EGF), and is shedded at the cell surface to yield soluble HB-EGF, resulting in making it active. In this study, the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in stimuli-induced shedding of HB-EGF was investigated using monkey kidney Vero cells overexpressing HB-EGF (Vero-H cells). 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) as a ligand for seventransmembrane G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) and sorbitol as stress induced shedding of HB-EGF mediated protein kinase C (PKC)-δ, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and p38MAPK, respectively. These stimuli-induced sheddings of HB-EGF were inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), suggesting the involvement of ROS. As specific inhibitors of these protein kinases inhibited the shedding of HB-EGF, these signaling pathways seem to be independent, respectively. In contrast, γ-ray irradiation did not induce shedding although it did increase intracellular ROS levels. Taken together, these results suggest that the synergistic generation of ROS and the activation of protein kinase are required to promote stimuli-induced shedding of HB-EGF. PMID:24930874

  3. III-10, a newly synthesized flavonoid, induces cell apoptosis with the involvement of reactive oxygen species-mitochondria pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qinsheng; Yin, Qian; Zhao, Yikai; Guo, Ruichen; Li, Zhiyu; Ma, Shiping; Lu, Na

    2015-10-01

    Study of the mechanisms of apoptosis in tumor cells is an important field of tumor therapy and cancer molecular biology. We recently established that III-10, a new flavonoid with a pyrrolidinyl and a benzyl group substitution, exerted its anti-tumor effect via inducing differentiation of human U937 leukemia cells. In this study, we demonstrated that III-10 induced cell apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The activation of caspase-3, caspase-9, and the increased expression ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 were detected in III-10-induced apoptosis. Z-VAD-FMK, a pan-caspase inhibitor, partly attenuated the apoptotic induction of III-10 on both HepG2 and BEL-7402 cells. Furthermore, the increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and the reduction of mitochondria ΔΨm were also observed in BEL-7402 and HepG2 cells after the treatment of III-10. Pretreatment with NAC, a reactive oxygen species production inhibitor, partly attenuated the apoptosis induced by III-10 via blocking the reactive oxygen species generation. Our data also showed that III-10 induced the release of cytochrome c and AIF to cytosol followed after the reactive oxygen species accumulation. Moreover, the GSH levels and ATP generation were both inhibited after III-10 treatment. Besides, the MAPK, the downstream effect of reactive oxygen species accumulation including JNK could be activated by III-10, as well as the inactivation of ERK. Collectively, the generation of reactive oxygen species might play an crucial role in III-10-induced mitochondrial apoptosis pathway, provided more stubborn evidence for III-10 as a potent anticancer therapeutic candidate. PMID:26164795

  4. The mechanisms involved in seed dormancy alleviation by hydrogen cyanide unravel the role of reactive oxygen species as key factors of cellular signaling during germination.

    PubMed

    Oracz, Krystyna; El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Kranner, Ilse; Bogatek, Renata; Corbineau, Françoise; Bailly, Christophe

    2009-05-01

    The physiological dormancy of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) embryos can be overcome during dry storage (after-ripening) or by applying exogenous ethylene or hydrogen cyanide (HCN) during imbibition. The aim of this work was to provide a comprehensive model, based on oxidative signaling by reactive oxygen species (ROS), for explaining the cellular mode of action of HCN in dormancy alleviation. Beneficial HCN effect on germination of dormant embryos is associated with a marked increase in hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion generation in the embryonic axes. It is mimicked by the ROS-generating compounds methylviologen and menadione but suppressed by ROS scavengers. This increase results from an inhibition of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and also involves activation of NADPH oxidase. However, it is not related to lipid reserve degradation or gluconeogenesis and not associated with marked changes in the cellular redox status controlled by the glutathione/glutathione disulfide couple. The expression of genes related to ROS production (NADPHox, POX, AO1, and AO2) and signaling (MAPK6, Ser/ThrPK, CaM, and PTP) is differentially affected by dormancy alleviation either during after-ripening or by HCN treatment, and the effect of cyanide on gene expression is likely to be mediated by ROS. It is also demonstrated that HCN and ROS both activate similarly ERF1, a component of the ethylene signaling pathway. We propose that ROS play a key role in the control of sunflower seed germination and are second messengers of cyanide in seed dormancy release.

  5. Picroside Ⅱ inhibits hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by ameliorating mitochondrial function through a mechanism involving a decrease in reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Zhe; Yu, Shu-Yi; Mo, Dan; Tang, Xiu-Neng; Shao, Qing-Rui

    2015-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)‑induced mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. Picroside Ⅱ, isolated from Picrorhiza scrophulariiflora Pennell (Scrophulariaceae), has been reported to protect cardiomyocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R)‑induced apoptosis, but the exact mechanism is not fully clear. The aim of the present study was to explore the protective effects of picroside Ⅱ on H/R‑induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the underlying mechanism. In the H9c2 rat cardiomyocyte cell line, picroside Ⅱ (100 µg/ml) was added for 48 h prior to H/R. The results showed that picroside Ⅱ markedly inhibited H/R‑induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis. In addition, picroside Ⅱ was also able to decrease the opening degree of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), increase the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibit cytochrome c release from mitochondria to cytosol and downregulate caspase‑3 expression and activity concomitantly with the decreased ROS production. These results suggested that picroside Ⅱ inhibited H/R‑induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis by ameliorating mitochondrial function through a mechanism involving a decrease in ROS production.

  6. Cadmium-Induced Hydrogen Sulfide Synthesis Is Involved in Cadmium Tolerance in Medicago sativa by Reestablishment of Reduced (Homo)glutathione and Reactive Oxygen Species Homeostases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Weiti; Chen, Huiping; Zhu, Kaikai; Jin, Qijiang; Xie, Yanjie; Cui, Jin; Xia, Yan; Zhang, Jing; Shen, Wenbiao

    2014-01-01

    Until now, physiological mechanisms and downstream targets responsible for the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mediated by endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) have been elusive. To address this gap, a combination of pharmacological, histochemical, biochemical and molecular approaches was applied. The perturbation of reduced (homo)glutathione homeostasis and increased H2S production as well as the activation of two H2S-synthetic enzymes activities, including L-cysteine desulfhydrase (LCD) and D-cysteine desulfhydrase (DCD), in alfalfa seedling roots were early responses to the exposure of Cd. The application of H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), not only mimicked intracellular H2S production triggered by Cd, but also alleviated Cd toxicity in a H2S-dependent fashion. By contrast, the inhibition of H2S production caused by the application of its synthetic inhibitor blocked NaHS-induced Cd tolerance, and destroyed reduced (homo)glutathione and reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostases. Above mentioned inhibitory responses were further rescued by exogenously applied glutathione (GSH). Meanwhile, NaHS responses were sensitive to a (homo)glutathione synthetic inhibitor, but reversed by the cotreatment with GSH. The possible involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling in NaHS responses was also suggested. In summary, LCD/DCD-mediated H2S might be an important signaling molecule in the enhancement of Cd toxicity in alfalfa seedlings mainly by governing reduced (homo)glutathione and ROS homeostases. PMID:25275379

  7. Caffeic acid improves cell viability and protects against DNA damage: involvement of reactive oxygen species and extracellular signal-regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Chen, L.J.; Jiang, F.; Yang, Y.; Wang, X.X.; Zhang, Z.; Li, Z.; Li, L.

    2015-01-01

    Hormesis is an adaptive response to a variety of oxidative stresses that renders cells resistant to harmful doses of stressing agents. Caffeic acid (CaA) is an important antioxidant that has protective effects against DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether CaA-induced protection is a hormetic effect remains unknown, as is the molecular mechanism that is involved. We found that a low concentration (10 μM) of CaA increased human liver L-02 cell viability, attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated decreases in cell viability, and decreased the extent of H2O2-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). In L-02 cells exposed to H2O2, CaA treatment reduced ROS levels, which might have played a protective role. CaA also activated the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal pathway in a time-dependent manner. Inhibition of ERK by its inhibitor U0126 or by its specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) blocked the CaA-induced improvement in cell viability and the protective effects against H2O2-mediated DNA damage. This study adds to the understanding of the antioxidant effects of CaA by identifying a novel molecular mechanism of enhanced cell viability and protection against DNA damage. PMID:25831202

  8. Involvement of Calcium-Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species in Inductive GRP78 Expression by Geldanamycin in 9L Rat Brain Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fang-Chun; Shyu, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Lai, Yiu-Kay

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with geldanamycin (GA) leads to an increase in [Ca2+]c and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in rat brain tumor 9L RBT cells. GA-exerted calcium signaling was blocked by BAPTA/AM and EGTA. The effect of GA on [Ca2+]c was significantly reduced in the presence of thapsigargin (TG) and ruthenium red (RR). GA-induced GRP78 expression is significantly decreased in the presence of BAPTA/AM, EGTA and RR, suggesting that the calcium influx from the extracellular space and intracellular calcium store oscillations are contributed to by the calcium mobilization and GRP78 expression induced by GA. The induced GRP78 expression is sensitive to added U73122 and Ro-31-8425, pinpointing the involvement of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) in GA-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC), BAPTA/AM, EGTA and H7 also have significant inhibitory effects on ROS generation. Finally, neither H7 nor NAC was able to affect the calcium response elicited by GA. Our results suggest that the causal signaling cascade during GA-inducted GRP78 expression occurs via a pathway that connects PLC to cytoplasmic calcium increase, PKC activation and, then, finally, ROS generation. Our data provides new insights into the influence of GA on ER stress response in 9L RBT cells. PMID:24051401

  9. Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanism in lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Song-Ze; Yang, Yu-Xiu; Li, Xiu-Ling; Michelli-Rivera, Audrey; Han, Shuang-Yin; Wang, Lei; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Xin; Lu, Jian; Yin, Yuan-Qin; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, Andrew J.

    2013-05-15

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is an important human carcinogen associated with pulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Exposure to Cr(VI) induces DNA damage, cell morphological change and malignant transformation in human lung epithelial cells. Despite extensive studies, the molecular mechanisms remain elusive, it is also not known if Cr(VI)-induced transformation might accompany with invasive properties to facilitate metastasis. We aimed to study Cr(VI)-induced epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells. The results showed that Cr(VI) at low doses represses E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression, enhances mesenchymal marker vimentin expression and transforms the epithelial cell into fibroblastoid morphology. Cr(VI) also increases cell invasion and promotes colony formation. Further studies indicated that Cr(VI) uses multiple mechanisms to repress E-cadherin expression, including activation of E-cadherin repressors such as Slug, ZEB1, KLF8 and enhancement the binding of HDAC1 in E-cadherin gene promoter, but DNA methylation is not responsible for the loss of E-cadherin. Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced E-cadherin and vimentin protein expression, attenuates cell invasion in matrigel and colony formation on soft agar. These results demonstrate that exposure to a common human carcinogen, Cr(VI), induces EMT and invasion during oncogenic transformation in lung epithelial cells and implicate in cancer metastasis and prevention. - Graphical abstract: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition during oncogenic transformation induced by hexavalent chromium involves reactive oxygen species-dependent mechanisms in lung epithelial cells. - Highlights: • We study if Cr(VI) might induce EMT and invasion in epithelial cells. • Cr(VI) induces EMT by altering E-cadherin and vimentin expression. • It also increases cell invasion and promotes oncogenic transformation. • Catalase reduces Cr(VI)-induced EMT, invasion and

  10. Secretion of S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12 by Neutrophils Involves Reactive Oxygen Species and Potassium Efflux

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Mélanie R.; Chapeton-Montes, Julie Andrea; Posvandzic, Alma; Pagé, Nathalie; Gilbert, Caroline; Tessier, Philippe A.

    2015-01-01

    S100A8/A9 (calprotectin) and S100A12 proinflammatory mediators are found at inflammatory sites and in the serum of patients with inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. These cytoplasmic proteins are secreted by neutrophils at sites of inflammation via alternative secretion pathways of which little is known. This study examined the nature of the stimuli leading to S100A8/A9 and S100A12 secretion as well as the mechanism involved in this alternative secretion pathway. Chemotactic agents, cytokines, and particulate molecules were used to stimulate human neutrophils. MSU crystals, PMA, and H2O2 induced the release of S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12 homodimers, as well as S100A8/A9 heterodimer. High concentrations of S100A8/A9 and S100A12 were secreted in response to nanoparticles like MSU, silica, TiO2, fullerene, and single-wall carbon nanotubes as well as in response to microbe-derived molecules, such as zymosan or HKCA. However, neutrophils exposed to the chemotactic factors fMLP failed to secrete S100A8/A9 or S100A12. Secretion of S100A8/A9 was dependent on the production of reactive oxygen species and required K+ exchanges through the ATP-sensitive K+ channel. Altogether, these findings suggest that S100A12 and S100A8/A9 are secreted independently either via distinct mechanisms of secretion or following the activation of different signal transduction pathways. PMID:27057553

  11. Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells into Fat Involves Reactive Oxygen Species and Forkhead Box O1 Mediated Upregulation of Antioxidant Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Masayoshi; Dusting, Gregory J.; Peshavariya, Hitesh; Jiang, Fan; Hsiao, Sarah Tzu-Feng; Chan, Elsa C.

    2013-01-01

    Both reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Forkhead box O (FOXO) family transcription factors are involved in the regulation of adipogenic differentiation of preadipocytes and stem cells. While FOXO has a pivotal role in maintaining cellular redox homeostasis, the interactions between ROS and FOXO during adipogenesis are not clear. Here we examined how ROS and FOXO regulate adipogenesis in human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC). The identity of isolated cells was confirmed by their surface marker expression pattern typical for human mesenchymal stem cells (positive for CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105, negative for CD45 and CD31). Using a standard adipogenic cocktail consisting of insulin, dexamethasone, indomethacin, and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylanxthine (IDII), adipogenesis was induced in hASC, which was accompanied by ROS generation. Scavenging ROS production with N-acetyl-L-cysteine or EUK-8, a catalytic mimetic of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, inhibited IDII-induced adipogenesis. We then mimicked IDII-induced oxidative stress through a lentiviral overexpression of Nox4 and an exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide in hASC and both manipulations significantly enhanced adipogenesis without changing the adipogenic differentiation rate. These data suggest that ROS promoted lipid accumulation in hASC undergoing adipogenesis. Antioxidant enzymes, including SOD2, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were upregulated by IDII during adipogenesis, and these effects were blunted by FOXO1 silencing, which also suppressed significantly IDII-induced adipogenesis. Our findings demonstrated a balance of ROS generation and endogenous antioxidants in cells undergoing adipogenesis. Approaches targeting ROS and/or FOXO1 in adipocytes may bring new strategies to prevent and treat obesity and metabolic syndrome. PMID:23025577

  12. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species. PMID:27423764

  13. Gardenin B-induced cell death in human leukemia cells involves multiple caspases but is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, Javier; Saavedra, Ester; Del Rosario, Henoc; Perdomo, Juan; Loro, Juan F; Cifuente, Diego A; Tonn, Carlos E; García, Celina; Quintana, José; Estévez, Francisco

    2016-08-25

    Flavonoids have attracted great interest due to their possible anticancer activities. Here we investigated the antiproliferative activity of the flavonoids isolated from Baccharis scandens against human leukemia cell lines and found that the methoxyflavonoid gardenin B was the most cytotoxic compound against HL-60 and U-937 cells, showing IC50 values between 1.6 and 3.0 μM, but had no significant cytotoxic effects against quiescent or proliferating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These effects on viability were accompanied by the concentration- and time-dependent appearance of apoptosis as evidenced by DNA fragmentation, formation of apoptotic bodies and a sub-G1 ratio increase. Comparative studies with the best-studied bioflavonoid quercetin indicate that gardenin B is a more cytotoxic and more apoptotic inducer than quercetin. Cell death induced by gardenin B was associated with: (i) a significant induction of caspase-2, -3, -8 and -9 activities; (ii) cleavage of the initiator caspases (caspase-2, -8 and -9), of the executioner caspase-3, and of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase; and (iii) a concentration-dependent reactive oxygen species generation. In conclusion, apoptosis induced by gardenin B is associated with activation of both the extrinsic and the intrinsic apoptotic pathways of cell death and occurs through a mechanism that is independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species.

  14. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES: IMPACT ON SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Ji, Li Li; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that contracting muscles produce both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Although the sources of oxidant production during exercise continue to be debated, growing evidence suggests that mitochondria are not the dominant source. Regardless of the sources of oxidants in contracting muscles, intense and prolonged exercise can result in oxidative damage to both proteins and lipids in the contracting myocytes. Further, oxidants regulate numerous cell signaling pathways and modulate the expression of many genes. This oxidant-mediated change in gene expression involves changes at transcriptional, mRNA stability, and signal transduction levels. Furthermore, numerous products associated with oxidant-modulated genes have been identified and include antioxidant enzymes, stress proteins, and mitochondrial electron transport proteins. Interestingly, low and physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required for normal force production in skeletal muscle, but high levels of reactive oxygen species result in contractile dysfunction and fatigue. Ongoing research continues to explore the redox-sensitive targets in muscle that are responsible for both redox-regulation of muscle adaptation and oxidant-mediated muscle fatigue. PMID:23737208

  15. Protective effects of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside in the MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38 and mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Wang, Songhai; Tian, Jiyu; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Junjie; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianzong

    2015-11-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Oxidative stress-induced neuron loss is thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of PD. Previous work from our group suggests that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an active component extracted from a traditional Chinese herb, Polygonum multiflorum thunb, can attenuate 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridium-induced apoptosis in the neuronal cell line PC12, by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation and modulating c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation. Here, we investigated the protective effects of TSG against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropypridine (MPTP)-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in mice and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that MPTP-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells and reactive oxygen species generation were prevented by TSG in a dose-dependent manner. The reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine could also mitigate reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, JNK and P38 were activated by MPTP, but extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases phosphorylation did not change after MPTP treatment. TSG at different doses blocked the activation of JNK and P38. The protective effect of TSG was also associated with downregulation of the bax/bcl-2 ratio, reversed the release of cytochrome c and smac, and inhibited the activation of caspase-3, -6, and -9 induced by MPTP. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that the protective effects of TSG in the MPTP-induced mouse model of PD are involved, at least in part, in controlling reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38, and mitochondrial pathways.

  16. Protective effects of 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside in the MPTP-induced mouse model of Parkinson's disease: Involvement of reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38 and mitochondrial pathways.

    PubMed

    He, Hong; Wang, Songhai; Tian, Jiyu; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Junjie; Tang, Haifeng; Zhang, Xiaojun; Chen, Jianzong

    2015-11-15

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the selective death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Oxidative stress-induced neuron loss is thought to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of PD. Previous work from our group suggests that 2,3,5,4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG), an active component extracted from a traditional Chinese herb, Polygonum multiflorum thunb, can attenuate 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridium-induced apoptosis in the neuronal cell line PC12, by inhibiting reactive oxygen species generation and modulating c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) activation. Here, we investigated the protective effects of TSG against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropypridine (MPTP)-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells in mice and the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that MPTP-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase positive cells and reactive oxygen species generation were prevented by TSG in a dose-dependent manner. The reactive oxygen species scavenger N-acetylcysteine could also mitigate reactive oxygen species generation. Moreover, JNK and P38 were activated by MPTP, but extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases phosphorylation did not change after MPTP treatment. TSG at different doses blocked the activation of JNK and P38. The protective effect of TSG was also associated with downregulation of the bax/bcl-2 ratio, reversed the release of cytochrome c and smac, and inhibited the activation of caspase-3, -6, and -9 induced by MPTP. In conclusion, our studies demonstrated that the protective effects of TSG in the MPTP-induced mouse model of PD are involved, at least in part, in controlling reactive oxygen species-mediated JNK, P38, and mitochondrial pathways. PMID:26477638

  17. Involvement of mitochondrial and reactive oxygen species in the sonodynamic toxicity of chlorin e6 in human leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yixiang; Wang, Pan; Wang, Xiaobing; Su, Xiaomin; Liu, Quanhong

    2014-05-01

    It is well accepted that sonodynamic therapy (SDT) exerts cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activity in many human tumors through the induction of cell apoptosis. The aim of the work described here was to study the effect of chlorin e6 (Ce6)-mediated SDT on human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells. Our results indicate that Ce6-mediated SDT can suppress the viability of K562 cells. SDT caused apoptosis as analyzed by annexin V-phycoerythrin/7-amino-actinomycin D staining as well as cleavage of caspase 3 and the polypeptide poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. After SDT exposure, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, translocation of Bax from cytoplasm to mitochondria and activation of caspase 9 indicated that the mitochondrial-related apoptotic pathway might be activated. This process was accompanied by rapid generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Scavenging of ROS significantly blocked caspase-3 expression and the killing effect of SDT on K562 cells. Stress-activated protein kinases c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase were activated after SDT treatment. Together, these findings indicate that Ce6-mediated SDT triggers mitochondria- and caspase-dependent apoptosis; oxidative injury may play a vital role in apoptotic signaling cascades. PMID:24462156

  18. Protection of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by β-hydroxybutyrate involves the preservation of energy levels and decreased production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Montiel, Teresa; Soto-Tinoco, Eva; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Massieu, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in brain but in certain circumstances such as prolonged fasting and the suckling period alternative substrates can be used such as the ketone bodies (KB), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetoacetate. It has been shown that KB prevent neuronal death induced during energy limiting conditions and excitotoxicity. The protective effect of KB has been mainly attributed to the improvement of mitochondrial function. In the present study, we have investigated the protective effect of D-BHB against neuronal death induced by severe noncoma hypoglycemia in the rat in vivo and by glucose deprivation (GD) in cortical cultures. Results show that systemic administration of D-BHB reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in distinct cortical areas and subregions of the hippocampus and efficiently prevents neuronal death in the cortex of hypoglycemic animals. In vitro results show that D-BHB stimulates ATP production and reduces ROS levels, while the nonphysiologic isomer of BHB, L-BHB, has no effect on energy production but reduces ROS levels. Data suggest that protection by BHB, not only results from its metabolic action but is also related to its capability to reduce ROS, rendering this KB as a suitable candidate for the treatment of ischemic and traumatic injury. PMID:25649993

  19. Protection of hypoglycemia-induced neuronal death by β-hydroxybutyrate involves the preservation of energy levels and decreased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Julio-Amilpas, Alberto; Montiel, Teresa; Soto-Tinoco, Eva; Gerónimo-Olvera, Cristian; Massieu, Lourdes

    2015-05-01

    Glucose is the main energy substrate in brain but in certain circumstances such as prolonged fasting and the suckling period alternative substrates can be used such as the ketone bodies (KB), beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and acetoacetate. It has been shown that KB prevent neuronal death induced during energy limiting conditions and excitotoxicity. The protective effect of KB has been mainly attributed to the improvement of mitochondrial function. In the present study, we have investigated the protective effect of D-BHB against neuronal death induced by severe noncoma hypoglycemia in the rat in vivo and by glucose deprivation (GD) in cortical cultures. Results show that systemic administration of D-BHB reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in distinct cortical areas and subregions of the hippocampus and efficiently prevents neuronal death in the cortex of hypoglycemic animals. In vitro results show that D-BHB stimulates ATP production and reduces ROS levels, while the nonphysiologic isomer of BHB, L-BHB, has no effect on energy production but reduces ROS levels. Data suggest that protection by BHB, not only results from its metabolic action but is also related to its capability to reduce ROS, rendering this KB as a suitable candidate for the treatment of ischemic and traumatic injury.

  20. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 regulates the migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via pathways involving reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong-Rong; Lv, Ya-Su; Tang, Yue-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Xiao-Xiao; Xie, Shang-Zhi; Cai, Ying; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2016-04-26

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2) has been identified as a critical gene in tumor metastasis. Research has suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as signaling molecules in cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the mechanisms linking eIF5A2 and ROS are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effects of ROS on the eIF5A2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration in six hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Western hybridization, siRNA transfection, transwell migration assays, wound-healing assays, and immunofluorescence analysis were used. The protein levels of eIF5A2 in tumor and adjacent tissue samples from 90 HCC patients with detailed clinical, pathological, and clinical follow-up data were evaluated. Overexpression of eIF5A2 was found in cancerous tissues compared with adjacent tissues. We found that eIF5A2 overexpression in HCC was associated with reduced overall survival. Knockdown of eIF5A2 and intracellular reduction of ROS significantly suppressed the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells. Interestingly, N1-guanyl-1, 7-diaminoheptane (GC7) suppressed the intracellular ROS levels. After blocking the EMT, administration of GC7 or N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not reduce cell migration further. Based on the experimental data, we concluded that inhibition of eIF5A2 alters progression of the EMT to decrease the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells via ROS-related pathways. PMID:27028999

  1. Tobacco Smoke: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Stable Free Radicals in Mechanisms of Oxidative Damage, Carcinogenesis and Synergistic Effects with Other Respirable Particles

    PubMed Central

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Vlachogianni, Thomais; Fiotakis, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoke contains many toxic, carcinogenic and mutagenic chemicals, as well as stable and unstable free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the particulate and the gas phase with the potential for biological oxidative damage. Epidemiological evidence established that smoking is one of the most important extrinsic factor of premature morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to investigate oxidative and carcinogenic mechanisms of tobacco and synergistic action with other respirable particles in the respiratory system of smokers. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) and spin-trapping techniques were used to study stable free radicals in the cigarette tar, and unstable superoxide anion (O2•−) and hydroxyl (HO•) radicals in the smoke Results showed that the semiquinone radical system has the potential for redox recycling and oxidative action. Further, results proved that aqueous cigarette tar (ACT) solutions can generate adducts with DNA nucleobases, particularly the mutagenic 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (a biomarker for carcinogenesis). Also, we observed synergistic effects in the generation of HO•, through the Fenton reaction, with environmental respirable particles (asbestos fibres, coal dust, etc.) and ambient particulate matter (PM), such as PM10, PM2.5 and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). The highest synergistic effects was observed with the asbestos fibres (freshly grounded), PM2.5 and DEP. Finally, we discuss results from our previous study of conventional cellulose acetate filters and “bio-filters” with hemoglobin impregnated activated carbon, which showed that these filters do not substantially alter the free radical content of smoke in the particulate and in the gaseous phase. PMID:19440393

  2. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 regulates the migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells via pathways involving reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yue-Xiao; Wang, Yan-Fang; Chen, Xiao-Ling; Zheng, Xiao-Xiao; Xie, Shang-Zhi; Cai, Ying; Yu, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A2 (eIF5A2) has been identified as a critical gene in tumor metastasis. Research has suggested that reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as signaling molecules in cancer cell proliferation and migration. However, the mechanisms linking eIF5A2 and ROS are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the effects of ROS on the eIF5A2-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and migration in six hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. Western hybridization, siRNA transfection, transwell migration assays, wound-healing assays, and immunofluorescence analysis were used. The protein levels of eIF5A2 in tumor and adjacent tissue samples from 90 HCC patients with detailed clinical, pathological, and clinical follow-up data were evaluated. Overexpression of eIF5A2 was found in cancerous tissues compared with adjacent tissues. We found that eIF5A2 overexpression in HCC was associated with reduced overall survival. Knockdown of eIF5A2 and intracellular reduction of ROS significantly suppressed the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells. Interestingly, N1-guanyl-1, 7-diaminoheptane (GC7) suppressed the intracellular ROS levels. After blocking the EMT, administration of GC7 or N-acetyl-L-cysteine did not reduce cell migration further. Based on the experimental data, we concluded that inhibition of eIF5A2 alters progression of the EMT to decrease the invasion and metastasis of HCC cells via ROS-related pathways. PMID:27028999

  3. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles.

    PubMed

    Elnakish, Mohammad T; Schultz, Eric J; Gearinger, Rachel L; Saad, Nancy S; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A E; Mohler, Peter J; Janssen, Paul M L

    2015-06-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle functions, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  4. Differential involvement of various sources of reactive oxygen species in thyroxin-induced hemodynamic changes and contractile dysfunction of the heart and diaphragm muscles

    PubMed Central

    Elnakish, Mohammad T.; Schultz, Eric J.; Gearinger, Rachel L.; Saad, Nancy S.; Rastogi, Neha; Ahmed, Amany A.E.; Mohler, Peter J.; Janssen, Paul M.L.

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are key regulators of basal metabolic state and oxidative metabolism. Hyperthyroidism has been reported to cause significant alterations in hemodynamics, and in cardiac and diaphragm muscle function, all of which have been linked to increased oxidative stress. However, the definite source of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) in each of these phenotypes is still unknown. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that thyroxin (T4) may produce distinct hemodynamic, cardiac, and diaphragm muscle abnormalities by differentially affecting various sources of ROS. Wild-type and T4 mice with and without 2-week treatments with allopurinol (xanthine oxidase inhibitor), apocynin (NADPH oxidase inhibitor), L-NIO (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), or MitoTEMPO (mitochondria-targeted antioxidant) were studied. Blood pressure and echocardiography were noninvasively evaluated, followed by ex vivo assessments of isolated heart and diaphragm muscle functions. Treatment with L-NIO attenuated the T4-induced hypertension in mice. However, apocynin improved the left-ventricular (LV) dysfunction without preventing the cardiac hypertrophy in these mice. Both allopurinol and MitoTEMPO reduced the T4-induced fatigability of the diaphragm muscles. In conclusion, we show here for the first time that T4 exerts differential effects on various sources of ROS to induce distinct cardiovascular and skeletal muscle phenotypes. Additionally, we find that T4-induced LV dysfunction is independent of cardiac hypertrophy and NADPH oxidase is a key player in this process. Furthermore, we prove the significance of both xanthine oxidase and mitochondrial ROS pathways in T4-induced fatigability of diaphragm muscles. Finally, we confirm the importance of the nitric oxide pathway in T4-induced hypertension. PMID:25795514

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugamura, Koichi; Keaney, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ‘free-radical theory’ of disease, researchers have been trying to elucidate the role of oxidative stress from free radicals in cardiovascular disease. Considerable data indicate that ROS and oxidative stress are important features of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. However, blanket strategies with antioxidants to ameliorate cardiovascular disease have not generally yielded favorable results. However, our understanding or reactive oxygen species has evolved to the point that we now realize these species have important roles in physiology as well as pathophysiology. Thus, it is overly simplistic to assume a general antioxidant strategy will yield specific effects on cardiovascular disease. Indeed, there are several sources of reactive oxygen species that are known to be active in the cardiovascular system. This review will address our understanding of reactive oxygen species sources in cardiovascular disease and both animal and human data defining how reactive oxygen species contribute to physiology and pathology. PMID:21627987

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Several agents used for treatment of colon and other cancers induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and this plays an important role in their anticancer activities. In addition to the well-known proapoptotic effects of ROS inducers, these compounds also decrease expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several pro-oncogenic Spregulated genes important for cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis. The mechanism of these responses involve ROS-dependent downregulation of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) or miR-20a (and paralogs) and induction of two Sp-repressors, ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 respectively. This pathway significantly contributes to the anticancer activity of ROS inducers and should be considered in development of drug combinations for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25584043

  7. The oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite species and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Inigo A.; Brunner, Benjamin; Breuer, Christian; Coleman, Max; Bach, Wolfgang

    2013-11-01

    Sulfite is an important sulfoxy intermediate in oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling in the marine and terrestrial environment. Different aqueous sulfite species exist, such as dissolved sulfur dioxide (SO2), bisulfite (HSO3-), pyrosulfite (S2O52-) and sulfite sensu stricto (SO32-), whereas their relative abundance in solution depends on the concentration and the pH. Conversion of one species into another is rapid and involves in many cases incorporation of oxygen from, or release of oxygen to, water (e.g. SO2 + H2O ↔ HSO3- + H+), resulting in rapid oxygen isotope exchange between sulfite species and water. Consequently, the oxygen isotope composition of sulfite is strongly influenced by the oxygen isotope composition of water. Since sulfate does not exchange oxygen isotopes with water under most earth surface conditions, it can preserve the sulfite oxygen isotope signature that it inherits via oxidative and reductive sulfur cycling. Therefore, interpretation of δO values strongly hinges on the oxygen isotope equilibrium fractionation between sulfite and water which is poorly constrained. This is in large part due to technical difficulties in extraction of sulfite from solution for oxygen isotope analysis.

  8. Ethylene promotes germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity by decreasing reactive oxygen species: evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide simulated by sodium nitroprusside.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingchao; Yang, Lei; Paul, Matthew; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2013-12-01

    Both ethylene and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in modulating seed germination in adverse environments. However, the mechanisms by which they interact and affect germination have not been explained. In this study, the relationship between ethylene and NO during germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity was analysed. Application of exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC, a precursor of ethylene biosynthesis) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) largely overcame the inhibition of germination induced by salinity. The effects of ACC and SNP were decreased by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO scavenger, or by aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, indicating that ethylene and NO interact during germination under salinity. Further, we demonstrated that ACC increased NO production and that SNP greatly induced the expression of the ACS2 gene involved in ethylene synthesis in Arabidopsis seeds germinating under salinity stress, suggesting that each substance influences the production of the other. Application of exogenous ACC increased germination under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) while SNP had a much smaller effect on wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0) and no effect on the ethylene insensitive mutant (ein3-1) seeds, respectively. This shows that NO increased germination under salinity indirectly through H2O2 acting via the ethylene pathway. The endogenous concentration of H2O2 was increased by salinity in germinating seeds but was decreased by exogenous ACC, which stimulated germination ultimately. To explain all these results and the regulation of germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity we propose a model involving ethylene, NO and H2O2 interaction.

  9. Ethylene promotes germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity by decreasing reactive oxygen species: evidence for the involvement of nitric oxide simulated by sodium nitroprusside.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingchao; Yang, Lei; Paul, Matthew; Zu, Yuangang; Tang, Zhonghua

    2013-12-01

    Both ethylene and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in modulating seed germination in adverse environments. However, the mechanisms by which they interact and affect germination have not been explained. In this study, the relationship between ethylene and NO during germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity was analysed. Application of exogenous 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC, a precursor of ethylene biosynthesis) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP, an NO donor) largely overcame the inhibition of germination induced by salinity. The effects of ACC and SNP were decreased by 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), a specific NO scavenger, or by aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), an inhibitor of ethylene biosynthesis, indicating that ethylene and NO interact during germination under salinity. Further, we demonstrated that ACC increased NO production and that SNP greatly induced the expression of the ACS2 gene involved in ethylene synthesis in Arabidopsis seeds germinating under salinity stress, suggesting that each substance influences the production of the other. Application of exogenous ACC increased germination under oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) while SNP had a much smaller effect on wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0) and no effect on the ethylene insensitive mutant (ein3-1) seeds, respectively. This shows that NO increased germination under salinity indirectly through H2O2 acting via the ethylene pathway. The endogenous concentration of H2O2 was increased by salinity in germinating seeds but was decreased by exogenous ACC, which stimulated germination ultimately. To explain all these results and the regulation of germination of Arabidopsis seed under salinity we propose a model involving ethylene, NO and H2O2 interaction. PMID:24148906

  10. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea. PMID:20967185

  11. Spectroscopically Characterized Synthetic Mononuclear Nickel-Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Company, Anna

    2016-09-12

    Iron, copper, and manganese are the predominant metals found in oxygenases that perform efficient and selective hydrocarbon oxidations and for this reason, a large number of the corresponding metal-oxygen species has been described. However, in recent years nickel has been found in the active site of enzymes involved in oxidation processes, in which nickel-dioxygen species are proposed to play a key role. Owing to this biological relevance and to the existence of different catalytic protocols that involve the use of nickel catalysts in oxidation reactions, there is a growing interest in the detection and characterization of nickel-oxygen species relevant to these processes. In this Minireview the spectroscopically/structurally characterized synthetic superoxo, peroxo, and oxonickel species that have been reported to date are described. From these studies it becomes clear that nickel is a very promising metal in the field of oxidation chemistry with still unexplored possibilities.

  12. Spectroscopically Characterized Synthetic Mononuclear Nickel-Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Corona, Teresa; Company, Anna

    2016-09-12

    Iron, copper, and manganese are the predominant metals found in oxygenases that perform efficient and selective hydrocarbon oxidations and for this reason, a large number of the corresponding metal-oxygen species has been described. However, in recent years nickel has been found in the active site of enzymes involved in oxidation processes, in which nickel-dioxygen species are proposed to play a key role. Owing to this biological relevance and to the existence of different catalytic protocols that involve the use of nickel catalysts in oxidation reactions, there is a growing interest in the detection and characterization of nickel-oxygen species relevant to these processes. In this Minireview the spectroscopically/structurally characterized synthetic superoxo, peroxo, and oxonickel species that have been reported to date are described. From these studies it becomes clear that nickel is a very promising metal in the field of oxidation chemistry with still unexplored possibilities. PMID:27484613

  13. Superoxide Dismutases and Reactive Oxygen Species

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The 'free radical theory' of aging was introduced over a half-century ago. In this theory, much of the deleterious effects of aging were attributed to the cumulative buildup of damage from reactive oxygen species. When discussing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aerobic systems, both superoxide radicals (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and superoxide dismutases (SODs) are considered to play prominent roles. O{sub 2}{sup -} is formed by attachment of the electron to oxygen (O{sub 2}) that is present in tens to hundreds of micromolar concentration in vivo. SODs are enzymes that serve to eliminate O{sub 2}{sup -} by rapidly converting it to O{sub 2} and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Both the radical and the enzyme will be discussed with the focus on the systems that are present in humans.

  14. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  16. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Oxygen-Sensitive Potassium Flux in Rainbow Trout Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated if reactive oxygen species are involved in the oxygen-dependent regulation of potassium-chloride cotransport activity in trout erythrocyte membrane. An increase in the oxygen level caused an increase in chloride-sensitive potassium transport (K+-Cl− cotransport). 5 mM hydrogen peroxide caused an increase in K+-Cl− cotransport at 5% oxygen. The increase in flux could be inhibited by adding extracellular catalase in the incubation. Pretreatment of the cells with mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species showing preference for hydroxyl radicals, abolished the activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter by increased oxygen levels. The inhibition by MPG was reversible, and MPG could not inhibit the activation of transporter by the sulfhydryl reagent, N-ethylmaleimide, indicating that the effect of MPG was due to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and not to the reaction of MPG with the cotransporter. Copper ions, which catalyze the production of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction, activated K+-Cl− cotransport significantly at hypoxic conditions (1% O2). These data suggest that hydroxyl radicals, formed from O2 in close vicinity to the cell membrane, play an important role in the oxygen-dependent activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter. PMID:11158169

  18. A Reaction Involving Oxygen and Metal Sulfides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, William D. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a procedure for oxygen generation by thermal decomposition of potassium chlorate in presence of manganese dioxide, reacted with various sulfides. Provides a table of sample product yields for various sulfides. (JM)

  19. Reactive oxygen species at phospholipid bilayers: distribution, mobility and permeation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in biochemical processes such as redox signaling, aging, carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although biomembranes are targets for reactive oxygen species attack, little is known about the role of their specific interactions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the distribution, mobility and residence times of various reactive oxygen species at the membrane-water interface. Simulations showed that molecular oxygen (O2) accumulated at the membrane interior. The applicability of this result to singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was discussed. Conversely, superoxide (O2(-)) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) remained at the aqueous phase. Both hydroxyl (HO) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals were able to penetrate deep into the lipid headgroups region. Due to membrane fluidity and disorder, these radicals had access to potential peroxidation sites along the lipid hydrocarbon chains, without having to overcome the permeation free energy barrier. Strikingly, HO2 radicals were an order of magnitude more concentrated in the headgroups region than in water, implying a large shift in the acid-base equilibrium between HO2 and O2(-). In comparison with O2, both HO and HO2 radicals had lower lateral mobility at the membrane. Simulations revealed that there were intermittent interruptions in the H-bond network around the HO radicals at the headgroups region. This effect is expected to be unfavorable for the H-transfer mechanism involved in HO diffusion. The implications for lipid peroxidation and for the effectiveness of membrane antioxidants were evaluated. PMID:24095673

  20. Reactive oxygen species and boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Awda, Basim J; Mackenzie-Bell, Meghan; Buhr, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    Boar spermatozoa are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS), but ROS involvement in damage and/or capacitation is unclear. The impact of exposing fresh boar spermatozoa to an ROS-generating system (xanthine/xanthine oxidase; XA/XO) on sperm ROS content, membrane lipid peroxidation, phospholipase (PL) A activity, and motility, viability, and capacitation was contrasted to ROS content and sperm function after cryopreservation. Exposing boar sperm (n = 4-5 ejaculates) to the ROS-generating system for 30 min rapidly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation in all sperm, increased PLA in dead sperm, and did not affect intracellular O2- (flow cytometry of sperm labeled with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorscein diacetate, BODIPY 581/591 C11, bis-BODIPY-FL C11, hydroethidine, respectively; counterstained for viability). Sperm viability remained high, but sperm became immotile. Cryopreservation decreased sperm motility, viability, and intracellular O2- significantly, but did not affect H2O2. As expected, more sperm incubated in capacitating media than Beltsville thawing solution buffer underwent acrosome reactions and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (four proteins, 58-174 kDa); which proteins were tyrosine phosphorylated was pH dependent. Pre-exposing sperm to the ROS-generating system increased the percentage of sperm that underwent acrosome reactions after incubation in capacitating conditions (P < 0.025), and decreased capacitation-dependent increases in two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (P < or = 0.035). In summary, H2O2 is the major free radical mediating direct ROS effects, but not cryopreservation changes, on boar sperm. Boar sperm motility, acrosome integrity, and lipid peroxidation are more sensitive indicators of oxidative stress than viability and PLA activity. ROS may stimulate the acrosome reaction in boar sperm through membrane lipid peroxidation and PLA activation. PMID:19357363

  1. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  2. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  3. Reactive oxygen species-mediated activation of JNK and down-regulation of DAXX are critically involved in penta-O-galloyl-beta-d-glucose-induced apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Tae-Rin; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Sohn, Eun Jung; Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Deok-Beom; Lu, Junxaun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2012-08-01

    Although 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-d-glucose (PGG) was well known to have antitumor activities in breast, prostate, kidney, liver cancers and HL-60 leukemia via regulation of caspase 3, p53, S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) and insulin receptor signaling, the underlying mechanism of PGG-induced apoptosis linked with reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and DAXX was never elucidated in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) K562 cells until now. Herein PGG significantly decreased the viability of CML cell lines such as K562 and KBM-5 without hurting normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs). PGG increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the sub-G1 cell population as well as activated caspase cascades including caspase-8, -9 and -3 in K562 cells. Interestingly, a significant activation of JNK by PGG was observed by MULTIPLEX assay and Western blotting. Conversely, JNK inhibitor D-JNKi suppressed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by PGG in K562 cells. Also, PGG dramatically enhanced generation of ROS and reduced the expression of death-domain-associated protein (DAXX). Of note, ROS inhibitor acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed JNK-dependent apoptosis and DAXX inhibition induced by PGG. Overall, these findings suggest that ROS-dependent JNK activation and DAXX downregulation are critically involved in PGG-induced apoptosis in K562 cells.

  4. Up-regulation of cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2}{alpha} expression by N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate in PC12 cells; involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Nobuteru; Nabemoto, Maiko; Hatori, Yoshio; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Hirabayashi, Tetsuya; Fujino, Hiromichi; Saito, Takeshi; Murayama, Toshihiko . E-mail: murayama@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2006-09-01

    Disulfiram (an alcohol-aversive drug) and related compounds are known to provoke several side effects involving behavioral and neurological complications. N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is considered as one of the main toxic species of disulfiram and acts as an inhibitor of superoxide dismutase. Since arachidonic acid (AA) formation is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related to toxicity in neuronal cells, we investigated the effects of DDC on AA release and expression of the {alpha} type of cytosolic phospholipase A{sub 2} (cPLA{sub 2}{alpha}) in PC12 cells. Treatment with 80-120 {mu}M DDC that causes a moderate increase in ROS levels without cell toxicity stimulated cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} mRNA and its protein expression. The expression was mediated by extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), one of the mitogen-activated protein kinases. Treatment with N {sup G} nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 1 mM) and oxy-hemoglobin (a scavenger of nitric oxide, 2 mg/mL) abolished the DDC-induced responses (ERK1/2 phosphorylation and cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} expression). We also showed DDC-induced up-regulation of the mRNA expression of lipocortin 1, an inhibitor of PLA{sub 2}. Furthermore, DDC treatment of the cells enhanced Ca{sup 2+}-ionophore-induced AA release in 30 min, although the effect was limited. Changes in AA metabolism in DDC-treated cells may have a potential role in mediating neurotoxic actions of disulfiram. In this study, we show the first to demonstrate the up-regulation of cPLA{sub 2}{alpha} expression by DDC treatment in neuronal cells.

  5. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  6. Signaling functions of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Forman, Henry Jay; Maiorino, Matilde; Ursini, Fulvio

    2010-02-01

    We review signaling by reactive oxygen species, which is emerging as a major physiological process. However, among the reactive oxygen species, H(2)O(2) best fulfills the requirements of being a second messenger. Its enzymatic production and degradation, along with the requirements for the oxidation of thiols by H(2)O(2), provide the specificity for time and place that are required in signaling. Both thermodynamic and kinetic considerations suggest that among possible oxidation states of cysteine, formation of sulfenic acid derivatives or disulfides can be relevant as thiol redox switches in signaling. In this work, the general constraints that are required for protein thiol oxidation by H(2)O(2) to be fast enough to be relevant for signaling are discussed in light of the mechanism of oxidation of the catalytic cysteine or selenocysteine in thiol peroxidases. While the nonenzymatic reaction between thiol and H(2)O(2) is, in most cases, too slow to be relevant in signaling, the enzymatic catalysis of thiol oxidation by these peroxidases provides a potential mechanism for redox signaling.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species in Skeletal Muscle Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elena; Sestili, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in eukaryotic cells' life. Up to the 1990s of the past century, ROS have been solely considered as toxic species resulting in oxidative stress, pathogenesis and aging. However, there is now clear evidence that ROS are not merely toxic species but also—within certain concentrations—useful signaling molecules regulating physiological processes. During intense skeletal muscle contractile activity myotubes' mitochondria generate high ROS flows: this renders skeletal muscle a tissue where ROS hold a particular relevance. According to their hormetic nature, in muscles ROS may trigger different signaling pathways leading to diverging responses, from adaptation to cell death. Whether a “positive” or “negative” response will prevail depends on many variables such as, among others, the site of ROS production, the persistence of ROS flow or target cells' antioxidant status. In this light, a specific threshold of physiological ROS concentrations above which ROS exert negative, toxic effects is hard to determine, and the concept of “physiologically compatible” levels of ROS would better fit with such a dynamic scenario. In this review these concepts will be discussed along with the most relevant signaling pathways triggered and/or affected by ROS in skeletal muscle. PMID:22175016

  8. Reactive oxygen species in redox cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Wu, Shiyong; Zuo, Li

    2015-10-10

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells has been intensively studied for the past two decades. Cancer cells mostly have higher basal ROS levels than their normal counterparts. The induction of ROS has been shown to be associated with cancer development, metastasis, progression, and survival. Various therapeutic approaches targeting intracellular ROS levels have yielded mixed results. As widely accepted dietary supplements, antioxidants demonstrate both ROS scavenging ability and anti-cancer characteristics. However, antioxidants may not always be safe to use since excessive intake of antioxidants could lead to serious health concerns. In this review, we have evaluated the production and scavenging systems of ROS in cells, as well as the beneficial and harmful roles of ROS in cancer cells. We also examine the effect of antioxidants in cancer treatment, the effect of combined treatment of antioxidants with traditional cancer therapies, and the side effects of excessive antioxidant intake.

  9. Downregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chul-Ho; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by diverse anti-cancer drugs or phytochemicals has been closely related with the induction of apoptosis in cancers. Also, the downregulation of ROS by these chemicals has been found to block initiation of carcinogenesis. Therefore, modulation of ROS by phytochemicals emerges as a crucial mechanism to regulate apoptosis in cancer prevention or therapy. This review summarizes the current understanding of the selected chemical compounds and related cellular components that modulate ROS during apoptotic process. Metformin, quercetin, curcumin, vitamin C, and other compounds have been shown to downregulate ROS in the cellular apoptotic process, and some of them even induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The cellular components mediating the downregulation of ROS include nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antioxidant signaling pathway, thioredoxin, catalase, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and uncoupling proteins. The present review provides information on the relationship between these compounds and the cellular components in modulating ROS in apoptotic cancer cells. PMID:27051644

  10. Imaging reactive oxygen species in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2004-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  11. Metabolic Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Liu, Man; Sturdy, Megan; Gao, Ge; Varghese, Susan T.; Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD) and add to the current heart failure (HF) health crisis. Nevertheless, the pathological processes underlying arrhythmias are unclear. Arrhythmic conditions are associated with systemic and cardiac oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In excitable cardiac cells, ROS regulate both cellular metabolism and ion homeostasis. Increasing evidence suggests that elevated cellular ROS can cause alterations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5), abnormal Ca2+ handling, changes of mitochondrial function, and gap junction remodeling, leading to arrhythmogenesis. This review summarizes our knowledge of the mechanisms by which ROS may cause arrhythmias and discusses potential therapeutic strategies to prevent arrhythmias by targeting ROS and its consequences. PMID:21978629

  12. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23528859

  13. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  14. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the sterilization of microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of reactive oxygen species on living cells, including various microbes, is discussed. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores reveals that an argoneoxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby indicating that oxygen radic...

  15. Reactive oxygen species and HIF-1 signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Alex; Pappa, Aglaia; Giannakakis, Antonis; Lanitis, Evripidis; Dangaj, Denarda; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael

    2008-07-18

    The heterodimeric transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1) represents the key mediator of hypoxia response. HIF-1 controls numerous genes of pivotal importance for cellular metabolism, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis. HIF-1 overexpression and enhanced transcriptional activity are linked to tumour initiation and progression. Malfunction of the HIF-1 signalling network has been associated with breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), also observed in such tumours, have been implicated in HIF-1 signalling. Deciphering the role of ROS in cancer onset and their involvement in signalling networks should prove invaluable for the design of novel anticancer therapeutics.

  16. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  17. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases. PMID:25161621

  18. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Annetti, Claudia; Aisa, Cristina; Floridi, Emanuela; Floridi, Ardesio

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses different aspects concerning classification/nomenclature, biochemical properties and pathophysiological roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are pivotal to interpret the concept of oxidative stress. In vitro studies in both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes clearly demonstrate that exogenous or constitutive and inducible endogenous sources of ROS together with cofactors such as transition metals can damage virtually all the biomolecules. This adverse chemistry is at the origin of structural and metabolic defects that ultimately may lead to cell dysfunction and death as underlying mechanisms in tissue degeneration processes. The same biomolecular interpretation of aging has been proposed to embodies an oxidative stress-based process and oxidative stress may virtually accompany all the inflammatory events. As a consequence, ROS have proposed to play several roles in the pathogenesis of chronic-degenerative conditions, such as athero-thrombotic events, neurodegeneration, cancer, some forms of anemia, auto-immune diseases, and the entire comorbidity of uremia and diabetes. Nowadays, the chance to investigate biochemical and toxicological aspects of ROS with advanced biomolecular tools has, if needed, still more emphasized the interest on this area of biomedicine. These technological advancements and the huge information available in literature represent in our time a challenge to further understand the clinical meaning of oxidative stress and to develop specific therapeutic strategies.

  19. Reactive oxygen species and the Antarctic macroalgal wound response.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Charles D; Dickinson, Dale A; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly produced by algal, vascular plant, and animal cells involved in the innate immune response as cellular signals promoting defense and healing and/or as a direct defense against invading pathogens. The production of reactive species in macroalgae upon injury, however, is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we surveyed 13 species of macroalgae from the Western Antarctic Peninsula and show that the release of strong oxidants is common after macroalgal wounding. Most species released strong oxidants within 1 min of wounding and/or showed cellular accumulation of strong oxidants over an hour post-wounding. Exogenous catalase was used to show that hydrogen peroxide was a component of immediate oxidant release in one of five species, but was not responsible for the entire oxidative wound response as is common in vascular plants. The other component(s) of the oxidant cocktail released upon wounding are unknown. We were unable to detect protein nitration in extracts of four oxidant-producing species flash frozen 30 s after wounding, but a role for reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite cannot be completely ruled out. Two species showed evidence for the production of a catalase-activated oxidant, a mechanism previously known only from the laboratory and from the synthetic drug isoniazid used to kill the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The rhodophyte Palmaria decipiens, which released strong oxidants after wounding, also produced strong oxidants upon grazing by a sympatric amphipod, suggesting that oxidants are involved in the response to grazing. PMID:26988009

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  2. Reactive oxygen species, essential molecules, during plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Daymi; Guzmán-Cedeño, Ángel; Moreno, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continually generated as a consequence of the normal metabolism in aerobic organisms. Accumulation and release of ROS into cell take place in response to a wide variety of adverse environmental conditions including salt, temperature, cold stresses and pathogen attack, among others. In plants, peroxidases class III, NADPH oxidase (NOX) locates in cell wall and plasma membrane, respectively, may be mainly enzymatic systems involving ROS generation. It is well documented that ROS play a dual role into cells, acting as important signal transduction molecules and as toxic molecules with strong oxidant power, however some aspects related to its function during plant-pathogen interactions remain unclear. This review focuses on the principal enzymatic systems involving ROS generation addressing the role of ROS as signal molecules during plant-pathogen interactions. We described how the chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes perceive the external stimuli as pathogen invasion, and trigger resistance response using ROS as signal molecule.

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated.

  4. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Alison; Grieve, David; Johar, Sofian; Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, secondary to left ventricular hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, is a condition with increasing morbidity and mortality. Although the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this condition remain a subject of intense interest, there is now growing evidence that redox-sensitive pathways play an important role. This article focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from a family of superoxide-generating enzymes, termed NADPH oxidases (NOXs), in the pathophysiology of ventricular hypertrophy, the accompanying interstitial fibrosis and subsequent heart failure. In particular, the apparent ability of the different NADPH oxidase isoforms to define the response of a cell to a range of physiological and pathophysiological stimuli is reviewed. If confirmed, these data would suggest that independently targeting different members of the NOX family may hold the potential for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of cardiac disease. PMID:16321803

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species: The Achilles' Heel of Cancer Cells?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cancer development, progression, and metastasis are multistep processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in cancer cell functions. This Forum reviews our current understanding of the important and paradoxical role of ROS in the regulation of tumor-associated cell properties, genes, and signaling pathways. The six reviews in this Forum showcase the up-to-date knowledge on how ROS modulate or interact with the p53 protein, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, tumor stromal cells, angiogenesis, and cancer stem cells, which are essential factors in cancer development and metastasis. The contributions demonstrate that ROS levels in cancer cells are tightly controlled, which brings promises and challenges in the development of novel ROS-targeted anticancer therapies. Further understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of oxidative stress on tumor growth and metastasis will contribute to the advancement of cancer biology and cancer treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1212–1214. PMID:22304673

  7. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  8. [Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Ryszard; Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Rutkowska, Joanna

    2007-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in every cell during normal oxidation. The most important ROS include: superoxide anion (O2*-), hydroxyl radical (OH*), hydroperoxyl radical (HO2*), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2*-). Reactive oxygen species can react with key cellular structures and molecules altering their biological function. Similarly reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (NO) or peroxinitrite anion (ONOO-) have physiological activity or reacts with different types of molecules to form toxic products. ROS and RNS are important in process of energy generation, lipids peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation, nitration, nitrosation or nitrosylation and catecholamine response. Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are neutralized by enzymatic activity or natural antioxidants that stop the initial formation of radicals. Overproduction of ROS or RNS results in "oxidative" or "nitrosative" stress which contributes to variety of pathological processes typical for different cancer, neurodegenerative, viral, toxic or inflammatory diseases. PMID:18044345

  9. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-12-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.

  10. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  11. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation. PMID:27025055

  12. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species: A Key Hallmark of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been the prime cause of mortality worldwide for decades. However, the underlying mechanism of their pathogenesis is not fully clear yet. It has been already established that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the progression of CVDs. ROS are chemically unstable reactive free radicals containing oxygen, normally produced by xanthine oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, lipoxygenases, or mitochondria or due to the uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase in vascular cells. When the equilibrium between production of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of human physiology gets altered due to several pathophysiological conditions, oxidative stress is induced, which in turn leads to tissue injury. This review focuses on pathways behind the production of ROS, its involvement in various intracellular signaling cascades leading to several cardiovascular disorders (endothelial dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion, and atherosclerosis), methods for its detection, and therapeutic strategies for treatment of CVDs targeting the sources of ROS. The information generated by this review aims to provide updated insights into the understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiovascular complications mediated by ROS. PMID:27774507

  14. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  15. Shear stress, reactive oxygen species, and arterial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matlung, Hanke L; Bakker, Erik N T P; VanBavel, Ed

    2009-07-01

    Shear stress is well known to be a key factor in the regulation of small-artery tone and structure. Although nitric oxide is a major endothelium-derived factor involved in short- and long-term regulation of vascular caliber, it is clear that other mechanisms also can be involved. This review discusses the evidence for endothelium-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators for shear-dependent arterial tone and remodeling. The work focuses on resistance vessels, because their caliber determines local perfusion. However, work on large vessels is included where needed. Attention is given to the shear-stress levels and profiles that exist in the arterial system and the differential effects of steady and oscillating shear on NO and ROS production. We furthermore address the relation between microvascular tone and remodeling and the effect of ROS and inflammation on the activity of remodeling enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases and transglutaminases. We conclude that future work should address the role of H(2)O(2) as an endothelium-derived factor mediating tone and influencing structure of small arteries over the long term.

  16. UV-induced reactive oxygen species in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Wlaschek, M; Brenneisen, P; Schauen, M; Blaudschun, R; Wenk, J

    1997-11-01

    The increase in UV irradiation on earth due to the stratospheric ozone depletion represents a major environmental threat to the skin increasing its risk of photooxidative damage by UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS load has been implicated in several pathological states including photoaging and photocarcinogenesis of the skin. Large efforts have been made to better define the involvement of distinct ROS in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Both pathological processes share common features; however, they reveal unique molecular characteristics which finally determine the fate of the cell and its host. As well as causing permanent genetic changes involving protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, ROS activate cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that are related to growth differentiation, senescence, transformation and tissue degradation. This review focuses on the role of UV-induced ROS in the photodamage of the skin resulting in biochemical and clinical characteristics of photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. A decrease in the ROS load by efficient sunscreens and/or otherwise protective agents may represent a promising strategy to prevent or at least minimize ROS induced cutaneous pathological states. PMID:9426184

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species-Driven Transcription in Arabidopsis under Oxygen Deprivation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pucciariello, Chiara; Parlanti, Sandro; Banti, Valeria; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role as triggers of gene expression during biotic and abiotic stresses, among which is low oxygen (O2). Previous studies have shown that ROS regulation under low O2 is driven by a RHO-like GTPase that allows tight control of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. H2O2 is thought to regulate the expression of heat shock proteins, in a mechanism that is common to both O2 deprivation and to heat stress. In this work, we used publicly available Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray datasets related to ROS and O2 deprivation to define transcriptome convergence pattern. Our results show that although Arabidopsis response to anoxic and hypoxic treatments share a common core of genes related to the anaerobic metabolism, they differ in terms of ROS-related gene response. We propose that H2O2 production under O2 deprivation is a trait present in a very early phase of anoxia, and that ROS are needed for the regulation of a set of genes belonging to the heat shock protein and ROS-mediated groups. This mechanism, likely not regulated via the N-end rule pathway for O2 sensing, is probably mediated by a NADPH oxidase and it is involved in plant tolerance to the stress. PMID:22415514

  18. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  19. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  20. Oxygen chemistry of shocked interstellar clouds. III - Sulfur and oxygen species in dense clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, T. M.; Graff, M. M.

    1988-01-01

    The chemical evolution of oxygen and sulfur species in shocked dense clouds is studied. Reaction rate constants for several important neutral reactions are examined, and revised values are suggested. The one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic shock structure and postshock chemical evolution are calculated for shocks of velocity v(s) = 10 km/s through clouds of initial number density n(0) = 100,000/cu cm and of molecule/atom ratios H2/H = 10, 1000, and 100,000 with most sulfur contained initially in molecules SO2 and SO. Abundances of SO2, SO, CS, and OCS remain near their preshock values, except in clouds containing substantial amounts of atomic hydrogen, where significant destruction of sulfur-oxygen species occurs. Abundances of shock-enhanced molecules HS and H2O are sensitive to the molecule/atom ratio. Nonthermal oxygen-hydrogen chemistry has a minor effect on oxygen-sulfur molecules in the case H2/H = 10.

  1. Kinetics of oxygen species in an electrically driven singlet oxygen generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Torbin, A. P.; Pershin, A. A.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    The kinetics of oxygen species in the gaseous medium of a discharge singlet oxygen generator has been revisited. Vibrationally excited ozone O3(υ) formed in O + O2 recombination is thought to be a significant agent in the deactivation of singlet oxygen O2(a1Δ), oxygen atom removal and ozone formation. It is shown that the process O3(υ ⩾ 2) + O2(a1Δ) → 2O2 + O is the main O2(a1Δ) deactivation channel in the post-discharge zone. If no measures are taken to decrease the oxygen atom concentration, the contribution of this process to the overall O2(a1Δ) removal is significant, even in the discharge zone. A simplified model for the kinetics of vibrationally excited ozone is proposed. Calculations based on this model yield results that are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Redox Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a major cause of mortality in the world, has been extensively studied over the past decade. However, the exact mechanism underlying its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in the progression of CVD. Particularly, ROS are commonly engaged in developing typical characteristics of atherosclerosis, one of the dominant CVDs. This review will discuss the involvement of ROS in atherosclerosis, specifically their effect on inflammation, disturbed blood flow and arterial wall remodeling. Pharmacological interventions target ROS in order to alleviate oxidative stress and CVD symptoms, yet results are varied due to the paradoxical role of ROS in CVD. Lack of effectiveness in clinical trials suggests that understanding the exact role of ROS in the pathophysiology of CVD and developing novel treatments, such as antioxidant gene therapy and nanotechnology-related antioxidant delivery, could provide a therapeutic advance in treating CVDs. While genetic therapies focusing on specific antioxidant expression seem promising in CVD treatments, multiple technological challenges exist precluding its immediate clinical applications. PMID:26610475

  3. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed.

  4. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators.

    PubMed

    Pouvreau, Sandrine

    2014-02-01

    Redox processes are increasingly being recognized as key elements in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. They are frequently encountered at the frontier between physiological functions and pathological events. The biological relevance of intracellular redox changes depends on the subcellular origin, the spatio-temporal distribution and the redox couple involved. Thus, a key task in the elucidation of the role of redox reactions is the specific and quantitative measurement of redox conditions with high spatio-temporal resolution. Unfortunately, until recently, our ability to perform such measurements was limited by the lack of adequate technology. Over the last 10 years, promising imaging tools have been developed from fluorescent proteins. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators (GERRIs) have the potential to allow real-time and pseudo-quantitative monitoring of specific ROS and thiol redox state in subcellular compartments or live organisms. Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent proteins (rxYFP family), redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFP family), HyPer (a probe designed to measure H2 O2 ), circularly permuted YFP and others have been used in several models and sufficient information has been collected to highlight their main characteristics. This review is intended to be a tour guide of the main types of GERRIs, their origins, properties, advantages and pitfalls.

  5. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  6. Generator-specific targets of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Lea; Wittig, Ilka; Heide, Heinrich; Steger, Mirco; Brandt, Ulrich; Dröse, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oxidative stress and redox signaling it is necessary to link their site of generation to the oxidative modification of specific targets. Here we have studied the selective modification of protein thiols by mitochondrial ROS that have been implicated as deleterious agents in a number of degenerative diseases and in the process of biological aging, but also as important players in cellular signal transduction. We hypothesized that this bipartite role might be based on different generator sites for "signaling" and "damaging" ROS and a directed release into different mitochondrial compartments. Because two main mitochondrial ROS generators, complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and complex III (ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase; cytochrome bc1 complex), are known to predominantly release superoxide and the derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into the mitochondrial matrix and the intermembrane space, respectively, we investigated whether these ROS generators selectively oxidize specific protein thiols. We used redox fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis to identify redox-sensitive targets in the mitochondrial proteome of intact rat heart mitochondria. We observed that the modified target proteins were distinctly different when complex I or complex III was employed as the source of ROS. These proteins are potential targets involved in mitochondrial redox signaling and may serve as biomarkers to study the generator-dependent dual role of mitochondrial ROS in redox signaling and oxidative stress.

  7. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  8. Adipose dysfunction, interaction of reactive oxygen species, and inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This American Society for Nutrition sponsored symposium summary contains information about the symposium focus and the general content of speaker presentation. The focus of the symposium was to delineate the significance of obesity-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and adipose ...

  9. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  10. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} − N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  11. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N(3) - N(4), where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles. PMID:25005287

  12. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N3 - N4, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  13. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  14. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVIE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES. CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON , FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). R...

  15. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  16. HIV-1, Reactive Oxygen Species and Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Kristi M.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2012-01-01

    Over 1 million people in the United States and 33 million individuals worldwide suffer from HIV/AIDS. Since its discovery, HIV/AIDS has been associated with an increased susceptibility to opportunistic infection due to immune dysfunction. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) restore immune function and, as a result, people infected with HIV-1 are living longer. This improved survival of HIV-1 patients has revealed a previously unrecognized risk of developing vascular complications, such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms underlying these HIV-associated vascular disorders are poorly understood. However, HIV-induced elevations in reactive oxygen species, including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, may contribute to vascular disease development and progression by altering cell function and redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the clinical and experimental evidence demonstrating HIV- and HIV antiretroviral therapy-induced alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and how these effects likely contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. PMID:22564529

  17. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  18. Production and consumption of reactive oxygen species by fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Zepp, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals) by Buckminster fullerene (C(60) ) and fullerenol were investigated in aqueous systems. Fullerenol exhibits higher photoproduction efficiency of singlet oxygen and superoxide than aqueous suspensions of C(60) aggregates (aqu/nC(60) ), and this higher efficiency results in higher steady-state concentrations of these two ROS. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that the C(60) molecules in aqu/nC(60) are much more closely packed than the C(60) cages in fullerenol. These observations provide additional evidence that the lower ROS production efficiency of aqu/nC(60) is attributable primarily to efficient self-quenching of C(60) triplet states. Production of singlet oxygen by aqu/nC(60) is accelerated by increasing oxygen concentration and in part is sensitized by fluorescent photoproducts that accumulate during irradiation. The fullerenes react slowly with singlet oxygen (second-order rate constant <4 × 10(5)  M(-1)  s(-1) ), but react rapidly with hydroxyl radicals (second-order rate constants of 5.4 × 10(9) and 4 × 10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1) for aqu/nC(60) and fullerenol, respectively). These results show that environmental conditions, including light exposure and oxygen concentration, have the potential to impact the generation of toxic ROS by fullerenes.

  19. Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall’s plaques (RPs) or Randall’s plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall’s plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles

  20. In situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroelectrochemistry of oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Takashi; Maeda, Toshiteru; Kasuya, Atsuo

    2006-01-01

    In situ surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) combined with electrochemical analysis is applied to the determination of oxygen species on silver electrodes in alkaline hydroxide aqueous solution at room temperature and gold electrodes in carbonate melts at high temperature. This technique, referred to as SERS spectroelectrochemistry, reveals Raman spectral lines in the 500-1100 cm(-1) range under electrode potential scanning, assignable to superoxide ions (O2-) and peroxide ions (O2(2-)) on the electrode surface. These lines for oxygen molecule species have potential dependence with changing potential. In the alkaline hydroxide aqueous solution, the Raman peaks due to oxygen molecules are observed at potentials between 0.2 V and -0.8 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) only in the cathodic scan. This irreversible behavior in cyclic voltammograms indicates the existence of an intermediate stage in the oxygen reduction process, in which oxygen is released from the AgO films on the electrode at potentials corresponding to the onset of the last current peak in the voltammogram. This liberated oxygen molecule remains in solution at the interface until hydroxyls or water molecules are formed when the potential reaches the potential zero charge (PZC). In the high-temperature carbonate melts, Raman lines at 1047, 1080, and 800 cm(-1) are apparent for the eutectic (62 + 38) mol% (Li + K)CO3 melt at 923 K, and at 735 cm(-1) for the Li2CO3 melt at 1123 K. These results suggest that oxygen reduction in the Li2CO3 melt involves only peroxide ions, while that in (62 + 38) mol% (Li + K)CO3 involves both peroxide and superoxide ions at the three-phase boundary interface. PMID:16833110

  1. Manganese neurotoxicity and the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J; Gavin, Claire E; Aschner, Michael; Gunter, Thomas E

    2013-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary nutrient, but an excess or accumulation can be toxic. Disease states, such as manganism, are associated with overexposure or accumulation of Mn and are due to the production of reactive oxygen species, free radicals, and toxic metabolites; alteration of mitochondrial function and ATP production; and depletion of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. This review focuses on all of the preceding mechanisms and the scientific studies that support them as well as providing an overview of the absorption, distribution, and excretion of Mn and the stability and transport of Mn compounds in the body.

  2. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  3. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  4. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  5. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  6. Myoglobin oxygenation and autoxidation in three reptilian species.

    PubMed

    Helbo, Signe; Bundgaard, Amanda G; Fago, Angela

    2015-09-01

    Differences between species in the oxygen (O2) affinity (P50) of myoglobin (Mb) may serve to fine tune O2 supply to cardiac and skeletal muscle in ectotherms. In support of this view, it has been shown that fish Mb O2 affinities differ between species when measured at the same temperature, but are in fact similar when adjusted for in vivo muscle temperatures, most likely to maintain intracellular O2 delivery in species adapted to different environments. It is unknown whether similar adaptations exist in the O2 affinity of Mb from reptiles, despite this group of ectothermic vertebrates displaying great variation in the tolerance to both temperature and hypoxia. In this study, we have purified Mb from muscle tissues of three reptilian species (turtle, tortoise and alligator) with different lifestyles. We have measured O2 binding characteristics and autoxidation rates of the three Mbs and measured the effects of temperature, lactate and blocking of reactive thiols on the O2 affinity of turtle Mb. Our data show that, at a constant temperature, reptilian Mbs have similar O2 affinities that are lower than those of mammalian Mbs, which may optimize intracellular O2 transport at lower body temperatures. Reptilian Mbs have lower autoxidation rates than both mammalian and fish Mbs, which may be beneficial during oxidative stress. Furthermore, the O2 affinity of turtle Mb is without allosteric control and independent of either lactate or thiol covalent modification. This study reveals some common adaptive patterns in the temperature-dependent regulation of Mb oxygenation in vertebrates.

  7. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  8. Putative Genes Involved in Saikosaponin Biosynthesis in Bupleurum Species

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tsai-Yun; Chiou, Chung-Yi; Chiou, Shu-Jiau

    2013-01-01

    Alternative medicinal agents, such as the herb Bupleurum, are increasingly used in modern medicine to supplement synthetic drugs. First, we present a review of the currently known effects of triterpene saponins-saikosaponins of Bupleurum species. The putative biosynthetic pathway of saikosaponins in Bupleurum species is summarized, followed by discussions on identification and characterization of genes involved in the biosynthesis of saikosaponins. The purpose is to provide a brief review of gene extraction, functional characterization of isolated genes and assessment of expression patterns of genes encoding enzymes in the process of saikosaponin production in Bupleurum species, mainly B. kaoi. We focus on the effects of MeJA on saikosaponin production, transcription patterns of genes involved in biosynthesis and on functional depiction. PMID:23783277

  9. Active oxygen species as mediators of plant immunity: three case studies.

    PubMed

    Sandermann, H

    2000-08-01

    A burst of active oxygen species (AOS) is known to be involved in local cell death as part of plant defence against pathogens. It is, however, under dispute to what extent AOS can induce pathogen resistance and immunity throughout the plant. Three experimental strategies that reveal a primary role for AOS and a surprisingly low chemical and spatial specificity are now described for tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Ozone is a gaseous AOS that was applied to non-transgenic plants. Hydrogen peroxide or singlet oxygen are AOS that were induced by high-light treatment of transgenic plants that contained antisense constructs inhibiting catalase activity or chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes. In all cases, activated oxygen species, cellular lesions, ethylene and salicylic acid, and components of major plant defence systems (systemic acquired resistance, hypersensitive response) were induced, as was resistance towards pathogens (tobacco mosaic virus, Pseudomonas syringae or Peronospora parasitica). It is concluded that active oxygen species can act as mediators of plant immunity so that new non-pesticidal plant protection strategies could be developed.

  10. Lung cell hypoxia: role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signaling in triggering responses.

    PubMed

    Schumacker, Paul T

    2011-11-01

    Lung cells experience hypoxia during development, during travel to high altitude, and in acute and chronic lung diseases. The functional responses evoked by hypoxia are diverse and generally act to protect the cells from hypoxic injury, although some lung cell responses are counterproductive because they degrade normal function of the organ. The cellular O(2) sensor responsible for many of these responses involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Under hypoxic conditions, increased release of reactive oxygen species from the inner mitochondrial membrane to the intermembrane space leads to the activation of transcription factors, including hypoxia-inducible factor, activation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase, and internalization of the membrane Na,K-ATPase from the basolateral membrane of alveolar epithelial cells. Although the specific targets of reactive oxygen species signals are not fully understood, this signaling pathway is critical for development and for normal lung responses in the newborn and the mature lung.

  11. The chemistry of cell signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Forman, Henry Jay; Fukuto, Jon M; Miller, Tom; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Levy, Smadar

    2008-09-15

    During the past several years, major advances have been made in understanding how reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) participate in signal transduction. Identification of the specific targets and the chemical reactions involved still remains to be resolved with many of the signaling pathways in which the involvement of reactive species has been determined. Our understanding is that ROS and RNS have second messenger roles. While cysteine residues in the thiolate (ionized) form found in several classes of signaling proteins can be specific targets for reaction with H(2)O(2) and RNS, better understanding of the chemistry, particularly kinetics, suggests that for many signaling events in which ROS and RNS participate, enzymatic catalysis is more likely to be involved than non-enzymatic reaction. Due to increased interest in how oxidation products, particularly lipid peroxidation products, also are involved with signaling, a review of signaling by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is included. This article focuses on the chemistry of signaling by ROS, RNS, and HNE and will describe reactions with selected target proteins as representatives of the mechanisms rather attempt to comprehensively review the many signaling pathways in which the reactive species are involved.

  12. [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene is involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in yeast and nematode.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Michihiko; Adachi, Noritaka; Shikatani, Kazuki; Ayusawa, Dai

    2009-04-01

    Oxygen is essential for the life of aerobic organisms, but reactive oxygen species (ROS) derived from oxygen can be a threat for it. Many genes are involved in generation of ROS, but not much attention has been focused on the reactions from which ROS are generated. We therefore screened for mutants that showed an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and isolated a novel mutant, oxy-4(qa5001). This mutant showed an increased sensitivity to a high concentration of oxygen, and decreased longevity at 20 degrees C but not at 26 degrees C. The genetic analysis has revealed that oxy-4 had a causative mutation in an [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like gene (Y54H5A.4). In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a deletion of NAR1, a possible homologue of oxy-4, also caused a similar increased sensitivity to oxygen. [FeFe]-hydrogenases are enzymes that catalyze both the formation and the splitting of molecular hydrogen, and function in anaerobic respiration in anaerobes. In contrast, [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes identified in aerobic eukaryotes do not generate hydrogen, and its functional roles are less understood. Our results suggested that [FeFe]-hydrogenase-like genes were involved in the regulation of sensitivity to oxygen in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans. PMID:19335616

  13. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  14. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  15. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  16. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species in Normal and Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in determining the fate of normal stem cells. Low levels of ROS are required for stem cells to maintain quiescence and self-renewal. Increases in ROS production cause stem cell proliferation/differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, leading to their exhaustion. Therefore, the production of ROS in stem cells is tightly regulated to ensure that they have the ability to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair damaged tissues for the life span of an organism. In this chapter, we discuss how the production of ROS in normal stem cells is regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and how the fate of these cells is altered by the dysregulation of ROS production under various pathological conditions. In addition, the implications of the aberrant production of ROS by tumor stem cells for tumor progression and treatment are also discussed. PMID:24974178

  18. Reactive oxygen species in organ-specific autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Di Dalmazi, Giulia; Hirshberg, Jason; Lyle, Daniel; Freij, Joudeh B; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been extensively studied in the induction of inflammation and tissue damage, especially as it relates to aging. In more recent years, ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here, ROS accumulation leads to apoptosis and autoantigen structural changes that result in novel specificities. ROS have been implicated not only in the initiation of the autoimmune response but also in its amplification and spreading to novel epitopes, through the unmasking of cryptic determinants. This review will examine the contribution of ROS to the pathogenesis of four organ specific autoimmune diseases (Hashimoto thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and vitiligo), and compare it to that of a better characterized systemic autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis). It will also discuss tobacco smoking as an environmental factor endowed with both pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant properties, thus capable of differentially modulating the autoimmune response. PMID:27491295

  19. Reactive oxygen species, ageing and the hormesis police

    PubMed Central

    Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2013-01-01

    For more than 50 years the Free Radical Theory served as the paradigm guiding most investigations of ageing. However, recent studies in a variety of organisms have identified conceptual and practical limitations to this theory. Some of these limitations are related to the recent discovery that caloric restriction and other experimental manipulations promote longevity by inducing hormesis effects in association with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). The beneficial role of ROS in lifespan extension is consistent with the essential role of these molecules in cell signalling. However, the identity of specific forms of ROS that promote longevity remains unclear. In this article, we argue that in several model systems, hydrogen peroxide plays a crucial role in the induction of hormesis. PMID:23965186

  20. Control of root growth and development by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively simple molecules that exist within cells growing in aerobic conditions. ROS were originally associated with oxidative stress and seen as highly reactive molecules that are injurious to many cell components. More recently, however, the function of ROS as signal molecules in many plant cellular processes has become more evident. One of the most important functions of ROS is their role as a plant growth regulator. For example, ROS are key molecules in regulating plant root development, and as such, are comparable to plant hormones. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ROS that are mainly associated with plant root growth are discussed. The molecular links between root growth regulation by ROS and other signals will also be briefly discussed.

  1. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  2. Photosensitizing Nanoparticles and The Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Dayane; Baptista, Mauricio

    2015-05-01

    The association of PhotoSensitizer (PS) molecules with nanoparticles (NPs) forming photosensitizing NPs, has emerged as a therapeutic strategy to improve PS tumor targeting, to protect PS from deactivation reactions and to enhance both PS solubility and circulation time. Since association with NPs usually alters PS photophysical and photochemical properties, photosensitizing NPs are an important tool to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Depending on the design of the photosensitizing NP, i.e., type of PS, the NP material and the method applied for the construction of the photosensitizing NP, the deactivation routes of the excited state can be controlled, allowing the generation of either singlet oxygen or other ROS. Controlling the type of generated ROS is desirable not only in biomedical applications, as in Photodynamic Therapy where the type of ROS affects therapeutic efficiency, but also in other technological relevant fields like energy conversion, where the electron and energy transfer processes are necessary to increase the efficiency of photoconversion cells. The current review highlights some of the recent developments in the design of Photosensitizing NPs aimed at modulating the primary photochemical events after light absorption.

  3. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Bianka; Steffen-Heins, Anja; Sauter, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism, and non-enzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical, and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS. PMID:23761805

  4. The immunopathogenic role of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, cancer, and aging. Basal levels of ROS production in cells could be related to several physiological functions including cell proliferation, apoptosis and homeostasis. However, excessive ROS production above basal levels would impair and oxidize DNA, lipids, sugars and proteins and consequently result in dysfunction of these molecules within cells and finally cell death. A leading theory of the cause of aging indicates that free radical damage and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Because the brain utilizes 20% more oxygen than other tissues that also undergo mitochondrial respiration, the potential for ROS exposure increases. In fact, AD has been demonstrated to be highly associated with cellular oxidative stress, including augmentation of protein oxidation, protein nitration, glycoloxidation and lipid peroxidation as well as accumulation of Amyloid β (Aβ). The treatment with anti-oxidant compounds can provide protection against oxidative stress and Aβ toxicity. In this review, our aim was to clarify the role of ROS in pathogenesis of AD and will discuss therapeutic efficacy of some antioxidants studies in recent years in this disease.

  5. Applications of Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometry for Reactive Oxygen Species and Reactive Nitrogen Species Research

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been widely applied in the research of biological free radicals for quantitative and qualitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The ESR spin-trapping method was developed in the early 1970s and enabled the analysis of short-lived free radicals. This method is now widely used as one of the most powerful tools for free radical studies. In this report, some of the studies that applied ESR for the measurement of ROS and RNS during oxidative stress are discussed. PMID:20664724

  6. Effects of reactive oxygen species on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation have been recognized as problems for sperm survival and fertility. The precise roles and detection of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and membrane lipid peroxidation have been problematic, because of the low specificity and sensitivity of the established chemiluminescence assay technologies. We developed flow cytometric assays to measure SO, HP, membrane lipid peroxidation, and inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential in boar sperm. These methods were sufficiently sensitive to permit detection of early changes in ROS formation in sperm cells that were still viable. Basal ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in the absence of ROS generators were low in viable sperm of both fresh and frozen-thawed boar semen, affecting less than 4% of the sperm cells on average. However, this is not the case in other species, as human, bovine, and poultry sperm have large increases in sperm ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, loss of motility, and death in vitro. Closer study of the effects of ROS formation on the relationship between sperm motility and ATP content in boar sperm was conducted using menadione (mitochondrial SO generator) and HP treatment. Menadione or HP caused an immediate disruption of motility with delayed or no decrease in sperm ATP content, respectively. Overall, the inhibitory effects of ROS on motility point to a mitochondrial-independent mechanism. The reduction in motility may have been due to a ROS-induced lesion in ATP utilization or in the contractile apparatus of the flagellum. PMID:22704396

  7. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  8. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-01-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′ -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. PMID:26827127

  9. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  10. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  11. Beyond oxidative stress: an immunologist’s guide to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Carl; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) react preferentially with certain atoms to modulate functions ranging from cell homeostasis to cell death. Molecular actions include both inhibition and activation of proteins, mutagenesis of DNA and activation of gene transcription. Cellular actions include promotion or suppression of inflammation, immunity and carcinogenesis. ROS help the host to compete against microorganisms and are also involved in intermicrobial competition. ROS chemistry and their pleiotropy make them difficult to localize, to quantify and to manipulate — challenges we must overcome to translate ROS biology into medical advances. PMID:23618831

  12. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate pollen tube rupture to release sperm for fertilization in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Johnson, Eric A.; Aggarwal, Mini; Gates, Laura; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    In flowering plants, sperm are transported inside pollen tubes to the female gametophyte for fertilization. The female gametophyte induces rupture of the penetrating pollen tube, resulting in sperm release and rendering them available for fertilization. Here we utilize the Arabidopsis FERONIA (FER) receptor kinase mutants, whose female gametophytes fail to induce pollen tube rupture, to decipher the molecular mechanism of this critical male-female interactive step. We show that FER controls the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species at the entrance to the female gametophyte to induce pollen tube rupture and sperm release. Pollen tube growth assays in vitro and in the pistil demonstrate that hydroxyl free radicals are likely the most reactive oxygen molecules, and they induce pollen tube rupture in a Ca2+-dependent process involving Ca2+ channel activation. Our results provide evidence for a RHO GTPase-based signalling mechanism to mediate sperm release for fertilization in plants.

  14. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lun; Li, Jiahui; Zong, Liang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ke; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Xuqi; Li, Wei; Shan, Tao; Ma, Qingyong; Ma, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concentration. ROS facilitates carcinogenesis and cancer progression with mild-to-moderate elevated levels, while excessive ROS damages cancer cells dramatically and leads to cell death. Based on the recent knowledge, either promoting ROS generation to increase the concentration of ROS with extremely high levels or enhancing ROS scavenging ability to decrease ROS levels may benefit the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, when faced with oxidative stress, the antioxidant programs of cancer cells have been activated to help cancer cells to survive in the adverse condition. Furthermore, ROS signaling and antioxidant programs play the vital roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer and in the response to cancer treatment. Eventually, it may be the novel target for various strategies and drugs to modulate ROS levels in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  17. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis Aj; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria.

  18. Tamoxifen reduces fat mass by boosting reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zou, P; Zheng, L; Linarelli, L E; Amarell, S; Passaro, A; Liu, D; Cheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    As the pandemic of obesity is growing, a variety of animal models have been generated to study the mechanisms underlying the increased adiposity and development of metabolic disorders. Tamoxifen (Tam) is widely used to activate Cre recombinase that spatiotemporally controls target gene expression and regulates adiposity in laboratory animals. However, a critical question remains as to whether Tam itself affects adiposity and possibly confounds the functional study of target genes in adipose tissue. Here we administered Tam to Cre-absent forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) floxed mice (f-FoxO1) and insulin receptor substrate Irs1/Irs2 double floxed mice (df-Irs) and found that Tam induced approximately 30% reduction (P<0.05) in fat mass with insignificant change in body weight. Mechanistically, Tam promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptosis and autophagy, which was associated with downregulation of adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes. However, normalization of ROS potently suppressed Tam-induced apoptosis, autophagy and adipocyte dedifferentiation, suggesting that ROS may account, at least in part, for the changes. Importantly, Tam-induced ROS production and fat mass reduction lasted for 4-5 weeks in the f-FoxO1 and df-Irs mice. Our data suggest that Tam reduces fat mass via boosting ROS, thus making a recovery period crucial for posttreatment study. PMID:25569103

  19. Cardiac reactive oxygen species after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Brett E; Stockwell, David W.; Boas, Stefan; Andrews, Trevor; Wellman, George C.; Lockette, Warren; Freeman, Kalev

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular complications after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to morbidity and mortality and may provide a target for therapy. We examined blood pressure and left ventricle contractility after TBI, and tested the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic blockade would decrease oxidative stress after TBI. Material and Methods Rodents received fluid-percussion injury or sham surgery, confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology. We followed recovery with sensorimotor coordination testing and blood pressure measurements. We assessed left ventricular ejection fraction using ECG-gated cardiac MRI and measured myocardial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with dihydroethidium. We randomized additional TBI and sham animals to post-operative treatment with propranolol or control, for measurement of ROS. Results Blood pressure and cardiac contractility were elevated 48 hours after TBI. Myocardial tissue sections showed increased ROS. Treatment with propranolol diminished ROS levels following TBI. Conclusions TBI is associated with increased cardiac contractility and myocardial ROS; decreased myocardial ROS after beta-blockade suggests that sympathetic stimulation is a mechanism of oxidative stress. PMID:22172132

  20. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  1. Reactive oxygen species, nutrition, hypoxia and diseases: Problems solved?

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Petry, Andreas; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Within the last twenty years the view on reactive oxygen species (ROS) has changed; they are no longer only considered to be harmful but also necessary for cellular communication and homeostasis in different organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. In the latter, ROS were shown to modulate diverse physiological processes including the regulation of growth factor signaling, the hypoxic response, inflammation and the immune response. During the last 60–100 years the life style, at least in the Western world, has changed enormously. This became obvious with an increase in caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure as well as the appearance of alcoholism and smoking; These changes were shown to contribute to generation of ROS which are, at least in part, associated with the occurrence of several chronic diseases like adiposity, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, and cancer. In this review we discuss aspects and problems on the role of intracellular ROS formation and nutrition with the link to diseases and their problematic therapeutical issues. PMID:26339717

  2. NSAIDs and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly used drugs worldwide. NSAIDs are used for a variety of conditions including pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and musculoskeletal disorders. The beneficial effects of NSAIDs in reducing or relieving pain are well established, and other benefits such as reducing inflammation and anticancer effects are also documented. The undesirable side effects of NSAIDs include ulcers, internal bleeding, kidney failure, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some of these side effects may be due to the oxidative stress induced by NSAIDs in different tissues. NSAIDs have been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different cell types including cardiac and cardiovascular related cells. Increases in ROS result in increased levels of oxidized proteins which alters key intracellular signaling pathways. One of these key pathways is apoptosis which causes cell death when significantly activated. This review discusses the relationship between NSAIDs and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the role of NSAID-induced ROS in CVD. PMID:26457127

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS): Beneficial Companions of Plants’ Developmental Processes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Mishra, Rohit K.; Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Singh, Vijay P.; Chauhan, Devendra K.; Prasad, Sheo M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated inevitably in the redox reactions of plants, including respiration and photosynthesis. In earlier studies, ROS were considered as toxic by-products of aerobic pathways of the metabolism. But in recent years, concept about ROS has changed because they also participate in developmental processes of plants by acting as signaling molecules. In plants, ROS regulate many developmental processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, programmed cell death, seed germination, gravitropism, root hair growth and pollen tube development, senescence, etc. Despite much progress, a comprehensive update of advances in the understanding of the mechanisms evoked by ROS that mediate in cell proliferation and development are fragmentry and the matter of ROS perception and the signaling cascade remains open. Therefore, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to summarize the recent findings regarding updates made in the regulatory action of ROS at various plant developmental stages, which are still not well-known. PMID:27729914

  4. Are Reactive Oxygen Species Always Detrimental to Pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are deadly weapons used by phagocytes and other cell types, such as lung epithelial cells, against pathogens. ROS can kill pathogens directly by causing oxidative damage to biocompounds or indirectly by stimulating pathogen elimination by various nonoxidative mechanisms, including pattern recognition receptors signaling, autophagy, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and T-lymphocyte responses. Thus, one should expect that the inhibition of ROS production promote infection. Increasing evidences support that in certain particular infections, antioxidants decrease and prooxidants increase pathogen burden. In this study, we review the classic infections that are controlled by ROS and the cases in which ROS appear as promoters of infection, challenging the paradigm. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which ROS could promote particular infections. These mechanisms are still not completely clear but include the metabolic effects of ROS on pathogen physiology, ROS-induced damage to the immune system, and ROS-induced activation of immune defense mechanisms that are subsequently hijacked by particular pathogens to act against more effective microbicidal mechanisms of the immune system. The effective use of antioxidants as therapeutic agents against certain infections is a realistic possibility that is beginning to be applied against viruses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1000–1037. PMID:23992156

  5. Stress granules inhibit apoptosis by reducing reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Matsuki, Hideaki; Yoshita, Manami; Ohsawa, Toshiaki; Oie, Masayasu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2013-02-01

    Cells can undergo two alternative fates following exposure to environmental stress: they either induce apoptosis or inhibit apoptosis and then repair the stress-induced alterations. These processes minimize cell loss and prevent the survival of cells with aberrant DNA and protein alterations. These two alternative fates are partly controlled by stress granules (SGs). While arsenite, hypoxia, and heat shock induce the formation of SGs that inhibit apoptosis, X-ray irradiation and genotoxic drugs do not induce SGs, and they are more prone to trigger apoptosis. However, it is unclear precisely how SGs control apoptosis. This study found that SGs suppress the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this suppression is essential for inhibiting ROS-dependent apoptosis. This antioxidant activity of SGs is controlled by two SG components, GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) and ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10). G3BP1 elevates the steady-state ROS level by inhibiting the antioxidant activity of USP10. However, following exposure to arsenite, G3BP1 and USP10 induce the formation of SGs, which uncovers the antioxidant activity of USP10. We also found that the antioxidant activity of USP10 requires the protein kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). This work reveals that SGs are critical redox regulators that control cell fate under stress conditions.

  6. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Modifications in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Bačić, Goran; Bridal, Lori; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.; Tavitian, Bertrand; Viel, Thomas; Utsumi, Hideo; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) may regulate signaling, ion channels, transcription factors, and biosynthetic processes. ROS-related diseases can be due to either a shortage or an excess of ROS. Recent Advances: Since the biological activity of ROS depends on not only concentration but also spatiotemporal distribution, real-time imaging of ROS, possibly in vivo, has become a need for scientists, with potential for clinical translation. New imaging techniques as well as new contrast agents in clinically established modalities were developed in the previous decade. Critical Issues: An ideal imaging technique should determine ROS changes with high spatio-temporal resolution, detect physiologically relevant variations in ROS concentration, and provide specificity toward different redox couples. Furthermore, for in vivo applications, bioavailability of sensors, tissue penetration, and a high signal-to-noise ratio are additional requirements to be satisfied. Future Directions: None of the presented techniques fulfill all requirements for clinical translation. The obvious way forward is to incorporate anatomical and functional imaging into a common hybrid-imaging platform. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 939–958. PMID:27139586

  7. Reactive oxygen species in diabetic nephropathy: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Bondeva, Tzvetanka; Wolf, Gunter

    2014-11-01

    Based on the numerous cellular and animal studies over the last decades, it has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important secondary messengers for signalling pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, damage and inflammation. Their adverse effects were considered to play a leading role in the onset and progression of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as in the complication of diabetic disease leading to vascular-, cardiac-, neuro-degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy. All these complications were mostly linked to the generation of the superoxide anion, due to a prolonged hyperglycaemia in diabetes, and this anion was almost 'blamed for everything', despite the fact that its measurement and detection in life systems is extremely complicated due to the short lifespan of the superoxide anion. Therefore, a tremendous amount of research has been focused on finding ways to suppress ROS production. However, a recent report from Dugan et al. shed new insights into the life detection of superoxide generation in diabetes and raised the question of whether we treat the diabetes-related complications correctly or the target is somewhat different as thought. This review will focus on some aspects of this novel concept for the role of ROS in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24589719

  8. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides and human inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  9. Reactive Oxygen Species and Respiratory Plasticity Following Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Wilkerson, J.E.R.; Lovett-Barr, M.R.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network controlling breathing exhibits plasticity in response to environmental or physiological challenges. For example, while hypoxia initiates rapid and robust increases in respiratory motor output to defend against hypoxemia, it also triggers persistent changes, or plasticity, in chemosensory neurons and integrative pathways that transmit brainstem respiratory activity to respiratory motor neurons. Frequently studied models of hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity include: 1) carotid chemosensory plasticity and metaplasticity induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), and 2) acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) in naïve and CIH preconditioned rats. These forms of plasticity share some mechanistic elements, although they differ in anatomical location and the requirement for CIH preconditioning. Both forms of plasticity require serotonin receptor activation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the cellular sources and targets of ROS are not well known, recent evidence suggests that ROS modify the balance of protein phosphatase and kinase activities, shifting the balance towards net phosphorylation and favoring cellular reactions that induce and/or maintain plasticity. Here, we review possible sources of ROS, and the impact of ROS on phosphorylation events relevant to respiratory plasticity. PMID:18692605

  10. Soot-driven reactive oxygen species formation from incense burning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim P; Lung, Shih-Chun C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2011-10-15

    This study investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated as a function of the physicochemistry of incense particulate matter (IPM), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and carbon black (CB). Microscopical and elemental analyses were used to determine particle morphology and inorganic compounds. ROS was determined using the reactive dye, Dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH), and the Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA), which determine DNA damage. Two common types of soot were observed within IPM, including nano-soot and micro-soot, whereas DEP and CB mainly consisted of nano-soot. These PM were capable of causing oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, especially IPM and DEP. A dose of IPM (36.6-102.3μg/ml) was capable of causing 50% oxidative DNA damage. ROS formation was positively correlated to smaller nano-soot aggregates and bulk metallic compounds, particularly Cu. These observations have important implications for respiratory health given that inflammation has been recognised as an important factor in the development of lung injury/diseases by oxidative stress. This study supports the view that ROS formation by combustion-derived PM is related to PM physicochemistry, and also provides new data for IPM.

  11. Reactive oxygen species inhibited by titanium oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Richard; Muyco, Julie; McKittrick, Joanna; Frangos, John A

    2003-08-01

    Titanium is a successful biomaterial that possesses good biocompatibility. It is covered by a surface layer of titanium dioxide, and this oxide may play a critical role in inhibiting reactive oxygen species, such as peroxynitrite, produced during the inflammatory response. In the present study, titanium dioxide was coated onto silicone substrates by radio-frequency sputtering. Silicone coating with titanium dioxide enhanced the breakdown of peroxynitrite by 79%. At physiologic pH, the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine-N-ethylcarbamide (SIN-1) was used to nitrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) to form 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetic acid (NHPA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited the nitration of 4-HPA by 61% compared to aluminum oxide-coated silicone and 55% compared to uncoated silicone. J774A.1 mouse macrophages were plated on oxide-coated silicone and polystyrene and stimulated to produce superoxide and interleukin-6. Superoxide production was measured by the chemiluminescent reaction with 2-methyl-6-[p-methoxyphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone exhibited a 55% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated silicone and a 165% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated polystyrene. Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited IL-6 production by 77% compared to uncoated silicone. These results show that the anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide can be transferred to the surfaces of silicone substrates.

  12. Reactive oxygen species in response of plants to gravity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers can induce stress response of plants. Thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) can function as sensors and transmitters of the ROS in stress signaling and antioxidant response. 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana have been investigated. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 20 g during 30 and 90 min and than intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence (SChL/ROS content), Trx and Prx activities were determined. All experiments were repeated from 3 to 5 times and the obtained data were statistically treated. In the tissue culture under development of the stress there were an increase in intensity of SChL and Trx and Prx activities. Thus, under hypergravity stress in the plant occurred early increase in the ROS level and the ROS induced the increase in the Trx and Prx activities. Prx and Trx can also participate in the formation of stress respons as acceptors and transducers of the redox signals. Increase in the activity of these enzymes primarily aimed at increasing of the total antioxidant activity in the cells to prevent of the plant to development of oxidative degradation by ROS.

  13. Reactive oxygen species a double-edged sword for mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Simona; Galati, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation which, in turn, could mediate most chronic diseases including cancer. Oxidants have been implicated in the activity of crocidolite and amosite, the most powerful types of asbestos associated to the occurrence of mesothelioma. Currently rates of mesothelioma are rising and estimates indicate that the incidence of mesothelioma will peak within the next 10–15 years in the western world, while in Japan the peak is predicted not to occur until 40 years from now. Although the use of asbestos has been banned in many countries around the world, production of and the potentially hazardous exposure to asbestos is still present with locally high incidences of mesothelioma. Today a new man-made material, carbon nanotubes, has arisen as a concern; carbon nanotubes may display ‘asbestos-like’ pathogenicity with mesothelioma induction potential. Carbon nanotubes resulted in the greatest reactive oxygen species generation. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the transformation of a normal cell to a tumor cell, to tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, is the aim of this review. PMID:26078352

  14. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis AJ; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria. PMID:26432659

  15. [Reactive oxygen species are triggers and mediators of an increase in cardiac tolerance to impact of ischemia-reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaia, N V; Podoksenov, Iu K; Prokudina, E S; Gorbunov, A S; Zhang, I; Peĭ, Zh-M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are triggers of ischemic preconditioning (IP). On the role of intracellular messengers of such cardioprotective effect of preconditioning claim: O2*, H2O2, OH*. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that other reactive oxygen metabolites also involved in the IP. Presented data suggest that IP enhances the production of ROS. The source of ROS may be mitochondrial respiratory chain and NADPH oxidase. Exogenous reactive oxygen species (O2*, H2O2) mimic the cardioprotective effect of preconditioning. Preconditioning prevents free radical damage of the heart during ischemia-reperfusion. The protective effect of IP is the consequence of reducing the production of ROS or the result of increased formation of endogenous antioxidants. Antioxidant enzymes are not involved in the protective effect of IP. Cardioprotective effect of many compounds (bradykinin, opioids, acetylcholine, phenylephrine, tumor necrosis factor-α, volatile anesthetics, protonophores, diazoxide, angiotensin II) depends on the increased production of ROS. PMID:25868322

  16. Roles of reactive oxygen species and selected antioxidants in regulation of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stańczyk, Małgorzata; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for life of aerobic organisms. They are produced in normal cells and formed as a result of exposure to numerous factors, both chemical and physical. In normal cells, oxygen derivatives are neutralized or eliminated owing to the presence of a natural defense mechanism that involves enzymatic antioxidants (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase) and water or fat-soluble non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamins C and E, glutathione, selenium). Under certain conditions, however, ROS production during cellular metabolism also stimulated by external agents may exceed the natural ability of cells to eliminate them from the organism. The disturbed balance leads to the state known as oxidative stress inducing damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids. An inefficient repair mechanism may finally trigger the process of neoplastic transformation or cell death. Reactive oxygen species are also an integral part of signal transduction essential for intercellular communication. The balance between pro- and antioxidative processes determines normal cellular metabolism manifested by genes activation and/or proteins expression in response to exo- and endogenous stimuli. PMID:16052887

  17. UV-B-Induced PR-1 Accumulation Is Mediated by Active Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Green, R.; Fluhr, R.

    1995-02-01

    Depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer may result in an increase in the levels of potentially harmful UV-B radiation reaching the surface of the earth. We have found that UV-B is a potent inducer of the plant pathogenesis-related protein PR-1 in tobacco leaves. UV-B fluences required for PR-1 accumulation are similar to those of other UV-B-induced responses. The UV-B-induced PR-1 accumulation was confined precisely to the irradiated area of the leaf but displayed no leaf tissue specificity. A study of some of the possible components of the signal transduction pathway between UV-B and PR-1 induction showed that photosynthetic processes are not essential, and photoreversible DNA damage is not involved. Antioxidants and cycloheximide were able to block the induction of PR-1 by UV-B, and treatment of leaves with a generator of reactive oxygen resulted in the accumulation of PR-1 protein. These results demonstrate an absolute requirement for active oxygen species and protein synthesis in this UV-B signal transduction pathway. In contrast, we also show that other elicitors, notably salicylic acid, are able to elicit PR-1 via nonreactive oxygen species-requiring pathways.

  18. A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study between tetrahydrozoline and naphazoline toward photogenerated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the vitamin B2 (riboflavin [Rf])-sensitized photo-oxidation of the imidazoline derivates (IDs) naphazoline (NPZ) and tetrahydrozoline (THZ) were investigated in aqueous solution. The process appears as important on biomedical grounds, considering that the vitamin is endogenously present in humans, and IDs are active components of ocular medicaments of topical application. Under aerobic visible light irradiation, a complex picture of competitive interactions between sensitizer, substrates and dissolved oxygen takes place: the singlet and triplet ((3)Rf*) excited states of Rf are quenched by the IDs: with IDs concentrations ca. 5.0 mM and 0.02 mM Rf, (3)Rf* is quenched by IDs, in a competitive fashion with dissolved ground state oxygen. Additionally, the reactive oxygen species: O(2)((1)Delta(g)), O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2), generated from (3)Rf* and Rf(*-), were detected with the employment of time-resolved methods or specific scavengers. Oxygen uptake experiments indicate that, for NPZ, only H(2)O(2) was involved in the photo-oxidation. In the case of THZ, O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2) were detected, whereas only HO(*) was unambiguously identified as THZ oxidative agents. Upon direct UV light irradiation NPZ and THZ generate O(2)((1)Delta(g)), with quantum yields of 0.2 (literature value, employed as a reference) and 0.08, respectively, in acetonitrile.

  19. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  1. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the vascular responses to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kvietys, Peter R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and potentially life-threatening condition that involves the participation of a variety of chemical mediators, signaling pathways, and cell types. The microcirculation, which is critical for the initiation and perpetuation of an inflammatory response, exhibits several characteristic functional and structural changes in response to inflammation. These include vasomotor dysfunction (impaired vessel dilation and constriction), the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, endothelial barrier dysfunction (increased vascular permeability), blood vessel proliferation (angiogenesis), and enhanced thrombus formation. These diverse responses of the microvasculature largely reflect the endothelial cell dysfunction that accompanies inflammation and the central role of these cells in modulating processes as varied as blood flow regulation, angiogenesis, and thrombogenesis. The importance of endothelial cells in inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction is also predicated on the ability of these cells to produce and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inflammation seems to upset the balance between nitric oxide and superoxide within (and surrounding) endothelial cells, which is necessary for normal vessel function. This review is focused on defining the molecular targets in the vessel wall that interact with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide to produce the characteristic functional and structural changes that occur in response to inflammation. This analysis of the literature is consistent with the view that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contribute significantly to the diverse vascular responses in inflammation and supports efforts that are directed at targeting these highly reactive species to maintain normal vascular health in pathological conditions that are associated with acute or chronic inflammation. PMID:22154653

  2. A case of mistaken identity: are reactive oxygen species actually reactive sulfide species?

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Eric R; Gao, Yan; Huang, Evelyn; Arif, Maaz; Arora, Nitin; Divietro, Alexander; Patel, Shivali; Olson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Stepwise one-electron reduction of oxygen to water produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are chemically and biochemically similar to reactive sulfide species (RSS) derived from one-electron oxidations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Both ROS and RSS are endogenously generated and signal via protein thiols. Given the similarities between ROS and RSS, we wondered whether extant methods for measuring the former would also detect the latter. Here, we compared ROS to RSS sensitivity of five common ROS methods: redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), 2', 7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, MitoSox Red, Amplex Red, and amperometric electrodes. All methods detected RSS and were as, or more, sensitive to RSS than to ROS. roGFP, arguably the "gold standard" for ROS measurement, was more than 200-fold more sensitive to the mixed polysulfide H2Sn(n = 1-8) than to H2O2 These findings suggest that RSS may be far more prevalent in intracellular signaling than previously appreciated and that the contribution of ROS may be overestimated. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that estimated daily sulfur metabolism and ROS production are approximately equal and the fact that both RSS and antioxidant mechanisms have been present since the origin of life, nearly 4 billion years ago, long before the rise in environmental oxygen 600 million years ago. Although ROS are assumed to be the most biologically relevant oxidants, our results question this paradigm. We also anticipate our findings will direct attention toward development of novel and clinically relevant anti-(RSS)-oxidants.

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane C; Flôr, Atalia F L; França-Silva, Maria S; Balarini, Camille M; Braga, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  4. Reactive Oxygen Species Alter Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Weber, Thomas J.; Tan, Ruimin; Markillie, Lye Meng; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant P450 protein in human liver and intestine and is highly inducible by a variety of drugs and other compounds. The P450 catalytic cycle is known to uncouple and release reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the effects of ROS from P450 and other enzymes in the endo-plasmic reticulum have been poorly studied from the perspective of effects on cell biology. In this study, we expressed low levels of CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, and examined effects on intracellular levels of ROS and on the secretion of a variety of growth factors that are important in extracellular communication. Using the redox-sensitive dye RedoxSensor red, we demonstrate that CYP3A4 expression increases levels of ROS in viable cells. A customELISA microarray platform was employed to demonstrate that expression of CYP3A4 increased secretion of amphiregulin, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, matrix metalloprotease 2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor, but suppressed secretion of CD14. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine suppressed all P450-dependent changes in protein secretion except for CD14. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that changes in protein secretion were consistently associated with corresponding changes in gene expression. Inhibition of the NF-{kappa}B pathway blocked P450 effects on PDGF secretion. CYP3A4 expression also altered protein secretion in human mammary epithelial cells and C10 mouse lung cells. Overall, these results suggest that increased ROS production in the endoplasmic reticulum alters the secretion of proteins that have key roles in paracrine and autocrine signaling.

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Nucleostemin Oligomerization and Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Whang, Patrick; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V.; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Kusler, Brenda; Xu, Liwen; Felsher, Dean W.; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a nucleolar-nucleoplasmic shuttle protein that regulates cell proliferation, binds p53 and Mdm2, and is highly expressed in tumor cells. We have identified NS as a target of oxidative regulation in transformed hematopoietic cells. NS oligomerization occurs in HL-60 leukemic cells and Raji B lymphoblasts that express high levels of c-Myc and have high intrinsic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); reducing agents dissociate NS into monomers and dimers. Exposure of U2OS osteosarcoma cells with low levels of intrinsic ROS to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces thiol-reversible disulfide bond-mediated oligomerization of NS. Increased exposure to H2O2 impairs NS degradation, immobilizes the protein within the nucleolus, and results in detergent-insoluble NS. The regulation of NS by ROS was validated in a murine lymphoma tumor model in which c-Myc is overexpressed and in CD34+ cells from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. In both instances, increased ROS levels were associated with markedly increased expression of NS protein and thiol-reversible oligomerization. Site-directed mutagenesis of critical cysteine-containing regions of nucleostemin altered both its intracellular localization and its stability. MG132, a potent proteasome inhibitor and activator of ROS, markedly decreased degradation and increased nucleolar retention of NS mutants, whereas N-acetyl-l-cysteine largely prevented the effects of MG132. These results indicate that NS is a highly redox-sensitive protein. Increased intracellular ROS levels, such as those that result from oncogenic transformation in hematopoietic malignancies, regulate the ability of NS to oligomerize, prevent its degradation, and may alter its ability to regulate cell proliferation. PMID:21242306

  6. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianfei; Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Gat

    2016-01-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS. Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. PMID:27535793

  8. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Redox biology is a rapidly developing area of research due to the recent evidence for general importance of redox control for numerous cellular functions under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Understanding of redox homeostasis is particularly relevant to the understanding of the aging process. The link between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accumulation of age-associated oxidative damage to macromolecules is well established, but remains controversial and applies only to a subset of experimental models. In addition, recent studies show that ROS may function as signaling molecules and that dysregulation of this process may also be linked to aging. Recent Advances: Many protein factors and pathways that control ROS production and scavenging, as well as those that regulate cellular redox homeostasis, have been identified. However, much less is known about the mechanisms by which redox signaling pathways influence longevity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis for the role of redox signaling in aging. Critical Issues: Recent studies allowed identification of previously uncharacterized redox components and revealed complexity of redox signaling pathways. It would be important to identify functions of these components and elucidate how distinct redox pathways are integrated with each other to maintain homeostatic balance. Future Directions: Further characterization of processes that coordinate redox signaling, redox homeostasis, and stress response pathways should allow researchers to dissect how their dysregulation contributes to aging and pathogenesis of various age-related diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1362–1372. PMID:22901002

  9. Growth enhancement and gene expression of Arabidopsis thaliana irradiated with active oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Shiratani, Masaharu; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Inoue, Asami; Yasuda, Kaori; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2016-07-01

    The characteristics of plant growth enhancement effect and the mechanism of the enhancement induced by plasma irradiation are investigated using various active species in plasma. Active oxygen species in oxygen plasma are effective for growth enhancement of plants. DNA microarray analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana indicates that the genes coding proteins that counter oxidative stresses by eliminating active oxygen species are expressed at significantly high levels. The size of plant cells increases owing to oxygen plasma irradiation. The increases in gene expression levels and cell size suggest that the increase in the expression level of the expansin protein is essential for plant growth enhancement phenomena.

  10. Differential production of active oxygen species in photo-symbiotic and non-symbiotic bivalves.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, K; Maruyama, T

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the generation of active oxygen species in the bivalves, Crassostrea gigas, Fulvia mutica and Tridacna crocea in order to understand the defensive mechanisms in giant clams that allow a stable association with symbiotic zooxanthellae. C. gigas produced active oxygens, superoxide anion and nitric oxide upon stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate. F. mutica generated a little amount of superoxide anion and nitric oxide, and contained significant phenoloxidase activity which catalyzes formation of quinones. T. crocea did not generate any apparent active oxygen species or quinones. The importance of lacking rapid cytotoxic responses consisting of active oxygen species to foreign organisms in the symbiotic clam is discussed.

  11. Oxygen availability is a major factor in determining the composition of microbial communities involved in methane oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria E.; Beck, David A.C.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed that methane supplied to lake sediment microbial communities as a substrate not only causes a response by bona fide methanotrophic bacteria, but also by non-methane-oxidizing bacteria, especially by members of the family Methylophilaceae. This result suggested that methane oxidation in this environment likely involves communities composed of different functional guilds, rather than a single type of microbe. To obtain further support for this concept and to obtain further insights into the factors that may define such partnerships, we carried out microcosm incubations with sediment samples from Lake Washington at five different oxygen tensions, while methane was supplied at the same concentration in each. Community composition was determined through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing after 10 and 16 weeks of incubation. We demonstrate that, in support of our prior observations, the methane-consuming communities were represented by two major types: the methanotrophs of the family Methylococcaceae and by non-methanotrophic methylotrophs of the family Methylophilaceae. However, different species persisted under different oxygen tensions. At high initial oxygen tensions (150 to 225 µM) the major players were, respectively, species of the genera Methylosarcina and Methylophilus, while at low initial oxygen tensions (15 to 75 µM) the major players were Methylobacter and Methylotenera. These data suggest that oxygen availability is at least one major factor determining specific partnerships in methane oxidation. The data also suggest that speciation within Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae may be driven by niche adaptation tailored toward specific placements within the oxygen gradient. PMID:25755930

  12. Metal species involved in long distance metal transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Fernández, Ana; Díaz-Benito, Pablo; Abadía, Anunciación; López-Millán, Ana-Flor; Abadía, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms plants use to transport metals from roots to shoots are not completely understood. It has long been proposed that organic molecules participate in metal translocation within the plant. However, until recently the identity of the complexes involved in the long-distance transport of metals could only be inferred by using indirect methods, such as analyzing separately the concentrations of metals and putative ligands and then using in silico chemical speciation software to predict metal species. Molecular biology approaches also have provided a breadth of information about putative metal ligands and metal complexes occurring in plant fluids. The new advances in analytical techniques based on mass spectrometry and the increased use of synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy have allowed for the identification of some metal-ligand species in plant fluids such as the xylem and phloem saps. Also, some proteins present in plant fluids can bind metals and a few studies have explored this possibility. This study reviews the analytical challenges researchers have to face to understand long-distance metal transport in plants as well as the recent advances in the identification of the ligand and metal-ligand complexes in plant fluids. PMID:24723928

  13. Synthesis, characterisation, and oxygen atom transfer reactions involving the first gold(I)-alkylperoxo complexes.

    PubMed

    Collado, Alba; Gómez-Suárez, Adrián; Oonishi, Yoshihiro; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Nolan, Steven P

    2013-11-25

    The synthesis of a new class of organogold species containing a peroxo moiety is reported. Complexes [Au(IPr)(OO(t)Bu)] and [Au(SIPr)(OO(t)Bu)] have been synthesised via a straightforward methodology using the parent gold(I) hydroxide complexes as synthons. These complexes have been successfully used in oxygen-transfer reactions to triphenylphosphine.

  14. Upsides and Downsides of Reactive Oxygen Species for Cancer: The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumorigenesis, Prevention, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Hevia, David; Patchva, Sridevi; Park, Byoungduck; Koh, Wonil

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Extensive research during the last quarter century has revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the body, primarily by the mitochondria, play a major role in various cell-signaling pathways. Most risk factors associated with chronic diseases (e.g., cancer), such as stress, tobacco, environmental pollutants, radiation, viral infection, diet, and bacterial infection, interact with cells through the generation of ROS. Recent Advances: ROS, in turn, activate various transcription factors (e.g., nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells [NF-κB], activator protein-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), resulting in the expression of proteins that control inflammation, cellular transformation, tumor cell survival, tumor cell proliferation and invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Paradoxically, ROS also control the expression of various tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and PTEN). Similarly, γ-radiation and various chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer mediate their effects through the production of ROS. Interestingly, ROS have also been implicated in the chemopreventive and anti-tumor action of nutraceuticals derived from fruits, vegetables, spices, and other natural products used in traditional medicine. Critical Issues: These statements suggest both “upside” (cancer-suppressing) and “downside” (cancer-promoting) actions of the ROS. Thus, similar to tumor necrosis factor-α, inflammation, and NF-κB, ROS act as a double-edged sword. This paradox provides a great challenge for researchers whose aim is to exploit ROS stress for the development of cancer therapies. Future Directions: The various mechanisms by which ROS mediate paradoxical effects are discussed in this article. The outstanding questions and future directions raised by our current understanding are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1295–1322. PMID:22117137

  15. Decreased oxygen tension lowers reactive oxygen species and apoptosis and inhibits osteoblast matrix mineralization through changes in early osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nicolaije, Claudia; Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating data show that oxygen tension can have an important effect on cell function and fate. We used the human pre-osteoblastic cell line SV-HFO, which forms a mineralizing extracellular matrix, to study the effect of low oxygen tension (2%) on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Mineralization was significantly reduced by 60-70% under 2% oxygen, which was paralleled by lower intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Following this reduction in ROS the cells switched to a lower level of protection by down-regulating their antioxidant enzyme expression. The downside of this is that it left the cells more vulnerable to a subsequent oxidative challenge. Total collagen content was reduced in the 2% oxygen cultures and expression of matrix genes and matrix-metabolizing enzymes was significantly affected. Alkaline phosphatase activity and RNA expression as well as RUNX2 expression were significantly reduced under 2% oxygen. Time phase studies showed that high oxygen in the first phase of osteoblast differentiation and prior to mineralization is crucial for optimal differentiation and mineralization. Switching to 2% or 20% oxygen only during mineralization phase did not change the eventual level of mineralization. In conclusion, this study shows the significance of oxygen tension for proper osteoblast differentiation, extra cellular matrix (ECM) formation, and eventual mineralization. We demonstrated that the major impact of oxygen tension is in the early phase of osteoblast differentiation. Low oxygen in this phase leaves the cells in a premature differentiation state that cannot provide the correct signals for matrix maturation and mineralization.

  16. Extensive Dark Biological Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brackish and Freshwater Ponds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M; Lamborg, Carl H

    2016-03-15

    Within natural waters, photodependent processes are generally considered the predominant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a suite of biogeochemically important molecules. However, recent discoveries of dark particle-associated ROS production in aquatic environments and extracellular ROS production by various microorganisms point to biological activity as a significant source of ROS in the absence of light. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of dark biological production of the ROS superoxide (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in brackish and freshwater ponds. Here we show that the ROS superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were present in dark waters at comparable concentrations as in sunlit waters. This suggests that, at least for the short-lived superoxide species, light-independent processes were an important control on ROS levels in these natural waters. Indeed, we demonstrated that dark biological production of ROS extensively occurred in brackish and freshwater environments, with greater dark ROS production rates generally observed in the aphotic relative to the photic zone. Filtering and formaldehyde inhibition confirmed the biological nature of a majority of this dark ROS production, which likely involved phytoplankton, particle-associated heterotrophic bacteria, and NADH-oxidizing enzymes. We conclude that biological ROS production is widespread, including regions devoid of light, thereby expanding the relevance of these reactive molecules to all regions of our oxygenated global habit.

  17. Involvement of microtubules in rhizoid differentiation of Spirogyra species.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Inoue, N; Sonobe, S; Shimmen, T

    2003-06-01

    Some species of Spirogyra form rosette-shaped or rod-shaped rhizoids in the terminal cell of the filaments. In the present study, we analyzed an involvement of microtubules (MTs) in rhizoid differentiation. Before rhizoid differentiation, cortical MTs were arranged transversely to the long axis of cylindrical cells, reflecting the diffuse growth. At the beginning of rhizoid differentiation, MTs were absent from the extreme tip of the terminal cell. In the other area of the cell, however, MTs were arranged transversely to the long axis of the cell. In the fully differentiated rosette-shaped rhizoid, MTs were randomly organized. However, at a younger stage of rosette-shaped rhizoids, MTs were sometimes arranged almost transversely in the lobes of the rosette. In the rod-shaped rhizoid, MTs were arranged almost transversely. MT-destabilizing drugs (oryzalin and propyzamide) induced swelling of rhizoids, and neither rosette-shaped nor rod-shaped rhizoids were formed. The role of MTs in rhizoid differentiation was discussed.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brain is a metabolically active organ exhibiting high oxygen consumption and robust production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The large amounts of ROS are kept in check by an elaborate network of antioxidants, which sometimes fail and lead to neuronal oxidative stress. Thus, ROS are typically categorized as neurotoxic molecules and typically exert their detrimental effects via oxidation of essential macromolecules such as enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. Most importantly, excessive ROS are associated with decreased performance in cognitive function. However, at physiological concentrations, ROS are involved in functional changes necessary for synaptic plasticity and hence, for normal cognitive function. The fine line of role reversal of ROS from good molecules to bad molecules is far from being fully understood. This review focuses on identifying the multiple sources of ROS in the mammalian nervous system and on presenting evidence for the critical and essential role of ROS in synaptic plasticity and memory. The review also shows that the inability to restrain either age- or pathology-related increases in ROS levels leads to opposite, detrimental effects that are involved in impairments in synaptic plasticity and memory function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2013–2054. PMID:20649473

  19. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  20. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  1. Pharmacology of Free Radicals and the Impact of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Aprioku, Jonah Sydney

    2013-01-01

    The role of free radicals in normal cellular functions and different pathological conditions has been a focus of pharmacological studies in the recent past. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals in general are essential for cell signaling and other vital physiological functions; however, excessive amounts can cause alteration in cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) balance, and disrupt normal biological functions. When there is an imbalance between activities of ROS and antioxidant/scavenging defense systems, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. A good number of studies have shown OS is involved in the development of several disease conditions, including male infertility. In the present article, generation of free radicals and their effects, as well as the mechanisms of antioxidant/scavenging defense systems are discussed, with particular focus on the testis. The review also discusses the contribution of OS on testicular dysfunction and briefly focuses on some OS-induced conditions that will alter testicular function. PMID:24551570

  2. Leukotoxicity of pyoverdin, production of reactive oxygen species, and effect of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Becerra, C; Albesa, I; Eraso, A J

    2001-07-13

    Pyoverdin was purified by solvent extraction, gel filtration, and ionic exchange chromatography. Assays of cytotoxic of pyoverdin were done with human leukocytes and macrophages from the peritoneum of mice. Both cell quantities showed a significant reduction. Death was followed by lysis in a dose-dependent form. The mechanism of action of pyoverdin involved the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT) reaction and chemiluminescence (CL). UV radiation at 368 nm increased the leukotoxicity; expositions of 5 min were enough to photostimulate the effect of pyoverdin on cellular oxydative metabolism, which increased between 35.4 and 53.2%. Genestein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, counteracted the ROS stimuli of pyoverdin, suggesting endocytic mechanism of action for this pigment. The little chloroquine interference on oxydative stress indicated that intraphagosomal pH and the stimuli of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (RNI) seem to be of less importance than ROS in pyoverdin action on leukocytes. PMID:11444858

  3. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not a promotor of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingrui; Chen, Tongsheng

    2009-02-01

    we have previously reported that taxol, a potent anticancer agent, induces caspase-independent cell death and cytoplasmic vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. However, the mechanisms of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization are poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported to be involved in the taxol-induced cell death. Here, we employed confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to explore the role of ROS in taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization. We found that ROS inhibition by addition of N-acetycysteine (NAC), a total ROS scavenger, did not suppress these vacuolization but instead increased vacuolization. Take together, our results showed that ROS is not a promotor of the taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization.

  4. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  5. Modulation of macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity by kerosene soot: Possible role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Arif, J.M.; Khan, S.G.; Ashquin, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1993-05-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytotoxicity of soot on rat alveolar macrophages has been postulated. A single intratracheal injection of soot (5 mg) in corn oil significantly induced the macrophage population, hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]) generation, thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substanced of lipid peroxidation, and the activities of extracellular acid phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at 1, 4, 8, and 16 days of postinoculation. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were significantly inhibited at all the stages, while glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) showed a different pattern. These results show that soot is cytotoxic to alveolar macrophages and suggest that ROS may play a primary role in the cytotoxic process. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy Modulation in Non-Marine Drugs and Marine Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Fayyaz, Sundas; Hou, Ming-Feng; Li, Kun-Tzu; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming more understandable that an existing challenge for translational research is the development of pharmaceuticals that appropriately target reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated molecular networks in cancer cells. In line with this approach, there is an overwhelmingly increasing list of many non-marine drugs and marine drugs reported to be involved in inhibiting and suppressing cancer progression through ROS-mediated cell death. In this review, we describe the strategy of oxidative stress-based therapy and connect the ROS modulating effect to the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, we focus on exploring the function and mechanism of cancer therapy by the autophagy modulators including inhibitors and inducers from non-marine drugs and marine drugs. PMID:25402829

  8. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1.

  9. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1. PMID:27110861

  10. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26185755

  11. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  12. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  13. Comparisons of early transcriptome responses to low-oxygen environments in three dicotyledonous plant species

    PubMed Central

    Christianson, Jed A; Llewellyn, Danny J; Dennis, Elizabeth S

    2010-01-01

    Waterlogging is a serious impediment to crop productivity worldwide which acts to reduce oxygen levels in the rhizosphere due to the low diffusion rate of molecular oxygen in water. Plants respond to low oxygen through rapid and specific changes at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Transcriptional changes to low-oxygen (hypoxia) stress have been studied in a number of plant species using whole genome microarrays. Using transcriptome data from root tissue from early time points (4–5 h) from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), Arabidopsis and gray poplar (Populus x canescens), we have identified a core set of orthologous genes that responded to hypoxia in similar ways between species, and others that showed species specific responses. Responses to hypoxia were most similar between Arabidopsis and cotton, while the waterlogging tolerant poplar species exhibited some significant differences. PMID:20724824

  14. Relationship between lignin degradation and production of reduced oxygen species by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Faison, B.D.; Kirk, T.K.

    1983-11-01

    The relationship between the production of reduced oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/), superoxide (O/sub 2//sup -/), and hydroxyl radical (.OH), and the oxidation of synthetic lignin to CO/sub 2/ was studied in whole cultures of the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burds. The kinetics of the synthesis of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ coincided with the appearance of the ligninolytic system; also, H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ production was markedly enhanced by growth under 100% O/sub 2/, mimicing the increase in ligninolytic activity characteristic of cultures grown under elevated oxygen tension. Lignin degradation by whole cultures was inhibited by a specific H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ scavenger, catalase, implying a role for H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ in the degradative process. Superoxide dismutase also inhibited lignin degradation, suggesting that O/sub 2//sup -/ is also involved in the breakdown of lignin. The production of .OH was assayed in whole cultures by a benzoate decarboxylation assay. Neither the kinetics of .OH synthesis nor the final activity of its producing system obtained under 100% O/sub 2/ correlated with that of the lignin-degrading system. However, lignin degradation was inhibited by compounds which react with .OH. It is concluded that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, and perhaps O/sub 2//sup -/, are involved in lignin degradation; because these species are relatively unreactive per se, their role must be indirect. Conclusions about a role for .OH in ligninolysis could not be reached. (Refs. 28).

  15. The interaction of copper (Cu++) with the erythrocyte membrane and 2,3-dimercaptopropanesulphonate in vitro: a source of activated oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Aaseth, J; Ribarov, S; Bochev, P

    1987-10-01

    The therapy of copper poisoning and of Wilson's disease with 2,3-dimercaptopropane-1-sulphonate (DMPS) may increase the copper-induced haemolysis. Some aspects of the mechanism of this effect were investigated. The possible generation of activated oxygen species during the interaction of Cu++ and DMPS was studied using a chemiluminescent method detecting oxygen radicals. It was found that incubation of DMPS with copper ions (free or bond with erythrocyte membranes) is accompanied with generation of oxygen radicals. Activated oxygen species produced via O2- are able to increase the haemolytic effects of cupric salts. Hence DMPS treatment in cases of copper poisonings or Wilson's disease may involve risk of side effects on the basis of activated oxygen species generation.

  16. The Effect of Oxygen Potential on the Sulfide Capacity for Slags Containing Multivalent Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allertz, Carl; Selleby, Malin; Sichen, Du

    2016-10-01

    The dependence of sulfide capacity on the oxygen partial pressure for slags containing multivalent species was investigated experimentally using a slag containing vanadium oxide. Copper-slag equilibration experiments were carried out at 1873 K (1600 °C) in the approximate oxygen partial pressure range 10-15.4 to 10-9 atm. The sulfide capacity was found to be strongly dependent on the oxygen potential in this slag system, increasing with the oxygen partial pressure. The sulfide capacity changed by more than two orders of magnitude over the oxygen partial pressure range. The effect of changing oxygen partial pressure was found to be much greater than the effect of changing slag composition at a fixed oxygen partial pressure.

  17. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  18. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robin J; Roe, Kelly L; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O[Formula: see text]) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O[Formula: see text] were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O[Formula: see text] and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O[Formula: see text] and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O[Formula: see text] production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10(-16) mol cell(-1) h(-1), while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10(-16) mol cell(-1) h(-1). Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O[Formula: see text] in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O[Formula: see text] is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O[Formula: see text] production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O[Formula: see text] for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O[Formula: see text]. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O[Formula: see text]) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O[Formula: see text]). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O

  19. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  20. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  1. Interconnection of reactive oxygen species chemistry across the interfaces of atmospheric, environmental, and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Anglada, Josep M; Martins-Costa, Marilia; Francisco, Joseph S; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2015-03-17

    Oxidation reactions are ubiquitous and play key roles in the chemistry of the atmosphere, in water treatment processes, and in aerobic organisms. Ozone (O3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydrogen polyoxides (H2Ox, x > 2), associated hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals (HOx = OH and HO2), and superoxide and ozonide anions (O2(-) and O3(-), respectively) are the primary oxidants in these systems. They are commonly classified as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Atmospheric chemistry is driven by a complex system of chain reactions of species, including nitrogen oxides, hydroxyl and hydroperoxide radicals, alkoxy and peroxy radicals, and ozone. HOx radicals contribute to keeping air clean, but in polluted areas, the ozone concentration increases and creates a negative impact on plants and animals. Indeed, ozone concentration is used to assess air quality worldwide. Clouds have a direct effect on the chemical composition of the atmosphere. On one hand, cloud droplets absorb many trace atmospheric gases, which can be scavenged by rain and fog. On the other hand, ionic species can form in this medium, which makes the chemistry of the atmosphere richer and more complex. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that air-cloud interfaces might have a significant impact on the overall chemistry of the troposphere. Despite the large differences in molecular composition, concentration, and thermodynamic conditions among atmospheric, environmental, and biological systems, the underlying chemistry involving ROS has many similarities. In this Account, we examine ROS and discuss the chemical characteristics common to all of these systems. In water treatment, ROS are key components of an important subset of advanced oxidation processes. Ozonation, peroxone chemistry, and Fenton reactions play important roles in generating sufficient amounts of hydroxyl radicals to purify wastewater. Biochemical processes within living organisms also involve ROS. These species can come from pollutants in

  2. Extracellular ultrathin fibers sensitive to intracellular reactive oxygen species: Formation of intercellular membrane bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Se-Hui; Park, Jin-Young; Joo, Jung-Hoon; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2011-07-15

    Membrane bridges are key cellular structures involved in intercellular communication; however, dynamics for their formation are not well understood. We demonstrated the formation and regulation of novel extracellular ultrathin fibers in NIH3T3 cells using confocal and atomic force microscopy. At adjacent regions of neighboring cells, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and glucose oxidase induced ultrathin fiber formation, which was prevented by Trolox, a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger. The height of ROS-sensitive ultrathin fibers ranged from 2 to 4 nm. PMA-induced formation of ultrathin fibers was inhibited by cytochalasin D, but not by Taxol or colchicine, indicating that ultrathin fibers mainly comprise microfilaments. PMA-induced ultrathin fibers underwent dynamic structural changes, resulting in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Thus, these fibers are formed by a mechanism(s) involving ROS and involved in formation of intercellular membrane bridges. Furthermore, ultrastructural imaging of ultrathin fibers may contribute to understanding the diverse mechanisms of cell-to-cell communication and the intercellular transfer of biomolecules, including proteins and cell organelles.

  3. Endogenous reactive oxygen species content and modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Donà, G; Fiore, C; Tibaldi, E; Frezzato, F; Andrisani, A; Ambrosini, G; Fiorentin, D; Armanini, D; Bordin, L; Clari, G

    2011-10-01

    Generation of controlled amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation of protein tyrosine (Tyr) residues are two main cellular changes involved in sperm capacitation. This study examined the relationship between tyrosine-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) and endogenous ROS production during sperm capacitation, and correlated them with both sperm motility and functionality expressed as acrosome-reacted cells. Immediate ROS generation was observed to peak after a 45-min incubation, followed by a rapid decrease in ROS content and successive regeneration of the ROS peak in 3 h and later. These two peaks were directly correlated with both the Tyr-P process involving sperm heads and tails, and the acrosome reaction (69 ± 8% and 65 ± 4%, respectively). The period of low-ROS content resulted in low Tyr-P patterns, located exclusively in the cell midpiece, and drastic reduction in acrosome-reacted cells. Ascorbic acid addition inhibited both Tyr-P patterns and acrosome reactions, whereas NADPH induced high ROS generation, with Tyr-P patterns located only on sperm tails, and prevented the acrosome reaction. Sperm hyperactivation was insensitive to ROS content. This is an important parameter for evaluation of sperm capacitation, which is achieved only when both ROS generation reaches a peak and Tyr-P involves the sperm head. PMID:20738429

  4. Using oxygen species to measure marine production in Drake Passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro Morales, Karel; Cassar, Nicolas; Bender, Michael; Kaiser, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Marine biological production is key to understanding the global carbon cycle, particularly the role of the Southern Ocean as a sink of CO2. Measurements of oxygen in the surface ocean allow quantifying marine biological productivity, since CO2 and O2 are linked via photosynthesis and respiration. Measurements of O2/Ar ratios and dissolved O2 isotopologues, together with wind-speed gas exchange parameterizations, give estimates of biological oxygen air-sea fluxes (Fbio) and gross photosynthetic production (G) in the mixed layer (zmix). In the absence of vertical mixing, Fbio can be used as a proxy for net community production (N). O2/Ar ratios and O2 concentrations were measured continuously in the uncontaminated seawater supply on board the RRS James Clark Ross along two sections across Drake Passage (DP). The DP1 section (southbound, 27 February-3 March 2007) represented mid-summer; DP2 represented early autumn (northbound, 12-15 April, 2007). The time difference between the two transects was 40 days. Weighted average gas exchange rates were calculated using the WOCE-NODC ocean mixed layer depth climatology and ECMWF wind speeds over 60 days prior to sample collection. The WOCE-NODC climatology shows a deepening of the zmix by on average 46 m within 40 days. The sea surface temperature decreased about 2.4 °C from DP1 to DP2. This reflects the seasonal transition from late summer to early autumn. In agreement with previous observations, we observed a strong north-south gradient of biological oxygen production in the DP. Our results also show high temporal variability over the course of 40 days. During late summer, the physical supersaturation contributes to about 3.6% of the total O2 supersaturation (?O2) for the Subantarctic and Polar Frontal Zones (SAZ and PFZ, respectively). In the other hand, the biological O2 supersaturation (?O2/Ar) showed mainly positive and homogeneous values (~1%) along the Antarctic Zone and Southern Antarctic Circumpolar Current Zone

  5. Synergistic photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by dissolved organic matter and C60 in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Niu, Junfeng; Shang, Enxiang; Crittenden, John Charles

    2015-01-20

    We investigated the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by C60 under UV irradiation, when humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) is present. When C60 and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were present as a mixture, singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation concentrations were 1.2–1.5 times higher than the sum of (1)O2 concentrations that were produced when C60 and DOM were present in water by themselves. When C60 and HA were present as a mixture, superoxide radicals (O2(•–)) were 2.2–2.6 times more than when C60 and HA were present in water by themselves. A synergistic ROS photogeneration mechanism involved in energy and electron transfer between DOM and C60 was proposed. Enhanced (1)O2 generation in the mixtures was partly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to O2. However, it was mostly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to C60 producing (3)C60*. (3)C60* has a prolonged lifetime (>4 μs) in the mixture and provides sufficient time for energy transfer to O2, which produces (1)O2. The enhanced O2(•–) generation for HA/C60 mixture was because (3)C60* mediated electron transfer from photoionized HA to O2. This study demonstrates the importance of considering DOM when investigating ROS production by C60.

  6. Sensitivity of primary fibroblasts in culture to atmospheric oxygen does not correlate with species lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Alison; Seluanov, Michael; Hwang, Chaewon; Tam, Jonathan; Khan, Tanya; Morgenstern, Ari; Wiener, Lauren; Vazquez, Juan M.; Zafar, Hiba; Wen, Robert; Muratkalyeva, Malika; Doerig, Katherine; Zagorulya, Maria; Cole, Lauren; Catalano, Sophia; Lobo Ladd, Aliny AB; Coppi, A. Augusto; Coşkun, Yüksel; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Nevo, Eviatar; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Vijg, Jan; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Differences in the way human and mouse fibroblasts experience senescence in culture had long puzzled researchers. While senescence of human cells is mediated by telomere shortening, Parrinello et al. demonstrated that senescence of mouse cells is caused by extreme oxygen sensitivity. It was hypothesized that the striking difference in oxygen sensitivity between mouse and human cells explains their different rates of aging. To test if this hypothesis is broadly applicable, we cultured cells from 16 rodent species with diverse lifespans in 3% and 21% oxygen and compared their growth rates. Unexpectedly, fibroblasts derived from laboratory mouse strains were the only cells demonstrating extreme sensitivity to oxygen. Cells from hamster, muskrat, woodchuck, capybara, blind mole rat, paca, squirrel, beaver, naked mole rat and wild-caught mice were mildly sensitive to oxygen, while cells from rat, gerbil, deer mouse, chipmunk, guinea pig and chinchilla showed no difference in the growth rate between 3% and 21% oxygen. We conclude that, although the growth of primary fibroblasts is generally improved by maintaining cells in 3% oxygen, the extreme oxygen sensitivity is a peculiarity of laboratory mouse strains, possibly related to their very long telomeres, and fibroblast oxygen sensitivity does not directly correlate with species' lifespan. PMID:27163160

  7. Sensitivity of primary fibroblasts in culture to atmospheric oxygen does not correlate with species lifespan.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Alison; Seluanov, Michael; Hwang, Chaewon; Tam, Jonathan; Khan, Tanya; Morgenstern, Ari; Wiener, Lauren; Vazquez, Juan M; Zafar, Hiba; Wen, Robert; Muratkalyeva, Malika; Doerig, Katherine; Zagorulya, Maria; Cole, Lauren; Catalano, Sophia; Lobo Ladd, Aliny Ab; Coppi, A Augusto; Coşkun, Yüksel; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Nevo, Eviatar; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Vijg, Jan; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2016-05-01

    Differences in the way human and mouse fibroblasts experience senescence in culture had long puzzled researchers. While senescence of human cells is mediated by telomere shortening, Parrinello et al. demonstrated that senescence of mouse cells is caused by extreme oxygen sensitivity. It was hypothesized that the striking difference in oxygen sensitivity between mouse and human cells explains their different rates of aging. To test if this hypothesis is broadly applicable, we cultured cells from 16 rodent species with diverse lifespans in 3% and 21% oxygen and compared their growth rates. Unexpectedly, fibroblasts derived from laboratory mouse strains were the only cells demonstrating extreme sensitivity to oxygen. Cells from hamster, muskrat, woodchuck, capybara, blind mole rat, paca, squirrel, beaver, naked mole rat and wild-caught mice were mildly sensitive to oxygen, while cells from rat, gerbil, deer mouse, chipmunk, guinea pig and chinchilla showed no difference in the growth rate between 3% and 21% oxygen. We conclude that, although the growth of primary fibroblasts is generally improved by maintaining cells in 3% oxygen, the extreme oxygen sensitivity is a peculiarity of laboratory mouse strains, possibly related to their very long telomeres, and fibroblast oxygen sensitivity does not directly correlate with species' lifespan. PMID:27163160

  8. A hybrid computer program for rapidly solving flowing or static chemical kinetic problems involving many chemical species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, A. G.; Rao, C. S. R.

    1976-01-01

    A hybrid chemical kinetic computer program was assembled which provides a rapid solution to problems involving flowing or static, chemically reacting, gas mixtures. The computer program uses existing subroutines for problem setup, initialization, and preliminary calculations and incorporates a stiff ordinary differential equation solution technique. A number of check cases were recomputed with the hybrid program and the results were almost identical to those previously obtained. The computational time saving was demonstrated with a propane-oxygen-argon shock tube combustion problem involving 31 chemical species and 64 reactions. Information is presented to enable potential users to prepare an input data deck for the calculation of a problem.

  9. Field ecology, fungal sex and food contamination involving Aspergillus species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several species within the genus Aspergillus are capable of producing a myriad of toxic secondary metabolites, with aflatoxin being of most concern. These fungi happen to colonize important agricultural commodities, thereby having the potential to contaminate our food with carcinogenic aflatoxins. P...

  10. Roles of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W.; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO−) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO, O2·−), are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including in the development of pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contribution of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel non-narcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the role of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is due to the fact that unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory [1]. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the last 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO/PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area. PMID:21277369

  11. Relevance of reactive oxygen species in the induction of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine in HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Riemschneider, Stephan; Podhaisky, Hans-Peter; Klapperstück, Thomas; Wohlrab, Wolfgang

    2002-01-01

    There is growing evidence that solar radiation-induced oxidative DNA damage may play an important role in carcinogenesis of the skin. One substantial modification in this context is the oxidation of the guanine base to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine. Using HaCaT keratinocytes, measurement of the 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine content in this study was performed by flow cytometry on whole cells. Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals seem not to be involved in the process of this DNA alteration. However, our results demonstrate that ultraviolet A can cause DNA damage at guanine sites primarily via photosensitized reactions. Although singlet oxygen can also lead to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine, the major mechanism seems to be based on formation of the guanylcation radical through excited riboflavin and can therefore proceed without the involvement of reactive oxygen species. PMID:12430729

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species on the Early Earth and Survival of Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balk, Melikea; Mason, Paul; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Freund, Friedemann; Rothschild, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    An oxygen-rich atmosphere appears to have been a prerequisite for complex, multicellular life to evolve on Earth and possibly elsewhere in the Universe. However it remains unclear how free oxygen first became available on the early Earth. A potentially important, and as yet poorly constrained pathway, is the production of oxygen through the weathering of rocks and release into the near-surface environment. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), as precursors to molecular oxygen, are a key step in this process, and may have had a decisive impact on the evolution of life, present and past. ROS are generated from minerals in igneous rocks during hydrolysis of peroxy defects, which consist of pairs of oxygen anions oxidized to the valence state -1 and during (bio) transformations of iron sulphide minerals. ROS are produced and consumed by intracellular and extracellular reactions of Fe, Mn, C, N, and S species. We propose that, despite an overall reducing or neutral oxidation state of the macroenvironment and the absence of free O2 in the atmosphere, organisms on the early Earth had to cope with ROS in their microenvironments. They were thus under evolutionary pressure to develop enzymatic and other defences against the potentially dangerous, even lethal effects of oxygen and its derived ROS. Conversely it appears that microorganisms learned to take advantage of the enormous reactive potential and energy gain provided by nascent oxygen. We investigate how oxygen might be released through weathering. We test microorganisms in contact with rock surfaces and iron sulphides. We model bacteria such as Deionococcus radiodurans and Desulfotomaculum, Moorella and Bacillus species for their ability to grow or survive in the presence of ROS. We examine how early Life might have adapted to oxygen.

  13. Effect of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species on crucial cellular antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lesgards, Jean-François; Gauthier, Cyrielle; Iovanna, Juan; Vidal, Nicolas; Dolla, Alain; Stocker, Pierre

    2011-03-15

    Numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) issuing from lipid and sugar oxidation are known to damage a large number of proteins leading to enzyme inhibition and alteration of cellular functions. Whereas studies in literature only focus on the reactivity of one or two of these compounds, we aimed at comparing in the same conditions of incubations (4 and 24h at 37°C) the effects of both various RCS (4-hydroxynonenal, 4-hydroxyhexenal, acrolein, methylglyoxal, glyoxal, malondialdehyde) and ROS (H₂O₂, AAPH) on the activity of key enzymes involved in cellular oxidative stress: superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). This was realized both in vitro on purified proteins and MIAPaCa-2 cells. Incubation of these enzymes with RCS resulted in a significant time- and concentration-dependent inhibition for both pure enzymes and in cell lysates. Among all RCS and ROS, hydroxynonenal (HNE) was observed as the most toxic for all studied enzymes except for SOD and is followed by hydrogen peroxide. At 100μM, HNE resulted in a 50% reduction of GPx, 56% of GST, 65% of G6PDH, and only 10% of Cu,Zn-SOD. Meanwhile it seems that concentrations used in our study are closer to biological conditions for ROS than for RCS. H₂O₂ and AAPH-induced peroxyl radicals may be probably more toxic towards the studied enzymes in vivo.

  14. Reactive oxygen species can modulate circadian phase and period in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Norbert; Nagy, Dóra; Makara, Krisztina; Ella, Krisztina; Káldi, Krisztina

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) may serve as signals coupling metabolism to other cell functions. In addition to being by-products of normal metabolism, they are generated at elevated levels under environmental stress situations. We analyzed how reactive oxygen species affect the circadian clock in the model organism Neurospora crassa. In light/dark cycles, an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species advanced the phase of both the conidiation rhythm and the expression of the clock gene frequency. Our results indicate a dominant role of the superoxide anion in the control of the phase. Elevation of superoxide production resulted in the activation of protein phosphatase 2A, a regulator of the positive element of the circadian clock. Our data indicate that even under nonstress conditions, reactive oxygen species affect circadian timekeeping. Reduction of their basal levels results in a delay of the phase in light/dark cycles and a longer period under constant conditions. We show that under entrained conditions the phase depends on the temperature and reactive oxygen species contribute to this effect. Our results suggest that the superoxide anion is an important factor controlling the circadian oscillator and is able to reset the clock most probably by activating protein phosphatase 2A, thereby modulating the activity of the White Collar complex.

  15. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nicholas G; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  16. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nicholas G.; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  17. Apolipoprotein A-I expression suppresses COX-2 expression by reducing reactive oxygen species in hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Jing; Liu, Wei; Wang, Yutong

    2014-11-21

    Abnormal lipid metabolism may contribute to the increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) accepts cellular cholesterol and phospholipids transported by ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 to generate nascent high density lipoprotein particles. Previous studies revealed that the overexpression of ABCA1 or apoA-I alleviated hepatic lipid levels by modifying lipid transport. Here, we examined the effect of apoA-I overexpression on ROS and genes involved in inflammation in both BEL-7402 hepatocytes and mice. Human apoA-I was overexpressed by transfection in BEL-7402 hepatocytes and by an adenoviral vector in C57BL/6J mice fed a methionine choline-deficient diet. The overexpression of apoA-I in both models resulted in decreased ROS and lipid peroxidation levels, as well as a reduced MAPK phosphorylation and decreased expression levels of c-Fos and COX-2. These results suggest that apoA-I overexpression can reduce steatosis by decreasing ROS levels and suppressing COX-2-induced inflammation in hepatocytes. MAPK and c-Fos are involved in this regulatory process.

  18. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Metabolic Changes in Barley Seed Embryo during Germination.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bykova, Natalia V; Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2016-01-01

    The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0-48 h post imbibition) the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione) were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS) might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy.

  19. Targeting cancer cells with reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generated by atmospheric-pressure air plasma.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hak Jun; Kim, Kang Il; Hoan, Nguyen Ngoc; Kim, Churl Ho; Moon, Eunpyo; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Yang, Sang Sik; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    The plasma jet has been proposed as a novel therapeutic method for cancer. Anticancer activity of plasma has been reported to involve mitochondrial dysfunction. However, what constituents generated by plasma is linked to this anticancer process and its mechanism of action remain unclear. Here, we report that the therapeutic effects of air plasma result from generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) including H2O2, Ox, OH-, •O2, NOx, leading to depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ROS accumulation. Simultaneously, ROS/RNS activate c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. As a consequence, treatment with air plasma jets induces apoptotic death in human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Pretreatment of the cells with antioxidants, JNK and p38 inhibitors, or JNK and p38 siRNA abrogates the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential and impairs the air plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting that the ROS/RNS generated by plasma trigger signaling pathways involving JNK and p38 and promote mitochondrial perturbation, leading to apoptosis. Therefore, administration of air plasma may be a feasible strategy to eliminate cancer cells.

  20. [Impact of biologically important anions on reactive oxygen species formation in water under the effect of non-ionizing physical agents].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Ivanov, V E; Karp, O É; Chernikov, A V; Belosludtsev, K N; Bobylev, A G; Astashev, M E; Gapeev, A B; Bruskov, V I

    2014-01-01

    The influence of biologically relevant anions (succinate, acetate, citrate, chloride, bicarbonate, hydroorthophosphate, dihydroorthophosphate, nitrite, nitrate) on the formation of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals in water was studied under the effect of non-ionizing radiation: heat, laser light with a wavelength of 632.8 nm, corresponding to the maximum absorption of molecular oxygen, and electromagnetic radiation of extremely high frequencies. It has been established that various anions may both inhibit the formation of reactive oxygen species and increase it. Bicarbonate and sulfate anions included in the biological fluids' and medicinal mineral waters have significant, but opposite effects on reactive oxygen species production. Different molecular mechanisms of reactive oxygen species formation are considered under the action of the investigated physical factors involving these anions, which may influence the biological processes by signal-regulatory manner and provide a healing effect in physical therapy.

  1. Blood biochemical and cellular changes during a decompression procedure involving eight hours of oxygen prebreathing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jauchem, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical and cellular parameters were measured in human subjects before and after exposure to a decompression schedule involving 8 h of oxygen prebreathing. The exposure was designed to simulate space-flight extravehicular activity (EVA) for 6 h. Several statistically significant changes in blood parameters were observed following the exposure: increases in calcium, magnesium, osmolality, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, monocytes, and prothrombin time, and decreases in chloride, creatine phosphokinase and eosinophils. The changes, however, were small in magnitude and blood factor levels remained within normal clinical ranges. Thus, the decompression profile used in this study is not likely to result in blood changes that would pose a threat to astronauts during EVA.

  2. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  3. Implication of reactive oxygen species in the antibacterial activity against Salmonella typhimurium of hepatocyte cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lajarin, F; Rubio, G; Lorenzo, N; Gámiz, P; Hernandez-Caselles, T; Garcia-Peñarrubia, P

    1999-11-01

    We recently described the antibacterial activity of a murine hepatocyte cell line stimulated with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-1 (IL-1), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) against intracellular Salmonella organisms. Here we show for the first time the existence of basal antibacterial activity in cultured hepatocyte cell lines. Thus treatment of resting and stimulated hepatocytes with catalase or superoxide dismutase increased bacterial number recovered per monolayer, which suggests that the mechanism involved with antibacterial activity of hepatocytes is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Also, the capacity of these cell lines to generate intracellular peroxides under resting and stimulated conditions was investigated. This revealed that IL-1 and LPS did not induce any increase in the amount of intracellular peroxides by themselves, but they primed IFN-gamma for maximal induction of peroxides. The intracellular amount of peroxides was highly increased on stimulation with IFN-gamma, IL-1, and LPS, and it was strongly inhibited by catalase. This explains that the mechanism whereby this enzyme inhibits antibacterial activity takes place by decreasing the intracellular pool of peroxides. In turn, experiments performed in the presence of several inhibitors of metabolic pathways involved in ROS generation suggested that cyclo-oxygenase are a source of these species in hepatocyte cell lines. These results attribute a prominent role to the generation of peroxides as effector molecules of antibacterial activity in hepatocyte cell lines. Thus these cells displayed a moderate basal level, which increased on stimulation with proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-gamma, IL-1, and bacterial products such as LPS. Finally, it has been also shown for the first time that IFN-gamma stimulation induces production of peroxides in human and murine hepatocyte cell lines.

  4. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  5. Effects of coordination number of Au catalyst on oxygen species and their catalytic roles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Gen; Zhu, Kong-Jie; Zhang, Lei; Cui, Peng-Fei; Teng, Bo-Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong

    2016-11-01

    To explore the effects of coordination number of Au nanoparticles on oxygen species and their catalytic roles is very important in gold catalysis. Based on the systematic study of oxygen adsorption on Au(997) by density functional theory calculation, the quantitative correlation for different oxygen species with coverage and Au coordination number is established in theory. The only O adatoms near step area with relatively low Au coordination numbers exist at low coverage (<1/18 ML), O adatoms adsorb at terrace areas with relatively high Au coordination numbers at medium coverage (1/18-2/9 ML); while oxygen islands form at high coverage (>2/9 ML). The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental observations in TDS spectrum. On the basis of Langmuir-Hinschelwood and Eley-Rideal mechanisms for NO oxidation, the activities of the three different oxygen species also exhibit correlation with Au coordination number. The oxygen island shows the highest oxidation activity, followed by the O adatom at terrace surface; while the O adatom near step area has the lowest oxidative performance. This work will shed light into the understanding of gold catalysis.

  6. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by Eriobotrya japonica seed extract.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Junko; Takuma, Daisuke; Hamada, Atsuhide; Onogawa, Masahide; Yoshioka, Saburo; Kusunose, Masahiko; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko; Kyotani, Shojiro; Nishioka, Yutaka

    2006-03-01

    We have clarified that Eriobotrya japonica seed extract has strong antioxidative activity, and is effective for the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as hepatopathy and nephropathy. In this study, to investigate the influences of components of Eriobotrya japonica seed extract on its antioxidative activity, extracts were prepared using various solvents (n-hexane (Hex), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (n-BuOH), methanol (MeOH) and H2O) and the antioxidative activity of the solvent fractions and components was evaluated based on the scavenging of various radicals (DPPH and O2(-)) measured by the ESR method and the inhibition of Fe3+-ADP induced NADPH dependent lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes. The radical scavenging activities and inhibitory activities on lipid peroxidation differed among the solvent fractions and components. In the n-BuOH, MeOH and H2O fractions, radical scavenging activity and inhibitory activity on lipid peroxidation were high. In addition, these fractions contained abundant polyphenols, and the radical scavenging activity increased with the polyphenol content. In the low-polar Hex and EtOAc fractions, the radical scavenging activity was low, but the lipid peroxidation inhibition activity was high. These fractions contained beta-sitosterol, and the inhibitory activity on lipid peroxidation was high. Based on these findings, the antioxidative activity of Eriobotrya japonica seed extract may be derived from many components involved in a complex mechanism, resulting in high activity.

  7. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells.

  8. Up-regulation of alpha1-microglobulin by hemoglobin and reactive oxygen species in hepatoma and blood cell lines.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Magnus G; Allhorn, Maria; Olofsson, Tor; Akerström, Bo

    2007-03-15

    alpha(1)-Microglobulin is a 26-kDa glycoprotein synthesized in the liver, secreted to the blood, and rapidly distributed to the extravascular compartment of all tissues. Recent results show that alpha(1)-microglobulin has heme-binding and heme-degrading properties and it has been suggested that the protein is involved in the defense against oxidation by heme and reactive oxygen species. In the present study the influence of hemoglobin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the cellular expression of alpha(1)-microglobulin was investigated. Oxy- and methemoglobin, free heme, and Fenton reaction-induced hydroxyl radicals induced a dose-dependent up-regulation of alpha(1)-microglobulin on both mRNA and protein levels in hepatoma cells and an increased secretion of alpha(1)-microglobulin. The up-regulation was reversed by the addition of catalase and ascorbate, and by reacting hemoglobin with cyanide which prevents redox reactions. Furthermore, the blood cell lines U937 and K562 expressed alpha(1)-microglobulin at low levels, and this expression increased up to 11-fold by the addition of hemoglobin. These results suggest that alpha(1)-microglobulin expression is induced by ROS, arising from redox reactions of hemoglobin or from other sources and are consistent with the hypothesis that alpha(1)-microglobulin participates in the defense against oxidation by hemoglobin, heme, and reactive oxygen species.

  9. Cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser.

    PubMed

    Alexsandra da Silva Neto Trajano, Larissa; da Silva, Camila Luna; de Carvalho, Simone Nunes; Cortez, Erika; Mencalha, André Luiz; de Souza da Fonseca, Adenilson; Stumbo, Ana Carolina

    2016-07-01

    Low-level infrared laser is considered safe and effective for treatment of muscle injuries. However, the mechanism involved on beneficial effects of laser therapy are not understood. The aim was to evaluate cell viability, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures exposed to low-level infrared laser at therapeutic fluences. C2C12 myoblast cultures at different (2 and 10 %) fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentrations were exposed to low-level infrared laser (808 nm, 100 mW) at different fluences (10, 35, and 70 J/cm(2)) and evaluated after 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated by WST-1 assay; reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and necrosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Cell viability was decreased atthe lowest FBS concentration. Laser exposure increased the cell viability in myoblast cultures at 2 % FBS after 48 and 72 h, but no significant increase in ROS was observed. Apoptosis was decreased at the higher fluence and necrosis was increased at lower fluence in myoblast cultures after 24 h of laser exposure at 2 % FBS. No laser-induced alterations were obtained at 10 % FBS. Results show that level of reactive oxygen species is not altered, at least to those evaluated in this study, but low-level infrared laser exposure affects cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis in myoblast cultures depending on laser fluence and physiologic conditions of cells. PMID:26886589

  10. Thioredoxin Is Involved in Oxygen-Regulated Formation of the Photosynthetic Apparatus of Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Cecile; Haberzettl, Kerstin; Klug, Gabriele

    1999-01-01

    Thioredoxin, a redox active protein, has been previously demonstrated to be essential for growth of the anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. In the present study, the involvement of thioredoxin in the formation of the photosynthetic apparatus of R. sphaeroides WS8 was investigated by construction and analysis of a mutant strain disrupted for the chromosomal trxA copy and carrying a plasmid-borne copy of trxA under the control of the hybrid ptrc promoter inducible by IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside). This strain was viable in the absence of IPTG but was affected in pigmentation. When shifted from high to low oxygen tension conditions, the trxA mutant showed a reduced bacteriochlorophyll content in comparison to that of the wild type. Although thioredoxin is able to regulate aminolevulinic acid (ALA) synthase (the first enzyme of the tetrapyrrole biosynthetic pathway) activity by a dithiol-disulfide exchange, our mutant strain exhibited a level of ALA synthase activity identical to that of the wild type, suggesting that thioredoxin is involved in other steps to regulate the synthesis of the photosynthetic apparatus. Accordingly, we showed that the trxA mutation affects the oxygen-regulated expression of the puf operon encoding the pigment-binding proteins of the light-harvesting and reaction center complexes. Upon transition from aerobic to semiaerobic growth conditions, the maximal puf mRNA level was found to be 40 to 50% lower in the mutant strain than in the wild type. The stability of the puf transcripts was identical in both strains grown under low oxygen tension, indicating that the role of thioredoxin in regulating puf expression occurs at the transcriptional level. PMID:9864318

  11. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  12. Endotoxin Disrupts Circadian Rhythms in Macrophages via Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yusi; Pati, Paramita; Xu, Yiming; Chen, Feng; Stepp, David W.; Huo, Yuqing; Rudic, R. Daniel; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a transcriptional network that functions to regulate the expression of genes important in the anticipation of changes in cellular and organ function. Recent studies have revealed that the recognition of pathogens and subsequent initiation of inflammatory responses are strongly regulated by a macrophage-intrinsic circadian clock. We hypothesized that the circadian pattern of gene expression might be influenced by inflammatory stimuli and that loss of circadian function in immune cells can promote pro-inflammatory behavior. To investigate circadian rhythms in inflammatory cells, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from mPer2luciferase transgenic mice and circadian oscillations were studied in response to stimuli. Using Cosinor analysis, we found that LPS significantly altered the circadian period in peritoneal macrophages from mPer2luciferase mice while qPCR data suggested that the pattern of expression of the core circadian gene (Bmal1) was disrupted. Inhibition of TLR4 offered protection from the LPS-induced impairment in rhythm, suggesting a role for toll-like receptor signaling. To explore the mechanisms involved, we inhibited LPS-stimulated NO and superoxide. Inhibition of NO synthesis with L-NAME had no effect on circadian rhythms. In contrast, inhibition of superoxide with Tempol or PEG-SOD ameliorated the LPS-induced changes in circadian periodicity. In gain of function experiments, we found that overexpression of NOX5, a source of ROS, could significantly disrupt circadian function in a circadian reporter cell line (U2OS) whereas iNOS overexpression, a source of NO, was ineffective. To assess whether alteration of circadian rhythms influences macrophage function, peritoneal macrophages were isolated from Bmal1-KO and Per-TKO mice. Compared to WT macrophages, macrophages from circadian knockout mice exhibited altered balance between NO and ROS release, increased uptake of oxLDL and increased adhesion and migration. These results

  13. Induction of apoptosis by plumbagin through reactive oxygen species-mediated inhibition of topoisomerase II

    SciTech Connect

    Kawiak, Anna; Piosik, Jacek; Stasilojc, Grzegorz; Gwizdek-Wisniewska, Anna; Marczak, Lukasz; Stobiecki, Maciej; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2007-09-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been recognized as key molecules, which can selectively modify proteins and therefore regulate cellular signalling including apoptosis. Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone exhibiting antitumor activity, is known to generate ROS and has been found to inhibit the activity of topoisomerase II (Topo II) through the stabilization of the Topo II-DNA cleavable complex. The objective of this research was to clarify the role of ROS and Topo II inhibition in the induction of apoptosis mediated by plumbagin. As determined by the comet assay, plumbagin induced DNA cleavage in HL-60 cells, whereas in a cell line with reduced Topo II activity-HL-60/MX2, the level of DNA damage was significantly decreased. The onset of DNA strand break formation in HL-60 cells was delayed in comparison with the generation of intracellular ROS. In HL-60/MX2 cells, ROS were generated at a similar rate, whereas a significant reduction in the level of DNA damage was detected. The pretreatment of cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) attenuated plumbagin-induced DNA damage, pointing out to the involvement of ROS generation in cleavable complex formation. These results suggest that plumbagin-induced ROS does not directly damage DNA but requires the involvement of Topo II. Furthermore, experiments carried out using light spectroscopy indicated no direct interactions between plumbagin and DNA. The induction of apoptosis was significantly delayed in HL-60/MX2 cells indicating the involvement of Topo II inhibition in plumbagin-mediated apoptosis. Thus, these findings strongly suggest ROS-mediated inhibition of Topo II as an important mechanism contributing to the apoptosis-inducing properties of plumbagin.

  14. IGF-I enhances cellular senescence via the reactive oxygen species-p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Handayaningsih, Anastasia-Evi; Takahashi, Michiko; Fukuoka, Hidenori; Iguchi, Genzo; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masaaki; Suda, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular senescence plays an important role in tumorigenesis and aging process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We demonstrated IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in primary confluent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IGF-I enhanced cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These results may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging. -- Abstract: Cellular senescence is characterized by growth arrest, enlarged and flattened cell morphology, the expression of senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), and by activation of tumor suppressor networks. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a critical role in cellular growth, proliferation, tumorigenesis, and regulation of aging. In the present study, we show that IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in mouse, rat, and human primary cells in the confluent state. IGF-I induced expression of a DNA damage marker, {gamma}H2AX, the increased levels of p53 and p21 proteins, and activated SA-{beta}-gal. In the confluent state, an altered downstream signaling of IGF-I receptor was observed. Treatment with a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger, N-acetylcystein (NAC) significantly suppressed induction of these markers, indicating that ROS are involved in the induction of cellular senescence by IGF-I. In p53-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, the IGF-I-induced augmentation of SA-{beta}-gal and p21 was inhibited, demonstrating that p53 is required for cellular senescence induced by IGF-I. Thus, these data reveal a novel pathway whereby IGF-I enhances cellular senescence in the ROS and p53-dependent manner and may explain the underlying mechanisms of IGF-I involvement in tumorigenesis and in regulation of aging.

  15. Influence of particle size and reactive oxygen species on cobalt chrome nanoparticle-mediated genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Devey, Michael; Hawkins, Sue; Hails, Lauren; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; Chang, Isaac T; Ingham, Eileen; Malhas, Ashraf; Vaux, David J; Lane, Jon D; Case, Charles P

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cobalt chrome (CoCr) metal-on-metal (MOM) implants may be exposed to a wide size range of metallic nanoparticles as a result of wear. In this study we have characterised the biological responses of human fibroblasts to two types of synthetically derived CoCr particles [(a) from a tribometer (30 nm) and (b) thermal plasma technology (20, 35, and 80 nm)] in vitro, testing their dependence on nanoparticle size or the generation of oxygen free radicals, or both. Metal ions were released from the surface of nanoparticles, particularly from larger (80 nm) particles generated by thermal plasma technology. Exposure of fibroblasts to these nanoparticles triggered rapid (2 h) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that could be eliminated by inhibition of NADPH oxidase, suggesting that it was mediated by phagocytosis of the particles. The exposure also caused a more prolonged, MitoQ sensitive production of ROS (24 h), suggesting involvement of mitochondria. Consequently, we recorded elevated levels of aneuploidy, chromosome clumping, fragmentation of mitochondria and damage to the cytoskeleton particularly to the microtubule network. Exposure to the nanoparticles resulted in misshapen nuclei, disruption of mature lamin B1 and increased nucleoplasmic bridges, which could be prevented by MitoQ. In addition, increased numbers of micronuclei were observed and these were only partly prevented by MitoQ, and the incidence of micronuclei and ion release from the nanoparticles were positively correlated with nanoparticle size, although the cytogenetic changes, modifications in nuclear shape and the amount of ROS were not. These results suggest that cells exhibit diverse mitochondrial ROS-dependent and independent responses to CoCr particles, and that nanoparticle size and the amount of metal ion released are influential.

  16. Phospholipase D signaling mediates reactive oxygen species-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Usatyuk, Peter V; Kotha, Sainath R; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as critical players in the pathophysiology of pulmonary disorders and diseases. Earlier, we have demonstrated that ROS stimulate lung endothelial cell (EC) phospholipase D (PLD) that generates phosphatidic acid (PA), a second messenger involved in signal transduction. In the current study, we investigated the role of PLD signaling in the ROS-induced lung vascular EC barrier dysfunction. Our results demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a typical physiological ROS, induced PLD activation and altered the barrier function in bovine pulmonary artery ECs (BPAECs). 1-Butanol, the quencher of PLD, generated PA leading to the formation of physiologically inactive phosphatidyl butanol but not its biologically inactive analog, 2-butanol, blocked the H2O2-mediated barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, cell permeable C2 ceramide, an inhibitor of PLD but not the C2 dihydroceramide, attenuated the H2O2-induced PLD activation and enhancement of paracellular permeability of Evans blue conjugated albumin across the BPAEC monolayers. In addition, transfection of BPAECs with adenoviral constructs of hPLD1 and mPLD2 mutants attenuated the H2O2-induced barrier dysfunction, cytoskeletal reorganization and distribution of focal adhesion proteins. For the first time, this study demonstrated that the PLD-generated intracellular bioactive lipid signal mediator, PA, played a critical role in the ROS-induced barrier dysfunction in lung vascular ECs. This study also underscores the importance of PLD signaling in vascular leak and associated tissue injury in the etiology of lung diseases among critically ill patients encountering oxygen toxicity and excess ROS production during ventilator-assisted breathing.

  17. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) detection of active oxygen species and organic phases in Martian soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow; Kim, Soon Sam; Liang, Ranty H.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-)) and other strong oxidants (Fe2O3 and Fe3O4) was invoked in interpretations of the Viking biological experiments and a model was also suggested for Martian surface chemistry. The non-biological interpretations of the biological results gain futher support as no organic compounds were detected in the Viking pyrolysis-gas chromatography mass spectrometer (GCSM) experiments at concentrations as low as 10 ppb. Electron spin resonance (ESR) measures the absorption of microwaves by a paramagnetic and/or ferromagnetic center in the presence of an external field. In many instances, ESR has the advantage of detailed submicroscopic identification of the transient species and/or unstable reaction intermediates in their environments. Since the higly active oxygen species (O(-), O2(-), O3(-), and R-O-O(-)) are all paramagnetic in nature, they can be readily detected in native form by the ESR method. Active oxygen species likely to occur in the Martian surface samples were detected by ESR in UV-irradiated samples containing MgO. A miniaturized ESR spectrometer system can be developed for the Mars Rover Sample Return Mission. The instrument can perform the following in situ Martian samples analyses: detection of active oxygen species; characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photooxidation processes; and searching for organic compounds in the form of free radicals preserved in subsoils, and detection of microfossils with Martian carbonate sediments.

  18. [Measurement of reactive oxygen species in a biological system and its perspectives].

    PubMed

    Todoki, K; Lee, C; Okabe, E

    1996-12-01

    In recent years, reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. Although the existence of reactive oxygen intermediates in drug metabolism can be inferred from end product analysis or from the effects of antioxidants or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, only the technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) allows the direct detection of these highly reactive species. However, some free radical species cannot be detected by ESR due to their extremely short half-lives, which result in low steady-state concentrations of the radicals or to short radical relaxation times, which lead to a very broad line. These facts made recent development of spin-trapping and chemiluminescence techniques are widely used to detect free radicals. The goal of this paper is to introduce the various assays available for measurement of reactive oxygen species in biological models. This paper will focus on two topics: (1) the spin-trapping/ESR technique in vitro and vivo and (2) the chemiluminescence-optical biosensor application of this technique, a very sensitive method that has the advantage of being able to provide continuous, online, nondestructive monitoring of reactive oxygen species.

  19. First demonstration of an increased serum level of reactive oxygen species during the peripartal period in the ewes.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Annalisa; Mutinati, Maddalena; Spedicato, Massimo; Minoia, Giuseppe; Trisolini, Carmelinda; Jirillo, Felicita; Sciorsci, Raffaele Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are produced during oxidative metabolism, and regulate many biological processes. The acute inflammation characterizing parturition induces many physiological changes. Among them, there is evidence that ROS affect the synthesis of many factors involved in parturition. Our study aims to determine serum levels of ROS in periparturient ewes, as well as to establish a value of reference of their physiological concentration. ROS determination was performed on blood collected every 12 hours in periparturient twin pregnant ewes. Our results will show a significant increase in ROS concentrations from the beginning to the end of the experiment. This increase may be due to the inflammatory process establishing during parturition.

  20. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-29

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation.

  1. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a non-toxic and inexpensive compound obtained by deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of arthropods as well as of the cell walls of many fungi. In agriculture CHT is used to control numerous diseases on various horticultural commodities but, although different mechanisms have been proposed, the exact mode of action of CHT is still unknown. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, CHT induces a set of defense/stress responses that includes production of H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO). We investigated the possible signaling role of these reactive molecules in some CHT-induced responses by means of inhibitors of production and/or scavengers. The results show that both reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are not only a mere symptom of stress conditions but are involved in the responses induced by CHT in sycamore cells. In particular, NO appears to be involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that shows apoptotic features like DNA fragmentation, increase in caspase-3-like activity and release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion. On the contrary, reactive oxygen species (ROS) appear involved in a cell death form induced by CHT that does not show these apoptotic features but presents increase in lipid peroxidation. PMID:25642757

  2. Reactive oxygen species metabolism during the cadmium hyperaccumulation of a new hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-chun; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance, a newly discovered hyperaccumulator, could serve as a good material for phytoremediation of Cd polluted sites. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidases (catalase (CAT); superoxide dismutase (SOD); peroxidase (POD)) in the leaf were determined when S. alfredii was treated for 15 d with various CdCl2 concentrations ranging from 0 to 800 micromol/L. The results showed that the production rate of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), which is an indicator of ROS level, reached up to the maximum at 400 micromol/L CdCl2 and then declined with the increase of CdCl2 concentration, while MDA accumulation tended to increase. CAT activity was significantly inhibited at all tested CdCl2 concentrations and SOD activity was sharply suppressed at 800 micromol/L CdCl2. However, the enhancement of POD activity was observed when CdCl2 concentration was higher than 400 micromol/L. In addition, its activity increased when treated with 600 micromol/L CdCl2 for more than 5 d. When sodium benzoate, a free radical scavenger, was added, S. alfredii was a little more sensitive to Cd toxicity than that exposed to Cd alone, and the Cd accumulation tended to decline with the increase of sodium benzoate concentration. It came to the conclusions that POD played an important role during Cd hyperaccumulation, and the accumulation of ROS induced by Cd treatment might be involved in Cd hyperaccumulation. PMID:18232224

  3. Interplay between reactive oxygen species and hormones in the control of plant development and stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Jie; Foyer, Christine H; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2015-05-01

    As a consequence of a sessile lifestyle, plants are continuously exposed to changing environmental conditions and often life-threatening stresses caused by exposure to excessive light, extremes of temperature, limiting nutrient or water availability, and pathogen/insect attack. The flexible coordination of plant growth and development is necessary to optimize vigour and fitness in a changing environment through rapid and appropriate responses to such stresses. The concept that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are versatile signalling molecules in plants that contribute to stress acclimation is well established. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of how ROS production and signalling are integrated with the action of auxin, brassinosteroids, gibberellins, abscisic acid, ethylene, strigolactones, salicylic acid, and jasmonic acid in the coordinate regulation of plant growth and stress tolerance. We consider the local and systemic crosstalk between ROS and hormonal signalling pathways and identify multiple points of reciprocal control, as well as providing insights into the integration nodes that involve Ca(2+)-dependent processes and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation cascades.

  4. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas. PMID:26593482

  5. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N.; Touyz, Rhian M.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2∙−) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47phox, p67phox, and p22phox and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2∙− production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  6. Catalase eliminates reactive oxygen species and influences the intestinal microbiota of shrimp.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Ting; Yang, Ming-Chong; Sun, Jie-Jie; Guo, Fang; Lan, Jiang-Feng; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2015-11-01

    Intestinal innate immune response is an important defense mechanism of animals and humans against external pathogens. The mechanism of microbiota homeostasis in host intestines has been well studied in mammals and Drosophila. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides have been reported to play important roles in homeostasis. However, how to maintain the microbiota homeostasis in crustacean intestine needs to be elucidated. In this study, we identified a novel catalase (MjCAT) involved in ROS elimination in kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus. MjCAT mRNA was widely distributed in hemocytes, heart, hepatopancreas, gills, stomach, and intestine. After the shrimp were challenged with pathogenic bacteria via oral infection, the expression level of MjCAT was upregulated, and the enzyme activity was increased in the intestine. ROS level was also increased in the intestine at early time after oral infection and recovered rapidly. When MjCAT was knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi), high ROS level maintained longer time, and the number of bacteria number was declined in the shrimp intestinal lumen than those in the control group, but the survival rate of the MjCAT-RNAi shrimp was declined. Further study demonstrated that the intestinal villi protruded from epithelial lining of the intestinal wall were damaged by the high ROS level in MjCAT-knockdown shrimp. These results suggested that MjCAT participated in the intestinal host-microbe homeostasis by regulating ROS level.

  7. Interplays between nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in cryptogein signalling.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Anna; Noirot, Elodie; Grandperret, Vincent; Bourque, Stéphane; Fromentin, Jérôme; Salloignon, Pauline; Truntzer, Caroline; Dobrowolska, Grażyna; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Wendehenne, David

    2015-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has many functions in plants. Here, we investigated its interplays with reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the defence responses triggered by the elicitin cryptogein. The production of NO induced by cryptogein in tobacco cells was partly regulated through a ROS-dependent pathway involving the NADPH oxidase NtRBOHD. In turn, NO down-regulated the level of H2O2. Both NO and ROS synthesis appeared to be under the control of type-2 histone deacetylases acting as negative regulators of cell death. Occurrence of an interplay between NO and ROS was further supported by the finding that cryptogein triggered a production of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Next, we showed that ROS, but not NO, negatively regulate the intensity of activity of the cryptogein-induced protein kinase NtOSAK. Furthermore, using a DNA microarray approach, we identified 15 genes early induced by cryptogein via NO. A part of these genes was also modulated by ROS and encoded proteins showing sequence identity to ubiquitin ligases. Their expression appeared to be negatively regulated by ONOO(-), suggesting that ONOO(-) mitigates the effects of NO and ROS. Finally, we provided evidence that NO required NtRBOHD activity for inducing cell death, thus confirming previous assumption that ROS channel NO through cell death pathways. PMID:24506708

  8. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas.

  9. Reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria of human gingival fibroblast induced by blue light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Makita, Tetsuya; Maehata, Yojiro; Higashi, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Takahashi, Osamu; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, it has become well known that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by blue-light irradiation causes adverse effects of photo-aging, such as age-related macular degeneration of the retina. Thus, orange-tinted glasses are used to protect the retina during dental treatment involving blue-light irradiation (e.g., dental resin restorations or tooth bleaching treatments). However, there are few studies examining the effects of blue-light irradiation on oral tissue. For the first time, we report that blue-light irradiation by quartz tungsten halogen lamp (QTH) or light-emitting diode (LED) decreased cell proliferation activity of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in a time-dependent manner (<5 min). Additionally, in a morphological study, the cytotoxic effect was observed in the cell organelles, especially the mitochondria. Furthermore, ROS generation induced by the blue-light irradiation was detected in mitochondria of HGFs using fluorimetry. In all analyses, the cytotoxicity was significantly higher after LED irradiation compared with cytotoxicity after QTH irradiation. These results suggest that blue light irradiation, especially by LED light sources used in dental aesthetic treatment, might have adverse effects on human gingival tissue. Hence, this necessitates the development of new dental aesthetic treatment methods and/or techniques to protect HGFs from blue light irradiation during dental therapy.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Signaling and Adaptation of Multicellular Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2012-01-01

    One of the universal traits of microorganisms is their ability to form multicellular structures, the cells of which differentiate and communicate via various signaling molecules. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hydrogen peroxide in particular, have recently become well-established signaling molecules in higher eukaryotes, but still little is known about the regulatory functions of ROS in microbial structures. Here we summarize current knowledge on the possible roles of ROS during the development of colonies and biofilms, representatives of microbial multicellularity. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonies, ROS are predicted to participate in regulatory events involved in the induction of ammonia signaling and later on in programmed cell death in the colony center. While the latter process seems to be induced by the total ROS, the former event is likely to be regulated by ROS-homeostasis, possibly H2O2-homeostasis between the cytosol and mitochondria. In Candida albicans biofilms, the predicted signaling role of ROS is linked with quorum sensing molecule farnesol that significantly affects biofilm formation. In bacterial biofilms, ROS induce genetic variability, promote cell death in specific biofilm regions, and possibly regulate biofilm development. Thus, the number of examples suggesting ROS as signaling molecules and effectors in the development of microbial multicellularity is rapidly increasing. PMID:22829965

  11. MITOCHONDRIA-DERIVED REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES MEDIATE CASPASE- DEPENDENT AND-INDEPENDENT NEURONAL DEATH

    PubMed Central

    McManus, Meagan J.; Murphy, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are implicated in many neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria-targeted drugs that effectively decrease oxidative stress, protect mitochondrial energetics, and prevent neuronal loss may therefore lend therapeutic benefit to these currently incurable diseases. To investigate the efficacy of such drugs, we examined the effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ10 and MitoE2 on neuronal death induced by neurotrophin deficiency. Our results indicate that MitoQ10 blocked apoptosis by preventing increased mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and mitochondrial damage in nerve growth factor (NGF)-deprived sympathetic neurons, while MitoE2 was largely ineffective. In this paradigm, the most proximal point of divergence was the ability of MitoQ10 to scavenge mitochondrial superoxide (O2•−). MitoQ10 also prevented caspase-independent neuronal death in these cells demonstrating that the mitochondrial redox state significantly influences both apoptotic and nonapoptotic pathways leading to neuronal death. We suggest that mitochondria-targeted antioxidants may provide tools for delineating the role and significance of mitochondrial ROS in neuronal death and provide a new therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative conditions involving trophic factor deficits and multiple modes of cell death. PMID:25239010

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Affect Transglutaminase Activity and Regulate Hematopoiesis in a Crustacean.

    PubMed

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene; Noonin, Chadanat

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as a prime signal in the commitment to hematopoiesis in both mammals and Drosophila In this study, the potential function of ROS during hematopoiesis in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus was examined. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used to decrease ROS in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. An increase in ROS was observed in the anterior proliferation center (APC) after LPS injection. In the absence of NAC, the LPS-induced increase in ROS levels resulted in the rapid restoration of the circulating hemocyte number. In the presence of NAC, a delay in the recovery rate of the hemocyte number was observed. NAC treatment also blocked the spread of APC and other hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, maintaining these cells at an undifferentiated stage. Extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) has been shown previously to play a role in maintaining HPT cells in an undifferentiated form. In this study, we show that extracellular TGase activity increased when the ROS level in HPT or APC cells was reduced after NAC treatment. In addition, collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix and a TGase substrate were co-localized on the HPT cell surface. Taken together, the results of this study show that ROS are involved in crayfish hematopoiesis, in which a low ROS level is required to maintain hematopoietic progenitor cells in the tissue and to reduce hemocyte release. The potential roles of TGase in this process are investigated and discussed. PMID:27339892

  13. Methylglyoxal Induces Apoptosis Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species in Bovine Retinal Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jang-Won; Lee, Jeong-An; Oh, Yeon-Sahng; Shinn, Soon-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    One of the histopathologic hallmarks of early diabetic retinopathy is the loss of pericytes. Evidences suggest that the pericyte loss in vivo is mediated by apoptosis. However, the underlying cause of pericyte apoptosis is not fully understood. This study investigated the influence of methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive α-dicarbonyl compound of glucose metabolism, on apoptotic cell death in bovine retinal pericytes. Analysis of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation by ELISA showed that MGO (200 to 800 µM) induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular reactive oxygen species were generated earlier and the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibited the MGO-induced apoptosis. NF-κB activation and increased caspase-3 activity were detected. Apoptosis was also inhibited by the caspase-3 inhibitor, Z-DEVD-fmk, or the NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These data suggest that elevated MGO levels observed in diabetes may cause apoptosis in bovine retinal pericytes through an oxidative stress mechanism and suggests that the nuclear activation of NF-κB are involved in the apoptotic process. PMID:14966349

  14. The Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Injury and Protective Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Muntean, Danina M.; Sturza, Adrian; Dănilă, Maria D.; Borza, Claudia; Duicu, Oana M.; Mornoș, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury of the heart represents a major health burden mainly associated with acute coronary syndromes. While timely coronary reperfusion has become the established routine therapy in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction, the restoration of blood flow into the previously ischaemic area is always accompanied by myocardial injury. The central mechanism involved in this phenomenon is represented by the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides their harmful role when highly generated during early reperfusion, minimal ROS formation during ischaemia and/or at reperfusion is critical for the redox signaling of cardioprotection. In the past decades, mitochondria have emerged as the major source of ROS as well as a critical target for cardioprotective strategies at reperfusion. Mitochondria dysfunction associated with I/R myocardial injury is further described and ultimately analyzed with respect to its role as source of both deleterious and beneficial ROS. Furthermore, the contribution of ROS in the highly investigated field of conditioning strategies is analyzed. In the end, the vascular sources of mitochondria-derived ROS are briefly reviewed. PMID:27200148

  15. Survival signaling by C-RAF: mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and Ca2+ are critical targets.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Smigelskaite, Julija; Doblander, Christine; Janakiraman, Manickam; Hermann, Martin; Wurm, Martin; Scheidl, Stefan F; Sucher, Robert; Deutschmann, Andrea; Troppmair, Jakob

    2008-04-01

    Survival signaling by RAF occurs through largely unknown mechanisms. Here we provide evidence for the first time that RAF controls cell survival by maintaining permissive levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+). Interleukin-3 (IL-3) withdrawal from 32D cells resulted in ROS production, which was suppressed by activated C-RAF. Oncogenic C-RAF decreased the percentage of apoptotic cells following treatment with staurosporine or the oxidative stress-inducing agent tert-butyl hydroperoxide. However, it was also the case that in parental 32D cells growing in the presence of IL-3, inhibition of RAF signaling resulted in elevated mitochondrial ROS and Ca(2+) levels. Cell death is preceded by a ROS-dependent increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+), which was absent from cells expressing transforming C-RAF. Prevention of mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload after IL-3 deprivation increased cell viability. MEK was essential for the mitochondrial effects of RAF. In summary, our data show that survival control by C-RAF involves controlling ROS production, which otherwise perturbs mitochondrial Ca(2+) homeostasis. PMID:18212057

  16. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Anticancer Therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Pan, Tai-Long; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. We aim to provide a systematic review about the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in anticancer therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen). Danshen, including its lipophilic and hydrophilic constituents, is potentially beneficial for treating various cancers. The mechanisms of ROS-related anticancer effects of Danshen vary depending on the specific type of cancer cells involved. Danshen may enhance TNF-α-induced apoptosis, upregulate caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, endoplasmic reticulum stress, P21, P53, Bax/Bcl-2, DR5, and AMP-activated protein kinase, or activate the p38/JNK, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and FasL signaling pathways. Conversely, Danshen may downregulate human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA, telomerase, survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD31, NF-κB, Erk1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, microtubule assembly, and receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptors, HER2, and P-glycoprotein and inhibit the PI3K/Akt/mTOR or estrogen receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Danshen may inhibit cancer cells proliferation through antioxidation on tumor initiation and induce apoptosis or autophagy through ROS generation on tumor progression, tumor promotion, and tumor metastasis. Based on the available evidence regarding its anticancer properties, this review provides new insights for further anticancer research or clinical trials with Danshen. PMID:27579153

  17. Reactive oxygen species, abscisic acid and ethylene interact to regulate sunflower seed germination.

    PubMed

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Sajjad, Yasar; Bazin, Jérémie; Langlade, Nicolas; Cristescu, Simona M; Balzergue, Sandrine; Baudouin, Emmanuel; Bailly, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) seed dormancy is regulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and can be alleviated by incubating dormant embryos in the presence of methylviologen (MV), a ROS-generating compound. Ethylene alleviates sunflower seed dormancy whereas abscisic acid (ABA) represses germination. The purposes of this study were to identify the molecular basis of ROS effect on seed germination and to investigate their possible relationship with hormone signalling pathways. Ethylene treatment provoked ROS generation in embryonic axis whereas ABA had no effect on their production. The beneficial effect of ethylene on germination was lowered in the presence of antioxidant compounds, and MV suppressed the inhibitory effect of ABA. MV treatment did not alter significantly ethylene nor ABA production during seed imbibition. Microarray analysis showed that MV treatment triggered differential expression of 120 probe sets (59 more abundant and 61 less abundant genes), and most of the identified transcripts were related to cell signalling components. Many transcripts less represented in MV-treated seeds were involved in ABA signalling, thus suggesting an interaction between ROS and ABA signalling pathways at the transcriptional level. Altogether, these results shed new light on the crosstalk between ROS and plant hormones in seed germination.

  18. Endothelial Microparticle-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species: Role in Endothelial Signaling and Vascular Function.

    PubMed

    Burger, Dylan; Turner, Maddison; Munkonda, Mercedes N; Touyz, Rhian M

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial microparticles are effectors of endothelial damage; however mechanisms involved are unclear. We examined the effects of eMPs on cultured endothelial cells (ECs) and isolated vessels and investigated the role of eMP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox signaling in these processes. eMPs were isolated from EC media and their ability to directly produce ROS was assessed by lucigenin and liquid chromatography. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (Nox) subunits were probed by Western blot. ECs were treated with eMPs and effects on kinase signaling, superoxide anion (O2 (∙-)) generation, and nitric oxide (NO) production were examined. Acetylcholine-mediated vasorelaxation was assessed by myography in eMP-treated mesenteric arteries. eMPs contained Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, p47(phox), p67(phox), and p22(phox) and they produced ROS which was inhibited by the Nox inhibitor, apocynin. eMPs increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Src, increased O2 (∙-) production, and decreased A23187-induced NO production in ECs. Pretreatment of eMPs with apocynin diminished eMP-mediated effects on ROS and NO production but had no effect on eMP-mediated kinase activation or impairment in vasorelaxation. Our findings identify a novel mechanism whereby eMP-derived ROS contributes to MP bioactivity. These interactions may be important in conditions associated with vascular injury and increased eMP formation. PMID:27313830

  19. Differential production of reactive oxygen species in distinct brain regions of hypoglycemic mice.

    PubMed

    Amador-Alvarado, Leticia; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes

    2014-09-01

    Hypoglycemia is a serious complication of insulin therapy in patients suffering from type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Severe hypoglycemia leading to coma (isoelectricity) induces massive neuronal death in vulnerable brain regions such as the hippocampus, the striatum and the cerebral cortex. It has been suggested that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress is involved in hypoglycemic brain damage, and that ROS generation is stimulated by glucose reintroduction (GR) after the hypoglycemic coma. However, the distribution of ROS in discrete brain regions has not been studied in detail. Using the oxidation sensitive marker dihydroethidium (DHE) we have investigated the distribution of ROS in different regions of the mouse brain during prolonged severe hypoglycemia without isoelectricity, as well as the effect of GR on ROS levels. Results show that ROS generation increases in the hippocampus, the cerebral cortex and the striatum after prolonged severe hypoglycemia before the coma. The hippocampus showed the largest increases in ROS levels. GR further stimulated ROS production in the hippocampus and the striatum while in the cerebral cortex, only the somatosensory and parietal areas were significantly affected by GR. Results suggest that ROS are differentially produced during the hypoglycemic insult and that a different response to GR is present among distinct brain regions.

  20. Isoalantolactone Induces Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Apoptosis in Pancreatic Carcinoma PANC-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad; Ding, Chuan; Rasul, Azhar; Yi, Fei; Li, Ting; Gao, Hongwen; Gao, Rong; Zhong, Lili; Zhang, Kun; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Tonghui

    2012-01-01

    Isoalantolactone, a sesquiterpene lactone compound possesses antifungal, antibacteria, antihelminthic and antiproliferative activities. In the present study, we found that isoalantolactone inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. Further mechanistic studies revealed that induction of apoptosis is associated with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, cardiolipin oxidation, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c and cell cycle arrest at S phase. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC), a specific ROS inhibitor restored cell viability and completely blocked isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis in PANC-1 cells indicating that ROS are involved in isoalantolactone-mediated apoptosis. Western blot study showed that isoalantolactone increased the expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK, Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 and decreased the expression of Bcl-2 in a dose-dependent manner. No change in expression of phosphorylated p38 MAPK and Bax was found when cells were treated with isoalantolactone in the presence of NAC, indicating that activation of these proteins is directly dependent on ROS generation. The present study provides evidence for the first time that isoalantolactone induces ROS-dependent apoptosis through intrinsic pathway. Furthermore, our in vivo toxicity study demonstrated that isoalantolactone did not induce any acute or chronic toxicity in liver and kidneys of CD1 mice at dose of 100 mg/kg body weight. Therefore, isoalantolactone may be a safe chemotherapeutic candidate for the treatment of human pancreatic carcinoma. PMID:22532787

  1. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao; Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-01

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca2+ release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  2. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate. PMID:26487906

  3. Controllable generation of reactive oxygen species by femtosecond-laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Wei; He, Hao Wang, Yintao; Wang, Yisen; Hu, Minglie; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-02-24

    Femtosecond lasers have been advancing Biophotonics research in the past two decades with multiphoton microscopy, microsurgery, and photodynamic therapy. Nevertheless, laser irradiation is identified to bring photodamage to cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation with unclear mechanism. Meanwhile, currently in biological researches, there is no effective method to provide controllable ROS production precisely, which originally is leaked from mitochondria during respiration and plays a key role in a lot of important cellular processes and cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we show the process of how the tightly focused femtosecond-laser induces ROS generation solely in mitochondria at the very beginning and then release to cytosol if the stimulus is intense enough. At certain weak power levels, the laser pulses induce merely moderate Ca{sup 2+} release but this is necessary for the laser to generate ROS in mitochondria. Cellular original ROS are also involved with a small contribution. When the power is above a threshold, ROS are then released to cytosol, indicating photodamage overwhelming cellular repair ability. The mechanisms in those two cases are quite different. Those results clarify parts of the mechanism in laser-induced ROS generation. Hence, it is possible to further this optical scheme to provide controllable ROS generation for ROS-related biological researches including mitochondrial diseases and aging.

  4. Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Anticancer Therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Tai-Long

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. We aim to provide a systematic review about the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in anticancer therapy with Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen). Danshen, including its lipophilic and hydrophilic constituents, is potentially beneficial for treating various cancers. The mechanisms of ROS-related anticancer effects of Danshen vary depending on the specific type of cancer cells involved. Danshen may enhance TNF-α-induced apoptosis, upregulate caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, endoplasmic reticulum stress, P21, P53, Bax/Bcl-2, DR5, and AMP-activated protein kinase, or activate the p38/JNK, mitogen-activated protein kinase, and FasL signaling pathways. Conversely, Danshen may downregulate human telomerase reverse transcriptase mRNA, telomerase, survivin, vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, CD31, NF-κB, Erk1/2, matrix metalloproteinases, microtubule assembly, and receptor tyrosine kinases including epidermal growth factor receptors, HER2, and P-glycoprotein and inhibit the PI3K/Akt/mTOR or estrogen receptor signaling pathways. Therefore, Danshen may inhibit cancer cells proliferation through antioxidation on tumor initiation and induce apoptosis or autophagy through ROS generation on tumor progression, tumor promotion, and tumor metastasis. Based on the available evidence regarding its anticancer properties, this review provides new insights for further anticancer research or clinical trials with Danshen. PMID:27579153

  5. The control of root growth by reactive oxygen species in Salix nigra Marsh. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Causin, Humberto F; Roqueiro, Gonzalo; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Láinez, Verónica; Pena, Liliana B; Marchetti, Cintia F; Gallego, Susana M; Maldonado, Sara I

    2012-02-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in specific regions of Salix seedlings roots seems essential for the normal growth of this organ. We examined the role of different ROS in the control of root development in Salix nigra seedlings, and explored possible mechanisms involved in the regulation of ROS generation and action. Root growth was not significantly affected by OH quenchers, while it was either partially or completely inhibited in the presence of H₂O₂ or O₂·⁻ scavengers, respectively. O₂·⁻ production was elevated in the root apex, particularly in the subapical meristem and protodermal zones. Apical O₂·⁻ generation activity was correlated to a high level of either Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase protein as well as carbonylated proteins. While NADPH-oxidase (NOX) was probably the main source of O₂·⁻ generation, the existence of other sources should not be discarded. O₂·⁻ production was also high in root hairs during budding, but it markedly decreased when the hair began to actively elongate. Root hair formation increased in the presence of H₂O₂ scavengers, and was suppressed when H₂O₂ or peroxidase inhibitors were supplied. The negative effect of H₂O₂ was partially counteracted by a MAPKK inhibitor. Possible mechanisms of action of the different ROS in comparison with other plant model systems are discussed.

  6. Deoxyamphimedine, a pyridoacridine alkaloid, damages DNA via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-01-01

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity. PMID:19597581

  7. Germination induction of dormant Avena fatua caryopses by KAR(1) and GA(3) involving the control of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2(·-)) and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and catalase) both in the embryo and the aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Cembrowska-Lech, Danuta; Koprowski, Marek; Kępczyński, Jan

    2015-03-15

    Avena fatua L. caryopses did not germinate at 20 °C in darkness because they were dormant. However, they were able to germinate in the presence of karrikinolide (KAR1), a key bioactive compound present in smoke, and also in the presence of gibberellin A3 (GA3), a commonly known stimulator of seed germination. The aim of this study was to collect information on a possible relationship between the above regulators and abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenging antioxidants in the regulation of dormant caryopses germination. KAR1 and GA3 caused complete germination of dormant A. fatua caryopses. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), compounds generating the superoxide (O2(·-)), i.e. menadione (MN), methylviologen (MV) and an inhibitor of catalase activity, aminotriazole (AT), induced germination of dormant caryopses. KAR1, GA3, H2O2 and AT decreased ABA content in embryos. Furthermore, KAR1, GA3, H2O2, MN, MV and AT increased α-amylase activity in caryopses. The effect of KAR1 and GA3 on ROS (H2O2, O2(·-)) and activities of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were determined in caryopses, embryos and aleurone layers. SOD was represented by four isoforms and catalase by one. In situ localization of ROS showed that the effect of KAR1 and GA3 was associated with the localization of hydrogen peroxide mainly on the coleorhiza. However, the superoxide was mainly localized on the surface of the scutellum. Superoxide was also detected in the protruding radicle. Germination induction of dormant caryopses by KAR1 and GA3 was related to an increasing content of H2O2, O2(·-)and activities of SOD and CAT in embryos, thus ROS homeostasis was probably required for the germination of dormant caryopses. The above regulators increased the content of ROS in aleurone layers and decreased the activities of SOD and CAT, probably leading to the programmed cell death. The presented data provide new insights into the germination induction of A. fatua dormant

  8. Germination induction of dormant Avena fatua caryopses by KAR(1) and GA(3) involving the control of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2(·-)) and enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase and catalase) both in the embryo and the aleurone layers.

    PubMed

    Cembrowska-Lech, Danuta; Koprowski, Marek; Kępczyński, Jan

    2015-03-15

    Avena fatua L. caryopses did not germinate at 20 °C in darkness because they were dormant. However, they were able to germinate in the presence of karrikinolide (KAR1), a key bioactive compound present in smoke, and also in the presence of gibberellin A3 (GA3), a commonly known stimulator of seed germination. The aim of this study was to collect information on a possible relationship between the above regulators and abscisic acid (ABA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ROS scavenging antioxidants in the regulation of dormant caryopses germination. KAR1 and GA3 caused complete germination of dormant A. fatua caryopses. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), compounds generating the superoxide (O2(·-)), i.e. menadione (MN), methylviologen (MV) and an inhibitor of catalase activity, aminotriazole (AT), induced germination of dormant caryopses. KAR1, GA3, H2O2 and AT decreased ABA content in embryos. Furthermore, KAR1, GA3, H2O2, MN, MV and AT increased α-amylase activity in caryopses. The effect of KAR1 and GA3 on ROS (H2O2, O2(·-)) and activities of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were determined in caryopses, embryos and aleurone layers. SOD was represented by four isoforms and catalase by one. In situ localization of ROS showed that the effect of KAR1 and GA3 was associated with the localization of hydrogen peroxide mainly on the coleorhiza. However, the superoxide was mainly localized on the surface of the scutellum. Superoxide was also detected in the protruding radicle. Germination induction of dormant caryopses by KAR1 and GA3 was related to an increasing content of H2O2, O2(·-)and activities of SOD and CAT in embryos, thus ROS homeostasis was probably required for the germination of dormant caryopses. The above regulators increased the content of ROS in aleurone layers and decreased the activities of SOD and CAT, probably leading to the programmed cell death. The presented data provide new insights into the germination induction of A. fatua dormant

  9. Carotenoid intake does not mediate a relationship between reactive oxygen species and bright colouration: experimental test in a lizard.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Mats; Wilson, Mark; Isaksson, Caroline; Uller, Tobias; Mott, Beth

    2008-04-01

    We performed experiments on male Australian painted dragon lizards (Ctenophorus pictus) to test the hypothesis that carotenoids can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS), protecting the organism from oxidative stress, and that this capacity is reflected in skin colours involved in signalling. Subsequent to 4 weeks of carotenoid treatment we used flow cytometry to analyse unspecified ROS (H(2)O(2), singlet oxygen, superoxide and peroxynitrite level), hereafter termed ROS, and baseline superoxide specifically (bSO in peripheral blood cells). Mean background levels of ROS and bSO did not differ between carotenoid-treated and control males. bSO, which represents the superoxide level in un-manipulated blood, was negatively correlated with colour development in all males, regardless of carotenoid treatment. Thus, carotenoid intake does not reduce circulating levels of ROS or bSO, suggesting that carotenoids are inefficient antioxidants in vivo and, therefore, are unlikely to provide a direct link between oxidative stress and colouration. PMID:18375850

  10. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  11. Release of elicitors from rice blast spores under the action of reactive oxygen species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on secretion of hypothesized elicitors from spores of rice blast causal fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied. For spore exposure to exogenous ROS, they were germinated for 5 h in 50 µM H2O2 followed by addition of catalase E.C. 1.11.1.6 (to decompose pe...

  12. Reactive oxygen species in photochemistry of the red fluorescent protein "Killer Red".

    PubMed

    Vegh, Russell B; Solntsev, Kyril M; Kuimova, Marina K; Cho, Soohee; Liang, Yue; Loo, Bernard L W; Tolbert, Laren M; Bommarius, Andreas S

    2011-05-01

    The fluorescent protein aptly named "Killer Red" (KRed) is capable of killing transfected cells and inactivating fused proteins upon exposure to visible light in the presence of oxygen. We have investigated the source of the bioactive species through a variety of photophysical and photochemical techniques. Our results indicate a Type I (electron transfer mediated) photosensitizing mechanism.

  13. Reactive oxygen species production is increased in the peripheral blood monocytes of obese patients.

    PubMed

    Degasperi, Giovanna R; Denis, Raphael G P; Morari, Joseane; Solon, Carina; Geloneze, Bruno; Stabe, Christiane; Pareja, José Carlos; Vercesi, Aníbal E; Velloso, Lício A

    2009-08-01

    Infiltrating macrophages play an important role in the production of inflammatory mediators by the adipose tissue of obese subjects. To reach the adipose tissue, peripheral monocytes are recruited by locally produced chemoattractants. However, little is known about the activation of monocytes in the peripheral blood of obese subjects. The objective of this study was to determine reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress as early markers of monocytic commitment with an inflammatory phenotype in the peripheral blood of nondiabetic obese patients. Patients were recruited from an academic general hospital; controls were voluntary students. Seven lean controls and 6 nondiabetic obese patients were included in the study. Monocytes were prepared from peripheral blood. Immunoblot, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction were used to determine reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Increased reactive oxygen species and activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress were detected in the monocytes from obese patients. Reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress with a chemical chaperone reversed monocytic activation, as determined by the reduction of reactive oxygen species production. Thus, monocytes from nondiabetic obese patients are already committed with an inflammatory phenotype in peripheral blood; and reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively modulates their activation.

  14. Involvement of spinal cord opioid mechanisms in the acute antinociceptive effect of hyperbaric oxygen in mice.

    PubMed

    Heeman, Jacqueline H; Zhang, Yangmiao; Shirachi, Donald Y; Quock, Raymond M

    2013-12-01

    Earlier research has demonstrated that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) can elicit an antinociceptive response in models of acute pain. We have demonstrated that this antinociceptive effect is centrally-mediated and is dependent on opioid receptors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of endogenous opioid peptides and opioid receptors specifically in the spinal cord in the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 in mice. Male NIH Swiss mice were exposed to HBO2 (100% oxygen at 3.5atm absolute) for 11min and their antinociceptive responsiveness was determined using the glacial acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test. HBO2-induced antinociception was sensitive to antagonism by intrathecal (i.t.) pretreatment with the κ- and μ-selective opioid antagonists norbinaltorphimine and β-funaltrexamine, respectively, but not the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole. The antinociceptive effect of HBO2 was also significantly attenuated by i.t. pretreatment with a rabbit antiserum against rat dynorphin1-13 but not antisera against β-endorphin or methionine-enkephalin. Based on these experimental findings, the acute antinociceptive effect of HBO2 appears to involve neuronal release of dynorphin and activation of κ- and μ-opioid receptors in the spinal cord. PMID:24113418

  15. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume - Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  17. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide Control Early Steps of the Legume – Rhizobium Symbiotic Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Isabelle; Pauly, Nicolas; Puppo, Alain; Brouquisse, Renaud; Boscari, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobium bacteria leads to the formation of a new organ, the nodule. Early steps of the interaction are characterized by the production of bacterial Nod factors, the reorientation of root-hair tip growth, the formation of an infection thread (IT) in the root hair, and the induction of cell division in inner cortical cells of the root, leading to a nodule primordium formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) have been detected in early steps of the interaction. ROS/NO are determinant signals to arbitrate the specificity of this mutualistic association and modifications in their content impair the development of the symbiotic association. The decrease of ROS level prevents root hair curling and ITs formation, and that of NO conducts to delayed nodule formation. In root hairs, NADPH oxidases were shown to produce ROS which could be involved in the hair tip growth process. The use of enzyme inhibitors suggests that nitrate reductase and NO synthase-like enzymes are the main route for NO production during the early steps of the interaction. Transcriptomic analyses point to the involvement of ROS and NO in the success of the infection process, the induction of early nodulin gene expression, and the repression of plant defense, thereby favoring the establishment of the symbiosis. The occurrence of an interplay between ROS and NO was further supported by the finding of both S-sulfenylated and S-nitrosylated proteins during early symbiotic interaction, linking ROS/NO production to a redox-based regulation of the symbiotic process. PMID:27092165

  18. Nitric Oxide and Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Metabolic Changes in Barley Seed Embryo during Germination

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhenguo; Marsolais, Frédéric; Bykova, Natalia V.; Igamberdiev, Abir U.

    2016-01-01

    The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP/ADP ratios, reduction levels of ascorbate and glutathione, expression of the genes encoding proteins involved in metabolism of NO and activities of the enzymes involved in fermentation and in metabolism of NO and ROS were studied in the embryos of germinating seeds of two barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) cultivars differing in dormancy level. The level of NO production continuously increased after imbibition while the level of nitrosylated SH-groups in proteins increased. This corresponded to the decrease of free SH-groups in proteins. At early stage of germination (0–48 h post imbibition) the genes encoding class 1 phytoglobin (the protein scavenging NO) and S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (scavenging S-nitrosoglutathione) were markedly expressed. More dormant cultivar exhibited lower ATP/ADP and ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratios and lower lactate and alcohol dehydrogenase activities, while the production of NO and nitrosylation of proteins was higher as compared to the non-dormant cultivar. The obtained data indicate that at the onset of germination NO is actively generated causing nitrosylation of SH-groups and a switch from respiration to fermentation. After radicle protrusion the metabolism changes in a more reducing type as recorded by ratio of reduced and oxidized glutathione and ascorbate. The turnover of NO by the scavenging systems (phytoglobin, S-nitrosoglutathione reductase and interaction with ROS) might contribute to the maintenance of redox and energy balance of germinating seeds and lead to alleviation of dormancy. PMID:26909088

  19. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and ROS-Induced ROS Release

    PubMed Central

    Zorov, Dmitry B.; Juhaszova, Magdalena; Sollott, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Byproducts of normal mitochondrial metabolism and homeostasis include the buildup of potentially damaging levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), Ca2+, etc., which must be normalized. Evidence suggests that brief mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) openings play an important physiological role maintaining healthy mitochondria homeostasis. Adaptive and maladaptive responses to redox stress may involve mitochondrial channels such as mPTP and inner membrane anion channel (IMAC). Their activation causes intra- and intermitochondrial redox-environment changes leading to ROS release. This regenerative cycle of mitochondrial ROS formation and release was named ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR). Brief, reversible mPTP opening-associated ROS release apparently constitutes an adaptive housekeeping function by the timely release from mitochondria of accumulated potentially toxic levels of ROS (and Ca2+). At higher ROS levels, longer mPTP openings may release a ROS burst leading to destruction of mitochondria, and if propagated from mitochondrion to mitochondrion, of the cell itself. The destructive function of RIRR may serve a physiological role by removal of unwanted cells or damaged mitochondria, or cause the pathological elimination of vital and essential mitochondria and cells. The adaptive release of sufficient ROS into the vicinity of mitochondria may also activate local pools of redox-sensitive enzymes involved in protective signaling pathways that limit ischemic damage to mitochondria and cells in that area. Maladaptive mPTP- or IMAC-related RIRR may also be playing a role in aging. Because the mechanism of mitochondrial RIRR highlights the central role of mitochondria-formed ROS, we discuss all of the known ROS-producing sites (shown in vitro) and their relevance to the mitochondrial ROS production in vivo. PMID:24987008

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species Contribute to the Bactericidal Effects of the Fluoroquinolone Moxifloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, M. J.; Martín-Galiano, A. J.; Arnanz, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin at a concentration that inhibits DNA gyrase. Treatment of the wild-type strain R6, at a concentration of 10× the MIC, triggered a response involving 132 genes after 30 min of treatment. Genes from several metabolic pathways involved in the production of pyruvate were upregulated. These included 3 glycolytic enzymes, which ultimately convert fructose 6-phosphate to pyruvate, and 2 enzymes that funnel phosphate sugars into the glycolytic pathway. In addition, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase was downregulated, likely leading to an increase in acetyl-CoA. When coupled with an upregulation in formate acetyltransferase, an increase in acetyl-CoA would raise the production of pyruvate. Since pyruvate is converted by pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an increase in pyruvate would augment intracellular H2O2. Here, we confirm a 21-fold increase in the production of H2O2 and a 55-fold increase in the amount of hydroxyl radical in cultures treated during 4 h with moxifloxacin. This increase in hydroxyl radical through the Fenton reaction would damage DNA, lipids, and proteins. These reactive oxygen species contributed to the lethality of the drug, a conclusion supported by the observed protective effects of an SpxB deletion. These results support the model whereby fluoroquinolones cause redox alterations. The transcriptional response of S. pneumoniae to moxifloxacin is compared with the response to levofloxacin, an inhibitor of topoisomerase IV. Levofloxacin triggers the transcriptional activation of iron transport genes and also enhances the Fenton reaction. PMID:26525786

  1. Reactive oxygen species regulate Smac mimetic/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death.

    PubMed

    Schenk, B; Fulda, S

    2015-11-19

    Necroptosis represents a key programmed cell death pathway involved in various physiological and pathophysiological conditions. However, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in necroptotic signaling has remained unclear. In the present study, we identify ROS as critical regulators of BV6/tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced necroptotic signaling and cell death. We show that BV6/TNFα-induced cell death depends on ROS production, as several ROS scavengers such as butylated hydroxyanisole, N-acetylcysteine, α-tocopherol and ethyl pyruvate significantly rescue cell death. Before cell death, BV6/TNFα-stimulated ROS generation promotes stabilization of the receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1)/RIP3 necrosome complex via a potential positive feedback loop, as on the one hand radical scavengers attenuate RIP1/RIP3 necrosome assembly and phosphorylation of mixed lineage kinase domain like (MLKL), but on the other hand silencing of RIP1 or RIP3 reduces ROS production. Although MLKL knockdown effectively decreases BV6/TNFα-induced cell death, it does not affect RIP1/RIP3 interaction and only partly reduces ROS generation. Moreover, the deubiquitinase cylindromatosis (CYLD) promotes BV6/TNFα-induced ROS generation and necrosome assembly even in the presence of BV6, as CYLD silencing attenuates these events. Genetic silencing of phosphoglycerate mutase 5 or dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) fails to protect against BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. By demonstrating that ROS are involved in regulating BV6/TNFα-induced necroptotic signaling, our study provides new insights into redox regulation of necroptosis. PMID:25867066

  2. Selection of functional human sperm with higher DNA integrity and fewer reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Velasco, Vanessa; Kingsley, James L.; Shoukat, Muhammad S.; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Tüzel, Erkan; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization and reproduction are central to the survival and propagation of a species. Couples who cannot reproduce naturally have to undergo in vitro clinical procedures. An integral part of these clinical procedures includes isolation of healthy sperm from raw semen. Existing sperm sorting methods are not efficient and isolate sperm having high DNA fragmentation and reactive oxygen species, and suffer from multiple manual steps and variations between embryologists. Inspired by in vivo natural sperm sorting mechanisms where vaginal mucus becomes less viscous to form microchannels to guide sperm towards egg, we present a chip that efficiently sorts healthy, motile and morphologically normal sperm without centrifugation. Higher percentage of sorted sperm show significantly lesser reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation than the conventional swim-up method. The presented chip is an easy-to-use high throughput sperm sorter that provides standardized sperm sorting assay with less reliance on embryologist’s skills, facilitating reliable operational steps. PMID:24753434

  3. Palladium-Based Nanomaterials: A Platform to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species for Catalyzing Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Huang, Hao; Li, Yaping; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-11-25

    Oxidation reactions by molecular oxygen (O2 ) over palladium (Pd)-based nanomaterials are a series of processes crucial to the synthesis of fine chemicals. In the past decades, investigations of related catalytic materials have mainly been focused on the synthesis of Pd-based nanomaterials from the angle of tailoring their surface structures, compositions and supporting materials, in efforts to improve their activities in organic reactions. From the perspective of rational materials design, it is imperative to address the fundamental issues associated with catalyst performance, one of which should be oxygen activation by Pd-based nanomaterials. Here, the fundamentals that account for the transformation from O2 to reactive oxygen species over Pd, with a focus on singlet O2 and its analogue, are introduced. Methods for detecting and differentiating species are also presented to facilitate future fundamental research. Key factors for tuning the oxygen activation efficiencies of catalytic materials are then outlined, and recent developments in Pd-catalyzed oxygen-related organic reactions are summarized in alignment with each key factor. To close, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields.

  4. Palladium-Based Nanomaterials: A Platform to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species for Catalyzing Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Huang, Hao; Li, Yaping; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-11-25

    Oxidation reactions by molecular oxygen (O2 ) over palladium (Pd)-based nanomaterials are a series of processes crucial to the synthesis of fine chemicals. In the past decades, investigations of related catalytic materials have mainly been focused on the synthesis of Pd-based nanomaterials from the angle of tailoring their surface structures, compositions and supporting materials, in efforts to improve their activities in organic reactions. From the perspective of rational materials design, it is imperative to address the fundamental issues associated with catalyst performance, one of which should be oxygen activation by Pd-based nanomaterials. Here, the fundamentals that account for the transformation from O2 to reactive oxygen species over Pd, with a focus on singlet O2 and its analogue, are introduced. Methods for detecting and differentiating species are also presented to facilitate future fundamental research. Key factors for tuning the oxygen activation efficiencies of catalytic materials are then outlined, and recent developments in Pd-catalyzed oxygen-related organic reactions are summarized in alignment with each key factor. To close, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields. PMID:26422795

  5. In vivo electron spin resonance: An effective new tool for reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species measurement.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Yi; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2010-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are regarded as important factors in the initiation and progression of many diseases. Therefore, measurement of redox status would be helpful in understanding the "Redox Navigation" of such diseases. Because electron spin resonance (ESR) shows good signal responses to nitroxyl radical and various redox-related species, such as oxygen radicals and antioxidants, the in vivo ESR/nitroxyl probe technique can provide useful information on real-time redox status in a living body. ESR spectrometers for in vivo measurements can be operated at lower frequencies (approximately 3.5 GHz, 1 GHz, 700 MHz, and 300 MHz) than usual (9-10 GHz). Several types of resonators were also designed to minimize the dielectric loss of electromagnetic waves caused by water in animal bodies. In vivo ESR spectroscopy and its imaging have been used to analyze radical generation, redox status, partial pressure of oxygen and other conditions in various diseases. In addition, ESR has been used to analyze injury models related to oxidative stresses, such as nitroxyl radicals. The application of in vivo ESR for diseases related to oxidative injuries currently being investigated and the accumulation of basic data for therapy is ongoing. Recent progress in the instrumentation for in vivo ESR spectroscopy and its application to the life sciences are reviewed, because measurement of redox status in vivo is considered necessary to understand the initiation and progression of diseases.

  6. Oxygen stress reduces zoospore survival of Phytophthora species in a simulated aquatic system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Phytophthora includes a group of agriculturally important pathogens and they are commonly regarded as water molds. They produce motile zoospores that can move via water currents and on their own locomotion in aquatic environments. However, zoosporic response to dissolved oxygen, an important water quality parameter, is not known. Like other water quality parameters, dissolved oxygen concentration in irrigation reservoirs fluctuates dramatically over time. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how zoospore survival may be affected by elevated and low concentrations of dissolved oxygen in water to better understand the aquatic biology of these pathogens in irrigation reservoirs. Results Zoospores of P. megasperma, P. nicotianae, P. pini and P. tropicalis were assessed for survival in 10% Hoagland’s solution at a range of dissolved concentrations from 0.9 to 20.1 mg L-1 for up to seven exposure times from 0 to 72 h. Zoospore survival was measured by resultant colony counts per ml. Zoospores of these species survived the best in control Hoagland’s solution at dissolved oxygen concentrations of 5.3 to 5.6 mg L-1. Zoospore survival rates decreased with increasing and decreasing concentration of dissolved oxygen, depending upon Phytophthora species and exposure time. Overall, P. megasperma and P. pini are less sensitive than P. nicotianae and P. tropicalis to hyperoxia and hypoxia conditions. Conclusion Zoospores in the control solution declined over time and this natural decline process was enhanced under hyperoxia and hypoxia conditions. These findings suggest that dramatic fluctuations of dissolved oxygen in irrigation reservoirs contribute to the population decline of Phytophthora species along the water path in the same reservoirs. These findings advanced our understanding of the aquatic ecology of these pathogens in irrigation reservoirs. They also provided a basis for pathogen risk mitigation by prolonging the turnover

  7. Cathepsin D is involved in the oxygen and glucose deprivation/reperfusion-induced apoptosis of astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianlin; Yang, Lin; Tian, Hongyan; Ma, Qiang

    2016-10-01

    The lysosome and its associated protein cathe-psin D (Cat D) play critical roles in the pathological process of secondary damage following ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. However, the roles of Cat D in I/R-exposed astrocytesremain unclear. In this study, we determined the roles of Cat D in the oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R)-induced apoptosis of astrocytes as well as the underlying mechanisms. We found that OGD/R markedly increased cell apoptosis and the production of inflammatory cytokines, namely IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and FasL in a reperfusion time‑dependent manner and their elevation peaked at 24 h after reperfusion. Moreover, the cytosolic Cat D level and Cat D activity was significantly upregulated in response to OGD/R exposure. Furthermore, OGD/R exposure gradually disrupted the innate acidic conditions of the lysosome. Exogenous TNF-α and FasL administration elevated cytosolic Cat D levels and cell apoptosis whereas TNFR1 and Fas inhibition significantly reversed these effects induced by OGD/R. Cat D overexpression enhanced cell apoptosis and the levels of apoptogenic proteins, including Bax and caspase-3, whereas Cat D siRNA transfection had an inhibitory effect on cell apoptosis and the expression of proapoptotic proteins. In addition, we observed that Cat D upregulation disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential and induced the production of reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, OGD/R injury induced the production of TNF-α, IL-6 and FasL which promoted lysosomal dysfunction and Cat D leakage into the cytoplasm. This eventually resulted in caspase‑dependent apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential loss and oxidative stress in astrocytes.

  8. Involvement of active oxygen in lipid peroxide radical reaction of epidermal homogenate following ultraviolet light exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Nishi, J.; Ogura, R.; Sugiyama, M.; Hidaka, T.; Kohno, M. )

    1991-07-01

    To elucidate the radical mechanism of lipid peroxidation induced by ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, an electron spin resonance (ESR) study was made on epidermal homogenate prepared from albino rat skin. The exposure of the homogenate to UV light resulted in an increase in lipid peroxide content, which was proportional to the time of UV exposure. Using ESR spin trapping (dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide, DMPO), the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals (L.) was measured following UV exposure (DMPO-L.:aN = 15.5 G, aH = 22.7 G), as was the spectrum of DMPO-hydroxyl radical (DMPO-OH, aN = aH = 15.5 G). In the presence of superoxide dismutase, the DMPO spin adduct spectrum of lipid radicals was found to be reduced remarkably. Therefore, it was shown that the generation of the lipid radicals partially involves superoxide anion radicals, in addition to hydroxyl radicals. In the ESR free-radical experiment, an ESR signal appeared at g = 2.0064 when the ESR tube filled with homogenate was exposed to UV light at -150 degrees C. The temperature-dependent change in the ESR free radical signal of homogenate exposed to UV light was observed at temperatures varying from -150 degrees C to room temperature. By using degassed samples, it was confirmed that oxygen is involved in the formation of the lipid peroxide radicals (LOO.) from the lipid radicals (L.).

  9. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  10. Photo-irradiation of proanthocyanidin as a new disinfection technique via reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin was evaluated in relation to reactive oxygen species formation. Staphylococcus aureus suspended in proanthocyanidin aqueous solution was irradiated with light from a laser at 405 nm. The bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power. When proanthocyanidin was used at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, the laser irradiation of the bacterial suspension could kill the bacteria with a >5-log reduction of viable cell counts. By contrast, bactericidal effect was not observed when proanthocyanidin was not irradiated. In electron spin resonance analysis, reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion radicals, and hydrogen peroxide, were detected in the photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin aqueous solution. The yields of the reactive oxygen species also depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power as is the case with the bactericidal assay. Thus, it is indicated that the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin is exerted via the reactive oxygen species formation. The bactericidal effect as well as the yield of the oxygen radicals increased with the concentration of proanthocyanidin up to 4 mg/mL, and then decreased with the concentration. These findings suggest that the antioxidative activity of proanthocyanidin might prevail against the radical generation potency of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin resulting in the decreased bactericidal effect when the concentration is over 4 mg/mL. The present study suggests that photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin whenever used in an optimal concentration range can be a new disinfection technique.

  11. Reactive oxygen species do not cause arsine-induced hemoglobin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Carter, D.E.

    1997-04-11

    Previous work suggested that arsine- (AsH{sub 3}-) induced hemoglobin (HbO{sub 2}) damage may lead to hemolysis (Hatlelid et al., 1996). The purpose of the work presented here was to determine whether reactive oxygen species are formed by AsH{sub 3} in solution, in hemoglobin solutions, or in intact red blood cells, and, if so, to determine whether these species are responsible for the observed hemoglobin damage. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was detected in aqueous solutions containing AsH{sub 3} and HbO{sub 2} or AsH{sub 3} alone but not in intact red blood cells or lysates. Additionally, high-activity catalase (19,200 U/ml) or glutathione peroxidase (68 U/ml) added to solutions of HbO{sub 2} and AsH{sub 3} had only a minor protective effect against AsH{sub 3}-induced damage. Further, the differences between the visible spectra of AsH{sub 3}-treated HbO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated HbO{sub 2} indicate that two different degradative processes occur. The presence of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) was measured by O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} -dependent reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). The results were negative for O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Exogenous superoxide dismutase (100 {mu}g/ml) did not affect AsH{sub 3}-induced HbO{sub 2} spectral changes, nor did the hydroxyl radical scavengers, mannitol, and DMSO (20mM each). The general antioxidants ascorbate ({le} 10 mM) and glutathione ({le}1 mM) also had no effect. These results indicate that the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical (OH) are not involved in the mechanism of AsH{sub 3}-induced HbO{sub 2} damage. The results also indicate that although AsH{sub 3} contributes to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production in vitro, cellular defenses are adequate to detoxify the amount formed. An alternative mechanism by which an arsenic species is the hemolytic agent is proposed. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David I.; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here we review the current literature regarding ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25634975

  13. Comparison of sensitizers by detecting reactive oxygen species after photodynamic reaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Bajgar, R; Tomankova, K; Nevrelova, P; Mosinger, J

    2007-10-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has a crucial effect on the result of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Because of this fact, we examined the ROS formation by means of three porphyrin sensitizers (TPPS(4), ZnTPPS(4) and PdTPPS(4)) and compared their effectivity for induction of cell death in the G361 (human melanoma) cell line. The porphyrins used are very efficient water-soluble aromatic dyes with a potential application in photomedicine and have a high tendency to accumulate in the membranes of intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and mitochondria. Interaction between the triplet excited state of the sensitizer and molecular oxygen leads to the production singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. Production of ROS was investigated by molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Our results demonstrated that ZnTPPS(4) induces the highest ROS production in the cell line compared to TPPS(4) and PdTPPS(4) at concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 microM and light dose of 1 J cm(-2). We also observed a consequence between ROS production and cell survival. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that photodynamic effect depends on sensitizer type, its concentration and light dose.

  14. Identification of different oxygen species in oxide nanostructures with 17O solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wu, Xin-Ping; Zheng, Sujuan; Zhao, Li; Li, Lei; Shen, Li; Gao, Yuxian; Xue, Nianhua; Guo, Xuefeng; Huang, Weixin; Gan, Zhehong; Blanc, Frédéric; Yu, Zhiwu; Ke, Xiaokang; Ding, Weiping; Gong, Xue-Qing; Grey, Clare P.; Peng, Luming

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured oxides find multiple uses in a diverse range of applications including catalysis, energy storage, and environmental management, their higher surface areas, and, in some cases, electronic properties resulting in different physical properties from their bulk counterparts. Developing structure-property relations for these materials requires a determination of surface and subsurface structure. Although microscopy plays a critical role owing to the fact that the volumes sampled by such techniques may not be representative of the whole sample, complementary characterization methods are urgently required. We develop a simple nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategy to detect the first few layers of a nanomaterial, demonstrating the approach with technologically relevant ceria nanoparticles. We show that the 17O resonances arising from the first to third surface layer oxygen ions, hydroxyl sites, and oxygen species near vacancies can be distinguished from the oxygen ions in the bulk, with higher-frequency 17O chemical shifts being observed for the lower coordinated surface sites. H217O can be used to selectively enrich surface sites, allowing only these particular active sites to be monitored in a chemical process. 17O NMR spectra of thermally treated nanosized ceria clearly show how different oxygen species interconvert at elevated temperature. Density functional theory calculations confirm the assignments and reveal a strong dependence of chemical shift on the nature of the surface. These results open up new strategies for characterizing nanostructured oxides and their applications. PMID:26601133

  15. Eccentric exercise, isokinetic muscle torque and delayed onset muscle soreness: the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Close, Graeme L; Ashton, Tony; Cable, Tim; Doran, Dominic; MacLaren, Don P M

    2004-05-01

    There is growing evidence that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in the muscular damage and soreness that is observed following strenuous or unaccustomed exercise. This study investigated the relationship between delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), muscle function and ROS following downhill running using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and plasma malonaldehyde (MDA) concentrations. Eight physically active male subjects participated in two trials consisting of 30 min of running at approximately 65% VO(2max) on the flat (FLA) or a 15% downhill (DWN) gradient. Venous blood samples were drawn before, immediately after, and then 24, 48 and 72 h post exercise, and at the same time DOMS and muscle function were assessed. Blood was analysed for markers of ROS, total and differential white blood cell count, and creatine kinase. Muscle function was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer, whilst DOMS was assessed using a visual analogue scale. An increase in ROS, detected via ESR spectroscopy and MDA, was observed following DWN ( P<0.05) but not following FLA. Increased DOMS and loss of muscle function were observed following DWN ( P<0.05) but not following FLA ( P>0.05). DWN resulted in a transient leukocytosis ( P<0.05) occurring immediately post-exercise but returning to pre-exercise levels by 24 h. Although DWN resulted in an increase in ROS production, the increase occurred after the peak decline in muscle function and DOMS, suggesting that there may be a disassociation in the temporal relationship between ROS, loss of muscle function and DOMS.

  16. Antioxidant Enzymes Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species during Pod Elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.− and.OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of.OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.− was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.− decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of.OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  17. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  18. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:25759638

  19. Withaferin A-Induced Apoptosis in Human Breast Cancer Cells Is Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Moura, Michelle B.; Kelley, Eric E.; Van Houten, Bennett; Shiva, Sruti; Singh, Shivendra V.

    2011-01-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a promising anticancer constituent of Ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, inhibits growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in culture and MDA-MB-231 xenografts in vivo in association with apoptosis induction, but the mechanism of cell death is not fully understood. We now demonstrate, for the first time, that WA-induced apoptosis is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. WA treatment caused ROS production in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, but not in a normal human mammary epithelial cell line (HMEC). The HMEC was also resistant to WA-induced apoptosis. WA-mediated ROS production as well as apoptotic histone-associated DNA fragment release into the cytosol was significantly attenuated by ectopic expression of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells. ROS production resulting from WA exposure was accompanied by inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation and inhibition of complex III activity. Mitochondrial DNA-deficient Rho-0 variants of MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells were resistant to WA-induced ROS production, collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and apoptosis compared with respective wild-type cells. WA treatment resulted in activation of Bax and Bak in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cells, and SV40 immortalized embryonic fibroblasts derived from Bax and Bak double knockout mouse were significantly more resistant to WA-induced apoptosis compared with fibroblasts derived from wild-type mouse. In conclusion, the present study provides novel insight into the molecular circuitry of WA-induced apoptosis involving ROS production and activation of Bax/Bak. PMID:21853114

  20. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Anopheles aquasalis Response to Plasmodium vivax Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bahia, Ana C.; Oliveira, José Henrique M.; Kubota, Marina S.; Araújo, Helena R. C.; Lima, José B. P.; Ríos-Velásquez, Claudia Maria; Lacerda, Marcus Vinícius G.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2013-01-01

    Malaria affects millions of people worldwide and hundreds of thousands of people each year in Brazil. The mosquito Anopheles aquasalis is an important vector of Plasmodium vivax, the main human malaria parasite in the Americas. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to have a role in insect innate immune responses as a potent pathogen-killing agent. We investigated the mechanisms of free radicals modulation after A. aquasalis infection with P. vivax. ROS metabolism was evaluated in the vector by studying expression and activity of three key detoxification enzymes, one catalase and two superoxide dismutases (SOD3A and SOD3B). Also, the involvement of free radicals in the mosquito immunity was measured by silencing the catalase gene followed by infection of A. aquasalis with P. vivax. Catalase, SOD3A and SOD3B expression in whole A. aquasalis were at the same levels of controls at 24 h and upregulated 36 h after ingestion of blood containing P. vivax. However, in the insect isolated midgut, the mRNA for these enzymes was not regulated by P. vivax infection, while catalase activity was reduced 24 h after the infectious meal. RNAi-mediated silencing of catalase reduced enzyme activity in the midgut, resulted in increased P. vivax infection and prevalence, and decreased bacterial load in the mosquito midgut. Our findings suggest that the interactions between A. aquasalis and P. vivax do not follow the model of ROS-induced parasite killing. It appears that P. vivax manipulates the mosquito detoxification system in order to allow its own development. This can be an indirect effect of fewer competitive bacteria present in the mosquito midgut caused by the increase of ROS after catalase silencing. These findings provide novel information on unique aspects of the main malaria parasite in the Americas interaction with one of its natural vectors. PMID:23441231

  1. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  2. Antioxidant enzymes regulate reactive oxygen species during pod elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.- and .OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of .OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.- was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.- decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of(.)OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells.

  3. Extending cassava root shelf life via reduction of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Zidenga, Tawanda; Leyva-Guerrero, Elisa; Moon, Hangsik; Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard

    2012-08-01

    One of the major constraints facing the large-scale production of cassava (Manihot esculenta) roots is the rapid postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) that occurs within 72 h following harvest. One of the earliest recognized biochemical events during the initiation of PPD is a rapid burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. We have investigated the source of this oxidative burst to identify possible strategies to limit its extent and to extend cassava root shelf life. We provide evidence for a causal link between cyanogenesis and the onset of the oxidative burst that triggers PPD. By measuring ROS accumulation in transgenic low-cyanogen plants with and without cyanide complementation, we show that PPD is cyanide dependent, presumably resulting from a cyanide-dependent inhibition of respiration. To reduce cyanide-dependent ROS production in cassava root mitochondria, we generated transgenic plants expressing a codon-optimized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mitochondrial alternative oxidase gene (AOX1A). Unlike cytochrome c oxidase, AOX is cyanide insensitive. Transgenic plants overexpressing AOX exhibited over a 10-fold reduction in ROS accumulation compared with wild-type plants. The reduction in ROS accumulation was associated with a delayed onset of PPD by 14 to 21 d after harvest of greenhouse-grown plants. The delay in PPD in transgenic plants was also observed under field conditions, but with a root biomass yield loss in the highest AOX-expressing lines. These data reveal a mechanism for PPD in cassava based on cyanide-induced oxidative stress as well as PPD control strategies involving inhibition of ROS production or its sequestration.

  4. Pathophysiological and pharmacological implications of mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species generation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Mei-Jie

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytes, in addition to passively supporting neurons, have recently been shown to be actively involved in synaptic transmission and neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS). This review summarizes briefly our previous observations using fluorescent probes coupled with laser scanning digital imaging microscopy to visualize spatio-temporal alteration of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generation in intact astrocytes. mROS formation is enhanced by exogenous oxidants exposure, Ca2+ stress and endogenous pathological defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, mROS formation can be specifically stimulated by visible light or visible laser irradiation and can be augmented further by photodynamic coupling with photosensitizers, particularly with mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers. "Severe" oxidative insult often results in massive and homogeneous augmentation of mROS formation which causes cessation of mitochondrial movement, pathological fission and irreversible swelling of mitochondria and eventually apoptosis or necrosis of cells. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and protectors such as MitoQ, melatonin and nanoparticle C(60) effectively prevent "severe" mROS generation. Intriguingly, "minor" oxidative insults enhance heterogeneity of mROS and mitochondrial dynamics. "Minor" mROS formation-induced fission and fusion of mitochondria relocates mitochondrial network to form a mitochondria free gap, i.e., "firewall", which may play a crucial role in mROS-mediated protective "preconditioning" by preventing propagation of mROS during oxidative insults. These mROS-targeted strategies for either enhancement or prevention of mitochondrial oxidative stress in astrocytes may provide new insights for future development of therapeutic interventions in the treatment of cancer such as astrocytomas and gliomas and astrocyte-associated neurodegeneration, mitochondrial diseases and aging. PMID:18692534

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediate visceral pain-related amygdala plasticity and behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangchen; Li, Zhen; Neugebauer, Volker

    2015-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests an important contribution of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to pain and neuropsychiatric disorders, but their role in pain-related plasticity in the brain is largely unknown. Neuroplasticity in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) correlates positively with pain behaviors in different models. Little is known, however, about mechanisms of visceral pain-related amygdala changes. The electrophysiological and behavioral studies reported here addressed the role of ROS in the CeA in a visceral pain model induced by intracolonic zymosan. Vocalizations to colorectal distension and anxiety-like behavior increased after intracolonic zymosan and were inhibited by intra-CeA application of a ROS scavenger (tempol, a superoxide dismutase mimetic). Tempol also induced a place preference in zymosan-treated rats but not in controls. Single-unit recordings of CeA neurons in anesthetized rats showed increases of background activity and responses to visceral stimuli after intracolonic zymosan. Intra-CeA application of tempol inhibited the increased activity but had no effect under normal conditions. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CeA neurons in brain slices from zymosan-treated rats showed that tempol decreased neuronal excitability and excitatory synaptic transmission of presumed nociceptive inputs from the brainstem (parabrachial area) through a combination of presynaptic and postsynaptic actions. Tempol had no effect in brain slices from sham controls. The results suggest that ROS contribute to visceral pain-related hyperactivity of amygdala neurons and amygdala-dependent behaviors through a mechanism that involves increased excitatory transmission and excitability of CeA neurons. PMID:25734993

  6. Acrolein activates matrix metalloproteinases by increasing reactive oxygen species in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, Timothy E. Zheng Yuting; Hellmann, Jason; Conklin, Daniel J.; Barski, Oleg; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-04-15

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous component of environmental pollutants such as automobile exhaust, cigarette, wood, and coal smoke. It is also a natural constituent of several foods and is generated endogenously during inflammation or oxidation of unsaturated lipids. Because increased inflammation and episodic exposure to acrolein-rich pollutants such as traffic emissions or cigarette smoke have been linked to acute myocardial infarction, we examined the effects of acrolein on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), which destabilize atherosclerotic plaques. Our studies show that exposure to acrolein resulted in the secretion of MMP-9 from differentiated THP-1 macrophages. Acrolein-treatment of macrophages also led to an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), free intracellular calcium ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}), and xanthine oxidase (XO) activity. ROS production was prevented by allopurinol, but not by rotenone or apocynin and by buffering changes in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I} with BAPTA-AM. The increase in MMP production was abolished by pre-treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or with the xanthine oxidase inhibitors allopurinol or oxypurinol. Finally, MMP activity was significantly stimulated in aortic sections from apoE-null mice containing advanced atherosclerotic lesions after exposure to acrolein ex vivo. These observations suggest that acrolein exposure results in MMP secretion from macrophages via a mechanism that involves an increase in [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub I}, leading to xanthine oxidase activation and an increase in ROS production. ROS-dependent activation of MMPs by acrolein could destabilize atherosclerotic lesions during brief episodes of inflammation or pollutant exposure.

  7. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  8. Roles of mitochondrial fragmentation and reactive oxygen species in mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Tomoyuki; Saotome, Masao; Nobuhara, Mamoru; Sakamoto, Atsushi; Urushida, Tsuyoshi; Katoh, Hideki; Satoh, Hiroshi; Funaki, Makoto; Hayashi, Hideharu

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests an association between aberrant mitochondrial dynamics and cardiac diseases. Because myocardial metabolic deficiency caused by insulin resistance plays a crucial role in heart disease, we investigated the role of dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1; a mitochondrial fission protein) in the pathogenesis of myocardial insulin resistance. Methods and Results: DRP1-expressing H9c2 myocytes, which had fragmented mitochondria with mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ{sub m}) depolarization, exhibited attenuated insulin signaling and 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) uptake, indicating insulin resistance. Treatment of the DRP1-expressing myocytes with Mn(III)tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin pentachloride (TMPyP) significantly improved insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction. When myocytes were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), they increased DRP1 expression and mitochondrial fragmentation, resulting in ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and insulin resistance. When DRP1 was suppressed by siRNA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and insulin resistance were restored. Our results suggest that a mutual enhancement between DRP1 and reactive oxygen species could induce mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial insulin resistance. In palmitate-induced insulin-resistant myocytes, neither DRP1-suppression nor TMPyP restored the ΔΨ{sub m} depolarization and impaired 2-DG uptake, however they improved insulin signaling. Conclusions: A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS could promote mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of insulin signal transduction. However, other mechanisms, including lipid metabolite-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, may be involved in palmitate-induced insulin resistance. - Highlights: • DRP1 promotes mitochondrial fragmentation and insulin-resistance. • A mutual enhancement between DRP1 and ROS ipromotes insulin-resistance. • Palmitate increases DRP1 expression and induces insulin

  9. Reactive oxygen species induce reversible PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding.

    PubMed

    Maas, Matthias; Wang, Ronggang; Paddock, Cathy; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2003-12-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1, CD31) functions to control the activation and survival of the cells on which it is expressed. Many of the regulatory functions of PECAM-1 are dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation and subsequent recruitment of the Src homology (SH2) domain containing protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2. The recent demonstration that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation occurs in cells exposed to the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) suggested that this form of oxidative stress may also support PECAM-1/SHP-2 complex formation. In the present study, we show that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation in response to exposure of cells to H2O2 is reversible, involves a shift in the balance between kinase and phosphatase activities, and supports binding of SHP-2 and recruitment of this phosphatase to cell-cell borders. We speculate, however, that the unique ability of H2O2 to reversibly oxidize the reactive site cysteine residues of protein tyrosine phosphatases may result in transient inactivation of the SHP-2 that is bound to PECAM-1 under these conditions. Finally, we provide evidence that PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 binding in endothelial cells requires exposure to an "oxidative burst" of H2O2, but that exposure of these cells to sufficiently high concentrations of H2O2 for a sufficiently long period of time abrogates binding of SHP-2 to tyrosine-phosphorylated PECAM-1. These findings support a role for PECAM-1 as a sensor of oxidative stress, perhaps most importantly during the process of inflammation. PMID:12893640

  10. Extending cassava root shelf life via reduction of reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Zidenga, Tawanda; Leyva-Guerrero, Elisa; Moon, Hangsik; Siritunga, Dimuth; Sayre, Richard

    2012-08-01

    One of the major constraints facing the large-scale production of cassava (Manihot esculenta) roots is the rapid postharvest physiological deterioration (PPD) that occurs within 72 h following harvest. One of the earliest recognized biochemical events during the initiation of PPD is a rapid burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. We have investigated the source of this oxidative burst to identify possible strategies to limit its extent and to extend cassava root shelf life. We provide evidence for a causal link between cyanogenesis and the onset of the oxidative burst that triggers PPD. By measuring ROS accumulation in transgenic low-cyanogen plants with and without cyanide complementation, we show that PPD is cyanide dependent, presumably resulting from a cyanide-dependent inhibition of respiration. To reduce cyanide-dependent ROS production in cassava root mitochondria, we generated transgenic plants expressing a codon-optimized Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mitochondrial alternative oxidase gene (AOX1A). Unlike cytochrome c oxidase, AOX is cyanide insensitive. Transgenic plants overexpressing AOX exhibited over a 10-fold reduction in ROS accumulation compared with wild-type plants. The reduction in ROS accumulation was associated with a delayed onset of PPD by 14 to 21 d after harvest of greenhouse-grown plants. The delay in PPD in transgenic plants was also observed under field conditions, but with a root biomass yield loss in the highest AOX-expressing lines. These data reveal a mechanism for PPD in cassava based on cyanide-induced oxidative stress as well as PPD control strategies involving inhibition of ROS production or its sequestration. PMID:22711743

  11. In the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM), do reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to muscle weakness?

    PubMed

    Lightfoot, Adam P; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J; Cooper, Robert G

    2015-07-01

    The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIMs) are a group of rare autoimmune disorders, collectively known as myositis. Affected patients present with proximal muscle weakness, which usually improves following treatment with immunosuppressants, but often incompletely so, thus many patients remain weak. IIMs are characterised histologically by inflammatory cell infiltrates into skeletal muscle and overexpression of major histocompatibility complex I on muscle cell surfaces. Although inflammatory cell infiltrates represent a major feature of myositis there is growing evidence that muscle weakness correlates only poorly with the degree of cellular infiltration, while weakness may in fact precede such infiltrations. The mechanisms underpinning such non-immune cell mediated weakness in IIM are poorly understood. Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways appears to be a potential contributor. Data from non-muscle cells indicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress results in altered redox homeostasis capable of causing oxidative damage. In myopathological situations other than IIM, as seen in ageing and sepsis, evidence supports an important role for reactive oxygen species (ROS). Modified ROS generation is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, depressed force generation and activation of muscle catabolic and autophagy pathways. Despite the growing evidence demonstrating a key role for ROS in skeletal muscle dysfunction in myopathologies other than IIM, no research has yet investigated the role of modified generation of ROS in inducing the weakness characteristic of IIM. This article reviews current knowledge regarding muscle weakness in the absence of immune cells in IIM, and provides a background to the potential role of modified ROS generation as a mechanism of muscle dysfunction. The authors suggest that ROS-mediated mechanisms are potentially involved in non-immune cell mediated weakness seen in IIM and outline how these mechanisms might be

  12. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(−), HCC353Hic-5(−), HCC372Hic-5(−), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(−) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression. PMID:26416447

  13. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 mediates reactive oxygen species signaling for hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jia-Ru; Hu, Chi-Tan; You, Ren-In; Pan, Siou-Mei; Cheng, Chuan-Chu; Lee, Ming-Che; Wu, Chao-Chuan; Chang, Yao-Jen; Lin, Shu-Chuan; Chen, Chang-Shan; Lin, Teng-Yi; Wu, Wen-Sheng

    2015-10-20

    One of the signaling components involved in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) progression is the focal adhesion adaptor paxillin. Hydrogen peroxide inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), one of the paralogs of paxillin, exhibits many biological functions distinct from paxillin, but may cooperate with paxillin to trigger tumor progression. Screening of Hic-5 in 145 surgical HCCs demonstrated overexpression of Hic-5 correlated well with intra- and extra-hepatic metastasis. Hic-5 highly expressed in the patient derived HCCs with high motility such as HCC329 and HCC353 but not in the HCCs with low motility such as HCC340. Blockade of Hic-5 expression prevented constitutive migration of HCC329 and HCC353 and HGF-induced cell migration of HCC340. HCC329Hic-5(-), HCC353Hic-5(-), HCC372Hic-5(-), the HCCs stably depleted of Hic-5, exhibited reduced motility compared with each HCC expressing Scramble shRNA. Moreover, intra/extrahepatic metastasis of HCC329Hic-5(-) in SCID mice greatly decreased compared with HCC329Scramble. On the other hand, ectopic Hic-5 expression in HCC340 promoted its progression. Constitutive and HGF-induced Hic-5 expression in HCCs were suppressed by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers catalase and dithiotheritol and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125. On the contrary, depletion of Hic-5 blocked constitutive and HGF-induced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation in HCCs. Also, ectopic expression of Hic-5 enhanced ROS generation and JNK phosphorylation. These highlighted that Hic-5 plays a central role in the positive feedback ROS-JNK signal cascade. Finally, the Chinese herbal derived anti-HCC peptide LZ-8 suppressed constitutive Hic-5 expression and JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Hic-5 mediates ROS-JNK signaling and may serve as a therapeutic target for prevention of HCC progression.

  14. Lactate Regulates Rat Male Germ Cell Function through Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Galardo, María Noel; Regueira, Mariana; Riera, María Fernanda; Pellizzari, Eliana Herminia; Cigorraga, Selva Beatriz; Meroni, Silvina Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Besides giving structural support, Sertoli cells regulate the fate of germ cells by supplying a variety of factors. These factors include hormones, several pro- and anti-apoptotic agents and also energetic substrates. Lactate is one of the compounds produced by Sertoli cells, which is utilized as an energetic substrate by germ cells, particularly spermatocytes and spermatids. Beyond its function as an energy source, some studies have proposed a role of lactate in the regulation of gene expression not strictly related to the energetic state of the cells. The general hypothesis that motivated this investigation was that lactate affects male germ cell function, far beyond its well-known role as energetic substrate. To evaluate this hypothesis we investigated: 1) if lactate was able to regulate germ cell gene expression and if reactive oxygen species (ROS) participated in this regulation, 2) if different signal transduction pathways were modified by the production of ROS in response to lactate and 3) possible mechanisms that may be involved in lactate stimulation of ROS production. In order to achieve these goals, cultures of germ cells obtained from male 30-day old rats were exposed to 10 or 20 mM lactate. Increases in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) C and monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)2 expression, in Akt and p38-MAPK phosphorylation levels and in ROS production were observed. These effects were impaired in the presence of a ROS scavenger. Lactate stimulated ROS production was also inhibited by a LDH inhibitor or a NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX) inhibitor. NOX4 expression was identified in male germ cells. The results obtained herein are consistent with a scenario where lactate, taken up by germ cells, becomes oxidized to pyruvate with the resultant increase in NADH, which is a substrate for NOX4. ROS, products of NOX4 activity, may act as second messengers regulating signal transduction pathways and gene expression. PMID:24498241

  15. Reactive oxygen species are messengers in maintenance of human and guinea pig gallbladder tonic contraction.

    PubMed

    Cong, Ping; Xiao, Zuo-Liang; Biancani, Piero; Behar, Jose

    2007-12-01

    The tonic contraction of human and guinea pig gallbladder (GB) is dependent on basal levels of PGE(2) and thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)). The pathway involved in the genesis of these prostaglandins has not been elucidated. We aimed to examine the source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and whether they contribute to the genesis of GB tonic contraction by generating basal prostaglandin levels. Tonic contraction was studied in human and guinea pig GB muscle strips treated with ROS scavengers (Tiron and catalase), apocynin (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase), and NOX-1 small interference RNA (siRNA). The subunits of NADPH oxidase and their functional roles were determined with specific antibodies in GB muscle cells. ROS scavengers reduced the GB tonic contraction and H(2)O(2) and PGE(2) levels. Apocynin also inhibited the tonic contraction. Antibodies against subunits of NADPH oxidase present in GB muscle cells lowered H(2)O(2) and PGE(2) levels. NOX-1 siRNA transfection reduced the tonic contraction, NOX-1 expression, and levels of H(2)O(2) and PGE(2). Tiron and apocynin inhibited the expected increase in tension and H(2)O(2) levels induced by stretching of muscle strips. H(2)O(2) increased the levels of PGE(2) and TxA(2) by increasing platelet-activating factor-like lipids that phosphorylate p38 and cPLA(2) sequentially. H(2)O(2) generated by NADPH oxidase participates in a signal transduction pathway that maintains the GB tonic contraction by activating PAF, p38, and cPLA(2) to generate prostaglandins.

  16. Reactive oxygen species enhance TLR10 expression in the human monocytic cell line THP-1.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghee; Kim, Yeon Ju; Koh, Hyun Sook; Jang, Tae Yang; Park, Hyo Eun; Kim, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    We investigated TLR10 expression in human monocytes, THP-1 cells, cultured in hypoxia (3% O(2)). Levels of both TLR10 mRNA and protein in THP-1 cells cultured in hypoxia were significantly higher than those cultured in normoxia (20% O(2)). We examined intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) content in hypoxic cells, and TLR10 expression in cells treated with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), to determine whether the increase in TLR10 expression observed with hypoxia was due to an increase in intracellular ROS levels. We found that the level of intracellular ROS in cells subject to hypoxia was significantly higher than in normoxia. Experiments with ROS synthesis inhibitors revealed that hypoxia induced ROS production is mainly due to NADPH oxidase activity. TLR10 mRNA expression was increased by treatment with H(2)O(2) at concentrations ranging from 50 to 250 μM. We screened the TLR10 promoter and found putative binding sites for transcription factors (TFs), such as NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1. Next, we examined TF activities using a luciferase reporter assay. Activities of NF-κB, NF-AT and AP-1 in the cells treated with H(2)O(2) were significantly higher than in untreated cells. The experiment with TF inhibitors revealed that ROS-induced upregulation of TLR10 expression is mainly due to NF-κB activation. Overall, our results suggest that hypoxia or ROS increase TLR10 expression in human monocytes and the transcriptional activities of NF-κB are involved in this process. Therefore, it is suggested that ROS produced by various exogenous stimuli may play a crucial role in the regulation of expression and function of TLR10 as second messengers.

  17. The role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the response of airway epithelium to particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L D; Krunkosky, T M; Dye, J A; Fischer, B M; Jiang, N F; Rochelle, L G; Akley, N J; Dreher, K L; Adler, K B

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies indicate adverse health effects due to inhalation of particulate air pollutants, but precise biologic mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully established. The tracheobronchial epithelium forms the body's first physiologic barrier to such airborne pollutants, where ciliary movement functions to remove the offending substances caught in the overlying mucus layer. Resident and infiltrating phagocytic cells also function in this removal process. In this paper, we examine the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the response of airway epithelium to particulates. Some particulates themselves can generate ROS, as can the epithelial cells, in response to appropriate stimulation. In addition, resident macrophages in the airways and the alveolar spaces can release ROS/RNS after phagocytosis of inhaled particles. These macrophages also release large amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine that can generate responses within the airway epithelium dependent upon intracellular generation of ROS/RNS. As a result, signal transduction pathways are set in motion that may contribute to inflammation and other pathobiology in the airway. Such effects include increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1, interleukin-6, cytosolic and inducible nitric oxide synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ultimately, ROS/RNS may play a role in the global response of the airway epithelium to particulate pollutants via activation of kinases and transcription factors common to many response genes. Thus, defense mechanisms involved in responding to offending particulates may result in a complex cascade of events that can contribute to airway pathology. PMID:9400742

  18. PKCα promotes generation of reactive oxygen species via DUOX2 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiajun; Shao, Miaomiao; Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Li, Lili; Wu, Weicheng; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Zhang, Mingming; Song, Shushu; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-08-07

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and elevated rates of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have long been considered as a hallmark of almost all types of cancer including HCC. Protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), a serine/threonine kinase among conventional PKC family, is recognized as a major player in signal transduction and tumor progression. Overexpression of PKCα is commonly observed in human HCC and associated with its poor prognosis. However, how PKCα is involved in hepatocellular carcinogenesis remains not fully understood. In this study, we found that among the members of conventional PKC family, PKCα, but not PKCβI or βII, promoted ROS production in HCC cells. PKCα stimulated generation of ROS by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. Depletion of DUOX2 abrogated PKCα-induced activation of AKT/MAPK pathways as well as cell proliferation, migration and invasion in HCC cells. Moreover, the expression of DUOX2 and PKCα was well positively correlated in both HCC cell lines and patient samples. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that PKCα plays a critical role in HCC development by inducing DUOX2 expression and ROS generation, and propose a strategy to target PKCα/DUOX2 as a potential adjuvant therapy for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • PKCα promotes the generation of ROS in hepatocellular carcinoma. • PKCα induces ROS production by up-regulating DUOX2 at post-transcriptional level. • DUOX2 is required for PKCα-induced AKT/MAPK activation and tumor progression in HCC. • The expression of PKCα is positively correlated with DUOX2 in HCC.

  19. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species at the Heart of the Matter: New Therapeutic Approaches for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kornfeld, Opher S.; Hwang, Sunhee; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Chen, Che-Hong; Qvit, Nir; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a variety of age-related diseases including multiple cardiovascular disorders. However, translation of ROS scavengers (anti-oxidants) into the clinic has not been successful. These anti-oxidants grossly reduce total levels of cellular ROS including ROS that participate in physiological signaling. In this review, we challenge the traditional anti-oxidant therapeutic approach that targets ROS directly with novel approaches that improve mitochondrial functions to more effectively treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25999419

  20. Biocompatible reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticles as superior drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Wei, Yanling; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Xiangjun; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Shi, Qing; Han, Songling; Chen, Xin; Gong, Hao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoplatform can be successfully manufactured from a ROS-triggerable β-cyclodextrin material. Extensive in vitro and in vivo studies validate that this nanoscaled system may serve as a new drug delivery vehicle with well-defined ROS-sensitivity and superior biocompatibility. This nanocarrier can be used for ROS-triggered transport of diverse therapeutics and imaging agents.

  1. Bacteriochlorin Dyads as Solvent Polarity Dependent Near-Infrared Fluorophores and Reactive Oxygen Species Photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Esemoto, Nopondo N; Yu, Zhanqian; Wiratan, Linda; Satraitis, Andrius; Ptaszek, Marcin

    2016-09-16

    Symmetrical, near-infrared absorbing bacteriochlorin dyads exhibit gradual reduction of their fluorescence (intensity and lifetime) and reactive oxygen species photosensitization efficiency (ROS) with increasing solvent dielectric constant ε. For the directly linked dyad, significant reduction is observed even in solvents of moderate ε, while for the dyad containing a 1,4-phenylene linker, reduction is more parallel to an increase in solvent ε. Bacteriochlorin dyads are promising candidates for development of environmentally responsive fluorophores and ROS sensitizers. PMID:27603934

  2. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na(+) extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na(+)/H(+) exchangers; (ii) better root K(+) retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H(+)-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K(+)-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  3. Difference in root K+ retention ability and reduced sensitivity of K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species confer differential salt tolerance in three Brassica species

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Koushik; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Lana; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Brassica species are known to possess significant inter and intraspecies variability in salinity stress tolerance, but the cell-specific mechanisms conferring this difference remain elusive. In this work, the role and relative contribution of several key plasma membrane transporters to salinity stress tolerance were evaluated in three Brassica species (B. napus, B. juncea, and B. oleracea) using a range of electrophysiological assays. Initial root growth assay and viability staining revealed that B. napus was most tolerant amongst the three species, followed by B. juncea and B. oleracea. At the mechanistic level, this difference was conferred by at least three complementary physiological mechanisms: (i) higher Na+ extrusion ability from roots resulting from increased expression and activity of plasma membrane SOS1-like Na+/H+ exchangers; (ii) better root K+ retention ability resulting from stress-inducible activation of H+-ATPase and ability to maintain more negative membrane potential under saline conditions; and (iii) reduced sensitivity of B. napus root K+-permeable channels to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The last two mechanisms played the dominant role and conferred most of the differential salt sensitivity between species. Brassica napus plants were also more efficient in preventing the stress-induced increase in GORK transcript levels and up-regulation of expression of AKT1, HAK5, and HKT1 transporter genes. Taken together, our data provide the mechanistic explanation for differential salt stress sensitivity amongst these species and shed light on transcriptional and post-translational regulation of key ion transport systems involved in the maintenance of the root plasma membrane potential and cytosolic K/Na ratio as a key attribute for salt tolerance in Brassica species. PMID:27340231

  4. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  5. Reactive oxygen species in chick hair cells after gentamicin exposure in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hockenbery, D M; Rubel, E W

    1997-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been invoked as a causative agent of cell death in many different developmental and pathological states. The presence of free radicals and their importance of hair cell death due to aminoglycosides is suggested by a number of studies that have demonstrated a protective effect of antioxidants. By using dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) a fluorescent compound that is a reporter of reactive oxygen species, we have shown that free radicals are rapidly produced by avian hair cells in vitro after exposure to gentamicin. In addition, free radical scavengers, catalase and glutathione, were tested with DCFH fluorescent imaging for their ability to quench the production of reactive oxygen species in hair cells after drug exposure. Both free radical scavengers were very effective in suppressing drug-induced production of free radicals. Next, we investigated the ability of these antioxidants to preserve the structural integrity of hair cells after exposure to gentamicin. We were not able to detect any attenuation of the hair cell loss using antioxidants in conjunction with gentamicin. This result must be qualified by the fact that the antioxidants used were not effective over long-term gentamicin exposure. Therefore, methodological constraints prevented adequately testing possible protective effects of the free radical scavengers in this model system. PMID:9119753

  6. [Effects of allelochemical dibutyl phthalate on Gymnodinium breve reactive oxygen species].

    PubMed

    Bie, Cong-Cong; Li, Feng-Min; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory action of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on red tide algae Gymnodinium breve. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, contents of *OH and H2O2, and O2*(-) production rate were investigated, and also for the effects of electron transfer inhibitors on the ROS induction of DBP. The results showed that DBP triggered the synthesis of reactive oxygen species ROS, and with the increase of concentration of DBP, *OH and H2O2 contents in cells accumulated, as for the 3 mg x L(-1) DBP treated algae cultures, OH showed a peak of 33 U x mL(-1) at 48 h, which was about 2. 4 times higher than that in the controlled, and H2O2 contents was about 250 nmol x (10(7) cells)(-1) at 72 h, which was about 5 times higher and also was the highest during the whole culture. Rotenone (an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondria electron transport chain) decreased the DBP induced ROS production, and dicumarol (an inhibitor of the redox enzyme system in the plasma membrane) stimulated the DBP induced ROS production. Taken all together, the results demonstrated DBP induced over production of reactive oxygen species in G. breve, which is the main inhibitory mechanism, and mitochondria and plasma membrane seem to be the main target site of DBP. These conclusions were of scientific meaning on uncovering the inhibitory mechanism of allelochemical on algae.

  7. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates non-freezing cold injury of rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhiwei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is an injury characterized by neuropathy, developing when patients expose to cold environments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been shown as a contributing factor for the non-freezing cold nerve injury. However, the detailed connections between non-freezing cold nerve injury and ROS have not been described. In order to investigate the relationship between non-freezing cold nerve injury and reactive oxygen species, we study the effects of two cooling methods-the continuous cooling and the intermittent cooling with warming intervals-on rat sciatic nerves. Specifically, we assess the morphological changes and ROS production of the sciatic nerves underwent different cooling treatments. Our data shows both types of cooling methods cause nerve injury and ROS production. However, despite of identical cooling degree and duration, the sciatic nerves processed by intermittent cooling with warming intervals present more ROS production, severer reperfusion injury and pathological destructions than the sciatic nerves processed by continuous cooling. This result indicates reactive oxygen species, as a product of reperfusion, facilitates non-freezing cold nerve injury. PMID:26629065

  8. Temperature-dependence of mitochondrial function and production of reactive oxygen species in the intertidal mud clam Mya arenaria.

    PubMed

    Abele, D; Heise, K; Pörtner, H O; Puntarulo, S

    2002-07-01

    Mitochondrial respiration, energetic coupling to phosphorylation and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were studied in mitochondria isolated from the eurythermal bivalve Mya arenaria (Myoidea) from a low-shore intertidal population of the German Wadden Sea. Measurements were conducted both within the range of the habitat temperatures (5-15 degrees C) and when subjected to heat exposure at 20 degrees C and 25 degrees C. Experimental warming resulted in an increase in the rate of state 3 and state 4 respiration in isolated mitochondria. The highest respiratory coupling ratios (RCR) were found at 15 degrees C; at higher temperatures mitochondrial coupling decreased, and release of ROS doubled between 15 and 25 degrees C. ROS production was 2-3% of total oxygen consumption in state 3 (0.3-0.5 nmol ROS mg(-1) protein min(-1)) at the habitat temperature, reaching a maximum of 4.3 % of state 3 respiration and 7 % of oligomycin-induced state 4+ respiration under heat stress. Thus, state 4 respiration, previously interpreted exclusively as a measure of proton leakage, included a significant contribution from ROS formation in this animal, especially under conditions of heat stress. Oxygen radical formation was directly dependent on temperature-controlled respiration rates in states 3 and 4 and inversely related to mitochondrial coupling (RCR+) in state 4. Mitochondrial ROS formation is therefore involved in cellular heat stress in this eurythermal marine ectotherm.

  9. Inactivation effects of neutral reactive-oxygen species on Penicillium digitatum spores using non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure oxygen radical source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashizume, Hiroshi; Ohta, Takayuki; Fengdong, Jia; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2013-10-01

    The effectiveness of atomic and excited molecular oxygen species at inactivating Penicillium digitatum spores was quantitatively investigated by measuring these species and evaluating the spore inactivation rate. To avoid the effects of ultraviolet light and charged species, a non-equilibrium atmospheric-pressure radical source, which supplies only neutral radicals, was employed. Ground-state atomic oxygen (O(3Pj)) and excited molecular oxygen (O2(1Δg)) species were measured using vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The inactivation rate of spores was evaluated using the colony count method. The lifetimes of O(3Pj) and O2(1Δg) in an argon gas ambient at atmospheric pressure were found to be about 0.5 ms and much more than tens of ms, and their spore inactivation rates were about 10-17 cm3 s-1 and much lower than 10-21 cm3 s-1, respectively.

  10. Insulin over expression induces heart abnormalities via reactive oxygen species regulation, might be step towards cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mushtaq, S; Ali, T; Gul, M; Javed, Q; Emanueli, C; Murtaza, I

    2015-01-01

    Insulin is known to regulate blood—glucose level and promote its utilization as an energy source in cardiac tissues under normal physiological conditions as well as stimulates signaling pathways that involved cell growth and proliferation. Although recently insulin generated free radicals via NAD(P)H has been documented but the molecular mechanism is still under investigation. The aim of present study is to elucidate the reactive oxygen species (ROS) dependent possible role of insulin in cardiac abnormalities, including hypertrophy by regulation of antioxidants enzyme (SOD) activity. In the current study, 60 cardiac patients and 50 healthy individuals as well as the rat model with insulin administration were under investigation. Oxidant, anti—oxidant biochemical assays, hypertrophic marker expression via immunobloting and histopathology were performed. We observed statistically significant elevation of the reactive oxygen species level in the serum of patients as well as in the insulin administrated rat model, a mild expression of cardiac marker in experimental models along with abnormal histopathology of hearts. However, super oxide dismutase free radical scavenger activity was down regulated upon insulin treatment compared to control rats. Conclusively, the present study showed that over expression of insulin might stimulate cardiac hypertrophic signal via up regulation of free radicals and down regulation of antioxidants enzymes including SOD activity.

  11. Inorganic Polyphosphates Regulate Hexokinase Activity and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Mitochondria of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus Embryo

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, Amanda; Moraes, Jorge; da Silva, José Roberto; Costa, Evenilton P.; Menezes, Jackson; da Silva Vaz Jr, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Campos, Eldo

    2013-01-01

    The physiological roles of polyphosphates (poly P) recently found in arthropod mitochondria remain obscure. Here, the possible involvement of poly P with reactive oxygen species generation in mitochondria of Rhipicephalus microplus embryos was investigated. Mitochondrial hexokinase and scavenger antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione reductase were assayed during embryogenesis of R. microplus. The influence of poly P3 and poly P15 were analyzed during the period of higher enzymatic activity during embryogenesis. Both poly Ps inhibited hexokinase activity by up to 90% and, interestingly, the mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase activity was stimulated by the hexokinase reaction product, glucose-6-phosphate. Poly P increased hydrogen peroxide generation in mitochondria in a situation where mitochondrial hexokinase is also active. The superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase activities were higher during embryo cellularization, at the end of embryogenesis and during embryo segmentation, respectively. All of the enzymes were stimulated by poly P3. However, superoxide dismutase was not affected by poly P15, catalase activity was stimulated only at high concentrations and glutathione reductase was the only enzyme that was stimulated in the same way by both poly Ps. Altogether, our results indicate that inorganic polyphosphate and mitochondrial membrane exopolyphosphatase regulation can be correlated with the generation of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria of R. microplus embryos. PMID:23983617

  12. Electronic excitation and relaxation processes of oxygen vacancies in YSZ and their involvement in photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Takaaki; Kuroda, Yasuhiro; Ohki, Yoshimichi

    2016-09-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) consists of zirconia and yttria and oxygen vacancies appear in accordance with the ratio of yttria. The oxygen vacancy would sometimes give annoyance, but it would be beneficial on other occasions, depending on its applications. Photoluminescence (PL) due to oxygen vacancies induced by photons with energies around 5.5 eV exhibits two decay time constants. As a possible reason for this, an oxygen vacancy changes its charging state from neutral to positive monovalent by losing an electron when YSZ is irradiated by ultraviolet photons. The PL decays either in a ms range or in a ns range, depending on whether the oxygen vacancies are neutral or positive monovalent.

  13. Involvement of sphingoid bases in mediating reactive oxygen intermediate production and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lihua; Bielawski, Jacek; Mu, Jinye; Dong, Haili; Teng, Chong; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Xiaohui; Tomishige, Nario; Hanada, Kentaro; Hannun, Yusuf A; Zuo, Jianru

    2007-12-01

    Sphingolipids have been suggested to act as second messengers for an array of cellular signaling activities in plant cells, including stress responses and programmed cell death (PCD). However, the mechanisms underpinning these processes are not well understood. Here, we report that an Arabidopsis mutant, fumonisin B1 resistant 11-1 (fbr 11-1), which fails to generate reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs), is incapable of initiating PCD when the mutant is challenged by fumonisin B(1) (FB(1)), a specific inhibitor of ceramide synthase. Molecular analysis indicated that FBR11 encodes a long-chain base 1 (LCB1) subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), which catalyzes the first rate-limiting step of de novo sphingolipid synthesis. Mass spectrometric analysis of the sphingolipid concentrations revealed that whereas the fbr 11-1 mutation did not affect basal levels of sphingoid bases, the mutant showed attenuated formation of sphingoid bases in response to FB(1). By a direct feeding experiment, we show that the free sphingoid bases dihydrosphingosine, phytosphingosine and sphingosine efficiently induce ROI generation followed by cell death. Conversely, ROI generation and cell death induced by dihydrosphingosine were specifically blocked by its phosphorylated form dihydrosphingosine-1-phosphate in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the maintenance of homeostasis between a free sphingoid base and its phosphorylated derivative is critical to determining the cell fate. Because alterations of the sphingolipid level occur prior to the ROI production, we propose that the free sphingoid bases are involved in the control of PCD in Arabidopsis, presumably through the regulation of the ROI level upon receiving different developmental or environmental cues.

  14. In vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José Luís Fontes da Costa; Bragagnolo, Neura

    2011-07-15

    Bixa orellana L. (annatto), from Bixaceae family, is a native plant of tropical America, which accumulates several carotenoids (including bixin and norbixin), terpenoids, tocotrienols and flavonoids with potential antioxidant activity. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated and compared to the bixin standard. Annatto extracts were obtained using solvents with different polarities and their phenolic compounds and bixin levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector. All annatto extracts were able to scavenge all the reactive species tested at the low μg/mL range, with the exception of superoxide radical. The ethanol:ethyl acetate and ethyl acetate extracts of annatto seeds, which presented the highest levels of hypolaetin and bixin, respectively, were the extracts with the highest antioxidant capacity, although bixin standard presented the lowest IC(50) values. PMID:23140681

  15. Generation of reactive oxygen species by lethal attacks from competing microbes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tao G.; Dong, Shiqi; Catalano, Christy; Moore, Richard; Liang, Xiaoye; Mekalanos, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Whether antibiotics induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to cell death is an important yet controversial topic. Here, we report that lethal attacks from bacterial and viral species also result in ROS production in target cells. Using soxS as an ROS reporter, we found soxS was highly induced in Escherichia coli exposed to various forms of attacks mediated by the type VI secretion system (T6SS), P1vir phage, and polymyxin B. Using a fluorescence ROS probe, we found enhanced ROS levels correlate with induced soxS in E. coli expressing a toxic T6SS antibacterial effector and in E. coli treated with P1vir phage or polymyxin B. We conclude that both contact-dependent and contact-independent interactions with aggressive competing bacterial species and viruses can induce production of ROS in E. coli target cells. PMID:25646446

  16. Light-responsive polymer nanoreactors: a source of reactive oxygen species on demand.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Patric; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Onaca-Fischer, Ozana; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2013-01-01

    Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that encapsulate photosensitizer-protein conjugates in polymer vesicles as a source of "on demand" reactive oxygen species. Vesicles made of poly(2-methyloxazoline)-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) successfully encapsulated the photosensitizer Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin conjugate (RB-BSA) during a self-assembly process, as demonstrated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A combination of light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanoreactors are stable over time. They serve a dual role: protecting the photosensitizer in the inner cavity and producing in situ reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with appropriate electromagnetic radiation. Illumination with appropriate wavelength light allows us to switch on/off and to control the production of ROS. Because of the oxygen-permeable nature of the polymer membrane of vesicles, ROS escape into the environment around vesicles, as established by electron paramagnetic resonance. The light-sensitive nanoreactor is taken up by HeLa cells in a Trojan horse fashion: it is nontoxic and, when irradiated with the appropriate laser light, produces ROS that induce cell death in a precise area corresponding to the irradiation zone. These nanoreactors can be used in theranostic approaches because they can be detected via the fluorescent photosensitizer signal and simultaneously produce ROS efficiently "on demand".

  17. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  18. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  19. The NRAMP proteins of Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli are selective manganese transporters involved in the response to reactive oxygen.

    PubMed

    Kehres, D G; Zaharik, M L; Finlay, B B; Maguire, M E

    2000-06-01

    NRAMPs (natural resistance-associated macrophage proteins) have been characterized in mammals as divalent transition metal transporters involved in iron metabolism and host resistance to certain pathogens. The mechanism of pathogen resistance is proposed to involve sequestration of Fe2+ and Mn2+, cofactors of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalases and superoxide dismutases, not only to protect the macrophage against its own generation of reactive oxygen species, but to deny the cations to the pathogen for synthesis of its protective enzymes. NRAMP homologues are also present in bacteria. We report the cloning and characterization of the single NRAMP genes in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica ssp. typhimurium, and the cloning of two distinct NRAMP genes from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and an internal fragment of an NRAMP gene in Burkholderia cepacia. The genes are designated mntH because the two enterobacterial NRAMPs encode H+-stimulated, highly selective manganese(II) transport systems, accounting for all Mn2+ uptake in each species under the conditions tested. For S. typhimurium MntH, the Km for 54Mn2+ ( approximately 0.1 microM) was pH independent, but maximal uptake increased as pH decreased. Monovalent cations, osmotic strength, Mg2+ and Ca2+ did not inhibit 54Mn2+ uptake. Ni2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+ inhibited uptake with Kis greater than 100 microM, Co2+ with a Ki of 20 microM and Fe2+ with a Ki that decreased from 100 microM at pH 7. 6 to 10 microM at pH 5.5. Fe3+ and Pb2+ inhibited weakly, exhibiting Kis of 50 microM, while Cd2+ was a potent inhibitor with a Ki of about 1 microM. E. coli MntH had a similar inhibition profile, except that Kis were three- to 10-fold higher. Both S. typhimurium and E. coli MntH also transport 55Fe2+ however, the Kms are equivalent to the Kis for Fe2+ inhibition of Mn2+ uptake, and are thus too high to be physiologically relevant. In both S. typhimurium and E. coli, mntH:lacZ constructs were strongly induced by hydrogen peroxide

  20. Photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Li, Qilin

    2013-12-17

    The study investigated the photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs), an important environmental process affecting their physicochemical characteristics and hence fate and transport. UVA irradiation removed carboxyl groups from COOH-MWCNT surface while creating other oxygen-containing functional groups with an overall decrease in total surface oxygen content. This was attributed to reactions with photogenerated reactive oxygen species (ROS). COOH-MWCNTs generated singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) under UVA light, which exhibited different reactivity toward the COOH-MWCNT surface. Inhibition experiments that isolate the effects of (•)OH and (1)O2 as well as experiments using externally generated (•)OH and (1)O2 separately revealed that (•)OH played an important role in the photochemical transformation of COOH-MWCNTs under UVA irradiation. The Raman spectroscopy and surface functional group analysis results suggested that (•)OH initially reacted with the surface carboxylated carbonaceous fragments, resulting in their degradation or exfoliation. Further reaction between (•)OH and the graphitic sidewall led to formation of defects including functional groups and vacancies. These reactions reduced the surface potential and colloidal stability of COOH-MWCNTs, and are expected to reduce their mobility in aquatic systems. PMID:24255932

  1. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  2. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  3. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  4. Reactive oxygen species and phosphatidylserine externalization in murine sickle red cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tinku; Kuypers, Frans A

    2004-02-01

    Due to their role in oxygen transport and the presence of redox active haemoglobin molecules, red blood cells (RBC) generate relatively high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To counteract the potential deleterious effects of ROS, RBCs have a well-integrated network of anti-oxidant mechanisms to combat this oxidative stress. ROS formation is increased in sickle-cell disease (SCD) and our studies in a murine SCD model showed a significant increase in the generation of ROS when compared with normal mice. Our data also indicated that murine sickle RBCs exhibit a significantly increased ATP catabolism, partly due to the increased activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase to regenerate intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels to neutralize the adverse milieu of oxidative stress. Higher ATP consumption by the murine sickle RBCs, together with the increased ROS formation and impairment of the aminophospholipid translocase or flipase may underlie the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface of these cells.

  5. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  7. Seed birth to death: dual functions of reactive oxygen species in seed physiology

    PubMed Central

    Jeevan Kumar, S. P.; Rajendra Prasad, S.; Banerjee, Rintu; Thammineni, Chakradhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be detrimental to seed viability. However, recent studies have demonstrated that ROS have key roles in seed germination particularly in the release of seed dormancy and embryogenesis, as well as in protection from pathogens. Scope This review considers the functions of ROS in seed physiology. ROS are present in all cells and at all phases of the seed life cycle. ROS accumulation is important in breaking seed dormancy, and stimulating seed germination and protection from pathogens. However, excessive ROS accumulation can be detrimental. Therefore, knowledge of the mechanisms by which ROS influence seed physiology will provide insights that may not only allow the development of seed quality markers but also help us understand how dormancy can be broken in several recalcitrant species. Conclusions Reactive oxygen species have a dual role in seed physiology. Understanding the relative importance of beneficial and detrimental effects of ROS provides great scope for the improvement and maintenance of seed vigour and quality, factors that may ultimately increase crop yields. PMID:26271119

  8. Peroxisome Proliferation in Foraminifera Inhabiting the Chemocline: An Adaptation to Reactive Oxygen Species Exposure?1

    PubMed Central

    BERNHARD, JOAN M.; BOWSER, SAMUEL S.

    2009-01-01

    Certain foraminiferal species are abundant within the chemocline of marine sediments. Ultrastructurally, most of these species possess numerous peroxisomes complexed with the endoplasmic reticulum; mitochondria are often interspersed among these complexes. In the Santa Barbara Basin, pore-water bathing Foraminifera and co-occurring sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats had micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species that can be detrimental to biological membranes. Experimental results indicate that adenosine triphosphate concentrations are significantly higher in Foraminifera incubated in 16 μM H2O2 than in specimens incubated in the absence of H2O2. New ultrastructural and experimental observations, together with published results, lead us to propose that foraminiferans can utilize oxygen derived from the breakdown of environmentally and metabolically produced H2O2. Such a capability could explain foraminiferal adaptation to certain chemically inhospitable environments; it would also force us to reassess the role of protists in biogeochemistry, especially with respect to hydrogen and iron. The ecology of these protists also appears to be tightly linked to the sulfur cycle. Finally, given that some Foraminifera bearing peroxisome-endoplasmic reticulum complexes belong to evolutionarily basal groups, an early acquisition of the capability to use environmental H2O2 could have facilitated diversification of foraminiferans during the Neoproterozoic. PMID:18460150

  9. Peroxisome proliferation in Foraminifera inhabiting the chemocline: an adaptation to reactive oxygen species exposure?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Bowser, Samuel S

    2008-01-01

    Certain foraminiferal species are abundant within the chemocline of marine sediments. Ultrastructurally, most of these species possess numerous peroxisomes complexed with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); mitochondria are often interspersed among these complexes. In the Santa Barbara Basin, pore-water bathing Foraminifera and co-occurring sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats had micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a reactive oxygen species that can be detrimental to biological membranes. Experimental results indicate that adenosine triphosphate concentrations are significantly higher in Foraminifera incubated in 16 microM H(2)O(2) than in specimens incubated in the absence of H(2)O(2). New ultrastructural and experimental observations, together with published results, lead us to propose that foraminiferans can utilize oxygen derived from the breakdown of environmentally and metabolically produced H(2)O(2). Such a capability could explain foraminiferal adaptation to certain chemically inhospitable environments; it would also force us to reassess the role of protists in biogeochemistry, especially with respect to hydrogen and iron. The ecology of these protists also appears to be tightly linked to the sulfur cycle. Finally, given that some Foraminifera bearing peroxisome-ER complexes belong to evolutionarily basal groups, an early acquisition of the capability to use environmental H(2)O(2) could have facilitated diversification of foraminiferans during the Neoproterozoic.

  10. Epstein-Barr virus infection induces bone resorption in apical periodontitis via increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Aleksandar; Andric, Miroslav; Miletic, Maja; Beljic-Ivanovic, Katarina; Knezevic, Aleksandra; Mojsilovic, Slavko; Milasin, Jelena

    2016-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory processes in periapical tissues caused by etiological agents of endodontic origin lead to apical periodontitis. Apart from bacteria, two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) are recognized as putative pathogens in apical periodontitis. Although previous reports suggest the involvement of EBV in the pathogenesis of apical periodontitis, its exact role in periapical bone resorption has not yet been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that EBV infection in apical periodontitis is capable of inducing periapical bone resorption via stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction. Increased levels of ROS induce expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). RANKL binding to receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) present on the surface of preosteoclasts induces their maturation and activation which consequently leads to bone resorption. The potential benefit of antiviral and antioxidant-based therapies in periapical bone resorption treatment remains to be assessed. PMID:27515196

  11. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of varicocele and its association with reactive oxygen species and sperm DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chak-Lam; Esteves, Sandro C; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele has been associated with reduced male reproductive potential. With the advances in biomolecular techniques, it has been possible to better understand the mechanisms involved in testicular damage provoked by varicocele. Current evidence suggests the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resultant oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of varicocele-associated male subfertility although the mechanisms have not yet been fully described and it is likely to be multifactorial. Excessive ROS is associated with sperm DNA fragmentation, which may mediate the clinical manifestation of poor sperm function and fertilization outcome related to varicocele. Testing of ROS/OS and DNA fragmentation has the potential to provide additional diagnostic and prognostic information compared to conventional semen analysis and may guide therapeutic management strategies in individual patient. PMID:26732105

  12. Reactive oxygen species regulatory mechanisms associated with rapid response of MC3T3-E1 cells for vibration stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Gan, Xueqi; Zhu, Zhuoli; Yang, Yang; He, Yuting; Yu, Haiyang

    2016-02-12

    Although many previous studies have shown that refractory period-dependent memory effect of vibration stress is anabolic for skeletal homeostasis, little is known about the rapid response of osteoblasts simply derived from vibration itself. In view of the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating differentiated activity of osteoblasts, whether and how ROS regulates the rapid effect of vibration deserve to be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that MC3T3-E1 cells underwent decreased gene expression of Runx2, Col-I and ALP and impaired ALP activity accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission immediately after vibration loading. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of ERK-Drp1 signal transduction in ROS regulatory mechanisms responsible for the rapid effect of vibration stress.

  13. Reactive oxygen species regulatory mechanisms associated with rapid response of MC3T3-E1 cells for vibration stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Gan, Xueqi; Zhu, Zhuoli; Yang, Yang; He, Yuting; Yu, Haiyang

    2016-02-12

    Although many previous studies have shown that refractory period-dependent memory effect of vibration stress is anabolic for skeletal homeostasis, little is known about the rapid response of osteoblasts simply derived from vibration itself. In view of the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mediating differentiated activity of osteoblasts, whether and how ROS regulates the rapid effect of vibration deserve to be demonstrated. Our findings indicated that MC3T3-E1 cells underwent decreased gene expression of Runx2, Col-I and ALP and impaired ALP activity accompanied by increased mitochondrial fission immediately after vibration loading. Moreover, we also revealed the involvement of ERK-Drp1 signal transduction in ROS regulatory mechanisms responsible for the rapid effect of vibration stress. PMID:26802466

  14. In vivo imaging of Ca2+, pH, and reactive oxygen species using fluorescent probes in plants.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Sarah J; Choi, Won-Gyu; Chanoca, Alexandra; Gilroy, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the levels of Ca(2+), pH, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are recognized as key cellular regulators involved in diverse physiological and developmental processes in plants. Critical to understanding how they exert such widespread control is an appreciation of their spatial and temporal dynamics at levels from organ to organelle and from seconds to many hours. With appropriate controls, fluorescent sensors can provide a robust approach with which to quantify such changes in Ca(2+), pH, and ROS in real time, in vivo. The fluorescent cellular probes available for visualization split into two broad classes: (a) dyes and (b) an increasingly diverse set of genetically encoded sensors based around green fluorescent proteins (GFPs). The GFP probes in particular can be targeted to well-defined subcellular locales, offering the possibility of high-resolution mapping of these signals within the cell.

  15. Mountain cedar pollen induces IgE-independent mast cell degranulation, IL-4 production, and intracellular reactive oxygen species generation

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Shuichiro; Hochman, Daniel J.; Midoro-Horiuti, Terumi; Goldblum, Randall M.; Brooks, Edward G.

    2011-01-01

    Cedar pollens cause severe allergic disease throughout the world. We have previously characterized allergenic pollen glycoproteins from mountain cedar (Juniperus ashei) that bind to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE). In the present report, we investigated an alternative pathway of mast cell activation by mountain cedar pollen extract through IgE-independent mechanisms. We show that mountain cedar pollen directly induces mast cell serotonin and IL-4 release and enhances release induced by IgE cross-linking. Concomitant with mediator release, high levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were generated, and both ROS and serotonin release were inhibited by anti-oxidants. These findings suggest that alternative mechanisms exist whereby pollen exposure enhances allergic inflammatory mediator release through mechanisms that involve ROS. These mechanisms have the potential for enhancing the allergenic potency of pollens. PMID:21944563

  16. Comparison of stainless and mild steel welding fumes in generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Welding fumes consist of a wide range of complex metal oxide particles which can be deposited in all regions of the respiratory tract. The welding aerosol is not homogeneous and is generated mostly from the electrode/wire. Over 390,000 welders were reported in the U.S. in 2008 while over 1 million full-time welders were working worldwide. Many health effects are presently under investigation from exposure to welding fumes. Welding fume pulmonary effects have been associated with bronchitis, metal fume fever, cancer and functional changes in the lung. Our investigation focused on the generation of free radicals and reactive oxygen species from stainless and mild steel welding fumes generated by a gas metal arc robotic welder. An inhalation exposure chamber located at NIOSH was used to collect the welding fume particles. Results Our results show that hydroxyl radicals (.OH) were generated from reactions with H2O2 and after exposure to cells. Catalase reduced the generation of .OH from exposed cells indicating the involvement of H2O2. The welding fume suspension also showed the ability to cause lipid peroxidation, effect O2 consumption, induce H2O2 generation in cells, and cause DNA damage. Conclusion Increase in oxidative damage observed in the cellular exposures correlated well with .OH generation in size and type of welding fumes, indicating the influence of metal type and transition state on radical production as well as associated damage. Our results demonstrate that both types of welding fumes are able to generate ROS and ROS-related damage over a range of particle sizes; however, the stainless steel fumes consistently showed a significantly higher reactivity and radical generation capacity. The chemical composition of the steel had a significant impact on the ROS generation capacity with the stainless steel containing Cr and Ni causing more damage than the mild steel. Our results suggest that welding fumes may cause acute lung injury. Since type of

  17. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  18. Effects of the reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorite on endothelial nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Jaimes, E A; Sweeney, C; Raij, L

    2001-10-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and hypochlorite (HOCl) participate in the pathogenesis of ischemia/reperfusion injury, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. Both NO and ROS are important modulators of vascular tone and architecture and of adhesive interactions between leukocytes, platelets, and vascular endothelium. We studied the effect of H(2)O(2) and HOCl on receptor-dependent (bradykinin [10(-6) mol/L] and ADP [10(-4) mol/L]) and receptor-independent mechanisms (calcium ionophore A23187 [10(-6) mol/L]) of NO production by porcine aortic endothelial cells (ECs). Changes in the level of EC cGMP (the second messenger of NO) were used as a surrogate of NO production. EC cGMP increased 300% in response to bradykinin and A23187 and 200% in response to ADP. Exposure of ECs to H(2)O(2) (50 micromol/L) for 30 minutes significantly impaired cGMP levels in response to ADP, bradykinin, and the receptor-independent NO agonist A23187. In contrast, preincubation with HOCl (50 micromol/L) impaired cGMP production only in response to ADP and bradykinin but not A23187. These concentrations of H(2)O(2) and HOCl did not result in increased EC lethality as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release. Neither H(2)O(2) nor HOCl affected EC cGMP production in response to NO donor sodium nitroprusside, which suggests that guanylate cyclase is resistant to these oxidants. We also demonstrated that neither H(2)O(2) nor HOCl affects endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) catalytic activity as measured by conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline in EC homogenates supplemented with eNOS cofactors. The present studies show that H(2)O(2) impairs NO production in response to both receptor-dependent and receptor-independent agonists and that these effects are due, at least in part, to inactivation of eNOS cofactors, whereas HOCl inhibits NO production by interfering with receptor-operated mechanisms at the level of the cell membrane. Concentrations of H(2)O(2) and HOCl used in

  19. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  20. Microcystin-LR Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cytoskeletal Disruption and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinlin; Shan, Zhengjun; Xu, Weili; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Junying; Kong, Deyang; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) contains Leucine (L) and Arginine (R) in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A) activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH) was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12 - 48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity. PMID:24376844

  1. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Targeting Myocardial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Rats With Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Widder, Julian D

    2015-11-01

    Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to progression of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ischemic heart failure. Clinical use of organic nitrates as nitric oxide donors is limited by development of nitrate tolerance and reactive oxygen species formation. We investigated the effects of long-term therapy with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an organic nitrate devoid of tolerance, in rats with congestive heart failure after extensive myocardial infarction. Seven days after coronary artery ligation, rats were randomly allocated to treatment with PETN (80 mg/kg BID) or placebo for 9 weeks. Long-term PETN therapy prevented the progressive left ventricular dilatation and improved left ventricular contractile function and relaxation in rats with congestive heart failure. Mitochondrial superoxide anion production was markedly increased in the failing left ventricular myocardium and nearly normalized by PETN treatment. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PETN beneficially modulated the dysregulation of mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, paralleled by prevention of uncoupling protein-3, thioredoxin-2, and superoxide dismutase-2 downregulation. Moreover, PETN provided a remarkable protective effect against reactive fibrosis in chronically failing hearts. Mechanistically, induction of heme oxygenase-1 by PETN prevented mitochondrial superoxide generation, NOX4 upregulation, and ensuing formation of extracellular matrix proteins in fibroblasts from failing hearts. In summary, PETN targeting reactive oxygen species generation prevented the changes of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and progressive fibrotic remodeling, leading to amelioration of cardiac functional performance. Therefore, PETN might be a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases involving oxidative stress and impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity.

  2. Different tobacco retrotransposons are specifically modulated by the elicitor cryptogein and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Anca, Iulia-Andra; Fromentin, Jérôme; Bui, Quynh Trang; Mhiri, Corinne; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2014-10-15

    Interactions of plant retrotransposons with different steps of biotic and abiotic stress-associated signaling cascades are still poorly understood. We perform here a finely tuned comparison of four tobacco retrotransposons (Tnt1, Tnt2, Queenti, and Tto1) responses to the plant elicitor cryptogein. We demonstrate that basal transcript levels in cell suspensions and plant leaves as well as the activation during the steps of defense signaling events are specific to each retrotransposon. Using antisense NtrbohD lines, we show that NtrbohD-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production might act as negative regulator of retrotransposon activation. PMID:25128785

  3. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  4. Function of reactive oxygen species during animal development: passive or active?

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Luis; Hernández-García, David; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Castro-Obregón, Susana

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative stress is considered causal of aging and pathological cell death, however, very little is known about its function in the natural processes that support the formation of an organism. It is generally thought that cells must continuously protect themselves from the possible damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (passive ROS function). However, presently, ROS are recognized as physiologically relevant molecules that mediate cell responses to a variety of stimuli, and the activities of several molecules, some developmentally relevant, are directly or indirectly regulated by oxidative stress (active ROS function). Here we review recent data that are suggestive of specific ROS functions during development of animals, particularly mammals.

  5. Role of auxin-induced reactive oxygen species in root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Joo, J H; Bae, Y S; Lee, J S

    2001-07-01

    We report our studies on root gravitropism indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may function as a downstream component in auxin-mediated signal transduction. A transient increase in the intracellular concentration of ROS in the convex endodermis resulted from either gravistimulation or unilateral application of auxin to vertical roots. Root bending was also brought about by unilateral application of ROS to vertical roots pretreated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Furthermore, the scavenging of ROS by antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, and Trolox) inhibited root gravitropism. These results indicate that the generation of ROS plays a role in root gravitropism. PMID:11457956

  6. Role of reactive oxygen species and TRP channels in the cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    The cough reflex is evoked by noxious stimuli in the airways. Although this reflex is essential for health, it can be triggered chronically in inflammatory and infectious airway disease. Neuronal transient receptor potential (TRP) channels such as ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are polymodal receptors expressed on airway nociceptive afferent nerves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive compounds are associated with inflammation, from either NADPH oxidase or mitochondria. These reactive compounds cause activation and hyperexcitability of nociceptive afferents innervating the airways, and evidence suggests key contributions of TRPA1 and TRPV1. PMID:27016063

  7. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes activity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanobacterium) under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen-bao; Liu, Yong-ding; Wang, Gao-hong; Song, Li-rong

    2004-12-01

    It was found that reactive oxygen species in Anabaena cells increased under simulated microgravity provided by clinostat. Activities of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase were higher than those in the controlled samples during the 7 days' experiment. However, the contents of gluathione, an intracellular antioxidant, decreased in comparison with the controlled samples. The results suggested that microgravity provided by clinostat might break the oxidative/antioxidative balance. It indicated a protective mechanism in algal cells, that the total antioxidant system activity increased, which might play an important role for algal cells to adapt the environmental stress of microgravity.

  8. NQO2 Is a Reactive Oxygen Species Generating Off-Target for Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:25313982

  9. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-09-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Consequently, the bacteria are selectively killed on the cathode surface. However, the cell experiment suggested that the level of ROS is safe for normal mammalian cells. PMID:27599911

  10. Functional implications of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generated by oncogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Between 15–20% of human cancers are associated with infection by oncogenic viruses. Oncogenic viruses, including HPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV-1, target mitochondria to influence cell proliferation and survival. Oncogenic viral gene products also trigger the production of reactive oxygen species which can elicit oxidative DNA damage and potentiate oncogenic host signaling pathways. Viral oncogenes may also subvert mitochondria quality control mechanisms such as mitophagy and metabolic adaptation pathways to promote virus replication. Here, we will review recent progress on viral regulation of mitophagy and metabolic adaptation and their roles in viral oncogenesis. PMID:25580106

  11. Redox state, reactive oxygen species and adaptive growth in colonial hydroids.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, N W

    2001-06-01

    Colonial metazoans often encrust surfaces over which the food supply varies in time or space. In such an environment, adaptive colony development entails adjusting the timing and spacing of feeding structures and gastrovascular connections to correspond to this variable food supply. To investigate the possibility of such adaptive growth, within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out using the hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Indeed, such colonies strongly exhibited adaptive growth, developing dense arrays of polyps (feeding structures) and gastrovascular connections in areas that were fed relative to areas that were starved, and this effect became more consistent over time. To investigate mechanisms of signaling between the food supply and colony development, measurements were taken of metabolic parameters that have been implicated in signal transduction in other systems, particularly redox state and levels of reactive oxygen species. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy of P. carnea cells in vivo, simultaneous measurements of redox state [using NAD(P)H] and hydrogen peroxide (using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) were taken. Both measures focused on polyp epitheliomuscular cells, since these exhibit the greatest metabolic activity. Colonies 3-5h after feeding were relatively oxidized, with low levels of peroxide, while colonies 24h after feeding were relatively reduced, with high levels of peroxide. The functional role of polyps in feeding and generating gastrovascular flow probably produced this dichotomy. Polyps 3-5h after feeding contract maximally, and this metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of oxidation and diminishes levels of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, 24h after feeding, polyps are quiescent, and this lack of metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of reduction and increases levels of reactive oxygen species. Within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out on

  12. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  13. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  14. Mechanistic and kinetic study on the reactions of coumaric acids with reactive oxygen species: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Barbero, Antonio J; Albaladejo, José

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of reactions between coumaric acids and a series of reactive oxygen species ((•)OX) was studied through the density functional theory (DFT). H atom abstraction from -OH and -COOH groups and addition to the nonaromatic double bond were the most representative reaction pathways chosen for which free energy barriers and rate constants were calculated within the transition state theory (TST) framework. From these calculations, it was estimated that (•)OH > (•)OCH3 > (•)OOH > (•)OOCH3 is the order of reactivity of (•)OX with any coumaric acid. The highest rate constant was estimated for p-coumaric acid + (•)OH reaction, whereas the rest of the (•)OX species are more reactive with o-coumaric acid. On the basis of the calculated rate constants, H abstraction from a -OH group should be the main mechanism for the reactions involving (•)OCH3, (•)OOH, and (•)OOCH3 radicals. Nevertheless, the addition mechanism, which sometimes is not considered in theoretical studies on reactions of phenolic compounds with electrophilic species, could play a relevant role in the global mechanism of coumaric acid + (•)OH reactions.

  15. Exceedingly Fast Oxygen Atom Transfer to Olefins via a Catalytically Competent Nonheme Iron Species.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Aguinaco, Almudena; Belda, Raquel; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2016-05-17

    The reaction of [Fe(CF3 SO3 )2 (PyNMe3 )] with excess peracetic acid at -40 °C leads to the accumulation of a metastable compound that exists as a pair of electromeric species, [Fe(III) (OOAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) and [Fe(V) (O)(OAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) , in fast equilibrium. Stopped-flow UV/Vis analysis confirmed that oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from these electromeric species to olefinic substrates is exceedingly fast, forming epoxides with stereoretention. The impact of the electronic and steric properties of the substrate on the reaction rate could be elucidated, and the relative reactivities determined for the catalytic oxidations could be reproduced by kinetic studies. The observed fast reaction rates and high selectivities demonstrate that this metastable compound is a truly competent OAT intermediate of relevance for nonheme iron catalyzed epoxidations.

  16. Exceedingly Fast Oxygen Atom Transfer to Olefins via a Catalytically Competent Nonheme Iron Species.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Aguinaco, Almudena; Belda, Raquel; García-España, Enrique; Basallote, Manuel G; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2016-05-17

    The reaction of [Fe(CF3 SO3 )2 (PyNMe3 )] with excess peracetic acid at -40 °C leads to the accumulation of a metastable compound that exists as a pair of electromeric species, [Fe(III) (OOAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) and [Fe(V) (O)(OAc)(PyNMe3 )](2+) , in fast equilibrium. Stopped-flow UV/Vis analysis confirmed that oxygen atom transfer (OAT) from these electromeric species to olefinic substrates is exceedingly fast, forming epoxides with stereoretention. The impact of the electronic and steric properties of the substrate on the reaction rate could be elucidated, and the relative reactivities determined for the catalytic oxidations could be reproduced by kinetic studies. The observed fast reaction rates and high selectivities demonstrate that this metastable compound is a truly competent OAT intermediate of relevance for nonheme iron catalyzed epoxidations. PMID:27071372

  17. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. PMID:25658194

  18. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  19. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants.

  20. Binding of Reactive Oxygen Species at Fe-S Cubane Clusters.

    PubMed

    Bruska, Marta K; Stiebritz, Martin T; Reiher, Markus

    2015-12-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the biochemistry of the cell and occur in degenerative processes as well as in signal transduction. Iron-sulfur proteins are particularly oxygen-sensitive and their inorganic cofactors frequently undergo ROS-induced decomposition reactions. As experimental knowledge about these processes is still incomplete we present here a quantum chemical study of the relative energetics for the binding of the most relevant ROS to [Fe4S4] clusters. We find that cubane clusters with one uncoordinated Fe atom (as found, for instance, in aconitase) bind all oxygen derivatives considered, whereas activation of triplet O2 to singlet O2 is required for binding to valence-saturated iron centers in these clusters. The radicals NO and OH feature the most exothermic binding energies to Fe atoms. Direct sulfoxidation of coordinating cysteine residues is only possible by OH or H2O2 as attacking agents. The thermodynamic picture of ROS binding to iron-sulfur clusters established here can serve as a starting point for studying reactivity-modulating effects of the cluster-embedding protein environment on ROS-induced decomposition of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26585994

  1. Production of reactive oxygen species after photodynamic therapy by porphyrin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Nevrelova, P; Tomankova, K; Kolar, P; Bajgar, R; Mosinger, J

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vitro. We examined second generation sensitizers, porphyrines (TPPS4, ZnTPPS4 and PdTPPS4) and compared their effectivity on ROS generation in G361 cell line. Used porphyrines are very efficient water-soluble aromatic dyes with potential to use in photomedicine and have a high propensity to accumulate in the membranes of intracellular organelles like lysosomes and mitochondria. Interaction between the triplet excited state of the sensitizer and molecular oxygen leads to produce singlet oxygen and other ROS to induce cell death. Production of ROS was verificated by molecular probe CM-H2DCFDA and viability of cells was determined by MTT assay. Our results demonstrated that ZnTPPS4 induces the highest ROS production in cell line compared to TPPS4 and PdTPPS4 at each used concentration and light dose. These results consist with a fact that photodynamic effect depends on sensitizer type, its concentration and light dose.

  2. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering.

  3. Deconvoluting the role of reactive oxygen species and autophagy in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Wu, Jinming; Wang, Fengtian; Liu, Bo; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, can form as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen and also have their crucial roles in cell homeostasis. Of note, the major intracellular sources including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes and the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex have been identified in cell membranes to produce ROS. Interestingly, autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process in which a cell degrades long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, has recently been well-characterized to be regulated by different types of ROS. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that ROS-modulated autophagy has numerous links to a number of pathological processes, including cancer, ageing, neurodegenerative diseases, type-II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, muscular disorders, hepatic encephalopathy and immunity diseases. In this review, we focus on summarizing the molecular mechanisms of ROS-regulated autophagy and their relevance to diverse diseases, which would shed new light on more ROS modulators as potential therapeutic drugs for fighting human diseases.

  4. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  5. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development.

  6. Light-responsive polymer nanoreactors: a source of reactive oxygen species on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Patric; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Onaca-Fischer, Ozana; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Palivan, Cornelia G.

    2012-12-01

    Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that encapsulate photosensitizer-protein conjugates in polymer vesicles as a source of ``on demand'' reactive oxygen species. Vesicles made of poly(2-methyloxazoline)-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) successfully encapsulated the photosensitizer Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin conjugate (RB-BSA) during a self-assembly process, as demonstrated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A combination of light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanoreactors are stable over time. They serve a dual role: protecting the photosensitizer in the inner cavity and producing in situ reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with appropriate electromagnetic radiation. Illumination with appropriate wavelength light allows us to switch on/off and to control the production of ROS. Because of the oxygen-permeable nature of the polymer membrane of vesicles, ROS escape into the environment around vesicles, as established by electron paramagnetic resonance. The light-sensitive nanoreactor is taken up by HeLa cells in a Trojan horse fashion: it is nontoxic and, when irradiated with the appropriate laser light, produces ROS that induce cell death in a precise area corresponding to the irradiation zone. These nanoreactors can be used in theranostic approaches because they can be detected via the fluorescent photosensitizer signal and simultaneously produce ROS efficiently ``on demand''.Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that

  7. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Aliyu, M; Isiaka, I; Haliru, F Z; Ibitoye, O B; Uwazie, J N; Muritala, H F; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Mohammed, A O

    2016-10-25

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality was investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were investigated using 96-well microtitre plate. MIC and MBC of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus are 600 and 700; 600 and 800; 600 and 800 μg/mL respectively. The optical densities and colony forming units of (+)-catechin-treated bacteria decreased. (+)-Catechin (4× MIC) significantly increased the superoxide anion content of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus compared to DMSO. Superoxide dismutase and catalase in (+)-catechin treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus increased significantly. Conversely, level of reduced glutathione in (+)-catechin-treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus decreased significantly while glutathione disulfide increased significantly. Furthermore, malondialdehyde and fragmented DNA increased significantly following exposure to (+)-catechin. From the above findings, (+)-catechin enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical) in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, possibly by autoxidation, Fenton chemistry and inhibiting electron transport chain resulting into lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation and consequentially bacterial cell death. PMID:27634360

  8. Covariance of oxygen and hydrogen isotopic composition in plant water: Species effects

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, L.W.; DeNiro, M.J. )

    1989-12-01

    Leaf water becomes enriched in the heavy isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen during evapotranspiration. The magnitude of the enrichment has been shown to be influenced by temperature and humidity, but the effects of species-specific factors on leaf water enrichment of D and {sup 18}O have not been studied for different plants growing together. To learn whether leaf water enrichment patterns and processes for D and {sup 18}O are different for individual species growing under the same environmental conditions the authors tested the proposal that leaf waters in plants with crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) show high sloped (m in the leaf water equation {delta}D = m {delta}{sup 18}O + b) than in C{sub 3} plants. They determined the relationships between the stable hydrogen ({delta}D) and oxygen ({delta}{sup 18}O) isotope ratios of leaf waters collected during the diurnal cycle of evapotranspiration for Yucca schidigera, Ephedra aspera, Agave deserti, Prunus ilicifolia, Yucca whipplei, Heteromeles arbutifolia, Dyckia fosteriana, Simmondsia chinensis, and Encelia farinosa growing at two sites in southern California. The findings indicate that m in the aforementioned equation is related to the overall residence time for water in the leaf and proportions of water subjected to repeated evapotranspiration enrichments of heavy isotopes.

  9. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  10. Reactive oxygen species exacerbate autoimmune hemolytic anemia in New Zealand Black mice.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tasuku; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kibe, Noriko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage occur in the red blood cells (RBCs) of SOD1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. This leads to autoimmune responses against RBCs in aged mice that are similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We examined whether a SOD1 deficiency and/or the human SOD1 transgene (hSOD1) would affect phenotypes of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice by establishing three congenic strains: those lacking SOD1, those expressing hSOD1 under a GATA-1 promoter, and those lacking mouse SOD1 but expressing hSOD1. Levels of intracellular ROS and oxidative stress markers increased, and the severity of the AIHA phenotype was aggravated by a SOD1 deficiency. In contrast, the transgenic expression of hSOD1 in an erythroid cell-specific manner averted most of the AIHA phenotype evident in the SOD1-deficient mice and also ameliorated the AIHA phenotype in the mice possessing intrinsic SOD1. These data suggest that oxidative stress in RBCs may be an underlying mechanism for autoimmune responses in NZB mice. These results were consistent with the hypothetical role of reactive oxygen species in triggering the autoimmune reaction in RBCs and may provide a novel approach to mitigating the progression of AIHA by reducing oxidative stress.

  11. Photolysis of atrazine in aqueous solution: role of process variables and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcela Prado; Batista, Ana Paula dos Santos; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Silva, Vanessa Honda Ogihara; Teixeira, Antonio Carlos Silva Costa

    2014-11-01

    Photochemical advanced oxidation processes have been considered for the treatment of water and wastewater containing the herbicide atrazine (ATZ), a possible human carcinogen and endocrine disruptor. In this study, we investigated the effects of the photon emission rate and initial concentration on ATZ photolysis at 254 nm, an issue not usually detailed in literature. Moreover, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed. Photon emission rates in the range 0.87 × 10(18)-3.6 × 10(18) photons L(-1) s(-1) and [ATZ]0 = 5 and 20 mg L(-1) were used. The results showed more than 65 % of ATZ removal after 30 min. ATZ photolysis followed apparent first-order kinetics with k values and percent removals decreasing with increasing herbicide initial concentration. A fivefold linear increase in specific degradation rate constants with photon emission rate was observed. Also, regardless the presence of persistent degradation products, toxicity was efficiently removed after 60-min exposure to UV radiation. Experiments confirmed a noticeable contribution of singlet oxygen and radical species to atrazine degradation during photolysis. These results may help understand the behavior of atrazine in different UV-driven photochemical degradation treatment processes.

  12. Reactive oxygen species and lipoxygenases regulate the oncogenicity of NPM-ALK-positive anaplastic large cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Thornber, K; Colomba, A; Ceccato, L; Delsol, G; Payrastre, B; Gaits-Iacovoni, F

    2009-07-23

    The chimera nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK), the tyrosine kinase activity of which is constitutively upregulated, is the causative agent of 75% of the anaplastic large-cell lymphomas (ALCLs). We have demonstrated that NPM-ALK induces the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by a pathway involving the arachidonic acid-metabolizing enzymes of the lipoxygenase (LOX) family. The use of the LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) and of the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) demonstrated that ROS are important in maintaining the ALK kinase active. Consistent with this, NDGA treatment resulted in the inhibition of key pathways, such as Akt, signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which are involved in NPM-ALK antiapoptotic and pro-mitogenic functions. Conversely, the stress-activated kinase p38, described in some instances as a mediator of apoptosis, was activated. Interestingly, 5-LOX, an isoform involved in many cancers, was found to be activated in NPM-ALK(+) cells. Functional studies have shown that transforming properties, namely proliferation and resistance to apoptosis, were abrogated by treatment with either NDGA or the 5-LOX inhibitor (N-(3-phenoxycinnamyl)-acetohydroxamic acid) (BW A4C). Together, these data point to the ROS/LOX pathway as a potential new target for therapy in NPM-ALK-positive tumors.

  13. Ototoxicity and noise trauma: electron transfer, reactive oxygen species, cell signaling, electrical effects, and protection by antioxidants: practical medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2008-01-01

    Ototoxins are substances of various structures and classes. This review provides extensive evidence for involvement of electron transfer (ET), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS) as a unifying theme. Successful application is made to the large majority of ototoxins, as well as noise trauma. We believe it is not coincidental that these toxins generally incorporate ET functionalities (quinone, metal complex, ArNO(2), or conjugated iminium) either per se or in metabolites, potentially giving rise to ROS by redox cycling. Some categories, e.g., peroxides and noise, appear to operate via non-ET routes in generating OS. These highly reactive entities can then inflict injury via OS upon various constituents of the ear apparatus. The theoretical framework is supported by the extensive literature on beneficial effects of antioxidants, both for toxins and noise. Involvement of cell signaling and electrical effects are discussed. This review is the first comprehensive one based on a unified mechanistic approach. Various practical medical aspects are also addressed. There is extensive documentation for beneficial effects of antioxidants whose use might be recommended clinically for prevention of ototoxicity and noise trauma. Recent research indicates that catalytic antioxidants may be more effective. In addition to ototoxicity, a widespread problem consists of ear infections by bacteria which are demonstrating increasing resistance to conventional therapies. A recent, novel approach to improved drugs involves use of agents which inhibit quorum sensors that play important roles in bacterial functioning. Prevention of ear injury by noise trauma is also discussed, along with ear therapeutics.

  14. Warm acclimation and oxygen depletion induce species-specific responses in salmonids.

    PubMed

    Anttila, Katja; Lewis, Mario; Prokkola, Jenni M; Kanerva, Mirella; Seppänen, Eila; Kolari, Irma; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2015-05-15

    Anthropogenic activities are greatly altering the habitats of animals, whereby fish are already encountering several stressors simultaneously. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the capacity of fish to respond to two different environmental stressors (high temperature and overnight hypoxia) separately and together. We found that acclimation to increased temperature (from 7.7±0.02°C to 14.9±0.05°C) and overnight hypoxia (daily changes from normoxia to 63-67% oxygen saturation), simulating climate change and eutrophication, had both antagonistic and synergistic effects on the capacity of fish to tolerate these stressors. The thermal tolerance of Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) and landlocked salmon (Salmo salar m. sebago) increased with warm acclimation by 1.3 and 2.2°C, respectively, but decreased when warm temperature was combined with overnight hypoxia (by 0.2 and 0.4°C, respectively). In contrast, the combination of the stressors more than doubled hypoxia tolerance in salmon and also increased hypoxia tolerance in char by 22%. Salmon had 1.2°C higher thermal tolerance than char, but char tolerated much lower oxygen levels than salmon at a given temperature. The changes in hypoxia tolerance were connected to the responses of the oxygen supply and delivery system. The relative ventricle mass was higher in cold- than in warm-acclimated salmon but the thickness of the compact layer of the ventricle increased with the combination of warm and hypoxia acclimation in both species. Char had also significantly larger hearts and thicker compact layers than salmon. The results illustrate that while fish can have protective responses when encountering a single environmental stressor, the combination of stressors can have unexpected species-specific effects that will influence their survival capacity.

  15. Detection of irradiation induced reactive oxygen species production in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo; Zhu, Debin

    2006-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play an important role in cell signaling of apoptosis, necrosis, and proliferation. Light irradiation increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mediates its intracellular signaling by adjusting the redox potential in tumor cells. Mitochondria are the main source of ROS in the living cell. Superoxide anions (0 II - are likely the first ROS generated in the mitochondria following radiation damage, and then convert to hydrogen peroxide (H II0 II), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (10 II), etc. Conventional methods for research ROS production in mitochondria mostly use isolated mitochondria rather than mitochondria in living cells. In this study, a highly selective probe to detect mitochondrial 0 II - in live cells, MitoSOX TM Red, was applied to quantify the mitochondrial ROS production in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) with laser scanning microscope (LSM) after ultraviolet C (UVC) and He-Ne laser irradiation. Dichiorodihydrofluoresein diacetate (DCFHDA), a common used fluorescent probe for ROS detection without specificity, were used as a comparison to image the ROS production. The fluorescent image of MItoSOX TM Red counterstained with MitoTracker Deep Red 633, a mitochondria selective probe, shows that the mitochondrial ROS production increases distinctly after UVC and He-Ne laser irradiation. DCFH-DA diffuses labeling throughout the cell though its fluorescence increases markedly too. In conclusion, the fluorescent method with MitoSOX TM Red reagent is proved to be a promising technique to research the role of ROS in radiation induced apoptosis.

  16. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  17. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves.

  18. Active oxygen species mediate the solar ultraviolet radiation-dependent increase in the tumour suppressor protein p53 in human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Vile, G F

    1997-07-21

    Active oxygen species mediate many of the biological consequences of exposing cultured human skin cells to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation (290-380 nm). A critical step in the escape from the carcinogenic potential of UV radiation is mediated by the protein p53. P53 activates growth arrest, allowing for DNA repair, and apoptosis, which removes damaged cells. Here I show that p53 in cultured human skin fibroblasts is elevated after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, an oxidant produced in cells during exposure to solar UV radiation. Simulated solar UV radiation increased p53, and agents that scavenge active oxygen species, N-acetylcysteine, ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol, inhibited the increase. The generation of DNA single strand breaks has been proposed to be an important step in the pathway leading to the increase in p53 initiated by a variety of cytotoxic agents. In this study I show that compounds that allow the accumulation of DNA single strand breaks, ara c and hydroxyurea, enhanced the UVC radiation (254 nm)-dependent increase in p53, but had no effect on the solar UV radiation-dependent increase. Thus, while DNA single strand breaks are involved in the UVC radiation-dependent increase in p53, the increase caused by solar UV radiation occurs by an alternative mechanism involving active oxygen species.

  19. The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species in Antibiotic-Induced Cell Death in Burkholderia cepacia Complex Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Acker, Heleen; Gielis, Jan; Acke, Marloes; Cools, Freya; Cos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    It was recently proposed that bactericidal antibiotics, besides through specific drug-target interactions, kill bacteria by a common mechanism involving the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, this mechanism involving the production of hydroxyl radicals has become the subject of a lot of debate. Since the contribution of ROS to antibiotic mediated killing most likely depends on the conditions, differences in experimental procedures are expected to be at the basis of the conflicting results. In the present study different methods (ROS specific stainings, gene-expression analyses, electron paramagnetic resonance, genetic and phenotypic experiments, detection of protein carbonylation and DNA oxidation) to measure the production of ROS upon antibiotic treatment in Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria were compared. Different classes of antibiotics (tobramycin, ciprofloxacin, meropenem) were included, and both planktonic and biofilm cultures were studied. Our results indicate that some of the methods investigated were not sensitive enough to measure antibiotic induced production of ROS, including the spectrophotometric detection of protein carbonylation. Secondly, other methods were found to be useful only in specific conditions. For example, an increase in the expression of OxyR was measured in Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 after treatment with ciprofloxacin or meropenem (both in biofilms and planktonic cultures) but not after treatment with tobramycin. In addition results vary with the experimental conditions and the species tested. Nevertheless our data strongly suggest that ROS contribute to antibiotic mediated killing in Bcc species and that enhancing ROS production or interfering with the protection against ROS may form a novel strategy to improve antibiotic treatment. PMID:27438061

  20. Differential accumulation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in maize lines with contrasting drought tolerance and aflatoxin resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abiotic stresses such as drought stress can exacerbate aflatoxin contamination of maize kernels. Previous studies showed that maize lines resistance to aflatoxin contamination tend to exhibit enhanced drought tolerance and accumulate lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species...

  1. Annihilation of Leishmania by daylight responsive ZnO nanoparticles: a temporal relationship of reactive oxygen species-induced lipid and protein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Nadhman, Akhtar; Khan, Malik Ihsanullah; Nazir, Samina; Khan, Momin; Shahnaz, Gul; Raza, Abida; Shams, Dilawar Farhan; Yasinzai, Masoom

    2016-01-01

    Lipid and protein oxidation are well-known manifestations of free radical activity and oxidative stress. The current study investigated extermination of Leishmania tropica promastigotes induced by lipid and protein oxidation with reactive oxygen species produced by PEGylated metal-based nanoparticles. The synthesized photodynamic therapy-based doped and nondoped zinc oxide nanoparticles were activated in daylight that produced reactive oxygen species in the immediate environment. Lipid and protein oxidation did not occur in dark. The major lipid peroxidation derivatives comprised of conjugated dienes, lipid hydroperoxides, and malondialdehyde whereas water, ethane, methanol, and ethanol were found as the end products. Proteins were oxidized to carbonyls, hydroperoxides, and thiol degrading products. Interestingly, lipid hydroperoxides were produced by more than twofold of the protein hydroperoxides, indicating higher degradation of lipids compared to proteins. The in vitro evidence represented a significant contribution of the involvement of both lipid and protein oxidation in the annihilated antipromastigote effect of nanoparticles. PMID:27330288

  2. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  3. Posttranslational modifications of cardiac and skeletal muscle proteins by reactive oxygen species after burn injury in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, J M; Ganguly, M; Stockman, H; Ferland, L H; Toner, M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the involvement of oxidative damage in muscle wasting after burn injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Burn injury damages tissue at the site of the burn and also affects peripheral tissue. There is evidence to suggest that reactive oxygen species may be generated in increased amounts after burn, and these may contribute to wound healing and to posttranslational modifications of tissue constituents distant from the wound site. METHODS: The oxidation of muscle proteins was assessed, using the dinitrophenylhydrazine assay for carbonyl content, in muscles of rats after a full-thickness skin scald burn covering 20% of the total body surface area, over a 6-week period. In this model, rats failed to incur normal body weight or muscle weight gain. RESULTS: Soleus, extensor digitorum longus, diaphragm, and heart ventricle proteins were oxidatively damaged after injury. The extent of tissue protein oxidation, however, differed depending on the time points studied. In general, higher levels of protein carbonyl group formation, an indicator of oxidative damage, were found to occur within 1 to 5 days after injury, and the oxidized protein content of the various tissues decreased during the later stages. Both sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar carbonyl-containing proteins accumulated in diaphragm 3 days after burn injury and were rapidly removed from the tissue during a 2-hour in vitro incubation. This coincided with increased proteolytic activity in diaphragm. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that the loss of proteins modified by reactive oxygen species may contribute to the burn-induced protein wasting in respiratory and other muscles by a proteolytically driven mechanism. PMID:9923807

  4. Silver nanoparticles induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species and alteration of antioxidant systems in the aquatic plant Spirodela polyrhiza.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong-Sheng; Qiu, Xiao-Ni; Li, Gen-Bao; Li, Wei; Yin, Li-Yan

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used commercially because of their antibacterial properties. Oxidative stress is known to be involved in the toxicity of AgNPs to bacteria, animals, and algae. The authors used Spirodela polyrhiza to investigate whether AgNPs can induce oxidative stress in higher plants. Results showed that there was a dose-dependent increase in levels of reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase and peroxidase activity, and the antioxidant glutathione content in 6-nm AgNP treatments. Catalase activity and malondialdehyde content in 6-nm AgNP treatments was significantly higher than the control at silver concentrations of 5 mg L(-1) . Superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and antioxidant glutathione and malondialdehyde content were not significantly different at 10 mg L(-1) of AgNPs (6 nm and 20 nm). Treatment with 20 µg L(-1) Ag(+) (the amount almost equal to 10 mg L(-1) AgNPs released) did not change the reactive oxygen species level or antioxidant enzymes activity. Micron-sized Ag particles had no effect on S. polyrhiza. Transmission electron microscopy showed that, compared with the control, chloroplasts in S. polyrhiza treated with 6-nm and 20-nm AgNPs accumulated starch grains and had reduced intergranal thylakoids. These results clearly indicate that AgNPs are able to cause oxidative stress and affect the chloroplast structure and function of S. polyrhiza, and this effect was not caused by Ag(+) released from particles. PMID:24619507

  5. Direct and dissolved oxygen involved photodegradation of MeO-PBDEs in water.

    PubMed

    Xue, Weifeng; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing

    2016-04-15

    Photodegradation has been proved to be a crucial way of elimination for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hydroxylated PBDEs (HO-PBDEs). However, it is still unknown whether methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs) can also undergo photodegradation. In this study, 4'-MeO-BDE-17, 5-MeO-BDE-47, 5'-MeO-BDE-99, 6-MeO-BDE-47 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 were selected as targets to investigate their photodegradation in water. Meanwhile, the effects of dissolved oxygen on the photoreactions of MeO-PBDEs were also unveiled. Simulated sunlight experiments indicate that 6-MeO-BDE-47 resisted photodegradation for 20h, while other MeO-PBDEs underwent relatively fast photodegradation, which was greatly susceptible to the substitution patterns of methoxyl and bromine. Photo-excited MeO-PBDEs (except 6-MeO-BDE-47) can sensitize dissolved oxygen to generate singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and superoxide anion radical (O2(-)). The generated (1)O2 cannot degrade the MeO-PBDEs, whereas O2(-) was reactive with MeO-PBDEs. The contribution of dissolved oxygen to the photodegradation of 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-85 was negligible; while the negative contribution was observed for 5-MeO-BDE-47 and 5'-MeO-BDE-99. Hydrodebromination was a crucial photodegradation pathway for MeO-PBDEs (excluding 4'-MeO-BDE-17 and 6-MeO-BDE-47). Eventually, direct photolysis half-lives of MeO-PBDEs except 6-MeO-BDE-47 in the surface waters at 40 N latitude were calculated to be 1.35-3.46d in midsummer and 6.39-17.47d in midwinter. PMID:26802632

  6. Comparable ecological dynamics underlie early cancer invasion and species dispersal, involving self-organizing processes

    PubMed Central

    Marco, Diana E.; Cannas, Sergio A.; Montemurro, Marcelo A.; Hu, Bo; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Occupancy of new habitats through dispersion is a central process in nature. In particular, long-distance dispersal is involved in the spread of species and epidemics, although it has not been previously related with cancer invasion, a process that involves cell spreading to tissues far away from the primary tumour. Using simulations and real data we show that the early spread of cancer cells is similar to the species individuals spread and we suggest that both processes are represented by a common spatio-temporal signature of long-distance dispersal and subsequent local proliferation. This signature is characterized by a particular fractal geometry of the boundaries of patches generated, and a power-law scaled, disrupted patch size distribution. In contrast, invasions involving only dispersal but not subsequent proliferation (“physiological invasions”) like trophoblast cells invasion during normal human placentation did not show the patch size power-law pattern. Our results are consistent under different temporal and spatial scales, and under different resolution levels of analysis. We conclude that the scaling properties are a hallmark and a direct result of long-distance dispersal and proliferation, and that they could reflect homologous ecological processes of population self-organization during cancer and species spread. Our results are significant for the detection of processes involving long-range dispersal and proliferation like cancer local invasion and metastasis, biological invasions and epidemics, and for the formulation of new cancer therapeutical approaches. PMID:18930739

  7. Evaluation of multistep derivatization methods for identification and quantification of oxygenated species in organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Flores, Rosa M; Doskey, Paul V

    2015-10-30

    Two, 3-step methods for derivatizing mono- and multi-functional species with carbonyl (CO), carboxylic acid (-COOH), and alcohol (-OH) moieties were compared and optimized. In Method 1, the CO, -COOH, and -OH moieties were converted (1) to methyloximes (R-CN-OCH3) with O-methylhydroxylamine hydrochloride (MHA), (2) to methyl esters (OC-R-OCH3) with (trimethylsilyl)diazomethane in methanol (TMSD/MeOH), and (3) to trimethylsilyl ethers [R-OSi(CH3)3] with N,O-bis(trimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) containing 1% trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS), respectively. Steps 1 and 3 of both methods were identical; however, in Step 2 of Method 2, -COOH moieties were derivatized with 10% (v/v) boron trifluoride (BF3) in MeOH or n-butanol (n-BuOH). The BF3/MeOH and BF3/n-BuOH were ineffective at converting species with more than 2-OH moieties. Average standard deviations for derivatization of 36 model compounds by the 3-step methods using TMSD/MeOH and BF3/(MeOH) were 7.4 and 14.8%, respectively. Average derivatization efficiencies for Methods 1 and 2 were 88.0 and 114%, respectively. Despite the lower average derivatization efficiency of Method 1, distinct advantages included a greater certainty of derivatization yield for the entire suite of mono- and multi-functional species and fewer processing steps for sequential derivatization. Detection limits for Method 1 using GC×GC-ToF-MS were 0.3-54pgm(-3). Approximately 100 oxygenated organic species were identified and quantified in aerosol filtered from 39m(3) of air in an urban location. Levels of species were 0.013-17ngm(-3) and were nearly all above the Method 1 limit of detection. PMID:26427323

  8. Reactive oxygen species in plasma against E. coli cells survival rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ren-Wu; Zhang, Xian-Hui; Zong, Zi-Chao; Li, Jun-Xiong; Yang, Zhou-Bin; Liu, Dong-Ping; Yang, Si-Ze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we report on the contrastive analysis of inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution with different disinfection methods. Compared with the hydrogen peroxide solution and the ozone gas, the atmospheric-pressure He plasma can completely kill the E. coli cells in the shortest time. The inactivation efficiency of E. coli cells in solution can be well described by using the chemical reaction rate model. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis shows that the C-O or C=O content of the inactivated E. coli cell surface by plasma is predominantly increased, indicating the quantity of oxygen-containing species in plasma is more than those of two other methods, and then the C-C or C-H bonds can be broken, leading to the etching of organic compounds. Analysis also indicates that plasma-generated species can play a crucial role in the inactivation process by their direct reactions or the decompositions of reactive species, such as ozone into OH radicals in water, then reacting with E. coli cells. Project supported by the Natural Science Foundation of Fujian Province, China (Grant No. 2014J01025), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11275261), and the Funds from the Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, China.

  9. The role of reactive oxygen species in the electrochemical inactivation of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Joonseon; Kim, Jee Yeon; Yoon, Jeyong

    2006-10-01

    Electrochemical disinfection has emerged as one of the most promising alternatives to the conventional disinfection of water in many applications. Although the mechanism of electrochemical disinfection has been largely attributed to the action of electro-generated active chlorine, the role of other oxidants, such as the reactive oxygen species (ROS) *OH, O3, H2O2, and *O2- remains unclear. In this study, we examined the role of ROS in the electrochemical disinfection using a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode in a chloride-free phosphate buffer medium, in order to avoid any confusion caused by the generation of chlorine. To determine which species of ROS plays the major role in the inactivation, the effects of several operating factors, such as the presence of *OH scavenger, pH, temperature, and the initial population of microorganisms, were systematically investigated. This study clearly showed that the *OH is the major lethal species responsible for the E. coli inactivation in the chloride-free electrochemical disinfection process, and that the E. coli inactivation was highly promoted at a lower temperature, which was ascribed to the enhanced generation of O3.

  10. Relationship between Active Oxygen Species, Lipid Peroxidation, Necrosis, and Phytoalexin Production Induced by Elicitins in Nicotiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rusterucci, C.; Stallaert, V.; Milat, M. L.; Pugin, A.; Ricci, P.; Blein, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    Excised leaves of Nicotiana tabacum var Xanthi and Nicotiana rustica were treated with cryptogein and capsicein, basic and acidic elicitins, respectively. Both compounds induced leaf necrosis, the intensity of which depended on concentration and duration of treatment. N. tabacum var Xanthi was the most sensitive species and cryptogein was the most active elicitin. Lipid peroxidation in elicitin-treated Nicotiana leaves was closely correlated with the appearance of necrosis. Elicitin treatments induced a rapid and transient burst of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell cultures of both Nicotiana species, with the production by Xanthi cells being 6-fold greater than that by N. rustica. Similar maximum AOS production levels were observed with both elicitins, but capsicein required 10-fold higher concentrations than those of cryptogein. Phytoalexin production was lower in response to both elicitins in N. tabacum var Xanthi cells than in N. rustica cells, and capsicein was the most efficient elicitor of this response. In cryptogein-treated cell suspensions, phytoalexin synthesis was unaffected by diphenyleneiodonium, which inhibited AOS generation, nor was it affected by tiron or catalase, which suppressed AOS accumulation in the extracellular medium. These results suggest that AOS production, lipid peroxidation, and necrosis are directly related, whereas phytoalexin production depends on neither the presence nor the intensity of these responses. PMID:12226334

  11. A novel biointerface that suppresses cell morphological changes by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Yoshinari, Tomoki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    During cell cultivation on conventional culture dishes, various events results in strong stresses that lead to the production of bioactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. These reactive species cause variable damage to cells and stimulate cellular responses. Here, we report the design of a novel biocompatible surface that decreases stress by not only morphologically modifying the dish surface by using poly(ethylene glycol) tethered chains, but also actively scavenging oxidative stress by using our novel nitroxide radical-containing polymer. A block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl)aminomethylstyrene] (PEG-b-PMNT) was used to coat the surface of a dish. Differentiation of undifferentiated human leukemia (HL-60) cells was found to be suppressed on the polymer-coated dish. Notably, HL-60 cell cultivation caused apoptosis under high-density conditions, while spontaneous apoptosis was suppressed in cells plated on the PEG-b-PMNT-modified surface, because a healthy mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained. In contrast, low molecular weight antioxidants did not have apparent effects on the maintenance of mitochondria. We attribute this to the lack of cellular internalization of our immobilized polymer and selective scavenging of excessive ROS generated outside of cells. These results demonstrate the utility of our novel biocompatible material for actively scavenging ROS and thus maintaining cellular morphology. PMID:25691268

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Role in the Infection of the Necrotrophic Fungi, Rhizoctonia solani in Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Rhonda C.; Kidd, Brendan N.; Hane, James K.; Anderson, Jonathan P.; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a nectrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes billions of dollars of damage to agriculture worldwide and infects a broad host range including wheat, rice, potato and legumes. In this study we identify wheat genes that are differentially expressed in response to the R. solani isolate, AG8, using microarray technology. A significant number of wheat genes identified in this screen were involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and redox regulation. Levels of ROS species were increased in wheat root tissue following R. solani infection as determined by Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT), 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and titanium sulphate measurements. Pathogen/ROS related genes from R. solani were also tested for expression patterns upon wheat infection. TmpL, a R. solani gene homologous to a gene associated with ROS regulation in Alternaria brassicicola, and OAH, a R. solani gene homologous to oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase which has been shown to produce oxalic acid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were highly induced in R. solani when infecting wheat. We speculate that the interplay between the wheat and R. solani ROS generating proteins may be important for determining the outcome of the wheat/R. solani interaction. PMID:27031952

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species Play a Role in the Infection of the Necrotrophic Fungi, Rhizoctonia solani in Wheat.

    PubMed

    Foley, Rhonda C; Kidd, Brendan N; Hane, James K; Anderson, Jonathan P; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani is a nectrotrophic fungal pathogen that causes billions of dollars of damage to agriculture worldwide and infects a broad host range including wheat, rice, potato and legumes. In this study we identify wheat genes that are differentially expressed in response to the R. solani isolate, AG8, using microarray technology. A significant number of wheat genes identified in this screen were involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and redox regulation. Levels of ROS species were increased in wheat root tissue following R. solani infection as determined by Nitro Blue Tetrazolium (NBT), 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) and titanium sulphate measurements. Pathogen/ROS related genes from R. solani were also tested for expression patterns upon wheat infection. TmpL, a R. solani gene homologous to a gene associated with ROS regulation in Alternaria brassicicola, and OAH, a R. solani gene homologous to oxaloacetate acetylhydrolase which has been shown to produce oxalic acid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were highly induced in R. solani when infecting wheat. We speculate that the interplay between the wheat and R. solani ROS generating proteins may be important for determining the outcome of the wheat/R. solani interaction. PMID:27031952

  14. Extended Hartree-Fock theory of chemical reactions. IX. Diradical and perepoxide mechanisms fo